WorldWideScience

Sample records for sandy coastal environments

  1. Ecosystem classification for EU habitat distribution assessment in sandy coastal environments: an application in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Maria Laura; Acosta, Alicia T R; Stanisci, Angela; Pirone, Gianfranco; Ciaschetti, Giampiero

    2008-05-01

    Many recent developments in coastal science have gone against the demands of European Union legislation. Coastal dune systems which cover small areas of the earth can host a high level of biodiversity. However, human pressure on coastal zones around the world has increased dramatically in the last 50 years. In addition to direct habitat loss, the rapid extinction of many species that are unique to these systems can be attributed to landscape deterioration through the lack of appropriate management. In this paper, we propose to use of an ecosystem classification technique that integrates potential natural vegetation distribution as a reference framework for coastal dune EU Habitats (92/43) distribution analysis and assessment. As an example, the present study analyses the EU Habitats distribution within a hierarchical ecosystem classification of the coastal dune systems of central Italy. In total, 24 land elements belonging to 8 land units, 5 land facets, 2 land systems and 2 land regions were identified for the coastal dunes of central Italy, based on diagnostic land attributes. In central Italy, coastal dune environments including all the beach area, mobile dunes and all the fixed-dune land elements contain or could potentially hold at least one EU habitat of interest. Almost all dune slack transitions present the potentiality for the spontaneous development of EU woodlands of interest. The precise information concerning these ecosystems distribution and ecological relationships that this method produces, makes it very effective in Natura 2000 European network assessment. This hierarchical ecosystem classification method facilitates the identification of areas to be surveyed and eventually bound, under the implementation of EU Habitat directive (92/43) including areas with highly disturbed coastal dune ecosystems.

  2. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal impact assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: coastal topography and bathymetry, impacts to coastal beaches and barriers, impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology, impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures, impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife. This fact sheet focuses assessing impacts to coastal beaches and barriers.

  3. Port redesign and planned beach renourishment in a high wave energy sandy-muddy coastal environment, Port Gisborne, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Terry; Stephens, Scott; Black, Kerry; Gorman, Richard; Cole, Russell; Beamsley, Brett

    2002-11-01

    Redesign of Port Gisborne for the 21st century has encompassed a broad interdisciplinary approach. This procedure has taken into account the operational requirements of the port, effects of dredging and construction upon the benthic fauna, and wave activity within the port confines after the proposed development. Added amenity value of the development to the local community is an important ancillary redesign consideration. Initially, a major research project into the environmental impacts of the developments has been undertaken. The project, which commenced in 1996 and is still continuing, involves an iterative approach integrating the initial design and development options with the operational feasibility, construction constraints, environmental constraints, social acceptability, and economic practicality of the port; all of these require in-depth assessment to obtain the necessary planning and development approvals. This requires close liaison between the professional environmental research scientists, port management, port operation staff (pilots), construction engineers, planners, and the community interest groups. Numerical modelling of the hydrodynamics of Poverty Bay, simulating waves and current effects on the various initial designs options, and calibrated against data from a substantial field program, has been a fundamental tool. It was applied experimentally to determine the best option for the port layout, as well as to assess sedimentation impacts. Modelling results indicated a significant increase in maintenance dredging expected as a result of deepening the navigation approach channel. Because this may have an impact on the nearby sandy beach by inducing erosion, the best option for disposal of the sandy dredged material was determined to be disposal in the surf zone for subtidal beach profile renourishment. Textural analysis of the sediments trapped in the navigation channel demonstrated that they were suitable for this purpose.

  4. Recent coastal evolution in a carbonate sandy environments and relation to beach ridge formation: the case of Anegada, British Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescon, Anna Lisa; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.

    2014-05-01

    In a changing climate context coastal areas will be affected by more frequent extreme events. Understanding the relationship between extreme events and coastal geomorphic response is critical to future adaptation plans. Beach ridge landforms commonly identified as hurricane deposits along tropical coasts in Australia and in the Caribbean Sea. However their formative processes in such environments are still not well understood. In particular, the role of different extreme wave events (storm waves, tsunami waves and extreme swell), in generating beach ridges is critical to their use as palaeotempestology archives. Anegada Island is a carbonate platform situated in the British Virgin Island between the Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Pleistocene in age, Anegada is surrounded by the Horseshoe fringing coral reef. Two Holocene sandy beach ridge plains are present on the western part of the island. The north beach ridge plain is Atlantic facing and has at least 30 ridges; the south beach ridge plain is Caribbean Sea facing and contains 10 ridges. Historical aerial photos enabled the shoreline evolution from 1953 to 2012 to be studied. Three different coastal domains are associate with the beach ridge plains: strong east-west longshore transport affects the north coastline, the south-west coastline from West End to Pomato Point represents an export corridor for these sediments and finally, along the southern coastline, from Pomato Point to Settling Point the area presents a depositional zone with little to no change in the last 70 years. The link between the extreme wave events that have affected Anegada Island in the last 70 years and beach ridge creation is discussed. Hurricane Donna crossed over Anegada Island in 1960: its geomorphological signature is tracked in the shoreline change analysis and its implication in beach ridge formation is discussed. Anegada Island has also been impacted by tsunami waves (Atwater et al., 2012) and a comparative discussion of the

  5. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  6. EAARL Coastal Topography-Sandy Hook 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface/bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey...

  7. 2014 NOAA Ortho-rectified Mosaic of Hurricane Sandy Coastal Impact Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains ortho-rectified mosaic tiles at 0.35m GSD created for NOAA Integrated Ocean and Coastal Mapping (IOCM) initiative in Hurricane Sandy coastal...

  8. Effect of coastal urbanization on sandy beach coleoptera Phaleria maculata (Kulzer, 1959) in northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sergio A; Yáñez-Navea, Katherine; Muñoz, Mauricio

    2014-06-15

    The beetle Phaleria maculata is a common inhabitant of the upper intertidal fringe of Chilean beaches. Anthropogenic intervention in coastal areas has increased intensely, leading to changes in the flora and fauna of sandy beaches. To examine the impact of human activities on P. maculata, we studied several beaches along the northern Chilean coast. Beaches were characterized based on morphodynamics and the level of intervention, leading to the estimation of an "Urbanization Index" based on various indicators. The analysis showed a significant inverse correlation between the rate of urbanization and night sky quality. Larval and adult beetles were almost absent on beaches with high levels of urbanization. The results of simple and multiple correlations based on nMDS ordination showed an inverse relationship between increases in urbanization and the abundance of beetles. Because darkling beetles are very sensitive to human interventions on sandy beaches, we suggest that they are ideal indicator organisms for the health of these environments.

  9. Utilization of Geotextile Tube for Sandy and Muddy Coastal Management: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Siew Cheng Lee; Roslan Hashim; Shervin Motamedi; Ki-Il Song

    2014-01-01

    Threats to beaches have accelerated the coastal destruction. In recent decades, geotextile tubes were used around the world to prevent coastal erosion, to encourage beach nourishment, and to assist mangrove rehabilitation. However, the applications of geotextile tube in sandy and muddy coasts have different concerns as the geological settings are different. Applications of geotextile tubes in sandy beaches were mainly to prevent coastline from further erosion and to nourish the beach. However...

  10. Influence of Particle Shape on Drag Coefficient for Commonly Occuring Sandy Particles in Coastal Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Arora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A well defined relationship connecting settling velocity with sediment geometry and ambient properties is an essential pre-requisite for coastal and hydraulic engineering studies. An established relationship for settling velocity of sandy particles assuming spherical shape geometry is available in the literature. In reality, the sediment particles need not be spherical at all times, which influences settling velocity that is strongly biased to the drag coefficient. Based on quantitative comparison with measured data collected at Oahu Islands located in the Hawaiian archipelago, USA this work provides a relationship between drag coefficient and particle shape factor for sand grains viz; sand, sandy loam and fine sandy loam typically found in coastal environment (typical size ranges from 0.05 to 2.0 mm. The particle Reynolds number and shape factor are evaluated for each grain. The drag coefficient evaluated as function of nominal diameter and Reynolds number show a positive correlation over a wide range of shape factors used in this study. A comprehensive correlation has been developed of the drag coefficient for non-spherical particles as a function of Reynolds number and particle shape. Further a regression analysis was performed on the functional dependence of drag coefficient on particle shape. Based on this study, it could be advocated the validity of Krumbien shape factor holds well for the above characterized grain size and various particle shapes considered. Hence, the settling velocity of particles has a functional dependence on estimated drag coefficient with important implications for modeling sediment transport and swash zone hydrodynamics.

  11. Hurricane Sandy science plan: impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Warren H.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: • Coastal topography and bathymetry

  12. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal topographic and bathymetric data to support hurricane impact assessment and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: • Coastal topography and bathymetry • Impacts to coastal beaches and barriers • Impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology • Impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures • Impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife This fact sheet focuses on coastal topography and bathymetry. This fact sheet focuses on coastal topography and bathymetry.

  13. Utilization of geotextile tube for sandy and muddy coastal management: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Siew Cheng; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin; Song, Ki-Il

    2014-01-01

    Threats to beaches have accelerated the coastal destruction. In recent decades, geotextile tubes were used around the world to prevent coastal erosion, to encourage beach nourishment, and to assist mangrove rehabilitation. However, the applications of geotextile tube in sandy and muddy coasts have different concerns as the geological settings are different. Applications of geotextile tubes in sandy beaches were mainly to prevent coastline from further erosion and to nourish the beach. However, for the muddy coasts, mangrove rehabilitation and conservation were additional concerns in coastal management schemes. The mangrove forests are natural barriers which can be found on the muddy coasts of many tropical countries. In this paper, the viability of geotextile tubes in sandy and muddy beaches was analysed. The advantages and disadvantages of the utilization of geotextile tubes in coastal management were discussed based on the experiences from the tropical countries such as Mexico, Malaysia, and Thailand. From the case studies, impressive improvements in coastal restoration after installation of geotextile tubes were shown. Based on the discussion, several recommendations to improve the application of geotextile tubes were suggested in this paper.

  14. Utilization of Geotextile Tube for Sandy and Muddy Coastal Management: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Siew Cheng; Hashim, Roslan; Motamedi, Shervin; Song, Ki-Il

    2014-01-01

    Threats to beaches have accelerated the coastal destruction. In recent decades, geotextile tubes were used around the world to prevent coastal erosion, to encourage beach nourishment, and to assist mangrove rehabilitation. However, the applications of geotextile tube in sandy and muddy coasts have different concerns as the geological settings are different. Applications of geotextile tubes in sandy beaches were mainly to prevent coastline from further erosion and to nourish the beach. However, for the muddy coasts, mangrove rehabilitation and conservation were additional concerns in coastal management schemes. The mangrove forests are natural barriers which can be found on the muddy coasts of many tropical countries. In this paper, the viability of geotextile tubes in sandy and muddy beaches was analysed. The advantages and disadvantages of the utilization of geotextile tubes in coastal management were discussed based on the experiences from the tropical countries such as Mexico, Malaysia, and Thailand. From the case studies, impressive improvements in coastal restoration after installation of geotextile tubes were shown. Based on the discussion, several recommendations to improve the application of geotextile tubes were suggested in this paper. PMID:24955408

  15. Utilization of Geotextile Tube for Sandy and Muddy Coastal Management: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Cheng Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Threats to beaches have accelerated the coastal destruction. In recent decades, geotextile tubes were used around the world to prevent coastal erosion, to encourage beach nourishment, and to assist mangrove rehabilitation. However, the applications of geotextile tube in sandy and muddy coasts have different concerns as the geological settings are different. Applications of geotextile tubes in sandy beaches were mainly to prevent coastline from further erosion and to nourish the beach. However, for the muddy coasts, mangrove rehabilitation and conservation were additional concerns in coastal management schemes. The mangrove forests are natural barriers which can be found on the muddy coasts of many tropical countries. In this paper, the viability of geotextile tubes in sandy and muddy beaches was analysed. The advantages and disadvantages of the utilization of geotextile tubes in coastal management were discussed based on the experiences from the tropical countries such as Mexico, Malaysia, and Thailand. From the case studies, impressive improvements in coastal restoration after installation of geotextile tubes were shown. Based on the discussion, several recommendations to improve the application of geotextile tubes were suggested in this paper.

  16. Evaluation of NYC's Coastal Vulnerability and Potential Adaptation Strategies in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.; Foti, R.; Montalto, F. A.

    2015-12-01

    New York City's coastlines are a mosaic of remnant natural habitat, man-made wetlands, manicured parkland, public beaches, housing, and industrial centers, all of which are extremely vulnerable to flooding, storm surge, and damaging wave action. Risks are projected to increase overtime as sea levels rise, population grows, and the frequency and severity of extreme events increases. In order to protect its citizens and infrastructure, New York City is planning to invest 20 billion into a coastal protection plan, including 200 million towards wetlands creation and restoration. Focusing on the role of wetlands and parkland in reducing damages during Hurricane Sandy, our study seeks to identify the primary causes of coastal vulnerability and to provide guidelines for the design of coastal protection measures. Our findings show that most of the small, fragmented NYC's wetlands did not provide significant protection from the violence of the hurricane. Large stretches of wetlands and parkland, on the other hand, were found to exacerbate storm surge along the coast, but did reduce surge penetration further inland. Much of the protection provided by wetlands and coastal green sites was in the form of cost avoidance. Wetlands existed in the most heavily hit areas and so averted damages that would have occurred if those areas had been developed. Our results suggest that, when positioned in the highest risk areas, coastal green infrastructure such as wetlands and parklands can reduce coastal flood risks associated with extreme events like Hurricane Sandy. Policy would ideally prioritize conservation, restoration, and enhancement of large contiguous areas of wetlands in the lowest elevation areas of the city. Where low-lying coastal development cannot be relocated, the risk of damage from storm surges is best reduced by elevating critical infrastructure.

  17. Precipitation patterns and moisture fluxes in a sandy, tropical environment with a shallow water table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihane, M. R.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2011-08-01

    Identifying the dominant mechanisms controlling recharge in shallow sandy soils in tropical climates has received relatively little attention. Given the expansion of coastal fill using marine sands and the growth of coastal populations throughout the tropics, there is a need to better understand the nature of water balances in these settings. We use time series of field observations at a coastal landfill in Singapore coupled with numerical modeling using the Richards' equation to examine the impact of precipitation patterns on soil moisture dynamics, including percolation past the root zone and recharge, in such an environment. A threshold in total precipitation event depth, much more so than peak precipitation intensity, is the strongest event control on recharge. However, shallow antecedent moisture, and therefore the timing between events along with the seasonal depth to water table, also play significant roles in determining recharge amounts. For example, at our field site, precipitation events of less than 3 mm per event yield little to no direct recharge, but for larger events, moisture content changes below the root zone are linearly correlated to the product of the average antecedent moisture content and the total event precipitation. Therefore, water resources planners need to consider identifying threshold precipitation volumes, along with the multiple time scales that capture variability in event antecedent conditions and storm frequency in assessing the role of recharge in coastal water balances in tropical settings.

  18. Heavy mineral analysis for assessing the provenance of sandy sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, F. L.; Woodrow, D. L.; McGann, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Heavy minerals have been used to trace the sources and transportation of sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay and nearby coastal areas since the 1960s. We have the opportunity to sample similar environments and revisit the heavy mineral populations under the current San Francisco Coastal System study of the provenance of beach sand. Most of the sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay can be traced to distant sources including the Sierra Nevada batholith and associated terranes with local contributions from the Franciscan Complex. Heavy minerals from Sierran sources include ordinary hornblende, metamorphic amphiboles, and hypersthene while those from the Franciscan Complex include other types of pyroxene, epidote, basaltic hornblende, and glaucophane... Tertiary strata and volcanics in the surrounding hills and displaced Sierran rocks found on the continental shelf west of the San Andreas Fault Zone introduce similar minerals, but perhaps in a lesser volume to be identified as major contributors... The primary result of cluster analysis of heavy minerals separated from sand-sized sediment taken within San Francisco Bay, the adjacent continental shelf, local beaches, cliffs outside the Golden Gate, and upstream drainages indicate a widespread occurrence of sediment traceable to the Sierra Nevada. A second cluster of samples identifies samples of mixed Sierran and Franciscan lineage within the strait of the Golden Gate, on the San Francisco bar, and on coastal beaches. Sediment samples with predominantly Franciscan mineral content appear on beaches around Point Reyes, possibly transported from the Russian River. The heavy mineral composition supports transport from the east, through San Francisco Bay and out the Golden Gate to the San Francisco bar and southward.

  19. Natural persistence of the coastal plant Glehnia littoralis along temperate sandy coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Xiao; Chu, Jian-Min; Liu, Xiao-Shan

    2017-01-01

    We studied germination behaviors and persistence mechanism of wild Glehnia littoralis, a typical coastal species at temperate sandy coasts of the North Pacific Ocean, and tested the hypothesis that the coastal plants may have evolved special seeds adapting to the coasts, by which they recruit and persist easily, occupying the coasts as ideal habitats. In the Shandong Peninsula, China, we investigated temperature and moisture conditions of coast sand in relation to germination and evaluated effects of sand burial, seawater immersion and sowing time on germination. When germination began, daily dawn temperatures of sand were about 10 °C and daily noon temperatures were about 25 °C; the temperatures were not different in the sand seeds exhibited large germination rates if sand burial was at depths >= 3 cm and winter freezing was kept longer than 2.5 months. Seeds experiencing seawater immersion were able to germinate well. These evidences suggest that G. littoralis has evolved special seeds adapting to seawater dispersal and specific season rhythm. By the seeds, G. littoralis occupies temperate sandy coasts as ideal habitats to persist. PMID:28211487

  20. EAARL-B Coastal Topography--Eastern New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy, 2012: First Surface, Pre-Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz and binary point-cloud data, as well as a digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the New Jersey coastline, pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy (October...

  1. Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil Column Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulakhudin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil ColumnMethod (Sulakhudin, A Syukur, D Shiddieq and T Yuwono: In coastal sandy soil, mainly nitrogen losses due toleaching resulted to low fertilizer efficiency. Slow-release N fertilizers are proposed to minimize these losses, andhumic-calcium coated urea has been examined. A soil column method was used to compare the effects of coated ureawith humic-calcium on transformation and leaching loss of N in coastal sandy soil. The experiment aid to compare twokinds sources of humic substances (cow manure and peat which mixed with calcium as coated urea on transformation,vertical distribution and leaching N in coastal sandy soil. The concentration of humic-calcium coated urea i.e.1%, 5%and 10% based on their weight. The results showed that urea coated with humic-calcium from cow manure (UCHMand humic-calcium from peat (UCHP increased the N total and available N in the soil and decreased leaching loss ofN from the soil column. Compared to UCHP, UCHM in all concentration showed N-nitrate higher than N-ammonium onincubation length 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The N leached from a costal sandy soil with application coated urea with UCHMranged from 21.18% to 23.72% of the total N added as fertilizer, for coated urea with UCHP they ranged between21.44% and 23.25%, whereas for urea (control reached 29.48%. Leaching losses of mineral N were lower when ureacoated with UCHM compared to urea coated with UCHP or urea fertilizer. The study concluded that the UCHM isbetter than UCHP in decreasing N leached from coastal sandy soil

  2. Coupled modeling of storm surge and coastal inundation: A case study in New York City during Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Lin, Ning; Yu, Dapeng

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method of modeling coastal inundation arising from storm surge by coupling a widely used storm surge model (ADCIRC) and an urban flood inundation model (FloodMap). This is the first time the coupling of such models is implemented and tested using real events. The method offers a flexible and efficient procedure for applying detailed ADCIRC storm surge modeling results along the coastal boundary (with typical resolution of ˜100 m) to FloodMap for fine resolution inundation modeling (Hurricane Sandy was simulated at both the city (New York City) and subregional (lower Manhattan) scales with various resolutions. Results obtained from the ADCIRC and coupled ADCIRC-FloodMap simulations were compared with the recorded (high water marks) and derived (inundation extent based on the planar method) data from FEMA. At the city scale, coupled ADCIRC-FloodMap modeling demonstrates improved prediction over ADCIRC modeling alone for both the extent and depth of inundation. The advantage of the coupled model is further illustrated in the subregional modeling, using a mesh resolution of 3 m which is substantially finer than the inland mesh resolution used by ADCIRC (>70 m). In further testing, we explored the effects of mesh resolution and roughness specification. Results agree with previous studies that fine resolution is essential for capturing intricate flow paths and connectivity in urban topography. While the specification of roughness is more challenging for urban environments, it may be empirically optimized. The successful coupling of ADCIRC and FloodMap models for fine resolution coastal inundation modeling unlocks the potential for undertaking large numbers of probabilistically based synthetic surge events for street-level risk analysis.

  3. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Derived products of a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012...

  4. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Lidar-extracted dune features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dune crest and toe positions along a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October...

  5. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Derived products of a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012 hurricane...

  6. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Digital elevation model (DEM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A DEM was produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012...

  7. EAARL-B coastal topography: eastern New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy, 2012: first surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. Wayne; Fredericks, Xan; Troche, Rodolfo J.; Klipp, Emily S.; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Nagle, David B.

    2014-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, Florida. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets for a portion of the New Jersey coastline beachface, acquired pre-Hurricane Sandy on October 26, and post-Hurricane Sandy on November 1 and November 5, 2012. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar system, known as the second-generation Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL-B), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL-B system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nm) lidar designed to map nearshore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL-B sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) and infrared (IR) digital cameras, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL-B platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL-B system. The resulting data were then processed using the Airborne Lidar Processing System (ALPS), a custom-built processing system developed in a NASA-USGS collaboration. ALPS supports the exploration and processing of lidar data in

  8. Coastal topography–Northeast Atlantic coast, post-hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Sopkin, Kristin L.; Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Fredericks, Xan

    2013-01-01

    This Data Series contains lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, dune elevations, and mean-high-water shoreline position datasets for most sandy beaches for Fire Island, New York, and from Cape Henlopen, Delaware to Cape Lookout, North Carolina. The data were acquired post-Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall as an extratropical cyclone on October 29, 2012.

  9. Hurricane Sandy 2013 National Wetlands Inventory Habitat Classification (habitat analysis of coastal federal lands located within high impact zones of Hurricane Sandy, October 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy directly hit the Atlantic shoreline of New Jersey during several astronomical high tide cycles in late October, 2012. The eastern seaboard areas are subject to sea level rise and increased severity and frequency of storm events, prompting habitat and land use planning changes. Wetland Aquatic Research Center (WARC) has conducted detailed mapping of marine and estuarine wetlands and deepwater habitats, including beaches and tide flats, and upland land use/land cover, using specially-acquired aerial imagery flown at 1-meter resolution.These efforts will assist the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) continuing endeavors to map the barrier islands adhering to Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) guidelines. Mapped areas consist of selected federal lands including, National Park Service areas, USFWS National Wildlife Refuges, and selected CBRA Units, including barrier islands and marshes in New York and New Jersey. These vital wetland areas are important for migratory waterfowl and neotropical bird habitats, wildlife food chain support and nurseries for shellfish and finfish populations. Coastal wetlands also play an important function as storm surge buffers. This project includes mapping of dominant estuarine wetland plant species useful for wetland functional analysis and wildlife evaluation and management concerns. It also aims to integrate with and offer updated databases pertinent to: USFWS NWR and NWI programs, NOAA tide flats and beaches data, FEMA flood zone data, Natural Heritage Endangered and Threated Species, watershed management, and state and local land use planning.

  10. 2012 USGS EAARL-B Coastal Topography: Post-Sandy, First Surface (NJ)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz and binary point-cloud data, as well as a digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the New Jersey coastline, pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy (October...

  11. EAARL-B Coastal Topography--Eastern New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy, 2012: First Surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ASCII xyz and binary point-cloud data, as well as a digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the New Jersey coastline, pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy (October...

  12. EAARL-B Coastal Topography--Eastern New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy, 2012: First Surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — ASCII xyz and binary point-cloud data, as well as a digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the New Jersey coastline, pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy (October...

  13. Effect of climatic change on surface environments in the typical region of Horqin Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The town of Agura,a typical region in Horqin Sandy Land,was selected as the study area in this paper.Using 12 remote sensing images and climatic data from the past 20 years,the effects of climate change on surface environments were analyzed.The impact indices of climatic factors,along with their corresponding ranks,were used to characterize the responses of different types of surface environments to climate change.Results show that in the past 20 years,the surface environments of the study area have been deteriorating.Furthermore,there is a positive relationship between the changes in surface environments and those in climatic factors.Various climatic factors influence surface environments in different ways and at different levels.The most sensitive factor is relative humidity,followed by precipitation and evaporation.Overall,moisture is the key factor that affects the changes in surface environments of arid and semi-arid areas.

  14. Sandy inland braidplain deposition with local aeolian sedimentation in the lower and middle parts of the buntsandstein and sandy coastal braidplain deposition in the topmost zechstein in the sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowski, Jerzy; Mader, Detlef

    The lower and middle parts of the Buntsandstein between Röt and Zechstein in the Sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland) crop out in the marginal seams of the North Sudetic Trough and the Intra Sudetic Trough. The continental red beds originate in predominantly sandy braided river systems of an extensive inland alluvial plain in almost arid climate. The sediments are laid down in channels and floodplains of a moderately- to highly-braided, sandy to pebbly stream complex consisting of narrowly- to moderately-spaced low-sinuosity watercourses and narrow to wide overbank plains between the channels. Rapid aggradation and abandonment, quick lateral migration or high avulsion rates of the considerably mobile streams result in effective combing of the interchannel areas. Persistent high-energy overspilling of watercourse banks and invasion of bed-load-saturated flood surges into the overbank areas often lead to primary restriction or even suppression of formation of topstratum suspension fines. Secondarily, the silty-clayey and fine sandy overbank sediments which could occasionally originate in remote or sheltered lakes and ponds are frequently completely reworked by considerable lateral and vertical erosion during sidewards displacement of the rivers. As a result of both primary-depositional restriction and secondary-erosional removal of floodplain fines, the channel sediments are commonly stacked upon each other to multistorey stream sand complexes. Emergence and desiccation of parts of the alluvial plain sometimes give rise to aeolian deflation and accumulation of the winnowed sand to small dunelets and wind ripple trains. The aeolian depositional environment representing a more peripheral erg facies with sheet sand interdune milieu could not be fully ascertained due to poor outcrop conditions, but is likely to occur locally in view of comparative interpretation with other mixed dune and river sand sequences in the Mid-European Buntsandstein. Variations of fluvial style are

  15. Exploring the potential of near-surface geophysical methods to delineate a shallow hardpan in a southeastern U.S. sandy coastal plain soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    A hardpan, which is a dense soil layer near the ground surface, is an undesirable feature of many soils in the Southeast U.S., especially sandy Coastal Plain soils. Shallow hardpans restrict root growth and water penetration through the soil profile, in turn reducing the effective crop root zone and...

  16. Reproductive biology and early establishment of Pinus elliottii var. elliottii in Brazilian sandy coastal plain vegetation: implications for biological invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Campanhã Bechara

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pinus is the most invasive woody taxon, exceeded only by herbaceous plants. This study reports the reproductive biology and early establishment of Pinus elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii, describing its invasive properties in a protected natural area of the Brazilian coastal sandy plains. We evaluated the seed germination and rain, longevity of seed viability and the initial dynamics of the seedlings of Pinus elliottii var elliottii through field and laboratory experiments. We recorded a continuous seed rain of about 204.0 viable seeds m- 2 per year, with a 90 % germination rate. The seeds exhibited a low longevity of viability in the soil and a dense, permanent seedling bank that may explain the high levels of pine invasion. The environmental impact caused by the pine's biological invasion suggests the recommendation for its immediate eradication, together with a restoration plan to restitute the native biodiversity gradually.

  17. Investigating Changes in Coastal Environment Using Internet-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigating Changes in Coastal Environment Using Internet-Based ... of the coastal areas was modified from water body to residential areas, 1.10% from ... of the people (marine, tourism and fishing activities) has been adversely affected.

  18. Mercury in tropical and subtropical coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Monica F.; Landing, William M.; Kehrig, Helena A.; Barletta, Mário; Holmes, Christopher D.; Barrocas, Paulo R. G.; Evers, David C.; Buck, David G.; Vasconcellos, Ana Claudia; Hacon, Sandra S.; Moreira, Josino C.; Malm, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities influence the biogeochemical cycles of mercury, both qualitatively and quantitatively, on a global scale from sources to sinks. Anthropogenic processes that alter the temporal and spatial patterns of sources and cycling processes are changing the impacts of mercury contamination on aquatic biota and humans. Human exposure to mercury is dominated by the consumption of fish and products from aquaculture operations. The risk to society and to ecosystems from mercury contamination is growing, and it is important to monitor these expanding risks. However, the extent and manner to which anthropogenic activities will alter mercury sources and biogeochemical cycling in tropical and sub-tropical coastal environments is poorly understood. Factors as (1) lack of reliable local/regional data; (2) rapidly changing environmental conditions; (3) governmental priorities and; (4) technical actions from supra-national institutions, are some of the obstacles to overcome in mercury cycling research and policy formulation. In the tropics and sub-tropics, research on mercury in the environment is moving from an exploratory “inventory” phase towards more process-oriented studies. Addressing biodiversity conservation and human health issues related to mercury contamination of river basins and tropical coastal environments are an integral part of paragraph 221 paragraph of the United Nations document “The Future We Want” issued in Rio de Janeiro in June 2012. PMID:22901765

  19. Regional variability in bed-sediment concentrations of wastewater compounds, hormones and PAHs for portions of coastal New York and New Jersey impacted by hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Patrick; Gibson, Cathy A; Fisher, Shawn C.; Fisher, Irene; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Foreman, William T.; ReVello, Rhiannon C.; Focazio, Michael J.; Jones, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Bed sediment samples from 79 coastal New York and New Jersey, USA sites were analyzed for 75 compounds including wastewater associated contaminants, PAHs, and other organic compounds to assess the post-Hurricane Sandy distribution of organic contaminants among six regions. These results provide the first assessment of wastewater compounds, hormones, and PAHs in bed sediment for this region. Concentrations of most wastewater contaminants and PAHs were highest in the most developed region (Upper Harbor/Newark Bay, UHNB) and reflected the wastewater inputs to this area. Although the lack of pre-Hurricane Sandy data for most of these compounds make it impossible to assess the effect of the storm on wastewater contaminant concentrations, PAH concentrations in the UHNB region reflect pre-Hurricane Sandy conditions in this region. Lower hormone concentrations than predicted by the total organic carbon relation occurred in UHNB samples, suggesting that hormones are being degraded in the UHNB region.

  20. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Lidar point-cloud data (LAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  1. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Lidar point-cloud data (LAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  2. Effects of Super Strom Sandy on Depositional Environments Offshore Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; McHugh, C. M.; Christensen, B. A.; Dutton, J.; Brownawell, B.; Gurung, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy's landfall affected the coastlines over a broad swath of mid-Atlantic including New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. The effects included breaching, overwash and erosion of barrier islands, some of which are heavily populated and sustained extensive damage. The peak storm-tide elevation produced by Hurricane Sandy measured by USGS stations in Jamaica Bay was about 3.5 m, 1.4 m more than the historical peak-water level elevations in the same area. As part of a National Science Foundation RAPID response we sampled the sediment in West Bay, Middle Bay, East Bay, Jones Inlet and Reynolds Channel of Long Island, New York from the R/V Pritchard. The sediment sampling took place 4 months after the storm and prior to any similar large storms. The sampling strategy was designed to characterize the post-storm sedimentation in distinct depositional environments. In this survey 156 grab samples were recovered from areas, many of which had been sampled prior to the storm. The samples were analyzed for grain size variability, short-lived radioisotopes and x-ray fluorescence elemental analyses. Google Earth images from before and after the storm reveal moderate to severe erosion and overwash of the dunes in Jones inlet, and Middle and East Bays. The Long Beach barrier island tidal marshes were submerged for several days post Sandy and underwent severe erosion. The storm surge brought from offshore a layer of coarse sand that was deposited over mussel beds. Most of the mussels were dead indicative of the strength of the waves. Be-7 concentrations allowed tracking the path of the storm from the bays and inlets, to the offshore. Some of the highest Be-7 concentrations ever detected in the local estuaries: 5,329, 4,955 and 4,553 pCi/kg were measured in West Bay and Middle Bay Channels. Additionally, unusually high Be-7 concentrations of 2,130 pCi/kg were recorded ~5.24 km offshore from Long Beach barrier island four months after the

  3. EAARL Coastal Topography-Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area, New Jersey, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Vivekanandan, Saisudha; Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.; Bonisteel-Cormier, J.M.; Nagle, D.B.; Klipp, E.S.; Stevens, Sara

    2010-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) and first-surface (FS) topography datasets were produced collaboratively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, FL, and the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of a portion of the Sandy Hook Unit of Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey, acquired post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter) on December 4, 2009. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural-resource managers. An innovative airborne lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multispectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers, and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for sub-meter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine aircraft, but the instrument was deployed on a Pilatus PC-6. A single pilot, a lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  4. Coastal environment: historical and continuous monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaldi, Roberta; Surace, Luciano

    2010-05-01

    The monitoring is a tool providing essential data to study the process dynamic. The formation and transformation of coastal environment involve physical, chemical, geological and biological processes. The knowledge of the littoral systems and marine seafloor therefore requires a multidisciplinary approach. Since the phenomena observation occurs in a short period of time it requires the use of high quality data acquired with high accuracy and suitable processing procedures. This knowledge considerable increased during the past 50 years closely following significant progress in the methods of investigation at sea and laboratory. In addition seafloor exploration is deeply rooted in History. A sector actually subject to control results the coastal zone for its position as transition component between continental and marine environments with closely connected natural and human actions. Certainly these activities are important in the time to develop the technologies suited for the knowledge and to increase different protection, prevention, intervention and management tools. In this context the Istituto Idrografico della Marina (Hydrographic Institute of Italian Navy - I.I.M.) is a precursor because since its foundation (in 1872) it contributed to the monitoring activities related to charting and navigation, including hydrologic surveying, seafloor measurements and in consequence the landward limit, the shoreline. The coastal area is certainly the most changeable sector either natural or socio-economic causes. This is the most dynamic environment, subject both to marine (waves and currents) and continental (river and ice) actions, and continuously changing the intended use for the increase of industrial, commercial, recreation and the need for new structures to support. The coast has more recently taken on a growing value determined by some processes, including erosion and retreat are evidence of a transformation of which, however, undermine the system and impoverishing

  5. Summary of other human activities in the coastal and marine environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Celliers, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available of non-renewable min- eral resources such as gypsum, manganese and titanium-rich dune fields and sandy shores. Even so, geological explora- tion of the region has been far from comprehensive and unknown deposits are likely to exist. Mining results... region provides a range of unique attractions and recreational activities for local and international coastal and marine tourism. Mainstays of the regional coastal tourism industry include sandy beaches, clean water, abundant sunshine, mangrove...

  6. Coastal tourism, environment, and sustainable local development

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Noronha, L.; Lourenco, N.; Lobo-Ferreira, J.P.; Lieopart, A.; Feoli, E.; Sawkar, K.; Chachadi, A.

    and managing for coastal development within a sustainability framework, and (3) the need for coastal policy making to be more state holder-sensitive. This roadmap provides a synoptic account of the analysis, results and decision tools developed to measure...

  7. Nutrient Discharge Beneath Urban Lawns To A Sandy Coastal Aquifer, Perth, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M. L.; Herne, D. E.; Byrne, J. D.; Kin, P. G.

    1996-01-01

    Excess nitrogen and phosphorus leaching beneath urban lawns on sandy soils in metropolitan Perth, Western Australia, may pose a serious threat not only to the quality of the underlying groundwater but also to many surface-water bodies. In this study, suction-driven lysimeters were developed and used to quantify water and nutrient fluxes below the root zone at four urban lawn sites in Perth. The four sites received similar fertiliser treatment but differed in irrigation regimes. Over a period of 12 months, up to 51 percent of incident water passed below the root zone. Annual flow-weighted concentrations of NO3-N in the leachate ranged from 0.8-5.4 mg/L, whereas PO4-P concentrations ranged from 0.003-0.034 mg/L. At most sites, NO3-N concentrations periodically equalled or exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO) drinking-water limit of 10 mg/L; high concentration were maintained for longer periods at two sites with coarser sands and high irrigation regimes. Evidence exists that concentrations of N and P in urban groundwater are reduced through dilution and possibly through chemical transformation and adsorption. It is unlikely that NO3-N concentrations in groundwater will exceed the WHO drinking limit except for relatively short periods of time. However, nutrients (especially N) from fertilised lawns are a threat to wetlands and waterways into which nutrient-rich groundwater is discharged. Modified management practices for urban lawns, or alternative-style home gardens may need to be developed in order to minimise nutrient enrichment of groundwater and water bodies. Some suggestions for these are presented.

  8. Effects of bioturbation on the fate of oil in coastal sandy sediments - An in situ experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Karen; Banta, Gary T.; Klinge, Lars

    2011-01-01

    –MS and bioturbation activity (feces production and irrigation) was measured regularly during the experiment and used as input parameters in a mechanistic model describing the effects of A. marina on the transport and degradation of oil compounds in the sediment. The chemical analytical data and model results......Effects of bioturbation by the common lugworm Arenicola marina on the fate of oil hydrocarbons (alkanes and PAHs) were studied in situ during a simulated oil spill in a shallow coastal area of Roskilde fjord, Denmark. The fate of selected oil compounds was monitored during 120 d using GC...... indicated that A. marina had profound and predictable effects on the distribution, degradation and preservation of oil and that the net effect depended on the initial distribution of oil. In sediment with an oil contaminated subsurface-layer A. marina buried the layer deeper in the sediment which clearly...

  9. An Investigation on the Formation of Submerged Bar Under Surges in Sandy Coastal Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa DEM(I)RC(I); M.Sami AK(O)Z

    2012-01-01

    Cross-shore sediment transport rate exposed to waves is very important for coastal morphology,the design of marine structures such as seawalls,jetties,breakwaters etc,and the prevention of coastal erosion and accretion due to onoff shore sediment transportation.In the present study,the experiments on cross-shore sediment transport are carried out in a laboratory wave channel with initial beach slopes of 1/8,1/10 and 1/15.By using the regular waves with different deep-water wave steepnesses generated by a pedal-type wave generator,the geometrical characteristics of beach profiles under storm conditions and the parameters affecting on-off shore sediment transport are investigated for the beach materials with medium diameters of d50=0.25,0.32,0.45,0.62 and 0.80 mm.The offshore bar geometric characteristics are the horizontal distances from the shoreline to the bar beginning (Xb),crest (Xt),and ending (Xs) points,the depth from the bar crest to the still water level (ht),and the bar volume (Vbar).The experimental results have indicated that when the deep-water steepness (H0/L0) increased,the net movement to seaside increased.With the increasing wave steepness,the bars moved to widen herewith the vertical distances from still water level to the bar beginning (Xb),crest (Xt) and ending (Xs) points and the horizontal distances from the coast line to the bar beginning,crest and ending points increased.It was also shown from experimental results that the horizontal distances from the bar beginning and ending points to the coast line increased with the decrease of the beach slope.The experimental results obtained from this study are compared with previous experimental work and found to be of the same magnitude as the experimental measurements and followed the expected basic trend.

  10. Impact of oasis establishment on underground environment in salinized sandy lands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Yuanjie(赵元杰); ZHANG; Henian(张鹤年); Maimaitiaiti(买买堤艾堤); SUN; Yongqiang(孙永强)

    2002-01-01

    The salinized sandy lands are the important reclaimable reserve wastelands in thesouth area of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. But it is necessary that the eco-logical environment of the area is not destroyed by action of oasis development. The main factor tohinder oasis development is land salinization. Rational oasis establishment rebuilds wastelandswith lower productivity and utilization efficiency for the growth of agriculture, forestry, and stock raising. The results of surveying sub-soil environment of Aimugaike. Awati oasis in Hotian County ofthe Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region show that the underground water and soil environment arenot deteriorated under the rational management and administration, which could be coordinatedfor obtaining economic and environmental benefit. During the oasis establishment period from1997 to 1999, the plowland area has reached 166.7 hm2, and the seed cotton yield per unit areahas reached 2250 kg @ hm-2, the area of timber forest and active sand break forest has reached 20hm2, the area of fruit trees is 71.5 hm2; and the soil moisture has decreased from 22.07% to18.12%. In the first year of oasis establishment, the soil type has changed salt soil into light saltsoil, in the second year the soil has been out of salt harm; and the content of soil organic matter intopsoil has increased obviously.

  11. Coastal zones : shifting shores, sharing adaptation strategies for coastal environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, J.E. [Waikato Univ. (New Zealand); Morneau, F.; Savard, J.P. [Ouranos, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Madruga, R.P. [Centre of Investigation on the Global Economy (Cuba); Leslie, K.R. [Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (Belize); Agricole, W. [Ministry of Environment and Natural Resources (Seychelles); Burkett, V. [United States Geological Survey (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A parallel event to the eleventh Conference of Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention of Climate Change was held to demonstrate examples of adaptation from around the world in the areas of food security, water resources, coastal zones, and communities/infrastructure. Panels on each theme presented examples from developing countries, countries in economic transition, and developed countries. These 4 themes were chosen because both mitigation and adaptation are essential to meeting the challenge of climate change. The objective of the event was to improve the knowledge of Canada's vulnerabilities to climate change, identify ways to minimize the negative effects of future impacts, and explore opportunities that take advantage of any positive impacts. This third session focused on how coastal communities are adapting to climate change in such places as Quebec, the Caribbean, and small Island States. It also presented the example of how a developed country became vulnerable to Hurricane Katrina which hit the coastal zone in the United States Gulf of Mexico. The presentations addressed the challenges facing coastal communities along with progress in risk assessment and adaptation both globally and in the Pacific. Examples of coastal erosion in Quebec resulting from climate change were presented along with climate change and variability impacts over the coastal zones of Seychelles. Cuba's vulnerability and adaptation to climate change was discussed together with an integrated operational approach to climate change, adaptation, biodiversity and land utilization in the Caribbean region. The lessons learned from around the world emphasize that adaptation is needed to reduce unavoidable risks posed by climate change and to better prepare for the changes ahead. refs., tabs., figs.

  12. Microplastics in coastal and marine environments of the western tropical and sub-tropical Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Monica F; Barletta, Mário

    2015-11-01

    Microplastic pollution is a global issue. It is present even in remote and pristine coastal and marine environments, likely causing impacts of unknown scale. Microplastics are primary- and secondary-sourced plastics with diameters of 5 mm or less that are either free in the water column or mixed in sandy and muddy sediments. Since the early 1970s, they have been reported to pollute marine environments; recently, concern has increased as soaring amounts of microplastics in the oceans were detected and because the development of unprecedented processes involving this pollutant at sea is being unveiled. Coastal and marine environments of the western tropical and sub-tropical Atlantic Ocean (WTAO) are contaminated with microplastics at different quantities and from a variety of types. The main environmental compartments (water, sediments and biota) are contaminated, but the consequences are still poorly understood. Rivers and all scales of fishery activities are identified as the most likely sources of this pollutant to coastal waters; however, based on the types of microplastics observed, other maritime operations are also possible sources. Ingestion by marine biota occurs in the vertebrate groups (fish, birds, and turtles) in these environments. In addition, the presence of microplastics in plankton samples from different habitats of estuaries and oceanic islands is confirmed. The connectivity among environmental compartments regarding microplastic pollution is a new research frontier in the region.

  13. 670 investigating changes in coastal environment using internet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    change, population pressure, urbanization and disasters are getting worse, ... give more attention to means of sustaining the human environment, especially the coastal areas. ... presents the result of investigation carried out in Okrika coastal areas of ..... Table 3 Trends in changes investigated in Okrika Land Use distribution ...

  14. Preface: Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak R. Mishra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Special Issue (SI on “Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments” presents a wide range of articles focusing on a variety of remote sensing models and techniques to address coastal issues and processes ranging for wetlands and water quality to coral reefs and kelp habitats. The SI is comprised of twenty-one papers, covering a broad range of research topics that employ remote sensing imagery, models, and techniques to monitor water quality, vegetation, habitat suitability, and geomorphology in the coastal zone. This preface provides a brief summary of each article published in the SI.

  15. Evaluation of the use of Olivella minuta (Gastropoda, Olividae) and Hastula cinerea (Gastropoda, Terebridae) as TBT sentinels for sandy coastal habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petracco, Marcelo; Camargo, Rita Monteiro; Berenguel, Thayana Amorim; de Arruda, Noelle C L Patrício; del Matto, Lygia A; Amado, Lílian Lund; Corbisier, Thais Navajas; Castro, Ítalo Braga; Turra, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) contamination is still recorded in the environment even after its ban in antifouling paints. Since most biomonitors of TBT contamination, through imposex evaluation, are hard-bottom gastropods, the identification of soft-bottom sentinels has become useful for regions where rocky shores and coral reefs are absent. Thus, an evaluation of Olivella minuta and Hastula cinerea as monitors of TBT contamination was performed in two sandy beaches located under influence area of São Sebastião harbor (São Paulo state, Brazil), where previous and simultaneous studies have reported environmental contamination by TBT. In addition, the imposex occurrence in H. cinerea was assessed in an area with low marine traffic (Una beach), also located in São Paulo State. A moderate imposex incidence in O. minuta was detected in Pernambuco (% I = 9.36, RPLI = 4.49 and RPLIstand = 4.27) and Barequeçaba (% I = 2.42, RPLI = 0.36 and RPLIstand = 0.81) beaches, indicating TBT contamination. In contrast, more severe levels of imposex were recorded for H. cinerea in Una beach (% I = 12.45) and mainly in Barequeçaba beach (% I = 98.92, RPLI = 26.65). Our results suggest that O. minuta and H. cinerea have good potential as biomonitors for TBT based on their wide geographical distribution, common occurrence in different coastal sediment habitats, easy collection, and association with TBT-contaminated sediments.

  16. Preface: Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak R. Mishra; Gould, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The Special Issue (SI) on “Remote Sensing in Coastal Environments” presents a wide range of articles focusing on a variety of remote sensing models and techniques to address coastal issues and processes ranging for wetlands and water quality to coral reefs and kelp habitats. The SI is comprised of twenty-one papers, covering a broad range of research topics that employ remote sensing imagery, models, and techniques to monitor water quality, vegetation, habitat suitability, and geomorphology i...

  17. Developmental stages of chaetognaths in the coastal environs of Bombay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, Neelam; Nair, V.R.

    Abundances of developmental stages-juveniles, developing and mature-of Sagitta bedoti, S. oceania, S. enflata and S. robusta were recorded from the coastal, estuarine and creek environs of Bombay (Maharashtra, India) from October 1985 to September...

  18. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Lidar and digital elevation model (DEM) tile index

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data represents the tile index for lidar data collected for the U.S. Geological Survey in November 2012 following Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall in the...

  19. In situ variation in leaf anatomy and morphology of Andira legalis (Leguminosae in two neighbouring but contrasting light environments in a Brazilian sandy coastal plain Variação in situ em anatomia e morfologia foliar de Andira legalis (Leguminosae em dois ambientes adjacentes, porém contrastantes quanto ao regime de luz, em restinga brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Carvalho Pereira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Andira legalis (Vell. Toledo is a legume shrub widespread along the sandy plains of the Brazilian coast. It occurs both shaded, in forest habitats, or exposed to full sunlight, in the vegetation islands growing on sand deposits. Previous studies reported a high range of morpho-physiological variation for this species along a geographical gradient. This study compared leaf morphology and anatomy of A. legalis in two distinct but adjacent light environments: a dense forest (shaded and a scrub of Palmae (exposed. We studied the amplitude of variation for these traits within a small (0.5 ha geographical area. Leaf anatomy parameters were measured for five leaves collected from five plants in each habitat. The parameters measured were leaf and mesophyll thickness, thickness of the outer periclinal cell wall, thickness of the adaxial and abaxial epidermis and vascular bundle transversal section area, and also common epidermal cells, stomata and trichome density. Leaf morphology parameters were obtained from five leaves of each of 20 plants in each site. Dry and fresh weights were measured to obtain leaf specific mass and succulence. All anatomy and morphology parameters, except trichome density, were significantly higher for the sun-exposed plants. Less expected, however, was the marked qualitative difference between exposed and shaded plants: in the former the mesophyll had a unilateral symmetry (i.e., the whole mesophyll occupied by photosynthetic tissue, whereas in the latter there was a dorsiventral symmetry (i.e., partly palisade and partly spongy parenchyma. Such amplitude of variation shows that even within a small geographic area A. legalis has a broad ecological plasticity.Andira legalis (Vell. Toledo é uma leguminosa arbustiva distribuída ao longo de planícies arenosas da costa brasileira. Tem ocorrência em ambientes florestais, sombreadas, ou em ilhas de vegetação de restingas abertas, onde é exposta à plena radiação solar

  20. Analysis of the effect of Hurricane Sandy on New Jersey Atlantic coastal marshes based on landsat thematic mapper and operational land imager data: 2000-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Riter, J. C. Alexis; Kearney, Michael S.; Ramsey, Elijah W.

    2017-01-01

    This USGS Data Release represents geospatial data sets that were created for the analysis of the effect of Hurricane Sandy on New Jersey Atlantic Coastal Marshes. The following listed image products were generated:1) Fifteen marsh surface condition index (MSCI) data sets were calculated from yearly summer collections of ETM+ image data from 2000 to 2015. Three classes described the results of the MSCI mapping; classs1-severely impacted, class 2-moderately impacted, and class 3-intact marsh.2) Marsh change data product using Landsat images of July 14, 2011 (before) and July 19, 2013 (after) Hurricane Sandy is based on the difference in the percentage of vegetation. It shows a pattern of an increasing loss of marsh vegetation for the marshes closest to where Sandy made landfall near Brigantine, New Jersey.3) Land cover classification using Landsat TM of 14 July 2011 and 19 July 2013, 30 m spatial resolution. Eleven classes namely i) high salt marsh ii) estuarine high salt marsh iii) forested wetland iv) Phragmites australis and Spartina cynosuroides v) salt shrub scrub vi) marsh substrate from estuarine marsh area vii) marsh substrate located near lagoon viii) unconsolidated beach sediment ix) ponds and other shallow bodies on marsh x) small tidal creeks xi) urban development areasThe data release was produced in compliance with the new 'open data' requirements as a way to make the scientific products associated with USGS research efforts and publications available to the public.

  1. Integrating Sustainable Tourism Development in Coastal and Marine Zone Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawal Mohammed Marafa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La gestion des processus touristique dans des secteurs marins et côtiers est complexe. Les pratiques touristiques et récréatives s’accompagnent d’effets positifs et négatifs sur l'environnement. Le développement de tourisme peut s’épanouir sur des environnements faiblement modifiés mais il n’est pas sans conséquence sur la modification des environnements côtiers. Une gestion intégrée s’impose pour intégrer les pratiques touristiques dans un processus de développement côtier soutenable. Le but de cet article est de proposer un cadre et une orientation pour la gestion intégrée des secteurs côtiers. Des cadres pour le développement côtier soutenable de tourisme et la gestion côtière de zone (CZM sont suggérés en tenant compte de la nature diversifiée des environnements côtiers. Bien que Hong Kong constitue destination touristique réussie, le tourisme littoral, avec des approches alternatives, est aussi un aspect à promouvoir tant autour de la diversité des habitats et que des formes de vie qui rendent le littoral d’Hong Kong uniqueTourism in marine and coastal areas is a complex phenomenon. Tourism in coastal areas brings along both positive and negative effects on the environment as a result of activities exerted upon such areas by proponents and tourists. While tourism development results in the modification of coastal environments, it can also flourish where such environments are left unmodified as the pristine nature of the environments attract visitors. Alternatively, in order for marine and coastal tourism to develop and continue to attract tourists, there is the need for an integrated approach that can be translated into a sustainable coastal tourism development.  The aim of this paper therefore, is to postulate and develop a framework and guideline to be addressed by decision-makers for coastal areas. Frameworks for sustainable coastal tourism development and coastal zone management (CZM are

  2. EAARL Coastal Topography--Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area, New Jersey, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Sandy Hook Unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter)...

  3. EAARL Coastal Topography--Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area, New Jersey, Post-Nor'Ida, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the Sandy Hook Unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area in New Jersey, post-Nor'Ida (November 2009 nor'easter)...

  4. Changes in the coastal and marine environments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSousa, S.N.; Ahmed, A.U.; DileepKumar, M.; Jagtap, T.G.; Sardessai, S.; Hassan, A.

    production (Ryther and Menzel, 1965). 1.1.1 Upwelling The onset of the SW monsoon gives rise to a vigorous atmospheric and oceanic circulation in the northern Indian Ocean, causing intense upwelling at several locations (Wyrtki, 1973) - off Somali coast, off... to the southeast Arabian coast cause Ekman transport of surface waters offshore giving rise to coastal upwelling (Elliot and Savidge, 1990; Savidge et aI., 1990) bringing cold and nutrient-rich deep waters to the surface. A temperature difference of at least 5 DC...

  5. Coastal fog, climate change, and the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa, Alicia; O'Brien, Travis A.; Faloona, Ian C.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal marine fog, a characteristic feature of climates generated at the eastern boundaries of ocean basins worldwide, evokes different feelings in those who experience it (see Figure 1). Authors and poets use fog to represent mystery, bleakness, and confusion. Film directors seek out fog to shroud scenes in eerie gloominess. Tourists visiting beaches bemoan the cool and damp conditions that create a striking contrast to the sunny warm conditions typically found less than a few kilometers inland. Airline passengers delayed by fog impatiently wait for the skies to clear. Residents get used to the Sun “rising” in midday after fog dissipates.

  6. Schwertmannite stability in acidified coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Richard N.; Jones, Adele M.; Waite, T. David

    2010-01-01

    A combination of analytical and field measurements has been used to probe the speciation and cycling of iron in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils. Iron K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that schwertmannite dominated (43-77%) secondary iron mineralization throughout the oxidized and acidified soil profile, while pyrite and illite were the major iron-bearing minerals in the reduced potential acid sulfate soil layers. Analyses of contemporary precipitates from shallow acid sulfate soil groundwaters indicated that 2-line ferrihydrite, in addition to schwertmannite, is presently controlling secondary Fe(III) mineralization. Although aqueous pH values and concentrations of Fe(II) were seasonally high, no evidence was obtained for the Fe(II)-catalyzed crystallization of either mineral to goethite. The results of this study indicate that: (a) schwertmannite is likely to persist in coastal lowland acid sulfate soils on a much longer time-scale than predicted by laboratory experiments; (b) this mineral is less reactive in these types of soils due to surface-site coverage by components such as silicate and possibly, to a lesser extent, natural organic matter and phosphate and; (c) active water table management to promote oxic/anoxic cycles around the Fe(II)-Fe(III) redox couple, or reflooding of these soils, will be ineffective in promoting the Fe(II)-catalyzed transformation of either schwertmannite or 2-line ferrihydrite to crystalline iron oxyhydroxides.

  7. Coastal environments around Thule settlements in Northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Aart; Jakobsen, Bjarne Holm; Pedersen, Jørn Bjarke Torp

    2010-01-01

    Inuit have travelled to and settled in the coastal landscapes of Northeast Greenland for several longer periods during the latest ca. 4500 years. Most recently the Thule culture Inuit lived in the region from around 1400 until 1850 AD. The access to partly and periodically ice covered near coastal...... waters has been crucial to the primarily marine based subsistence strategy of the Thule Inuit culture, and their settlements are therefore found immediately at the coast. Changing geological and geomorphologic settings strongly influence the coastal morphodynamics, and only specific locations offer...... stable and protected conditions needed for proper winter settlements. The comprehensive study of coastal environments and Thule culture winter settlements in the Young Sound region show an accumulation of winter settlements, nearly all located either in protected pocket beaches or on stable basalt capes...

  8. Health concerns and perceptions of central and coastal New Jersey residents in the 100 days following Superstorm Sandy

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey 29–30 October 2012 (80 km/hr winds), and many residents were evacuated, were without power for days to several weeks, and suffered property damages or lost their homes. The objective of this study was to understand health concerns within 100 days of this devastating storm that might improve recovery, future preparedness, and resilience. We conducted a survey of New Jersey residents in central (N = 407) and shore communities (n=347) about health con...

  9. Comparison of aerosol size distribution in coastal and oceanic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.T.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2006-01-01

    The results of applying the empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) method to decomposition and approximation of aerosol size distributions are presented. A comparison was made for two aerosol data sets, representing coastal and oceanic environments. The first data set includes measurements collected a

  10. Aerosol transport in the coastal environment and effects on extinction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignati, E.; Leeuw, G. de; Berkowicz, R.

    1998-01-01

    The aerosol in the coastal environment consists of a complicated mixture of anthropogenic and rural aerosol generated over land, and sea spray aerosol. Also, particles are generate dover sea by physical and chemical processes and the chemical composition may change due to condensation/evaporation of

  11. Unusual rise in mercury-resistant bacteria in coastal environs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; De, J.

    A sharp rise in mercury-resistant bacteria (MRB) capable of tolerating very high concentration of Hg was observed over the last 3-4 years in the coastal environs of India. While none or negligible colony-forming units (CFU) of bacteria were counted...

  12. Post-Hurricane Sandy coastal oblique aerial photographs collected from Cape Lookout, North Carolina, to Montauk, New York, November 4-6, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Karen L.M.; Krohn, M. Dennis

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducts baseline and storm response photography missions to document and understand the changes in vulnerability of the Nation's coasts to extreme storms. On November 4-6, 2012, approximately one week after the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS conducted an oblique aerial photographic survey from Cape Lookout, N.C., to Montauk, N.Y., aboard a Piper Navajo Chieftain (aircraft) at an altitude of 500 feet (ft) and approximately 1,000 ft offshore. This mission was flown to collect post-Hurricane Sandy data for assessing incremental changes in the beach and nearshore area since the last survey in 2009. The data can be used in the assessment of future coastal change. The photographs provided here are Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) images. The photograph locations are an estimate of the position of the aircraft and do not indicate the location of the feature in the images. These photos document the configuration of the barrier islands and other coastal features at the time of the survey. Exiftool was used to add the following to the header of each photo: time of collection, Global Positioning System (GPS) latitude, GPS longitude, keywords, credit, artist (photographer), caption, copyright, and contact information. Photographs can be opened directly with any JPEG-compatible image viewer by clicking on a thumbnail on the contact sheet. Table 1 provides detailed information about the GPS location, image name, date, and time each of the 9,481 photographs were taken, along with links to each photograph. The photographs are organized in segments, also referred to as contact sheets, and represent approximately 5 minutes of flight time. In addition to the photographs, a Google Earth Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file is provided and can be used to view the images by clicking on the marker and then clicking on either the thumbnail or the link above the thumbnail. The KML files were created using the photographic navigation files.

  13. Long-term responses of sandy beach crustaceans to the effects of coastal armouring after the 2010 Maule earthquake in South Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodil, Iván F.; Jaramillo, Eduardo; Acuña, Emilio; Manzano, Mario; Velasquez, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Earthquakes and tsunamis are large physical disturbances frequently striking the coast of Chile with dramatic effects on intertidal habitats. Armouring structures built as societal responses to beach erosion and shoreline retreat are also responsible of coastal squeeze and habitat loss. The ecological implications of interactions between coastal armouring and earthquakes have recently started to be studied for beach ecosystems. How long interactive impacts persist is still unclear because monitoring after disturbance generally extends for a few months. During five years after the Maule earthquake (South Central Chile, February 27th 2010) we monitored the variability in population abundances of the most common crustacean inhabitants of different beach zones (i.e. upper, medium, and lower intertidal) at two armoured (one concrete seawall and one rocky revetment) and one unarmoured sites along the sandy beach of Llico. Beach morphology changed after the earthquake-mediated uplift, restoring upper- and mid-shore armoured levels that were rapidly colonized by typical crustacean species. However, post-earthquake increasing human activities affected the colonization process of sandy beach crustaceans in front of the seawall. Lower-shore crab Emerita analoga was the less affected by armouring structures, and it was the only crustacean species present at the three sites before and after the earthquake. This study shows that field sampling carried out promptly after major disturbances, and monitoring of the affected sites long after the disturbance is gone are effective approaches to increase the knowledge on the interactive effects of large-scale natural phenomena and artificial defences on beach ecology.

  14. Coastline complexity: A parameter for functional classification of coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, J.D.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Bennett, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    clustered using LOICZVIEW, a high dimensionality clustering routine developed for large-scale coastal classification studies. The results show distinctive differences in coastal environments that have the potential for interpretation in terms of both biotic and hydrogeochemical environments, and that can be related to the resolution limits and uncertainties of the shoreline data used. These objective, quantitative measures of coastal complexity as a function of scale can be further developed and combined with other data sets to provide a key component of functional classification of coastal environments. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Impacts of Back-Beach Barriers on Sandy Beach Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-beach barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California beaches each year. Beaches in California are an important component of the state and federal economy and provide hundreds of thousands of jobs. Approximately 14% of the California coast from Marin County to the Mexican border is artificially armored with seawalls, rip rap, or revetment, more than half of which protects back-beach developments or lower-lying dynamic regions like harbors and dunes. Many sandy beaches that do not have back-beach armoring are still restricted by commercial and residential infrastructure, parking lots, and roadways. Although these types of coastal infrastructure are not back-beach barriers by intentional design like seawalls and rip rap, they still restrict beaches from landward migration and can cause significant placement loss of the beach. Nearly 67 km, or 44% of the total length of sandy coastline from Long Beach to the U.S.-Mexico border is backed by such infrastructure. This study is part of a broader effort to catalog the extent to which California’s beaches are restricted in the back beach, to describe the effects of back-beach barriers on sandy beach morphology, and to predict how these different beaches might behave with future sea-level rise. Beach morphology, shoreface characteristics, and historical rates of shoreline change were compared between select beaches with back-beach barriers and unrestricted beaches using 1997 LiDAR data and shoreline rates of change published in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change report. Although preliminary results of the morphological analysis show that there is no statistically

  16. EAARL-B coastal topography: Fire Island, New York, pre-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: seamless (bare earth and submerged)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C. Wayne; Kranenburg, Christine J.; Klipp, Emily S.; Troche, Rodolfo J.; Fredericks, Alexandra M.; Masessa, Melanie L.; Nagle, David B.

    2014-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of lidar-derived seamless (bare-earth and submerged) topography datasets were produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center, St. Petersburg, Florida.

  17. Health concerns and perceptions of central and coastal New Jersey residents in the 100 days following Superstorm Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey 29–30 October 2012 (80 km/hr winds), and many residents were evacuated, were without power for days to several weeks, and suffered property damages or lost their homes. The objective of this study was to understand health concerns within 100 days of this devastating storm that might improve recovery, future preparedness, and resilience. We conducted a survey of New Jersey residents in central (N = 407) and shore communities (n=347) about health concerns before, during, and after Superstorm Sandy. People were interviewed at public places, town hall and FEMA meetings, health and university centers, and other gathering places. 47 % of shore and 13 % of central Jersey respondents evacuated. Both populations were concerned about agents of destruction, survival needs, and possessions before and during the storm, but they were mainly concerned about survival needs thereafter. During the storm, medical issues were the greatest concern for shore respondents (23 %) vs secure and safe food and water (29 %) for central respondents. Medical concerns increased after the storm. In the future, 42 % of shore respondents would prepare more, while 51 % of central residents would buy more supplies; 20 % (shore) and 11 % (central) would heed future evacuation warnings. Before Sandy many residents did not heed warnings and evacuation orders, but worried about property damage, while during and after their major concerns were personal and community health. Prevention of future health and property impacts could be enhanced by stronger evacuation enforcement, better preparedness information, greater attention to the possibility of prolonged power outages, and more attention to medical needs during and after a storm. PMID:24631998

  18. Integrated Coastal Zone Planning Based on Environment Carrying Capacity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miharja, M.; Arsallia, S.

    2017-07-01

    Coastal zone is a crucial area in terms of planning development. It holds high economic value, which affect to increasing number of inhabitants living in the area. As a result, this condition influences environmental degradation. Thus, in every attempt towards coastal zone development, it is crucial to always refer to environment carrying capacity. Carrying capacity is the limit of a certain coastal zone capability to support all human created activities, in which all ecological performances are maintained at sustainable level. The failure to establish strong and clear method and regulation on carrying capacity analysis will lead to a very risky coastal zone development, which in turn would threat the area’s sustainability. This paper discusses method for analysing carrying capacity of coastal zone as important input for the area development plan. Two key parameters, i.e. land and clean water carrying capacities are discussed to form carrying capacity analytical method. Furthermore, an empirical data of Ambon Bay, Moluccas Province, is used to illustrate the operationalization of the method.

  19. National Assessment of Shoreline Change Part 3: Historical Shoreline Change and Associated Coastal Land Loss Along Sandy Shorelines of the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Reid, David; Richmond, Bruce M.; Ruggiero, Peter; List, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. In the case of this study, the shoreline being measured is the boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the California Coast represents the first of two reports on long-term sandy shoreline change for the western U.S., the second of which will include the coast of the Pacific NW, including Oregon and Washington. A report for the Gulf of Mexico shoreline was completed in 2004 and is available at: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1043/. This report summarizes the methods of analysis, interprets the results, provides explanations regarding long-term and short-term trends and rates of change, and describes how different coastal communities are responding to coastal erosion. Shoreline change evaluations are based on comparing three historical shorelines digitized from maps, with a recent shoreline derived from lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) topographic surveys. The historical shorelines generally represent the following periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1950s-1970s, whereas the lidar shoreline is from 1998-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated using all

  20. Global path planning methods of UUV in coastal environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Honghan; LIU Xiaofu; YAN Zheping; ZHOU Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    In coastal environment,the motion of unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) is influenced signiifcantly by complex current. The operational performance of UUV can be greatly improved when the impact of ocean current is con-sidered. A global path planning method of the static obstacle environmental space is addressed in the paper. Firstly,accord-ing to the typically coastal vortex,a model of ocean current is proposed and the influence to the motion of UUV is analyzed. Secondly,to satisfy the rapid requirement in path planning,a heuristic A*algorithm is used to design global planning path with multiple constraints. Besides,to meet the UUV’s smooth path requirement,Bezier curve theory is applied. Simula-tion experiments are performed to illustrate the feasibility of the algorithm in the steady current and vortex environment.

  1. Survey of butyltin contamination in Portuguese coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, L; Quevauviller, P; Martin, F; Donard, O F

    1993-01-01

    Butyltin compounds (MBT, DBT and TBT) in intertidal sediments collected in four different Portuguese coastal environments have been measured in order to evaluate the extent of contamination. The sites chosen were the Rias of Aveiro and Faro, and the Sado and Tejo estuaries. These zones were traditional areas for shellfish production in the recent past, but the effects of industrial development have caused a deterioration of the environment. Specific contaminations were derived from the harbour (commercial and/or fisheries) and shipyard activities, resulting in a release of TBT and causing the oyster populations of the above mentioned estuaries to almost disappear. Results presented in this study give a survey of TBT contamination levels found in the four areas. The paper discusses the importance of the pollution in comparison with other European coastal areas.

  2. Measurements of the volume scattering function in a coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthon, Jean-François; Lee, Michael; Shybanov, Eugeny; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2007-04-01

    The Volume Scattering Function (VSF) is an essential variable in the context of marine radiative transfer modeling and of the inversion of ocean colour remote sensing data. However, an important lack of knowledge on the VSF natural variability affects the present models, in particular for the coastal environment. Measurements of the Volume Scattering Function between 0.6° and 177.3° with an angular resolution of 0.3° were performed in the northern coastal Adriatic Sea onboard an oceanographic platform in October 2004 using a prototype instrument. Observed differences with the commonly used Petzold's functions are significant, in particular for the "open ocean" and "coastal" types in the backward directions. The use of an empirical relationship for the derivation of b b(λ) from a unique measurement of β(ψ,λ) at ψ=140 for the Hydroscat-6 was validated for this coastal site at that season. Finally, the use of the Kopelevich VSF model together with a measurement of b p(λ) at λ=555 nm allowed the reconstruction of the VSF to within about 35%.

  3. Hurricane Sandy's Impact on Coastal Sedimentation on Long Island's South Shore: Results from a 2013 Rapid Response Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B. A.; Goff, J. A.; Flood, R. D.; Austin, J. A., Jr.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the NY coast, we conducted subsurface and multi-beam analyses, ground-truthed by grab samples, in 3 areas: the western end of Fire Island (FIW), eastern Fire Island (FIE) where a new inlet formed during the storm, and Long Beach (LB). Grab samples yielded sands and muds, a surprise given the shallow (10-25m) water depths. Muds rested on top of sands and were removed for additional analyses. Since percent mud could not be determined absolutely, sediments were washed through a 63 mm sieve, RoTapped for 10 minutes at ¼ Φ, and weight percent calculated for the coarse fraction. At FIW and FIE, fine sands dominate the shallowest depths studied, consistent with previous studies. At FIE, the sedimentary wedge extends to ~15m, with finest sands (peak 3-3.5 Φ) in shallowest waters surveyed (~10m). Slightly coarser (2.5Φ) sediments plus relict gravels are present in swales where the wedge shoals. This supports mapping results indicating sand ridges migrated to the SW. Medium to fine sand is present at the deepest extent of the wedge; the grain size distribution matches a sample taken in the swash zone on the eastern flank of the new breach. Sediments may have been transported shoreward and then reworked post-Sandy. Samples seaward of the new breach were capped by a mud layer, which in turn had a layer of fine sand resting on it, evidence of a nascent ebb tidal deposit. At FIW, sediments in the shallow NE swale are finer (3.5Φ) and better sorted. As the region is underlain by relict sediments, these fine sands may be relicts exposed by storm-driven bedform migration. Deeper water (~22m w.d.) samples at FIW are coarser and contain shell hash. Sand on the lee side of the sand ridge, which CHIRP profiles show did not migrate significantly and accumulated sands, are medium (1.5 Φ), and match the grain sizes found on Fire Island beach. Muds contain heavy metals in concentrations consistent with transport from adjacent estuaries.

  4. Some observations on the state of coastal environment of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    prior to development. Tourism and related anthropogenic activities are prominent in the state of Goa. This paper describes the state of coastal environment with reference to human intervention on coastal systems....

  5. Post-storm evolution a high-energy remote sandy beach backed by a high and wide coastal dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelle, Bruno; Bujan, Stéphane; Ferreira, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    During the winter 2013/2014, the high-energy meso-macrotidal remote beach of Truc Vert (SW France) was exposed to the most energetic wave conditions over at least the last 65 years with, for instance, the 2-month averaged significant wave height at the coast exceeding 3.6 m. Unprecedented beach and dune erosion was observed with the notable presence of a 700-m long localized megacusp embayment with the erosion scarp height exceeding 6 m in its centre where the dune retreat reached 30 m. Both the beach and the coastal dune eroded by about 90 m3/m within 3 months of severe storm activity, that is, a total beach-dune system sediment loss reaching 180m3/m. Beach and dune evolution after the winter 2013/2014 was inspected from March 2014 to November 2015 using bimonthly topographic surveys covering 1500+ m alongshore. 1.5 years after the winter 2014/2015, the beach-dune system did not fully recover to its pre-winter 2014/2015 level. The dune accreted by only a few m3/m while the beach accreted by an impressive amount of approximately 150m3/m, to reach a total volume that was only exceeded in 2012 within our full 10-year time series. Despite little volumetric changes, the dune showed significant morphological change through slumping and onshore wave- and wind-driven sediment transport. Seasonal natural revegetation was observed with large dune grass growth into the summer berm and within the erosion scarp with slumped clots of dune grass re-establishing their growth during the winter 2014/2015. In late 2015, the onset of morphological foredune development was observed. It is anticipated that, if Truc Vert is not exposed to a cluster of severe storms during the winter 2015/2016, the coastal dune will increase in volume within 2016 at a much higher rate than during 2015. Last but not least, starting in late 2015, the coastal dune of Truc Vert is now intensively monitored through regular 4-km long UAV photogrammetric surveys. Given that, nowadays, some scientists advocate

  6. Mussels as bioindicators of diclofenac contamination in coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, S C; Pena, A; Fernandes, J O

    2017-06-01

    Diclofenac a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) has been confirmed as an emerging contaminant in the aquatic environment. Toxicology studies have revealed that harmful effects may emerge from diclofenac presence not only for human health, but also for marine organisms, which implies its monitoring. To overcome the demanding challenges of diclofenac quantification in biotic aquatic species, a novel method for the determination of diclofenac in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Mytilus edulis) and macroalgae (Laminaria digitata) using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated according to the EC Decision 2002/657/EC. Additionally, a study was done about diclofenac contamination in mussels collected from 8 sites along the 1115 miles of coastline in Portugal in 2015. The results suggested that levels in mussels are closely related to the environmental contamination. Therefore, mussels can be a potential bioindicator of diclofenac contamination in the coastal environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Erosion risk assessment of active coastal cliffs in temperate environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, Laura; Gracia, F. Javier

    2009-11-01

    The potentially negative consequences resulting from cliff recession are a matter of serious concern in many coastal areas worldwide. The assessment of such processes has traditionally been performed by calculating average cliff recession rates and projecting them into the future, without taking into consideration the diverse factors affecting cliff dynamics and stability. In this work a new, practical method is presented to evaluate cliff erosion risk in temperate environments, by analysing the main factors responsible for both the physical and the socioeconomic aspects of erosion, representing cliff loss potential and damage potential, respectively. For this purpose an integration of 11 physical variables (such as cliff lithology, beach characteristics or rainfall regime) and 6 socioeconomic variables (such as land use type or population density) is proposed. These variables are weighted and combined into a Hazard Index and an Impact Index, which in turn are merged into a composite Risk Index where the resulting values are normalized and expressed as a percentage of the maximum theoretical risk. The method is tested and validated by using data about cliff retreat rates and mass movement processes in the coast of Cádiz province (SW Spain). The proposed approach allows the zoning of coastal cliffs according to the risk, hazard and/or impact levels, including the recognition of critical areas where specific intervention strategies should be adopted. The method presented in this work is deemed both practical and scientifically valid, without requiring extensive and detailed surveys of the area where it is to be applied. This way, it constitutes an easy to use, valuable tool for decision-making regarding land use planning and management strategies for active coastal cliffs.

  8. Depositional models of sandy debrites and turbidites of Palaeogene reservoir sands in deep-lacustrine environments, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Chen, G.

    2013-12-01

    Two depositional models are proposed for deep-lacustrine petroleum reservior sands (Palaeogene) in the Fushan Sag, Beibuwan Basin, South China. This facies trend is used as a template for predicting the distribution of reservoir facies of the Fushan oilfield. Based on examination of 150m of conventional cores from 13 drilled wells, four depositional facies have been interpreted: (1) fine-grained massive sandstone with floating mudstone clasts and planar clast fabric (sandy debrite); (2) fine-grained sandstone and siltstone showing contorted bedding, sand injection, and ptygmatic folding (sandy slump), (3) fine-grained sandstone with thin layers of normal grading and flute casts (turbidite), and (4) mudstone with faint laminae (suspension fallout). Combined with multiple seismic attributes, two depositional models are characterized by (1) sublacustrine fan: thick turbidite units occur at the bottom of the western sag beneath a series of normal faults slope. (2) Thinner deposition of sandy debrites mainly distribute at the bottom of eastern sag far from sandy slump at the lake margin slope, which interpreted to be controlled by "two-step" flexure slope break. The transfer zone located in the centre area is confirmed to be the primary origin for such differential depositions. In our study area, sandy debrites constitute the producing petroleum reservoirs, but turbidites are non reservoirs. This dramatic understanding will well account for "eastern much more than western" distribution of proven petroleum reserves and be applicable to predicting reservoir distribution.

  9. Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between EPA and SEMARNAT on cooperation in coastal and aquatic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    In September 2012, EPA signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Mexico's Environment Ministery (SEMARNAT) on cooperation in coastal and aquatic environments to promote such joint work, including work on ship emissions.

  10. Generic framework for meso-scale assessment of climate change hazards in coastal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelquist, Lars Rosendahl

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a generic framework for assessing inherent climate change hazards in coastal environments through a combined coastal classification and hazard evaluation system. The framework is developed to be used at scales relevant for regional and national planning and aims to cover all...... coastal environments worldwide through a specially designed coastal classification system containing 113 generic coastal types. The framework provides information on the degree to which key climate change hazards are inherent in a particular coastal environment, and covers the hazards of ecosystem...... disruption, gradual inundation, salt water intrusion, erosion and flooding. The system includes a total of 565 individual hazard evaluations, each graduated into four different hazard levels based on a scientific literature review. The framework uses a simple assessment methodology with limited data...

  11. Offshore baseline for New Jersey North coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates from Sandy Hook to Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey (NJN_baseline.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  12. OahuS_shorelines - Shorelines of the southern coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  13. Shorelines of the New Jersey North coastal region used in shoreline change analysis from Sandy Hook to Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey (NewJerseyN_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  14. OahuS_shorelines - Shorelines of the southern coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  15. Mercury in the atmospheric and coastal environments of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas-Inzunza, Jorge; Delgado-Alvarez, Carolina; Frías-Espericueta, Martín; Páez-Osuna, Federico

    2013-01-01

    In Mexico, published studies relating to the occurrence of Hg in the environment are limited. Among the main sources of Hg in Mexico are mining and refining of Auand Hg, chloralkali plants, Cu smelting, residential combustion of wood, carbo electric plants, and oil refineries. Hg levels are highly variable in the atmospheric compartment because of the atmospheric dynamics and ongoing metal exchange with the terrestrial surface. In atmospheric studies, Hg levels are usually reported as total gaseous Hg (TGM). In Mexico, TGM values ranged from 1.32 ng m-3 in Hidalgo state (a rural agricultural area) to 71.82 ng m-3 in Zacatecas state (an area where brick manufacturers use mining wastes as a raw material).Published information on mercury levels in the coastal environment comprise 21 studies, representing 21 areas, in which sediments constituted the substrate that was analyzed for Hg. In addition, water samples were analyzed for Hg in nine studies.Few studies exist on Hg levels in the Caribbean and in the southwest of the country where tourism is rapidly increasing. Hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury in these increasingly visited areas. In regions where studies have been undertaken, Hg levels in sediments were highly variable. Variations in Hg sediment levels mainly result from geological factors and the varying degree of anthropogenic impacts in the studied areas. In areas that still have pristine or nearly pristine environments (e.g., coast, Baja California, Todos Santos Bay, and La Paz lagoon), sediment Hg levels ranged from coastal lagoons in NW Mexico, it is clear that Hg fluxes to sediments have increased from2- to 15-fold in recent years. Since the 1940s, historical increases of Hg fluxes have resulted from higher agricultural waste releases and exhaust from the thermo electric plants. The levels of Hg in water reveal a moderate to elevated contamination of some Mexican coastal sites. In Urias lagoon (NW Mexico), moderate to high

  16. Ecological impacts of ocean acidification in coastal marine environments (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, C.; Crim, R.; Gooding, R.; Nienhuis, S.; Tang, E.

    2010-12-01

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are driving rapid and potentially unprecedented reductions in pH and carbonate ion availability in coastal marine environments. This process, known as ocean acidification (OA), has far-reaching implications for the performance and survival of marine organisms, particularly those with calcified shells and skeletons. Here, we highlight the ways in which OA impacts plants and animals in a coastal benthic food web, with an emphasis on what we know and what we don’t know about the ways in which the responses of individual organisms will scale up to long-term changes in community structure. Our system of interest is the rocky shore benthic community that is broadly represented from Alaska through California. Ecologically important species include producers (micro- and macro-algae), grazers (urchins and gastropods), filter feeders (mussels), and predators (sea stars). Although the direct effects of OA on coastal phytoplankton and kelps remain poorly understood, it appears as though elevated CO2 will increase the doubling rate of benthic diatoms. Small changes in food supply, however, may pale in comparison to the direct effects of OA on heavily calcified grazers and filter feeders. Sea urchin and mussel growth are both reduced by increased CO2 in the lab, and decadal-scale reductions in pH are associated with reduced turban snail growth in the field. Although adult abalone growth appears to be unaffected by CO2, larval development is impaired and larval survival is significantly reduced in acidified conditions. In contrast to the negative effects of OA on heavily calcified herbivores and filter feeders, lightly calcified sea stars actually grow faster when CO2 is experimentally increased. The acidification-induced changes described here are likely to result in substantial shifts in the benthic ecosystem. Increasing predation pressure may further reduce the abundance of grazers and filter feeders that are already suffering

  17. CURRENT ENVIRONMENT STATE OF COASTAL MARINE WATER OF DAGESTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Guseinova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We analysed current environmental state of the Dagestan coast of the Caspian Sea. Data on the spatial variability of contaminants in the coastal areas of the Dagestan segment of the Caspian Sea from the northern districts (Lopatin to the central (Sulak coastal land and, further, to the southern district (within Russian subsoil management confirm that it is caused by irregular contamination of the sea by above-ground sources. Location. Dagestan coastal area of the Caspian SeaMethods. Concentration analysis of background contamination of chemical agents in the Dagestan coastal water from northern districts (Lopatin to southern (Sulak coastal land during the period between 2004 and 2007.Results. Data on the spatial variability of contaminants in the coastal areas of the Dagestan segment of the Caspian Sea from the northern districts (Lopatin to the central (Sulak coastal land and, further, to the southern district (within Russian subsoil management confirm that it is caused by irregular contamination of the sea by above-ground sources.Main conclusions. The envisaged large-scale hydrocarbon resource development requires regular monitoring of sea currents on Makhachkala, Izberbash and Derbent roads.

  18. Annual variations in zooplankton from a polluted coastal environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Haridas, P.; Menon, P.G.; Madhupratap, M.

    Seasonal changes in the composition and distribution of zooplankton from the coastal waters of Trivandrum were studied. The study indicated that the effluent discharged from a nearby titanium dioxide factory did not affect the zooplankton abundance...

  19. Flight dynamics of Cory's shearwater foraging in a coastal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Vitor H; Guilford, Tim; Meade, Jessica; Geraldes, Pedro; Ramos, Jaime A; Garthe, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Flight dynamics theories are influenced by two major topics: how birds adapt their flight to cope with heterogeneous habitats, and whether birds plan to use the wind field or simply experience it. The aim of this study was to understand the flight dynamics of free-flying Cory's shearwaters in relation to the wind characteristics on the coastal upwelling region of continental Portugal. We deployed recently miniaturised devices-global positioning system loggers to collect precise and detailed information on birds' positions and motions. Prevalent winds were blowing from the north-east and adults used those winds by adjusting their flight directions mainly towards north-west and south-west, flying with cross and tail winds, respectively, and avoiding head winds. This is confirmation that Cory's shearwaters use a shear soaring flying strategy while exploiting the environment for food: adults foraged mainly with cross winds and their ground speed was not constant during all foraging trips as it changed dynamically as a result of the ocean surface shear winds. During travelling phases, ground speed was strongly influenced by the position of the bird with regard to the wind direction, as ground speed increased significantly with increasing tail wind component (TWC) values. Adults appear to choose foraging directions to exploit ambient wind, in order to improve shear soaring efficiency (cross winding) and exploit diurnal changes in tail wind strength to maximise commuting efficiency. We report, for the first time, precise ground speed values (GPS-derived data) and computed actual flight speed values (using TWC analysis) for Cory's shearwater.

  20. Quantum Fingerprint-Based Air Quality Monitoring in Coastal Environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Coastal environments vital to our nation are strongly impacted by natural and human factors and are also sensitive to global climate change. A need exists for...

  1. [Assessment of ecological environment effects of coastal development in Hebei Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Li-Tuo; Li, Zhi-Wei

    2014-07-01

    Through the analysis of the development activities and the ecological environment in coastal of Hebei Province, China, an index system for evaluating the ecological environment effect, composed of 28 indices, was set up by the pressure, state and response subsystems. Using the comprehensive index evaluation method, the integrated effects of ecological environment index (EI) was calculated and its grading criterion was founded. The results showed that the ecological environment effect of Hebei Province coastal development varied from being relatively small, normal and then relatively large from 1984 to 2010, and its acceptance degree evolved from being acceptable to being unacceptable. Because the resource and environment pressures caused by coastal development were serious and a delay existed in the state relative to the response, the improvement of various measures in the response subsystem did not show a positive effect on the state, and the environmental quality of ocean showed a degrading trend. Due to the differences in coastal development pattern and strength, the ecological environment effect of development activities showed some spatial differences. The ecological environment effect of Qinhuangdao coastal development was the minimum, followed by Cangzhou and Tangshan. Cangzhou and Tangshan had reached unacceptable levels and needed to further strengthen the restoration and protection of ecological environment.

  2. Managing coastal environments under climate change: Pathways to adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; García-León, Manuel; Gracia, Vicente; Devoy, Robert; Stanica, Adrian; Gault, Jeremy

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the question of how to manage vulnerable coastal systems so as to make them sustainable under present and future climates. This is interpreted in terms of the coastal functionality, mainly natural services and support for socio-economic activities. From here we discuss how to adapt for long term trends and for short terms episodic events using the DPSIR framework. The analysis is presented for coastal archetypes from Spain, Ireland and Romania, sweeping a range of meteo-oceanographic and socio-economic pressures, resulting in a wide range of fluxes among them those related to sediment. The analysis emphasizes the variables that provide a higher level of robustness. That means mean sea level for physical factors and population density for human factors. For each of the studied cases high and low sustainability practices, based on stakeholders preferences, are considered and discussed. This allows proposing alternatives and carrying out an integrated assessment in the last section of the paper. This assessment permits building a sequence of interventions called adaptation pathway that enhances the natural resilience of the studied coastal systems and therefore increases their sustainability under present and future conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Civitavecchia Coastal Environment Monitoring System (C-CEMS): an integrated approach to the study of coastal oceanographic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, Marco; Piermattei, Viviana; Madonia, Alice; Bonamano, Simone; Martellucci, Riccardo; Pierattini, Alberto; Albani, Marta; Borsellino, Chiara; Zappalà, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The study of the physical and biological processes of the coastal environment, characterized by high spatial and time variability, requires the adoption of multidisciplinary strategies of investigation that takes into account, not only the biotic and abiotic components of coastal marine ecosystems, but also the terrestrial, atmospheric and hydrological features linked to them. The understanding of coastal environment is fundamental to face efficiently and effectively the pollution phenomena, as expected by Marine Strategy (2008/56 EC) Directive, which is focused on the achievement of GES by 2020 in all Member States. Following these lines, the Laboratory of Experimental Oceanology and Marine Ecology (University of Tuscia) has developed a multi-platform observing network (the Civitavecchia Coastal Environment Monitoring System, C-CEMS) that operates since 2005 in the coastal marine area of Civitavecchia (northern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy), where multiple uses (industrial, commercial and tourist activities) and high ecological values (Posidonia oceanica meadows, hard-bottom benthic communities, priority species, etc.) closely coexist. Furthermore, in the last years the Civitavecchia harbour, which is one of the main ports of Europe, has been subjected to a series of expansion works that could impact significantly on the coastal environment. The C-CEMS, implemented in the current configuration, is composed by five main modules (fixed stations, in-situ measurements and samplings, satellite observations, numerical models, GIS) which provide integrated informations to be used in different fields of the environmental research. The fixed stations system controls one weather, two water quality and two wave-buoy stations along the coast. In addition to the long term observations acquired by the fixed stations (L-TER), in situ surveys are periodically carried out for the monitoring of the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water column and marine sediments

  4. Sustainable Management of Coastal Environments Through Coupled Terrestrial-Coastal Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrenz, S. E.; Cai, W.; Tian, H.; He, R.; Xue, Z.; Fennel, K.; Hopkinson, C.; Howden, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    Changing climate and land use practices have the potential to dramatically alter coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes and associated movement of water, carbon and nutrients through various terrestrial reservoirs into rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters. Consequences of climate- and land use-related changes will be particularly evident in large river basins and their associated coastal outflow regions. The large spatial extent of such systems necessitates a combination of satellite observations and model-based approaches coupled with targeted ground-based site studies to adequately characterize relationships among climate forcing (e.g., wind, precipitation, temperature, solar radiation, humidity, extreme weather), land use practice/land cover change, and transport of materials through watersheds and, ultimately, to coastal regions. Here, we describe a NASA Interdisciplinary Science project that employs an integrated suite of models in conjunction with remotely sensed as well as targeted in situ observations with the objectives of describing processes controlling fluxes on land and their coupling to riverine, estuarine and ocean ecosystems. The objectives of this effort are to 1) assemble and evaluate long term datasets for the assessment of impacts of climate variability, extreme weather events, and land use practices on transport of water, carbon and nitrogen within terrestrial systems and the delivery of materials to waterways and rivers; 2) using the Mississippi River as a testbed, develop and evaluate an integrated suite of models to describe linkages between terrestrial and riverine systems, transport of carbon and nutrients in the Mississippi river and its tributaries, and associated cycling of carbon and nutrients in coastal ocean waters; and 3) evaluate uncertainty in model products and parameters and identify areas where improved model performance is needed through model refinement and data assimilation. The effort employs the Dynamic Land

  5. Genome sequence of Synechococcus CC9311: Insights into adaptation to a coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Brian; Ren, Qinghu; Dupont, Chris L.; Myers, Garry S.; Heidelberg, John F.; Badger, Jonathan H.; Madupu, Ramana; Nelson, William C.; Brinkac, Lauren M.; Dodson, Robert J.; Durkin, A. Scott; Daugherty, Sean C.; Sullivan, Stephen A.; Khouri, Hoda; Mohamoud, Yasmin; Halpin, Rebecca; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal aquatic environments are typically more highly productive and dynamic than open ocean ones. Despite these differences, cyanobacteria from the genus Synechococcus are important primary producers in both types of ecosystems. We have found that the genome of a coastal cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. strain CC9311, has significant differences from an open ocean strain, Synechococcus sp. strain WH8102, and these are consistent with the differences between their respective environments. CC9311 has a greater capacity to sense and respond to changes in its (coastal) environment. It has a much larger capacity to transport, store, use, or export metals, especially iron and copper. In contrast, phosphate acquisition seems less important, consistent with the higher concentration of phosphate in coastal environments. CC9311 is predicted to have differences in its outer membrane lipopolysaccharide, and this may be characteristic of the speciation of some cyanobacterial groups. In addition, the types of potentially horizontally transferred genes are markedly different between the coastal and open ocean genomes and suggest a more prominent role for phages in horizontal gene transfer in oligotrophic environments. PMID:16938853

  6. Conceptualizing delta forms and processes in Arctic coastal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette; Kroon, Aart

    2017-01-01

    Climate warming in the Arctic directly causes two opposite changes in Arctic coastal systems: increased melt-water discharge through rivers induces extra influx of sediments and extended open water season increases wave impact which reworks and erodes the shores. A shoreline change analysis along...... the southern coast of Disko Island in western Greenland was conducted with aerial photographs and satellite images from 1964, 1985, and 2012. The decadal morphologic evolution of this 85km section showed that large parts of the coast had undergone very limited changes. However, two deltas were highly dynamic...

  7. Geospatial characteristics of Florida's coastal and offshore environments: Administrative and political boundaries and offshore sand resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Geospatial Characteristics Geopdf of Florida's Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political and natural resources of Florida. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, military areas, marine protected areas, cultural resources, locations of submerged cables, and shipping routes. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in the administrative and political boundaries of Florida's coastal and offshore region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map may be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of Florida. Users of this geospatial database will find that they have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning Florida's coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers.

  8. The impact of tourism and personal leisure transport on coastal environments: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John; Davenport, Julia L.

    2006-03-01

    Coastal tourism started in the 19th Century and has increased in non-linear fashion ever since, stimulated by a combination of developments in transport technology and rising prosperity. Initially, mainly national in character, the introduction of roll-on, roll-off ferries and inexpensive air transport caused an exponential 28-fold rise in international tourism between 1950 and the start of the 21st Century. This review considers the impact of tourism at two levels: (1) that created by the sheer numbers of tourists and their demands ('mass tourism and transport') and (2) that resulting from individual, often novel, forms of transport ('personal leisure transport'). Under (1), the consequences of the construction of coastal resorts and roads, marinas and jetties for habitat fragmentation and reduced biodiversity are described. Next, the effects of large cruise ships (now some 250 in number) are considered, particularly in relation to unregulated pollution and the delivery of substantial numbers of tourists to remote destinations. Thirdly, the literature related to disturbance caused by intertidal trampling by tourists on rocky/sandy shores is reviewed, followed by a section devoted to the unappreciated effects of beach 'cleaning' (i.e. removal of natural strandlines as well as litter) that is practiced throughout the world's sandy beach resorts. Finally, the potentially positive area of coastal ecotourism is considered, but evidence is assembled to highlight the problems associated with too high a demand. Under (2), the impact of a range of personal leisure transport modes is considered. These range from relatively innocuous pursuits (e.g. swimming, surfing, sailboarding and dinghy sailing), to an extremely popular sport (SCUBA diving) that is marketed for its environmentally-friendly nature, yet causes measurable deterioration in the world's coral ecosystems despite good management practices. The impact of motorboats is considered, particularly in the context of

  9. Hurricane Sandy and earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    MAVASHEV BORIS; MAVASHEV IGOR

    2013-01-01

    Submit for consideration the connection between formation of a hurricane Sandy and earthquakes. As a rule, weather anomalies precede and accompany earthquakes. The hurricane Sandy emerged 2 days prior to strong earthquakes that occurred in the area. And the trajectory of the hurricane Sandy matched the epicenter of the earthquakes. Possibility of early prediction of natural disasters will minimize the moral and material damage.

  10. Afforestation Methods of Pandanus tectorius on Coastal Drought Sandy Land%海岸风口沙地林投造林方式试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴惠忠

    2015-01-01

    In order to search for tree species which are adapted to drought sandy land,suitability of Pandanustecto-rius on difficult site of drought sandy coast and comprehensive measures of improving its survival rate were studied in Chihu Stated-owned Protective Forest Farm.Result shows that:Pandanus tectorius has the superior characteris-tics of wind-resistance and drought-resistance;the windy fence would be built before afforestation;the hedge-type planting and agglomerate afforestation are optimal than row planting among different afforestation configuration;one bag of slow-release solid water bag should be used in autumn afforestation;survival rate being above 90% can be kept without slow-release solid water bag.%为探索适应于风口造林的树种,在惠安赤湖林场通过开展不同方式造林研究林投在沙质海岸风口困难立地的适生性及提高其成活率的综合措施,结果表明,林投自身具有抗风旱等不良生境的优良特性,造林前需预先搭建风障,不同造林配置中篱状或团状造林方式优于行状造林,秋季造林建议施放1袋固体保水袋,春季造林不需放固体保水袋可保持90%以上的成活率。

  11. Brazilian sandy beaches: characteristics, ecosystem services, impacts, knowledge and priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Cecília Zacagnini Amaral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sandy beaches constitute a key ecosystem and provide socioeconomic goods and services, thereby playing an important role in the maintenance of human populations and in biodiversity conservation. Despite the ecological and social importance of these ecosytems, Brazilian sandy beaches are significantly impacted by human interference, chemical and organic pollution and tourism, as well as global climate change. These factors drive the need to better understand the environmental change and its consequences for biota. To promote the implementation of integrated studies to detect the effects of regional and global environmental change on beaches and on other benthic habitats of the Brazilian coast, Brazilian marine researchers have established The Coastal Benthic Habitats Monitoring Network (ReBentos. In order to provide input for sample planning by ReBentos, we have conducted an intensive review of the studies conducted on Brazilian beaches and summarized the current knowledge about this environment. In this paper, we present the results of this review and describe the physical, biological and socioeconomics features of Brazilian beaches. We have used these results, our personal experience and worldwide literature to identify research projects that should be prioritized in the assessment of regional and global change on Brazilian sandy beaches. We trust that this paper will provide insights for future studies and represent a significant step towards the conservation of Brazilian beaches and their biodiversity.

  12. Macrofouling community development at tropical coastal environment (New Mangalore Port, West Coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkat, K.; Anil, A.C.; Wagh, A.B.

    to evaluate the influence of environment on the development of macrofouling community at a locality which is not directly influenced by river run-off, a coastal station at New Mangalore Port (West coast of India) was monitored. Panels of admeasuring 10 x 15...

  13. Discrimination of classes of ships for aided recognition in a coastal environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, S.P. van den; Bouma, H.; Degache, M.A.C.; Burghouts, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    For naval operations in a coastal environment, detection of boats is not sufficient. When doing surveillance near a supposedly friendly coast, or self protection in a harbor, it is important to find the one object that means harm, among many others that do not. For this, it is necessary to obtain in

  14. Evaluation of the Wave Energy Conversion Efficiency in Various Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Rusu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present work was to assess and compare the wave power resources in various offshore and nearshore areas. From this perspective, three different groups of coastal environments were considered: the western Iberian nearshore, islands and an enclosed environment with sea waves, respectively. Some of the most representative existent wave converters were evaluated in the analysis and a second objective was to compare their performances at the considered locations, and in this way to determine which is better suited for potential commercial exploitation. In order to estimate the electric power production expected in a certain location, the bivariate distributions of the occurrences corresponding to the sea states, defined by the significant wave height and the energy period, were constructed in each coastal area. The wave data were provided by hindcast studies performed with numerical wave models or based on measurements. The transformation efficiency of the wave energy into electricity is evaluated via the load factor and also through the capture width, defined as the ratio between the electric power estimated to be produced by each specific wave energy converters (WEC and the expected wave power corresponding to the location considered. Finally, by evaluating these two different indicators, comparisons of the performances of three WEC types (Aqua Buoy, Pelamis and Wave Dragon in the three different groups of coastal environments considered have been also carried out. The work provides valuable information related to the effectiveness of various technologies for the wave energy extraction that would operate in different coastal environments.

  15. Underwater noise pollution in a coastal tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, L; Carvalho, R R; Lailson-Brito, J; Azevedo, A F

    2014-06-15

    Underwater noise pollution has become a major concern in marine habitats. Guanabara Bay, southeastern Brazil, is an impacted area of economic importance with constant vessel traffic. One hundred acoustic recording sessions took place over ten locations. Sound sources operating within 1 km radius of each location were quantified during recordings. The highest mean sound pressure level near the surface was 111.56±9.0 dB re 1 μPa at the frequency band of 187 Hz. Above 15 kHz, the highest mean sound pressure level was 76.21±8.3 dB re 1 μPa at the frequency 15.89 kHz. Noise levels correlated with number of operating vessels and vessel traffic composition influenced noise profiles. Shipping locations had the highest noise levels, while small vessels locations had the lowest noise levels. Guanabara Bay showed noise pollution similar to that of other impacted coastal regions, which is related to shipping and vessel traffic.

  16. Diagenesis of conifer needles in a coastal marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, John I.; Weliky, K.

    1989-10-01

    Physically intact fir, hemlock and cedar needles were isolated from different horizons of a sediment core from a coastal marine bay (Dabob Bay, Washington State, U.S.A.) and from nearby trees and forest litter. Green fir, hemlock and cedar needles were all characterized by glucose-rich aldose mixtures (~30% of tissue carbon), the production of vanillyl and cinnamyl CuO-derived phenols (~8% of tissue carbon) and the presence of both pinitol and myo-inositol (1-2% of tissue carbon). Needles from forest litter were enriched in lignin phenols and non-glucose aldoses and depleted in glucose and cyclitols. The sediment core contained an average of 10 mg/1 of physically intact fir, hemlock and cedar needles, which occurred in similar relative abundances and accounted for less than 1% of the total nonwoody gymnosperm tissue. Compared to the green and litter counterparts, all sedimentary needles were greatly depleted in cyclitols, glucose and p-coumaric acid and enriched in vanillyl phenol precursors. The degree of elevation of vanillyl phenol yield from the degraded needles was used to estimate minimal carbon losses from the samples, which ranged from near 40% for needle litter to almost 70% for the deepest (~100 years old) sedimentary fir/hemlock samples. Although downcore increases in carbon loss and refractory organic components indicated in situ diagenesis, the bulk of overall degradation occurred either on land or during the first 10-20 years after deposition. Atomic C/N ratios of degraded needles were lower than for green counterparts, but nitrogen was lost overall. These relative changes indicate the following stability series: vanillyl phenols > N > ferulic acid, p-hydroxy phenols, most aldoses and bulk tissue > glucose and p-coumaric acid > cyclitols (near 100% loss). Vanillic acid to vanillin ratios, (Ad/Al)v, of the green fir and hemlock needles were unusually high (0.36-0.38) and decreased downcore. Diagenesis also decreased the cinnamyl/vanillyl phenol ratio

  17. The Light-Field of Microbenthic Communities - Radiance Distribution and Microscale Optics of Sandy Coastal Sediments Rid A-1977-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    KUHL, M.; JØRGENSEN, BB

    1994-01-01

    The light field in coastal sediments was investigated at a spatial resolution of 0.2-0.5 mm by spectral measurements (450-850 nm) of field radiance and scalar irradiance using fiber-optic microprobes. Depth profiles of field radiance were measured with radiance microprobes at representative angles...... with the scalar irradiance measured directly by a fiber-optic scalar irradiance microprobe. Close to the sediment surface, the light field was highly anisotropic, dominated by incident collimated light, and the scalar irradiance reached a maximum of 200% of incident scalar irradiance. Below the sediment surface...

  18. Behaviour of Radium in coastal marine water of India - Behaviour of Radium in coastal marine environment of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, S.K.; Sartandel, S.; Tripathi, R.M. [Environmental Radioactivity measurement Section, Health Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Kanyakumari which comprises the high natural background region reflects different ratio varying from 3.5 to 6.9. The Higher concentration ratio of {sup 228}Ra to {sup 226}Ra in coastal water of Rameswaram and Kanyakumari reflecting {sup 232}Th rich sources of terrigenous material in regions. The findings supported the fact that the area also comes under natural high radiation background at the south west of Indian peninsula due to the presence of heavy mineral containing monazite in the beach sand. In Arabian sea, {sup 226}Ra activity concentration were observed to be in the range of 1.5-2.9 Bq m{sup -3} with a mean of 2.2 Bq m{sup -3} while {sup 228}Ra was in the range of 2.5-8.6 Bq m{sup -3} with mean of 4.9 Bq m{sup -3}. The observed ratio at locations in Arabian sea indicates restricted circulation pattern of sea water. The activity concentrations for radium isotopes were found within the reported range of values from other coastal area. The radioactive database can be used as tracer for understanding processes and for assessing radioactivity inventory in the coastal marine environment in India. (authors)

  19. Study on detection of coastal water environment of China by ocean color remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Coastal water environment is essentially enhanced by ocean color which is basically decided by substances concentration in water such as chlorophyll, suspended material and yellow substance. It is very difficult, even not possible, to detect water color by expensive ship routing, because of its temporal and spatial variety of feature and scales in the very complicated dynamical system of coastal water. With the development of satellite technique in the last 20 a, space sensors can be applied to detect ocean color by measuring the spectra of water-leaving radiance. It is proven that ocean color remote sensing is a powerful tool for understanding the process of oceanic biology and physics. Since the 1980s, great attention has been paid to the advanced remote sensing technique in China, especially to development of satellite programs for the coastal water environment. On 7 September 1988, China launched her first polar orbit satellite FY- 1A for meteorological and oceanographic application (water color and temperature) and the second satellite FY- 1B two years later. In May 1999, China launched her second generation environment satellite FY- 1C with higher sensitivies,more channels and stable operation. The special ocean color satellite HY - 1 is planned to be in the orbit in 2001, whose main purpose is to detect the coastal water environment of China seas. China is also developing a very advantageous sensor termed as Chinese moderate imaging spectra radiometer (CMODIS) with 91 channels, which will be a good candidate of the third generation satellite FY-3in 2003.The technical system of ocean color rermote sensing was developed by the Second Institute of Oceanography (SIO), State Oceanic Administration (SOA) in 1997. The system included data receiving, processing, distribution, calibration, validation and application units. The Hangzhou Station of SIO, SOA has the capability to receive FY- 1 and AVHRR data since 1989. It was also a SeaWiFS scientific research station

  20. Sand on the move: Post Hurricane Sandy analysis of the coastal sediment budget and bedform migration at Jones Inlet, Long Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, M. K.; Goff, J. A.; Austin, J. A.; Flood, R. D.; Christensen, B. A.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy struck the Northeast coast of the United States on October 29, 2012. Although sustained winds were downgraded to ~70 kts upon landfall, the vast area of the storm along with the direction of impact resulted in major storm-surge flooding and damage, as well as significant changes to the morphology of the coast-line, altering the characteristics of major barrier islands, inlets, and estuaries. A January 2013 post-storm survey aboard the R/V Pritchard, conducted by the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Stony Brook University, and Adelphi University, sought to investigate the impact of this post-tropical cyclone on the southwestern coast of Long Island, NY which sustained storm surges of up to 4 m above normal sea level. The objective of this project is to gain insight on the sedimentological volume changes and bathymetrical alterations made on the seafloor within Jones Inlet and the immediate estuaries behind Jones Beach and Long Beach Island. By studying these changes we hope to gain a better understanding of how large cyclonic storms alter sediment volumes and seafloor topography within major inlets and estuarine systems. These modifications can be observed in post-storm multibeam swath bathymetry and backscatter when compared to similar pre-storm data collected in 2010 by Stony Brook University. Post-storm CHIRP seismic reflection data were also collected, in order to define stratigraphic geometries, as well as grab samples to determine grain size distributions and ground truth for the backscatter data. The acoustic reflections imaged in the CHIRP data allow basal reflectors and dominate horizons to be traced throughout the inlet and estuaries. Our analysis focuses on (1) defining and quantifying areas of deposition and erosion from before-and-after bathymetry data; (2) comparing bedform patterns and grain size distributions from before-and-after backscatter and grab sample analysis; and (3) defining stratal geometries of the shallow

  1. Analyzing coastal environments by means of functional data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos; Flor-Blanco, Germán; Ordoñez, Celestino; Flor, Germán; Gallego, José R.

    2017-07-01

    Here we used Functional Data Analysis (FDA) to examine particle-size distributions (PSDs) in a beach/shallow marine sedimentary environment in Gijón Bay (NW Spain). The work involved both Functional Principal Components Analysis (FPCA) and Functional Cluster Analysis (FCA). The grainsize of the sand samples was characterized by means of laser dispersion spectroscopy. Within this framework, FPCA was used as a dimension reduction technique to explore and uncover patterns in grain-size frequency curves. This procedure proved useful to describe variability in the structure of the data set. Moreover, an alternative approach, FCA, was applied to identify clusters and to interpret their spatial distribution. Results obtained with this latter technique were compared with those obtained by means of two vector approaches that combine PCA with CA (Cluster Analysis). The first method, the point density function (PDF), was employed after adapting a log-normal distribution to each PSD and resuming each of the density functions by its mean, sorting, skewness and kurtosis. The second applied a centered-log-ratio (clr) to the original data. PCA was then applied to the transformed data, and finally CA to the retained principal component scores. The study revealed functional data analysis, specifically FPCA and FCA, as a suitable alternative with considerable advantages over traditional vector analysis techniques in sedimentary geology studies.

  2. Adaptions of ArcGIS' Linear Referencing System to the Coastal Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balstrøm, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    For many years it has been problematic to store information for the coastal environment in a GIS. However, a system named "Linear referencing System" based upon a dynamic segmentation principle implemented in ESRIs ArcGIS 9 software has now made it possible to store and analyze information refere...... referenced to the coastline. This presentation  demonstrates how to initialize this system, how to incorporate data into it and how to perform analysis queries hereon....

  3. Terrestrial Sediment Delivery to Coastal and Marine Environments: US Virgin Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, R. A.; Brooks, G. R.; Devine, B.; Wallace, L. E.; Holmes, C. W.; Schwing, P. T.

    2007-05-01

    Understanding terrestrial sediment dynamics in high-relief, tropical island settings, such as St. Thomas and St. John, USVI, has become a critical issue, as sediments are a potential threat to the health of down-slope environments. The primary depositional sinks of terrestrial sediments are 1) coastal buffer zones such as salt ponds, which trap sediments and keep them from being input into the marine environment, and 2) near-shore marine environments (coral reefs, seagrasses, algal flats etc.), many of which are adversely affected by terrestrial sedimentation. Land use change by anthropogenic activities has been shown to alter terrestrial sediment dynamics and greatly increase sediment delivery and accumulation rates in coastal and marine environments. Sediment cores collected in salt ponds and the near-shore marine environment were used to determine the sedimentology (texture and composition) and geochronology (using 14C, and 210Pb) prior to anthropogenic activities to define the "natural signal", or "baseline", as well as recent deviations from the "natural signal", which may be attributed to anthropogenic activities. Salt pond and marine sediments in watersheds without anthropogenic activities exhibit no deviations from the "natural signal" in sedimentology or accumulation rate. Salt pond and marine sediments in watersheds with anthropogenic activities contain a deviation from the "natural signal" manifested as an increase in accumulation rate within the last 100 yrs (most likely within the last 25-50 yrs) ranging from 3 -10 times greater than the "natural" accumulation rate. Sedimentologically, salt ponds reflect no recent change, where as marine sediments do show a recent deviation in sedimentology. This marine deviation is represented by an increase in organic content, a decrease in grain size, and a decrease in carbonate content (marine-derived) compared to the "natural signal". This change reflects an increase in terrestrial (non- carbonate, finer

  4. Management of karstic coastal groundwater in a changing environment (Salento, southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polemio, Maurizio; Romanazzi, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    groundwater trends from 1930 to 2060 and emphasizes an essential decrease of piezometric level and a huge worsening of the groundwater salinisation due seawater intrusion. More details on previous results of this research activity were recently published (Polemio and Romanazzi, 2012; Romanazzi and Polemio, 2013). References Polemio M., Romanazzi A., (2013), A groundwater model to support the management water resources of coastal karstic aquifer of salento (south italy), Rend. Online Soc. Geol. It., Atti del IX Convegno Nazionale dei Giovani Ricercatori di Geologia Applicata, Vol. 24 (2013), pp. 254-256. Romanazzi A., Polemio M., (2013), Modelling of coastal karst aquifers for management support: Study of Salento (Apulia, Italy), Italian Journal of Engineering Geology and Environment, 13, 1, pp. 65-83.

  5. Implications of accelerated sea-level rise on Louisiana coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Karen E.; Penland, Shea; Roberts, Harry H.

    1991-01-01

    Natural and human-induced processes have combined to produce high rates of relative sea-level rise and coastal land loss in Louisiana. This paper presents historical trends in sea-level rise and the implication of predicted accelerated rise scenarios on Louisiana's coastal environments. Mean eustatic sea-level in the Gulf of Mexico is 0.23 cm/yr. In Louisiana, relative sea-level rise, which combines eustacy and subsidence, averages from 0.50 cm/yr in the chenier plain to 1.0 cm/yr in the delta plain. Subsidence due to the compaction of Holocene sediments is believed to be the major component influencing these high rates of rise. Subsidence contributes up to 80% of the observed relative sea-level rise in coastal Louisiana. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) predicts the rate of sea-level rise to increase over the next century due to global climate change. If these predictions are accurate, a dramatic increase in the coastal land loss conditions in Louisiana can be expected.

  6. Application of ERTS-1 data to the protection and management of New Jersey's coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunghans, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Feinberg, E. B.; Stitt, J. A.; Mairs, R. L.; Wobber, F. J.; Macomber, R. T.; Stanczuk, D. T.; Thibult, D.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Quasi-operational information products for coastal zone management have been prepared using ERTS-1 imagery and collateral aerial photography. These products were applied to the practical regulation, protection, and management of New Jersey's coastal environment. Procedures were developed for the operational use of ERTS-1 data products within New Jersey's Department of Environmental Protection. Successful analysis and product preparation for operational needs centered on four major coastal resource problem areas: (1) detection of environmental changes in coastal areas, (2) siting of ocean outfalls, (3) monitoring of offshore waste disposal, and (4) calculation of recession rates along the Atlantic Shore. The utility and monetary benefits derived from ERTS and aircraft imagery for each problem area have been determined. The NJDEP estimates the possibility of $620,000 yearly savings through the use of an operational ERTS system and a one-time savings of $2.8 million on current or planned projects if a truly operational ERTS type satellite were available.

  7. Joint probability analysis of extreme precipitation and storm tide in a coastal city under changing environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Xu

    Full Text Available Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt's tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05. The design joint return period (RP of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment.

  8. Joint probability analysis of extreme precipitation and storm tide in a coastal city under changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Ma, Chao; Lian, Jijian; Bin, Lingling

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic flooding resulting from extreme meteorological events has occurred more frequently and drawn great attention in recent years in China. In coastal areas, extreme precipitation and storm tide are both inducing factors of flooding and therefore their joint probability would be critical to determine the flooding risk. The impact of storm tide or changing environment on flooding is ignored or underestimated in the design of drainage systems of today in coastal areas in China. This paper investigates the joint probability of extreme precipitation and storm tide and its change using copula-based models in Fuzhou City. The change point at the year of 1984 detected by Mann-Kendall and Pettitt's tests divides the extreme precipitation series into two subsequences. For each subsequence the probability of the joint behavior of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated by the optimal copula. Results show that the joint probability has increased by more than 300% on average after 1984 (α = 0.05). The design joint return period (RP) of extreme precipitation and storm tide is estimated to propose a design standard for future flooding preparedness. For a combination of extreme precipitation and storm tide, the design joint RP has become smaller than before. It implies that flooding would happen more often after 1984, which corresponds with the observation. The study would facilitate understanding the change of flood risk and proposing the adaption measures for coastal areas under a changing environment.

  9. Landscape Visual Quality and Meiofauna Biodiversity on Sandy Beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Gabriela; Marenzi, Rosemeri C.; Polette, Marcos; Netto, Sérgio A.

    2016-10-01

    Sandy beaches are central economic assets, attracting more recreational users than other coastal ecosystems. However, urbanization and landscape modification can compromise both the functional integrity and the attractiveness of beach ecosystems. Our study aimed at investigating the relationship between sandy beach artificialization and the landscape perception by the users, and between sandy beach visual attractiveness and biodiversity. We conducted visual and biodiversity assessments of urbanized and semiurbanized sandy beaches in Brazil and Uruguay. We specifically examined meiofauna as an indicator of biodiversity. We hypothesized that urbanization of sandy beaches results in a higher number of landscape detractors that negatively affect user evaluation, and that lower-rated beach units support lower levels of biodiversity. We found that urbanized beach units were rated lower than semiurbanized units, indicating that visual quality was sensitive to human interventions. Our expectations regarding the relationship between landscape perception and biodiversity were only partially met; only few structural and functional descriptors of meiofauna assemblages differed among classes of visual quality. However, lower-rated beach units exhibited signs of lower environmental quality, indicated by higher oligochaete densities and significant differences in meiofauna structure. We conclude that managing sandy beaches needs to advance beyond assessment of aesthetic parameters to also include the structure and function of beach ecosystems. Use of such supporting tools for managing sandy beaches is particularly important in view of sea level rise and increasing coastal development.

  10. Geochemistry of shallow ground water in coastal plain environments in the southeastern United States: Implications for aquifer susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoriero, A.J.; Spruill, T.B.; Eimers, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Ground-water chemistry data from coastal plain environments have been examined to determine the geochemical conditions and processes that occur in these areas and assess their implications for aquifer susceptibility. Two distinct geochemical environments were studied to represent a range of conditions: an inner coastal plain setting having more well-drained soils and lower organic carbon (C) content and an outer coastal plain environment that has more poorly drained soils and high organic C content. Higher concentrations of most major ions and dissolved inorganic and organic C in the outer coastal plain setting indicate a greater degree of mineral dissolution and organic matter oxidation. Accordingly, outer coastal plain waters are more reducing than inner coastal plain waters. Low dissolved oxygen (O2) and nitrate (NO 3-) concentrations and high iron (Fe) concentrations indicate that ferric iron (Fe (III)) is an important electron acceptor in this setting, while dissolved O2 is the most common terminal electron acceptor in the inner coastal plain setting. The presence of a wide range of redox conditions in the shallow aquifer system examined here underscores the importance of providing a detailed geochemical characterization of ground water when assessing the intrinsic susceptibility of coastal plain settings. The greater prevalence of aerobic conditions in the inner coastal plain setting makes this region more susceptible to contamination by constituents that are more stable under these conditions and is consistent with the significantly (psampled), however concentrations were typically low (water table depths often found in coastal plain settings may result in an increased risk of the detection of pesticides (e.g., alachlor) that degrade rapidly in the unsaturated zone.

  11. Analyzing Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Angelyn; Meyer, Stephan; Edwards, Becca

    2015-03-01

    Post-tropical Storm Sandy underwent extratropical transition shortly before making landfall in southern New Jersey October 29 2012. Data from this system was compared with data from Hurricane Ike (2008) which represents a classic hurricane with a clear eye wall and symmetry after landfall. Storm Sandy collided with a low pressure system coming in from the north as the hurricane made landfall on the US East coast. This contributed to Storm Sandy acting as a non-typical hurricane when it made landfall. Time histories of wind speed and wind direction were generated from data provided by Texas Tech's StickNet probes for both storms. The NOAA Weather and Climate program were used to generate radar loops of reflectivity during the landfall for both storms; these loops were compared with time histories for both Ike and Sandy to identify a relationship between time series data and storm-scale features identified on radar.

  12. Biodegradation of MC252 oil in oil:sand aggregates in a coastal headland beach environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elango, Vijaikrishnah; Urbano, Marilany; Lemelle, Kendall R; Pardue, John H

    2014-01-01

    Unique oil:sand aggregates, termed surface residue balls (SRBs), were formed on coastal headland beaches along the northern Gulf of Mexico as emulsified MC252 crude oil mixed with sand following the Deepwater Horizon spill event. The objective of this study is to assess the biodegradation potential of crude oil components in these aggregates using multiple lines of evidence on a heavily-impacted coastal headland beach in Louisiana, USA. SRBs were sampled over a 19-month period on the supratidal beach environment with reasonable control over and knowledge of the residence time of the aggregates on the beach surface. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkane concentration ratios were measured including PAH/C30-hopane, C2/C3 phenanthrenes, C2/C3 dibenzothiophenes and alkane/C30-hopane and demonstrated that biodegradation was occurring in SRBs in the supratidal. These biodegradation reactions occurred over time frames relevant to the coastal processes moving SRBs off the beach. In contrast, submerged oil mat samples from the intertidal did not demonstrate chemical changes consistent with biodegradation. Review and analysis of additional biogeochemical parameters suggested the existence of a moisture and nutrient-limited biodegradation regime on the supratidal beach environment. At this location, SRBs possess moisture contents biodegradation in the literature. Despite these limitations, biodegradation of PAHs and alkanes proceeded at relevant rates (2-8 year(-1)) due in part to the presence of degrading populations, i.e., Mycobacterium sp., adapted to these conditions. For submerged oil mat samples in the intertidal, an oxygen and salinity-impacted regime is proposed that severely limits biodegradation of alkanes and PAHs in this environment. These results support the hypothesis that SRBs deposited at different locations on the beach have different biogeochemical characteristics (e.g., moisture, salinity, terminal electron acceptors, nutrient, and oil

  13. Inputs and distributions of synthetic musk fragrances in an estuarine and coastal environment; a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, Nicola R. [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Science, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth PL1 3DH (United Kingdom); Guitart, Carlos, E-mail: guitart.carlos@gmail.co [Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth PL1 3DH (United Kingdom); Fuentes, Gustavo [Instituto Universitario de Tecnologia del Mar (IUTEMAR), Fundacion La Salle de Ciencias Naturales, Margarita Island (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Readman, James W. [Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth PL1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Synthetic musks are ubiquitous contaminants in the environment. Compartmental distributions (dissolved, suspended particle associated and sedimentary) of the compounds throughout an axial estuarine transect and in coastal waters are reported. High concentrations of Galaxolide (HHCB) and Tonalide (AHTN) (987-2098 ng/L and 55-159 ng/L, respectively) were encountered in final effluent samples from sewage treatment plants (STPs) discharging into the Tamar and Plym Estuaries (UK), with lower concentrations of Celestolide (ADBI) (4-13 ng/L), Phantolide (AHMI) (6-9 ng/L), musk xylene (MX) (4-7 ng/L) and musk ketone (MK) (18-30 ng/L). Rapid dilution from the outfalls is demonstrated with resulting concentrations of HHCB spanning from 5 to 30 ng/L and those for AHTN from 3 to 15 ng/L. The other musks were generally not detected in the estuarine and coastal waters. The suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sedimentary profiles and compositions (HHCB:AHTN ratios) generally reflect the distribution in the water column with highest concentrations adjacent to sewage outfalls. - Synthetic musks were determined in coastal environmental compartments along an estuarine transect indicating their ubiquitous occurrence in transitional waters.

  14. Strategies for the protection of the coastal marine environment of Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zingde, M.D.

    of 40 to 60 km and Is traditionally called Konksn. Strategies for the protection of the coastal marln~environment of Konkan keeping In view the need for the development of this backward region are discussed. . . It must be realised that thec08~ta...Jzone Is not only the most susceptlbkl area to man-made changes. but also the most biologically productive of the marine ecosystem8. With the various development plan.: for Konkan getting Impl:,mented, the prenure on the coaatal zone wUl continue~C? Increase year...

  15. Biological Cycling of Nutrients of Acacia crassicarpa Plantation in Coastal Sandy Area%沿海沙地厚荚相思人工林养分生物循环特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林宇

    2016-01-01

    用标准木法和收获法对闽东南沿海沙地8年生厚荚相思人工林N、P、K、Ca和Mg的养分含量、 积累、 分配和生物循环进行研究.结果表明:5种营养元素含量以树叶为最高,干材最低,各器官营养元素含量排序为N>K>Ca>Mg>P;营养元素总积累量为579.21 kg/hm2,各器官营养元素积累量排序为枝>干>皮>叶>根;各营养元素积累量排序为N>K>Ca>Mg>P.0~60 cm土层土壤中5种养分元素含量大小排序为Ca>K>Mg>P>N,厚荚相思各器官对土壤养分的富集能力排序为叶>根>枝>皮>干.厚荚相思乔木层养分年存留量为72.40 kg/(hm2?a),年吸收量为255.25 kg/(hm2?a),总归还量为182.85 kg/(hm2?a).5种元素利用系数和周转期均为K>Ca>P>N>Mg,循环速率为Mg>N>P>Ca>K,循环系数为0.72,利用系数为0.28,周转期为3.17 a.厚荚相思林5种营养元素利用效率高,循环速率快,而周转期短,有利于沙质土壤肥力的恢复和生产力的维持.%Standard-timber and harvesting methods were used to study the concentration, accumulation, distri-bution and biological cycling of the nutrient elements (N, P, K, Ca and Mg) in an 8-year-old Acacia crassicarpa plantation on a sandy coastal plain soil in southeast Fujian Province, China. The results showed that nutrient con-tents in the leaves were the highest among those in different organs, with the lowest in the stems. The total nutrient accumulation was 579. 21 kg/hm2 . In this plantation, concentration of N was the highest among the five elements, followed by K, Ca, Mg and P. The nutrient accumulation of various organs was ranked as branches>stems>barks>leaves>roots in the pure plantation of A. crassicarpa, and the nutrient accumulation of the five elements were ranked as N>K>Ca>Mg>P . Nutrient contents of 0-60 cm depth of soil was rank as Ca>K>Mg>P>N, the accumulation coefficients of nutrient elements of different organs was leaves>roots>barks>branches>stems. Annual net nutrient accumulation, return and

  16. Shorelines of the Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, used in shoreline change analysis (GreaterBoston_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  17. Shorelines of the Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, used in shoreline change analysis (GreaterBoston_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  18. Offshore baseline for Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates (GreaterBoston_baseline.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  19. Offshore baseline for Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates (GreaterBoston_baseline.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  20. Geospatial characteristics of Florida's coastal and offshore environments: Coastal habitats, artificial reefs, wrecks, dumping grounds, harbor obstructions and offshore sand resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of Florida's Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of Florida. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, coastal habitats, artificial reefs, shipwrecks, dumping grounds, and harbor obstructions. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of Florida's coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map may be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of Florida. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning Florida's coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning beach restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of Florida's territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Geographic Data Library, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of Florida, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are provided as attached xml files for all geographic information system (GIS) layers.

  1. The Civitavecchia Coastal Environment Monitoring System (C-CEMS): a new tool to analyze the conflicts between coastal pressures and sensitivity areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamano, S.; Piermattei, V.; Madonia, A.; Paladini de Mendoza, F.; Pierattini, A.; Martellucci, R.; Stefanì, C.; Zappalà, G.; Caruso, G.; Marcelli, M.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of the coastal environment is fundamental for efficiently and effectively facing the pollution phenomena as expected by the Marine Strategy Framework Directive, and for limiting the conflicts between anthropic activities and sensitivity areas, as stated by Maritime Spatial Planning Directive. To address this, the Laboratory of Experimental Oceanology and Marine Ecology developed a multi-platform observing network that has been in operation since 2005 in the coastal marine area of Civitavecchia (Latium, Italy) where multiple uses and high ecological values closely coexist. The Civitavecchia Coastal Environment Monitoring System (C-CEMS), implemented in the current configuration, includes various components allowing one to analyze the coastal conflicts by an ecosystem-based approach. The long-term observations acquired by the fixed stations are integrated with in situ data collected for the analysis of the physical, chemical and biological parameters of the water column, sea bottom and pollution sources detected along the coast. The in situ data, integrated with satellite observations (e.g., temperature, chlorophyll a and TSM), are used to feed and validate the numerical models, which allow the analysis and forecasting of the dynamics of pollutant dispersion under different conditions. To test the potential capabilities of C-CEMS, two case studies are reported here: (1) the analysis of fecal bacteria dispersion for bathing water quality assessment, and (2) the evaluation of the effects of the dredged activities on Posidonia meadows, which make up most of the two sites of community importance located along the Civitavecchia coastal zone. The simulation outputs are overlapped by the thematic maps showing bathing areas and Posidonia oceanica distribution, thus giving a first practical tool that could improve the resolution of the conflicts between coastal uses (in terms of stress produced by anthropic activities) and sensitivity areas.

  2. Coastal zone environment measurements at Sakhalin Island using autonomous mobile robotic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyugin, Dmitry; Kurkin, Andrey; Zaytsev, Andrey; Zeziulin, Denis; Makarov, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    To perform continuous complex measurements of environment characteristics in coastal zones autonomous mobile robotic system was built. The main advantage of such system in comparison to manual measurements is an ability to quickly change location of the equipment and start measurements. AMRS allows to transport a set of sensors and appropriate power source for long distances. The equipment installed on the AMRS includes: a modern high-tech ship's radar «Micran» for sea waves measurements, multiparameter platform WXT 520 for weather monitoring, high precision GPS/GLONASS receiver OS-203 for georeferencing, laser scanner platform based on two Sick LMS-511 scanners which can provide 3D distance measurements in up to 80 meters on the AMRS route and rugged designed quad-core fanless computer Matrix MXE-5400 for data collecting and recording. The equipment is controlled by high performance modular software developed specially for the AMRS. During the summer 2016 the experiment was conducted. Measurements took place at the coastal zone of Sakhalin Island (Russia). The measuring system of AMRS was started in automatic mode controlled by the software. As result a lot of data was collected and processed to database. It consists of continuous measurements of the coastal zone including different weather conditions. The most interesting for investigation is a period of three-point storm detected on June, 2, 2016. Further work will relate to data processing of measured environment characteristics and numerical models verification based on the collected data. The presented results of research obtained by the support of the Russian president's scholarship for young scientists and graduate students №SP-193.2015.5

  3. Anaerobic methane oxidation coupled to nitrite reduction can be a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Bao-Lan; Liu, Shuai; Chai, Xiao-Ping; He, Zhan-Fei; Ren, Hong-Xing; Liu, Yan; Geng, Sha; Wang, Wei; Tang, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yi-Ming; Lou, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zheng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, we investigated nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (N-DAMO) as a potential methane sink in the Hangzhou Bay and the adjacent Zhoushan sea area. The potential activity of the N-DAMO process was primarily observed in Hangzhou Bay by means of (13)C-labeling experiments, whereas very low or no potential N-DAMO activity could be detected in the Zhoushan sea area. The measured potential N-DAMO rates ranged from 0.2 to 1.3 nmol (13)CO2 g(-1) (dry sediment) day(-1), and the N-DAMO potentially contributed 2.0-9.4 % to the total microbial methane oxidation in the examined sediments. This indicated that the N-DAMO process may be an alternative pathway in the coastal methane cycle. Phylogenetic analyses confirmed the presence of Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera-like bacteria in all the examined sediments, while the group A members (the dominant bacteria responsible for N-DAMO) were found mainly in Hangzhou Bay. Quantitative PCR showed that the 16S rRNA gene abundance of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria varied from 5.4 × 10(6) to 5.0 × 10(7) copies g(-1) (dry sediment), with a higher abundance observed in Hangzhou Bay. In addition, the overlying water NO3 (-) concentration and salinity were identified as the most important factors influencing the abundance and potential activity of Candidatus M. oxyfera-like bacteria in the examined sediments. This study showed the evidence of N-DAMO in coastal environments and indicated the importance of N-DAMO as a potential methane sink in coastal environments.

  4. Geomorphometry in coastal morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado-Pintado, Emilia; Jackson, Derek

    2017-04-01

    Geomorphometry is a cross-cutting discipline that has interwoven itself into multiple research themes due to its ability to encompass topographic quantification on many fronts. Its operational focus is largely defined as the extraction of land-surface parameters and earth surface characterisation. In particular, the coastal sciences have been enriched by the use of digital terrain production techniques both on land and in the nearshore/marine area. Numerous examples exist in which the utilisation of field instrumentation (e.g. LIDAR, GPS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning, multi-beam echo-sounders) are used for surface sampling and development of Digital Terrain Models, monitoring topographic change and creation of nearshore bathymetry, and have become central elements in modern investigations of coastal morphodynamics. The coastal zone is a highly dynamic system that embraces variable and at times, inter-related environments (sand dunes, sandy beaches, shoreline and nearshore) all of which require accurate and integrated monitoring. Although coastal studies can be widely diverse (with interconnected links to other related disciplines such as geology or biology), the characterisation of the landforms (coastal geomorphology) and associated processes (morphodynamics, hydrodynamics, aeolian processes) is perhaps where geomorphometry (topo-bathymetry quantification) is best highlighted. In this respect, many tools have been developed (or improved upon) for the acquisition of topographic data that now commands a high degree of accuracy, simplicity, and ultimately acquisition cost reduction. We present a series of field data acquisitions examples that have produced land surface characterisation using a range of techniques including traditional GPS surveys to more recent Terrestrial Laser Scanning and airborne LIDAR. These have been conducted within beach and dune environments and have helped describe erosion and depositional processes driven by wind and wave energy (high

  5. Metal dispersion resulting from mining activities in coastal environments: A pathways approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Randolph A.

    2012-01-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) and disposal of tailings that result from mining activities impact coastal areas in many countries. The dispersion of metals from mine sites that are both proximal and distal to the shoreline can be examined using a pathways approach in which physical and chemical processes guide metal transport in the continuum from sources (sulfide minerals) to bioreceptors (marine biota). Large amounts of metals can be physically transported to the coastal environment by intentional or accidental release of sulfide-bearing mine tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals results in elevated dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters on land (producing ARD) and in pore waters of submarine tailings. Changes in pH, adsorption by insoluble secondary minerals (e.g., Fe oxyhydroxides), and precipitation of soluble salts (e.g., sulfates) affect dissolved metal fluxes. Evidence for bioaccumulation includes anomalous metal concentrations in bivalves and reef corals, and overlapping Pb isotope ratios for sulfides, shellfish, and seaweed in contaminated environments. Although bioavailability and potential toxicity are, to a large extent, functions of metal speciation, specific uptake pathways, such as adsorption from solution and ingestion of particles, also play important roles. Recent emphasis on broader ecological impacts has led to complementary methodologies involving laboratory toxicity tests and field studies of species richness and diversity.

  6. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements in coastal and estuarine environments: examples from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewetzer, Silke F. K.; Duck, Robert W.; Anderson, James M.

    1999-08-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a means to measure the components of water current velocities in three dimensions. Such instruments have been used widely by the oil industry in deep offshore waters but their application to nearshore coastal and estuarine environments has been principally confined to the USA. Using examples of ADCP datasets acquired from the macrotidal Tay Estuary, eastern Scotland, the principles of field deployment, data acquisition and forms of output are critically summarised. It is shown, for the first time in the Tay Estuary, that vertical current velocities are significant and are particularly so in downwelling zones associated with the development and passage of axially convergent tidal fronts. The improved understanding of three-dimensional water and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal and estuarine waters is crucial to, inter alia, the sustainable management of effluent discharges and, in more general terms, it is predicted on the basis of the Tay case study, that ADCP measurements afford significant opportunities to refine understanding of geomorphological processes in a variety of aquatic environments worldwide.

  7. Coastal erosion as a source of mercury into the marine environment along the Polish Baltic shore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełdowska, Magdalena; Jędruch, Agnieszka; Łęczyński, Leszek; Saniewska, Dominika; Kwasigroch, Urszula

    2016-08-01

    The climate changes in recent years in the southern Baltic have been resulting in an increased frequency of natural extreme phenomena (i.e. storms, floods) and intensification of abrasion processes, which leads to introduction of large amounts of sedimentary deposits into the marine environment. The aim of this study was to determine the mercury load introduced to the Baltic Sea with deposits crumbling off the cliffs-parts of the coast that are the most exposed to abrasion. The studies were carried out close to five cliffs located on the Polish coast in the years 2011-2014. The results show that coastal erosion could be an important Hg source into the marine environment. This process is the third most important route, after riverine and precipitation input, by which Hg may enter the Gulf of Gdańsk. In the Hg budget in the gulf, the load caused by erosion (14.3 kg a(-1)) accounted for 80 % of the wet deposition and was 50 % higher than the amount of mercury introduced with dry deposition. Although the Hg concentration in the cliff deposits was similar to the natural background, due to their large mass, this problem could be significant. In addition, the preliminary studies on the impact of coastal erosion on the Hg level in the marine ecosystem have shown that this process may be one of the Hg sources into the trophic chain.

  8. Prevalence of microplastics in Singapore's coastal marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.L. [Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Obbard, J.P. [Division of Environmental Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail esejpo@nus.edu.sg

    2006-07-15

    Microplastics have been recently identified as marine pollutants of significant concern due to their persistence, ubiquity and potential to act as vectors for the transfer and exposure of persistent organic pollutants to marine organisms. This study documents, for the first time, the presence and abundance of microplastics (>1.6 {mu}m) in Singapore's coastal environment. An optimized sampling protocol for the collection and analysis of microplastics was developed, and beach sediments and seawater (surface microlayer and subsurface layer) samples were collected from nine different locations around the coastline. Low density microplastics were separated from sediments by flotation and polymer types were identified using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry. Synthetic polymer microplastics identified in beach sediments included polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, nylon, polyvinyl alcohol and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. Microplastics were detected in samples from four out of seven beach environments, with the greatest quantity found in sediments from two popular beaches in the eastern part of Singapore. Polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene microplastics were also found in the surface microlayer (50-60 {mu}m) and subsurface layer (1 m) of coastal waters. The presence of microplastics in sediments and seawater is likely due to on-going waste disposal practices from industries and recreational activities, and discharge from shipping.

  9. Metal dispersion resulting from mining activities in coastal environments: a pathways approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Randolph A.

    2012-01-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) and disposal of tailings that result from mining activities impact coastal areas in many countries. The dispersion of metals from mine sites that are both proximal and distal to the shoreline can be examined using a pathways approach in which physical and chemical processes guide metal transport in the continuum from sources (sulfide minerals) to bioreceptors (marine biota). Large amounts of metals can be physically transported to the coastal environment by intentional or accidental release of sulfide-bearing mine tailings. Oxidation of sulfide minerals results in elevated dissolved metal concentrations in surface waters on land (producing ARD) and in pore waters of submarine tailings. Changes in pH, adsorption by insoluble secondary minerals (e.g., Fe oxyhydroxides), and precipitation of soluble salts (e.g., sulfates) affect dissolved metal fluxes. Evidence for bioaccumulation includes anomalous metal concentrations in bivalves and reef corals, and overlapping Pb isotope ratios for sulfides, shellfish, and seaweed in contaminated environments. Although bioavailability and potential toxicity are, to a large extent, functions of metal speciation, specific uptake pathways, such as adsorption from solution and ingestion of particles, also play important roles. Recent emphasis on broader ecological impacts has led to complementary methodologies involving laboratory toxicity tests and field studies of species richness and diversity.

  10. Inland and coastal water environment remote sensing monitoring system: rapid construction and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua; Gu, Xingfa; Yin, Qiu; Li, Li; Chen, Qiang; Ren, Yuhuan; Chen, Hong; Liu, Xudong; Zhang, Juan

    2009-10-01

    This paper aims at bridging the gap between the academic research and practical application in water environment monitoring by remote sensing. It mainly focuses on how to rapidly construct the Inland and coastal Water Environment Remote Sensing Monitoring System (IWERSMS) in a software perspective. In this paper, the remote sensed data processing framework, dataflow and product levels are designed based on the retrieval algorithms of water quality parameters. The prototype is four-tier architecture and modules are designed elaborately. The paper subsequently analyzes the strategy and key technology of conglutinating hybrid components, adopting semantic metafiles and tiling image during rapid construction of prototype. Finally, the paper introduces the successful application to 2008 Qingdao enteromorpha prolifra disaster emergency monitoring in Olympics Sailing Match fields. The solution can also fit other domains in remote sensing and especially it provides a clue for researchers who are in an attempt to establish a prototype to apply research fruits to practical applications.

  11. Aerobic methane oxidation in a coastal environment with seasonal hypoxia - a time series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Lea; Bethke, Christina; Schweers, Johanna; Bange, Hermann; Kock, Annette; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Treude, Tina; Niemann, Helge

    2014-05-01

    In the coastal ocean, methane is generally produced in anoxic sediments from where it can migrate through the water column to the atmosphere. A significant amount of methane is consumed along this passage by a series of microbial filter systems. Over the last 15 years, researchers focused on the first filter in marine sediments, the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Comparably little is known about the second filter, the aerobic methane oxidation (MOx), which is mediated by bacteria and takes place in the oxic water column. MOx is particularly important in shallow coastal environments that account for more than 75 % of the global oceanic methane emissions. Key environmental factors possibly controlling MOx in these systems are subjected to strong temporal variations since coastal regions are highly dynamic systems. We will present results from a time-series study on methane cycling in the water column of a coastal inlet in the southwestern Baltic Sea (Eckernförde Bay, Boknis Eck Time Series Station, 54°31.823 N, 10°02.764 E, 28m water depth; www.bokniseck.de). Results from monthly samplings for the last 8 years revealed year-round methane seepage from the seafloor and methane supersaturation (with respect to the atmospheric equilibrium) of surface waters. Seasonal stratification during the summer months leads to intermittent oxygen depletion (hypoxic to anoxic) in bottom waters in late summer to early fall. The frequency of these low-oxygen events increased over the last 20 years. In addition to oxygen fluctuations, bottom water salinity can vary strongly (17-24 psu) due to regular inflows of salty North Sea water through the Kattegat. Over the course of one and a half years, we investigated MOx rates, the methanotrophic community, methane concentrations and physicochemical parameters of the water column on a quarterly basis. Albeit methane concentrations were high throughout the water column (20-120 nM), methane turnover showed a clear spatial pattern. That

  12. Evolution of a Mediterranean coastal zone: human impacts on the marine environment of Cape Creus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Josep; Riera, Victòria

    2008-12-01

    This study presents an integrated analysis of the evolution of the marine environment and the human uses in Cape Creus, a Mediterranean coastal area where intense commercial fisheries and recreational uses have coexisted over the last fifty years. The investigation synthesizes the documented impacts of human activities on the marine environment of Cap de Creus and integrates them with new data. In particular, the evolution of vulnerable, exploited species is used to evaluate the fishing impacts. The effects of area protection through the establishment of a marine reserve in the late 1990s and the potential climate change impacts are also considered. The evolution of the human uses is marked by the increasing socioeconomic importance of recreational activities (which affect species and habitats) in detriment to artisanal and red coral fisheries (which principally affect at a species level). Overall, populations of sedentary, vulnerable exploited species, hard sessile benthic invertebrates, and ecologically fragile habitats, such as seagrass meadows, the coralligenous and infralittoral algal assemblages have been the most negatively impacted by anthropogenic activities. Albeit human uses currently constitute the largest negative impact on the marine environment of Cap de Creus, climate change is emerging as a key factor that could have considerable implications for the marine environment and tourism activities. The establishment of the marine reserve appears to have had little socioeconomic impact, but there is some evidence that it had some positive biological effects on sedentary, littoral fishes. Results demonstrate that the declaration of a marine reserve alone does not guarantee the sustainability of marine resources and habitats but should be accompanied with an integrated coastal management plan.

  13. Relative sea level and coastal environments in arctic Alaska during Marine Isotope Stage 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, L. M.; Mann, D. H.; Jones, B. M.; Rittenour, T. M.; Grosse, G.; Groves, P.

    2015-12-01

    Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 was characterized by marked fluctuations in climate, the warmest being MIS 5e (124-119 ka) when relative sea level (RSL) stood 2-10 m higher than today along many coastlines. In northern Alaska, marine deposits now 5-10 m above modern sea level are assigned to this time period and termed the Pelukian transgression (PT). Complicating this interpretation is the possibility that an intra-Stage 5 ice shelf extended along the Alaskan coast, causing isostatic depression along its grounded margins, which caused RSL highs even during periods of low, global RSL. Here we use optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to date inferred PT deposits on the Beaufort Sea coastal plain. A transition from what we interpret to be lagoonal mud to sandy tidal flat deposits lying ~ 2.75 m asl dates to 113+/-18 ka. Above this, a 5-m thick gravelly barrier beach dates to 95 +/- 20 ka. This beach contains well-preserved marine molluscs, whale vertebrae, and walrus tusks. Pleistocene-aged ice-rich eolian silt (yedoma) blanket the marine deposits and date to 57.6 +/-10.9 ka. Our interpretation of this chronostratigraphy is that RSL was several meters higher than today during MIS 5e, and lagoons or brackish lakes were prevalent. Gravel barrier beaches moved onshore as local RSL rose further after MIS 5e. The error range of the OSL age of the barrier-beach unit spans the remaining four substages of MIS 5; however, the highstand of RSL on this arctic coastline appears to occurr after the warmest part of the last interglacial and appears not to be coeval with the eustatic maximum reached at lower latitudes during MIS 5. One possibility is that RSL along the Beaufort Sea coast was affected by isostatic depression caused by an ice shelf associated with widespread, intra-Stage 5 glaciation that was out of phase with lower latitude glaciation and whose extent and timing remains enigmatic.

  14. An Overview of Biodegradation of LNAPLs in Coastal (Semi)-arid Environment.

    KAUST Repository

    Yadav, Brijesh Kumar

    2011-02-22

    Contamination of soil and water due to the release of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) is a ubiquitous problem. The problem is more severe in arid and semi-arid coastal regions where most of the petroleum production and related refinery industries are located. Biological treatment of these organic contaminated resources is receiving increasing interests and where applicable, can serve as a cost-effective remediation alternative. The success of bioremediation greatly depends on the prevailing environmental variables, and their remediation favoring customization requires a sound understanding of their integrated behavior on fate and transport of LNAPLs under site-specific conditions. The arid and semi-arid coastal sites are characterized by specific environmental extremes; primarily, varying low and high temperatures, high salinity, water table dynamics, and fluctuating soil moisture content. An understanding of the behavior of these environmental variables on biological interactions with LNAPLs would be helpful in customizing the bioremediation for restoring problematic sites in these regions. Therefore, this paper reviews the microbial degradation of LNAPLs in soil-water, considering the influences of prevailing environmental parameters of arid and semi-arid coastal regions. First, the mechanism of biodegradation of LNAPLs is discussed briefly, followed by a summary of popular kinetic models used by researchers for describing the degradation rate of these hydrocarbons. Next, the impact of soil moisture content, water table dynamics, and soil-water temperature on the fate and transport of LNAPLs are discussed, including an overview of the studies conducted so far. Finally, based on the reviewed information, a general conclusion is presented with recommendations for future research subjects on optimizing the bioremediation technique in the field under the aforesaid environmental conditions. The present review will be useful to better understand the

  15. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M. E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Weathers, K. C.; Juhl, A. R.; Uriarte, M.

    2012-02-01

    Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols) play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA) and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's) in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28 %) and fog (21 %) libraries. The fog and ocean surface libraries were significantly more similar in microbial community composition than clear (non-foggy) and ocean surface libraries, according to both Jaccard and Sorenson indices. These findings provide the first evidence of a difference in community composition and microbial culturability of aerosols associated with fog compared to clear conditions. The data support a dual role for fog in enhancing the fallout of viable microbial aerosols via increased gravitational settling rates and decreased aerosolization stress on the organisms, which may include relief from UV inactivation, desiccation, and oligotrophic microconditions. This study provides a strong case for ocean to terrestrial transport of microbes and a potential connection

  16. Biodegradation of MC252 oil in oil:sand aggregates in a coastal headland beach environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaikrishnah eElango

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation potential of MC252 in oil:sand aggregates, termed surface residue balls (SRBs, was examined using multiple lines of evidence on a heavily-impacted coastal headland beach in Louisiana, USA. SRBs were sampled over a 16-month period on the supratidal beach environment where reasonable control existed on the residence time of the aggregates on the beach surface. PAH and alkane concentration ratios were measured including PAH/C30-hopane, C2/C3 phenanthrenes, C2/C3 dibenzothiophenes and alkane/C30-hopane and demonstrated unequivocally that biodegradation was occurring in SRBs in the supratidal. These biodegradation reactions occurred over time frames relevant to the coastal processes moving SRBs off the beach. In contrast, submerged oil mat (SOM samples did not demonstrate chemical changes consistent with biodegradation. Review and analysis of additional biogeochemical parameters suggested the existence of a moisture and N-limited biodegradation regime on the supratidal beach environment. At this location, SRBs possess moisture contents < 2% and molar C:N ratios from 131-323, well outside of optimal values for biodegradation in the literature. Despite these limitations, biodegradation of PAHs and alkanes proceeded at relevant rates (2-8 year-1 due in part to the presence of degrading populations, i.e., Mycobacterium sp., adapted to these conditions. For SOM samples in the intertidal, an oxygen and salinity-impacted regime is proposed that severely limits biodegradation of alkanes and PAHs in this environment. These results support the hypothesis that SRBs deposited at different locations on the beach have different biogeochemical characteristics (e.g., moisture; salinity; terminal electron acceptors; nutrient; and oil composition due, in part, to their location on the landscape.

  17. Local Authority Empowerment towards Quality Living Environment for Coastal Reclamation Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusup Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Good urban governance administration system is the key to a successful physical planning development. A local authority of a local government concentrates on planning administration and executes the policies and strategies either the federal or state, or even the local’s policies and strategies. Based on its characteristic as the lowest level of government, it becomes the best authority to regulate and monitor the development process within their territory. The significance of a local authority in providing quality living environment invites various academia and professionals to ponder the best urban governance system at a local level. However, there are issues with regards to financial and technical capacity of a local authority, its legal limitation and development instrument adopted in providing urban services for coastal reclamation area in Malaysia. The aim of this paper is to investigate the capability of local authorities in Malaysia in implementing their function as drawn by the legislation. Hence, this paper examines the roles and functions of a local authority as the lowest level of government administration agency in providing urban services; collecting revenue; safeguarding the physical environment in Malaysia, particularly when dealing with development in a coastal reclamation area. Primary data collection was gathered through face-to-face interview sessions involving government agencies and stakeholders. Legal documents, policies and development plans were then analysed to support the primary data for further understanding of the issues concerning the capacity of a local authority especially when providing urban services within its area. The study is expected to provide a new approach to local authorities in Malaysia in providing quality living environment in terms of development procedure, the role and function, legal empowerment, and decentralisation of function particularly in enhancing the current practices at local level.

  18. The Civitavecchia Coastal Environment Monitoring System (C-CEMS: a new tool to analyse the conflicts between coastal pressures and sensitivity areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bonamano

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the coastal environment is fundamental for efficiently and effectively facing the pollution phenomena, as expected by Marine Strategy Directive, which is focused on the achievement of Good Environmental Status (GES by all Member States by 2020. To address this, the Laboratory of Experimental Oceanology and Marine Ecology developed a multi-platform observing network that has been in operation since 2005 in the coastal marine area of Civitavecchia, where multiple uses and high ecological values closely coexist. The Civitavecchia Coastal Environment Monitoring System (C-CEMS, implemented in the current configuration, includes various modules that provide integrated information to be used in different fields of the environmental research. The long term observations acquired by the fixed stations are integrated by in situ surveys, periodically carried out for the monitoring of the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water column and marine sediments, as well as of the benthic biota. The in situ data, integrated with satellite observations (e.g., temperature, chlorophyll a and TSM, are used to feed and validate the numerical models, which allow analyses and forecasting of the dynamics of conservative and non-conservative particles under different conditions. As examples of C-CEMS applications, two case studies are reported in this work: (1 the analysis of faecal bacteria dispersion for bathing water quality assessment and, (2 the evaluation of the effects of the dredged activities on Posidonia meadows, which make up most of the two sites of community importance located along the Civitavecchia coastal zone. The simulations results are combined with Posidonia oceanica distribution and bathing areas presence in order to resolve the conflicts between coastal uses (in terms of stress produced by anthropic activities and sensitivity areas management.

  19. Geospatial characteristics of Florida's coastal and offshore environments: Distribution of important habitats for coastal and offshore biological resources and offshore sand resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Foster, Ann M.; Jones, Michal L.; Gualtieri, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    The Geospatial Characteristics GeoPDF of Florida's Coastal and Offshore Environments is a comprehensive collection of geospatial data describing the political boundaries and natural resources of Florida. This interactive map provides spatial information on bathymetry, sand resources, and locations of important habitats (for example, Essential Fish Habitats (EFH), nesting areas, strandings) for marine invertebrates, fish, reptiles, birds, and marine mammals. The map should be useful to coastal resource managers and others interested in marine habitats and submerged obstructions of Florida's coastal region. In particular, as oil and gas explorations continue to expand, the map can be used to explore information regarding sensitive areas and resources in the State of Florida. Users of this geospatial database will have access to synthesized information in a variety of scientific disciplines concerning Florida's coastal zone. This powerful tool provides a one-stop assembly of data that can be tailored to fit the needs of many natural resource managers. The map was originally developed to assist the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE) and coastal resources managers with planning beach restoration projects. The BOEMRE uses a systematic approach in planning the development of submerged lands of the Continental Shelf seaward of Florida's territorial waters. Such development could affect the environment. BOEMRE is required to ascertain the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic conditions of the submerged lands and estimate the impact of developing these lands. Data sources included the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, BOEMRE, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Geographic Data Library, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida Natural Areas Inventory, and the State of Florida, Bureau of Archeological Research. Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) compliant metadata are

  20. Eogenetic karst, glacioeustatic cave pools and anchialine environments on Mallorca Island: a discussion of coastal speleogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Ginès

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Coastal karst is characterized by special geomorphologic and hydrodynamic conditions as well as by peculiar sedimentary, geochemical, and biospeleological environments. Generally, the more distinctive karstic features produced near the coastline are strongly influenced by sea-level changes, which generate a broad set of interactions between littoral processes and karst development. The glacioeustatic rises and falls of sea level affected the littoral karst in different ways, namely: vertical and horizontal shifts in the shoreline position, changes in elevation of the local water table, and vertical displacements of the halocline. Most eogenetic karsts have been subjected over long time spans to repeated changes of a variety of vertically-zoned geochemical environments: vadose, phreatic meteoric-water, brackish mixing-waters and even marine water. Many coastal caves appear to be passively drowned by Holocene sea-level rise, and to contain glacioeustatic pools of varied size where the current water table intersects formerly air-filled chambers or passages. These coastal phreatic waters are controlled by sea level and fluctuate with tides. Significantly, features such as phreatic speleothems that are able to record ancient sea levels occur closely associated to the surface of the pools. The cave pools are brackish or even marine anchialine environments that contain remarkable communities of troglobitic stygofauna. All of these aspects can be studied in detail along the southern and eastern coast of Mallorca Island owing to the widespread outcrop of Upper Miocene calcarenites, in which the development of eogenetic karst features started approximately 6 Ma ago, at the end of Messinian times. Some outstanding coastal caves result and include the celebrated Coves del Drac (explored by E.A. Martel in 1896, the labyrinthine Cova des Pas de Vallgornera (more than 30 km in length and the recently explored Cova de sa Gleda (whose submerged passages exceed

  1. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Dueker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (<2 m s−1 the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium making up 66 % of all sequences. The sequence library from microbial aerosol isolates, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the culturable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97 % similarity cut-off, sequence libraries from ocean surface and fog isolates shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28

  2. Coupling of fog and marine microbial content in the near-shore coastal environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Dueker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbes in the atmosphere (microbial aerosols play an important role in climate and provide an ecological and biogeochemical connection between oceanic, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments. However, the sources and environmental factors controlling the concentration, diversity, transport, and viability of microbial aerosols are poorly understood. This study examined culturable microbial aerosols from a coastal environment in Maine (USA and determined the effect of onshore wind speed and fog presence on deposition rate, source, and community composition. During fog events with low onshore winds (< 2 m s−1 the near-shore deposition of microbial aerosols (microbial fallout decreased with increasing wind speeds, whereas microbial fallout rates under clear conditions and comparable low wind speeds showed no wind speed dependence. Mean aerosol particle size also increased with onshore wind speed when fog was present, indicating increased shoreward transport of larger aerosol particles. 16S rRNA sequencing of culturable ocean surface bacteria and microbial aerosols deposited onshore resulted in the detection of 31 bacterial genera, with 5 dominant genera (Vibrio, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, Psychrobacter, Salinibacterium making up 66% of all sequences. The microbial aerosol sequence library, as with libraries found in other coastal/marine aerosol studies, was dominated at the phylum level by Proteobacteria, with additional representation from Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Seventy-five percent of the viable microbial aerosols falling out under foggy conditions were most similar to GenBank-published sequences detected in marine environments. Using a 97% similarity cut-off, ocean surface and fog sequence libraries shared eight operational taxonomic units (OTU's in total, three of which were the most dominant OTU's in the library, representing large fractions of the ocean (28% and fog (21% libraries. The fog and

  3. Response of zooplankton to physical changes in the environment: coastal upwelling along central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Nair, S.R.S.; Haridas, P.; Padmavati, G.

    Research 413-426 Fort Lauderdale, Florida Response of Zooplankton to Physical Changes in the Environment: Coastal Upwelling Along the Central West Coast of India b~ M. Madhupratap,t S.R. Sreekumaran Nair/ P. Haridas,* and Gadi PadmavatP tNational Institute... of zooplankton to physical changes in the environment: COlistlil upwelling along the central west coast of India. Journal of Coastal Research, 6(2), 413-426. Fort Lauderdale (Florida). ISSN 0749-0208. Zooplankton composition lind abundance were studied in a...

  4. Carbon budgets and potential blue carbon stores in Scotland's coastal and marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John; austin, william

    2016-04-01

    The role of marine ecosystems in storing blue carbon has increasingly become a topic of interest to both scientists and politicians. This is the first multidisciplinary study to assess Scotland's marine blue carbon stores, using GIS to collate habitat information based on existing data. Relevant scientific information on primary habitats for carbon uptake and storage has been reviewed, and quantitative rates of production and storage were obtained. Habitats reviewed include kelp, phytoplankton, saltmarshes, biogenic reefs (including maerl), marine sediments (coastal and shelf), and postglacial geological sediments. Each habitat has been individually assessed for any specific threats to its carbon sequestration ability. Here we present an ecosystem-scale inventory of the key rates and ultimate sequestration capacity of each habitat. Coastal and offshore sediments are the main repositories for carbon in Scotland's marine environment. Habitat-forming species on the coast (seagrasses, saltmarsh, bivalve beds, coralline algae), are highly productive but their contribution to the overall carbon budget is very small because of the limited extent of each habitat. This study highlights the importance of marine carbon stores in global carbon cycles, and the implications of climate change on the ability of marine ecosystems to sequester carbon.

  5. Plume dispersion sensitivity to upper-level wind variations in a Chilean coastal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Brown; Brown, M.J.; Williams, M.D.

    1996-02-01

    Government and industry leaders in Chile are concerned with the impact of coastal smelter emissions on the air quality of surrounding communities and the inland capitol city of Santiago. The smelter emissions contain large amounts of sulfur and heavy metals. Because several large smelters are located along the coast, an air quality modeling system must be able to handle flow in both a coastal and mountainous environment. Linked seabreeze and mountain-induced slope flows which change in time and space have been best handled using prognostic numerical models. We are using a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model (HOTMAC - Higher-Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric Circulation) linked to a random walk/puff model (RAPTAD - Random Particle Transport and Dispersion) in order to simulate plume transport over hundreds of kilometers. In this paper, we test the sensitivity of plume dispersion to variations in the prescribed wind direction. These tests were motivated by our desire to evaluate the effect of the uncertainties inherent in rawinsonde wind measurements and large-scale weather wind-field forecasts, which are often used as input to meteorological models, as well as to develop a climatology of plume transport direction based on prevailing wind direction.

  6. Paleolimnological reconstruction of Holocene environments in wetland ponds of the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaiser, E.E.; Taylor, B.E. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The paleohydrology and paleoecology of Carolina bays and upland wetland ponds on the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina are being investigated to reconstruct environmental changes brought about by long-term variation in the climate of the Upper Atlantic Coastal Plain. Cores were taken in transacts through Flamingo Bay, a temporary pond on the SRS, to determine the vertical and horizontal sediment particle size and diatom, plant phytolith and sponge spicule microfossils. Stratigraphic data were used to construct a 3-dimensional map of the basin. In conjunction with archaeological data from the rim of the pond, physical stratigraphic data indicate a decrease in pond size and depth during the past 10,000 years. In order to infer past ecological settings from the fossil record, a survey to determine microhabitat requirements of regional diatom flora was undertaken in 43 temporary ponds throughout the coastal plain of South Carolina. The relationships between diatom assemblages and environmental variables were assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Variables contributing significantly to the diatom-environment relationship included surface core location (near shore or pelagic), water depth, hydroperiod, microhabitat substrate, and sampling date, in order of decreasing influence. Strong relationships of diatom assemblages to drought frequency within and among basins provides a reliable basis for water level reconstruction in upland temporary ponds.

  7. Toxaphene residues from cotton fields in soils and in the coastal environment of Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F P; Montenegro-Guillén, S; Villeneuve, J P; Cattini, C; Tolosa, I; Bartocci, J; Lacayo-Romero, M; Cruz-Granja, A

    2003-11-01

    Toxaphene (camphechlor) was intensively used in the cotton growing fields of Nicaragua for decades with application rates as high as 31 kg ha(-1) in 1985. Although the use of this compound has recently been discontinued in the country, its intensive use in the past and its long persistence in soil allowed for the build up of large reservoirs of toxaphene in agriculture soils and a wide dispersal of residues in the environment. Measurements of toxaphene in coastal areas on the coast of the Pacific Ocean show that environmental concentrations are particularly high in the district of Chinandega, the traditional cotton growing region. Toxaphene residues measured in soils attained 44 microg g(-1) (dry weight) while concentrations in lagoon sediments attained 6.9 microg g(-1) (dry weight) near the mouth of the rivers flowing across the agricultural region. Measurements in aquatic biota showed concentrations as high as 1.6 microg g(-1) (dry weight) in the soft tissues of clams. The toxaphene reservoir in soils combined with the obvious persistence of this compound in soils and lagoon sediments allows predicting that toxaphene will remain in the coastal ecosystem at relatively high concentrations for many years. Toxic effects in lagoon fauna are likely to be observed especially in benthic species that may recycle this compound from sediments. Consumption of seafood, in particular of clams (Anadara spp.) from the more contaminated areas, may expose the population to unacceptably high intake of toxaphene, 30 microg d(-1) per person, with the diet.

  8. Survey of organotin compounds in rivers and coastal environments in Portugal 1999-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez, Sergi [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: sdsqam@cid.csic.es; Lacorte, Silvia [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Viana, Paula [Direcao Geral do Ambiente, Ministerio do Ambiente, Rua da Murgueira, Zambujal, 2720 Amadora (Portugal); Barcelo, Damia [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Bayona, Josep M. [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-08-15

    In the period from April 1999 to May 2000, organotin pollution, namely butyl and phenyltins, was investigated in coastal and continental waters (46 stations), estuarine sediments (15 stations) and mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) (13 stations) throughout Portugal. Sampling points were chosen in areas of specific industrial, agricultural and harbor activities. Butyltins (BTs) were the only tin species identified of which tributyltin (TBT) was found in the whole area. Concentrations of TBT in river water ranged from 3 to 30 ng L{sup -1} (as Sn), marine sediment ranged from 4 to 12 {mu}g kg{sup -1} (as Sn), whereas concentrations in mussel tissue ranged from 2.5 to 490 {mu}g kg{sup -1} (as Sn). Given that some water samples appeared to be contaminated by higher monobutyltin (MBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) concentrations, the role of biological degradation and direct inputs from agricultural and industrial applications areas are discussed. The study compares depleted butyltin pollution in sediments and mussels of the Portuguese coastline associated with antifouling paints with previously reported levels. Inputs in river waters are more related to (i) PVC leaching and (ii) industrial sources, in some cases discharged by municipal wastewaters. - Survey data illustrate the complexities of organotin sources and cycling in coastal environments.

  9. Using SAR Data for a Numerical Assessment of the Indonesian Coastal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Martin; Mayer, Bernhard; Pohlmann, Thomas; Putri, Mutiara; Setiawan, Agus

    2016-08-01

    Within the German-Indonesian pilot study IndoNACE (Indonesian Seas Numerical Assessment of the Coastal Environment) a wealth of SAR data of two dedicated regions in Indonesian waters are being analysed with respect to the imaging of marine oil pollution. Numerical tracer studies using a regional 3-d numerical model are used to aide those analyses and to help understanding the observed seasonal variations in marine oil pollution. Our first results are based on 130 ENVISAT ASAR images of each of the two regions of interest, the 'Western Java Sea' and the 'Makassar Strait' and indicate that most pollution was found in areas of high ship traffic and of intense oil production.

  10. Reproductive phenology of Mauritia flexuosa L. (Arecaceae in a coastal restinga environment in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. N. Mendes

    Full Text Available Abstract The buriti, Mauritia flexuosa, is the most common palm in Brazil, where it has considerable ecological and economic importance. However, few data are available on the phenology of the species, mainly in coastal restinga ecosystems. The present study monitored the reproductive phenology of M. flexuosa in the restinga of Barreirinhas, in the Brazilian Northeast, and investigated the relationship between phenophases and climatic variables. The presence/absence of flowers and fruits was recorded monthly in 25 individuals of each sex between August, 2009, and October, 2012. There was no difference in the phenology of male and female specimens, with flowering and fruiting occurring exclusively in the dry season. We believe that the specific abiotic characteristics of the study environment, such as the intense sunlight and availability of water in the soil, contribute to the reproductive success of M. flexuosa in the dry season, with consequent germination and establishment of seedlings occurring during the subsequent rainy season.

  11. Prominent artificial radionuclide activity in the environment of coastal Karnataka on the southwest coast of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayana, Y. [Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri-574 199 (India)]. E-mail: narayanay@yahoo.com; Somashekarappa, H.M.; Karunakara, N.; Avadhani, D.N.; Mahesh, H.M.; Siddappa, K. [Department of Studies in Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri-574 199 (India)

    2000-09-01

    Studies on radiation level and radionuclide distribution in the environment of coastal Karnataka were undertaken to provide baseline data for the future assessment of the impact of the nuclear and thermal power stations that are being set up in the region and to understand the behaviour of radionuclides in the environment. As part of the programme the concentrations of two important artificial radionuclides, namely {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs, have been measured in a number of environmental samples. The concentration of {sup 90}Sr is very low in most of the samples. Among the samples analysed for the concentration of {sup 137}Cs, soil samples showed elevated levels of activity in some sampling stations. Among the vegetables, brinjal (Solanum melongena. L) showed considerable activity. The internal dose due to intake of {sup 90}Sr through diet was 0.42 {mu}Sv year{sup -1} for the vegetarian population and 0.32 {mu}Sv year{sup -1} for the non-vegetarian population. The internal dose due to dietary intake of {sup 137}Cs was found to be 0.34 {mu}Sv year{sup -1} and 0.26 {mu}Sv year{sup -1} respectively for the vegetarian and non-vegetarian population. The results are discussed in the light of the literature values reported for other environs of India and abroad and appropriate inferences are drawn. (author)

  12. XoxF encoding an alternative methanol dehydrogenase is widespread in coastal marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Martin; Grob, Carolina; Howat, Alexandra M; Burns, Oliver J; Dixon, Joanna L; Chen, Yin; Murrell, J Colin

    2015-10-01

    The xoxF gene, encoding a pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent methanol dehydrogenase, is found in all known proteobacterial methylotrophs. In several newly discovered methylotrophs, XoxF is the active methanol dehydrogenase, catalysing the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. Apart from that, its potential role in methylotrophy and carbon cycling is unknown. So far, the diversity of xoxF in the environment has received little attention. We designed PCR primer sets targeting clades of the xoxF gene, and used 454 pyrosequencing of PCR amplicons obtained from the DNA of four coastal marine environments for a unique assessment of the diversity of xoxF in these habitats. Phylogenetic analysis of the data obtained revealed a high diversity of xoxF genes from two of the investigated clades, and substantial differences in sequence composition between environments. Sequences were classified as being related to a wide range of both methylotrophs and non-methylotrophs from Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria. The most prominent sequences detected were related to the family Rhodobacteraceae, the genus Methylotenera and the OM43 clade of Methylophilales, and are thus related to organisms that employ XoxF for methanol oxidation. Furthermore, our analyses revealed a high degree of so far undescribed sequences, suggesting a high number of unknown bacterial species in these habitats.

  13. The socio-economic significance of the Turkish coastal environment for sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleli, Tuncay

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the contribution from the coastal resources in the coastal region to the national economy for sustainable development. There was no separate data base for the coastal zone so that the contribution from the coastal resources in the coastal region to the national economy was not evaluated. In estimating the significance of Turkish coastal cities, indirect methods and the geographical information system were used. In conclusion, it was found that 61.09% of the total national gross domestic product and 50.75% of the national agricultural, 90.98% of the national fisheries, 68.19% of the national tourism and 71.82% of the national industrial gross domestic product came from the coastal zone. It was determined that while coastal cities of Turkey had 28.23% of the national surface area, the coastal district had 12.96%; in other words, 21.5 million (28.04%) of the national population lived in 101.5 thousand km(2) (12.96%) of the national surface area. Approximately 44% of the national gross domestic product comes from the top ten coastal cities. According to the contribution ratio to the national economy of each coastal city, these low-lying coastal cities have about $16 billion risk value. An analysis showed that the coastal zone is very important for the national economy of Turkey and also the pressure on the coastal zone is very high. At a time of increasing pressures on coastal resources of Turkey, the decision-makers need the most up-to-date information on the full range of values these resources provide in order to make decisions that best reflect the public interest.

  14. A dedicated study of new particle formation and fate in the coastal environment (PARFORCE): overview of objectives and achievements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dowd, C.D.; Haemeri, K.; Maekelae, J.M.; Pirjola, L.; Kulmala, M.; Jennings, S.G.; Berresheim, H.; Hansson, H-C.; Leeuw, G. de; Kunz, G.J.; Allen, A.G.; Hewitt, C.N.; Jackson, A.; Viisanen, Y.; Hoffman, T.

    2002-01-01

    A dedicated study into the formation of new particles, New Particle Formation and Fate in the Coastal Environment (PARFORCE), was conducted over a period from 1998 to 1999 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station on the western coast of Ireland. Continuous measurements of new particle formation

  15. Assessment of the environmental status of the coastal and marine aquatic environment in Europe: A plea for adaptive management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laane, R.W.P.M.; Slijkerman, D.M.E.; Vethaak, A.D.; Schobben, J.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Policymakers and managers have a very different philosophy and approach to achieving healthy coastal and marine ecosystems than scientists. In this paper we discuss the evolution of the assessment of the chemical status in the aquatic environment and the growing rift between the political intention

  16. Lead concentration and isotope chronology in two coastal environments in Western and South East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, G. G.; Chen, M.; Boyle, E. A.; Zhao, N.; Nurhati, I. S.; Gevao, B.; al Ghadban, A.; Switzer, A.; Lee, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Lead is a trace metal that is closely related to anthropogenic activity, mainly via leaded gasoline and coal combustion. The study of lead concentrations and isotopes in seawater, sediments, corals and aerosols allows for a systematic look at its sources and their time evolution in a natural environment. We will discuss results from two projects in Western and South East Asia, regions that have seen dramatic socio-economical changes over the past half-century that may have left environmental signals. These results highlight the usefulness of the method, indicate the degree of complexity of these systems, and point to the need for a continuous monitoring of anthropogenic trace metals in the small-medium coastal scale to be able to asses the larger scale effects of human activity. On the one hand, coastal Kuwait is heavily influenced by the Shat al-Arab river and shows a clear anthropogenic signature from Kuwait city. A mix of two sources can be tracked through the coral and sediment chronological records, with Pb206/Pb207 ratios (1.202 and 1.151) that approach the suspected source values (1.21 and 1.12) and eliminate the possibility of other sources. Through a wide sediment geographic distribution, the strength of the anthropogenic signature is modulated. On the other hand, Singapore offers a more complex system, where an apparent mix of two sources (extreme isotope ratios 1.215 and ~1.14) occurs also, but where either an unresolved potentially important third source (isotope ratio ~1.18), or an isotope exchange process should be invoked. The sediment and coral records allows us to track the changes through time; however, there seems to be incongruence with the aerosol isotope record. Further potential sources are being explored currently and will be discussed.

  17. Species-environment relationships and potential for distribution modelling in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snickars, M.; Gullström, M.; Sundblad, G.; Bergström, U.; Downie, A.-L.; Lindegarth, M.; Mattila, J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to increasing pressure on the marine environment there is a growing need to understand species-environment relationships. To provide background for prioritising among variables (predictors) for use in distribution models, the relevance of predictors for benthic species was reviewed using the coastal Baltic Sea as a case-study area. Significant relationships for three response groups (fish, macroinvertebrates, macrovegetation) and six predictor categories (bottom topography, biotic features, hydrography, wave exposure, substrate and spatiotemporal variability) were extracted from 145 queried peer-reviewed field-studies covering three decades and six subregions. In addition, the occurrence of interaction among predictors was analysed. Hydrography was most often found in significant relationships, had low level of interaction with other predictors, but also had the most non-significant relationships. Depth and wave exposure were important in all subregions and are readily available, increasing their applicability for cross-regional modelling efforts. Otherwise, effort to model species distributions may prove challenging at larger scale as the relevance of predictors differed among both response groups and regions. Fish and hard bottom macrovegetation have the largest modelling potential, as they are structured by a set of predictors that at the same time are accurately mapped. A general importance of biotic features implies that these need to be accounted for in distribution modelling, but the mapping of most biotic features is challenging, which currently lowers the applicability. The presence of interactions suggests that predictive methods allowing for interactive effects are preferable. Detailing these complexities is important for future distribution modelling.

  18. Persistent organic pollutants in the Antarctic coastal environment and their bioaccumulation in penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, John Kennedy; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Wang, Lin-Chi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Fang, Lee-Shing; Lee, Yen-Yi; Chang-Chien, Guo-Ping

    2016-09-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), have been identified in penguins, lichens, soils, and ornithogenic soils in the Antarctic coastal environment in this study. To the best of our knowledge, no previous study has reported PBDD/F and PBB data from Antarctica. The POP mass contents in penguins were in the following order: PCBs > PBDEs > PCDD/Fs; PCBs were the dominant pollutants (6310-144,000 pg/g-lipid), with World Health Organization toxic equivalency values being 2-14 times higher than those of PCDD/Fs. Long-range atmospheric transport is the most primary route by which POPs travel to Antarctica; however, local sources, such as research activities and penguin colonies, also influence POP distribution in the local Antarctic environment. In penguins, the biomagnification factor (BMF) of PCBs was 61.3-3760, considerably higher than that for other POPs. According to BMF data in Adélie penguins, hydrophobic PBDE congeners were more biomagnified at log Kow > 6, and levels decreased at log Kow > 7.5 because larger molecular sizes inhibited transfer across cell membranes.

  19. A spatial pattern analysis of the halophytic species distribution in an arid coastal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreldin, Nasem; Uria-Diez, J; Mateu, J; Youssef, Ali; Stal, Cornelis; El-Bana, Magdy; Magdy, Ahmed; Goossens, Rudi

    2015-05-01

    Obtaining information about the spatial distribution of desert plants is considered as a serious challenge for ecologists and environmental modeling due to the required intensive field work and infrastructures in harsh and remote arid environments. A new method was applied for assessing the spatial distribution of the halophytic species (HS) in an arid coastal environment. This method was based on the object-based image analysis for a high-resolution Google Earth satellite image. The integration of the image processing techniques and field work provided accurate information about the spatial distribution of HS. The extracted objects were based on assumptions that explained the plant-pixel relationship. Three different types of digital image processing techniques were implemented and validated to obtain an accurate HS spatial distribution. A total of 2703 individuals of the HS community were found in the case study, and approximately 82% were located above an elevation of 2 m. The micro-topography exhibited a significant negative relationship with pH and EC (r = -0.79 and -0.81, respectively, p < 0.001). The spatial structure was modeled using stochastic point processes, in particular a hybrid family of Gibbs processes. A new model is proposed that uses a hard-core structure at very short distances, together with a cluster structure in short-to-medium distances and a Poisson structure for larger distances. This model was found to fit the data perfectly well.

  20. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR and Multispectral Scanner (MSS Studies Examine Coastal Environments Influenced by Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Charles Kerfoot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous examples of past and present mine disposal into freshwater and marine coastal bays and riverine environments. Due to its high spatial resolution and extended water penetration, coastal light detection and ranging (LiDAR, coupled with multispectral scanning (MSS, has great promise for resolving disturbed shoreline features in low turbidity environments. Migrating mine tailings present serious issues for Lake Superior and coastal marine environments. Previous investigations in Lake Superior uncovered a metal-rich “halo” around the Keweenaw Peninsula, related to past copper mining practices. For over a century, waste rock migrating from shoreline tailing piles has moved along extensive stretches of coastline, compromising critical fish breeding grounds, damming stream outlets, transgressing into wetlands and along recreational beaches and suppressing benthic invertebrate communities. In Grand (Big Traverse Bay, Buffalo Reef is an important spawning area for lake trout and whitefish threatened by drifting tailings. The movement of tailings into Buffalo Reef cobble fields may interfere with the hatching of fish eggs and fry survival, either by filling in crevices where eggs are deposited or by toxic effects on eggs, newly hatched larvae or benthic communities. Here, we show that the coastal tailing migration is not “out of sight, out of mind”, but clearly revealed by using a combination of LiDAR and MSS techniques.

  1. A Study of Variations in Atmospheric Turbulence Kinetic Energy on a Sandy Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscinski, J. S.; MacMahan, J. H.; Wang, Q.; Thornton, E. B.

    2016-12-01

    A 6-m high, meteorological tower consisting six evenly spaced ultrasonic anemometers and temperature-relative humidity sensors was deployed at the high tide line on sandy, wave-dissipative, meso-tidal beach in southern Monterey Bay, CA in October 2015. The micro-meteorology study focus is to explore the momentum fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy influenced by the interaction between an intensive wave-breaking surf zone and a sandy beach associated with onshore & cross-shore winds, diurnal heating, and differences in ocean-air temperatures. The tower was deployed for approximately 1-month and experienced diurnal wind variations and synoptic storm events with winds measuring up to 10 m/s and an air temperature range of 5-28 oC. This beach environment was found to be primarily unstable in thermal stratification indicating that the air temperature is colder than underlying surface, either the ocean or the sandy beach. The drag coefficient was found to be dependent upon the atmospheric stability. Direct-estimates of atmospheric stability were obtained with the sonic anemometer. The direct estimates are a ratio of w*/u*, where the w*, vertically scaled buoyancy velocity, is greater than u*, horizontally scaled friction velocity. Hypotheses for the enhanced buoyancy are 1) diurnal heating of the sandy beach, 2) warmer ocean temperatures relative to air temperatures, and 3) the wave breaking within the surf zone. Further exploration into these hypotheses is conducted by using vertical tower sensor pairs for estimating the temporal variability of the mechanical shear production and buoyancy production terms in turbulent kinetic energy budget. These results are part of the Coastal Land Air Sea Interaction (CLASI) experiment.

  2. Holocene Coastal Environments near Pompeii before the A.D. 79 Eruption of Mount Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescatore, Tullio; Senatore, Maria Rosaria; Capretto, Giovanna; Lerro, Gaia

    2001-01-01

    Studies of some 70 bore holes around ancient Pompeii, on the southwestern slope of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano, allow the reconstruction of Holocene environments earlier than the A.D. 79 eruption. This eruption produced about 10 km3 of pyroclastic material that buried the Roman cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Stabiae and promoted a shoreline progradation of 1 km. The Sarno coastal plain, in a post-Miocene sedimentary basin, has been affected by Somma-Vesuvius volcanic activity since the late Pleistocene. At the Holocene transgressive maximum, the sea reached an area east of ancient Pompeii and formed a beach ridge (Messigno, 5600 and 4500 14C yr B.P.) more than 2 km inland from the present shore. Progradation of the plain due to high volcanic supply during the following highstand resulted in a new beach ridge (Bottaro-Pioppaino, 3600 14C yr B.P.) 0.5 km seaward of the Messigno ridge. Ancient Pompeii was built as the shoreline continued to prograde toward its present position. Deposits of the A.D. 79 eruption blanketed the natural levees of the Sarno River, marshes near the city and on the Sarno's floodplain, the morphological highs of Messigno and Bottaro-Pioppaino beach ridges, and the seashore. That shore was probably 1 km landward of the present one.

  3. Environmental Impacts - Coastal Ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.; Baas, Andreas C.W.; Bartholdy, Jesper; Jones, Laurence; Ruessink, B.G.; Temmerman, Stijn; van de Pol, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the impacts of climate change on the natural coastal ecosystems in the North Sea region. These comprise sandy shores and dunes and salt marshes in estuaries and along the coast. The chapter starts by describing the characteristic geomorphological features of these systems and t

  4. Promoting the Geosciences for Minority Students in the Urban Coastal Environment of New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou-Mark, J.; Blake, R.

    2013-12-01

    The 'Creating and Sustaining Diversity in the Geo-Sciences among Students and Teachers in the Urban Coastal Environment of New York City' project was awarded to New York City College of Technology (City Tech) by the National Science Foundation to promote the geosciences for students in middle and high schools and for undergraduates, especially for those who are underrepresented minorities in STEM. For the undergraduate students at City Tech, this project: 1) created and introduced geoscience knowledge and opportunities to its diverse undergraduate student population where geoscience is not currently taught at City Tech; and 2) created geoscience articulation agreements. For the middle and high schools, this project: 1) provided inquiry-oriented geoscience experiences (pedagogical and research) for students; 2) provided standards-based professional development (pedagogical and research) in Earth Science for teachers; 3) developed teachers' inquiry-oriented instructional techniques through the GLOBE program; 4) increased teacher content knowledge and confidence in the geosciences; 5) engaged and intrigued students in the application of geoscience activities in a virtual environment; 6) provided students and teachers exposure in the geosciences through trip visitations and seminars; and 7) created community-based geoscience outreach activities. Results from this program have shown significant increases in the students (grades 6-16) understanding, participation, appreciation, and awareness of the geosciences. Geoscience modules have been created and new geosciences courses have been offered. Additionally, students and teachers were engaged in state-of-the-art geoscience research projects, and they were involved in many geoscience events and initiatives. In summary, the activities combined geoscience research experiences with a robust learning community that have produced holistic and engaging stimuli for the scientific and academic growth and development of grades 6

  5. Valuing the risk reduction of coastal ecosystems in data poor environments: an application in Quintana Roo, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguero, B. G.; Toimil, A.; Escudero, M.; Menendez, P.; Losada, I. J.; Beck, M. W.; Secaira, F.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal risks are increasing from both economic growth and climate change. Understanding such risks is critical to assessing adaptation needs and finding cost effective solutions for coastal sustainability. Interest is growing in the role that nature-based measures can play in adapting to climate change. Here we apply and advance a framework to value the risk reduction potential of coastal ecosystems, with an application in a large scale domain, the coast of Quintana Roo, México, relevant for coastal policy and management, but with limited data. We build from simple to use open-source tools. We first assess the hazards using stochastic simulation of historical tropical storms and inferring two scenarios of future climate change for the next 20 years, which include the effect of sea level rise and changes in frequency and intensity of storms. For each storm, we obtain wave and surge fields using parametrical models, corrected with pre-computed static wind surge numerical simulations. We then assess losses on capital stock and hotels and calculate total people flooded, after accounting for the effect of coastal ecosystems in reducing coastal hazards. We inferred the location of major barrier reefs and dune systems using available satellite imagery, and sections of bathymetry and elevation data. We also digitalized the surface of beaches and location of coastal structures from satellite imagery. In a poor data environment, where there is not bathymetry data for the whole of the region, we inferred representative coastal profiles of coral reef and dune sections and validated at available sections with measured data. Because we account for the effect of reefs, dunes and mangroves in coastal profiles every 200 m of shoreline, we are able to estimate the value of such ecosystems by comparing with benchmark simulations when we take them out of the propagation and flood model. Although limited in accuracy in comparison to more complex modeling, this approach is able to

  6. Analysis of the Escherichia coli dynamics in Civitavecchia bathing areas using the multi-platform coastal observing system C-CEMS (Civitavecchia-Coastal Environment Monitoring System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamano, Simone; Madonia, Alice; Borsellino, Chiara; Piermattei, Viviana; Martellucci, Riccardo; Pierattini, Alberto; Albani, Marta; Stefanì, Chiara; Caruso, Gabriella; Zappalà, Giuseppe; Marcelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Coastal areas are strongly affected by episodes of fecal contamination due to polluted water inflows from inadequately treated sewages that can cause a loss of resilience of the coastal ecosystems and also an alteration of their functioning. With the aim to provide an useful tool to assess the effects of such phenomena a big effort has been undertaken to the realization of a multi-platform monitoring observing system C-CEMS (Civitavecchia-Coastal Environment Monitoring System) in the coastal zone of Civitavecchia (Northern Latium, Italy), which collect a large amount of data by fixed stations, periodic in-situ samplings and remote observations and use them to feed the mathematical models in order to forecast the paths of the polluted substances in the marine environment. This work is focused on the analysis of the dispersion of Escherichia coli in Civitavecchia bathing areas during the summer 2012. Four daily field surveys under different meteomarine conditions were performed to detect the E. coli concentration at the discharge points and the control stations located in the bathing areas. The collected samples were analysed through the Culture-Based technique (CB) and the Fluorescent Antibody (FA) method in order to estimate both the viable culturable cells and the total E.coli population. The comparison between bacterial concentrations obtained by the two methods shows that the quantitative discrepancy between the culture and microscopical counts increases as the distance to the discharge point grows, underlining the occurrence of a high percentage of non viable cells, which are detected by FA only, at the control stations. Microbiological datasets integrated with C-CEMS measures were used to feed and validate the hydrodynamical (Delft3d-Flow and Swan) and bacterial dispersion (Delft3d-Waq) models. In order to analyze the contribute of physical (transport induced by marine currents) and biological processes (cells decay connected to solar radiation, temperature

  7. Probabilistic estimation of dune erosion and coastal zone risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal erosion has gained global attention and has been studied for many decades. As a soft sea defence structure, coastal sandy dunes protect coastal zones all over the world, which usually are densely populated areas with tremendous economic value. The coastal zone of the Netherlands, one of the

  8. Sediment resuspension in tidally dominated coastal environments: new insights into the threshold for initial movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Ya Ping; Gao, Shu; Wang, Xiao Hua; Shi, Ben Wei; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Dan Dan; Dai, Chen; Li, Gao Cong

    2016-03-01

    An understanding of sediment resuspension and its threshold, for initial movement in shallow marine environments, is of great importance in coastal geomorphology, ecology, and harbor/fishery management applications. In the present study, in situ measurements of tides, current velocities, waves, and suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) were measured at three shallow water sites with different tidal current patterns and seabed sediment grain sizes. The sites were associated with the radial sand ridge system (B4 and D2, rectilinear currents) and the Great Yangtze Shoal (D1, rotatory currents), in the southern Yellow Sea, China, both representing tidally dominated environments. The SSC data were analyzed to identify the controlling factors associated with resuspension and advection processes. There is a significant correlation between the near-bed SSC and shear stress, indicating that SSC variations are dominated by resuspension processes. Based on integrated field measurements of SSCs and hydrodynamics, the bed shear stresses of currents and waves were calculated, and the critical shear stresses for seabed erosion of the three sites were determined. At D2 (non-cohesive sediment) and B4/D1 (cohesive sediment), the critical shear stresses for seabed erosion (or resuspension) were estimated to be 0.11 and 0.07/0.09 N m-2, respectively. Although this result is reasonable when only the three sites are compared, both values are lower than predicted by existing threshold models, with a difference between 30 and 83 %. Such discrepancies can be related to intermittent turbulence events. For both sites, statistical and quadrant analyses have revealed significant correlations between near-bed SSC variations and intermittent turbulence events. This observation implies that the threshold conditions using the critical bed shear stress, derived from the current velocity profile, have a spatial scale effect: on a small scale (e.g., a flume in laboratory), the threshold can be

  9. Resetting the bar: Establishing baselines for persistent contaminants after Hurricane Sandy in the coastal environments of New Jersey and New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.; Simmons, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    In the immediate aftermath of natural disasters, public health officials and other first responders engage in many activities to protect the public and ecosystems in the affected area. These activities include critical tasks designed to minimize adverse consequences resulting from chemical and microbial contaminant exposures, such as acute disease incidence and transmission. However, once these urgent priorities have been met and situations requiring immediate attention have been stabilized, questions regarding the potential longer term threats to humans and ecosystems associated with persistent contaminant exposures remain. Research conducted to address these questions is frequently challenged by the lack of available baseline contaminant information collected before the event for comparison and perspective. In addition, deployments of field crews and collection of environmental samples typically occur days, weeks, or months after the event. Consequently, during and in the aftermath of disasters, public health agencies commonly advise the public to disinfect water, avoid contact with disturbed infrastructure (such as sewer lines), and (or) refrain from use of recreational waters, with the general focus on acute health threats; however, the persisting effects of such releases on local recreational waters, fisheries, and other estuarine habitats are often undetermined.

  10. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Florida Panhandle: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for the Florida...

  11. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Florida Panhandle: ESIL (ESI Shoreline Types - Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIL data set contains vector lines representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of the Florida Panhandle, classified according to the Environmental...

  12. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Florida Panhandle: ESIP (ESI Shoreline Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIP data set contains vector polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of the Florida Panhandle, classified according to the Environmental...

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: ESIL (ESI Shoreline Types - Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIL data set contains vector lines representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of South Florida classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: ESIP (ESI Shoreline Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIP data set contains vector polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of South Florida classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: South Florida: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for South...

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northern California: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Northern...

  17. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Mississippi: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Mississippi....

  18. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Southern California: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Southern...

  19. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV), floating aquatic vegetation (FAV), and rare/sensitive coastal...

  20. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for the Hudson...

  1. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: North Carolina: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for North...

  2. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: New Hampshire: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for New...

  3. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Central California: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Central...

  4. Temporal trends of coastal environment along Japan as revealed by mussel watch and specimen bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Y.; Yoshinaga, J.; Horiguchi, T.; Uehiro, T.; Morita, M. [National Inst. of Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Mussel watch program coupled with a pilot specimen bank at NIES was conducted from 1983 to 1987, and also from 1993 to 1994, and their results were compared to reveal temporal trends of coastal environment along Japan. Special emphasis was paid to reveal the change of ``background`` level of pollutants by collecting bivalves in remote islands. Several species of mussels (Mytilus edulis galloprovincialis, M. coruscus, Septifer virgatus, Pema viridis), oysters (Saxostrea mordax, Crassostrea gigas) and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum, Tridacna crocea) were collected to cover subfrigid to subtropical zones along Japan islands. The level of TBT decreased considerably between the above two intervals, i.e., from 0.12--0.01 {micro}g/g in mid 80`s to 0.03-n.d. (less than 0.01) {micro}g/g in 1993. This decrease may reflect the start of the regulation in 1990. The clam samples collected at Tokyo bay and stored in specimen bank were found to contain considerable levels (near 0.3 {micro}g/g) of TBT and TPT in 1980, and their levels were almost constant through mid and late 1980`s. Several heavy metals, including Cd, showed interesting spatial distribution patterns; their concentrations tend to be higher in less populated remote islands in western part of Japan than in densely populated areas. Cd concentrations, however, also show apparent correlation with Zn status of each organism (especially evident in Septifer sp.), and the interpretation of the results is not straightforward at this stage. Interestingly, a tropical green mussel, P. viridis, was found to be spreading in some densely populated area including Tokyo and Osaka bays.

  5. Thermal characteristics of a marine microcosm designed to simulate the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idso, S. B.; Idso, K. E.

    1982-05-01

    The construction and stocking of a 15 000-liter marine microcosm is described. The microcosm is located outdoors in the arid desert environment of Tempe, Arizona and is an attempt to simulate the coastal water environment of the northern Gulf of California near Puerto Penasco, Mexico. Temperature modulation is achieved by an appropriate area/volume ratio, partial shading of the water surface, and auxiliary solar panel heating. Long-term measurements demonstrate that the system is capable of accurately duplicating the mean monthly temperatures of Puerto Penasco waters throughout the entire year.

  6. Air pollutant transport in a coastal environment. Part 1: Two-dimensional simulations of sea-breeze and mountain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Rong; Turco, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    Over the southern California coastal region, observations of the vertical distributions of pollutants show that maximum concentrations can occur within temperature inversion layers well above the surface. A mesoscale model is used to study the dynamical phenomena that cause such layers, including sea breezes and mountain flows, and to study the characteristics of air pollutant transport in a coastal environment capped by a temperature inversion. The mathematical and physical structure of the model is described. Two-dimensional simulations corresponding to four configurations of coastal plains and mountains are discussed. The simulations reveal that pollutant transport over a coastal plain is strongly influenced by the topographic configuration, including the height of coastal mountains and their distance from the coastline. Sea breezes induced by land-sea thermal contrasts, as well as upslope winds induced along mountain flanks, both create vertical transport that can lead to the formation of elevated pollution layers. The sea-breeze circulation generates pollution layers by undercutting the mixed layer and lofting pollutants into the stable layer. Heating of mountain slopes acts to vent pollutants above the mountain ridge during the day; during the evening, pollutants can be injected directly into the inversion layer from the decaying upslope flows. In a land-sea configuration with mountains close to the coastline, the sea breeze and heated-mountain flow are strongly coupled. In the afternoon, this interaction can produce upslope flow from which polluted air is detrained into the inversion layer as a return circulation. When the mountains lie farther inland, however, pollutants may be trapped aloft when the mixed layer stabilizes in the late afternoon. As the nocturnal boundary layer forms over the coast in the evening, polluted mixed-layer air is effectively left behind in the inversion layer. In the Los Angeles Basin, the formation mechanism for elevated

  7. Combined geophysical and petrophysical characterization to support a hydrogeological model of a coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burschil, Thomas; Wiederhold, Helga; Scheer, Wolfgang; Kirsch, Reinhard; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2014-05-01

    Global warming affects the water cycle by changing precipitation/evaporation and raising sea level. Especially groundwater systems in sensitive environments, such as coastal areas or barrier islands, have to be evaluated with respect to the potential reduction of water quality, e.g. salinization by saltwater intrusion (Hinsby et al., 2012). To assess these hazards using groundwater modeling we need a strong base of hydraulic and hydrogeological information. The use of integrated geophysical methods, in combination with a petrophysical characterization, provides a reliable architecture for groundwater modeling. Within the EU-project CLIWAT, we investigated the hydrogeological situation of the North Sea island of Föhr in Schleswig-Holstein (Germany). The island was mainly formed during glaciations in Pleistocene Series, especially Saalian and Weichselian Stages. These deposits remain as a Geest core in the southern central part, and house a freshwater lens that is used for the local water supply. To investigate the architecture of the fresh water lens, we carried out several surveys with airborne electromagnetic (AEM), seismic reflection, and borehole methods. To enhance the AEM resistivity model we inverted the data with a-priori constraints from seismic reflections (Burschil et al., 2012a). This constrained inversion leads to, among other things, a separation of two aquifers by resistivity data. Additionally, from borehole logs, vertical seismic profiles (VSP), and nearby AEM inversion point models we are able to petrophysically characterize different lithological categories regarding resistivity and seismic velocity. Subsurface glacial structures, e.g. buried valleys and a push moraine complex, are mapped down to 150 m below sea level. Below this rather horizontal features indicate Tertiary layers. Geophysically determined petrophysical values were correlated with lithological categories to enhance the interpretation of geophysical data. In this way, we expose

  8. Abrasive wear based predictive maintenance for systems operating in sandy conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldman, M.; Tinga, T.; Heide, E. van der; Masen, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Machines operating in sandy environments are damaged by the abrasive action of sand particles that enter the machine and become entrapped between components and contacting surfaces. In the case of the military services the combination of a sandy environment and the wide range of tasks to be fulfille

  9. Benthic Foraminifera as bio-indicators of anthropogenic impacts in coastal environments: Acqua dei Corsari area case study (Palermo, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musco, Marianna; Cuttitta, Angela; Bicchi, Erica; Quinci, Enza Maria; Sprovieri, Mario; Tranchida, Giorgio; Giaramita, Luigi; Traina, Anna; Salvagio Manta, Daniela; Gherardi, Serena; Mercurio, Pietro; Siragusa, Angelo; Mazzola, Salvatore

    2017-04-15

    This study investigates living benthic foraminiferal assemblages as bio-indicators of anthropogenic activities in a coastal area within the Gulf of Palermo (Sicily, Italy), affected by industrial and urban activities, and evaluates the environmental quality through the calibration of a Tolerant Species index (%TSstd). Sediments from 6 stations were sampled along a bathymetric transect from the coast to offshore. Sediment grain size, TOC, major, minor and trace elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were compared to benthic foraminiferal assemblages and species at each station. Diversity and density of benthic foraminiferal assemblages were not affected by the presence of pollutants, while tolerant species increased with organic (TOC and PAHs) or chemical (As and Pb) concentrations. Moreover, the calibration of the %TSstd formula to >125μm foraminiferal assemblage, gives a detailed description of environmental quality along the transect, representing a good and sensitive tool to evaluate marine coastal environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrated subsurface water solutions for coastal environments through integrated pump&treat and aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdikaki, Martha; Kallioras, Andreas; Christoforidis, Christophoros; Iossifidis, Dimitris; Zafeiropoulos, Anastasios; Dimitriadis, Klisthenis; Makropoulos, Christos; Raat, Klaasjan; van den Berg, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Coastal wetlands in semi-arid regions, as in Circum-Mediterranean, are considered important ecosystems that provide valuable services to human population and the environment, such as: flood protection, erosion control, wildlife habitat, water quality, recreation and carbon sequestration. Un-managed surface and groundwater exploitation in these areas usually leads to deterioration of such sensitive ecosystems by means of water resources degradation and/or increased salinity. Groundwater usually plays a vital role for the sustainability of these hydrological systems, as the underlying aquifers operate as regulators for both quantity and quality of their waters. Multi-layer and multi-objective Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) systems can be proved effective groundwater engineered solutions for the restoration of deteriorated coastal wetlands in semi- and arid regions. The plain of Marathon is a typical Mediterranean environment that hosts a naturally occurring -and today degraded- coastal wetland with the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem linked to a typical coastal hydrogeological system of a semi-arid region; and therefore can serve as a model for similar systems world-wide. The geo-hydrological setting of the area involves a multi-layer aquifer system consisting of (i) an upper un-consolidated formation of depositional unit dominated mostly by fluvial sediments and (ii) the surrounding and underlying karstified marbles; both being linked to the investigated wetland and also subjected to seawater encroachment. A smart engineered MAR system via an optimised Pump & Treat system integrated with an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) scheme in this area would include the abstraction of brackish groundwater from the deeper karst aquifer at a location close to the shoreline and direct treatment with Reverse Osmosis (RO). for desalination. Two-fold re-use scheme of the purified effluent can then be engineered for (i) the restoration of the coastal wetland; and (ii

  11. Jellyfish aggregations and leatherback turtle foraging patterns in a temperate coastal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jonathan D R; Doyle, Thomas K; Wilson, Mark W; Davenport, John; Hays, Graeme C

    2006-08-01

    Leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are obligate predators of gelatinous zooplankton. However, the spatial relationship between predator and prey remains poorly understood beyond sporadic and localized reports. To examine how jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria: Orders Semaeostomeae and Rhizostomeae) might drive the broad-scale distribution of this wide ranging species, we employed aerial surveys to map jellyfish throughout a temperate coastal shelf area bordering the northeast Atlantic. Previously unknown, consistent aggregations of Rhizostoma octopus extending over tens of square kilometers were identified in distinct coastal "hotspots" during consecutive years (2003-2005). Examination of retrospective sightings data (>50 yr) suggested that 22.5% of leatherback distribution could be explained by these hotspots, with the inference that these coastal features may be sufficiently consistent in space and time to drive long-term foraging associations.

  12. Hurricane Sandy science plan: New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Clarice N.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. More than one-half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of a coast, and this number is increasing. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is one of the largest providers of geologic and hydrologic information in the world. Federal, State, and local partners depend on the USGS science to know how to prepare for hurricane hazards and reduce losses from future hurricanes. The USGS works closely with other bureaus within the Department of the Interior, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and many State and local agencies to identify their information needs before, during, and after hurricanes.

  13. Progress in sandy desertification research of China%中国沙漠化研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛

    2004-01-01

    Sandy desertification is land degradation characterized by wind erosion mainly resulted from the excessive human activities in arid, semiarid and part of sub-humid regions in northern China. The research on sandy desertification has experienced more than 5 decades of arduous course of the struggle along with the establishment and development of China′s desert science. Researches in this field have made a great contribution to the national economic construction, and environmental protection. This paper focuses on presenting the major progress and achievements in the sandy desertification research during the last 50 years, including the stages of study on sandy desertification,background environment of sandy desertification and its changes, the conception, causes, process,monitoring and assessment of sandy desertification, the vegetation succession, landscape ecology, plant physiology, impacts on ecosystem, high-effective use of water and land resources and sustainable development in sandy desertified regions, sandy desertification control models and techniques etc.

  14. An overview of biodegradation of LNAPLs in coastal (semi)-arid environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yadav, B.K.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of soil and water due to the release of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) is a ubiquitous problem. The problem is more severe in arid and semi-arid coastal regions where most of the petroleum production and related refinery industries are located. Biological treatment of

  15. An overview of biodegradation of LNAPLs in coastal (semi)-arid environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yadav, B.K.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of soil and water due to the release of light non-aqueous phase liquids (LNAPLs) is a ubiquitous problem. The problem is more severe in arid and semi-arid coastal regions where most of the petroleum production and related refinery industries are located. Biological treatment of these o

  16. Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

    2009-01-01

    We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not

  17. Evaluation of harmonious development for economy-environment system in coastal cities: a case study of Tianjin Municipality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Fen; Zhang Yuan; Zheng Binghui; Wang Xiqin

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of the harmonious development of economy-environment system in coastal cities in China, an index system used to evaluate the economy-environment system is built up in this paper, which includes four aspects: economy,environment, resources, and ocean industry. Based on the analysis on present condition and future trends of economic development in Tianjin and the quantification of various evaluation indices, the author applies integrated index valuation model to valuate the harmonious development of economy-environment of Tianjin. The results show that the coordinated degree of economy-environment would drop down in the future, from 0.95(superior level of harmonious development) in 2000 to 0.59(inferior level of harmonious development) in 2015, under the circumstance of the current economic development mode. The level of comprehensive development of Tianjin also presents to descend. Based on the analyzing of status and future trends of environment-economy coordinated development, the paper puts forward the countermeasures such as industry structure adjustment, increasing the level of environmental protection investment, strengthening the enforcement of environmental policies to improve the coordinated development of environment-economy in Tianjin municipality.

  18. Coastal Digital Surface Model on Low Contrast Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, A.-M.; Assenbaum, M.; De la Torre, Y.; Pierrot-Deseilligny, M.

    2015-08-01

    Coastal sandy environments are extremely dynamic and require regular monitoring that can easily be achieved by using an unmanned aerial system (UAS) including a drone and a photo camera. The acquired images have low contrast and homogeneous texture. Using these images and with very few, if any, ground control points (GCPs), it is difficult to obtain a digital surface model (DSM) by classical correlation and automatic interest points determination approach. A possible response to this problem is to work with enhanced, contrast filtered images. To achieve this, we use and tune the free open-source software MicMac.

  19. Spatial distribution of sandy desertificationchange in the west of Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUHuiqing; XUJiawei; LVXinmiao

    2003-01-01

    The sandy land of the western part of Jilin Province is located in the ecotone of semi-humid and semi-arid area in the temperate zone of China. The sandy desertification has widely spread in the region because of the vulnerable natural conditions and the unreasonable human activity; as a result of this, the precious land resources and the economic development in the area have been seriously impacted. In this paper, the sandy land ecologic environment geographic information system is established based on the multi-spectral, multi-temporal Landsat TM images and field investigation. The comprehensive indexes of sandy desertification extent assessment which include vegetation degradation, wind erosion extent and soil depth are presented to classify the sandy land in western Jilin into three levels--slight, moderate and severe sandy desertification with the support of GIS platform. The results demonstrate that the sandy desertification has been partly controlled in the past twenty years, except some small sites. However, this doesn't necessarily mean that there is nothing for more concern. The two main causes of sandy desertification have not been eliminated yet, one is its natural factor, especially the physical and chemical characters of sandy soil and dry climate; another is the immoderate economic activity of human being that has highly accelerated the sandy desertification process.

  20. Uav Application in Coastal Environment, Example of the Oleron Island for Dunes and Dikes Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, B.; Pouget, F.

    2015-08-01

    The recent evolutions in civil UAV ease of use led the University of La Rochelle to conduct an UAV program around its own potential costal application. An application program involving La Rochelle University and the District of Oleron Island began in January 2015 and lasted through July of 2015. The aims were to choose 9 study areas and survey them during the winter season. The studies concerned surveying the dikes and coastal sand dunes of Oleron Island. During each flight, an action sport camera fixed on the UAV's brushless gimbal took a series of 150 pictures. After processing the photographs and using a 3D reconstruction plugin via Photoscan, we were able to export high-resolution ortho-imagery, DSM and 3D models. After applying GIS treatment to these images, volumetric evolutions between flights were revealed through a DDVM (Difference of Digital volumetric Model), in order to study sand movements on coastal sand dunes.

  1. UAV APPLICATION IN COASTAL ENVIRONMENT, EXAMPLE OF THE OLERON ISLAND FOR DUNES AND DIKES SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Guillot

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent evolutions in civil UAV ease of use led the University of La Rochelle to conduct an UAV program around its own potential costal application. An application program involving La Rochelle University and the District of Oleron Island began in January 2015 and lasted through July of 2015. The aims were to choose 9 study areas and survey them during the winter season. The studies concerned surveying the dikes and coastal sand dunes of Oleron Island. During each flight, an action sport camera fixed on the UAV’s brushless gimbal took a series of 150 pictures. After processing the photographs and using a 3D reconstruction plugin via Photoscan, we were able to export high-resolution ortho-imagery, DSM and 3D models. After applying GIS treatment to these images, volumetric evolutions between flights were revealed through a DDVM (Difference of Digital volumetric Model, in order to study sand movements on coastal sand dunes.

  2. Investigation of the radiological impact on the coastal environment surrounding a fertilizer plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Samad, O; Aoun, M; Nsouli, B; Khalaf, G; Hamze, M

    2014-07-01

    This investigation was carried out in order to assess the marine environmental radioactive pollution and the radiological impact caused by a large production plant of phosphate fertilizer, located in the Lebanese coastal zone. Natural radionuclides ((238)U, (235)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Po, (210)Pb, (40)K) and anthropogenic (137)Cs were measured by alpha and gamma spectrometry in seawater, sediment, biota and coastal soil samples collected from the area impacted by this industry. The limited environmental monitoring program within 2 km of the plant indicates localized contamination with radionuclides of the uranium decay chain mainly due to the transport, the storage of raw materials and the free release of phosphogypsum waste.

  3. The Coastal Dynamics of Heterogeneous Sedimentary Environments: Numerical Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Mass Transport in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    1967-1988: (A) Farallon Islands, (solid) and Golden Gate, Sta. 1 (dash); (B) Alameda, Sta. 2 (solid) and Martinez, Sta. 3 (dash); (C) Port Chicago...of sewage waste introduce nitrogen, as well as fecal coliform (E. coli) and cryptosporidium, into estuaries. Nitrogen joins nutrient loading from...Physics of estuaries and coastal seas. J. Dronkers and M. B. A. M. Scheffers. Rotterdam , The Netherlands, A.A. Balkema: 115-124. Gibbs, R. J. (1967

  4. Modelling molecular iodine emissions in a coastal marine environment: the link to new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Lopez, A.; Plane, J. M. C.; McFiggans, G.; Williams, P. I.; Ball, S. M.; Bitter, M.; Jones, R. L.; Hongwei, C.; Hoffmann, T.

    2006-03-01

    A model of iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer (MBL) has been used to investigate the impact of daytime coastal emissions of molecular iodine (I2). The model contains a full treatment of gas-phase iodine chemistry, combined with a description of the nucleation and growth, by condensation and coagulation, of iodine oxide nano-particles. In-situ measurements of coastal emissions of I2 made by the broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) techniques are presented and compared to long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) observations of I2 at Mace Head, Ireland. Simultaneous measurements of enhanced I2 emissions and particle bursts show that I2 is almost certainly the main precursor of new particles at this coastal location. The ratio of IO to I2 predicted by the model indicates that the iodine species observed by the DOAS are concentrated over a short distance (about 8% of the 4.2 km light path) consistent with the intertidal zone, bringing them into good agreement with the I2 measurements made by the two in-situ techniques. The model is then used to investigate the effect of iodine emission on ozone depletion, and the production of new particles and their evolution to form stable cloud condensation nuclei (CCN).

  5. Modelling molecular iodine emissions in a coastal marine environment: the link to new particle formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Saiz-Lopez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer (MBL has been used to investigate the impact of daytime coastal emissions of molecular iodine (I2. The model contains a full treatment of gas-phase iodine chemistry, combined with a description of the nucleation and growth, by condensation and coagulation, of iodine oxide nano-particles. In-situ measurements of coastal emissions of I2 made by the broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy (BBCRDS and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP/MS techniques are presented and compared to long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS observations of I2 at Mace Head, Ireland. Simultaneous measurements of enhanced I2 emissions and particle bursts show that I2 is almost certainly the main precursor of new particles at this coastal location. The ratio of IO to I2 predicted by the model indicates that the iodine species observed by the DOAS are concentrated over a short distance (about 8% of the 4.2 km light path consistent with the intertidal zone, bringing them into good agreement with the I2 measurements made by the two in-situ techniques. The model is then used to investigate the effect of iodine emission on ozone depletion, and the production of new particles and their evolution to form stable cloud condensation nuclei (CCN.

  6. Condition and biochemical profile of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) cultured at different depths in a cold water coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardi, Daria; Mills, Terry; Donnet, Sebastien; Parrish, Christopher C.; Murray, Harry M.

    2017-08-01

    The growth and health of cultured blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are affected by environmental conditions. Typically, culture sites are situated in sheltered areas near shore (i.e., impact in coastal areas are concerns and interest in developing deep water (> 20 m depth) mussel culture has been growing. This study evaluated the effect of culture depth on blue mussels in a cold water coastal environment (Newfoundland, Canada). Culture depth was examined over two years from September 2012 to September 2014; mussels from three shallow water (5 m) and three deep water (15 m) sites were compared for growth and biochemical composition; culture depths were compared for temperature and chlorophyll a. Differences between the two years examined were noted, possibly due to harsh winter conditions in the second year of the experiment. In both years shallow and deep water mussels presented similar condition; in year 2 deep water mussels had a significantly better biochemical profile. Lipid and glycogen analyses showed seasonal variations, but no significant differences between shallow and deep water were noted. Fatty acid profiles showed a significantly higher content of omega-3 s (20:5ω3; EPA) and lower content of bacterial fatty acids in deep water sites in year 2. Everything considered, deep water appeared to provide a more favorable environment for mussel growth than shallow water under harsher weather conditions.

  7. Environmental risks associated with booster biocides leaching from spent anti-fouling paint particles in coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Chowdhury K; Turner, Andrew; Readman, James; Frickers, Trish

    2014-12-01

    Boat maintenance facilities in coastal areas contribute a significant amount of antifouling paint particles (APP) to coastal environments. Very few studies have concentrated on the leaching of booster biocides embedded in old paint particles. Therefore, this study attempted to assess the leaching of Dichlofluanid and Irgarol 1051 from APP collected from Mayflower Marina in southwest England. They were analyzed by GC-MS. A leaching experiment revealed that a considerable amount of Dichlofluanid (ca. 24 μg/L) leached from 0.4 g/L of APP after the first hour, followed by a marked decline in the amount measured in the water over time, almost degrading after 24 h in seawater, affording less of an environmental threat to non-target organisms. Conversely, Irgarol 1051 appeared to be persistent and continuously leached from the 0.4 g/L of APP even after 10 days, yielding a concentration of 0.61 μg/L in seawater, potentially posing a significant threat to the aquatic environment through leaching from APP.

  8. Deaths associated with Hurricane Sandy - October-November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit the northeastern U.S. coastline. Sandy's tropical storm winds stretched over 900 miles (1,440 km), causing storm surges and destruction over a larger area than that affected by hurricanes with more intensity but narrower paths. Based on storm surge predictions, mandatory evacuations were ordered on October 28, including for New York City's Evacuation Zone A, the coastal zone at risk for flooding from any hurricane. By October 31, the region had 6-12 inches (15-30 cm) of precipitation, 7-8 million customers without power, approximately 20,000 persons in shelters, and news reports of numerous fatalities (Robert Neurath, CDC, personal communication, 2013). To characterize deaths related to Sandy, CDC analyzed data on 117 hurricane-related deaths captured by American Red Cross (Red Cross) mortality tracking during October 28-November 30, 2012. This report describes the results of that analysis, which found drowning was the most common cause of death related to Sandy, and 45% of drowning deaths occurred in flooded homes in Evacuation Zone A. Drowning is a leading cause of hurricane death but is preventable with advance warning systems and evacuation plans. Emergency plans should ensure that persons receive and comprehend evacuation messages and have the necessary resources to comply with them.

  9. Application of ERTS-A data to the protection and management of New Jersey's coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunghans, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Feinberg, E. B.; Wobber, F. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Apparent sewage sludge disposal by barge has been detected approximately 12 miles offshore in an area with an approximate radius of 2.5 nautical miles. Verification is underway to determine whether this dumping is within one of the approved dump sites in the Bight. Analysis of all available historical and routine meteorological data in correlation with the observed phenomenon is necessary before final conclusions can be reached with respect to the effects of currents on the disposal of dumped wastes. Four effluent plumes emanating from the shoreline just south of Sandy Hook were observed and are moving in a southerly direction. Another plume is evident north of Barnegat Inlet and is moving almost directly offshore. This suggests that the more northerly plumes are under the influence of the tidal regime around New York Harbor much more than are the plumes further south along the New Jersey coast. Of further interest are what appear to be an internal wave phenomena approximately 75 miles east of the New Jersey coast. This same sort of phenomena has been observed repetitively off the coast of Oregon.

  10. Sandy PMO Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 Financial Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Sandy PMO: Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (Sandy Supplemental Bill) Financial Data. This is the Sandy Supplemental Quarterly Financial Datasets that are...

  11. Hurricane Sandy science plan: impacts of environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskie, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: • Coastal topography and bathymetry

  12. A Coordinated USGS Science Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.; Buxton, H. T.; Andersen, M.; Dean, T.; Focazio, M. J.; Haines, J.; Hainly, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy came ashore during a spring high tide on the New Jersey coastline, delivering hurricane-force winds, storm tides exceeding 19 feet, driving rain, and plummeting temperatures. Hurricane Sandy resulted in 72 direct fatalities in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, and widespread and substantial physical, environmental, ecological, social, and economic impacts estimated at near $50 billion. Before the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS provided forecasts of potential coastal change; collected oblique aerial photography of pre-storm coastal morphology; deployed storm-surge sensors, rapid-deployment streamgages, wave sensors, and barometric pressure sensors; conducted Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) aerial topographic surveys of coastal areas; and issued a landslide alert for landslide prone areas. During the storm, Tidal Telemetry Networks provided real-time water-level information along the coast. Long-term networks and rapid-deployment real-time streamgages and water-quality monitors tracked river levels and changes in water quality. Immediately after the storm, the USGS serviced real-time instrumentation, retrieved data from over 140 storm-surge sensors, and collected other essential environmental data, including more than 830 high-water marks mapping the extent and elevation of the storm surge. Post-storm lidar surveys documented storm impacts to coastal barriers informing response and recovery and providing a new baseline to assess vulnerability of the reconfigured coast. The USGS Hazard Data Distribution System served storm-related information from many agencies on the Internet on a daily basis. Immediately following Hurricane Sandy the USGS developed a science plan, 'Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy-A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery'. The plan will ensure continuing coordination of internal USGS activities as well as

  13. Spring molybdenum enrichment in scallop shells: a potential tracer of diatom productivity in coastal temperate environments (Brittany, NW France?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barats

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal molybdenum/calcium ([Mo]/[Ca]shell ratios were recently examined in bivalves. These ratios were determined by quantitative LA-ICP-MS analyses every third daily striae (i.e. a temporal resolution of 3 days in 36 flat valves of the Great Scallop shells Pecten maximus (2-year old; 3 shells/year collected in temperate coastal environments of Western Europe (42 to 49° N. Variations of ([Mo]/[Ca]shell ratio were significant and reproducible for scallops from a same population, from different years (1998–2004 and from different coastal temperate locations. ([Mo]/[Ca]shell exhibits typical profiles characterized by a background content, below the method detection limit (<0.003 μmol/mol for most of the shell growth period, which is punctuated by a significant transient enrichment (0.031−2.1 μmol/mol mainly occurring from May to June. The Bay of Brest (France was especially investigated because of long term observations on scallop communities, environmental variables, and high resolution analyses of dissolved Mo in bottom seawater in 2000. In 2000, dissolved Mo exhibited significant increasing concentration just preceding a maximum of ([Mo]/[Ca]shell ratio. The environmental conditions preceding ([Mo]/[Ca]shell maximum events, both in 2000 and over the 7-year survey indicates a direct influence of the scallop environmental conditions at the sediment water interface subsequent to the intense and periodic spring bloom event. Spring maxima of ([Mo]/[Ca]shell ratio were found to be specifically related to the dynamic of spring diatom blooms and to the extent of the subsequent silicate depletion. ([Mo]/[Ca]shell records reveal thus unexpected biogeochemical routes of Mo, potentially related to coastal spring productivity.

  14. Vivipary in coastal cacti: a potential reproductive strategy in halophytic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota-Sánchez, J Hugo; Reyes-Olivas, Alvaro; Sánchez-Soto, Bardo

    2007-09-01

    Vivipary, the germination of seeds within the fruit prior to abscission from the maternal plant, is an important event in plants. Two main types of vivipary are known in vascular plants: true vivipary and pseudovivipary. In crop grasses, pseudovivipary is an undesirable character as it results in lower yields. To date, vivipary in the Cactaceae has been reported for less than 20 species, most of which are cultivated. Here, we report viviparous (cryptoviviparous-a subcategory of true vivipary) cacti in nature in members of the tribes Cacteae and Pachycereeae (subfamily Cactoideae). We present four species inhabiting coastal plains in areas subject to periodic flooding, namely, Ferocactus herrerae, Stenocereus alamosensis, S. thurberi, and Pachycereus schottii. These species from localities in northwestern Mexico had viviparous fruits and offspring in different stages of development. A potential trend in the data indicates that the overall proportion of viviparous plants is higher in coastal flooding areas relative to halophytic, nonflooding areas. In our view, vivipary is a reproductive strategy that has evolved to provide a more efficient mechanism favoring germination and new avenues for survival by contributing to population maintenance and short-distance dispersal on halophytic substrates.

  15. Differentiating littering, urban runoff and marine transport as sources of marine debris in coastal and estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Kathryn; Denise Hardesty, Britta; Kriwoken, Lorne; Wilcox, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Marine debris is a burgeoning global issue with economic, ecological and aesthetic impacts. While there are many studies now addressing this topic, the influence of urbanisation factors such as local population density, stormwater drains and roads on the distribution of coastal litter remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we carried out standardized surveys at 224 transect surveys at 67 sites in two estuaries and along the open coast in Tasmania, Australia. We explored the relative support for three hypotheses regarding the sources of the debris; direct deposition by beachgoers, transport from surrounding areas via storm water drains and coastal runoff, and onshore transport from the marine system. We found strong support for all three mechanisms, however, onshore transport from the marine reservoir was the most important mechanism. Overall, the three models together explained 45.8 percent of the variation in our observations. Our results also suggest that most debris released into the marine environment is deposited locally, which may be the answer to where all the missing plastic is in the ocean. Furthermore, local interventions are likely to be most effective in reducing land-based inputs into the ocean. PMID:28281667

  16. Differentiating littering, urban runoff and marine transport as sources of marine debris in coastal and estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Kathryn; Denise Hardesty, Britta; Kriwoken, Lorne; Wilcox, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Marine debris is a burgeoning global issue with economic, ecological and aesthetic impacts. While there are many studies now addressing this topic, the influence of urbanisation factors such as local population density, stormwater drains and roads on the distribution of coastal litter remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, we carried out standardized surveys at 224 transect surveys at 67 sites in two estuaries and along the open coast in Tasmania, Australia. We explored the relative support for three hypotheses regarding the sources of the debris; direct deposition by beachgoers, transport from surrounding areas via storm water drains and coastal runoff, and onshore transport from the marine system. We found strong support for all three mechanisms, however, onshore transport from the marine reservoir was the most important mechanism. Overall, the three models together explained 45.8 percent of the variation in our observations. Our results also suggest that most debris released into the marine environment is deposited locally, which may be the answer to where all the missing plastic is in the ocean. Furthermore, local interventions are likely to be most effective in reducing land-based inputs into the ocean.

  17. A study on the relationship between BOD5 and COD in coastal seawater environment with a rapid BOD measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X L; Jing, M; Chen, X; Zhuang, Z X; Wang, X R; Wang, X R; Lee, Frank S C

    2009-01-01

    The dual objectives of this study are to: (1) examine the relationship between COD and BOD in seawater environment with a rapid but reliable method for the measurement of BOD in seawater, and (2) establish the relationship model between BOD(5) and COD in the firth of Dongbao River to predict the values of BOD(5). The first objective is met by the successful development of a technique utilizing bacteria-immobilized membrane flow cell for biodegradation process, coupled with fibre optic fluorescence detection for oxygen depletion quantitation. The technique has been applied to coastal seawater samples collected in the coastal area of Shenzhen, China. The BOD(5) and COD values for the samples are acquired and the results show that there is no apparent linear relationship existing between BOD(5) and COD in relatively clean seawater samples away from the shore. However, in estuary water samples containing relatively high concentration of sewage contamination, a linear correlation does exist between BOD(5) and COD. The linear relationship between the two parameters allows for the calculation of BOD(5) values based on COD data which can be measured more readily and precisely.

  18. Hurricane Sandy Poster (October 29, 2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hurricane Sandy poster. Multi-spectral image from Suomi-NPP shows Hurricane Sandy approaching the New Jersey Coast on October 29, 2012. Poster size is approximately...

  19. Coupling bacterioplankton populations and environment to community function in coastal temperate waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traving, S. J.; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Knudsen-Leerbeck, H.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterioplankton play a key role in marine waters facilitating processes important for carbon cycling. However, the influence of specific bacterial populations and environmental conditions on bacterioplankton community performance remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to identify...... drivers of bacterioplankton community functions, taking into account the variability in community composition and environmental conditions over seasons, in two contrasting coastal systems. A Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO) analysis of the biological and chemical data obtained from...... surface waters over a full year indicated that specific bacterial populations were linked to measured functions. Namely, Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) was strongly correlated with protease activity. Both function and community composition showed seasonal variation. However, the pattern of substrate...

  20. A bacterial community-based index to assess the ecological status of estuarine and coastal environments

    KAUST Repository

    Aylagas, Eva

    2016-10-23

    Biotic indices for monitoring marine ecosystems are mostly based on the analysis of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Due to their high sensitivity to pollution and fast response to environmental changes, bacterial assemblages could complement the information provided by benthic metazoan communities as indicators of human-induced impacts, but so far, this biological component has not been well explored for this purpose. Here we performed 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to analyze the bacterial assemblage composition of 51 estuarine and coastal stations characterized by different environmental conditions and human-derived pressures. Using the relative abundance of putative indicator bacterial taxa, we developed a biotic index that is significantly correlated with a sediment quality index calculated on the basis of organic and inorganic compound concentrations. This new index based on bacterial assemblage composition can be a sensitive tool for providing a fast environmental assessment and allow a more comprehensive integrative ecosystem approach for environmental management. © 2016.

  1. Typhoon Haiyan's sedimentary record in coastal environments of the Philippines and its palaeotempestological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Dominik; May, Simon Matthias; Engel, Max; Reyes, Michelle; Pint, Anna; Opitz, Stephan; Dierick, Manuel; Gonzalo, Lia Anne; Esser, Sascha; Brückner, Helmut

    2016-12-01

    On 8 November 2013, category 5 Supertyphoon Haiyan made landfall on the Philippines. During a post-typhoon survey in February 2014, Haiyan-related sand deposition and morphological changes were documented at four severely affected sites with different exposure to the typhoon track and different geological and geomorphological settings. Onshore sand sheets reaching 100-250 m inland are restricted to coastal areas with significant inundation due to amplification of surge levels in embayments or due to accompanying long-wave phenomena at the most exposed coastlines of Leyte and Samar. However, localized washover fans with a storm-typical laminated stratigraphy occurred even along coasts with limited inundation due to waves overtopping or breaching coastal barriers. On a recent reef platform off Negros in the Visayan Sea, storm waves entrained coral rubble from the reef slope and formed an intertidal coral ridge several hundreds of metres long when breaking at the reef edge. As these sediments and landforms were generated by one of the strongest storms ever recorded, they not only provide a recent reference for typhoon signatures that can be used for palaeotempestological and palaeotsunami studies in the region but might also increase the general spectrum of possible cyclone deposits. Although a rather atypical example for storm deposition due to the influence of infra-gravity waves, it nevertheless provides a valuable reference for an extreme case that should be considered when discriminating between storm and tsunami deposits in general. Even for sites with low topography and high inundation levels during Supertyphoon Haiyan, the landward extent of the documented sand sheets seems significantly smaller than typical sand sheets of large tsunamis. This criterion may potentially be used to distinguish both types of events.

  2. Deposit model for heavy-mineral sands in coastal environments: Chapter L in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Fey, David L.; Shah, Anjana K.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a descriptive model of heavy-mineral sands, which are sedimentary deposits of dense minerals that accumulate with sand, silt, and clay in coastal environments, locally forming economic concentrations of the heavy minerals. This deposit type is the main source of titanium feedstock for the titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigments industry, through recovery of the minerals ilmenite (Fe2+TiO3), rutile (TiO2), and leucoxene (an alteration product of ilmenite). Heavy-mineral sands are also the principal source of zircon (ZrSiO4) and its zirconium oxide; zircon is often recovered as a coproduct. Other heavy minerals produced as coproducts from some deposits are sillimanite/kyanite, staurolite, monazite, and garnet. Monazite [(Ce,La,Nd,Th)PO4] is a source of rare earth elements as well as thorium, which is used in thorium-based nuclear power under development in India and elsewhere.

  3. On Sandy Shores. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Craig; And Others

    The activities in this guide (for grades 2-4) transport students to the sandy shore, one of the most fascinating ecosystems on the planet. At this ecological juncture a multiplicity of life forms find ways to survive, thrive, and interact with each other. Using a wide variety of learning formats, students explore and deepen their understanding of…

  4. Small-footprint, waveform-resolving lidar estimation of submerged and sub-canopy topography in coastal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, A.; Brock, J.C.; Wright, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental advanced airborne research lidar (EAARL) is an airborne lidar instrument designed to map near-shore submerged topography and adjacent land elevations simultaneously. This study evaluated data acquired by the EAARL system in February 2003 and March 2004 along the margins of Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, to map bare-earth elevations under a variety of vegetation types and submerged topography in shallow, turbid water conditions. A spatial filtering algorithm, known as the iterative random consensus filter (IRCF), was used to extract ground elevations from a point cloud of processed last-surface EAARL returns. Filtered data were compared with acoustic and field measurements acquired in shallow submerged (0-2.5 m water depth) and sub-canopy environments. Root mean square elevation errors (RMSEs) ranged from 10-14 cm for submerged topography to 16-20 cm for sub-canopy topography under a variety of vegetation communities. The effect of lidar sampling angles and global positioning system (GPS) satellite configuration on accuracy was investigated. Results show high RMSEs for data acquired during periods of poor satellite configuration and at large sampling angles along the edges of the lidar scan. The results presented in this study confirm the cross-environment capability of a green-wavelength, waveform-resolving lidar system, making it an ideal tool for mapping coastal environments.

  5. Use of geoelectrical methods in groundwater pollution surveys in a coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, R.K.; Urish, D.W.; Fuller, J.; O'Reilly, M.

    1994-01-01

    The pollution of coastal aquifers by old landfills can contaminate valuable and scarce water resources in the freshwater lens utilized seasonably by overcrowded communities. The pollutants will ultimately flow into the sea where they may also cause a coastal water pollution problem. We have detected pollution in the freshwater lens from a sanitary landfill near Provincetown, Cape Cod, using the geoelectrical resistivity method. This survey included Schlumberger geoelectrical depth soundings and a horizontal geoelectrical profile using the Wenner configuration. The geoelectrical survey was conducted at a site along Highway 6 where it passes the coastal town of Provincetown and a sanitary landfill that has been in operation since 1954. The depth soundings suggest the characteristic decrease in resistivity vs. depth from the high resistivity of the unsaturated zone to the low resistivity of the saltwater saturated zone. The freshwater lens is clearly identified by the change in slope of the steeply dipping curve of resistivity versus electrode spacing. Interpretations made using a multilayer program, Geomate, resulted in layer resistivities between 460 and 95 ohm?m for the freshwater lens. A comparison with well water resistivities suggests that a layer resistivity of 230 ohm?m or lower is indicative of pollution in the freshwater lens. The results of the geoelectrical depth soundings were confirmed in the Wenner horizontal profile. Both measurements suggest that the pollutants do not spread evenly as one would expect for a homogeneous and isotropic medium. Instead, a preferred channel for the flow of the pollutants is observed along a path from the landfill toward the shoreline. The depth to the saltwater/freshwater interface or, more specifically, to the low resistivity-high resistivity interface appears to be shallow where the freshwater lens is polluted. This was confirmed by pore water well samples that were highly mineralized. The equilibrium postulated by the

  6. Use of geoelectrical methods in groundwater pollution surveys in a coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Reinhard K.; Urish, Daniel W.; Fuller, James; O'Reilly, Mary

    1994-08-01

    The pollution of coastal aquifers by old landfills can contaminate valuable and scarce water resources in the freshwater lens utilized seasonably by overcrowded communities. The pollutants will ultimately flow into the sea where they may also cause a coastal water pollution problem. We have detected pollution in the freshwater lens from a sanitary landfill near Provincetown, Cape Cod, using the geoelectrical resistivity method. This survey included Schlumberger geoelectrical depth soundings and a horizontal geoelectrical profile using the Wenner configuration. The geoelectrical survey was conducted at a site along Highway 6 where it passes the coastal town of Provincetown and a sanitary landfill that has been in operation since 1954. The depth soundings suggest the characteristic decrease in resistivity vs. depth from the high resistivity of the unsaturated zone to the low resistivity of the saltwater saturated zone. The freshwater lens is clearly identified by the change in slope of the steeply dipping curve of resistivity versus electrode spacing. Interpretations made using a multilayer program, GEOMATE, resulted in layer resistivities between 460 and 95 ohm·m for the freshwater lens. A comparison with well water resistivities suggests that a layer resistivity of 230 ohm·m or lower is indicative of pollution in the freshwater lens. The results of the geoelectrical depth soundings were confirmed in the Wenner horizontal profile. Both measurements suggest that the pollutants do not spread evenly as one would expect for a homogeneous and isotropic medium. Instead, a preferred channel for the flow of the pollutants is observed along a path from the landfill toward the shoreline. The depth to the saltwater/freshwater interface or, more specifically, to the low resistivity-high resistivity interface appears to be shallow where the freshwater lens is polluted. This was confirmed by pore water well samples that were highly mineralized. The equilibrium postulated by the

  7. Meteo-marine parameters for highly variable environment in coastal regions from satellite radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskachevsky, A. L.; Rosenthal, W.; Lehner, S.

    2016-09-01

    The German Bight of the North Sea is the area with highly variable sea state conditions, intensive ship traffic and with a high density of offshore installations, e.g. wind farms in use and under construction. Ship navigation and the docking on offshore constructions is impeded by significant wave heights HS > 1.3 m. For these reasons, improvements are required in recognition and forecasting of sea state HS in the range 0-3 m. Thus, this necessitates the development of new methods to determine the distribution of meteo-marine parameters from remote sensing data with an accuracy of decimetres for HS. The operationalization of these methods then allows the robust automatic processing in near real time (NRT) to support forecast agencies by providing validations for model results. A new empirical algorithm XWAVE_C (C = coastal) for estimation of significant wave height from X-band satellite-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has been developed, adopted for coastal applications using TerraSAR-X (TS-X) and Tandem-X (TD-X) satellites in the German Bight and implemented into the Sea Sate Processor (SSP) for fully automatic processing for NRT services. The algorithm is based on the spectral analysis of subscenes and the model function uses integrated image spectra parameters as well as local wind information from the analyzed subscene. The algorithm is able to recognize and remove the influence of non-sea state produced signals in the Wadden Sea areas such as dry sandbars as well as nonlinear SAR image distortions produced by e.g. short wind waves and breaking waves. Also parameters of very short waves, which are not visible in SAR images and produce only unsystematic clutter, can be accurately estimated. The SSP includes XWAVE_C, a pre-filtering procedure for removing artefacts such as ships, seamarks, buoys, offshore constructions and slicks, and an additional procedure performing a check of results based on the statistics of the whole scene. The SSP allows an

  8. A Multi Size-Level Assessment of Benthic Marine Communities in a Coastal Environment: Are They Different Sides of the Same Coin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Claudia; Volpi, Marta; Lardicci, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    in ecosystems, the attempts that have been made in this sense are still very scarce and a reliable approach for these research still has to be defined. We characterized the benthic communities of bacteria, microbial eukaryotes, meiofauna and macrofauna in a coastal environment, encompassing a 10000-fold...

  9. Multidisciplinary oil spill modeling to protect coastal communities and the environment of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tiago M.; Kokinou, Eleni; Zodiatis, George; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Panagiotakis, Costas; Lardner, Robin

    2016-11-01

    We present new mathematical and geological models to assist civil protection authorities in the mitigation of potential oil spill accidents in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Oil spill simulations for 19 existing offshore wells were carried out based on novel and high resolution bathymetric, meteorological, oceanographic, and geomorphological data. The simulations show a trend for east and northeast movement of oil spills into the Levantine Basin, affecting the coastal areas of Israel, Lebanon and Syria. Oil slicks will reach the coast in 1 to 20 days, driven by the action of the winds, currents and waves. By applying a qualitative analysis, seabed morphology is for the first time related to the direction of the oil slick expansion, as it is able to alter the movement of sea currents. Specifically, the direction of the major axis of the oil spills, in most of the cases examined, is oriented according to the prevailing azimuth of bathymetric features. This work suggests that oil spills in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea should be mitigated in the very few hours after their onset, and before wind and currents disperse them. We explain that protocols should be prioritized between neighboring countries to mitigate any oil spills.

  10. Non-market valuation of the coastal environment--uniting political aims, ecological and economic knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östberg, Katarina; Hasselström, Linus; Håkansson, Cecilia

    2012-11-15

    In this paper, we examine the feasibility of using an approach for estimating Willingness-To-Pay for marine environmental improvements, based on a holistic, policy-determined scenario. Conducting valuation studies based on a policy-determined scenario is beneficial for decision-makers in terms of practical applicability but also for research in terms of e.g. data availability. Using a case study in two Swedish coastal areas, we examine whether respondents are able to understand and attach a monetary value to these types of scenarios. The tested scenarios are based on improving water quality according to the EU Water Framework Directive and reducing noise and littering according to standard-type measures in a Swedish archipelago setting. The results are promising, paving the ground for future valuation studies using this approach. However, there might be tradeoffs, since the use of scenarios like this require much preparation by researchers and much efforts by respondents. We recommend environmental managers to adopt this approach when possible, but to have these potential tradeoffs in mind. Mean monthly WTP per household for the water quality improvement scenario is estimated to 71 and 102 SEK(1) in the two study areas, respectively. The corresponding numbers for the less noise and littering scenario are 38 and 46 SEK. Valuation of noise and littering in archipelago areas has previously not been very common, making these estimates especially important for marine policy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modelling submerged coastal environments: Remote sensing technologies, techniques, and comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Chris

    Built upon remote sensing and GIS littoral zone characterization methodologies of the past decade, a series of loosely coupled models aimed to test, compare and synthesize multi-beam SONAR (MBES), Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry (ALB), and satellite based optical data sets in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada, eco-region. Bathymetry and relative intensity metrics for the MBES and ALB data sets were run through a quantitative and qualitative comparison, which included outputs from the Benthic Terrain Modeller (BTM) tool. Substrate classification based on relative intensities of respective data sets and textural indices generated using grey level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were investigated. A spatial modelling framework built in ArcGIS(TM) for the derivation of bathymetric data sets from optical satellite imagery was also tested for proof of concept and validation. Where possible, efficiencies and semi-automation for repeatable testing was achieved using ArcGIS(TM) ModelBuilder. The findings from this study could assist future decision makers in the field of coastal management and hydrographic studies. Keywords: Seafloor terrain characterization, Benthic Terrain Modeller (BTM), Multi-beam SONAR, Airborne LiDAR Bathymetry, Satellite Derived Bathymetry, ArcGISTM ModelBuilder, Textural analysis, Substrate classification.

  12. Effects of the Coastal Park Environment Attributes on Its Admission Fee Charges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Erda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the effect of those recognized nature-and-activity-based attributes on the level of park’s admission fee charges using a panel data of 29 coastal recreation parks in Dalian city of China. A total of seven different Hedonic pricing model specifications are used in the estimating process. The results indicate that a numerous attributes have statistically significant effects (α≤ 0.10 on the level of park admission fee charges. In terms of the economic valuation, the marine sightseeing results in the highest value of Marginal Willingness to Pay (MWTP of $6.4 as its quality rank improves to a designated higher level. As expected that the park congestion has a negative effect on the MWTP (-$0.47 and overall park’s rankings have a positive effect ($0.05 on park’s MWTP. However, many recreation activities accommodated by the park sites exhibit a relatively weak effect on the park entrance fee charges. One possible reason is perhaps owing to the single admission package fee policy adopted by the park management..

  13. Seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols in the outdoor environment of the Qingdao coastal region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xi; Qi, Jianhua; Li, Hongtao; Dong, Lijie; Gao, Dongmei

    2016-09-01

    Microbial activities in the atmosphere can indicate the physiological processes of microorganisms and can indirectly affect cloud formation and environmental health. In this study, the microbial activity in bioaerosols collected in the Qingdao coastal region was investigated using the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis method to detect the enzyme activity of microorganisms. The results showed that the microbial activity ranged from 5.49 to 102 ng/m3 sodium fluorescein from March 2013 to February 2014; the average value was 34.4 ng/m3. Microbial activity has no statistical correlation with total microbial quantity. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that meteorological factors such as atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and wind speed accounted for approximately 35.7% of the variation of the microbial activity, although their individual impacts on microbial activity varied. According to the correlation analysis, atmospheric temperature and wind speed had a significant positive and negative influence on microbial activity, respectively, whereas relative humidity and wind direction had no significant influence. The seasonal distribution of microbial activity in bioaerosols was in the order of summer > autumn > winter > spring, with high fluctuations in the summer and autumn. Microbial activity in bioaerosols differed in different weather conditions such as the sunny, foggy, and hazy days of different seasons. Further in situ observations in different weather conditions at different times and places are needed to understand the seasonal distribution characteristics of microbial activity in bioaerosols and the influence factors of microbial activity.

  14. Benthic diatoms as monitoring organisms for radionuclides in a brackish-water coastal environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoeijs, P. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)); Notter, M. (Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, Drottningholm (Sweden))

    1993-01-01

    The gamma-spectra of 421 algal samples (diatoms and filamentous macroalgae) taken in 1983-1989 from a brackish coastal area (northern Baltic Sea) were determined. The sources of radionuclide input in the ecosystem were (1) continuous discharge from the Forsmark nuclear power plant and (2) distinct discharge from the Chernobyl accident in April 1986. Discharge from Forsmark and concentrations in diatom samples were significantly related; distance from the discharge point and hydrographical conditions determined the level of radionuclides in the diatoms. After the Chernobyl accident very high radionuclide concentrations were found in diatom samples, especially at sites with little water exchange. The short-lived radionuclides from Chernobyl were below the detection limit after 1 year, but the caesium-isotopes were still found recycling in the diatom communities after 3 years. The use of benthic diatoms as monitoring organisms for radioactive discharges was compared with the use of macroalgae, and is discussed in connection with the present field study and general algal ecology. (author).

  15. Multidisciplinary oil spill modeling to protect coastal communities and the environment of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tiago M; Kokinou, Eleni; Zodiatis, George; Radhakrishnan, Hari; Panagiotakis, Costas; Lardner, Robin

    2016-11-10

    We present new mathematical and geological models to assist civil protection authorities in the mitigation of potential oil spill accidents in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Oil spill simulations for 19 existing offshore wells were carried out based on novel and high resolution bathymetric, meteorological, oceanographic, and geomorphological data. The simulations show a trend for east and northeast movement of oil spills into the Levantine Basin, affecting the coastal areas of Israel, Lebanon and Syria. Oil slicks will reach the coast in 1 to 20 days, driven by the action of the winds, currents and waves. By applying a qualitative analysis, seabed morphology is for the first time related to the direction of the oil slick expansion, as it is able to alter the movement of sea currents. Specifically, the direction of the major axis of the oil spills, in most of the cases examined, is oriented according to the prevailing azimuth of bathymetric features. This work suggests that oil spills in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea should be mitigated in the very few hours after their onset, and before wind and currents disperse them. We explain that protocols should be prioritized between neighboring countries to mitigate any oil spills.

  16. Scattering and absorption characteristics of atmospheric aerosols over a semi-urban coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, K.; Lakshmi Kumar, T. V.; Rao, D. Narayana; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Babu, S. Suresh; Krishnamoorthy, K.

    2014-11-01

    The scattering and absorption components of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) over a semi-urban coastal location (12.81°N, 80.03°E) near the mega city Chennai in peninsular India are separated using the collocated measurements of Black Carbon concentration and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height (ABLH) from ERA Interim Reanalysis data assuming that most of the BC is contained and homogeneously mixed in the ABL. It is found that the absorption component to scattering component ratio has a strong seasonal variation with a pronounced maximum in the South West (SW) monsoon season. This is indicative of more effective wet removal of scattering aerosols than absorbing (BC) aerosols. There could also be an effect due to preferential removal of large particles which would have a lower content of BC. The Angstrom wavelength exponent shows a minimum in the SW monsoon season, the minimum being more pronounced for the scattering aerosols implying relative dominance of coarse mode particles. Investigation of the effect of Relative Humidity on scattering and absorption components of AOD revealed that the BC (absorbing) aerosols are non-hydrophilic/not coated with hydrophilic substance.

  17. An investigation of nucleation events in a coastal urban environment in the Southern Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. Mejía

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of and conditions favourable to nucleation were investigated at an industrial and commercial coastal location in Brisbane, Australia during five different campaigns covering a total period of 13 months. To identify potential nucleation events, the difference in number concentration in the size range 14–30 nm (N14−30 between consecutive observations was calculated using first-order differencing. The data showed that nucleation events were a rare occurrence, and that in the absence of nucleation the particle number was dominated by particles in the range 30–300 nm. In many instances, total particle concentration declined during nucleation. There was no clear pattern in change in NO and NO2 concentrations during the events. SO2 concentration, in the majority of cases, declined during nucleation but there were exceptions. Most events took place in summer, followed by winter and then spring, and no events were observed for the autumn campaigns. The events were associated with sea breeze and long-range transport. Roadside emissions, in contrast, did not contribute to nucleation, probably due to the predominance of particles in the range 50–100 nm associated with these emissions.

  18. Biogeography of Anurans from the Poorly Known and Threatened Coastal Sandplains of Eastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ariane Lima; Guedes, Thaís Barreto; Napoli, Marcelo Felgueiras

    2015-01-01

    The east coast of Brazil comprises an extensive area inserted in the Tropical Atlantic Domain and is represented by sandy plains of beach ridges commonly known as Restingas. The coastal environments are unique and house a rich amphibian fauna, the geographical distribution patterns of which are incipient. Biogeographical studies can explain the current distributional patterns and provide the identification of natural biogeographical units. These areas are important in elucidating the evolutionary history of the taxa and the areas where they occur. The aim of this study was to seek natural biogeographical units in the Brazilian sandy plains of beach ridges by means of distribution data of amphibians and to test the main predictions of the vicariance model to explain the patterns found. We revised and georeferenced data on the geographical distribution of 63 anuran species. We performed a search for latitudinal distribution patterns along the sandy coastal plains of Brazil using the non-metric multidimensional scaling method (NMDS) and the biotic element analysis to identify natural biogeographical units. The results showed a monotonic variation in anuran species composition along the latitudinal gradient with a break in the clinal pattern from 23°S to 25°S latitude (states of Rio de Janeiro to São Paulo). The major predictions of the vicariance model were corroborated by the detection of four biotic elements with significantly clustered distribution and by the presence of congeneric species distributed in distinct biotic elements. The results support the hypothesis that vicariance could be one of the factors responsible for the distribution patterns of the anuran communities along the sandy coastal plains of eastern Brazil. The results of the clusters are also congruent with the predictions of paleoclimatic models made for the Last Glacial Maximum of the Pleistocene, such as the presence of historical forest refugia and biogeographical patterns already detected

  19. National assessment of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards--Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Thompson, David M.; Sopkin, Kristin L.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Sallenger, Asbury H.

    2012-01-01

    Sandy beaches provide a natural barrier between the ocean and inland communities, ecosystems, and resources. However, these dynamic environments move and change in response to winds, waves, and currents. During a hurricane, these changes can be large and sometimes catastrophic. High waves and storm surge act together to erode beaches and inundate low-lying lands, putting inland communities at risk. A decade of USGS research on storm-driven coastal change hazards has provided the data and modeling capabilities to identify areas of our coastline that are likely to experience extreme and potentially hazardous erosion during a hurricane. This report defines hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards for sandy beaches along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coastline. The analysis is based on a storm-impact scaling model that uses observations of beach morphology combined with sophisticated hydrodynamic models to predict how the coast will respond to the direct landfall of category 1-5 hurricanes. Hurricane-induced water levels, due to both surge and waves, are compared to beach and dune elevations to determine the probabilities of three types of coastal change: collision (dune erosion), overwash, and inundation. As new beach morphology observations and storm predictions become available, this analysis will be updated to describe how coastal vulnerability to storms will vary in the future.

  20. A review of the LATEX project: mesoscale to submesoscale processes in a coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Anne A.; Doglioli, Andrea M.; Nencioli, Francesco; Kersalé, Marion; Hu, Ziyuan; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    The main objective of the LAgrangian Transport EXperiment (LATEX) project was to study the influence of coastal mesoscale and submesoscale physical processes on circulation dynamics, cross-shelf exchanges, and biogeochemistry in the western continental shelf of the Gulf of Lion, Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. LATEX was a five-year multidisciplinary project based on the combined analysis of numerical model simulations and multi-platform field experiments. The model component included a ten-year realistic 3D numerical simulation, with a 1 km horizontal resolution over the gulf, nested in a coarser 3 km resolution model. The in situ component involved four cruises, including a large-scale multidisciplinary campaign with two research vessels in 2010. This review concentrates on the physics results of LATEX, addressing three main subjects: (1) the investigation of the mesoscale to submesoscale processes. The eddies are elliptic, baroclinic, and anticyclonic; the strong thermal and saline front is density compensated. Their generation processes are studied; (2) the development of sampling strategies for their direct observations. LATEX has implemented an adaptive strategy Lagrangian tool, with a reference software available on the web, to perform offshore campaigns in a Lagrangian framework; (3) the quantification of horizontal mixing and cross-shelf exchanges. Lateral diffusivity coefficients, calculated in various ways including a novel technique, are in the range classically encountered for their associated scales. Cross-shelf fluxes have been calculated, after retrieving the near-inertial oscillation contribution. Further perspectives are discussed, especially for the ongoing challenge of studying submesoscale features remotely and from in situ data.

  1. Using Teleducation and Field Experiences to further the Understanding of Coastal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, S. A.; Szuba, T. A.; Shugart, H.

    2007-05-01

    This project is an outreach and education program with a partner in the K-12 schools at Accomack County on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. It endeavors to build a community knowledgeable of the importance the ocean plays daily in our lives, and our own impact on the ocean. It is an program built in stages that: 1) Establish high speed live interactive classes (teleducation) linkages with the Eastern Shore High Schools with earth science teachers enabling them to remotely participate in University of Virginia classes in Oceanography (designed on a faculty development basis or acquire NSTA certification in Earth Science Education, as well as participation by seniors in the Accomack Schools; 2) Establish field experiences for teachers and selected students that involve travel to both the Virginia Coast Reserve Long Term Ecological Research (VCR/LTER) Center, UVA to observe first- hand the science programs at those locations and participate in cutting edge coastal marine research efforts. These experiences improve student understanding of the ocean-atmosphere biogeophysical system and encourage students to explore the sciences as a field of study and possible vocation. Advanced high school students and science teachers from Accomack County Public Schools participated in an experience involving field and laboratory methods employed in a NSF-sponsored study of the coupled natural-human dynamics on the Eastern Shore of Virginia over the past 500 years (NSF-Biocomplexity). Students and teachers worked with researchers of the VCR facility in Oyster, VA, collected sediment cores from Chesapeake Bay tributaries, and traveled to the Organic Geochemistry Laboratory at UVA, in Charlottesville, VA to prepare and analyze samples for isotopic and palynological information. In a first of its kind connectivity, in June/July, 2006, using high speed internet connections, a summer class in Oceanography was live, interactively broadcast (teleducation) from UVA to Arcadia High School on

  2. Waste loading in shrimp and fish processing effluents: potential source of hazards to the coastal and nearshore environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Khan, Saleha; Tanaka, Masaru

    2004-07-01

    On average, only 30-40% of the global fishery production is consumed fresh and the rest 60-70% is processed for human consumption and other purposes. Although the proportion of the total fishery production that are processed remained relatively stable over the last decade, the total bulk of processed fishery commodity increased due to the steady increase in the total fishery production. Processing of large bulk of fish, shrimp and other aquatic organisms produces a corresponding large bulk of by-products and wastes. Although recent trend shows that much of these wastes are made into various value added products, considerable quantities are discharged as the processing effluents with large volume of waters used in processing. Reports suggest that fish and shrimp processing effluents are very high in biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), fat-oil-grease (FOG), pathogenic and other microflora, organic matters and nutrients, etc. Fish and shrimp processing effluents are, therefore, highly likely to produce adverse effects on the receiving coastal and marine environments. Although substantial reduction of the waste loads is possible by applying available simple techniques, this is not in practice in most part of the world due to lack of proper managerial and regulatory approach. The present paper reviews the characteristics of fish and shrimp processing effluents as a potential source of coastal and marine pollution and, using the existing data, analyzes the global production and discharge of waste loads from the processing plants and discusses available options for waste treatment and management.

  3. Characteristics of coastal dune topography and vegetation in environments recently modified using beach fill and vegetation plantings, Veneto, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Karl F; Gamper, Ulrike; Fontolan, Giorgio; Bezzi, Annelore; Jackson, Nancy L

    2009-12-01

    Human actions can contribute to degradation of coastal environments or they can increase the likelihood that these environments will be restored. Beach nourishment provides a basis for restoration, but ways must be found to add habitat improvement to projects designed for shore protection. This study examines how beach nourishment projects can help reinstate dune landscapes in locations where beaches and dunes had been replaced by static shore protection structures. Dune topography and vegetation on three nourished sites on the northern Adriatic Coast of Italy are compared to a reference site to evaluate changes after beach fill was emplaced. Results reveal how nourishment projects used for shore protection can restore the space available for dunes to form, increase the likelihood of sediment transfers inland and increase the diversity of topography and vegetation. Beach raking prevents formation and growth of hummocky, incipient backshore dunes that would otherwise evolve into a naturally functioning foredune. Sand-trapping fences can speed the process of foredune development but can be counterproductive if they interfere with transport to beach grass (Ammophila littoralis) planted landward of them. Shore protection structures can provide stability and more time for dune evolution on eroding shores, resulting in greater species richness and longer retention of ecological niches. These structures need not be required if re-nourishment occurs frequently enough to provide a beach wide enough to protect against storm wave uprush.

  4. Activity of 210Po and 210Pb in the riverine environs of coastal Kerala on the southwest coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Venunathan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the systematic investigations on the activity concentrations of 210Po and 210Pb in the riverine environs of Bharathapuzha, Periyar and Kallada, the three major rivers of coastal Kerala. The radionuclides 210Po and 210Pb in sediment and water samples were separated using radiochemical methods and activity was counted using scintillation based alpha counting system. The mean value of 210Po activity in sediment samples was found to be 3.4 Bq kg−1, 40.0 Bq kg−1 and 22.5 Bq kg−1 in Bharathapuzha, Periyar and Kallada river respectively. The mean value of 210Pb activity was found to be 13.5 Bq kg−1, 88.7 Bq kg−1 and 60.8 Bq kg−1 in the sediment samples of Bharathapuzha, Periyar and Kallada river respectively. The activity ratio 210Po/210Pb shows that the radionuclides 210Po and 210Pb are not in equilibrium in the riverine environs and the accumulation of 210Pb in sediment is greater than that of 210Po. The disequilibrium between 210Po and 210Pb and the higher activity of 210Pb indicates the presence of unsupported 210Pb in the sediments. A significant correlation was observed between the concentrations of these radionuclides and organic matter content and clay minerals of the sediment samples. The low activity of 210Po and 210Pb was observed in the dissolved phase due to the removal of these particle reactive radionuclides from solution to particle. High Kd value for 210Po and 210Pb in water column indicates that there is a strong adsorption of these radionuclides on to the suspended particles in the aquatic environment, where suspended particulate matter acts as a carrier to transport and removal of 210Po and 210Pb from their site of production.

  5. Draft Detailed Project Report and Environmental Assessment, Sandy Point Navigation Channel, Whatcom County, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    ment. Maurice L. Schwartz, of Coastal Consultants, Inc., provided a report on shoaling at Sandy Point which was also used in developing this...8217 BS SOFT TO VERY A. SFT. LACO [...j L RAVEL C0%TACT SUR- TORVAYAE.BOOPSF FIT ORGANIC SILT £PEAT IN LAYE RS, VERY CT LL:RA BLACK * ~~ VE ASN PL 44...Schwartz, Maurice L. 1983. Marina inlet shoaling at Sandy Point, Washington. Submitted to Seattle District, U.S. Amy Corps of Engineers. U.S. Fish and

  6. Uncertainties in sandy shorelines evolution under the Bruun rule assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonéri eLe Cozannet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current practice of sandy shoreline change assessments, the local sedimentary budget is evaluated using the sediment balance equation, that is, by summing the contributions of longshore and cross-shore processes. The contribution of future sea-level-rise induced by climate change is usually obtained using the Bruun rule, which assumes that the shoreline retreat is equal to the change of sea-level divided by the slope of the upper shoreface. However, it remains unsure that this approach is appropriate to account for the impacts of future sea-level rise. This is due to the lack of relevant observations to validate the Bruun rule under the expected sea-level rise rates. To address this issue, this article estimates the coastal settings and period of time under which the use of the Bruun rule could be (invalidated, in the case of wave-exposed gently-sloping sandy beaches. Using the sedimentary budgets of Stive (2004 and probabilistic sea-level rise scenarios based on IPCC, we provide shoreline change projections that account for all uncertain hydrosedimentary processes affecting idealized coasts (impacts of sea-level rise, storms and other cross-shore and longshore processes. We evaluate the relative importance of each source of uncertainties in the sediment balance equation using a global sensitivity analysis. For scenario RCP 6.0 and 8.5 and in the absence of coastal defences, the model predicts a perceivable shift toward generalized beach erosion by the middle of the 21st century. In contrast, the model predictions are unlikely to differ from the current situation in case of scenario RCP 2.6. Finally, the contribution of sea-level rise and climate change scenarios to sandy shoreline change projections uncertainties increases with time during the 21st century. Our results have three primary implications for coastal settings similar to those provided described in Stive (2004 : first, the validation of the Bruun rule will not necessarily be

  7. Numerical prediction on the scour burial of cylinder object freely resting on the sandy seabed in the East China Sea using the DRAMBUIE model1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-guang PANG; Li-qian LIU; Kun LI

    2014-01-01

    After experiencing 8-day combined tidal current, circulation and wave actions, scour depth surrounding cylinder object freely resting on sandy seabed in the East China Sea (ECS) in January is numerically predicted using the DRAMBUIE model designed for scour burial, which has been widely used and verified by in-situ experiments. During the period of numerical integration, the value of time t is generally variable at every time step via the special time-stepped approach developed by this paper to eliminate the time error. The tidal current velocity, wave orbital velocity and the depth-averaged circulation in the ECS have been obtained by numerical simulations with Estuarine Coastal and Ocean Model (ECOM), Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) model and Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model respectively. The control experiment and several idealized test cases on influential factors in scour depth reveal that the dominant hydrodynamic factor is tidal current in the ECS under normal weather conditions, and the impacts of shelf circulation and wave motion on local scour almost can be ignored with an exception of the Kuroshio area where the high-speed mainstream of Kuroshio flows. It is also indicated that in sandy sediments, the distribution of scour depth nearly follows the pattern of tidal currents, while the secondary influencing factor on scour depth appears to be grain size of sandy sediment in the ECS. Numerical tests on sediment grain size further testify that much finer sand is more easily scoured, and an increasing trend for scour depth with reduction of grain size is displayed due to imposed resistance of larger sized particles. Three aspects explored by this paper, including the empirical equations in the Defense Research Agency Mine Burial Environment (DRAMBUIE) model, the accuracy of inputs and infill process can severely affect the prediction of scour depth surrounding cylinder objects freely resting on sandy seabed in the ECS.

  8. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Based Wireless Sensor Network for Marine-Coastal Environment Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasviña-Moreno, Carlos A; Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Trasviña-Castro, Armando

    2017-02-24

    Marine environments are delicate ecosystems which directly influence local climates, flora, fauna, and human activities. Their monitorization plays a key role in their preservation, which is most commonly done through the use of environmental sensing buoy networks. These devices transmit data by means of satellite communications or close-range base stations, which present several limitations and elevated infrastructure costs. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are another alternative for remote environmental monitoring which provide new types of data and ease of use. These aircraft are mainly used in video capture related applications, in its various light spectrums, and do not provide the same data as sensing buoys, nor can they be used for such extended periods of time. The aim of this research is to provide a flexible, easy to deploy and cost-effective Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for monitoring marine environments. This proposal uses a UAV as a mobile data collector, low-power long-range communications and sensing buoys as part of a single WSN. A complete description of the design, development, and implementation of the various parts of this system is presented, as well as its validation in a real-world scenario.

  9. Endocrine-disrupting chemicals in the Pearl River Delta and coastal environment: sources, transfer, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weihai; Yan, Wen; Huang, Weixia; Miao, Li; Zhong, Lifeng

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the occurrence and behavior of six endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in sewage, river water, and seawater from the Pearl River Delta (PRD). The six EDCs under study were 4-nonylphenol (NP), bisphenol A (BPA), 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2), estrone (E2), 17β-estradiol (E2), and estriol (E3). These EDCs, predominated by BPA, were found in high levels in the influents and the effluents of sewage treatment plants in the area. The relatively high concentrations (0.23-625 ng/L) of the EDCs detected in the receiving river water suggested that the untreated sewage discharge was a major contributor. The EDCs detected in eight outlets of the Pear River and the Pear River Estuary were in the ranges of 1.2-234 and 0.2-178 ng/L, respectively. The estrogen equivalents in the aquatic environments under study ranged from 0.08 to 4.5 ng/L, with E1 and EE2 being the two predominant contributors. As the fluxes of the EDCs from the PRD region to the nearby ocean are over 500 tons each year, the results of this study point to the potential that Pearl River is a significant source of the EDCs to the local environment there.

  10. Mugilid Fish Are Sentinels of Exposure to Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Coastal and Estuarine Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Ortiz-Zarragoitia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects on fish reproduction can result from a variety of toxicity mechanisms first operating at the molecular level. Notably, the presence in the environment of some compounds termed endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs can cause adverse effects on reproduction by interfering with the endocrine system. In some cases, exposure to EDCs leads to the animal feminization and male fish may develop oocytes in testis (intersex condition. Mugilid fish are well suited sentinel organisms to study the effects of reproductive EDCs in the monitoring of estuarine/marine environments. Up-regulation of aromatases and vitellogenins in males and juveniles and the presence of intersex individuals have been described in a wide array of mullet species worldwide. There is a need to develop new molecular markers to identify early feminization responses and intersex condition in fish populations, studying mechanisms that regulate gonad differentiation under exposure to xenoestrogens. Interestingly, an electrophoresis of gonad RNA, shows a strong expression of 5S rRNA in oocytes, indicating the potential of 5S rRNA and its regulating proteins to become useful molecular makers of oocyte presence in testis. Therefore, the use of these oocyte markers to sex and identify intersex mullets could constitute powerful molecular biomarkers to assess xenoestrogenicity in field conditions.

  11. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Based Wireless Sensor Network for Marine-Coastal Environment Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Trasviña-Moreno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine environments are delicate ecosystems which directly influence local climates, flora, fauna, and human activities. Their monitorization plays a key role in their preservation, which is most commonly done through the use of environmental sensing buoy networks. These devices transmit data by means of satellite communications or close-range base stations, which present several limitations and elevated infrastructure costs. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV are another alternative for remote environmental monitoring which provide new types of data and ease of use. These aircraft are mainly used in video capture related applications, in its various light spectrums, and do not provide the same data as sensing buoys, nor can they be used for such extended periods of time. The aim of this research is to provide a flexible, easy to deploy and cost-effective Wireless Sensor Network (WSN for monitoring marine environments. This proposal uses a UAV as a mobile data collector, low-power long-range communications and sensing buoys as part of a single WSN. A complete description of the design, development, and implementation of the various parts of this system is presented, as well as its validation in a real-world scenario.

  12. Mugilid fish are sentinels of exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds in coastal and estuarine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Zarragoitia, Maren; Bizarro, Cristina; Rojo-Bartolomé, Iratxe; de Cerio, Oihane Diaz; Cajaraville, Miren P; Cancio, Ibon

    2014-09-12

    Effects on fish reproduction can result from a variety of toxicity mechanisms first operating at the molecular level. Notably, the presence in the environment of some compounds termed endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can cause adverse effects on reproduction by interfering with the endocrine system. In some cases, exposure to EDCs leads to the animal feminization and male fish may develop oocytes in testis (intersex condition). Mugilid fish are well suited sentinel organisms to study the effects of reproductive EDCs in the monitoring of estuarine/marine environments. Up-regulation of aromatases and vitellogenins in males and juveniles and the presence of intersex individuals have been described in a wide array of mullet species worldwide. There is a need to develop new molecular markers to identify early feminization responses and intersex condition in fish populations, studying mechanisms that regulate gonad differentiation under exposure to xenoestrogens. Interestingly, an electrophoresis of gonad RNA, shows a strong expression of 5S rRNA in oocytes, indicating the potential of 5S rRNA and its regulating proteins to become useful molecular makers of oocyte presence in testis. Therefore, the use of these oocyte markers to sex and identify intersex mullets could constitute powerful molecular biomarkers to assess xenoestrogenicity in field conditions.

  13. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Based Wireless Sensor Network for Marine-Coastal Environment Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasviña-Moreno, Carlos A.; Blasco, Rubén; Marco, Álvaro; Casas, Roberto; Trasviña-Castro, Armando

    2017-01-01

    Marine environments are delicate ecosystems which directly influence local climates, flora, fauna, and human activities. Their monitorization plays a key role in their preservation, which is most commonly done through the use of environmental sensing buoy networks. These devices transmit data by means of satellite communications or close-range base stations, which present several limitations and elevated infrastructure costs. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) are another alternative for remote environmental monitoring which provide new types of data and ease of use. These aircraft are mainly used in video capture related applications, in its various light spectrums, and do not provide the same data as sensing buoys, nor can they be used for such extended periods of time. The aim of this research is to provide a flexible, easy to deploy and cost-effective Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for monitoring marine environments. This proposal uses a UAV as a mobile data collector, low-power long-range communications and sensing buoys as part of a single WSN. A complete description of the design, development, and implementation of the various parts of this system is presented, as well as its validation in a real-world scenario. PMID:28245587

  14. Tsunami characteristics and formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit in Sanriku Coast: implications from numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, D.; Haraguchi, T.; Takahashi, T.

    2013-12-01

    Geological investigation of paleotsunami deposit is crucial for knowing the history and magnitude of tsunami events in the past. Among various kinds of grain sizes, sandy tsunami deposit has been best investigated by previous studies, because of its potential for identification in the sedimentary column. Many sandy tsunami deposits have been found from coastal plains, which have sandy beach and low-lying wetlands. However, sandy tsunami deposits in narrow valleys at rocky ria coast have rarely been found. It may be presumed that formation potential of sandy tsunami layer in the rocky coasts is generally lower than coastal plains, because of the absence of sandy beach, tsunami run-up on steeper slope and stronger return flow. In this presentation, characteristics of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake tsunami in Sanriku Coast, a continuous rocky ria coast located in the northeast Japan, is investigated based on numerical modeling. In addition, the formation potential of sandy tsunami deposit is also investigated based on numerical modeling of sediment transport. Preliminary result of tsunami hydrodynamics showed that the waveform and amplification of the tsunami are clearly affected by the local bathymetry, which is associated with submerged topography formed during the last glacial stage. Although the tsunami height in the offshore of each bay is around 8.0 m, the tsunami height at the bay head was increased in different way. The amplification factor at the bay head was typically 2.0 among most of V-shaped narrow embayments; meanwhile the amplification factor is much lower than 1.0 at some cases. The preliminary result of the modeling of sediment transport predicted huge amount of sediments may be suspended into the water column, given that sandy deposit is available there. Massive erosion and deposition of sea bottom sediments may commonly take place in the bays. However, formation of onshore tsunami deposit differs from each other. Whether the suspended sediments

  15. Reconstruction of centennial-scale fluxes of chemical elements in the Australian coastal environment using seagrass archives

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2015-10-02

    The study of a Posidonia australis sedimentary archive has provided a record of changes in element concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Co, As, Cu, Ni and S) over the last 3000 years in the Australian marine environment. Human-derived contamination in Oyster Harbor (SW Australia) started ~. 100 years ago (AD ~. 1900) and exponentially increased until present. This appears to be related to European colonization of Australia and the subsequent impact of human activities, namely mining, coal and metal production, and extensive agriculture. Two contamination periods of different magnitude have been identified: Expansion period (EXP, AD ~. 1900-1970) and Establishment period (EST, AD ~. 1970 to present). Enrichments of chemical elements with respect to baseline concentrations (in samples older than ~. 115 cal. years BP) were found for all elements studied in both periods, except for Ni, As and S. The highest enrichment factors were obtained for the EST period (ranging from 1.3-fold increase in Cu to 7.2-fold in Zn concentrations) compared to the EXP period (1.1-fold increase for Cu and Cr to 2.4-fold increase for Pb). Zinc, Pb, Mn and Co concentrations during both periods were 2- to 7-fold higher than baseline levels. This study demonstrates the value of Posidonia mats as long-term archives of element concentrations and trends in coastal ecosystems. We also provide preliminary evidence on the potential for Posidonia meadows to act as significant long-term biogeochemical sinks of chemical elements.

  16. The Diurnal Cycle of the Boundary Layer, Convection, Clouds, and Surface Radiation in a Coastal Monsoon Environment (Darwin Australia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Peter T.; Long, Charles N.; Protat, Alain

    2012-08-01

    The diurnal variation of convection and associated cloud and radiative properties remains a significant issue in global NWP and climate models. This study analyzes observed diurnal variability of convection in a coastal monsoonal environment examining the interaction of convective rain clouds, their associated cloud properties, and the impact on the surface radiation and corresponding boundary layer structure during periods where convection is suppressed or active on the large scale. The analysis uses data from the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) as well as routine measurements from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology and the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Both active monsoonal and large-scale suppressed (buildup and break) conditions are examined and demonstrate that the diurnal variation of rainfall is much larger during the break periods and the spatial distribution of rainfall is very different between the monsoon and break regimes. During the active monsoon the total net radiative input to the surface is decreased by more than 3 times the amount than during the break regime - this total radiative cloud forcing is found to be dominated by the shortwave (SW) cloud effects because of the much larger optical thicknesses and persistence of long-lasting anvils and cirrus cloud decks associated with the monsoon regime. These differences in monsoon versus break surface radiative energy contribute to low-level air temperature differences in the boundary layer over the land surfaces.

  17. Primary risk assessment of dimethyldithiocarbamate, a dithiocarbamate fungicide metabolite, based on their probabilistic concentrations in a coastal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hano, Takeshi; Ito, Katsutoshi; Mochida, Kazuhiko; Ohkubo, Nobuyuki; Kono, Kumiko; Onduka, Toshimitsu; Ito, Mana; Ichihashi, Hideki; Fujii, Kazunori; Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    The primary ecological risk of dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC), a dithiocarbamate fungicide (DTC) metabolite, was evaluated based on their probabilistic environmental concentration distributions (ECDs) in the coastal environment, Hiroshima Bay, Japan. And their behavior and temporal trends was further considered. This is the first report of the identification of DMDC from environmental seawater and sediment samples. DMDC concentrations in bottom seawater were substantially higher than those in surface seawater, which are associated with the leachability from sediments in bottom seawaters, and with photodegradation in surface seawaters. Furthermore, seasonal risks are dominated by higher concentrations from April to June, indicating temporal variation in the risk to exposed species. Hierarchical Bayesian analysis offered DMDC ECD medians and range (5th to 95th percentiles) of 0.85 ng L(-1) (0.029, 22), 12 ng L(-1) (3.2, 48) and 110 ng kg dry(-1) (9.5, 1200) in surface seawater, bottom seawater and sediment, respectively. Considering that DMDC and DTCs have similar toxicological potential to aquatic organisms, the occurrence of the compound in water is likely to be of biological relevance. In summary, this work provides the first demonstration that the ecological risk of DMDC and its derived DTCs in Hiroshima Bay is relatively high, and that DTCs should be a high priority for future research on marine contamination, especially in bottom seawaters.

  18. Vegetational response to human colonisation of the coastal and volcanic environments of Ketilsstaðir, southern Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlendsson, Egill; Edwards, Kevin J.; Buckland, Paul C.

    2009-09-01

    Tephra-dated, high-resolution pollen profiles from Ketilsstaðir, southern Iceland, indicate a largely unwooded pre-settlement environment, a probable consequence of the exposed coastal location. The degree of change associated with the Norse landnám is more limited than in many Icelandic pollen diagrams. There are three main periods of change in the post-settlement vegetational development of the area. Firstly, Norse settlement affected the hydrology of the bog, resulting in the near-disappearance of Sphagnum and agricultural activity led to a reduction of some species (e.g. Angelica spp. and, Salix). Secondly, the establishment of probable permanent settlement in the mid-11th century AD initiated expansion of such apophytic taxa as Plantago spp. Lactuceae, Ranunculus spp. and Pteridophytes. Thirdly, the ≥ 10 cm thick Katla tephra, deposited in AD 1357, enhanced drainage of the bog surface, favouring dryland taxa (e.g. Poaceae, Galium and Lactuceae). The tephra deposit and the associated drainage probably caused or contributed to the local extinction of the wetland beetle Hydraena britteni. The study has enabled a series of natural and humanly-related issues to be addressed including tephra-vegetation relationships, the anthropogenic reduction in plant diversity, and comparisons between historical and environmental settlement records.

  19. Seasonal variation of bivalve larvae on an exposed sandy beach on Kashima-nada: Tips for the sandy beach recruitment process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hideki; Saito, Hajime; Adachi, Kumiko; Toyohara, Haruhiko

    2011-02-01

    Bivalves are often the dominant macrobenthos species in exposed sandy beach environments. However, our understanding of their recruitment processes before post-settlement stages on sandy beaches with highly energetic environments is incomplete. To clarify the characteristics of the free-swimming planktonic stage that affects recruitment efficiency in sandy shore ecosystems, we investigated the temporal (weekly-biweekly) variation of bivalve planktonic larval concentration coupled with oceanographic conditions on an exposed sandy shore on the sea of Kashima-nada, Japan, from summer 2003 to autumn 2005. Larvae were observed throughout the year, but the surge of larval concentration composed of sandy beach and sessile bivalves occurred most prominently in summer, from August to September. The peak concentration of larvae during this season was more than 1000 times higher than in other seasons. The larval concentration was positively correlated with water temperature and northward wind velocity and negatively correlated with each of the nutrient concentrations. On the other hand, chlorophyll a concentration and salinity seemed to have little effect on the larval concentration. Based on this fundamental knowledge, further investigations about planktonic larvae in sandy beaches are needed.

  20. Floating seaweed in the neustonic environment: A case study from Belgian coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriessche, Sofie; Vincx, Magda; Degraer, Steven

    2006-02-01

    Floating seaweeds form the most important natural component of all floating material found on the surface of oceans and seas. Notwithstanding the absence of natural rocky shores, ephemeral floating seaweed clumps are frequently encountered along the Belgian coast. From October 2002 to April 2003, seaweed samples and control samples (i.e. surface water samples from a seaweed-free area) were collected every other week. Multivariate analysis on neustonic macrofaunal abundances showed significant differences between seaweed and control samples in the fraction > 1 mm. Differences were less conspicuous in the 0.5-1 mm fraction. Seaweed samples were characterised by the presence of seaweed fauna e.g. Acari, Idotea baltica, Gammarus sp ., while control samples mainly contained Calanoida, Larvacea, Chaetognatha, and planktonic larvae of crustaceans and polychaetes. Seaweed samples (1 mm fraction) harboured considerably higher diversities (× 3), densities (× 18) and biomasses (× 49) compared to the surrounding water column (control samples). The impact of floating seaweeds on the neustonic environment was quantified by the calculation of the added values of seaweed samples considering biomass and density. These calculations resulted in mean added values of 311 ind m - 2 in density and 305 mg ADW m - 2 in biomass. The association degree per species was expressed as the mean percentage of individuals found in seaweed samples in proportion to the total density and biomass of that species (seaweed samples + control samples). Thirteen species showed an association percentage > 95%, and can therefore be considered members of the floating seaweed fauna.

  1. Application of ERTS-1-data to the protection and management of New Jersey's coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunghans, R. S.; Feinberg, E. B.; Mairs, R. L. (Principal Investigator); Woodward, D.; Thibault, D. A.; Macomber, R. T.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. New Jersey's planned, regionalized network of sewage disposal facilities has been plotted on an ERTS-1 mosaic and circulation parameters for each of the planned outfall locations have been analyzed using the ERTS-1 imagery and comparative aircraft photography. Work is continuing on the circulation and dispersion of barge-dumped wastes in the New York Bight area. One of the largest remote sensing experiments ever attempted in this country was completed on April 7, 1973 during the ERTS-1 overpass. The test area included the northern portion of New Jersey and the Raritan Bay - New York Harbor area. Three NASA aircraft, two helicopters, nine surface vessels, 40 ground team personnel, and numerous oceanographic, radiometric, and meteorological equipment were deployed in an effort to characterize the surface and near-surface circulation dynamics in this 600 square mile area, during an entire tidal cycle. The analyses of these data in concert with all previous ERTS-1 overpasses will provide information that can lead to a better and more rational use of the nearshore marine environment. The data will be utilized to plan future outfall locations, regulating offshore disposal of wastes, etc.

  2. Detection, Identification, and Prevalence of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Fish and Coastal Environment in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaboudi, Akram R; Ababneh, Mustafa; Osaili, Tareq M; Al Shloul, Khalaf

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is widely distributed in the marine environments and considered the leading cause of human gastroenteritis in Asian countries. A total of 150 marketed fish and 50 water and sediment samples from the Gulf of Aqaba were examined for the prevalence of pathogenic strains of V. parahaemolyticus. A total of 132 typical isolates obtained from the primary selective medium (thiosulfate-citrate bile salt sucrose agar) and showed positive biochemical properties were subjected to confirmation by polymerase chain reaction targeting the gyrB and toxR genes. These genes were confirmed at rates of 82% (108 isolates) and 72% (95 isolates), respectively. The toxR positive isolates were tested for the presence of thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) virulence genes. Accordingly, the prevalence rates of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were 4%, 8%, and 12% in sediment, water, and fish samples, respectively. The 16S rRNA amplification and sequences were conducted for confirmation of the isolates and showing the relatedness among these isolates. The results showed that both 16S rRNA and toxR assays had same sensitivity and tested isolates had high nucleotide similarity irrespective of their sources.

  3. Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV for High-Resolution Reconstruction of Topography: The Structure from Motion Approach on Coastal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mancini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The availability of high-resolution Digital Surface Models of coastal environments is of increasing interest for scientists involved in the study of the coastal system processes. Among the range of terrestrial and aerial methods available to produce such a dataset, this study tests the utility of the Structure from Motion (SfM approach to low-altitude aerial imageries collected by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV. The SfM image-based approach was selected whilst searching for a rapid, inexpensive, and highly automated method, able to produce 3D information from unstructured aerial images. In particular, it was used to generate a dense point cloud and successively a high-resolution Digital Surface Models (DSM of a beach dune system in Marina di Ravenna (Italy. The quality of the elevation dataset produced by the UAV-SfM was initially evaluated by comparison with point cloud generated by a Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS surveys. Such a comparison served to highlight an average difference in the vertical values of 0.05 m (RMS = 0.19 m. However, although the points cloud comparison is the best approach to investigate the absolute or relative correspondence between UAV and TLS methods, the assessment of geomorphic features is usually based on multi-temporal surfaces analysis, where an interpolation process is required. DSMs were therefore generated from UAV and TLS points clouds and vertical absolute accuracies assessed by comparison with a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS survey. The vertical comparison of UAV and TLS DSMs with respect to GNSS measurements pointed out an average distance at cm-level (RMS = 0.011 m. The successive point by point direct comparison between UAV and TLS elevations show a very small average distance, 0.015 m, with RMS = 0.220 m. Larger values are encountered in areas where sudden changes in topography are present. The UAV-based approach was demonstrated to be a straightforward one and accuracy of the vertical dataset

  4. Effects of water application intensity of microsprinkler irrigation on water and salt environment and crop growth in coastal saline soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Lin-lin; KANG Yao-hu; WAN Shu-qin

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory and ifeld experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of water application intensity (WAI) on soil salinity management and the growth ofFestuca arundinacea (festuca) under three stages of water and salt management strategies using microsprinkler irrigation in Hebei Province, North China. The soil water content (è) and salinity of homogeneous coastal saline soils were evaluated under different water application intensities in the laboratory experiment. The results indicated that the WAI of microsprinkler irrigation inlfuenced theè, electrical conductivity (ECe) and pH of saline soils. As the WAI increased, the average values ofè and ECe in the 0–40 cm proifle also increased, while their average values in the 40–60 cm proifle decreased. The pH value also slightly decreased as depth increased, but no signiifcant differences were observed between the different treatments. The time periods of the water redistribution treatments had no obvious effects. Based on the results forè, ECe and pH, a smaler WAI was more desirable. The ifeld experiment was conducted after being considered the results of the technical parameter experiment and evaporation, wind and leaching duration. The ifeld experiment included three stages of water and salt regulation, based on three soil matric potentials (SMP), in which the SMP at a 20-cm depth below the surface was used to trigger irrigation. The results showed that the microsprinkler irrigation created an appropriate environment for festuca growth through the three stages of water and salt regulation. The low-salinity conditions that occurred at 0–10 cm depth during the ifrst stage (−5 kPa) continued to expand through the next two stages. The average pH value was less than 8.5. The tiler number of festuca increased as SMP decreased from the ifrst stage to the third stage. After the three stages of water and salt regulation, the highly saline soil gradualy changed to a low-saline soil. Overal, based on the

  5. Development and application of a new comprehensive image-based classification scheme for coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Christopher

    The coastal (terrestrial) and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf show a unique biophysical succession of marine features from a highly urbanized, developed coastal region in the north (i.e. northern Miami-Dade County) to a protective marine sanctuary in the southeast (i.e. Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary). However, the establishment of a standard bio-geomorphological classification scheme for this area of coastal and benthic environments is lacking. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis and answer the research question of whether new parameters of integrating geomorphological components with dominant biological covers could be developed and applied across multiple remote sensing platforms for an innovative way to identify, interpret, and classify diverse coastal and benthic environments along the southeast Florida continental shelf. An ordered manageable hierarchical classification scheme was developed to incorporate the categories of Physiographic Realm, Morphodynamic Zone, Geoform, Landform, Dominant Surface Sediment, and Dominant Biological Cover. Six different remote sensing platforms (i.e. five multi-spectral satellite image sensors and one high-resolution aerial orthoimagery) were acquired, delineated according to the new classification scheme, and compared to determine optimal formats for classifying the study area. Cognitive digital classification at a nominal scale of 1:6000 proved to be more accurate than autoclassification programs and therefore used to differentiate coastal marine environments based on spectral reflectance characteristics, such as color, tone, saturation, pattern, and texture of the seafloor topology. In addition, attribute tables were created in conjugation with interpretations to quantify and compare the spatial relationships between classificatory units. IKONOS-2 satellite imagery was determined to be the optimal platform for applying the hierarchical classification scheme

  6. Hurricane Sandy washover deposits on southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James M.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Zaremba, Nicholas J.; Lunghino, Brent D.; Kane, Haunani H.

    2016-07-22

    Sedimentologic and topographic data from Hurricane Sandy washover deposits were collected from southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey, in order to document changes to the barrier-island beaches, dunes, and coastal wetlands caused by Hurricane Sandy and subsequent storm events. These data will provide a baseline dataset for use in future coastal change descriptive and predictive studies and assessments. The data presented here were collected as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/sandy-wetland-assessment/), which aims to assess ecological and societal vulnerability that results from long- and short-term physical changes to barrier islands and coastal wetlands. This report describes data that were collected in April 2015, approximately 2½ years after Hurricane Sandy’s landfall on October 29, 2012. During the field campaign, washover deposits were photographed and described, and sediment cores, sediment samples, and surface-elevation data were collected. Data collected during this study, including sample locations and elevations, core photographs, computed tomography scans, descriptive core logs, sediment grain-size data, and accompanying Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata, are available in the associated U.S. Geological Survey data release (Bishop and others, 2016; http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7PK0D7S).

  7. Process-based modeling of coastal dune development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.C.; Roelvink, D.; Luijendijk, A.P.; De Vries, S.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the aeolian transport model DUNE (Sauermann et al., 2001, Kroy et al., 2002) that describes important features and dynamics of typical desert dunes, is extended such that it can be applied in sandy coastal areas. Initial tests explore the limitations of the model in coastal areas afte

  8. Sulfide oxidation and distribution of metals near abandoned copper mines in coastal environments, Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, R.A.; Munk, L.; Foster, A.L.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Stillings, L.L.

    2008-01-01

    The oxidation of sulfide-rich rocks, mostly leftover debris from Cu mining in the early 20th century, is contributing to metal contamination of local coastal environments in Prince William Sound, Alaska. Analyses of sulfide, water, sediment, precipitate and biological samples from the Beatson, Ellamar, and Threeman mine sites show that acidic surface waters generated from sulfide weathering are pathways for redistribution of environmentally important elements into and beyond the intertidal zone at each site. Volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits composed of pyrrhotite and (or) pyrite + chalcopyrite + sphalerite with subordinate galena, arsenopyrite, and cobaltite represent potent sources of Cu, Zn, Pb, As, Co, Cd, and Hg. The resistance to oxidation among the major sulfides increases in the order pyrrhotite ??? sphalerite Hg (to 4100 ng/L) in the pore waters probably result from oxidation of sphalerite-rich rocks. The low-pH and high concentrations of dissolved Fe, Al, and SO4 are conducive to precipitation of interstitial jarosite in the intertidal gravels. Although pore waters from the intertidal zone at the Threeman mine site have circumneutral pH values, small amounts of dissolved Fe2+ in the pore waters are oxidized during mixing with seawater, resulting in precipitation of Fe-oxyhydroxide flocs along the beach-seawater interface. At the Beatson site, surface waters funneled through the underground mine workings and discharged across the waste dumps have near-neutral pH (6.7-7.3) and a relatively small base-metal load; however, these streams probably play a role in the physical transport of metalliferous particulates into intertidal and offshore areas during storm events. Somewhat more acidic fluids, to pH 5.3, occur in stagnant seeps and small streams emerging from the Beatson waste dumps. Amorphous Fe precipitates in stagnant waters at Beatson have high Cu (5.2 wt%) and Zn (2.3 wt%) concentrations that probably reflect adsorption onto the extremely high

  9. Revealing accumulation zones of plastic pellets in sandy beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fabiana T; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Barbosa, Lucas; Turra, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Microplastics such as pellets are reported worldwide on sandy beaches, and have possible direct and indirect impacts on the biota and physical characteristics of the habitats where they accumulate. Evaluations of their standing stock at different spatial scales generate data on levels of contamination. This information is needed to identify accumulation zones and the specific beach habitats and communities that are likely to be most affected. Standing stocks of plastic pellets were evaluated in 13 sandy beaches in São Paulo state, Brazil. The sampling strategy incorporated across-shore transects from coastal dunes and backshores, and vertical profiles of the accumulated pellets down to 1 m depth below the sediment surface. Accumulation zones were identified at regional (among beaches) and local (between compartments) scales. At the regional scale pellet density tended to increase at beaches on the central and southwestern coast, near ports and factories that produce and transport the largest amounts of pellets in the country. At the local scale coastal dunes showed larger accumulations of pellets than backshores. For both compartments pellets tended to occur deeper in areas where standing stocks were larger. Most of the pellets were concentrated from the surface down to 0.4 m depth, suggesting that organisms inhabiting this part of the sediment column are more exposed to the risks associated with the presence of pellets. Our findings shed light on the local and regional scales of spatial variability of microplastics and their consequences for assessment and monitoring schemes in coastal compartments. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northern California: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Northern California, classified according to the Environmental...

  11. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Hudson River: WETLANDS (Environmental Sensitivity Index Wetland Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector polygons representing coastal wetland habitats for the Hudson River classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  12. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Southern California: ESI (Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Southern California, classified according to the Environmental...

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector arcs and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Northwest...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Upper Coast of Texas: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for the Upper...

  15. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Upper Coast of Texas: ESIL (ESI Shoreline Types - Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIL data set contains lines representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of the Upper Coast of Texas, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity...

  16. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Upper Coast of Texas: ESIP (ESI Shoreline Types - Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ESIP data set contains polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of the Upper Coast of Texas, classified according to the Environmental...

  17. Basin-scale contributions of Cr, Ni and Co from Ortegal Complex to the surrounding coastal environment (SW Europe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego, Ricardo; Caetano, Miguel; Ospina-Alvarez, Natalia; Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos

    2014-01-15

    The enrichment of Cr and Ni in the coastal zones is usually associated with anthropogenic sources such as the tanning, galvanization, ceramic, and cement industries. However, geological complexes of specific lithologic composition located near shorelines may act as natural sources of metals to the continental shelf. Cape Ortegal (SW Europe) is an ultramafic complex that has Cr, Ni and Co enriched in rocks due to the minerals chromite, chromospinel, gersdorfite and pentlandite. Thus, the hypothesis that this geological complex contributes to metal enrichment in Ortigueira and Barqueiro Rias and the adjacent continental shelf was tested. Chromium, Ni, and Co were determined in water and in suspended particulate matter of ria tributaries, rainfall, surface sediments, mussels, and algae. High contents of Cr (max. 1670mg·kg(-1)) and Ni (max. 1360 mg · kg(-1)) were found in the sediments surrounding Cape Ortegal and the Ortigueira Ria as a result of erosion of exposed cliffs. Dissolved Cr and Ni concentrations in fluvial waters were significantly higher in the rivers that crosses the Ortegal Complex, i.e. Lourido (0.47 μg Cr · L(-1); 9.4 μg Ni · L(-1)) and Landoi (0.37 μg Cr · L(-1); 4.3 μg Ni · L(-1)), in comparison with the nearby basin out of the complex influence (Sor River: fluvial contributions of Cr and Ni to the Ortigueira Ria were higher than fluxes into the Barqueiro Ria. Moreover, the increase in Cr and Ni in the rainfall in summer demonstrated the importance of the atmosphere pathway for introducing these elements into the aquatic environment. As a consequence, the contents of these metals in soft tissues and shell of mussels and algae from the Ortigueira Ria were higher than the organisms from Barqueiro Ria. Thus, geological complexes, such as the Cape Ortegal, located in an uncontaminated area, can increase the land-sea exchange of trace metals.

  18. A sensitivity analysis of the parameters controlling water-sediment interactions in the coastal zone: Consequences to man and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosjpe, M.

    2011-10-01

    A sensitivity analysis has been carried out on the basis of the local and global sensitivity indexes for selected radionuclides ( 3H, 137Cs, 238Pu, 241Am and 244Cm) and main parameters describing the water-sediment interaction (sediment reworking rate, pore-water turnover rate, sediment distribution coefficient, suspended sediment load in water column, sedimentation rate, molecular diffusion coefficient, surface sediment thickness, porosity of bottom sediment and density of sediment material). Sensitivity analysis has been carried out using a compartment model for dose assessment to man and biota, which includes the processes of advection of radioactivity between compartments, sedimentation, diffusion of radioactivity through pore water in sediments, particle mixing, pore water mixing and a burial process of radioactivity in deep sediment layers. The sensitivity analysis indicates that for the conditions in the Norwegian Current (the Norwegian Sea) particle mixing dominates the transfer of radioactivity between the bottom water and surface sediment compartments. For the conditions in the Ob Bay (the Kara Sea), the sedimentation process has also been found to be significant. The calculated dynamics of the sensitivity indexes demonstrate clearly the complexities encountered when modeling water-sediment interactions. It is also shown that the results can be strongly dependent on the time of analysis. For example, given a specific change of parameters the radionuclide concentration will be either increased or decreased, depending on the temporal interval. Information provided by the sensitivity analysis can contribute to a better understanding of experimental data and might further improve the parameterization process. The obtained results show that water-sediment interactions can play a key role in the marine coastal environment, thus demonstrating the need to further deepen our understanding of them, as well as improve the models describing them.

  19. Reconstruction of centennial-scale fluxes of chemical elements in the Australian coastal environment using seagrass archives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Oscar; Davis, Grace; Lavery, Paul S; Duarte, Carlos M; Martinez-Cortizas, Antonio; Mateo, Miguel Angel; Masqué, Pere; Arias-Ortiz, Ariane; Rozaimi, Mohammad; Kendrick, Gary A

    2016-01-15

    The study of a Posidonia australis sedimentary archive has provided a record of changes in element concentrations (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, Cr, Cd, Co, As, Cu, Ni and S) over the last 3000 years in the Australian marine environment. Human-derived contamination in Oyster Harbor (SW Australia) started ~100 years ago (AD ~1900) and exponentially increased until present. This appears to be related to European colonization of Australia and the subsequent impact of human activities, namely mining, coal and metal production, and extensive agriculture. Two contamination periods of different magnitude have been identified: Expansion period (EXP, AD ~1900-1970) and Establishment period (EST, AD ~1970 to present). Enrichments of chemical elements with respect to baseline concentrations (in samples older than ~115 cal years BP) were found for all elements studied in both periods, except for Ni, As and S. The highest enrichment factors were obtained for the EST period (ranging from 1.3-fold increase in Cu to 7.2-fold in Zn concentrations) compared to the EXP period (1.1-fold increase for Cu and Cr to 2.4-fold increase for Pb). Zinc, Pb, Mn and Co concentrations during both periods were 2- to 7-fold higher than baseline levels. This study demonstrates the value of Posidonia mats as long-term archives of element concentrations and trends in coastal ecosystems. We also provide preliminary evidence on the potential for Posidonia meadows to act as significant long-term biogeochemical sinks of chemical elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. GIS and Remote Sensing Applications in the Assessment of Change within a Coastal Environment in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund C. Merem

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, the Niger Delta region has experienced rapid growth in population and economicv activity with enormous benefits to the adjacent states and the entire Nigerian society. As the region embarks upon an unprecedented phase of economic expansion in the 21st century, it faces several environmental challenges fuelled partly by the pressures caused by human activities such as oil and gas exploration, housing development, and road construction for transportation, economic development and demographic changes. This continued growth has resulted in environmental problems such as coastal wetland loss, habitat degradation, and water pollution, gas flaring, destruction of forest vegetation as well as a host of other issues. This underscores the urgent need to design new approaches for managing remote costal resources in sensitive tropical environments effectively in order to maintain a balance between coastal resource conservation and rapid economic development in developing countries for sustainability. Notwithstanding previous initiatives, there have not been any major efforts in the literature to undertake a remote sensing and GIS based assessment of the growing incidence of environmental change within coastal zone environments of the study area. This project is an attempt to fill that void in the literature by exploring the applications of GIS and remote sensing in a tropical coastal zone environment with emphasis on the environmental impacts of development in the Niger Delta region of Southern Nigeria. To deal with some of the aforementioned issues, several research questions that are of great relevance to the paper have been posed. The questions include, Have there been any changes in the coastal environment of the study area? What are the impacts of the changes? What forces are responsible for the changes? Has there been any major framework in place to deal with the changes? The prime objective of the paper is to provide a novel

  1. Hydrodynamic Stresses Driving Pore Pressure Changes in Sandy Coastal Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-30

    Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 2 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT...nature of the sediment properties (Mei and Foda , 1981, Bennett et al. 1982, 1992a and b). A serious deficiency exist in the available in situ data bases

  2. 2012 USACE Post Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Coastal Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data has been acquired and developed by the U.S. Corps of Engineers ST. Louis District to collect and deliver topographic elevation point data derived from...

  3. Submicron aerosol size distribution measurements in the city of Seoul, and coastal and marine environments around South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, S. S.; Kim, J.; Han, D.; Oh, S.; Nam, J.

    2005-12-01

    Submicron aerosol size distributions and total particle (i.e., condensation nuclei, CN) concentrations were measured continuously from September 2004 at the campus of Yonsei University located at the central part of Seoul. The instruments, TSI SMPS-3936L10 and CPC-3010, were installed at an office in the sixth floor of a building and the sample air was drawn from a window. The height of the building and the relatively low traffic in the campus may qualify these measurements as a background aerosol distribution in a highly urbanized city. The highest monthly average CPC (total particle) concentration was 37000 cm-3 in February 2005. The trend of wintertime increase was also obvious in the SMPS integrated concentrations but these were only 60-70 percent of the CPC concentrations. There was rather clear diurnal trend of near dawn (~4 AM) minima and morning peak (~8 AM) and a secondary peak in the evening (~8 PM) for both CPC and SMPS data. As a part of the Atmospheric Brown Clouds East Asian Regional Experiment (ABC-EAREX2005), measurements were also made on board the research vessel Kisang 2000 during the cruise from March 2 to March 10, 2005 over the South Sea of Korea and over the Korean sector of the Yellow Sea. Ship track was 60 km or more away from the coast. After the ship measurements the instruments were placed at the Gosan ABC Observatory in Jeju Island, for almost four weeks starting from March 11, 2005 to measure coastal aerosol distributions and inter-comparisons with other instruments. The average CPC and SMPS concentrations were 6700 cm-3 and 4400 cm-3, respectively, for the ship measurements, and 6000 cm-3 and 4000 cm-3 for the same two measurements at Gosan. However, when remote marine environments near Jeju Island were segregated from the ship measurements, the CPC and SMPS concentrations were 3600 cm-3 and 2400 cm-3, respectively. CPC and SMPS measurements will also be made over the South China Sea during another ship cruise from Jeju Island to

  4. The impact of onsite wastewater disposal systems on groundwater in areas inundated by Hurricane Sandy in New York and New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Irene; Phillips, Patrick; Colella, Kaitlyn; Fisher, Shawn C.; Tagliaferri, Tristen N.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal onsite wastewater disposal systems (OWDS) were inundated by Hurricane Sandy's storm tide. This study compares the shallow groundwater quality (nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and hormones) downgradient of OWDS before and after Hurricane Sandy, where available, and establishes a baseline for wastewater influence on groundwater in coastal communities inundated by Hurricane Sandy. Nutrients and contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) were detected in shallow groundwater downgradient of OWDS in two settings along the New Jersey and New York coastlines: 1) a single, centralized OWDS in a park; and 2) multiple OWDS (cesspools) in low-density residential and mixed-use/medium density residential areas. The most frequently detected pharmaceuticals were lidocaine (40%), carbamazepine (36%), and fexofenadine, bupropion, desvenlafaxine, meprobamate, and tramadol (24–32%). Increases in the number and total concentration of pharmaceuticals after Hurricane Sandy may reflect other factors (seasonality, usage) besides inundation, and demonstrate the importance of analyzing for a wide variety of CECs in regional studies.

  5. Vulnerability of sandy coasts to climate change and anthropic pressures: methodology and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, D.; Poumadère, M.; Vinchon, C.; Romieu, E.; Oliveros, C.

    2009-04-01

    medium-term (decades), whereas the space scales range from several tens of meters to several tens of kilometers. The project is based on the study of representative coastal units: 4 sites characterised by low-lying linear sandy beaches but different, representative, hydrodynamic and socio-economic environments. These sites are located in: Mediterranean Sea (Lido of Sète), Atlantic coast (Truc Vert beach and Noirmoutier island) and English channel coast (Est of Dunkerque). Each of these sites is studied following the same methodology, on both the physical and socio-economic dimensions, the aim being to identify vulnerability indicators regarding climate change and anthropic pressure. 2 - METHODOLOGY The work is based on the following methodology, for every site: 1) The compartments of the unit are defined: shoreface, coastline, backshore, hinterland, from a physical and socio-economical point of view. 2) The available data are analysed in order to provide some information on the present trend of the coastal unit, regarding climate change and anthropic pressure, but also to support the model validation. 3) The vulnerability is studied. On one hand, the socio-economic dimension is assessed and, in a risk governance perspective, stake holders are identified and involved. This part of the project combines the study of social perceptions of dangers along with a deliberative workshop. On the other hand, numerical models of the physical behaviour of shoreface and coastline are applied. The selected models cover a time scale from short-term (storm time scale) to long-term (decades). Then, vulnerability can be studied: the vulnerability of coast/beach is defined and studied based on in-situ observations and model results. Most of these models needs some forcing conditions (waves at the boundary of the computational domains for instance). The present day conditions can be potentially modified by climate change. However, the model and literature review on climate change show that

  6. Nitrogen Mineralization of Broiler Litter Applied to Southeastern Coastal Plain Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (clayey, kaoliniti...

  7. MINERALIZATION OF NITROGEN FROM BROILER LITTER AS AFFECTED BY SOIL TEXTURE IN THE SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL PLAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    A field study was conducted during 2004-2005 to determine nitrogen (N) mineralization of broiler litter (BL) in two Coastal Plain soils of differing texture, sandy or clayey. The soils were a Tifton loamy sand (fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic, Plinthic Kandiudults) and a Greenville sandy clay loam (...

  8. Hurricane Sandy science plan: impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caskie, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: • Coastal topography and bathymetry • Impacts to coastal beaches and barriers

  9. IMPLEMENTASI SANDI HILL UNTUK PENYANDIAN CITRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JJ Siang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hill's code is one of text encoding technique. In this research, Hill's code is extended to image encoding. The image used is BMP 24 bit format. 2x2 and 3x3 matrices is used as a key. The results show that Hill's code is suitable for image whose RGB values vary highly. On the contrary, it is not suitable for less varied RGB images since its original pattern is still persisted in encrypted image. Hill's code for image encoding has also disadvantage in the case that the key matrix is not unique. However, for daily application, with good key matrix, Hill's code can be applied to encode image since it's process only deals with simple matrix operation so it become fast. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Sandi Hill merupakan salah satu teknik penyandian teks. Dalam penelitian ini, pemakaian sandi Hill diperluas dari teks ke citra bertipe BMP 24 bit. Matriks yang dipakai berordo 2x2 dan 3x3. Hasil percobaan menunjukkan bahwa sandi Hill cocok untuk enkripsi citra dengan variasi nilai RGB antar piksel berdekatan yang tinggi (seperti foto, tapi tidak cocok untuk citra dengan variasi nilai RGB yang rendah (seperti gambar kartun karena pola citra asli masih tampak dalam citra sandi. Sandi Hill juga memiliki kelemahan dalam hal tidak tunggalnya matriks kunci yang dapat dipakai. Akan tetapi untuk pemakaian biasa, dengan pemilihan matriks kunci yang baik, sandi Hill dapat dipakai untuk penyandian karena hanya melibatkan operasi matriks biasa sehingga prosesnya relatif cepat. Kata kunci: Sandi Hill, Citra, Relatif Prima.

  10. Contrasting Pristine and Human-Modified Deltaic Environments: Severe Consequences from Long-Term Coastal Embankments in Southwest Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace Auerbach, L.; Goodbred, S. L.; Mondal, D.; Roy, K.; Ahmed, K.; Gilligan, J. M.; Ackerly, B.

    2012-12-01

    River deltas are defined by a balance of net aggradational processes that construct the delta platform, and marine processes and human modifications that redistribute sediments and facilitate platform evolution. The lower Ganges-Brahmaputra delta plain in southwest Bangladesh is isolated from fluvial processes but receives up to 1 cm of sediment accretion annually as sediments discharged at the river mouth are reworked by tides and re-deposited onto the lower delta plain via a dendritic network of tidal channels. Sediment flux and dispersal from tidal channels onto the landscape is one of the principal processes that determines the lower delta plain response to environmental changes, including sea level rise. We investigate the processes and conditions that define the relationship between tides, sea level, and sediment accretion in human-modified and pristine areas of the coastal delta plain. In the pristine deltaic environment, tidal fluctuations and sea level rise in the tidal channel are capable of maintaining a dynamic equilibrium with the subsiding and compacting landscape via sediment dispersal and accretion. Human modification of the landscape by embankment construction in 1961 has locally inhibited sediment delivery to the landscape, decoupling these interacting systems. The sediment-starved landscape has continued to subside and compact, but in the absence of sediment accretion, the elevation of the interior landscape has become offset relative to the tidally inundated river bank terraces, and the land surface is situated 1.0-2.0 m below mean high water. In 2009, a cyclonic storm surge breached embankments, causing catastrophic flooding, re-establishment of tidal sediment delivery, and rapid sedimentation on the human-modified landscape. The pristine environment adjacent to the embanked landscape exhibits no signs of catastrophic inundation, likely because the continuous sediment delivery allowed the landscape to remain in dynamic equilibrium with mean

  11. Coastal lake sediments reveal 5500 years of tsunami history in south central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Philipp; Moernaut, Jasper; Van Daele, Maarten; Vandoorne, Willem; Pino, Mario; Urrutia, Roberto; De Batist, Marc

    2017-04-01

    We present an exceptionally long and continuous coastal lacustrine record of ∼5500 years from Lake Huelde on the west coast of Chiloé Island in south central Chile. The study area is located within the rupture zone of the giant 1960 CE Great Chilean Earthquake (MW 9.5). The subsequent earthquake-induced tsunami inundated Lake Huelde and deposited mud rip-up clasts, massive sand and a mud cap in the lake. Long sediment cores from 8 core sites within Lake Huelde reveal 16 additional sandy layers in the 5500 year long record. The sandy layers share sedimentological similarities with the deposit of the 1960 CE tsunami and other coastal lake tsunami deposits elsewhere. On the basis of general and site-specific criteria we interpret the sandy layers as tsunami deposits. Age-control is provided by four different methods, 1) 210Pb-dating, 2) the identification of the 137Cs-peak, 3) an infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) date and 4) 22 radiocarbon dates. The ages of each tsunami deposit are modelled using the Bayesian statistic tools of OxCal and Bacon. The record from Lake Huelde matches the 8 regionally known tsunami deposits from documented history and geological evidence from the last ∼2000 years without over- or underrepresentation. We extend the existing tsunami history by 9 tsunami deposits. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various sedimentary environments for tsunami deposition and preservation, e.g. we find that Lake Huelde is 2-3 times less sensitive to relative sea-level change in comparison to coastal marshes in the same region.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability in the otolith chemistry of the Brazilian snapper Lutjanus alexandrei from estuarine and coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, A; Ferreira, B P; Rooker, J R

    2016-07-01

    Otolith chemistry of juvenile and adult individuals of the Brazilian snapper Lutjanus alexandrei was measured to assess the utility of natural markers for investigating individual movements. Individuals were collected over a 3-year period (2010-2012) along the north-eastern coast of Brazil from both estuarine (juvenile to sub-adult stages) and coastal (sub-adult to adult stages) areas. Six elements ((7) Li, (24) Mg, (55) Mn, (59) Co, (88) Sr and (137) Ba) were measured in sectioned otoliths of L. alexandrei using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Edge composition analysis indicated that element:Ca ratios in the otoliths of juvenile and sub-adult L. alexandrei from estuaries were not significantly different among the three consecutive years (2010, 2011 and 2012), suggesting that physicochemical conditions within the nursery area investigated were temporally stable. Similarly, apart from two elements (Ba and Co), element:Ca ratios for larger L. alexandrei inhabiting coastal waters were also similar. In contrast, otolith chemistry of similar sized L. alexandrei from estuarine and coastal areas was significantly different (based on recently accreted material). Otolith Mn:Ca and Ba:Ca were both significantly higher for L. alexandrei collected in estuaries compared to fish from adjacent coastal reefs, while the opposite trend was observed for Sr:Ca. Given the pronounced differences in otolith chemistry between estuarine and coastal areas, element:Ca transects were constructed from the core to margin of the otoliths for adults (age 7+ years) collected on reefs to determine the timing of movement (ontogenetic migration) from estuarine to coastal areas. Based on observed patterns of decline for both Mn:Ca and Ba:Ca, it appears that L. alexandrei begin the move to more coastal habitats (i.e. lower element:Ca ratios) after age 2 years. The patterns observed for this species highlight the importance of conserving connectivity between

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon and alkalinity fluxes from coastal marine sediments: model estimates for different shelf environments and sensitivity to global change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krumins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We present a one-dimensional reactive transport model to estimate benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and alkalinity (AT from coastal marine sediments. The model incorporates the transport processes of sediment accumulation, molecular diffusion, bioturbation and bioirrigation, while the reactions included are the redox pathways of organic carbon oxidation, re-oxidation of reduced nitrogen, iron and sulfur compounds, pore water acid-base equilibria, and dissolution of particulate inorganic carbon (calcite, aragonite, and Mg-calcite. The coastal zone is divided into four environmental units with different particulate inorganic carbon (PIC and particulate organic carbon (POC fluxes: reefs, banks and bays, carbonate shelves and non-carbonate shelves. Model results are analyzed separately for each environment and then scaled up to the whole coastal ocean. The model-derived estimate for the present-day global coastal benthic DIC efflux is 126 Tmol yr−1, based on a global coastal reactive POC depositional flux of 117 Tmol yr−1. The POC decomposition leads to a~carbonate dissolution from shallow marine sediments of 7 Tmol yr−1 (on the order of 0.1 Pg C yr−1. Assuming complete re-oxidation of aqueous sulfide released from sediments, the effective net flux of alkalinity to the water column is 29 Teq yr−1, primarily from PIC dissolution (46% and ammonification (33%. Because our POC depositional flux falls in the high range of global values given in the literature, the reported DIC and alkalinity fluxes should be viewed as upper-bound estimates. Increasing coastal seawater DIC to what might be expected in year 2100 due to the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 increases PIC dissolution by 2.3 Tmol yr−1 and alkalinity efflux by 4.8 Teq yr−1. Our reactive transport modeling approach not only yields global estimates of benthic DIC, alkalinity

  14. Monitoring and Management of Karstic Coastal Groundwater in a Changing Environment (Southern Italy: A Review of a Regional Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Polemio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The population concentration in coastal areas and the increase of groundwater discharge in combination with the peculiarities of karstic coastal aquifers constitute a huge worldwide problem, which is particularly relevant for coastal aquifers of the Mediterranean basin. This paper offers a review of scientific activities realized to pursue the optimal utilization of Apulian coastal groundwater. Apulia, with a coastline extending for over 800 km, is the Italian region with the largest coastal karst aquifers. Apulian aquifers have suffered both in terms of water quality and quantity. Some regional regulations were implemented from the 1970s with the purpose of controlling the number of wells, well locations, and well discharge. The practical effects of these management criteria, the temporal and spatial trend of recharge, groundwater quality, and seawater intrusion effects are discussed based on long-term monitoring. The efficacy of existing management tools and the development of predictive scenarios to identify the best way to reconcile irrigation and demands for high-quality drinking water have been pursued in a selected area. The Salento peninsula was selected as the Apulian aquifer portion exposed to the highest risk of quality degradation due to seawater intrusion. The capability of large-scale numerical models in groundwater management was tested, particularly for achieving forecast scenarios to evaluate the impacts of climate change on groundwater resources. The results show qualitative and quantitative groundwater trends from 1930 to 2060 and emphasize the substantial decrease of the piezometric level and a serious worsening of groundwater salinization due to seawater intrusion.

  15. Heterotrophic bacterial populations in tropical sandy beaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Distribution pattern of heterotrophic bacterial flora of three sandy beaches of the west coast of India was studied. The population in these beaches was microbiologically different. Population peaks of halotolerant and limnotolerant forms were...

  16. Establishing physiographic provinces for an integrative approach of the coastal zone management - The case of Rhodes Island, Aegean Sea, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Vasileios; Angelos Hatiris, Georgios; Sioulas, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    The coastal zone is a dynamic natural system affected by terrestrial and marine processes as well as human intervention. The sediments derived by the land and supplied by the adjacent catchment are reworked and distributed according to the prevailing hydrodynamic regime. Based on inland and coastal physiography of Rhodes Island, six (6) main Physiographic Provinces were identified, which incorporate 56 main drainage basins and 168 interfluves. Moreover, the variety of coastal types was mapped and the total length of the island's coastline ( 285 km) was measured by using geospatial tools (ArcGIS and Google Earth). The coastline is comprised of depositional sandy beaches (44.5%), rocky coasts (47%) and coasts altered from anthropogenic constructions (8.5%). The Physiographic Provinces were defined in order to facilitate an Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) scheme for Rhodes Island and also adaptation measures. Overexploitation of the island's natural coastal environment by the tourism industry, mainly in the northern and northeastern parts of the island, left a series of adverse effects on the coastal area, such as erosion of beaches, water and energy overconsumption and land degradation.

  17. EFFECTS OF ALKALINE SANDY LOAM ON SULFURIC SOIL ACIDITY AND SULFIDIC SOIL OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Michael

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available  In poor soils, addition of alkaline sandy loam containing an adequate proportion of sand, silt and clay would add value by improving the texture, structure and organic matter (OM for general use of the soils. In acid sulfate soils (ASS, addition of alkaline sandy would improve the texture and leach out salts as well as add a sufficient proportion of OM for vegetation establishment. In this study, addition of alkaline sandy loam into sulfuric soil effectively increased the pH, lowered the redox and reduced the sulfate content, the magnitude of the effects dependent on moisture content. Addition of alkaline sandy loam in combination with OM was highly effective than the effects of the lone alkaline sandy loam. When alkaline sandy was added alone or in combination with OM into sulfidic soil, the effects on pH and the redox were similar as in the sulfuric soil but the effect on sulfate content was variable. The effects under aerobic conditions were higher than under anaerobic conditions. The findings of this study have important implications for the general management of ASS where lime availability is a concern and its application is limited.International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-3, June-August 2015Page: 42-54

  18. Degradation capability of the coastal environment adjacent to the Itata River in central Chile (36.5° S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ampuero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The response of the coastal ocean influenced by both river discharges and inputs of photosynthetically derived organic carbon product of upwelling, was evaluated by estimating rates of microbial hydrolysis of macromolecules with the goal of estimating the potential degradation capability of the coastal ecosystem off central Chile. Extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA in seawater was dominated by aminopeptidase activity on substrate L-leucine-4-methyl-7-coumarinylamide (MCA-leu (1.2 to 182 nmol l−1 h−1 followed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-ß-D-glucoside (MUF-glu (0.08–61 nmol l−1 h−1 and 4-methylumbelliferyl-ß-D-cellobiose (MUF-cel (0.15–7 nmol l−1 h−1, with the highest rates measured during spring-summer. In riverine waters, extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis remained within the range of 45 to 131 nmol l−1 h−1 for MCA-leu and ca. 20 nmol l−1 h−1 for glucosidic substrates, year-round. Contrary to the EEA observed for the marine water column, surface sediment extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of MCA-leu (0.04 to 6.13 nmol g−1 dw h−1 was in the same order of magnitude as the rates observed for MUF-cel (0.004 to 5.1 nmol g−1 dw h−1 and MUF-glu (0.007 to 10.5 nmol g−1 dw h−1. Moreover, hydrolysis in sediments was characterized by higher rates during winter compared with spring-summer in the coastal and estuarine zone. The five years of data allowed us to evaluate the potential capability of microbial processing of organic carbon in the coastal area adjacent to the Itata river discharge where the increase in primary production in the productive seasons is accompanied by the increase in hydrolysis of macromolecules.

  19. Content Analysis of Select YouTube Postings: Comparisons of Reactions to the Sandy Hook and Aurora Shootings and Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric D

    2015-11-01

    This study details an innovative and methodical content analysis of 2,207 YouTube comments from four different YouTube videos (e.g., breaking news or memorials) related to the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School and Aurora theater mass shootings and the catastrophic Hurricane Sandy. As expected, YouTube comments associated with the Sandy Hook shootings (particularly those from a memorial video) were especially likely to feature compassion and grief with lessened hostility. This study highlights differing online contexts by which individuals show grief and related emotions following man-made and natural calamities and how-even in an online environment-powerful situational contexts greatly guide behavior.

  20. Impact of a coastal disposal site for inert waste on the physical marine environment, Barcola-Bovedo, Trieste, Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colizza, E. [Istituto di Geologia e Paleontologia, Univ. degli Studi, Trieste (Italy); Fontolan, G. [Istituto di Geologia e Paleontologia, Univ. degli Studi, Trieste (Italy); Brambati, A. [Istituto di Geologia e Paleontologia, Univ. degli Studi, Trieste (Italy)

    1996-06-01

    Sediments in the marine area surrounding the Barcola-Bovedo coastal disposal site for inert wastes show a textural adjustment as a response to the new morphology due to construction of a 150-m-wide x 350-m-long landfill. Relatively coarse-sized deposits were found along the nearshore area facing the central landfill face, while pelitic sediments transported in suspension settle deeper, mainly in the northwestern sector of the study area, according to the cyclonic circulation scheme. Geochemical comparison between disposed material and sea-bottom sediments, normalized taking in account the regional variability of the element contents, shows: (1) Cr concentrations in the coastal samples twice as high as in the offshore ones, with the former characterizing the whole coastal and port area of Trieste, and (2) `anomalous` enrichments of Zn, Cu, and Pb, located mainly in the southern stretch of the investigated area, where dumping work is in progress in order to connect the landfill with the port area. Although the new morphology of the sea bottom is reflected in the grain-size redistribution, the sediments were not altered as far as their geochemical properties are concerned. In contrast, the recent discharge of material in the southern area is easily discernible because of its high heavy-metal content. (orig.)

  1. Coastal Morphology and Coastal Protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Graaff, J.

    2009-01-01

    Lecture notes ct5309. Tides, currents and water; coastal problems; sediment transport processes; coastal transport modes; longshore transport; cross-shore transport; fundamentals of mud; channels and trenches; coastal protection; application of structures; application of nourishments.

  2. Metagenomics unveils the attributes of the alginolytic guilds of sediments from four distant cold coastal environments: Alginolytic guilds from cold sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Marina N. [Laboratorio de Microbiología Ambiental, Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos (CESIMAR, CONICET), Puerto Madryn U9120ACD Argentina; Lozada, Mariana [Laboratorio de Microbiología Ambiental, Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos (CESIMAR, CONICET), Puerto Madryn U9120ACD Argentina; Anselmino, Luciano E. [Laboratorio de Microbiología Ambiental, Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos (CESIMAR, CONICET), Puerto Madryn U9120ACD Argentina; Musumeci, Matías A. [Laboratorio de Microbiología Ambiental, Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos (CESIMAR, CONICET), Puerto Madryn U9120ACD Argentina; Henrissat, Bernard [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolécules Biologiques, CNRS, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille 13288 France; INRA, USC 1408 AFMB, Marseille F-13288 France; Department of Biological Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 Saudi Arabia; Jansson, Janet K. [Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Mac Cormack, Walter P. [Instituto Antártico Argentino, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1064ABR, Argentina; Instituto Nanobiotec, CONICET - Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, C1113AAC, Argentina; Carroll, JoLynn [Akvaplan-niva, Fram - High North Research Centre for Climate and the Environment, Tromsø NO-9296 Norway; CAGE - Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø N-9037 Norway; Sjöling, Sara [School of Natural Sciences and Environmental Studies, Södertörn University, Huddinge 141 89 Sweden; Lundgren, Leif [Stockholm University, Stockholm SE-106 91 Sweden; Dionisi, Hebe M. [Laboratorio de Microbiología Ambiental, Centro para el Estudio de Sistemas Marinos (CESIMAR, CONICET), Puerto Madryn U9120ACD Argentina

    2016-07-18

    Alginates are abundant polysaccharides in brown algae that constitute an important energy source for marine heterotrophic bacteria. Despite the key role of alginate assimilation processes in the marine carbon cycle, little information is available on the bacterial populations involved in these processes. The goal of this work was to gain insight into the structure and functional traits of the alginolytic communities from sediments of cold coastal environments. Sediment metagenomes from high-latitude regions of both Hemispheres were interrogated for alginate lyase gene homolog sequences and their genomic context. Sediments contained highly abundant and diverse bacterial assemblages with alginolytic potential, including members of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria, as well as several poorly characterized taxa. Temperature and salinity were correlated to the variation in community structure. The microbial communities in Arctic and Antarctic sediments exhibited the most similar alginolytic profiles, whereas brackish sediments had a higher proportion of novel members. Examination of the gene context of the alginate lyase homologs revealed distinct patterns according to the phylogenetic origin of the scaffolds, with evidence of evolutionary relationships among lineages. This information is relevant for understanding carbon fluxes in cold coastal environments and provides valuable information for the development of biotechnological applications from brown algae biomass.

  3. Impacts of severe wave event to the coastal environment, east Taiwan: a case study of 2015 Typhoon Soudelor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao-Yi; Yen, Jiun-Yee; Wu, Bo-Lin; Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Ting-Yi

    2017-04-01

    As an island surrounded by open water bodies, Taiwan faces associated challenges of oceanic events such as tidal, current and seasonsal wave cycles. In addition to the secular variations of the adjacent oceans, researchers have raised public awareness toward extreme wave events such as tsunamis and storm surges that may cause great damage to coastal infrastructures and loss of valuable lives. The east coast of Taiwan is prone to suffer from typhoons every year and records have shown that more than 30% of the low-pressure centers took the east coastline as their landing point. In year 2015, Typhoon Soudelor attacked the east coast of Taiwan and resulted in a great number of casualties and severe damage to the infrastructures all over the island. Soudelor is not the greatest typhoon of the year yet still brought in significant influences to the coastal topography due to its path and robust structure. In order to understand the impacts of typhoons like Soudelor, we investigated the coastal areas of Hualien, east Taiwan, to document how sediments and debris are transported along the shoreline under the extreme wave condition. Four coastal areas were surveyed to extract applicable information such as local relief profiles, grain size distribution of drifted sediments/debris, maximum inundation limit and so forth. Field observation suggests that the waves displayed great capability of transporting the sediments and redistributing the beach morphology. For instance, the beach of Qixing Lake (Chishingtan) has astonishing records like maximum volume of transported boulder around 3,000,000 cm3, maximum long axis of transported boulder around 144 cm, maximum distance of boulder transportation of 70 m, and maximum inundation distance of ca. 180 m. The composition and distribution of the drifted sediments in every areas vary with local geological conditions but in general all suggest similar characteristics: 1. the transported materials size down toward inland; 2. The sediments

  4. Factors That Can Undermine the Psychological Benefits of Coastal Environments: Exploring the Effect of Tidal State, Presence, and Type of Litter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, Kayleigh J; Pahl, Sabine; Thomas, Katrina; Thompson, Richard C

    2016-11-01

    The beneficial effects of blue environments have been well documented; however, we do not know how marine litter might modify these effects. Three studies adopted a picture-rating task to examine the influence of litter on preference, perceived restorative quality, and psychological impacts. Photographs varied the presence of marine litter (Study 1) and the type of litter (Studies 2 and 3). The influence of tide and the role of connectedness were also explored. Using both quantitative and qualitative methods, it was shown that litter can undermine the psychological benefits that the coast ordinarily provides, thus demonstrating that, in addition to environmental costs of marine litter, there are also costs to people. Litter stemming from the public had the most negative impact. This research extends our understanding of the psychological benefits from natural coastal environments and the threats to these benefits from abundant and increasing marine litter.

  5. State of the art of the meiofauna of Brazilian Sandy Beaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Fabricio Maria

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, meiofauna studies began in the middle of last century, but they adopted a purely taxonomical approach, describing species from various zoological groups. After this first step, this benthic group was largely neglected until the end of the 20th century when ecological studies began. We here provide a brief review of present knowledge of the meiofauna found on Brazilian sandy beaches to provide information for ReBentos (Coastal Benthic Habitats Monitoring Network. Our methodology consisted of a bibliographic survey undertaken using different datasets (Web of ScienceTM, SCOPUS, Google Scholar and Lattes Plataform. For the survey, we considered only those studies published till early 2015. Our analysis showed that the number of meiofauna studies has increased over the last two decades, though they are mainly still concentrated on the Southeast of Brazil. These studies aim to explain the distribution pattern of the meiofauna of the intertidal region of sandy beaches. Based on the results, we presented a discussion of three main topics, i.e., (a current knowledge of Brazilian sandy beach meiofauna, (b sampling strategies for monitoring of the meiofauna, and (c use of the meiofauna as a tool to assess climate change. We trust that this brief review will be useful as a starting point for the delineation of further climate change investigations into sandy beach meiofauna.

  6. Penetration grouting reinforcement of sandy gravel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; PENG Zhen-bin; TANG Yi-qun; PENG Wen-xiang; HE Zhong-ming

    2008-01-01

    To study the relationship between grouting effect and grouting factors, three factors (seven parameters) directionless pressure and small cycle grouting model experiment on sandy gravel was done, which was designed according to uniform design method. And regressing was applied to analysis of the test data. The two models test results indicate that when the diffusing radius of grout changes from 26 to 51 era, the grouted sandy gravel compressing strength changes fTom 2.13 to 12.30 MPa; the relationship between diffusing radius(R) and water cement ratio(m), permeability coefficient(k), grouting pressure(p), grouting time(t) is R=19.953m0.121k0.429p0.412t0.437, the relationship between compressing strength(P) and porosity(n), water cement ratio, grouting pressure, grouting time is P=0.984n0.517m-1.488p0.118t0.031.So the porosity of sandy gravel, the permeability coefficient of sandy gravel, grouting pressure, grouting time, water cement ratio are main factors to influence the grouting effect. The grouting pressure is the main factor to influence grouting diffusing radius, and the water cement ratio is the main factor to influence grouted sandy gravel compressing strength.

  7. Degradation capability of the coastal environment adjacent to the Itata River in central Chile (36.5° S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ampuero

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The response of the coastal ocean influenced by both river discharges and inputs of photosynthetically derived organic carbon product of upwelling, was evaluated by estimating rates of microbial hydrolysis of macromolecules with the goal of estimating the degradation capability of the coastal ecosystem off central Chile. Extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis in seawater was dominated by aminopeptidase activity on substrate MCA-leu (1.2 to 182 nM h−1, which surpassed that of substrates MUF-glu (0.08–61 nM h−1 and MUF-cel (0.15–6.8 nM h−1, with the fastest rates measured during spring-summer. In riverine waters, extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis remained within the range of 45 to 131 nM h−1 for MCA-leu and ca. 20 nM h−1 for glucosidic substrates, year-round. Contrary to the observed for the marine water column, surface sediment extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of MCA-leu (0.04 to 6.13 nmol gdw−1 h−1 was in the same order of magnitude as the rates observed for MUF-cel (0.004 to 2.58 nmol gdw−1 h−1 and MUF-glu (0.007 to 10.5 nmol gdw−1 h−1. Moreover, hydrolysis was characterized by higher rates during winter compared with spring-summer in the coastal and estuarine zone. The five years of data allowed us to construct a carbon budget for winter and spring-summer in the coastal area adjacent to the Itata River discharge. The comparison of fluxes evidenced a deficit of photosynthetic carbon to fuel extracellular hydrolysis in the water column during both periods (winter 20% and spring-summer 35%. We estimated that the Itata River is a feasible source of dissolved organic carbon, specially during winter, in the form of macromolecules, although non-focal sources may be also significant for the area.

  8. Coastal Processes with Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Robert G.; Dalrymple, Robert A.

    2004-03-01

    The world's coastlines, dividing land from sea, are geological environments that are unique in their composition and the physical processes affecting them. At the dynamically active intersection of land and the oceans, humans have been building structures throughout history. Initially used for naval and commercial purposes, more recently recreation and tourism have increased activity in the coastal zone dramatically. Shoreline development is now causing a significant conflict with natural coastal processes. This text on coastal engineering will help the reader understand these coastal processes and develop strategies to cope effectively with shoreline erosion. The book is organized in four parts: (1) an overview of coastal engineering, using case studies to illustrate problems; (2) hydrodynamics of the coastal zone, reviewing storm surges, water waves, and low frequency motions within the nearshore and surf zone; (3) coastal responses including equilibrium beach profiles and sediment transport; (4) applications such as erosion mitigation, beach nourishment, coastal armoring, tidal inlets, and shoreline management.

  9. Combining L- and X-Band SAR Interferometry to Assess Ground Displacements in Heterogeneous Coastal Environments: The Po River Delta and Venice Lagoon, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Tosi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available From leveling to SAR-based interferometry, the monitoring of land subsidence in coastal transitional environments significantly improved. However, the simultaneous assessment of the ground movements in these peculiar environments is still challenging. This is due to the presence of relatively small built-up zones and infrastructures, e.g., coastal infrastructures, bridges, and river embankments, within large natural or rural lands, e.g., river deltas, lagoons, and farmland. In this paper we present a multi-band SAR methodology to integrate COSMO-SkyMed and ALOS-PALSAR images. The method consists of a proper combination of the very high-resolution X-band Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI, which achieves high-density and precise measurements on single structures and constructed areas, with L-band Short-Baseline SAR Interferometry (SBAS, properly implemented to raise its effectiveness in retrieving information in vegetated and wet zones. The combined methodology is applied on the Po River Delta and Venice coastland, Northern Italy, using 16 ALOS-PALSAR and 31 COSMO-SkyMed images covering the period between 2007 and 2011. After a proper calibration of the single PSI and SBAS solution using available GPS records, the datasets have been combined at both the regional and local scales. The measured displacements range from ~0 mm/yr down to −35 mm/yr. The results reveal the variable pattern of the subsidence characterizing the more natural and rural environments without losing the accuracy in quantifying the sinking of urban areas and infrastructures. Moreover, they allow improving the interpretation of the natural and anthropogenic processes responsible for the ongoing subsidence.

  10. Alkenones, alkenoates, and organic matter in coastal environments of NW Scotland: Assessment of potential application for sea level reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendle, James A. P.; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Cox, Nicholas J.; Shennan, Ian

    2009-12-01

    Reconstruction of late Quaternary sea level history in areas of glacioisostatic uplift often relies on sediment archives from coastal isolation basins, natural coastal rock depressions previously isolated from or connected to the sea at different times. Proxy indicators for marine, brackish, or lacustrine conditions combined with precise dating can constrain the time when the sea crossed the sill threshold and isolated (or connected) the basin. The utility of isolation basins in investigations of sea level change is well known, but investigations have been mostly limited to microfossil proxies, the application of which can be limited by preservation and nonanalog problems. Here we investigate the potential of long-chain alkenones, alkenoates, and bulk organic parameters (TOC, Corg/N) for reconstructing past sea level changes in isolation basins in NW Scotland. We analyze organic biomarkers and bulk parameters from both modern basins (at different stages of isolation from the sea) and fossil basins (with sea level histories reconstructed from established proxies). Logit regression analysis was employed to find which of the biomarker metrics or bulk organic measurements could reliably characterize the sediment samples in terms of a marine/brackish or isolated/lacustrine origin. The results suggested a good efficiency for the alkenone index %C37:4 at predicting the depositional origin of the sediments. This study suggests that alkenones could be used as a novel proxy for sea level change in fossil isolation basins especially when microfossil preservation is poor.

  11. Seasonality in the distribution of dinoflagellates with special reference to harmful algal species in tropical coastal environment, Bay of Bengal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Gouri; Mohanty, A K; Samantara, M K; Satpathy, K K

    2014-10-01

    A study was carried out in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam, southeast coast of India, to find out the seasonal variation in dinoflagellate community structure. Samples were collected for a period of 4 years during 2006-2010. During the study 69 species of dinoflagellates were encountered among which Ceratium furca and Prorocentrum micans were most common during all the seasons. Genus Ceratium was found to be the most diverse one with 23 species which was followed by genus Protoperidinium with 16 species. Of 69 species, 27 species were considered as dominant based on their abundance during pre-monsoon (PRM), monsoon (MON) and post-monsoon (POM) periods. Relatively high density and diversity of dinoflagellates were encountered during the PRM period as compared to the MON and POM periods. Abundance pattern of dinoflagellates for three seasons showed the following trend: PRM > POM > MON. Salinity showed a positive correlation with dinoflagellate community showing its importance in dinoflagellate growth and sustenance. Ammonia and phosphate developed negative correlation with dinoflagellate density indicating the utilization of these nutrients by the dinoflagellate community. The presence of three dinoflagellate associations, broadly representing the three seasons experienced at this location, was evident from the cluster analysis. The study revealed presence of 19 relatively abundant toxic/red tide forming dinoflagellate species in the coastal waters of Kalpakkam.

  12. A study on the relationship between BOD(5) and COD in a coastal seawater environment with a rapid BOD measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X L; Jing, M; Chen, X; Zhuang, Z X; Wang, X R; Lee, Frank S C

    2010-01-01

    The dual objectives of this study are to: (1) examine the relationship between COD and BOD in seawater environment with a rapid but reliable method for the measurement of BOD in seawater, and (2) establish the relationship model between BOD(5) and COD in the firth of Dongbao River to predict the values of BOD(5). The first objective is met by the successful development of a technique utilizing bacteria-immobilized membrane flow cell for biodegradation process, coupled with fibre optic fluorescence detection for oxygen depletion quantitation. The technique has been applied to coastal seawater samples collected in the coastal area of Shenzhen, China. The BOD(5) and COD values for the samples are acquired and the results show that there is no apparent linear relationship existing between BOD(5) and COD in relatively clean seawater samples away from the shore. However, in estuary water samples containing relatively high concentration of sewage contamination, a linear correlation does exist between BOD(5) and COD. The linear relationship between the two parameters allows for the calculation of BOD(5) values based on COD data which can be measured more readily and precisely.

  13. [Simulation alfalfa growth in Wulanbuhe sandy region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wenming; Bao, Xuemei

    2002-12-01

    Based on the theories of accumulated temperature and on the physio-ecological characteristics of Medicago sativa, a simulation model for its growth under soil water stress in arid sandy region was developed. The model was mainly composed of four modules: the stage module of growth, the dynamic module of leaf area index, the accumulated module of dry matter, and the distributive module of dry matter. After simulating and calculating, the model could be used to predict the growing progress and dynamic changes of leaf area and yield for herbage in sandy region. The result shows that the application of the model to production is usually effective.

  14. Trends in soil organic matter contents in Dutch grasslands and maize fields on sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanegraaf, M.C.; Hoffland, E.; Kuikman, P.J.; Brussaard, L.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable concern in Europe that soil organic matter (SOM) contents are declining, which would threaten both agriculture and the environment. We performed a trend analysis of SOM contents in sandy soils, using historic data from routine agricultural soil analyses. Data were selected from

  15. Coastal biodiversity and bioresources: variation and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Song; Liu, Zhengyi; Yu, Roger Ziye

    2016-03-01

    The 1st International Coastal Biology Congress (1st ICBC) was held in Yantai, China, in Sep. 26-30, 2014. Eighteen manuscripts of the meeting presentations were selected in this special issue. According to the four themes set in the ICBC meeting, this special issue include four sections, i.e., Coastal Biodiversity under Global Change, Adaptation and Evolution to Special Environment of Coastal Zone, Sustainable Utilization of Coastal Bioresources, and Coastal Biotechnology. Recent advances in these filed are presented.

  16. Quantifying human mobility perturbation and resilience in Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Taylor, John E

    2014-01-01

    Human mobility is influenced by environmental change and natural disasters. Researchers have used trip distance distribution, radius of gyration of movements, and individuals' visited locations to understand and capture human mobility patterns and trajectories. However, our knowledge of human movements during natural disasters is limited owing to both a lack of empirical data and the low precision of available data. Here, we studied human mobility using high-resolution movement data from individuals in New York City during and for several days after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. We found the human movements followed truncated power-law distributions during and after Hurricane Sandy, although the β value was noticeably larger during the first 24 hours after the storm struck. Also, we examined two parameters: the center of mass and the radius of gyration of each individual's movements. We found that their values during perturbation states and steady states are highly correlated, suggesting human mobility data obtained in steady states can possibly predict the perturbation state. Our results demonstrate that human movement trajectories experienced significant perturbations during hurricanes, but also exhibited high resilience. We expect the study will stimulate future research on the perturbation and inherent resilience of human mobility under the influence of hurricanes. For example, mobility patterns in coastal urban areas could be examined as hurricanes approach, gain or dissipate in strength, and as the path of the storm changes. Understanding nuances of human mobility under the influence of such disasters will enable more effective evacuation, emergency response planning and development of strategies and policies to reduce fatality, injury, and economic loss.

  17. Quantifying human mobility perturbation and resilience in Hurricane Sandy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    Full Text Available Human mobility is influenced by environmental change and natural disasters. Researchers have used trip distance distribution, radius of gyration of movements, and individuals' visited locations to understand and capture human mobility patterns and trajectories. However, our knowledge of human movements during natural disasters is limited owing to both a lack of empirical data and the low precision of available data. Here, we studied human mobility using high-resolution movement data from individuals in New York City during and for several days after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. We found the human movements followed truncated power-law distributions during and after Hurricane Sandy, although the β value was noticeably larger during the first 24 hours after the storm struck. Also, we examined two parameters: the center of mass and the radius of gyration of each individual's movements. We found that their values during perturbation states and steady states are highly correlated, suggesting human mobility data obtained in steady states can possibly predict the perturbation state. Our results demonstrate that human movement trajectories experienced significant perturbations during hurricanes, but also exhibited high resilience. We expect the study will stimulate future research on the perturbation and inherent resilience of human mobility under the influence of hurricanes. For example, mobility patterns in coastal urban areas could be examined as hurricanes approach, gain or dissipate in strength, and as the path of the storm changes. Understanding nuances of human mobility under the influence of such disasters will enable more effective evacuation, emergency response planning and development of strategies and policies to reduce fatality, injury, and economic loss.

  18. 吉林省西部土地沙化动态变化%Spatial distribution of sandy desertification change in the west of Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘惠清; 许嘉巍; 吕新苗

    2003-01-01

    The sandy land of the western part of Jilin Province is located in the ecotone ofsemi-humid and semi-arid area in the temperate zone of China. The sandy desertification has widelyspread in the region because of the vulnerable natural conditions and the unreasonable humanactivity; as a result of this, the precious land resources and the economic development in the areahave been seriously impacted. In this paper, the sandy land ecologic environment geographicinformation system is established based on the multi-spectral, multi-temporal Landsat TM images andfield investigation. The comprehensive indexes of sandy desertification extent assessment whichinclude vegetation degradation, wind erosion extent and soil depth are presented to classify the sandyland in western Jilin into three levels--slight, moderate and severe sandy desertification with thesupport of GIS platform. The results demonstrate that the sandy desertiffcation has been partlycontrolled in the past twenty years, except some small sites. However, this doesn't necessarily meanthat there is nothing for more concern. The two main causes of sandy desertification have not beeneliminated yet, one is its natural factor, especially the physical and chemical characters of sandy soiland dry climate; another is the immoderate economic activity of human being that has highlyaccelerated the sandy desertification process.

  19. Sheltered coastal environments as archives of paleo-tsunami deposits: Observations from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Vanessa; Rajendran, Kusala; Rajendran, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 2004 earthquake left several traces of coseismic land deformation and tsunami deposits, both on the islands along the plate boundary and distant shores of the Indian Ocean rim countries. Researchers are now exploring these sites to develop a chronology of past events. Where the coastal regions are also inundated by storm surges, there is an additional challenge to discriminate between the deposits formed by these two processes. Paleo-tsunami research relies largely on finding deposits where preservation potential is high and storm surge origin can be excluded. During the past decade of our work along the Andaman and Nicobar Islands and the east coast of India, we have observed that the 2004 tsunami deposits are best preserved in lagoons, inland streams and also on elevated terraces. Chronological evidence for older events obtained from such sites is better correlated with those from Thailand, Sri Lanka and Indonesia, reiterating their usefulness in tsunami geology studies.

  20. The presence of cadmium in the intertidal environments of a moderately impacted coastal lagoon in western Portugal (Óbidos Lagoon)--spatial and seasonal evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Carmen A; Santos, Márcia S S; Ferreira, Susana M F; Gonçalves, Sílvia C

    2016-01-01

    A seasonal environmental monitoring program was carried out (winter 2009 to summer 2010) to evaluate the spatial and seasonal cadmium concentrations in the intertidal environments of the Óbidos Lagoon (Portugal). Also, some environmental parameters were monitored at each sampling station. Both the water and the sediment samples were contaminated, although to different degrees. In general, cadmium contamination appears to be mostly focused on the inner areas of the lagoon, namely, in Barrosa's arm, which receives a small tributary contaminated by agro-industrial activities. Only cadmium concentration in sediment showed to be significantly influenced by seasons. Some environmental parameters presented spatial and temporal heterogeneity which influenced, to some extent, cadmium bioavailability. The results of this study allow a better understanding of the environmental quality of this ecosystem regarding cadmium contamination and may assist in the definition of future coastal management measures specifically targeted to trace metal contamination and pollution monitoring.

  1. Degraded Ecosystem and its Rehabilitating Measures in Sandy Areas of North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGFengchun; LUQi

    2004-01-01

    Ecosystem degradation occurs in parallel with desertification process in sandy areas of North China. The vast sandy areas in North China are characterized with flexible environments and fragile ecosystems as well as intensive human activities. Due to the annual precipitation gradient decreases from east to west in North China, the whole sandy region falls into 3 main climatic zones: add, semi-add and dry sub-humid zones.The ecosystems in each type of climatic zones are different in climatic conditions, human activities,cultural dimensions, vegetation covers, landscapes, and causes and processes of ecosystem degradation.Therefore, the most effective rehabilitation measures of degraded ecosystems in different types of the climatic zones are also different. For the arid sandy areas, vegetation rehabilitation of degraded ecosystems needs to be completely closed, assisting with artificial measures, such as plantation, irrigation or others. For semi-add sandy areas, the effective measures of vegetation rehabilitation of degraded ecosystems include increasing of proportion of forests and rangelands and limitation of reclamation; reducing the carrying capacity of livestock on unit area of rangelands and growth of fodder plants; and plantation on the lowlands betweens and dunes. For the dry sub-humid areas, the most effective measure is enclosure of degraded ecosystems combined with plantation, and in some cases, just stop uses by grazing or reclamation.

  2. Distribution of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria across a coastal acid sulfate soil (CASS environment: implications for passive bioremediation by tidal inundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen eLing

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coastal acid sulfate soils (CASS constitute a serious and global environmental problem. Oxidation of iron sulfide minerals exposed to air generates sulfuric acid with consequently negative impacts on coastal and estuarine ecosystems. Tidal inundation represents one current treatment strategy for CASS, with the aim of neutralizing acidity by triggering microbial iron- and sulfate-reduction and inducing the precipitation of iron-sulfides. Although well-known functional guilds of bacteria drive these processes, their distributions within CASS environments, as well as their relationships to tidal cycling and the availability of nutrients and electron acceptors, are poorly understood. These factors will determine the long-term efficacy of passive CASS remediation strategies. Here we studied microbial community structure and functional guild distribution in sediment cores obtained from ten depths ranging from 0-20 cm in three sites located in the supra-, inter- and sub-tidal segments, respectively, of a CASS-affected salt marsh (East Trinity, Cairns, Australia. Whole community 16S rRNA gene diversity within each site was assessed by 454 pyrotag sequencing and bioinformatic analyses in the context of local hydrological, geochemical and lithological factors. The results illustrate spatial overlap, or close association, of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in an environment rich in organic matter and controlled by parameters such as acidity, redox potential, degree of water saturation, and mineralization. The observed spatial distribution implies the need for empirical understanding of the timing, relative to tidal cycling, of various terminal electron-accepting processes that control acid generation and biogeochemical iron and sulfur cycling.

  3. Sandy desertification trend in western Northeast China Plain in the past 10 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The west sandy land of the Northeast China Plain is located in the eastern huge sandy belt of mid-latitude in Eurasia and the eastern fringe of desertified land with best bio-climatic conditions in China. With rapid economic development, the deterioration of eco-environment has occurred and the desertification becomes very obvious. The first part of this paper studies the regional differences of landscape patterns and explores the regional differences of desertification. The second part aims to reveal the dynamics of desertification in the 1990s by using NOAA/AVHRR data and thematic data in GIS database. This work lays a scientific basis for the rehabilitation and development of the sandy lands.

  4. Management of the coastal biophysical environment in tropical Queensland under conditions of heavy developmental pressure: the case of tourist resorts and acid sulphate soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Erfurt-Haupt

    2008-09-01

    While the remarkable surface features of the tropical coastal environment such as the surf beaches, the unique dune lakes, and the coastal vegetation, as well as the prolific wildlife, are used as selling points for new settlement and above all tourism, little is known or apparently of major concern with respect to the long term environmental impact of coastal development. While the crowding effect of large numbers of visitors and their impact on the natural environment - through significant degradation, site hardening or lack of proper on-site management – has been identified as a particular problem in certain areas, there is little knowledge of impacts on the underlying coastal geomorphology. In particular, developmental choices are often made in ignorance of, or disregard of, the widespread existence of tropical acid sulfate soils in that coastal environment. Reactive soils such as these can, and do, greatly affect the biophysical outcomes of a development if they are exposed. This paper documents such impacts in the form of a case study of the acid sulfate soil problem in relation to the development of tourist resorts, and suggests that part of the solution is for the State Government to insist on enforceable standards relating to their development for tourism in the coastal zone. These would reduce the use by many resort owners of fancy golf course developments as an environmental cover up to make it look as if they put a lot of effort into protecting the environment ….

  5. The status of sandy beach science: Past trends, progress, and possible futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Ronel; Campbell, Eileen E.; Harris, Linda; Hauser, Lorenz; Schoeman, David S.; McLachlan, Anton; du Preez, Derek R.; Bezuidenhout, Karien; Schlacher, Thomas A.

    2014-10-01

    Open-ocean sandy beaches are coastal ecosystems with growing relevance in the face of global change. They provide key ecosystem services, such as storm buffering, nutrient cycling, water purification, nursery habitats for resource species, and feeding-breeding habitats for focal species (e.g. endangered sea turtles and shorebirds), and have also become nodes for economic development and cultural use. As a result, beaches face a range of threats, primarily from extractive use, habitat modification and development, sea-level rise and coastal squeeze. Consequently, balancing conservation of the ecosystem and sustainable use of the goods and services is particularly important for sandy shores. Thus, the only way to ensure their protection and continued provision of their valuable services, especially in a period of rapid global change, will be to apply knowledge generated from sound science in beach conservation and management. Here we aim to (1) identify and outline the broad ecological paradigms in sandy beach science; (2) report on a citation analysis of the published literature of the past 63 years (1950-2013) to provide context regarding the topics and location of research, the size and institutional composition of the research teams; and (3) investigate whether beach ecology can and has been incorporated into integrated coastal zone management practices. Past research was framed by specific paradigms (chiefly the Swash Exclusion Hypothesis and derivatives), which can be identified with distinct principles and concepts unique to beaches. Most of the sandy beach literature comes from only a few countries (dominated by USA, South Africa, Brazil and Italy), published by small research teams (theory. Despite the constraints, beach science is responding to new challenges, with increasing use of the latest techniques. However, research in conservation and management specifically remains limited, with stronger focus on anthropogenic impacts, in turn leading to management

  6. Interstitial meiofauna of Namib sandy beaches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-03-16

    Mar 16, 1988 ... sandy beaches on the Namibian coast, Langstrand and Cape Cross. A transverse ... prominent in the mid-shore at Cape Cross but occurred in low numbers at Langstrand , where archiannelids ... Koop (1983) recorded the faunal composition of local .... four replicate sediment cores were taken at 15 cm.

  7. Brazilian sandy beach macrofauna production: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Petracco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of the studies on the production of Brazilian sandy beach macrofauna was analyzed on the basis of the data available in the literature. For this purpose, the representativeness of the production dataset was examined by latitudinal distribution, degree of exposure and morphodynamic state of beaches, taxonomic groups, and methods employed. A descriptive analysis was, further, made to investigate the trends in production of the more representative taxonomic groups and species of sandy beach macrofauna. A total of 69 macrofauna annual production estimates were obtained for 38 populations from 25 studies carried out between 22º56'S and 32º20'S. Production estimates were restricted to populations on beaches located on the southern and southeastern Brazilian coast. Most of the populations in the dataset inhabit exposed dissipative sandy beaches and are mainly represented by mollusks and crustaceans, with a smaller number of polychaetes. The trends in production among taxonomic groups follow a similar pattern to that observed on beaches throughout the world, with high values for bivalves and decapods. The high turnover rate (P/B ratio of the latter was due to the presence of several populations of the mole crab Emerita brasiliensis, which can attain high values of productivity, in the dataset. Most of the studies focus on the comparison of production and, especially, of P/B ratio according to life history traits in populations of the same species/taxonomic group. Despite the importance of life history-production studies, other approaches, such as the effect of man-induce disturbances on the macrofauna, should be undertaken in these threatened environments.O estado da arte dos estudos de produção da macrofauna de praias arenosas brasileiras foi analisado a partir de informações disponíveis na literatura. Para essa finalidade, a representatividade dos dados de produção foi examinada de acordo com a distribuição latitudinal

  8. Bibliography of sandy beaches and sandy beach organisms on the African continent

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bally, R

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography covers the literature relating to sandy beaches on the African continent and outlying islands. The bibliography lists biological, chemical, geographical and geological references and covers shallow marine sediments, surf zones off...

  9. 77 FR 74341 - Establishing the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force By the authority vested in me as President by the.... Hurricane Sandy made landfall on October 29, 2012, resulting in major flooding, extensive structural damage... assist the affected region. A disaster of Hurricane Sandy's magnitude merits a comprehensive...

  10. Coastal Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Introduction, waves, sediment transport, littoral transport, lonshore sediment transport, onshore-offshore sediment transport, coastal changes, dune erosion and storm surges, sedimentation in channels and trenches, coastal engineering in practice.

  11. CLASSIFICATION OF TSUNAMI HAZARD ALONG THE SOUTHERN COAST OF INDIA: AN INITIATIVE TO SAFEGUARD THE COASTAL ENVIRONMENT FROM SIMILAR DEBACLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Chandrasekar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention of natural disasters is not feasible but the destruction it conveys could be minimized at least to some extent by the postulation of reliable hazard management system and consistent implementation of it. With that motive, the beaches along the study area have been classified into various zones of liability based upon their response to the tsunami surge of 26 December 2004. Thereby, the beaches which are brutally affected has been identified and the beaches which are least. Based on the seawater inundation with relative to their coastal geomorphic features, we have classified the tsunami impact along the coast and the probability of the behaviour of the beaches in case of similar havoc in future. The maximum seawater inundation recorded in the study area is 750 m as in the case of Colachel and the minimum is 100 m as in the case of Kadiapatanam, Mandakadu and Vaniakudy.Beaches like Chinnamuttom, Kanyakumari, Manakudy, Pallam and Colachel are under high risk in case of similar disaster in future and the beaches like Ovari, Perumanal, Navaladi, Rajakkamangalam, Kadiapatanam, Mandakadu, Vaniakudy, Inayam and Taingapatnam are under least viability.

  12. Nitrogen stable isotope ratios of anthropgenic organic matter in the coastal environment of Kosirina Bay (Murter Island, Croatia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenec, T.; Lambaša, Ž.; Lojen, S.; Rogan, N.; Kniewald, G.; Dolenec, M.

    2009-04-01

    In this study stable nitrogen isotopes ratios of particulate matter POM, zooplankton and selected biota such as Anemonia sulcata and Mytilus galloprovincialis were used to assessed the impact of anthropogenically derived organic matter from the untreated domestic sewage, municipal and industrial effluents on the coastal ecosystem of the Kosirina Bay (Murter Island). The differences in δ15N values observed in POM and organisms collected in Kosirina Bay as compared to POM and biota sampled at unaffected sites from the southern part of the Kornati Island and highly impacted Pirovac Bay revealed only a very minor effects of anthropogenic inputs of nutrients and organic matter which most probably derived from a sewage outfall south of the Tužbina Island. However, to get a better insight into the qualitative or quantitative shifts in the structure of aquatic food web caused by pollutants, more extended research on benthic population is needed, as well as a detailed investigation of seasonal variations of abundance and isotopic composition of POM and zooplankton as their presumed food source.

  13. Coastal Protection and Dune Management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Because dunes protect a large part of The Netherlands against coastal flooding and inundation, it is vital to guarantee the strength of these natural sea defenses. Besides sea defense, dunes have other functions. Sandy shorelines and dunes are frequently eroded. A legal framework has been developed

  14. Coastal Protection and Dune Management in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    Because dunes protect a large part of The Netherlands against coastal flooding and inundation, it is vital to guarantee the strength of these natural sea defenses. Besides sea defense, dunes have other functions. Sandy shorelines and dunes are frequently eroded. A legal framework has been developed

  15. Enhancing evaluation of post-storm morphologic response using aerial orthoimagery from Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jacquelyn Rose; Long, Joseph W.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Birchler, Justin J.

    2015-01-01

    Improved identification of morphological responses to storms is necessary for developing and maintaining predictive models of coastal change. Morphological responses to Hurricane Sandy were measured using lidar and orthophotos taken before and after the storm. Changes to dune features measured from lidar were compared to the occurrence of overwash deposits measured using orthophotos. Thresholds on morphologic change (e.g. overwash volume and dune height change) were defined to optimize agreement between the classification of lidar and orthophoto-derived dune erosion and overwash. A linear regression showed that overwash volume can be calculated from orthophoto-derived overwash extent.

  16. Seasonality in autotrophic mesoplankton in a coastal upwelling-mud bank environment along the southwest coast of India and its ecological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnan, C.; Jyothibabu, R.; Manoj Kumar, T. M.; Balachandran, K. K.; Arunpandi, N.; Jagadeesan, L.

    2017-08-01

    Mesoplankton refers to both autotrophic and heterotrophic plankton with a body size between 200 - 20,000 μm. Here, we applied a FlowCAM to identify the autotrophs present in the mesoplankton size class in a coastal environment along the southwest coast of India (off Alappuzha, Kerala), which is characterized by intense coastal upwelling and mud bank formation during the Southwest Monsoon. 18 time series sampling (weekly/biweekly) sessions were carried out spanning over the Pre-Southwest Monsoon (April) to the Late-Southwest Monsoon (September) period in 2014. The study showed that during the Pre-Southwest Monsoon when nitrate level was relatively low in the study area, the mesoplankton community was entirely contributed by zooplankton, mostly consisting of copepods. During this time, the only autotrophic mesoplankton found in the water column, that too inconsistently, was Trichodesmium erythraeum. However, the entire scenario changed with the onset of the Southwest Monsoon due to hydrographical transformation and nutrient enrichment caused by the coastal upwelling. Especially during the Peak (July) and Late-Southwest Monsoon (August), the mesoplankton composition changed with a significant dominance of larger diatoms such as Fragilaria and Coscinodiscus. The autotrophic mesoplankton abundance was noticeably low during the Pre-Southwest Monsoon (av. 3145 ± 2396 individual m-3 and av. 2045 ± 1907 individual m-3 in M1 and M2, respectively), as compared to the Southwest Monsoon (av. 30436 ± 5983 individual m-3 and av. 32346 ± 11664 individual m-3 in M1 and M2, respectively). Similar was the seasonal trend in the autotrophic mesoplankton biomass, which increased from a low Pre-Southwest Monsoon value (av. 8.45 ± 7.1 mgC m-3and av. 4 ± 3.7 mgC m-3 in M1 and M2, respectively) to a significantly high value during the Southwest Monsoon (av. 117.04 ± 40.2mgC m-3 and av. 136.9 ± 68.1 mgC m-3 in M1 and M2, respectively). The FlowCAM analysis results also showed that

  17. Early diagenetic production and sediment-water exchange of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Annelie; Hall, Per O. J.; Hulth, Stefan; Paxéus, Nicklas; Van Der Loeff, Michiel Rutgers; Westerlund, Stig

    1996-10-01

    Fluorescence at wavelengths characteristic of humic substances (excitation 350 nm, emission 450 nm) have been used in this study to approximate concentrations of fluorescent dissolved organic material (FDOM). In situ regulated and unregulated benthic chambers, sediment cores, and laboratory tank incubations were used to study early diagenesis of FDOM in coastal marine sediments of the Gullmar Fjord, western Sweden. In the regulated in situ chambers, pH and oxygen were kept at relatively stable levels, while in the unregulated in situ chambers, pH and oxygen were left to decrease as a result of biological activity. FDOM porewater distributions and correlation between FDOM and parameters indicating mineralization showed that FDOM was formed in the sediment and should flux across the sediment-water interface. A substantial flux of FDOM was also observed during winter and spring conditions and during anoxic conditions fall. However, no flux was observed during oxic conditions fall. Modeling indicated that oxygen penetration depth was deeper during winter than during fall, i.e., the oxygen penetration depth increased during fall towards winter values. We suggest that as FeOOH was formed when oxygen penetration depths increased, FROM was sorbed to newly formed FeOOH, inhibiting FDOM flux over the sediment-water interface. In addition, at onset of anoxic conditions in the sediment surface layer in fall incubations, FDOM flux from sediment to overlying water increased substantially. Increases in anoxic FDOM fluxes were accompanied by increases in Fe and phosphate fluxes. We suggest that reductively dissolved FeOOH released sorbed FDOM. FDOM released from FeOOH by anoxic conditions was not resorbed when oxic conditions were resumed. This could be an effect of higher pH in overlying water as compared with porewater, inhibiting FeOOH sorption of FDOM.

  18. Pattern of aerosol mass loading and chemical composition over the atmospheric environment of an urban coastal station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindu, G.; Nair, Prabha R.; Aryasree, S.; Hegde, Prashant; Jacob, Salu

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol sampling was carried out at four locations in and around Cochin (9°58‧ N, 76°17‧ E), an urban area, located on the southwest coast of India. The gravimetric estimates of aerosol mass loading showed wide range from 78 μg m-3 to >450 μg m-3, occasionally reaching values >500 μg m-3, associated with regional source characteristics. Most of the values were above the air quality standard. Both boundary layer and synoptic scale airflow pattern play role in the temporal features in aerosol mass loading and chemical composition. Chemical analysis of the aerosol samples were done for anionic species viz; F-, Cl-, Br-, NO2-,   NO3-,   PO43-,   SO42- and metallic/cationic species viz; Na, Ca, K, Mg, NH4+, Fe, Al, Cu, Mg, Pb, etc using Ion Chromatography, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma- Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). At all the locations, extremely high mass concentration of SO42- was observed with the mean value of 13±6.4 μg m-3 indicating the strong anthropogenic influence. Statistical analysis of the chemical composition data was carried out and the principal factors presented. Seasonal variation of these chemical species along with their percentage contributions and regional variations were also examined. Increase in level of Na in aerosol samples indicated the influence of monsoonal activity. Most of the species showed mass concentrations well above those measured over another coastal site Thiruvananthapuram (8°29‧ N, 76°57‧ E) situated ~220 km south of Cochin revealing the highly localized aerosol features.

  19. Black carbon aerosols in a tropical semi-urban coastal environment: Effects of boundary layer dynamics and long range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, K.; Kumar, T. V. Lakshmi; Rao, D. Narayana; Murthy, B. V. Krishna; Babu, S. Suresh; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2013-11-01

    Regular measurements of Black Carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentration have been carried out since March 2011 at a tropical location (12.81°N, 80.03°E) adjoining the mega city, Chennai, on the east coast of India for the first time. As this region is influenced by both the South West and North East monsoons, the BC observations at this site assume importance in understanding the overall BC distribution over India. The data collected until August 2012 has been examined for the general and regionally distinctive features. Spectral absorption characteristics reveal that the BC is mainly from fossil fuel based emissions. The BC concentration shows significant diurnal variation only in the North East monsoon and winter seasons with night time concentration considerably higher than the day time concentration. In the other seasons the day-night contrast in BC is not significant. Seasonal variation is rather subdued with a broad maximum during the Northeast monsoon and winter months and a minimum during the southwest monsoon months. The observed diurnal and seasonal variations are examined in the light of local Atmospheric Boundary Layer dynamics and long range transport. For the first time, an inverse relationship has been established between BC and ABL height on a quantitative basis. A distinctive feature of the region is that in all the seasons transport pathways have long continental overpasses which could lead to the suppressed seasonal variation. It is found that the BC over this region shows distinct diurnal and seasonal features compared to those reported for other coastal and inland regions in India.

  20. Androgenic and Estrogenic Response of Green Mussel Extracts from Singapore’s Coastal Environment Using a Human Cell-Based Bioassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayen, Stéphane; Gong, Yinhan; Chin, Hong Soon; Lee, Hian Kee; Leong, Yong Eu; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade, evidence of endocrine disruption in biota exposed to environmental pollutants has raised serious concern. Human cell-based bioassays have been developed to evaluate induced androgenic and estrogenic activities of chemical compounds. However, bioassays have been sparsely applied to environmental samples. In this study we present data on sex hormone activities in the green mussel, Perna viridis, in Singapore’s coastal waters. P. viridis is a common bioindicator of marine contamination, and this study is a follow-up to an earlier investigation that reported the presence of sex hormone activities in seawater samples from Singapore’s coastal environment. Specimens were collected from eight locations around the Singapore coastline and analyzed for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals. Tissue extracts were then screened for activities on androgen receptors (ARs) and estrogen receptors (ER-α and ER-β) using a reporter gene bio-assay based on a HeLa human cell line. Mussel extracts alone did not exhibit AR activity, but in the presence of the reference androgenic hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT), activities were up to 340% higher than those observed for DHT alone. Peak activities were observed in locations adjacent to industrial and shipping activities. Estrogenic activities of the mussel extract both alone and in the presence of reference hormone were positive. Correlations were statistically investigated between sex hormone activities, levels of pollutants in the mussel tissues, and various biological parameters (specimen size, sex ratio, lipid and moisture content). Significant correlations exist between AR activities, in the presence of DHT, and total concentration of POPs (r = 0.725, p < 0.05). PMID:15531429

  1. Trophic network model of exposed sandy coast: Linking continental and marine water ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razinkovas-Baziukas, Artūras; Morkūnė, Rasa; Bacevičius, Egidijus; Gasiūnaitė, Zita Rasuolė

    2017-08-01

    A macroscopic food web network for the exposed sandy coastal zone of the south-eastern Baltic Sea was reconstructed using ECOPATH software to assess the matter and energy balance in the ecosystem. The model incorporated 40 living functional groups representing the Baltic Sea coastal system of Lithuania during the first decade of 21rst century. The overall pedigree index of our model was relatively high (0.66) as much of the input data originated from the study area. The results indicate net heterotrophy of the coastal zone due to strong influences from the nearby river - lagoon system (Curonian Lagoon). The majority of fish species and waterbirds were present in the coastal system on a seasonal basis and their migrations contributed to heterotrophic conditions. Among fish, the freshwater stragglers possibly contribute to the reversal of flow in biomass and energy from the coastal zone to the river-lagoon system. Top predators such as breeding and wintering piscivorous waterbirds and large pike-perch were identified as keystone species. There was a clear negative balance for the biomass of small marine pelagic fishes such as smelt, sprat and Baltic herring which represent the main prey items in this system.

  2. Narrowing the gap between theory and practice? Interactive knowledge development in a coastal defense project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seijger, Chris; van Tatenhove, J.; Dewulf, Geert P.M.R.; Otter, Henriëtte; Javernick-Will, A.; Chinowsky, P.

    2012-01-01

    Coastal defence projects intend to develop solutions in a highly dynamic environment. The coastal zone is characterized by expanding cities, rising flood risks, economic activity, and a threatened natural environment. Developing relevant knowledge for solutions in coastal defence projects is

  3. Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    decreases biodiversity but also the ability of a coastal ecosystem to soak up pollutants from human activities, such as farming, aquaculture , urban...casts a very wide net. From glass fixation to seaweed , only the creativeness of an innovator’s mind limits the new environmental technology

  4. A Preliminary Study on Utilization and Protection of Sandy Coast%砂质海岸资源开发及保护浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王广禄; 陶常飞

    2012-01-01

    我国砂质海岸资源非常丰富,但随近些年海洋开发利用活动不断开展,砂质海岸的资源与功能遭到不同层面的破坏,其中海岸蚀退是最为突出的问题。本研究通过阐述砂质海岸资源利用中所呈现的问题,提出相应保护措施与管理建议。%The sandy coastal resources in our country is very abundant and diversiforrn, but with the coastal exploitation going on, the resources and functions of the sandy coast are damaged in different aspects, of which the coastal erosion is one of most prominent problems. In the present study, the problems present in the coastal exploitation are described and the corresponding strategies for protection and management of sandy coastal resources are suggested.

  5. A long-term study of new particle formation in a coastal environment: Meteorology, gas phase and solar radiation implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorribas, M., E-mail: sorribas@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain); Adame, J.A. [‘El Arenosillo’ — Atmospheric Sounding Station, Atmospheric Research and Instrumentation Branch, National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), Mazagón, Huelva, 21130 (Spain); Olmo, F.J. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain); Vilaplana, J.M.; Gil-Ojeda, M. [‘El Arenosillo’ — Atmospheric Sounding Station, Atmospheric Research and Instrumentation Branch, National Institute for Aerospace Technology (INTA), Mazagón, Huelva, 21130 (Spain); Alados-Arboledas, L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada, 18071 (Spain); Andalusian Institute for Earth System Research (IISTA), University of Granada, 18006 (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    New particle formation (NPF) was investigated at a coastal background site in Southwest Spain over a four-year period using a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer (SMPS). The goals of the study were to characterise the NPF and to investigate their relationship to meteorology, gas phase (O{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, CO and NO{sub 2}) and solar radiation (UVA, UVB and global). A methodology for identifying and classifying the NPF was implemented using the wind direction and modal concentrations as inputs. NPF events showed a frequency of 24% of the total days analysed. The mean duration was 9.2 ± 4.2 h. Contrary to previous studies conducted in other locations, the NPF frequency reached its maximum during cold seasons for approximately 30% of the days. The lowest frequency took place in July with 10%, and the seasonal wind pattern was found to be the most important parameter influencing the NPF frequency. The mean formation rate was 2.2 ± 1.7 cm{sup −3} s{sup −1}, with a maximum in the spring and early autumn and a minimum during the summer and winter. The mean growth rate was 3.8 ± 2.4 nm h{sup −1} with higher values occurring from spring to autumn. The mean and seasonal formation and growth rates are in agreement with previous observations from continental sites in the Northern Hemisphere. NPF classification of different classes was conducted to explore the effect of synoptic and regional-scale patterns on NPF and growth. The results show that under a breeze regime, the temperature indirectly affects NPF events. Higher temperatures increase the strength of the breeze recirculation, favouring gas accumulation and subsequent NPF appearance. Additionally, the role of high relative humidity in inhibiting the NPF was evinced during synoptic scenarios. The remaining meteorological variables (RH), trace gases (CO and NO), solar radiation, PM{sub 10} and condensation sink, showed a moderate or high connection with both formation and growth rates. - Highlights: • New

  6. Climate-change impacts on sandy-beach biota: crossing a line in the sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, David S; Schlacher, Thomas A; Defeo, Omar

    2014-08-01

    Sandy ocean beaches are iconic assets that provide irreplaceable ecosystem services to society. Despite their great socioeconomic importance, beaches as ecosystems are severely under-represented in the literature on climate-change ecology. Here, we redress this imbalance by examining whether beach biota have been observed to respond to recent climate change in ways that are consistent with expectations under climate change. We base our assessments on evidence coming from case studies on beach invertebrates in South America and on sea turtles globally. Surprisingly, we find that observational evidence for climate-change responses in beach biota is more convincing for invertebrates than for highly charismatic turtles. This asymmetry is paradoxical given the better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms by which turtles are likely to respond to changes in climate. Regardless of this disparity, knowledge of the unique attributes of beach systems can complement our detection of climate-change impacts on sandy-shore invertebrates to add rigor to studies of climate-change ecology for sandy beaches. To this end, we combine theory from beach ecology and climate-change ecology to put forward a suite of predictive hypotheses regarding climate impacts on beaches and to suggest ways that these can be tested. Addressing these hypotheses could significantly advance both beach and climate-change ecology, thereby progressing understanding of how future climate change will impact coastal ecosystems more generally.

  7. Exploring Water Level Sensitivity for Metropolitan New York during Sandy (2012 Using Ensemble Storm Surge Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Colle

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes storm surge simulations made for Sandy (2012 for the Metropolitan New York (NYC area using the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC model forced by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model. The atmospheric forecast uncertainty was quantified using 11-members from an atmospheric Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF system. A control WRF member re-initialized every 24 h demonstrated the capability of the WRF-ADCIRC models to realistically simulate the 2.83 m surge and 4.40 m storm tide (surge + astronomical tide above mean lower low water (MLLW for NYC. Starting about four days before landfall, an ensemble of model runs based on the 11 “best” meteorological predictions illustrate how modest changes in the track (20–100 km and winds (3–5 m s−1 of Sandy approaching the New Jersey coast and NYC can lead to relatively large (0.50–1.50 m storm surge variations. The ensemble also illustrates the extreme importance of the timing of landfall relative to local high tide. The observed coastal flooding was not the worst case for this particular event. Had Sandy made landfall at differing times, locations and stages of the tide, peak water levels could have been up to 0.5 m higher than experienced.

  8. Fracionamento do alumínio por técnicas de dissoluções seletivas em espodossolos da planície costeira do Estado de São Paulo Fractionation of aluminum by selective dissolution techniques of soils on the São Paulo State sandy coastal plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Rizzato Coelho

    2010-08-01

    soils poorly studied, as the coastal plain regions and Spodosols of Brazil. The application of these techniques commonly used for characterization of spodic horizons and soil profiles for large amount horizons and soils studied in cronossequences are rare for those environments and become possible to establish comparisons with those intensively studied under boreal and temperate climatic. In spite of the recognized limitations of all selective dissolution techniques these used procedures were relatively selective and become possible (a the differentiation of the horizons, (b deduce mineralogical components of soil, and (c deduce pedogenetic process. The studied soils are situated in Bertioga, Cananeia and Ilha Comprida counties, São Paulo State, where were opened, make the morphological descriptions and sampled thirty-one pedons. The main results reached are: cold 0,5 M NaOH extracted in average 22 to 30 % more Al than dithionite-citrate (Al d, oxalate ammonium (Al o and Na pyrophosphate (Al o for all group of samples. In some well drained spodic horizons (Bs, Bhs and Bsm the chemical properties (pH and the relationship among the different techniques (Al n-Al o; Al o-Al p; Al p/Al o; Al p/Al d allowed to deduce about the formation and maintenance of low cristallinity Al minerals to the detriment of this element bounded to soil organic matter. This last form of Al predominates in the hidromorphic Spodosols.

  9. Development of a High-Sensitivity Lab-On-Chip Sensor for In Situ Determinations of Phosphate in Coastal and Open-Ocean Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, M. M.; Turner, G. S. C.; Mowlem, M. C.; Achterberg, E. P.; Beaton, A.; Owsianka, D. R.; Slavik, G. J.; Nightingale, A.; Connelly, D.

    2016-02-01

    The development of field-deployable nutrient sensors with a dynamic quantification range suitable for high-frequency sampling in estuaries, coastal waters and oligotrophic seas is essential to improve our understanding of the fluxes and biogeochemical implications of nutrient distributions in the marine environment. By virtue of their compactness, low reagent (power (1.5 W) consumption, microfluidic wet-chemical analysers based on Lab-On-Chip technology provide an attractive means to address this challenge while opening the possibility of in situ monitoring onboard autonomous seagoing platforms such as oceanic gliders. Here we report the development and complete characterization of a stand-alone, microfluidic Lab-On-Chip sensor for phosphate determinations using the classic Molybdenum Blue (MB) method. The sensor is the second iteration of a Lab-On-Chip sensor designed at the National Oceanographic Centre, which was successfully deployed in shallow water environments and gliders for nitrate determinations. The phosphate chemical assay consists of merging streams of an acidic molybdate solution, sample and reducing agent into a 41 mm absorption cell fitted with a LED and photodiode for absorbance quantification. The assay is performed in stopped flow mode, which allows monitoring the kinetics of the reaction as well as altering the dynamic quantification range by varying the length of the stopped flow period. A complete optimization of the assay parameters of the MB method to achieve optimal performance on a microfluidic chip will be described along with results of a deployment in a temperature controlled chamber to address the effect of ambient temperature on the sensitivity of the assay. Data with regards to the long-term stability of the reagents will be presented along with a trial deployment in a shallow water environment. The use of long-path absorbance cells for nanomolar phosphate determinations will also be discussed.

  10. A miniaturized UV/VIS/IR hyperspectral radiometer for autonomous airborne and underwater imaging spectroscopy of coastal and oceanic environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Remote sensing of optical properties of oceans and coastal waters provides essential information for various scientific questions and applications, including...

  11. Visual Odometry for Planetary Exploration Rovers in Sandy Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Visual odometry provides planetary exploration rovers with accurate knowledge of their position and orientation, which needs effective feature tracking results, especially in barren sandy terrains. In this paper, a stereovision based odometry algorithm is proposed for a lunar rover, which is composed of corner extraction, feature tracking and motion estimation. First, a morphology based image enhancement method is studied to guarantee enough corners are extracted. Second, a Random Sample Consensus (RANSAC algorithm is proposed to make a robust estimation of the fundamental matrix, which is the basic and critical part of feature matching and tracking. Then, the 6 degrees of freedom rover position and orientation is estimated by the RANSAC algorithm. Finally, experiments are performed in a simulated lunar surface environment using a prototype rover, which have confirmed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Screening of cellulose decomposing fungi in sandy dune soil of Horqin Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaoKun Wang; XueYong Zhao; XiaoAn Zuo; XinPing Liu; Hao Qu; Wei Mao; JianYing Yun

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose decomposing fungi play an important role in litter decomposition and are decisive in nutrient cycling in sandy land ecosystems. Thirty-one strains were isolated to select efficient cellulose decomposers, and four efficient cellulose decomposing fungi (NM3-1, NM3-2, NM3-3, and NM3-4) were screened using a CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose) carbon source in dune soil of Horqin Sandy Land. They were identified as Asperigillus calidoustus, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Hypocrea lixii by rDNA-ITS molecular biological methods. Cloth decomposition rates were 15.71%, 15.89%, 17.29%, and 17.89%by the four efficient decomposers incubated for 30 days, respectively. Screening of efficient cellulose decomposers can not only increase the dune soil functional microbe bank, but can also accelerate litter decom-position and available nutrient input in the Horqin Sandy Land.

  13. New Perspectives for the Observation of Coastal Zones with the Coastal Thematic Exploitation Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, Sebastien; Tuhoy, Eimear; Mangin, Antoine; Datcu, Mihai; Vignudelli, Stefano; Illuzzi, Diomede; Craciunescu, Vasile; Aspetsberger, Michael; Leone, Rosemarie; Campbell, Gordon

    2016-08-01

    The Coastal Thematic Exploitation Platform (CTEP) is an on-going ESA project to develop a platform dedicated to the observation of the coastal environment to support management and monitoring; this paper explains how the innovations of the CTEP will provide new means to handle the technical challenges of observation of coastal areas and contribute to improved understanding and decision-making with respect to coastal resources and environments.

  14. Trends and transformation of nutrients and pesticides in a Coastal Plain aquifer system, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denver, J.M.; Tesoriero, A.J.; Barbaro, J.R.

    2010-01-01

    Four local-scale sites in areas with similar corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] agriculture were studied to determine the effects of different hydrogeologic settings of the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain (NACP) on the transport of nutrients and pesticides in groundwater. Settings ranged from predominantly well-drained soils overlying thick, sandy surficial aquifers to predominantly poorly drained soils with complex aquifer stratigraphy and high organic matter content. Apparent age of groundwater, dissolved gases, N isotopes, major ions, selected pesticides and degradates, and geochemical environments in groundwater were studied. Agricultural chemicals were the source of most dissolved ions in groundwater. Specific conductance was strongly correlated with reconstructed nitrate (the sum of N in nitrate and N gas) (R2 = 0.81, p Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  15. A crisis in waste management, economic vitality, and a coastal marine environment: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Butman, B.

    1994-01-01

    Discharge of sewage sludge and effluent from 43 communities in the greater Boston metropolitan area has helped make the harbor one of the most polluted in the nation. As part of a court-mandated plan to end pollution of the harbor, effluent will no longer be discharged into the harbor, but instead, by 1995 it will be discharged into Massachusetts Bay through a record-long 15.34 km tunnel. By the year 2000 all of the sewage is scheduled to recive full secondary treatment. The public is concerned about long-term effects of the new ocean outfall on the environment, including Cape Cod Bay and Stellwagen Bank, which is an important habitat for whales and a newly designated national marine sanctuary. The bay has been additionally stressed by dumping of low-level radioactive and other hazardous wastes during the 1950s and 1960s. -from Authors

  16. Zeolite and Hucalcia as Coating Material for Improving Quality of NPK Fertilizer in Costal Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulakhudin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available he growth and yield of plants are mainly a function of the quantity of fertilizer and water. In coastal sandy soil, nutrient losses and dry soils are seriously problems. The objective of the research was to study effect of zeolite and hucalci concentrations as NPK coating materials on NPK qualities i.e. water adsorption and release of N, P and K. The research used a coastal sandy soil as media. It was conducted in a laboratory of Soil Science Department, Gadjah Mada University from July to August 2009. Experimental design used was a factorial in a completely randomized design. The first factor was hucalci concentration, consisted of 10% (H1, 20% (H2, and 30% (H3. The second factor was zeolite concentration, consisted of 25% (Z1, 50% (Z2, 75% (Z3, and 100% (Z4. NPK fertilizer (without coating used as a control. The results showed that hucalci and zeolite had a capability to increase water adsorption and to retard the release of N, P, K. The coated NPK with hucalci 30% and zeolite 100% had the highest quality in water absorption, water retention and release of nutrients.

  17. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  18. Resource utilization and trophic niche width in sandy beach macrobenthos from an oligotrophic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Cisneros, Kelly; de Lecea, Ander M.; Smit, Albertus J.; Schoeman, David S.

    2017-01-01

    One of the paradigms underlying sandy beach ecology is the overriding control by physical processes; thus, biological interactions (i.e. food availability, competition and predation) are believed to play a role structuring macrofaunal communities only in benign habitats such as dissipative beaches. Moreover, sandy beaches are characterized by low in-situ productivity, so their food webs rely heavily on marine inputs. Studies have shown that estuarine organic matter plays a key role in influencing the dynamics of marine ecosystems. However, very few studies have tested the role of estuarine input on sandy beaches. Here, we aim to determine the impact of estuarine input on the food web of a sandy beach macrobenthic community. To this end, particulate organic matter (POM) samples from the marine environment and the estuary, as well as macrobenthic samples from the beach, were analysed for their stable isotope (SI) signature. Our results indicated that the POM SI signatures were not different along the beach, but differences were recorded between marine and estuarine sources. Bayesian mixing models indicated that the organisms did not make use of the estuarine POM at the beginning of the wet season, but relied more heavily on this resource towards the end of the wet season. This leads to the conclusion that changes in estuarine flow throughout the wet season can impact the trophic structure of macrobenthos communities, confirming a link between lotic and marine communities. Moreover, SI signatures suggest that the species collected here exhibit overlapping trophic niches, indicating high level of inter-specific competition. This highlights that species in low-productivity areas, such as the one studied here, can experience high levels of competition even in physically controlled environments such as sandy beaches.

  19. The source of naturally occurring arsenic in a coastal sand aquifer of eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Bethany; Jankowski, Jerzy; Sammut, Jesmond

    2007-07-01

    The discovery of dissolved arsenic in a coastal aquifer used extensively for human consumption has led to widespread concern for its potential occurrence in other sandy coastal environments in eastern Australia. The development of an aquifer specific geomorphic model (herein) suggests that arsenic is regionally derived from erosion of arsenic-rich stibnite (Sb(2)S(3)) mineralisation present in the hinterland. Fluvial processes have transported the eroded material over time to deposit an aquifer lithology elevated in arsenic. Minor arsenic contribution to groundwater is derived from mineralised bedrock below the unconsolidated aquifer. An association with arsenic and pyrite has been observed in the aquifer in small discrete arsenian pyrite clusters rather than actual acid sulfate soil horizons. This association is likely to influence arsenic distribution in the aquifer, but is not the dominant control on arsenic occurrence. Arsenic association with marine clays is considered a function of their increased adsorptive capacity for arsenic and not solely on the influence of sea level inundation of the aquifer sediments during the Quaternary Period. These findings have implications for, but are not limited to, coastal aquifers. Rather, any aquifer containing sediments derived from mineralised provenances may be at risk of natural arsenic contamination. Groundwater resource surveys should thus incorporate a review of the aquifer source provenance when assessing the likely risk of natural arsenic occurrence in an aquifer.

  20. Corn Response to Nitrogen Timing and Rate under Strip Tillage and Low-Yield Environment in Southeastern Coastal Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Wiatrak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Insufficient rainfall under low yield environment may affect nitrogen management, plant growth indices and grain yields of corn (Zea mays L.. Approach: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of two N application timings (all at planting and as split application with N applied at planting and V6 stage and five N fertilizer rates (0, 45, 90, 135 and 180 kg N ha−1 on strip-tilled, dryland corn growth and yields under low-yield environmental conditions near Blackville SC, from 2007-2009. Plant growth measurements included plant height, ear height, relative chlorophyll content (SPAD, Leaf Area Index (LAI and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI. Results: Plant LAI at V8, NDVI at V8 and R1, SPAD at R1, plant height at V8 and grain yield generally increased with increasing N application rates. Due to most likely insufficient precipitation, the N application timing did not affect corn growth or yield. Despite relatively low grain yields, corn yield was increased by 1.6 Mg ha−1 with increasing N application rate of 100 kg ha−1. Grain yield was positively correlated with plant leaf area index (LAI at R1 (r = 0.27, p≤0.05 and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI at V8 and R1 (r = 0.33 and 0.29, p≤0.01, respectively and plant height at V8 stage (r = 0.42, p≤0.001. With N applied at planting, there was a 0.55 and 0.49 Mg ha−1 yield increase with 0.1 increases in plant NDVI at V8 and R1, respectively. Conclusion: Under strip tillage and low yield environment conditions, plant growth and yields may not be affected by timing of N application mainly due to insufficient rainfall. Plant NDVI (for treatments with all N applied at planting at V8 and R1 can help to estimate potential of corn grain yield, which may be reduced due to low nitrogen use efficiency.

  1. Coastal Risk Management in a Changing Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Existing coastal management and defense approaches are not well suited to meet the challenges of climate change and related uncertanities. Professionals in this field need a more dynamic, systematic and multidisciplinary approach. Written by an international group of experts, "Coastal Risk...... Management in a Changing Climate" provides innovative, multidisciplinary best practices for mitigating the effects of climate change on coastal structures. Based on the Theseus program, the book includes eight study sites across Europe, with specific attention to the most vulnerable coastal environments...

  2. Geo-environment studies applied to dumpsite remediation in a coastal river-lagoon system in southern Tamaulipas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, P. F.; Sanchez-Esqueda, G.; Yañez, D.; Garcia, G.; Fierro, A.; Salas, B. G.; Melo, A.

    2007-05-01

    The "Isteta del Zapote" dumpsite, located in Tampico was used for this purpose approximately for 28 years (1978-2003). The Dumpsite is 42 ha, with thickness of waste of 3-9 meters. The site has approximately 2.5 millions tons of waste accumulated mostly from household waste. The dumpsite was recently (2004) closed and an inter-institutional remediation project with academic character was started in order to develop an Executive Project. The preliminary results of the geo-environment approach about geochemistry, geo-technical and geophysical correlations were focused in the vertical profile of sediments in the Zapote Dumpsite. The metal concentrations in the upper layer (0-2m) of this profile were 60-20 mg/Kg, while the metal concentrations in the lower layer (2-11m) were below 30 mg/Kg. These concentrations were correlated with the Plastic Index results among the ranges of 45 to 20%. A 75 to 38% of Liquid Limit corresponded to the upper layer. The Plastic Index and Liquid Limit were below to 30 and 50% in the lower layer, respectively. The resistivity results in the upper layer were 0.5-0.2 ohm-m, while an increase of values up to1.6 ohm-m in the lower layer was found. These results suggest the presence of a natural liner (seal layer) at least in the southwest front of the Zapote dumpsite.

  3. Molecular diversity of fungal phylotypes co-amplified alongside nematodes from coastal and deep-sea marine environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punyasloke Bhadury

    Full Text Available Nematodes and fungi are both ubiquitous in marine environments, yet few studies have investigated relationships between these two groups. Microbial species share many well-documented interactions with both free-living and parasitic nematode species, and limited data from previous studies have suggested ecological associations between fungi and nematodes in benthic marine habitats. This study aimed to further document the taxonomy and distribution of fungal taxa often co-amplified from nematode specimens. A total of 15 fungal 18S rRNA phylotypes were isolated from nematode specimens representing both deep-sea and shallow water habitats; all fungal isolates displayed high pairwise sequence identities with published data in Genbank (99-100% and unpublished high-throughput 454 environmental datasets (>95%. BLAST matches indicate marine fungal sequences amplified in this study broadly represent taxa within the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, and several phylotypes showed robust groupings with known taxa in phylogenetic topologies. In addition, some fungal phylotypes appeared to be present in disparate geographic habitats, suggesting cosmopolitan distributions or closely related species complexes in at least some marine fungi. The present study was only able to isolate fungal DNA from a restricted set of nematode taxa; further work is needed to fully investigate the taxonomic scope and function of nematode-fungal interactions.

  4. Diversity, community structure, and bioremediation potential of mercury-resistant marine bacteria of estuarine and coastal environments of Odisha, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Hirak R; Das, Surajit

    2016-04-01

    Both point and non-point sources increase the pollution status of mercury and increase the population of mercury-resistant marine bacteria (MRMB). They can be targeted as the indicator organism to access marine mercury pollution, besides utilization in bioremediation. Thus, sediment and water samples were collected for 2 years (2010-2012) along Odisha coast of Bay of Bengal, India. Mercury content of the study sites varied from 0.47 to 0.99 ppb irrespective of the seasons of sampling. A strong positive correlation was observed between mercury content and MRMB population (P mercury pollution in the marine environment. Seventy-eight percent of the MRMB isolates were under the phylum Firmicutes, and 36 and 31% of them could resist mercury by mer operon-mediated volatilization and mercury biosorption, respectively. In addition, most of the isolates could resist a number of antibiotics and toxic metals. All the MRMB isolates possess the potential of growth and survival at cardinal pH (4-8), temperature (25-37 °C), and salinity (5-35 psu). Enterobacteria repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) and repetitive element palindromic PCR (REP-PCR) produced fingerprints corroborating the results of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis also revealed strain-level speciation and phylogenetic relationships.

  5. Dispersion of Louisiana crude oil in salt water environment by Corexit 9500A in the presence of natural coastal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Lee, Mengshan; Berbakov, Jillian; Tansel, Derya Z.; Koklonis, Urpiana

    2014-04-01

    Effectiveness of Corexit 9500A for dispersing Louisiana crude oil was evaluated in salt water solutions containing natural materials in relation to salinity and dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR). Experimental results showed that both salinity and DOR had significant effects on dispersion of Louisiana crude oil in the presence of different natural materials. The natural materials added to the salt water solutions included sea sand (South Beach, Miami, Florida), red mangrove leaves (Rhizophora mangle), seaweed (Sargassum natans), and sea grass (Halodule wrightii). Dispersant effectiveness (amount of oil dispersed into the water) was reduced significantly with increasing salinity with the minimum effectiveness observed in the salinity range between 30 and 50 ppt in all aqueous samples containing natural materials. When significant amounts of floating oil were present, the partially submerged natural materials enhanced the transfer of oil into the water column, which improved the dispersion effectiveness. However, dispersant effectiveness was significantly reduced when the amount of floating oil was relatively small and could not be released back to the water column. Surface tension may not be an adequate parameter for monitoring the effectiveness of dispersants in salt water environment. When distilled water was used (i.e., zero salinity), surface tension was significantly reduced with increasing dispersant concentration. However, there was no clear trend in the surface tension of the salt water solutions (17-51 ppt) containing crude oil and natural materials with increasing dispersant concentration.

  6. Enhanced detection of pathogenic enteric viruses in coastal marine environment by concentration using methacrylate monolithic chromatographic supports paired with quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Mukundh N; Rački, Nejc; Gonçalves, José; Kovač, Katarina; Žnidarič, Magda T; Turk, Valentina; Ravnikar, Maja; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion

    2016-12-01

    Currently, around 50% of the world's population lives in towns and cities within 100 km of the coast. Monitoring of viruses that are frequently present in contaminated coastal environments, such as rotavirus (RoV) and norovirus (NoV), which are also the major cause of human viral gastroenteritis, is essential to ensure the safe use of these water bodies. Since exposure to as few as 10-100 particles of RoV or NoV may induce gastrointestinal disease, there is a need to develop a rapid and sensitive diagnostic method for their detection in coastal water samples. In this study, we evaluate the application of methacrylate monolithic chromatographic columns, commercially available as convective interaction media (CIM(®)), to concentrate pathogenic enteric viruses from saline water samples prior to virus quantification by one-step reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Using RoV and NoV as model enteric viruses, we present our results on the most effective viral concentration conditions from saline water matrices using butyl (C4) hydrophobic interaction monolithic support (CIM(®) C4). C4 monolithic columns exhibit a good capacity to bind both RoV and NoV and both viruses can be eluted in a single step. Our protocol using a 1 ml C4 column enables processing of 400 ml saline water samples in less than 60 min and increases the sensitivity of RoV and NoV detection by approximately 50-fold and 10-fold respectively. The protocol was also scaled up using larger capacity 8 ml C4 columns to process 4000 ml of seawater samples with concentration factors of 300-fold for RoV and 40-fold for NoV, without any significant increase in processing time. Furthermore, C4 monolithic columns were adapted for field use in an on-site application of RoV concentration from seawater samples with performance equivalent to that of the reference laboratory setup. Overall, the results from successful deployment of CIM C4 columns for concentration of rotavirus and norovirus in

  7. Guiana Dolphins (Sotalia guianensis) and DR-CALUX for Screening Coastal Brazilian Environments for Dioxins and Related Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Paulo R; Lailson-Brito, José; Bisi, Tatiana L; Domit, Camila; Barbosa, Lupércio A; Meirelles, Ana C O; Carvalho, Vitor L; Malm, Olaf; Azevedo, Alexandre F; Brose, François; Das, Krishna; Scippo, Marie-Louise

    2016-10-01

    Guiana dolphin is the top predator of highest toxicological concern in Brazil and many studies on levels of persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxicant (PBT) pollutants have been performed on the species. However, due to high costs of the analyses, only one investigation comprised the determination of dioxins and related compounds (DRCs) in Guiana dolphin tissues. The dioxin responsive-chemically activated luciferase gene expression (DR-CALUX(®)) cell bioassay was used in the present study for the analyses of hepatic samples from 28 male Guiana dolphins in order to screen estuarine environments for DRCs, comprising three regions (Northeastern, Southeastern, and Southern) and four states [Paraná (PR), Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Espírito Santo (ES), and Ceará (CE)] of Brazil. High bioanalytical equivalent (BEQ) concentrations [dioxins (pg BEQ/g lipid)] were found, varying from 1.94 to 15.6 pg BEQ/g. A significant negative correlation between BEQ concentrations and total length was found in Guiana dolphins from Brazil (all analysed dolphins). This pattern also was verified for RJ state, pointing to (1) chemically induced developmental disruption or to (2) increasing efficiency of the detoxifying activity with the growth of the animal. Comparison was performed with literature data and significantly higher BEQ levels were found in Brazilian Guiana dolphins than in those reported for North Sea harbour porpoises. Higher levels were found in Southeastern (the most PBT-contaminated area of the country) than in Southern region. However, it is not possible to affirm that Guiana dolphins are more contaminated by DRCs in SE than in S region, because individuals were lengthier in S than in SE region. Our results seem to have mirrored dolphin exposure to PCBs in Brazil according to the literature. Further studies are required for investigating the hypotheses 1 and 2 mentioned above.

  8. Coastal Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.T.

    1998-01-01

    This book deals on "Coastal Dynamics", which will be defined in a narrow sense as a mathematical theory, which starts from given equations of motion for the sediment, which leads with the continuity equation and given boundary conditions to a calculated (eventually schematized) coastal topography,

  9. Environmental Risk Evaluation System – An Approach to Ranking Risk of Ocean Energy Development on Coastal and Estuarine Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Deployment and operation of ocean energy devices does not represent the first foray into industrialization of the oceans; shipping, nearshore development, waste disposal, subsea mining, oil and gas extraction, and large-scale commercial fishing all coexist in various states of equilibrium with the marine environment. In most cases these industries were developed without a clear understanding of the likely outcomes of large-scale development. In virtually every country where the harvest of ocean energy is emerging, regulators and stakeholders require that the industry examine potential effects of devices, minimize the footprint of effects, and provide management measures that either avoid the impacts or mitigate to further reduce the residual impacts. The ERES analysis is based on scenarios that are consistent with sequences of events that lead to adverse impacts, distinguishing between episodic, intermittent, and chronic risks. In the context of ocean energy development, an episodic scenario might involve the exceedingly rare but potentially devastating event of an oil spill from vessels caused by the presence of the device, while vulnerable receptors are present; understanding the risk of such a scenario involves determining the probability of the occurrence by examining factors such as the petroleum content of ocean energy devices, the vessel traffic volume and the proximity of shipping lanes to the ocean energy devices, the reliability of the control measures to avoid an episodic event, and the likely presence of seabirds, marine mammals, or fish that may be affected by oil. In contrast, chronic risk scenarios involve events or circumstances that are continuous, so that risk characterization involves assessing only the severity of the consequences. An example of a chronic risk scenario might be the toxicity to marine organisms due to low-level chemical releases from anti-biofouling paints and coatings that may be used on devices, and the effect that the level of

  10. Modern geomorphological environment research during rapid urbanization in Shenzhen east coastal zone%快速城市化过程中的深圳东部海岸地貌环境与可持续发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭伟; 李书恒; 朱大奎

    2011-01-01

    The geomorphological environment is one of the most fundamental variables affecting the development of human society. The mission of geomorphological environment research is to explore the most basic environment and features of our Earth's surface morphology. The results can be applied to resource evaluation, environmental protection and reducing and preventing geological disasters. Thus, it can serve to help achieve sustainable development. This paper examines the Shenzhen east coastal zone as a case strongly influenced by urban expansion. We use modern geomorphological theory and methods, along with GIS and RS techniques, to reveal key characteristics of the geomorphological environment and landform classification. Furthermore, coastal ecosystem evaluation and regional resources sustainable utilization should be considered relative to the corresponding geomorphological environment. Based on this study, we conclude that modern geomorphological theory and methods, supported by "3S" techniques including GIS, RS and GPS, can play an important role in resolving the environment, resources and population problems as well as sustainable development challenges facing humankind at present.

  11. Effects of salinity and flooding on post-hurricane regeneration potential in coastal wetland vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A

    2016-08-01

    The nature of regeneration dynamics after hurricane flooding and salinity intrusion may play an important role in shaping coastal vegetation patterns. The regeneration potentials of coastal species, types and gradients (wetland types from seaward to landward) were studied on the Delmarva Peninsula after Hurricane Sandy using seed bank assays to examine responses to various water regimes (unflooded and flooded to 8 cm) and salinity levels (0, 1, and 5 ppt). Seed bank responses to treatments were compared using a generalized linear models approach. Species relationships to treatment and geographical variables were explored using nonmetric multidimensional scaling. Flooding and salinity treatments affected species richness even at low salinity levels (1 and 5 ppt). Maritime forest was especially intolerant of salinity intrusion so that species richness was much higher in unflooded and low salinity conditions, despite the proximity of maritime forest to saltmarsh along the coastal gradient. Other vegetation types were also affected, with potential regeneration of these species affected in various ways by flooding and salinity, suggesting relationships to post-hurricane environment and geographic position. Seed germination and subsequent seedling growth in coastal wetlands may in some cases be affected by salinity intrusion events even at low salinity levels (1 and 5 ppt). These results indicate that the potential is great for hurricanes to shift vegetation type in sensitive wetland types (e.g., maritime forest) if post-hurricane environments do not support the regeneration of extent vegetation. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. © Botanical Society of America (outside the USA) 2016.

  12. AquaScan: A miniaturized UV/VIS/IR hyperspectral imager for autonomous airborne and underwater imaging spectroscopy of coastal & oceanic environments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AquaScan, a miniaturized UV/VIS/NIR hyperspectral imager will be built for deployment on a UAV or small manned aircraft for ocean coastal remote sensing...

  13. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Northwest Arctic, Alaska: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Polygons and Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Northwest Arctic, Alaska classified according to the...

  14. Sensitivity of Coastal Environments and Wildlife to Spilled Oil: Puget Sound and Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington: HYDRO (Hydrography Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing coastal hydrography used in the creation of the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) for Puget Sound...

  15. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  16. Water column particulate matter: A key contributor to phosphorus regeneration in a coastal eutrophic environment, the Chesapeake Bay: Particulate phosphorus in the Chesapeake Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiying [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Reardon, Patrick [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Now at NMR Facility, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; McKinley, James P. [Geochemistry Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Joshi, Sunendra R. [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Bai, Yuge [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Bear, Kristi [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA; Jaisi, Deb P. [Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark Delaware USA

    2017-04-01

    Particulate phosphorus (PP) in the water column is an essential component of phosphorus (P) cycling in aquatic ecosystems yet its composition and transformations remain largely uncharacterized. To understand the roles of suspended particulates on regeneration of inorganic P (Pi) into the water column as well as sequestration into more stable mineral precipitates, we studied seasonal variation in both organic and inorganic P speciation in suspended particles in three sites in the Chesapeake Bay using sequential P extraction, 1D (31P) and 2D (1H-31P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and electron microprobe analyses (EMPA). Remineralization efficiency of particulate P average 8% and 56% in shallow and deep sites respectively, suggesting the importance of PP remineralization is in resupplying water column Pi. Strong temporal and spatial variability of organic P composition, distributions, and remineralization efficiency were observed relating to water column parameters such as temperature and redox conditions: concentration of orthophosphate monoesters and diesters, and diester-to-monoester (D/M) ratios decreased with depth. Both esters and the D/M ratios were lower in the hypoxic July and September. In contrast, pyrophosphate and orthophosphate increased with depth, and polyphosphates was high in the anoxic water column. Sequential extraction and EMPA analyses of the suspended particles suggest presence of Ca-bound phosphate in the water column. We hypothesize authigenic precipitation of carbonate fluorapatite and/or its precursor mineral(s) in Pi rich water column, supported by our thermodynamic calculations. Our results, overall, reveal the important role suspended particles play in P remineralization and P sequestration in the Chesapeake Bay water column, provide important implications on P bioavailability and P sinks in similar eutrophic coastal environments.

  17. Distribution of chlorophyll and harmful algal blooms (HABs): A review on space based studies in the coastal environments of Chinese marginal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guifeng; Tang, Danling; Wang, Sufen

    Monitoring of spatial and temporal distribution of chlorophyll (Chl-a) concentrations in the aquatic milieu is always challenging and often interesting. However, the recent advancements in satellite digital data play a significant role in providing outstanding results for the marine environmental investigations. The present paper is aimed to review ‘remote sensing research in Chinese seas’ within the period of 24 years from 1978 to 2002. Owing to generalized distributional pattern, the Chl-a concentrations are recognized high towards northern Chinese seas than the southern. Moreover, the coastal waters, estuaries, and upwelling zones always exhibit relatively high Chl-a concentrations compared with offshore waters. On the basis of marine Chl-a estimates obtained from satellite and other field measured environmental parameters, we have further discussed on the applications of satellite remote sensing in the fields of harmful algal blooms (HABs), primary production and physical oceanographic currents of the regional seas. Concerned with studies of HABs, satellite remote sensing proved more advantageous than any other conventional methods for large-scale applications. Probably, it may be the only source of authentic information responsible for the evaluation of new research methodologies to detect HABs. At present, studies using remote sensing methods are mostly confined to observe algal bloom occurrences, hence, it is essential to coordinate the mechanism of marine ecological and oceanographic dynamic processes of HABs using satellite remote sensing data with in situ measurements of marine environmental parameters. The satellite remote sensing on marine environment and HABs is believed to have a great improvement with popular application of technology.

  18. 78 FR 32296 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... recipients most severely affected by Hurricane Sandy: the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New Jersey... Federal Register notice, bringing the total amount of Hurricane Sandy Emergency Relief funds allocated...

  19. How quickly do High Arctic coastal environments respond to rapid deglaciation and the paraglacial transformation of proglacial areas? - Answers from Spitsbergen, Svalbard Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, Matt; Long, Antony; Lloyd, Jerry; Zagórski, Piotr

    2014-05-01

    The coastal zone is one of the most important storage systems for sediments that are eroded and transported by rivers, wind and slope processes from deglacierised valleys and proglacial areas before reaching their final sediment sink (fjords or the open sea. The Svalbard archipelago provides an excellent location to quantify how High Arctic coasts are responding to climate warming and the associated paraglacial landscape transformations. In this paper we summarize the results of several coastal surveys carried out by our research teams along the paraglacial coasts of Spitsbergen during the last decade. We reconstruct the post-Little Ice Age development of selected coastlines in Spitsbergen to illustrate the variable coastal response to paraglacial and periglacial processes activated following the recent retreat of glaciers. Our surveys use aerial photogrammetric and GIS analyses, sedimentological classification of coastal deposits and field-based geomorphological mapping in Kongsfjorden, Billefjorden, Bellsund, Hornsund and Sørkappland. Our results document dramatic changes in sediment flux and coastal response under intervals characterized by a warming climate, retreating local ice masses, a shortened winter sea-ice season and thawing permafrost. The study highlights the need for a greater understanding of the controls on High Arctic coastal geomorphology, especially given the potential for future accelerated warming and sea-level rise.

  20. Coastline evolution of Portuguese low-lying sandy coast in the last 50 years: an integrated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte Lira, Cristina; Nobre Silva, Ana; Taborda, Rui; Freire de Andrade, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    Regional/national-scale information on coastline rates of change and trends is extremely valuable, but these studies are scarce. A widely accepted standardized methodology for analysing long-term coastline change has been difficult to achieve, but it is essential to conduct an integrated and holistic approach to coastline evolution and hence support coastal management actions. Additionally, databases providing knowledge on coastline evolution are of key importance to support both coastal management experts and users.The main objective of this work is to present the first systematic, national-scale and consistent long-term coastline evolution data of Portuguese mainland low-lying sandy coasts.The methodology used quantifies coastline evolution using a unique and robust coastline indicator (the foredune toe), which is independent of short-term changes.The dataset presented comprises (1) two polyline sets, mapping the 1958 and 2010 sandy beach-dune system coastline, both optimized for working at 1 : 50 000 scale or smaller; (2) one polyline set representing long-term change rates between 1958 and 2010, each estimated at 250 m; and (3) a table with minimum, maximum and mean of evolution rates for sandy beach-dune system coastline. All science data produced here are openly accessible at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.859136" target="_blank">https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.859136 and can be used in other studies.Results show beach erosion as the dominant trend, with a mean change rate of -0.24 ± 0.01 m year-1 for all mainland Portuguese beach-dune systems. Although erosion is dominant, this evolution is variable in signal and magnitude in different coastal sediment cells and also within each cell. The most relevant beach erosion issues were found in the coastal stretches of Espinho-Torreira and Costa Nova-Praia de Mira, Cova da Gala-Leirosa, and Cova do Vapor-Costa da Caparica. The coastal segments Minho River-Nazaré and Costa da Caparica adjacent to the

  1. Organic matter dynamics in coarse sandy calcareous soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, A.A.; Reuler, van H.

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of organic matter in coarse sandy calcareous soils (beach sand) is thought to be much higher than in acid fine sandy soils but relatively little research is performed on these soils. Laboratory incubation experiments in which the release of soil carbon (C) is determined may overest

  2. Comparison of split nitrogen appliacation strategies in leek (Allium porrum) to reduce N fertilization on sandy soils in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geel, van W.C.A.; Meurs, E.J.J.; Radersma, S.; Grashoff, C.

    2006-01-01

    High nitrogen (N) fertilization to maximize production of leek (Allium porrum L.) combined with low N recovery can lead to considerable nitrogen pollution of the environment. A field trial was conducted in 2002 and 2003 on a sandy soil in the Netherlands. To synchronize N supply and N demand, two st

  3. Status and development trend of study on estuarine and coastal eco-environment%河口海岸生态环境研究现状及发展趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康婧; 蒋云钟; 甘治国; 王浩

    2012-01-01

    在广泛查阅国内外关于河口海岸生态问题研究相关文献基础上,综述了河口海岸侵蚀治理研究、河口地区水质研究和河口湿地的恢复与重建等三个热点方向的研究现状.进而,根据研究现状和我国河口海岸研究的实际需求,对海岸侵蚀,河口水质恢复和湿地保护等有关河口生态环境的研究方向进行了展望.%Based on wide access to the relevant reference literature on the issues of the estuarine and coastal eco-environment at home and abroad, the status of three study focuses, such as the study on the estuarine and coastal erosion control, study on water quality within the estuarine area, restoration and reconstruction of the estuarine wetland is summarized herein. Furthermore, the study tendency related to the estuarine eco-environment, I. E. Coastal erosion, estuarine water quality restoration and wetland protection, etc. Is prospected in accordance with the status and actual demand of the relevant study in China.

  4. Localised Effects of a Mega-Disturbance: Spatiotemporal Responses of Intertidal Sandy Shore Communities to the 2010 Chilean Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Roger D; Valdivia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Determining the effects of unpredictable disturbances on dynamic ecological systems is challenged by the paucity of appropriate temporal and spatial coverage of data. On 27 February 2010, an 8.8 Mw mega-earthquake and tsunami struck central Chile and caused coastal land-level changes, massive damage to coastal infrastructure, and widespread mortality of coastal organisms. Wave-exposed sandy beaches showed significant changes of species abundances from before to after the earthquake, but the highly dynamic biotic and abiotic conditions of these habitats make difficult to draw clear-cut conclusions from these patterns. Here, we analysed a beyond-BACI (Before-After Control-Impact) sampling design to test whether the effects of the Maule earthquake on sandy-shore species diversity, abundance, and structure were heterogeneous along the shore. Invertebrate species abundances were quantified before (i.e. February 2010) and after (i.e. March 2010, September 2010, and March 2011) the earthquake at three sandy shores randomly located within the earthquake rupture area and three sites within a "control" area located >400 km southward from epicentre. Immediately after the earthquake took place, the three sites located in the rupture area showed anomalous beach-profile uplifts that did not comply with the erosion (i.e. "negative" uplifts) that regularly occurs during late summer in the region. Species richness, abundance, and community structure significantly varied from before to after the strike, but these patterns of change varied among sites within both areas. Only the site with the strongest and persistent beach-profile uplift within the rupture area showed significant concomitant changes in species richness and community structure; after 13 months, this community showed a similar multivariate structure to the before-disturbance state. This site, in particular, was located in the section of the rupture area that received most of the impact of the after-earthquake tsunami

  5. Localised Effects of a Mega-Disturbance: Spatiotemporal Responses of Intertidal Sandy Shore Communities to the 2010 Chilean Earthquake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Sepúlveda

    Full Text Available Determining the effects of unpredictable disturbances on dynamic ecological systems is challenged by the paucity of appropriate temporal and spatial coverage of data. On 27 February 2010, an 8.8 Mw mega-earthquake and tsunami struck central Chile and caused coastal land-level changes, massive damage to coastal infrastructure, and widespread mortality of coastal organisms. Wave-exposed sandy beaches showed significant changes of species abundances from before to after the earthquake, but the highly dynamic biotic and abiotic conditions of these habitats make difficult to draw clear-cut conclusions from these patterns. Here, we analysed a beyond-BACI (Before-After Control-Impact sampling design to test whether the effects of the Maule earthquake on sandy-shore species diversity, abundance, and structure were heterogeneous along the shore. Invertebrate species abundances were quantified before (i.e. February 2010 and after (i.e. March 2010, September 2010, and March 2011 the earthquake at three sandy shores randomly located within the earthquake rupture area and three sites within a "control" area located >400 km southward from epicentre. Immediately after the earthquake took place, the three sites located in the rupture area showed anomalous beach-profile uplifts that did not comply with the erosion (i.e. "negative" uplifts that regularly occurs during late summer in the region. Species richness, abundance, and community structure significantly varied from before to after the strike, but these patterns of change varied among sites within both areas. Only the site with the strongest and persistent beach-profile uplift within the rupture area showed significant concomitant changes in species richness and community structure; after 13 months, this community showed a similar multivariate structure to the before-disturbance state. This site, in particular, was located in the section of the rupture area that received most of the impact of the after

  6. Rediscovering community--reflections after Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hoboken, New Jersey, is a town of 50,000 residents located across the Hudson River from New York City. Most of Hoboken's infrastructure was compromised during Hurricane Sandy as a result of flooding and power outages that rendered many businesses inoperable, including all of the pharmacies in town. Despite a focus on emergency preparedness since Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, there were no contingencies in place to facilitate and assess the medication needs of the community in the event of a natural disaster. This essay describes how the author rediscovered the meaning of community, and through working with colleagues in other health care disciplines and non-health care volunteers, provided care to patients in suboptimal circumstances.

  7. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...... of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors...

  8. Assessment of Damage and Adaptation Strategies for Structures and Infrastructure from Storm Surge and Sea Level Rise for a Coastal Community in Rhode Island, United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Small

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluation of inundation, erosion, and wave damage for a coastal community in Rhode Island, USA. A methodology called the Coastal Environmental Risk Index (CERI was used that incorporates levels of inundation including sea level rise, wave heights using STWAVE, and detailed information about individual structures from an E911 database. This information was input into damage functions developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers following Hurricane Sandy. Damage from erosion was evaluated separately from local published erosion rates. Using CERI, two different adaptation strategies were evaluated that included a combination of dune restoration, protective berms, and a tide gate. A total of 151 out of 708 structures were estimated to be protected from inundation and wave action by the combined measures. More importantly, the use of CERI allowed for the assessment of the impact of different adaptation strategies on both individual structures and an entire community in a Geographical Information Systems (GIS environment. This tool shows promise for use by coastal managers to assess damage and mitigate risk to coastal communities.

  9. Coastal adaptation with ecological engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, So-Min; Silliman, Brian; Wong, Poh Poh; van Wesenbeeck, Bregje; Kim, Choong-Ki; Guannel, Greg

    2013-09-01

    The use of combined approaches to coastal adaptation in lieu of a single strategy, such as sea-wall construction, allows for better preparation for a highly uncertain and dynamic coastal environment. Although general principles such as mainstreaming and no- or low-regret options exist to guide coastal adaptation and provide the framework in which combined approaches operate, few have examined the interactions, synergistic effects and benefits of combined approaches to adaptation. This Perspective provides three examples of ecological engineering -- marshes, mangroves and oyster reefs -- and illustrates how the combination of ecology and engineering works.

  10. Monitoring storm tide and flooding from Hurricane Sandy along the Atlantic coast of the United States, October 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Brian E.; Wicklein, Shaun M.; Reiser, Robert G.; Busciolano, Ronald J.; Morrison, Jonathan; Verdi, Richard J.; Painter, Jaime A.; Frantz, Eric R.; Gotvald, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a temporary monitoring network of water-level and barometric pressure sensors at 224 locations along the Atlantic coast from Virginia to Maine to continuously record the timing, areal extent, and magnitude of hurricane storm tide and coastal flooding generated by Hurricane Sandy. These records were greatly supplemented by an extensive post-flood high-water mark (HWM) flagging and surveying campaign from November to December 2012 involving more than 950 HWMs. Both efforts were undertaken as part of a coordinated federal emergency response as outlined by the Stafford Act under a directed mission assignment by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  11. Nourishment practices on Australian sandy beaches: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Belinda C; Jones, Alan R; Goodwin, Ian D; Bishop, Melanie J

    2012-12-30

    It is predicted that the coastal zone will be among the environments worst affected by projected climate change. Projected losses in beach area will negatively impact on coastal infrastructure and continued recreational use of beaches. Beach nourishment practices such as artificial nourishment, replenishment and scraping are increasingly used to combat beach erosion but the extent and scale of projects is poorly documented in large areas of the world. Through a survey of beach managers of Local Government Areas and a comprehensive search of peer reviewed and grey literature, we assessed the extent of nourishment practices in Australia. The study identified 130 beaches in Australia that were subject to nourishment practices between 2001 and 2011. Compared to projects elsewhere, most Australian projects were small in scale but frequent. Exceptions were nine bypass projects which utilised large volumes of sediment. Most artificial nourishment, replenishment and beach scraping occurred in highly urbanised areas and were most frequently initiated in spring during periods favourable to accretion and outside of the summer season of peak beach use. Projects were generally a response to extreme weather events, and utilised sand from the same coastal compartment as the site of erosion. Management was planned on a regional scale by Local Government Authorities, with little monitoring of efficacy or biological impact. As rising sea levels and growing coastal populations continue to put pressure on beaches a more integrated approach to management is required, that documents the extent of projects in a central repository, and mandates physical and biological monitoring to help ensure the engineering is sustainable and effective at meeting goals.

  12. Acidification of sandy grasslands - consequences for plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Pål Axel; Mårtensson, Linda-Maria; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Questions: (1) Does soil acidification in calcareous sandy grasslands lead to loss of plant diversity? (2) What is the relationship between the soil content of lime and the plant availability of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in sandy grasslands? Location: Sandy glaciofluvial deposits...... in south-eastern Sweden covered by xeric sand calcareous grasslands (EU habitat directive 6120). Methods: Soil and vegetation were investigated in most of the xeric sand calcareous grasslands in the Scania region (136 sample plots distributed over four or five major areas and about 25 different sites...

  13. Storm impacts on a high energy sandy beach system, northwest Ireland: short (event) to long term (decadal) behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado-Pintado, Emilia; Jackson, Derek; Cooper, Andrew; O'Connor, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Long-term monitoring of beach dynamics is an important element in risk prevention and management of both natural and human resources at the coast. The predicted intensification in storminess (frequency, duration and magnitude), partly associated with climate change, represents a pressing concern for coastal communities globally and has undoubtedly led to an improvement in available techniques and technologies for observation and analysis. Here we examine a high energy Atlantic beach system at Five Fingers strand (NW Ireland) to help understand hydrodynamic forcing on beach response under various wave energy scenarios. The system, which has been modally attuned to a large swell wave environment, periodically undergoes significant morphological changes over various spatial and temporal scales manifest in the development and movements of dynamic nearshore bars and a nearshore ebb-tide delta. A combination of field and laboratory techniques (GPS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) Instrumentation, Drone surveys) implemented from the shoreface to the beach, captures the response and evolution of the system over the short (event), medium (weeks to months) and long-term (multiyear) timescale. Numerical modelling of nearshore wave hydrodynamics (using SWAN wave simulation model) helps understanding wave forcing across shoreface area and is ran under a number of iterative time intervals. Here, we investigate the role of infrequent and sometimes extreme events in the system to understand the importance of clustering of storminess and the occurrence of single high-magnitude storm events that perturb the inlet-beach system and thus induce key morphodynamic changes. Preliminary results show that ultimately the configuration of the ebb-tide channel influences the geomorphic response of the system. In the short term, a storm induced erosion of the shoreface is observed, which also appears to lead to changes in the ebb-tide channel, and ultimately the welding of a nearshore bar

  14. Biodiversity and distribution of macroinfauna assemblages on sandy beaches along the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. José Reyes-Martínez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the macroinfauna communities inhabiting 12 sandy beaches along the Spanish coast of the Gulf of Cadiz were describe in order to characterize their unexplored biodiversity, their zonation patterns and their environmental features. A total of 66 macroinfauna taxa were recorded on 12 sandy beaches, ranging from 4 to 33 species. Density reached 848 individual per m2. The individual zonation pattern ranged from two to three zones, regardless of the morphodynamic state. A common zonation pattern of the whole set of beaches was established, comprising three across-shore biological zones. Generally, the supralittoral zone was typified by the air-breathing amphipod Talitrus saltator and coleopterans; the middle zone was dominated by true intertidal species, such as Haustoriidae amphipods (Haustorius arenarius, Cirolanidae isopods (Eurydice affinis, Spionidae polychaetes (Scolelepis spp. and nemerteans; and the lower or sublittoral zone was typified by Pontoporeiidae amphipods, mysids and spionid polychaetes. Sediment moisture, average grain size, organic matter content and elevation were the main predictor variables of zonation patterns. We used the conservation and recreation potential indices to show how this information can be useful for coastal management. Most beaches studied show a score above 5 on the conservation index, so the beaches have a reasonable potential for conservation management.

  15. The protection of sandy shores - Can we afford to ignore the contribution of seagrass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maike

    2017-08-15

    Shore nourishment is considered an effective soft coastal protection measure for sandy shorelines. However, sand demand and costs are high, especially as nourishment has to be repeated regularly due to ongoing erosion. Seagrass meadows are able to trap and stabilise sediment by reducing bed shear stress. Moreover, they reduce flow velocity and wave energy in regions beyond their boundaries. Especially small species may not provide these ecosystem services sufficiently to protect shorelines from erosion, but they may stabilise beach profiles enough to increase nourishment intervals. This review discusses the potential benefits of integrating ecosystem services provided by seagrass meadows, both existing and newly planted, in nourishment plans, and also addresses potential limitations such as unsuitable hydrodynamic conditions and seasonality. Finally, it highlights knowledge gaps that should be addressed by interdisciplinary research to improve nourishment plans and use seagrass ecosystem services to their full potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Field application of PAM as an amendment in deep-tilled US southeastern Coastal Plain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyacrylamide (PAM) was added to sandy coastal plain soils to improve physical properties and yield. Soils were amended with 8 treatments of linear and cross-linked PAMs or controls. Treatments and controls included the following: 1. spraying a 600 mg/kg solution of linear PAM behind a subsoil shan...

  17. Understanding coastal processes to assist with coastal erosion management in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyes, S. G.; Wasson, R. J.; Munksgaard, N. C.; Evans, K. G.; Brinkman, R.; Williams, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Sand transport pathways in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia, are being investigated to assist with coastal management. Coastal erosion, which threatens public and private infrastructure, is one of the major problems along the harbour beaches. A study of sediment transport is essential to identify the challenges encountered by the stakeholders in coastal management. Darwin Harbour, located in the tropical, cyclone prone area of Australia, was, until recently, considered a near pristine estuary. A semi-diurnal macro-tidal embayment, the tidal variation in the harbour reaches up to 8 m with a mean tidal range of 3.7 m. The beach morphology consists of sandy pocket beaches between coastal cliffs, sandbars, rocky shore platforms, tidal flats and mangrove fringes. A two-dimensional depth averaged finite-element hydrodynamic model (RMA-2), coupled with a sediment transport model (RMA-11) from Resource Modelling Associates, has been used to infer the sources and the depositional areas of sand in the harbour. Grain size distributions and geochemical analysis are also used to characterize the sand and its source(s). Initial results show that the beach sand is mostly of offshore origin with small sand input from the rivers. Potential supplementary sand sources are the eroded materials from the shore platforms and the rocky cliffs. Due to the rapid development in Darwin Harbour, this study is fundamental in understanding coastal processes to support decision making in coastal management, particularly in a macro-tidal, tropical estuary.

  18. COASTAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOUTH SINGKEP AREA, RIAU ISLANDS PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor C.D. Aryanto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of coastal characteristics, such as coastal constituent lithology, oceanographic processes and the influence of human activities along the coastal area, are the factors that affect the coastal typology. The typology of coastal area can be divided into 3 types namely: (1 Sandy beaches, dominated by medium size quartz sand, gravelly sand and silt of alluvium deposits ; (2 Rocky beaches that belong to the Tanjung Buku Granite lithologic units and Persing metamorphic complex, its beach slope between 5° and 15°, and a fault structure encountered. The steep beach slopes (45°-50° trends to offshore with the maximum depth of 28 meters below the sea level at the distance of 3.5 km from the its shore line. At the depth of 20 m, there are a foot slope of 1.5 km width interpreted as the fault plane; (3 Muddy beaches is characterized by mangroves, gentle beach slopes until flats. Those sandy and muddy beaches are alluvial deposits of Quarternary sediments.

  19. Toward a Global Classification of Coastal Anthromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli D. Lazarus

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Given incontrovertible evidence that humans are the most powerful agents of environmental change on the planet, research has begun to acknowledge and integrate human presence and activity into updated descriptions of the world’s biomes as “anthromes”. Thus far, a classification system for anthromes is limited to the terrestrial biosphere. Here, I present a case for the consideration and validity of coastal anthromes. Every coastal environment on Earth is subject to direct and indirect human modification and disturbance. Despite the legacy, ubiquity, and pervasiveness of human interactions with coastal ecosystems, coastal anthromes still lack formal definition. Following the original argument and framework for terrestrial anthromes, I outline a set of coastal anthrome classifications that dovetail with terrestrial and marine counterparts. Recognising coastal environments as complex and increasingly vulnerable anthropogenic systems is a fundamental step toward understanding their modern dynamics—and, by extension, realising opportunities for and limits to their resilience.

  20. Using humic acid for remediation of sandy soils contaminated by heavy metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a new remediation technology for contaminated sandy soil using humic acid (HA). Distribution of amount of Cr (VI) in the aqueous or solid system containing humic acid and sandy soil, was studied using batch experiments, es-pecially for effects of reaction time, pH, concentrations, temperature and irradiation on the reduction of Cr (VI), and the optimum reaction conditions. The results indicated a significant increase of the adsorption of Cr (VI) because of the complexion reaction between HA and Cr (VI) that occurred under acidic condition. The reaction mechanisms of HA with chromium on sand surfaces were certified. Thus it came to a conclusion that HA could be used effectively on remediation of Cr (VI)-contaminated soil and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight. These results suggest that the organic-inorganic complex-such as sandy soils coated with humic substances-is important as a metal reservoir in the environment.

  1. On the Impact Angle of Hurricane Sandy's New Jersey Landfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy's track crossed the New Jersey coastline at an angle closer to perpendicular than any previous hurricane in the historic record, one of the factors contributing to recordsetting peak-water levels in parts of New Jersey and New York. To estimate the occurrence rate of Sandy-like tracks, we use a stochastic model built on historical hurricane data from the entire North Atlantic to generate a large sample of synthetic hurricanes. From this synthetic set we calculate that under long-term average climate conditions, a hurricane of Sandy's intensity or greater (category 1+) makes NJ landfall at an angle at least as close to perpendicular as Sandy's at an average annual rate of 0.0014 yr-1 (95% confidence range 0.0007 to 0.0023); i.e., a return period of 714 years (95% confidence range 435 to 1429).

  2. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Post Sandy (Long Island, NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Long Island New York Sandy LIDAR lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G14PD00296 Woolpert...

  3. Hurricane Sandy: Rapid Response Imagery of the Surrounding Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of Hurricane Sandy. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The images were acquired...

  4. 2008 USDA Forest Service Lidar: Sandy River Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Sandy River study area in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service. The areas...

  5. James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory @ Sandy Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, located on the New Jersey shore at Sandy Hook, is a state-of-the-art marine research facility shared by the National...

  6. Studies on Thiobacilli spp. isolated from sandy beaches of Kerala

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gore, P.S.; Raveendran, O.; Unnithan, R.V.

    Occurrence, isolation and oxidative activity of Thiobacilli spp. from some sandy beaches of Kerala are reported. These organisms were encountered in polluted beaches and were dominant during monsoon in all the beaches...

  7. James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory @ Sandy Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, located on the New Jersey shore at Sandy Hook, is a state-of-the-art marine research facility shared by the National...

  8. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Sandy Restoration (Delaware and Maryland)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Geographic Extent: SANDY_Restoration_DE_MD_QL2 Area of Interest covers approximately 3.096 square miles. Lot #5 contains the full project area Dataset Description:...

  9. Short Communication Energy and ash contents of sandy beach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    macrofauna found on three exposed sandy beaches on the west coast ... that they often form the predominant shore type (Bally,. McQuaid ... their sediments are given in Table I. Animals ..... The biochemical composition of the tropical intertida1 ...

  10. Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oumeraci, H.; Burcharth, H. F.; Rouck, J. De;

    1995-01-01

    The paper attempts to present an overview of five research projects supported by the Commission of the European Communities, Directorate General XII, under the MAST 2- Programme (Marine Sciences and Technology), with the overall objective of contributing to the development of improved rational me...... methods for the design of coastal structures....

  11. Chemical Stablilisation of Sand : Part VIII Furan Resins as Dune and Coastal Sand Stabiliser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal

    1990-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies on furan resin as dune sand stabiliser are presented. Influence of acid catalysts, viz. phenol disulphonic acid, sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid and phosphoric acid and other catalysts, viz. trichlorotoluene and benzoyl chloride along with promoters, zinc chloride and ferric chloride, on the strength of stabilised furan resin-sand specimens has been discussed. Optimisation studies on resin content, catalysts and promoters and curing conditions have revealed that maximum strength of 260 kg/cm/sup 2/ of the standard specimens made by compaction of coastal sand using furan resins (10 per cent, sulphuric acid (9N, 30 per cent and a curing time of 2 hr at 40 degree Centigrade is higher than the 170 kg/cm/sup 2/ of specimens made of Rajasthan desert sand. Sandy patches stabilised by seepage technique recorded a maximum strength of 125 kg/cm/sup 2/. Physico-chemical characteristics of this system and effect of environment on stabilised specimens have also been studied and field trials conducted successfully. This resin-catalyst system would be extremely useful in humid and saline field (coastal areas for different military applications.

  12. Does extreme environmental severity promote plant facilitation? An experimental field test in a subtropical coastal dune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanho, Camila T; Oliveira, Alexandre A; Prado, Paulo Inácio K L

    2015-07-01

    The stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) postulates how the balance between plant competition and facilitation shifts along environmental gradients. Early formulations of the SGH predicted that facilitation should increase monotonically with stress. However, a recent theoretical refinement of the SGH postulates stronger facilitation under moderate stress, followed by a decreasing role of facilitation in the most severe environments. We conducted field experiments along the most severe part of a coastal dune gradient in southeast Brazil to test the effect of stress on the intensity and importance of the net interactions between two tree species. First, we compared the performance of distinct life stages of Ternstroemia brasiliensis in the presence and absence of Guapira opposita adults along a beach-to-inland gradient, a gradient of environmental severity. To test the effect of one stress factor in particular, we also manipulated water availability, a limiting resource due to the sandy soils. At the most severe part of the coastal gradient (i.e. closest to the seashore), both intensity and importance of the interaction between G. opposita and T. brasiliensis were negatively related to stress, with a pattern consistent across distinct life stages of the target species. However, the sign of the net interaction depended on the life stage of the target species. Our results provide empirical evidence that the role of facilitation tends to wane, leading to neutral or even negative net interactions between species as stress reaches its maximum, as predicted by the recent refinements of the SGH.

  13. Noctiluca and copepods grazing on the phytoplankton community in a nutrient-enriched coastal environment along the southwest coast of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunpandi, N; Jyothibabu, R; Jagadeesan, L; Gireeshkumar, T R; Karnan, C; Naqvi, S W A

    2017-07-01

    The relative grazing impact of Noctiluca scintillans (hereafter referred only Noctiluca) and copepods (Acrocalanus gracilis, Paracalanus parvus, Acartia danae and Oithona similis) on the phytoplankton community in an upwelling-mudbank environment along the southwest coast India is presented here. This study was carried out during the Pre-Southwest Monsoon (April-May) to the Late Southwest Monsoon (August) period in 2014. During the sampling period, large hydrographical transformation was evident in the study area (off Alappuzha, Southwest coast of India); warmer Pre-Southwest Monsoon water column condition got transformed into cooler and nitrate-rich hypoxic waters during the Southwest Monsoon (June-August) due to intense coastal upwelling. Copepods were present in the study area throughout the sampling period with a noticeable increase in their abundance during the Southwest Monsoon. On the other hand, the first appearance of Noctiluca in the sampling location was during the Early Southwest Monsoon (mid-June) and thereafter their abundance increased towards the Peak Southwest Monsoon. The grazing experiments carried out as per the food removal method showed noticeable differences in the feeding preferences of Noctiluca and copepods, especially on the different size fractions of phytoplankton. Noctiluca showed the highest positive electivity for the phytoplankton micro-fraction (av. 0.49 ± 0.04), followed by nano-fraction (av. 0.17 ± 0.04) and a negative electivity for the pico-fraction (av. -0.66 ± 0.06). In total ingestion of Noctiluca, micro-fraction contribution (83.7%) was significantly higher compared to the nano- (15.7%) and pico-fractions (0.58%). On the other hand, copepods showed the highest positive electivity for the phytoplankton nano-fraction (av. 0.38 ± 0.04) followed by micro- (av. -0.17 ± 0.05) and pico-fractions (av. -0.35 ± 0.05). Similarly, in total ingestion of copepods, nano-fraction (69.7%) was the highest followed by micro

  14. Study of Goa and its environment from space: A report on coastal sand dune ecosystems of Goa: Siginficance, uses and anthropogenic impacts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    are now flat, bare and devoid of vegetation (January 1998). Figure 12: Calangute - A clear example of how sand dunes are simply flattened and removed, in this case to create an access to the beach for tourists (December 1997). Figure 13: Miramar - A site...) Notification (Anonymous, 1991) issued under the Enviroment Protection Act of 1986. 3 The main purpose of this notification which lists various rules and guidelines, was to control and minimise environmental damage to coastal stretches including estuaries...

  15. Documentation and hydrologic analysis of Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey, October 29–30, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro, Thomas P.; Deetz, Anna; Hearn, Paul

    2016-11-17

    higher than the previously recorded period-of-record maximum. A comparison of peak storm-tide elevations to preliminary FEMA Coastal Flood Insurance Study flood elevations indicated that these areas experienced the highest recurrence intervals along the coast of New Jersey. Analysis showed peak storm-tide elevations exceeded the 100-year FEMA flood elevations in many parts of Middlesex, Union, Essex, Hudson, and Bergen Counties, and peak storm-tide elevations at many locations in Monmouth County exceeded the 500-year recurrence interval.A level 1 HAZUS (HAZards United States) analysis was done for the counties in New Jersey affected by flooding to estimate total building stock losses. The aggregated total building stock losses estimated by HAZUS for New Jersey, on the basis of the final inundation verified by USGS high-water marks, was almost $19 billion. A comparison of Hurricane Sandy with historic coastal storms showed that peak storm-tide elevations associated with Hurricane Sandy exceeded most of the previously documented elevations associated with the storms of December 1992, March 1962, September 1960, and September 1944 at many coastal communities in New Jersey. This scientific investigation report was prepared in cooperation with FEMA to document flood processes and flood damages resulting from this storm and to assist in future flood mitigation actions in New Jersey.

  16. Aeolian Coastal Landscapes in changes (a study from Tahkuna, Estonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, A.

    2012-04-01

    The openness of the coast to the winds and storm waves has an important part in changing aeolian coastal landscapes as well as anthropogenic factor. The aeolian coastal landscapes are probably the most dynamic areas. Occurrence of aeolian coastal landscapes in Estonia is limited. They consist of sandy beaches, sandy beach ridges and dunes. The coastal ecosystems are strongly affected by their topography, based on the character of deposits and moisture conditions. The majority of their ecosystems are quite close to the specific natural habitat. These ecosystems are represented in the list of the European Union Habitats (Natura 2000). In recent decades human influence has changed the landscape over time in different activities (recreation, trampling, off-road driving) and their intensities, which has led to destruction or degradation of various habitats. Previously coastal landscapes were used for forestry and pasture. Nowadays one of the most serious threats to open landscape is afforestation. This study examines the relationships between landscape components during last decades. Trying to find out how much aeolian coastal landscapes are influenced by natural processes or human activities. The results are based on cartographic analysis, fieldwork data. The method of landscape complex profile was used. The profiles show a cross-sections of landforms and interrelationships between landscape components, most frequently describing the relations between soils and vegetation. In each sample point the mechanical composition of sediments, vegetation cover and soil is determined. Results show that changes in landscapes are induced by their own development as well as changes in environmental factors and human activities. Larger changes are due to increase of coastal processes activity. These processes can be observed in sandy beaches, which are easily transformed by waves. Higher sea levels during storm surges are reaching older beach formation, causing erosion and creating

  17. Immediate Impact of Hurricane Sandy on People Who Inject Drugs in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouget, Enrique R; Sandoval, Milagros; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Friedman, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    Over the eight months following Hurricane Sandy, of October 2012, we interviewed 300 people who inject drugs in New York City. During the week after the storm, 28% rescued others or volunteered with aid groups; 60% experienced withdrawal; 27% shared drug injection or preparation equipment, or injected with people they normally would not inject with; 70% of those on opioid maintenance therapy could not obtain sufficient doses; and 43% of HIV-positive participants missed HIV medication doses. Although relatively brief, a hurricane can be viewed as a Big Event that can alter drug environments and behaviors, and may have lasting impact. The study's limitations are noted and future needed research is suggested.

  18. Three-dimensional distribution of plastic pellets in sandy beaches: shifting paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turra, Alexander; Manzano, Aruanã B.; Dias, Rodolfo Jasão S.; Mahiques, Michel M.; Barbosa, Lucas; Balthazar-Silva, Danilo; Moreira, Fabiana T.

    2014-03-01

    Plastic pellets are worldwide contaminants that accumulate in the ocean, especially in sandy beaches, where their historic standing-stock quantification relies on surface sediment samples. We demonstrated these particles present a three-dimensional instead of a simple along-across shore distribution, being found as deep as 2.0 m, with surface layers accounting for microplastics and sedimentary environments as a whole should be investigated. This poses criticism in the exactness of standing-stock records and demands urgent discussion of sampling protocols.

  19. The Coordinated Development of Economic and Marine Environment in Liaoning Coastal Economic Belt%辽宁沿海经济带经济与海洋环境协调发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盖美; 赵丽玲

    2012-01-01

    Liaoning Province is the only coastal north-east province of China, while the marine environment is an important influencing factor and bearing of economic growth, so the study of economic coordination with economic development and the marine environment is the key to achieve Liaoning sustainable economic development. and the marine environment of economic analysis, In this paper, Liaoning coastal economic belt based on economic, select both the marine environment evaluation, built in Liaoning coastal economic belt and the marine environment, sustainable development, economic evaluation index system, evaluation of class division, and using AHP method to determine the index weight, while the use of variable fuzzy recognition model analysis of Liaoning coastal economic belt and the marine environment of economic coordination degree.The results show that: the regions of Liaoning coastal economic belt' s economic growth and development and the marine environment are still in a condition that a little better than the dynamic equilibrium but far less than in the apparent coordination stage. From the time series analysis, Liaoning coastal economic zone strategy is not beneficial but drawbacks of various apparent to the regions. For example, to contrast 2008 and 2005, although the coordination degree of Panjin, Dandong, Jinzhou are rising, Huludao ,Yingkou and Dalian are in a downward trend. And by industry decomposition and GK.E model analysis the gap of the regions of Liaoning coastal economic belt and the marine environment pollution disparity, industrial production shows that primary , secondary and tertiary industry were played on slow down economic disparities, increase and maintain the effect; and GK.E model analysis, under the effect of economic structure and concentration, the marine environment in Panjin, Dandong area was significantly better in Dalian and Yingkou.%辽宁省是东北唯一的沿海省份,而海洋环境是经济增长的重要影响因素

  20. Hurricane Sandy beach response and recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and beach profile data, October 2012 to October 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehre Henderson, Rachel E.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen T.; Reynolds, Billy J.

    2015-04-30

    In response to the forecasted impact of Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall on October 29, 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a substantial data-collection effort to assess the morphological impacts to the beach and dune system at Fire Island, New York. Global positioning system (GPS) field surveys of the beach and dunes were conducted just prior to and after landfall and these data were used to quantify change in several focus areas. In order to quantify morphologic change along the entire length of the island, pre-storm (May 2012) and post-storm (November 2012) lidar and aerial photography were used to assess changes to the shoreline and beach.As part of the USGS Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Fire Island Study, the beach is monitored periodically to enable better understanding of post-Sandy recovery. The alongshore state of the beach is recorded using a differential global positioning system (DGPS) to collect data around the mean high water (MHW; 0.46 meter North American Vertical Datum of 1988) to derive a shoreline, and the cross-shore response and recovery are measured along a series of 10 profiles.Overall, Hurricane Sandy substantially altered the morphology of Fire Island. However, the coastal system rapidly began to recover after the 2012­–13 winter storm season and continues to recover in the form of volume gains and shoreline adjustment.

  1. Coastal hydrodynamics, geomorphology and sedimentary environments of two major Javanese river deltas. Program and preliminary results from the Snellius-II expedition (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P.; Tiktanata

    River outflow, sediment transport, depositional processes and facies, as well as delta morphology of the rivers Solo and Porong (East Java, Indonesia) have been studied in detail during the Indonesian-Dutch Snellius II expedition (1984-1985). The humid tropical climate of Java in combination with the mountainous relief and the presence of easily erodible volcanic soils in relation to an intensive agriculture, results in a tremendous soil erosion and denudation rates are extremely high. Since river flow in the dry season is strongly reduced, sediment transport is mainly restricted to the wet season. Every wet season large volumes of sediment are carried towards the sea and the surplus of sediment in the coastal zone has resulted in the formation of two major river deltas. The Solo delta, a single-delta, is made up of one straight major channel with only few and small natural crevasses. Prominent natural levees are present; a consequence of the fact that in the wet season maximum outflow of the river coincides with high water. The development of this delta is considered to be a direct response to the high outflow velocities of the river, the huge mudload in the wet season and the low current and wave action. The Porong delta is a half-circular, lobate delta with a multidistributary network of channels which resulted in a regular distribution of sediment. A small part of the delivered sediments in both deltas escapes to sea and is seized by offshore, monsoon-induced coastal currents. The monsoon-type climate has a significant influence on depositional processes by determining river regime and sediment transport, by modifying river outflow and generating a coastal drift of water and suspended sediments.

  2. Microhabitat use by two rocky shore gastropods in an intertidal sandy substrate with rocky fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turra, A; Denadai, M R

    2006-02-01

    Sandy beaches in some areas of the São Sebastião Channel in southeastern Brazil have unremittingly undergone a variety of impacts, including the deposition of rock fragments in the intertidal region. Consequently, these environments support a rich fauna comprising both sandy beach and rocky shore organisms. Two rocky shore gastropods, Tegula viridula and Morula nodulosa, are particularly abundant in such environments. An evaluation of the use of microhabitats by these two species revealed that they occupy the available microhabitats in different proportions and the presence of one species is associated with the absence of the other. Morula nodulosa is randomly dispersed, occupying mostly areas with rock fragments covered with sediment and branching brown algae. Tegula viridula shows a clumped dispersion associated with the patchiness of the microhabitats used: the presence of encrusting green algae and absence of sediment and branching brown algae covering the rocks. These findings suggest T. viridula has a lower tolerance than M. nodulosa to sand inundation of the rocky fragments, a stochastic event common to the environment in question.

  3. Microhabitat use by two rocky shore gastropods in an intertidal sandy substrate with rocky fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turra

    Full Text Available Sandy beaches in some areas of the São Sebastião Channel in southeastern Brazil have unremittingly undergone a variety of impacts, including the deposition of rock fragments in the intertidal region. Consequently, these environments support a rich fauna comprising both sandy beach and rocky shore organisms. Two rocky shore gastropods, Tegula viridula and Morula nodulosa, are particularly abundant in such environments. An evaluation of the use of microhabitats by these two species revealed that they occupy the available microhabitats in different proportions and the presence of one species is associated with the absence of the other. Morula nodulosa is randomly dispersed, occupying mostly areas with rock fragments covered with sediment and branching brown algae. Tegula viridula shows a clumped dispersion associated with the patchiness of the microhabitats used: the presence of encrusting green algae and absence of sediment and branching brown algae covering the rocks. These findings suggest T. viridula has a lower tolerance than M. nodulosa to sand inundation of the rocky fragments, a stochastic event common to the environment in question.

  4. Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

    2002-11-01

    The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years

  5. Carbon and nitrogen stoichiometry regulates the magnitude and temporal dynamics of nitrogenous nutrient regeneration in sandy beach pore water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodridge, B. M.; Melack, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Sandy beaches are located at the interface of terrestrial and marine ecosystems, lining about 70% of the world's ice-free coastline. They can be conduits for fresh groundwater delivery of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), a vital and often limiting nutrient source, to oceans along coastlines where a hydrologic connection exists with shallow coastal aquifers. However, even along such coastlines, the majority of water within beach sands is recirculated seawater (i.e., pore water), and the regeneration of DIN from the mineralization of marine organic matter (OM) is considered the dominant source of DIN in beach pore water and flux to coastal oceans. The biogeochemical mechanisms regulating the magnitude of and temporal changes in DIN regeneration in saline beach pore water are therefore of prime importance in assessing the role of beaches in coastal marine nitrogen cycling. We assessed the potential stoichiometric control of resource carbon to nitrogen (C:N) on pore water DIN regeneration at four sandy beach study locations, and temporal evolution of pore water C:N at two of the four study locations, along the Santa Barbara, California coastline during synoptic sampling events over the course of a year. We identified pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) as the resources most likely available to microbial heterotrophic metabolism (i.e., C:N), the dominant catalyst of DIN regeneration in marine sediments, finding a negative exponential correlation of DIN with DOC:TDN ratios (673 × 173 e-1.05 × 0.30(DOC:TDN); R2 = 0.55, n = 123). DOC:TDN ratios also demonstrated a negative exponential correlation with residence time (10.0 × 1.7 e-1.08 × 0.48(RT) + 1.61 × 0.54; R2 = 0.79, n = 46), estimated using radon-222 as a pore water residence time tracer. Using model-derived DOC:TDN ratios as the independent variable in the DIN vs. DOC:TDN relationship, we explored temporal changes in DIN regeneration. The modeled DIN vs. residence time

  6. Hurricane Sandy Washover Deposits on Southern Long Beach Island, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. M.; Richmond, B. M.; Kane, H. H.; Lunghino, B.

    2015-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy washover deposits were investigated at Forsyth National Wildlife Refuge (FNWR) on Southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey in order to map deposit thickness and characterize the sedimentary deposits. FNWR was chosen as a field area because there has been relatively little anthropogenic shoreline modification since washover deposition from Hurricane Sandy. Sediment, elevation, and geophysical data were collected during the April 2015 field campaign, approximately two and a half years after the storm. Sediment deposit data included trenches, stratigraphic descriptions, bulk sediment samples, push cores, Russian cores, and photos. Computed tomography (CT) scanning was conducted on push cores in order to acquire high resolution imaging of density, grain size, and sedimentary structure. Profiles of washover elevation were measured using Differential GPS with Real Time Kinematic processing. Ground Penetrating Radar data was collected to image the depth of the deposit and identify sedimentary structures. These data sets are compared to pre- and post -Sandy lidar surveys in order to determine post-Sandy modification in the two and a half years following the hurricane. We compare sediment thickness and sedimentary characteristics to hurricane Sandy deposits elsewhere along the U.S. eastern seaboard and to tsunami deposits.

  7. Human resources training in coastal science

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vijayaraghavan, S.

    The paper stresses the importance of training and education to the development and application of knowledge on the coastal marine environment and its resources. Present status of human resources training in India is discussed and changes...

  8. Coastal Inlet Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Coastal Inlet Model Facility, as part of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP), is an idealized inlet dedicated to the study of coastal inlets and equipped...

  9. COASTAL, Pacific, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a coastal study.

  10. Coastal Analysis, Northampton, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study as defined in FEMA Guides and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping submitted as a result of a coastal study....

  11. The Black Sea coastal zone in the high resolution satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurovskaya, Maria; Dulov, Vladimir; Kozlov, Igor

    2016-04-01

    Landsat data with spatial resolution of 30-100 m provide the ability of regular monitoring of ocean phenomena with scale of 100-1000 m. Sentinel-1 is equipped with C-band synthetic aperture radar. The images allow recognizing the features that affect either the sea surface roughness, or its color characteristics. The possibilities of using the high spatial resolution satellite data are considered for observation and monitoring of Crimean coastal zone. The analyzed database includes all Landsat-8 (Level 1) multi-channel images from January 2013 to August 2015 and all Sentinel-1 radar images in May-August 2015. The goal of the study is to characterize the descriptiveness of these data for research and monitoring of the Crimean coastal areas. The observed marine effects are reviewed and the physical mechanisms of their signatures in the satellite images are described. The effects associated with the roughness variability are usually manifested in all bands, while the subsurface phenomena are visible only in optical data. Confidently observed structures include internal wave trains, filamentous natural slicks, which reflect the eddy coastal dynamics, traces of moving ships and the oil films referred to anthropogenic pollution of marine environment. The temperature fronts in calm conditions occur due to surfactant accumulation in convergence zone. The features in roughness field can also be manifested in Sentinel-1 data. Subsurface processes observed in Landsat-8 images primarily include transport and distribution of suspended matter as a result of floods and sandy beach erosion. The surfactant always concentrates on the sea surface in contaminated areas, so that these events are also observed in Sentinel-1 images. A search of wastewater discharge manifestations is performed. The investigation provides the basis for further development of approaches to obtain quantitative characteristics of the phenomena themselves. Funding by Russian Science Foundation under grant 15

  12. Coastal Adaptation and Ecological Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ecological engineering combines ecology and engineering to sustain coastal environment and facilitate adaptation to climate change. This paper discusses how the cases of mangroves, oyster reefs, and marshes help mainstream climate change with ecosystem conservation. It demonstrates the benefits of combining strategies to combat changing climate given the financial and political constraints.

  13. Vulnerability to coastal cholera ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrew E

    2003-10-01

    The battle to completely control cholera continues. Multiple strains, high levels of morbidity in some regions of the world, and a complex of influences on its distribution in people and the environment are accompanied by only rough resolution prediction of outbreaks. Uncertainty as to the most effective array of interventions for one of the most researched infectious diseases thwarts further progress in providing cost-effective solutions. Progress on the research front consistently points towards the importance of disease ecology, coastal environments, and the sea. However, evaluation of the link between cholera in people and environment can only be effective with analysis of human vulnerability to variable coastal cholera ecologies. As there are some clear links between the organism, cholera incidence and the sea, it is appropriate that cholera research should examine the nature of coastal population vulnerability to the disease. The paper reviews the cholera risks of human-environment interactions in coastal areas as one component of the evaluation of cholera management. This points to effective intervention through integrative knowledge of changing human and environmental ecologies, requiring improved detection, but also an acceptance of complex causality. The challenge is to identify indicators and interventions for case specific ecologies in variable locales of human vulnerability and disease hazard. Further work will therefore aim to explore improved surveillance and intervention across the socio-behavioural and ecological spectrum. Furthermore, the story of cholera continues to inform us about how we should more effectively view emergent and resurgent infectious disease hazards more generally.

  14. South Baltic representative coastal field surveys, including monitoring at the Coastal Research Station in Lubiatowo, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Rafał; Schönhofer, Jan; Szmytkiewicz, Piotr

    2016-10-01

    The paper contains a brief description of selected investigations carried out in the south Baltic coastal zone, with the particular focus on the history and recent activities conducted at the Coastal Research Station in Lubiatowo (CRS Lubiatowo), Poland. These activities comprise field investigations of nearshore hydrodynamic, lithodynamic, and morphodynamic processes. The study area is a sandy multi-bar shore with a mild slope, much exposed to the impact of waves approaching from NW-NE sector. The shore has a dissipative character which means that the wave energy is subject to gradual dissipation in the nearshore zone and only a small part of this energy is reflected by the shore. Due to the big wind fetch in N-NNE direction, the location of CRS Lubiatowo is favourable to registration of the maximum values of parameters of hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes which occur in the Baltic during extreme storms.

  15. Coastal Navigation Portfolio Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-19

    the entire navigation portfolio of projects , both inland and coastal. The Coastal Structures Management , Analysis, and Ranking Tool (CSMART) is a...FEB 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coastal Navigatoin Portfolio Management 5a. CONTRACT...CIRP.aspx Coastal Inlets Research Program Coastal Navigation Portfolio Management The Coastal Navigatoin Portfolio Management work unit

  16. Did Hurricane Sandy influence the 2012 US presidential election?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joshua

    2014-07-01

    Despite drawing on a common pool of data, observers of the 2012 presidential campaign came to different conclusions about whether, how, and to what extent "October surprise" Hurricane Sandy influenced the election. The present study used a mixed correlational and experimental design to assess the relation between, and effect of, the salience of Hurricane Sandy on attitudes and voting intentions regarding President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in a large sample of voting-aged adults. Results suggest that immediately following positive news coverage of Obama's handling of the storm's aftermath, Sandy's salience positively influenced attitudes toward Obama, but that by election day, reminders of the hurricane became a drag instead of a boon for the President. In addition to theoretical implications, this study provides an example of how to combine methodological approaches to help answer questions about the impact of unpredictable, large-scale events as they unfold.

  17. Hurricane Sandy, Disaster Preparedness, and the Recovery Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy was the second largest and costliest hurricane in U.S. history to affect multiple states and communities. This article describes the lived experiences of 24 occupational therapy students who lived through Hurricane Sandy using the Recovery Model to frame the research. Occupational therapy student narratives were collected and analyzed using qualitative methods and framed by the Recovery Model. Directed content and thematic analysis was performed using the 10 components of the Recovery Model. The 10 components of the Recovery Model were experienced by or had an impact on the occupational therapy students as they coped and recovered in the aftermath of the natural disaster. This study provides insight into the lived experiences and recovery perspectives of occupational therapy students who experienced Hurricane Sandy. Further research is indicated in applying the Recovery Model to people who survive disasters. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  18. TURISMO E AMBIENTES COSTEIROS NOS DOIS LADOS DO ATLÂNTICO: POTENCIALIDADES E IMPLICAÇÕES / TOURISM AND COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS IN TWO SIDES OF THE ATLANTIC: POTENTIAL AND IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Cerqueira Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Este trabalho resultou das pesquisas realizadas para o desenvolvimento da tese de doutoramento em Geografia, na Universidade de Coimbra. O objetivo principal foi fazer uma análise comparativa sobre a inserção do turismo em duas áreas costeiras, localizadas em pontos diferenciados do Oceano Atlântico, no caso Jaguaripe, no Recôncavo Baiano, e Mira, na Região Centro de Portugal. Os principais resultados obtidos estão relacionados com as diferenças e/ou similitudes encontradas nos dois territórios, resultantes tanto das condições físicas e bióticas, quanto da dinâmica cultural. Palavras-chave: Turismo, ambiente costeiro, Jaguaribe-BA, Mira-Portugal. ABSTRACT This work resulted from research carried out for the development of the doctoral thesis in Geography at the University of Coimbra. The main objective was to make a comparative analysis of the insertion of tourism in two coastal areas, located in different parts of the Atlantic Ocean in Jaguaripe if the Reconcavo Baiano, and Mira, in the Central Region of Portugal. The main results are related to the differences and / or similarities found in the two territories, linked to both the physical and biotic conditions, as to the cultural dynamics. Keywords: Tourism, coastal environment, Jaguaribe-BA, Mira-Portugal.

  19. Introduction to coastal engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D' Angremond, K.; Pluim-van der Velden, E.T.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Lecture notes on genesis of the coastline, climatology, oceanography, coastal morphology, coastal formations, coastalzonde management, tidal inlets and estuaries, pollution and density problems, practical problems and common solutions.

  20. Family Structures, Relationships, and Housing Recovery Decisions after Hurricane Sandy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nejat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the recovery phase of a disaster cycle is still in its infancy. Recent major disasters such as Hurricane Sandy have revealed the inability of existing policies and planning to promptly restore infrastructure, residential properties, and commercial activities in affected communities. In this setting, a thorough grasp of housing recovery decisions can lead to effective post-disaster planning by policyholders and public officials. The objective of this research is to integrate vignette and survey design to study how family bonds affected rebuilding/relocating decisions after Hurricane Sandy. Multinomial logistic regression was used to investigate respondents’ family structures before Sandy and explore whether their relationships with family members changed after Sandy. The study also explores the effect of the aforementioned relationship and its changes on households’ plans to either rebuild/repair their homes or relocate. These results were compared to another multinomial logistic regression which was applied to examine the impact of familial bonds on respondents’ suggestions to a vignette family concerning rebuilding and relocating after a hurricane similar to Sandy. Results indicate that respondents who lived with family members before Sandy were less likely to plan for relocating than those who lived alone. A more detailed examination shows that this effect was driven by those who improved their relationships with family members; those who did not improve their family relationships were not significantly different from those who lived alone, when it came to rebuilding/relocation planning. Those who improved their relationships with family members were also less likely to suggest that the vignette family relocate. This study supports the general hypothesis that family bonds reduce the desire to relocate, and provides empirical evidence that family mechanisms are important for the rebuilding/relocating decision

  1. Sandy Deposits of the 2006 Java Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setja Atmadja, C. M.; Yulianto, E.

    2007-05-01

    A field reconnaissance was performed out a week after Java tsunami on July, last year. It focused on documentation of sedimentary deposit as the first step to study delineate tsunami history in extend to tsunami hazard assessments. In a region with tremendous tsunami thread, the 2006 Java tsunami still gave a shock with at least 650 death tolls at 300 km affected coast line. The slight felt shaking onshore and unobvious leading recession of sea water were probably the reason as these were the reverse indications of tsunami to the lessons learned from the great Sumatra 2004 event. In addition, although tsunami of similar size have struck the southern coast of Java at least twice in the last century, in 1921 and 1994, tsunami history and the potential threat is still unknown to local population. Three shore normal transects across coastal plain were made in the two affected sites to exhibit the recent tsunami deposit thickness, internal layering, and landward extent. During the documentation, we also discovered two additional sand beds at the end of 2006 deposit landward extent in greater depth. All this information may provides preliminary information to better identify the geologic traces of earlier Javanese tsunami which in turn may help constructing Java's tsunami history.

  2. Bioerosion by microbial euendoliths in benthic foraminifera from heavy metal-polluted coastal environments of Portovesme (South-Western Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cherchi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A monitoring survey of the coastal area facing the industrial area of Portoscuso-Portovesme (South-Western Sardinia, Italy revealed intense bioerosional processes. Benthic foraminifera collected at the same depth (about 2 m but at different distances from the pollution source show extensive microbial infestation, anomalous Mg/Ca molar ratios and high levels of heavy metals in the shell associated with a decrease in foraminifera richness, population density and biodiversity with the presence of morphologically abnormal specimens. We found that carbonate dissolution induced by euendoliths is selective, depending on the Mg content and morpho-structural types of foraminiferal taxa. This study provides evidences for a connection between heavy metal dispersion, decrease in pH of the sea-water and bioerosional processes on foraminifera.

  3. Micro-phytoplankton community structure in the coastal upwelling zone off Concepción (central Chile): Annual and inter-annual fluctuations in a highly dynamic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabalón, V.; Morales, C. E.; González, H. E.; Menschel, E.; Schneider, W.; Hormazabal, S.; Valencia, L.; Escribano, R.

    2016-12-01

    An intensification of upwelling-favorable winds in recent decades has been detected in some of the main eastern boundary current systems, especially at higher latitudes, but the response of coastal phytoplankton communities in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) remains unknown. At higher latitudes in the HCS (35-40°S), strong seasonality in wind-driven upwelling during spring-summer coincides with an annual increase in coastal chlorophyll-a and primary production, and a dominance of micro-phytoplankton. In order to understand the effects of potential upwelling intensification on the micro-phytoplankton community in this region, annual and inter-annual variability in its structure (total and taxa-specific abundance and biomass) and its association with oceanographic fluctuations were analyzed using in situ time series data (2002-2009) from a shelf station off Concepcion (36.5°S). At the annual scale, total mean abundance and biomass, attributed to a few dominant diatom taxa, were at least one order of magnitude greater during spring-summer than autumn-winter, in association with changes in upwelling and surface salinity and temperature, whereas macro-nutrient concentrations remained relatively high all the year. At the inter-annual scale, total abundance and biomass decreased during the upwelling season of the 2006-2009 period compared with the 2002-2006 period, notably due to lower abundances of Skeletonema and Leptocylindrus, but the relative dominance of a few taxa was maintained. The 2006-2009 period was characterized by higher upwelling intensity, colder and higher salinity waters, and changes in nutrient concentrations and ratios compared with the first period. The inter-annual changes in the micro-phytoplankton community were mostly associated with changes in surface salinity and temperature (changes in upwelling intensity) but also with changes in Si/N and N/P, which relate to other land-derived processes.

  4. The Ecosystem Approach for the design of compensation and mitigation measures on coastal marine environment: the case study of Civitavecchia harbour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, Marco; Scanu, Sergio; Piermattei, Viviana; Bonamano, Simone; Mancini, Emanuele; Madonia, Alice

    2017-04-01

    The coastal marine domain is characterized by physical and ecological conditions that favour and determine a spatial overlap between the different uses of natural resources. In this context, the coastal area of Civitavecchia houses important biodiversity hotspots as well as multiple human activities, being affected by potential conflicts. In particular, the works of expansion scheduled for the Port of Civitavecchia, one of the largest in Europe in terms of cruise and ferry traffic, could impact on two Sites of Community Importance (IT6000005 and IT6000006), for the presence of priority habitats (Posidonia oceanica meadows and reefs of rocky substrates and biogenic concretions) and species (Pinna nobilis and Corallium rubrum) according to Habitat Directive 92/43/EEC. Considering that the Natural Capital analysis is indeed a valid emerging management tool for marine conflicts resolution (Maritime Spatial Planning Directive 2014/89 / EU - MSP), this study aims to propose a methodology to quantify the compensation and mitigation measures, evaluating the ecosystem services of priority habitats and species impacted by harbour expansion activities. To evaluate the ecosystem services the benthic biocoenoses, analyzed in the study area over the past 35 years, were chosen as reference spatial unit. We present the results of the economic evaluation of the benefits produced by Posidonia oceanica meadows (Habitat 1120), and Reef (Habitat 1170). For Posidonia oceanica meadows we computed benefits in relation to carbon sequestration, erosion control, bioremediation, food production, recreational potential and O2 supply, for Reefs using the method proposed by De Groot et al. 2012. The results of the economic assessment of ecosystem services for Habitat 1120 are in agreement with literature data. The results for the services related to the Habitat 1120 are significantly lower because of the influence of the ongoing impacts of human activity. This study allowed to define a specific

  5. Numerical modeling of the effects of Hurricane Sandy and potential future hurricanes on spatial patterns of salt marsh morphology in Jamaica Bay, New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqing; Chen, Qin; Hu, Kelin; Snedden, Gregg A.; Hartig, Ellen K.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Johnson, Cody L.; Orton, Philip M.

    2017-03-29

    The salt marshes of Jamaica Bay, managed by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and the Gateway National Recreation Area of the National Park Service, serve as a recreational outlet for New York City residents, mitigate flooding, and provide habitat for critical wildlife species. Hurricanes and extra-tropical storms have been recognized as one of the critical drivers of coastal wetland morphology due to their effects on hydrodynamics and sediment transport, deposition, and erosion processes. However, the magnitude and mechanisms of hurricane effects on sediment dynamics and associated coastal wetland morphology in the northeastern United States are poorly understood. In this study, the depth-averaged version of the Delft3D modeling suite, integrated with field measurements, was utilized to examine the effects of Hurricane Sandy and future potential hurricanes on salt marsh morphology in Jamaica Bay, New York City. Hurricane Sandy-induced wind, waves, storm surge, water circulation, sediment transport, deposition, and erosion were simulated by using the modeling system in which vegetation effects on flow resistance, surge reduction, wave attenuation, and sedimentation were also incorporated. Observed marsh elevation change and accretion from a rod surface elevation table and feldspar marker horizons and cesium-137- and lead-210-derived long-term accretion rates were used to calibrate and validate the wind-waves-surge-sediment transport-morphology coupled model.The model results (storm surge, waves, and marsh deposition and erosion) agreed well with field measurements. The validated modeling system was then used to detect salt marsh morphological change due to Hurricane Sandy across the entire Jamaica Bay over the short-term (for example, 4 days and 1 year) and long-term (for example, 5 and 10 years). Because Hurricanes Sandy (2012) and Irene (2011) were two large and destructive tropical cyclones which hit the northeast coast, the validated coupled

  6. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Summers Engel

    Full Text Available Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales. Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales. These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment

  7. Human threats to sandy beaches: A meta-analysis of ghost crabs illustrates global anthropogenic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Lucrezi, Serena; Connolly, Rod M.; Peterson, Charles H.; Gilby, Ben L.; Maslo, Brooke; Olds, Andrew D.; Walker, Simon J.; Leon, Javier X.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Weston, Michael A.; Turra, Alexander; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Holt, Rebecca A.; Schoeman, David S.

    2016-02-01

    Beach and coastal dune systems are increasingly subjected to a broad range of anthropogenic pressures that on many shorelines require significant conservation and mitigation interventions. But these interventions require reliable data on the severity and frequency of adverse ecological impacts. Such evidence is often obtained by measuring the response of 'indicator species'. Ghost crabs are the largest invertebrates inhabiting tropical and subtropical sandy shores and are frequently used to assess human impacts on ocean beaches. Here we present the first global meta-analysis of these impacts, and analyse the design properties and metrics of studies using ghost-crabs in their assessment. This was complemented by a gap analysis to identify thematic areas of anthropogenic pressures on sandy beach ecosystems that are under-represented in the published literature. Our meta-analysis demonstrates a broad geographic reach, encompassing studies on shores of the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, as well as the South China Sea. It also reveals what are, arguably, two major limitations: i) the near-universal use of proxies (i.e. burrow counts to estimate abundance) at the cost of directly measuring biological traits and bio-markers in the organism itself; and ii) descriptive or correlative study designs that rarely extend beyond a simple 'compare and contrast approach', and hence fail to identify the mechanistic cause(s) of observed contrasts. Evidence for a historically narrow range of assessed pressures (i.e., chiefly urbanisation, vehicles, beach nourishment, and recreation) is juxtaposed with rich opportunities for the broader integration of ghost crabs as a model taxon in studies of disturbance and impact assessments on ocean beaches. Tangible advances will most likely occur where ghost crabs provide foci for experiments that test specific hypotheses associated with effects of chemical, light and acoustic pollution, as well as the consequences of climate change (e

  8. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Annette Summers; Gupta, Axita A

    2014-01-01

    Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales). Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales). These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment. Future research will

  9. 2012 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Lidar: Northeast Atlantic Coast Post-Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  10. 2012 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Lidar: Northeast Atlantic Coast Post-Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  11. STATUS, CAUSES AND COMBATING SUGGESTIONS OF SANDY DESERTIFICATION IN QINGHAI-TIBET PLATEAU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-hua; DONG Guang-rong; LI Sen; DONG Yu-xiang

    2005-01-01

    The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is one of the major sandy desertification regions of China. Based on the recent investigation on sandy desertification, this paper analyses the status such as the type, area, distribution and damage of sandy land desertification in the plateau. Through the analysis on the factors affecting sandy desertification in the region's natural and socio-economic systems as well as the processes and their interrelations, it can be concluded that sandy desertification in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau resulted from the combined actions of normal natural sand drift processes, natural sandy desertification processes caused by climatic changes and man-made sandy desertification caused by improper human activities. In addition, it also predicts the possible developmental trend including the increase in desertification area and the enhancement in desertification developmental degree with the exacerbation of the complex processes, and finally puts forward some strategic suggestions to combat sandy desertification in the coming years.

  12. Hurricane Sandy: Caught in the eye of the storm and a city's adaptation response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, P. M.; Horton, R. M.; Blumberg, A. F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Solecki, W.; Bader, D.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA RISA program has funded the seven-institution Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN) for the past five years to serve stakeholder needs in assessing and managing risks from climate variability and change. When Hurricane Sandy struck, we were in an ideal position, making flood forecasts and communicating NOAA forecasts to the public with dozens of media placements, translating the poorly understood flood forecasts into human dimensions. In 2013 and 2015, by request of New York City (NYC), we worked through the NYC Panel on Climate Change to deliver updated climate risk assessment reports, to be used in the post-Sandy rebuilding and resiliency efforts. These utilized innovative methodologies for probabilistic local and regional sea level change projections, and contrasted methods of dynamic versus (the more common) static flood mapping. We participated in a federal-academic partnership that developed a Sea Level Tool for Sandy Recovery that integrates CCRUN sea level rise projections with policy-relevant FEMA flood maps, and now several updated flood maps and coastal flood mapping tools (NOAA, FEMA, and USACE) incorporate our projections. For the adaptation response, we helped develop NYC's $20 billion flood adaptation plan, and we were on a winning team under the Housing and Urban Development Rebuild By Design (RBD) competition, a few of the many opportunities that arose with negligible additional funding and which CCRUN funds supported. Our work at times disrupted standard lines of thinking, but NYC showed an openness to altering course. In one case we showed that an NYC plan of wetland restoration in Jamaica Bay would provide no reduction in flooding unless deep-dredged channels circumventing them were shallowed or narrowed. In another, the lead author's RBD team challenged the notion at one location that levees were the solution to accelerating sea level rise, developing a plan to use ecological breakwaters and layered components of

  13. Disentangling the influences of habitat structure and limnological predictors on stream fish communities of a coastal basin, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cop Ferreira

    Full Text Available In stream environments habitat structure and limnological factors interact regulating patterns of energy and material transfer and affecting fish communities. In the coastal basins of Southeastern Brazil, limnological and structural characteristics differ between clear and blackwaters streams. The former have a diversity of substrate types, higher water velocities, and lower water conductivity, while the latter have sandy substrate, tea-colored and acidic waters, and low water velocities. In this study, we verified the relative importance of habitat structure and limnological variables in predicting patterns of variation in stream fish communities. Eight first to third order streams were sampled in the coastal plain of Itanhaém River basin. We captured 34 fish species and verified that community structure was influenced by physical habitat and limnology, being the former more important. A fraction of the variation could not be totally decomposed, and it was assigned to the joint influence of limnology and habitat structure. Some species that were restricted to blackwater streams, may have physiological and behavioral adaptations to deal with the lower pH levels. When we examined only the clearwater streams, all the explained variation in fish community composition was assigned to structural factors, which express specific preferences for different types of habitats.

  14. Analysis on Degradation of Ecological Environment of Coastal Wetland around the Pearl River Estuary%珠江口滨海湿地生态环境退化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马玉; 蔡钰灿; 李团结; 刘昆; 王迪; 彭嵩

    2011-01-01

    The coastal wetland around the Pearl River estuary is various and widespread, but in the past few years it was unreasonably exploited, and the quality of ecological environment presented a declining trend. The authors investigated the coastal wetland around the Pearl River estuary in autumn of 2007 and 2008, selecting six representative zones to be studied. The results show that the water was badly polluted by chemical oxygen demand and biologic oxygen demand, the sediment was mostly polluted by Cu, Zn, Cd and As, especially Cu, and Cd pollution resource could be found around the Modaomen Estuary, higher plant grew mainly in nature reserve and wetland parks and was mostly mangrove, benthos diversity was low and evenness was medial. The main degradation phenomena of coastal wetland around the Pearl River estuary are area reduction of natural wetlands, declining of productivity of wetlands and continual deterioration of the wetland environment, etc. The main causes are irrational beach exploitation and reclamation, mass pollutant emissions, and overfishing, etc.%2007和2008年秋季对珠江口滨海湿地进行了2个航次的现状调查,并选择了6条代表性断面进行现场观测和样品采集.结果显示:珠江口滨海湿地的水质污染严重,主要受化学需氧量和生化需氧量的污染,沉积物主要受铜、锌、镉、砷的污染较为严重,特别是铜污染,而且磨刀门断面很有可能存在镉污染源;高等植物主要分布在自然保护区和湿地公园,且以红树林为主;底栖生物多样性不高,均匀度一般.珠江口滨海湿地退化主要表现为天然湿地面积减少、湿地生产力不断下降和湿地环境状况持续恶化等.退化的主要原因是滩涂开发与围填海、污染物大量排放和过度捕捞与养殖等.

  15. Effects of soil amendment on soil characteristics and maize yield in Horqin Sandy Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Liu, J. H.; Zhao, B. P.; Xue, A.; Hao, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    A 4-year experiment was conducted to investigate the inter-annual effects of sandy soil amendment on maize yield, soil water storage and soil enzymatic activities in sandy soil in Northeast China in 2010 to 2014. We applied the sandy soil amendment in different year, and investigated the different effects of sandy soil amendment in 2014. There were six treatments including: (1) no sandy soil amendment application (CK); (2) one year after applying sandy soil amendment (T1); (3) two years after applying sandy soil amendment(T2); (4) three years after applying sandy soil amendment(T3); (5)four years after applying sandy soil amendment(T4); (6) five years after applying sandy soil amendment (T5). T refers to treatment, and the number refers to the year after application of the sandy soil amendment. Comparing with CK, sandy soil amendments improved the soil water storage, soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in different growth stages and soil layers, the order of soil water storage in all treatments roughly performed: T3 > T5 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. the order of soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in all treatments roughly performed: T5 > T3 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. Soil application of sandy soil amendment significantly (p≤⃒0.05) increased the grain yield and biomass yield by 22.75%-41.42% and 29.92%-45.45% respectively, and maize yield gradually increased with the years go by in the following five years. Sandy soil amendment used in poor sandy soil had a positive effect on soil water storage, soil enzymatic activities and maize yield, after five years applied sandy soil amendment (T5) showed the best effects among all the treatments, and deserves further research.

  16. Fit-for-purpose phosphorus management: do riparian buffers qualify in catchments with sandy soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, David; Summers, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Hillslope runoff and leaching studies, catchment-scale water quality measurements and P retention and release characteristics of stream bank and catchment soils were used to better understand reasons behind the reported ineffectiveness of riparian buffers for phosphorus (P) management in catchments with sandy soils from south-west Western Australia (WA). Catchment-scale water quality measurements of 60 % particulate P (PP) suggest that riparian buffers should improve water quality; however, runoff and leaching studies show 20 times more water and 2 to 3 orders of magnitude more P are transported through leaching than runoff processes. The ratio of filterable reactive P (FRP) to total P (TP) in surface runoff from the plots was 60 %, and when combined with leachate, 96 to 99 % of P lost from hillslopes was FRP, in contrast with 40 % measured as FRP at the large catchment scale. Measurements of the P retention and release characteristics of catchment soils (bank soil (bank soils suggest that catchment soils contain more P, are more P saturated and are significantly more likely to deliver FRP and TP in excess of water quality targets than stream bank soils. Stream bank soils are much more likely to retain P than contribute P to streams, and the in-stream mixing of FRP from the landscape with particulates from stream banks or stream beds is a potential mechanism to explain the change in P form from hillslopes (96 to 99 % FRP) to large catchments (40 % FRP). When considered in the context of previous work reporting that riparian buffers were ineffective for P management in this environment, these studies reinforce the notion that (1) riparian buffers are unlikely to provide fit-for-purpose P management in catchments with sandy soils, (2) most P delivered to streams in sandy soil catchments is FRP and travels via subsurface and leaching pathways and (3) large catchment-scale water quality measurements are not good indicators of hillslope P mobilisation and transport

  17. Meadows in Coastal Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    seagrasses and also on the adjacent sediments. (Borowitzka ... characterised by a short, steep sandy slope, below which are ..... The differences in species composition could perhaps be attributed to .... shore waters of Tanzania. M .Sc. Thesis ...

  18. Hurricane Sandy: An Educational Bibliography of Key Research Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There, undoubtedly, will be a flurry of research activity in the "Superstorm" Sandy impact area on a myriad of disaster-related topics, across academic disciplines. The purpose of this study was to review the disaster research related specifically to hurricanes in the educational and social sciences that would best serve as a compendium…

  19. Patterns of species richness in sandy beaches of South America

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Species richness of the intertidal macroinfauna of exposed sandy beaches around South America is reviewed in relation ... The middle shore is prim

  20. Microfungi diversity isolation from sandy soil of Acapulco touristic beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microscopic fungi diversity in marine sandy soil habitats is associated with key functions of beach ecosystems. There are few reports on their presence in Mexican beaches. Although standard methods to obtain the fungi from soil samples are established, the aim of this pilot study was to test the pla...

  1. 78 FR 46999 - Additional Waivers and Alternative Requirements for Hurricane Sandy Grantees in Receipt of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Additional Waivers and Alternative Requirements for Hurricane Sandy Grantees in... impacted and distressed areas declared a major disaster due to Hurricane Sandy (see 78 FR 14329, published....) (Stafford Act), due to Hurricane Sandy and other eligible events in calendar years 2011, 2012, and 2013....

  2. 77 FR 74891 - Order Granting Exemptions From Certain Rules of Regulation SHO Related to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... COMMISSION Order Granting Exemptions From Certain Rules of Regulation SHO Related to Hurricane Sandy December 12, 2012. I. Introduction Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the mid-Atlantic Coast on October 29... in the Vault at the time Hurricane Sandy made landfall, facilitating DTCC's ability to...

  3. 78 FR 33467 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency; Correction AGENCY: Federal Transit... by Hurricane Sandy. This amount was in addition to the initial $2 billion allocation announced in the... allocation restoration FTA Section 5324 Emergency Relief Program Allocations for Hurricane Sandy, by...

  4. 33 CFR 165.507 - Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... south (eastbound) span of the William P. Lane Jr. Memorial Bridge, from the western shore at Sandy Point..., between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. 165.507 Section 165.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.507 Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. (a...

  5. Biogeochemical transformations and fluxes in redox-stratified environments: from the shallow coastal ocean to the deep subsurface. Geologica Ultraiectina (291)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Biogeochemical activity is often concentrated at interfaces where the supplies of bioessential elements and energy converge. Processes in these environments control to a large extent the exchange fluxes between the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere and, therefore, play an important

  6. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Mean-high-water shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Mean-high-water (MHW) shoreline for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines were derived from lidar data collected...

  7. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dune features (dune crest and toe elevations) and mean-high-water shoreline data for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina...

  8. 2012 Post-Superstorm Sandy Lidar Elevation Data, USACE National Coastal Mapping Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — These files contain classified topographic and bathymetric lidar data as unclassified valid topographic data (1), and valid topographic data classified as ground...

  9. Photosynthesis as a Possible Source of Gas Bubbles in Shallow Sandy Coastal Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    clearly demonstrates that gas bubbles can be formed when photosynthesis by benthic microalgae causes pore water to become supersaturated with oxygen...We also collected sediment samples from the upper few mm of sand to identify the dominant taxa of benthic microalgae present. Although benthic...Jan Rines (Graduate School of Oceanography / University of Rhode Island = GSO/URI) to identify the benthic microalgae in the samples. Following the

  10. Variability of coastal suprabenthic assemblages from sandy beaches of the Caribbean coast of Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Ortega

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The suprabenthos or hyperbenthos is the macrofaunal assemblage of small-sized organisms that interact for some time in the benthic boundary layer. Information about the taxonomic composition and role of suprabenthic species, especially in littoral zones, is scarce and scattered. This work attempts to contribute alleviate this problem. We analyze the temporal and spatial variations of suprabenthic assemblages in the swash-zone from four beaches of the littoral coast of Venezuela. For each beach, two sites were chosen, and special attention was given to water and sediment characteristics. 12 environmental variables were measured: Dissolved oxygen, oxygen saturation percentage, pH, salinity, surface temperature, total, organic and inorganic suspended solids, total organic carbon, organic matter in sediment, grain size of sediment, and amount of dragged material of sample. All faunal samples were taken on a monthly basis during 2011; these were extracted using a manual suprabenthic sledge towed parallel to the shoreline. Samples were sorted and identified to their lowest possible taxonomic level. A total of 24 141 specimens (mean abundance: 26.16±55.35ind./m² belonging to 21 taxonomic groups were identified. Analysis suggests that seasonality does not explain observed changes either in fauna or environmental variables. It was found that suprabenthic assemblages, total suprabenthos density, richness and environmental variables changed in a dissimilar fashion between months and beaches. The most frequent groups were amphipods and decapods; and at the species/categories level post-larval shrimp (Penaeidae, Grapsidae crab megalopae and Arenaeus cribarius megalopae were common. Dissimilarity between months in each beach was primarily explained by the abundance of amphipods, ctenophores, decapods and mysids. For particular months and selected beaches very high abundances of ctenophores were found. This group dominated the sample even though it is not usually a representative group in suprabenthos. Samples showed low correlations between suprabenthos and environmental variables. A somewhat stronger correlation could be established between water characteristics and dragged material abundance. The studied suprabenthos assemblage was found to have high taxa richness and very dynamic behaviour at spatial and temporal scale. Further analysis suggested that there is no evident pattern of distribution and that causality can not be directly attributed to temporal variation only. Possibly there is an influence of a synergy of environmentals or biological factors, rather than a single variable. The species Americamysis bahia and Americamysis taironana are reported for the first time in Venezuela. This study represents the first ecological research of the suprabenthos in the Caribbean region.

  11. 2012 USACE Post-Hurricane Sandy Topographic LiDAR: Coastal Connecticut

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These topographic elevation data have been acquired and developed by the U.S. Corps of Engineers St. Louis District for a 116 sq. mile project area encompassing the...

  12. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dune features (dune crest and toe elevations) and mean-high-water shoreline data for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina...

  13. Searching a Holocene coastal lagoon for paleotsunami deposits: Kamala Beach, Phuket, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J. R.; Kirby, M. E.; Rhodes, B. P.; Jankaew, K.

    2006-12-01

    In the wake of the devastating December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, there is a renewed effort to locate and date paleotsunami deposits. As part of this effort, one piston and two push cores were extracted along a transect from a Holocene age coastal lagoon in Kamala Beach, Phuket, Thailand. The piston core (KBPISTON06-1 measures 513 cm total length. The overall sedimentology reflects a long-term sea level regression and beach progradation across the core site to the modern beach position. The sedimentology is, however, highly complex indicating variable depositional environments throughout the Holocene. Basal sands (estimated at 8,000 cy BP) are overlain by various thickness laminated clays, interbedded organic silts, and occasional sands. The upper 40 cm may reflect recent human disturbance, which includes mining of placer tin, planting of coconut trees, and tourist-related infrastructure. In addition to visual descriptions, mass magnetic susceptibility, percent total organic matter, and percent total carbonate were determined at 1 cm contiguous intervals. Micro-fossil counts and grain size measurements were also determined but at lower resolution throughout the core. Using visual description as the basic identifying criteria, we recognize four candidate deposits as potentially tsunamigenic. Each of the four units is sand-rich. Sandy clays bracket the upper two sand units; whereas, the lower two sand units are much coarser and bracketed by semi-to-well laminated clays. Considering each of the analyses above, we cannot identify any one of these candidate deposits as unequivocally tsunamigenic. Similarly, we cannot conclude that any one of these candidate deposits is not tsunamigenic. Nonetheless, our initial conclusion is that coastal lagoon environments may not represent the best location for preservation and identification of paleotsunami deposits in Thailand. Sites with less complex terrestrial-marine sediment interaction, such mangrove swamps, may be easier

  14. A 700 year record of combustion-derived pollution in northern Spain: tools to identify the Holocene/Anthropocene transition in coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leorri, Eduardo; Mitra, Siddhartha; Irabien, María Jesús; Zimmerman, Andrew R; Blake, William H; Cearreta, Alejandro

    2014-02-01

    There is an uneven geographical distribution of historic records of atmospheric pollutants from SW Europe and those that exist are very limited in temporal extent. Alternative data source is required to understand temporal trends in human impacts on atmospheric pollution. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heavy metal content and stable Pb isotopic ratios in a sediment core from a salt marsh in northern Spain were used to reconstruct the regional history of contaminant inputs over the last 700 years. Pre-1800s concentrations of Pb and PAHs represented baseline concentrations, i.e. pre-Industrial, conditions. During the initial stages of the Industrial Revolution, 1800s to 1860s, PAH concentrations increased by a factor of about two above baseline levels in the sediment column. By the 1930s, PAH levels reached ca. 10 times pre-Industrial levels and, along with Pb, reached a peak at ca. 1975 CE. Since then, sedimentary PAH and Pb concentrations decreased significantly. A combination of PAH isomer and Pb stable isotope ratios suggests that the contaminant sources are regional, likely derived partially from wood, but mainly coal used by the metallurgic industry in the Basque country since the 1800s and until the 1970s when leaded petrol saw increased use. This chronology of regional atmosphere-derived pollution expands current southwest Europe emission records and shows coastal salt marsh sediments to be useful in reconstructing the Anthropocene.

  15. Short wave Aerosol Radiative Forcing estimates over a semi urban coastal environment in south-east India and validation with surface flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, K.; Lakshmi Kumar, T. V.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Babu, S. Suresh; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Rao, D. Narayana

    2016-01-01

    The short wave direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) at a semi urban coastal location near Chennai (12.81 °N, 80.03 °E, ˜45 m amsl), a mega city on the east coast of India has been estimated for all the four seasons in the year 2013 using the SBDART (Santa Barbara Discrete ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) model. As inputs to this model, measured aerosol parameters together with modeled aerosol and atmospheric parameters are used. The ARF in the atmosphere is found to be higher in the pre-monsoon and winter seasons compared to the other seasons whereas at the surface, it is found to be higher in the south-west (SW) monsoon and winter seasons. The estimated ARF values are compared with those reported over other locations in India. The effect of Relative Humidity on ARF has been investigated for the first time in the present study. It is found that the ARF increases with increasing RH in the SW monsoon and winter seasons. An unique feature of the present study is the comparison of the net surface short wave fluxes estimated from the model (SBDART) and measured fluxes using CNR 4 net radiometer. This comparison between the estimated and measured fluxes showed good agreement, providing a 'closure' for the estimates.

  16. REVIEW OF COASTAL CHARACTERISTICS OF IRON SAND DEPOSITS IN CILACAP CENTRAL JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananto Kurnio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineable iron sand deposits in Cilacap – southern coastal area of Central Java have certain coastal characteristics that need to be studied in order to understand its depositional environment. With the knowledge of such environment, it can be applied to look for other places prospective of iron sand deposits that have the same characteristics especially recently when Cilacap’s deposits were almost depleted. Coastal characteristics of iron sand deposit in Cilacap is shown by successive sandy beach ridges separated by marshy valleys typical of prograded coasts and by dunes of sand elongated parallel to the shore line with elevation varies from 0 m to 15 m above sea level. The iron sand deposit was derived from denudation of andesite and “Old Andesite Formation” enriched in magnetite and ilmenite minerals in the steep elevated and deeply weathered rock hinterlands of Cilacap. High sediment loads of Serayu Basin in the hinterland (3,500-4,500 ton/km2/year; Citarum River basin only 800-1,200 ton/km2/year was causing extensive deposition of iron sand in the coastal zone. Key words: coast, characteristic, iron sand, Cilacap Endapan pasir besi yang dapat ditambang di Cilacap – pesisir selatan Jawa Tengah memiliki karakteristik pantai tertentu yang perlu dikaji agar dapat dipahami lingkungan pengendapannya. Dengan pengetahuan tentang lingkungan pengendapan tersebut, dapat diterapkan untuk mencari daerah-daerah lain prospek endapan pasir besi yang memiliki karakteristik yang sama terutama pada akhir-akhir ini ketika endapan Cilacap akan habis. Karakteristik pantai endapan pasir besi di Cilacap dicirikan oleh urutan pematang pantai berpasir yang dipisahkan oleh lembah-lembah berawa khas pantai maju dan oleh gumuk-gumuk pasir memanjang sejajar dengan garis pantai dengan ketinggian bervariasi dari 0 m hingga 15 m dari muka laut. Endapan pasir besi di daerah ini berasal dari proses denudasi andesit dan “Formasi Andesit

  17. Seletividade do pirofosfato de sódio e de cloretos não tamponados (CuCl2 e LaCl3 como extratores de alumínio associado à matéria orgânica em solos de restinga do estado de São Paulo Selectivity of sodium pyrophosphate and unbuffered chlorides (CuCl2 and LaCl3 as extractants of aluminum bound to soil organic matter in soils of the sandy coastal plain in São Paulo state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Rizzato Coelho

    2010-10-01

    dos processos envolvidos na gênese dos Espodossolos tropicais derivados de sedimentos quartzosos costeiros.Aluminum in complexes with soil organic matter is usually determined by selective extraction techniques. A common extractant for this Al form is sodium pyrophosphate. Due to its lack of selectivity for some soil samples, unbuffered Al extractants, such as CuCl2 and LaCl3, have been recommended. The selectivity of sodium pyrophosphate (Al p and of unbuffered Cu (AlCu and La (AlLa chlorides to extract aluminum bound to soil organic matter (Al-humus was evaluated in soil samples from 31 pedons (Spodosols and Quartzipsamments representative of the sandy coastal plains of the state of São Paulo. The results were compared with those obtained by ammonium oxalate and KCl and the extraction capacity and selectivity of the reagents interpreted as commonly used in the literature. Pyrophosphate was not totally selective for some samples containing inorganic aluminum. CuCl2 and LaCl3, in turn, were more selective for Al-humus in the same samples and their order of extractability was: Al p>AlCu>AlLa . Based on the different extraction capacities and the relations between the reagents used the analytic evidences were converged in order to analyze and interpret parameters such as Al saturation in the soil organic matter and stability of C-metal interactions. The stability of the interaction C-metal and humus Al saturation of all horizons studied was greater in the Bs, Bhs and Bsm spodic horizons. Based on the results it was concluded that all reagents studied can be used as Al extractants since they allow establishing relations and interpretations that may help understanding the complex chemistry of Al-humus on the studied Restinga soil. These extractors are therefore adequate and promising to study and understand processes involved in the genesis of tropical Spodosols derived from sandy coastal plain sediments.

  18. Coastal Risk Management in a Changing Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Management in a Changing Climate" provides innovative, multidisciplinary best practices for mitigating the effects of climate change on coastal structures. Based on the Theseus program, the book includes eight study sites across Europe, with specific attention to the most vulnerable coastal environments......Existing coastal management and defense approaches are not well suited to meet the challenges of climate change and related uncertanities. Professionals in this field need a more dynamic, systematic and multidisciplinary approach. Written by an international group of experts, "Coastal Risk...... such as deltas, estuaries and wetlands, where many large cities and industrial areas are located. Integrated risk assessment tools for considering the effects of climate change and related uncertainties. Presents latest insights on coastal engineering defenses. Provides integrated guidelines for setting up...

  19. Differences in impacts of Hurricane Sandy on freshwater swamps on the Delmarva Peninsula, Mid−Atlantic Coast, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane wind and surge may have different influences on the subsequent composition of forests. During Hurricane Sandy, while damaging winds were highest near landfall in New Jersey, inundation occurred along the entire eastern seaboard from Georgia to Maine. In this study, a comparison of damage from salinity intrusion vs. wind/surge was recorded in swamps of the Delmarva Peninsula along the Pocomoke (MD) and Nanticoke (DE) Rivers, south of the most intense wind damage. Hickory Point Cypress Swamp (Hickory) was closest to the Chesapeake Bay and may have been subjected to a salinity surge as evidenced by elevated salinity levels at a gage upstream of this swamp (storm salinity = 13.1 ppt at Nassawango Creek, Snow Hill, Maryland). After Hurricane Sandy, 8% of the standing trees died at Hickory including Acer rubrum, Amelanchier laevis, Ilex spp., and Taxodium distichum. In Plot 2 of Hickory, 25% of the standing trees were dead, and soil salinity levels were the highest recorded in the study. The most important variables related to structural tree damage were soil salinity and proximity to the Atlantic coast as based on Stepwise Regression and NMDS procedures. Wind damage was mostly restricted to broken branches although tipped−up trees were found at Hickory, Whiton and Porter (species: Liquidamabar styraciflua, Pinus taeda, Populus deltoides, Quercus pagoda and Ilex spp.). These trees fell mostly in an east or east−southeast direction (88o−107o) in keeping with the wind direction of Hurricane Sandy on the Delmarva Peninsula. Coastal restoration and management can be informed by the specific differences in hurricane damage to vegetation by salt versus wind.

  20. Inner-shelf ocean dynamics and seafloor morphologic changes during Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, John C.; Schwab, William C.; List, Jeffrey H.; Safak, Ilgar; Liste, Maria; Baldwin, Wayne

    2017-04-01

    Hurricane Sandy was one of the most destructive hurricanes in US history, making landfall on the New Jersey coast on October 30, 2012. Storm impacts included several barrier island breaches, massive coastal erosion, and flooding. While changes to the subaerial landscape are relatively easily observed, storm-induced changes to the adjacent shoreface and inner continental shelf are more difficult to evaluate. These regions provide a framework for the coastal zone, are important for navigation, aggregate resources, marine ecosystems, and coastal evolution. Here we provide unprecedented perspective regarding regional inner continental shelf sediment dynamics based on both observations and numerical modeling over time scales associated with these types of large storm events. Oceanographic conditions and seafloor morphologic changes are evaluated using both a coupled atmospheric-ocean-wave-sediment numerical modeling system that covered spatial scales ranging from the entire US east coast (1000 s of km) to local domains (10 s of km). Additionally, the modeled response for the region offshore of Fire Island, NY was compared to observational analysis from a series of geologic surveys from that location. The geologic investigations conducted in 2011 and 2014 revealed lateral movement of sedimentary structures of distances up to 450 m and in water depths up to 30 m, and vertical changes in sediment thickness greater than 1 m in some locations. The modeling investigations utilize a system with grid refinement designed to simulate oceanographic conditions with progressively increasing resolutions for the entire US East Coast (5-km grid), the New York Bight (700-m grid), and offshore of Fire Island, NY (100-m grid), allowing larger scale dynamics to drive smaller scale coastal changes. Model results in the New York Bight identify maximum storm surge of up to 3 m, surface currents on the order of 2 ms-1 along the New Jersey coast, waves up to 8 m in height, and bottom stresses