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Sample records for sandstone illinois basin

  1. Reservoir characterization of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Illinois Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Leetaru, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of open hole well log analyses, core analyses and pressure transient analyses was used for reservoir characterization of the Mt. Simon sandstone. Characterization of the injection interval provides the basis for a geologic model to support the baseline MVA model, specify pressure design requirements of surface equipment, develop completion strategies, estimate injection rates, and project the CO2 plume distribution.The Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone overlies the Precambrian granite basement of the Illinois Basin. The Mt. Simon is relatively thick formation exceeding 800 meters in some areas of the Illinois Basin. In the deeper part of the basin where sequestration is likely to occur at depths exceeding 1000 m, horizontal core permeability ranges from less than 1 ?? 10-12 cm 2 to greater than 1 ?? 10-8 cm2. Well log and core porosity can be up to 30% in the basal Mt. Simon reservoir. For modeling purposes, reservoir characterization includes absolute horizontal and vertical permeability, effective porosity, net and gross thickness, and depth. For horizontal permeability, log porosity was correlated with core. The core porosity-permeability correlation was improved by using grain size as an indication of pore throat size. After numerous attempts to identify an appropriate log signature, the calculated cementation exponent from Archie's porosity and resistivity relationships was used to identify which porosity-permeability correlation to apply and a permeability log was made. Due to the relatively large thickness of the Mt. Simon, vertical permeability is an important attribute to understand the distribution of CO2 when the injection interval is in the lower part of the unit. Only core analyses and specifically designed pressure transient tests can yield vertical permeability. Many reservoir flow models show that 500-800 m from the injection well most of the CO2 migrates upward depending on the magnitude of the vertical permeability and CO2 injection

  2. Utilization of the St. Peter Sandstone in the Illinois Basin for CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, Robert; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This project is part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) under cooperative agreement DE-FE0002068 from 12/08/2009 through 9/31/2014. The study is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. This report evaluates the potential injectivity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data acquired through funding in this project as well as existing data from two additional, separately funded projects: the US DOE funded Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), which received a phase two award from DOE. This study addresses the question of whether or not the St. Peter Sandstone may serve as a suitable target for CO2 sequestration at locations within the Illinois Basin where it lies at greater depths (below the underground source of drinking water (USDW)) than at the IBDP site. The work performed included numerous improvements to the existing St. Peter reservoir model created in 2010. Model size and spatial resolution were increased resulting in a 3 fold increase in the number of model cells. Seismic data was utilized to inform spatial porosity distribution and an extensive core database was used to develop porosity-permeability relationships. The analysis involved a Base Model representative of the St. Peter at “in-situ” conditions, followed by the creation of two hypothetical models at in-situ + 1,000 feet (ft.) (300 m) and in-situ + 2,000 ft. (600 m) depths through systematic depthdependent adjustment of the Base Model

  3. Geological Carbon Sequestration Storage Resource Estimates for the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone, Illinois and Michigan Basins, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, David; Ellett, Kevin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Midwest of the United States is a primary target for potential geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations. The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive evaluation of the Cambro-Ordovician strata in the Illinois and Michigan Basins above the basal Mount Simon Sandstone since the Mount Simon is the subject of other investigations including a demonstration-scale injection at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project. The primary reservoir targets investigated in this study are the middle Ordovician St Peter Sandstone and the late Cambrian to early Ordovician Knox Group carbonates. The topic of this report is a regional-scale evaluation of the geologic storage resource potential of the St Peter Sandstone in both the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Multiple deterministic-based approaches were used in conjunction with the probabilistic-based storage efficiency factors published in the DOE methodology to estimate the carbon storage resource of the formation. Extensive data sets of core analyses and wireline logs were compiled to develop the necessary inputs for volumetric calculations. Results demonstrate how the range in uncertainty of storage resource estimates varies as a function of data availability and quality, and the underlying assumptions used in the different approaches. In the simplest approach, storage resource estimates were calculated from mapping the gross thickness of the formation and applying a single estimate of the effective mean porosity of the formation. Results from this approach led to storage resource estimates ranging from 3.3 to 35.1 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 1.0 to 11.0 Gt in the Illinois Basin at the P10 and P90 probability level, respectively. The second approach involved consideration of the diagenetic history of the formation throughout the two basins and used depth-dependent functions of porosity to derive a more realistic spatially variable model of porosity rather than applying a

  4. Fe-oxide grain coatings support bacterial Fe-reducing metabolisms in 1.7-2.0 km-deep subsurface quartz arenite sandstone reservoirs of the Illinois Basin (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran eDong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone, deeply buried within the Illinois Basin of the midcontinent of North America, contains quartz sand grains ubiquitously encrusted with iron-oxide cements and dissolved ferrous iron in pore-water. Although microbial iron reduction has previously been documented in the deep terrestrial subsurface, the potential for diagenetic mineral cementation to drive microbial activity has not been well studied. In this study, two subsurface formation water samples were collected at 1.72 and 2.02 km, respectively, from the Mt. Simon Sandstone in Decatur, Illinois. Low-diversity microbial communities were detected from both horizons and were dominated by Halanaerobiales of Phylum Firmicutes. Iron-reducing enrichment cultures fed with ferric citrate were successfully established using the formation water. Phylogenetic classification identified the enriched species to be related to Vulcanibacillus from the 1.72 km depth sample, while Orenia dominated the communities at 2.02 km of burial depth. Species-specific quantitative analyses of the enriched organisms in the microbial communities suggest that they are indigenous to the Mt. Simon Sandstone. Optimal iron reduction by the 1.72 km enrichment culture occurred at a temperature of 40oC (range 20 to 60oC and a salinity of 25 parts per thousand (range 25-75 ppt. This culture also mediated fermentation and nitrate reduction. In contrast, the 2.02 km enrichment culture exclusively utilized hydrogen and pyruvate as the electron donors for iron reduction, tolerated a wider range of salinities (25-200 ppt, and exhibited only minimal nitrate- and sulfate-reduction. In addition, the 2.02 km depth community actively reduces the more crystalline ferric iron minerals goethite and hematite. The results suggest evolutionary adaptation of the autochthonous microbial communities to the Mt. Simon Sandstone and carries potentially important implications for future utilization of this reservoir

  5. Upper Illinois River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    During the past 25 years, industry and government made large financial investments that resulted in better water quality across the Nation; however, many water-quality concerns remain. Following a 1986 pilot project, the U.S. Geological Survey began implementation of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program in 1991. This program differs from other national water-quality assessment studies in that the NAWQA integrates monitoring of surface- and ground-water quality with the study of aquatic ecosystems. The goals of the NAWQA Program are to (1) describe current water-quality conditions for a large part of the Nation's freshwater streams and aquifers (water-bearing sediments and rocks), (2) describe how water quality is changing over time, and (3) improve our understanding of the primary natural and human factors affecting water quality.The Upper Illinois River Basin National Water- Quality Assessment (NAWQA) study will increase the scientific understanding of surface- and ground-water quality and the factors that affect water quality in the basin. The study also will provide information needed by water-resource managers to implement effective water-quality management actions and evaluate long-term changes in water quality.

  6. Geologic characterization and carbon storage resource estimates for the knox group, Illinois Basin, Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, David; Ellett, Kevin; Rupp, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Research documented in this report includes (1) refinement and standardization of regional stratigraphy across the 3-state study area in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, (2) detailed core description and sedimentological interpretion of Knox cores from five wells in western Kentucky, and (3) a detailed calculation of carbon storage volumetrics for the Knox using three different methodologies. Seven regional cross sections document Knox formation distribution and thickness. Uniform stratigraphic nomenclature for all three states helps to resolve state-to-state differences that previously made it difficult to evaluate the Knox on a basin-wide scale. Correlations have also refined the interpretation of an important sandstone reservoir interval in southern Indiana and western Kentucky. This sandstone, a CO2 injection zone in the KGS 1 Blan well, is correlated with the New Richmond Sandstone of Illinois. This sandstone is over 350 ft (107 m) thick in parts of southern Indiana. It has excellent porosity and permeability at sufficient depths, and provides an additional sequestration target in the Knox. The New Richmond sandstone interval has higher predictability than vuggy and fractured carbonates, and will be easier to model and monitor CO2 movement after injection.

  7. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G. [and others

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  8. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO₂-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO₂), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO₂ emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin – Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO₂. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO₂ without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO₂-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (9101–9860 kPa [1320–1430 psi] and 32°–42°C [90°– 108°F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO₂ as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this

  9. Hydrogeologic impacts of underground (Longwall) mining in the Illinois basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, C.J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that hydrogeological impacts of active longwall mining were studied at two sites in Illinois. At the site with the more transmissive sandstone aquifer, aquifer permeabilities increased an order of magnitude due to subsidence. Piezometric levels declined with subsidence due to increased porosity, and ahead of mining due to a transmitted drawdown. Levels recovered rapidly at first and fully over two years. At the site with the less transmissive aquifer, impacts were similar except that recovery has been limited. Local aquifer enhancement through increased yield can occur, but only where the aquifer is transmissive enough for recovery

  10. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern

  11. Discussion on metallogenic prospect of sandstone-type uranium deposit in Yabulai basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lianshe; Li Xiangping

    2003-01-01

    Based on characteristics of initial basin type and tectonic reworking process, this article analyses the distribution features of depositional system and subsequent alteration of the target horizon of sandstone-type uranium deposits in Yabulai basin. Guided by prognostic criteria of sandstone-type uranium deposits, authors suggest that the post-depositional tectonic reworking in the basin was quite intense, and uranium metallogenic prospects are unfavorable. However, the Lower Cretaceous in the paleo-slope at the middle of the basin does show certain metallogenic prospects for sandstone-type uranium deposits

  12. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses

  13. Middle Ordovician brachiopods from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Grube; Brock, Glenn A.; Nielsen, Arne Thorshøj

    2014-01-01

    -water palaeoenvironment along the margin of northeastern Gondwana. The brachiopods from the Stairway Sandstone are of low diversity and represent ca 9% of the entire shelly fauna. Five brachiopod taxa are described from the Stairway Sandstone; all are endemic to the Amadeus Basin at species level. Two new species...

  14. Uranium distribution and sandstone depositional environments: oligocene and upper Cretaceous sediments, Cheyenne basin, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nibbelink, K.A.; Ethridge, F.G.

    1984-01-01

    Wyoming-type roll-front uranium deposits occur in the Upper Cretaceous Laramie and Fox Hills sandstones in the Cheyenne basin of northeastern Colorado. The location, geometry, and trend of specific depositional environments of the Oligocene White River and the Upper Cretaceous Laramie and Fox Hills formations are important factors that control the distribution of uranium in these sandstones. The Fox Hills Sandstone consists of up to 450 ft (140 m) of nearshore marine wave-dominated delta and barrier island-tidal channel sandstones which overlie offshore deposits of the Pierre Shale and which are overlain by delta-plain and fluvial deposits of the Laramie Formation. Uranium, which probably originated from volcanic ash in the White River Formation, was transported by groundwater through the fluvial-channel deposits of the White River into the sandstones of the Laramie and Fox Hills formations where it was precipitated. Two favorable depositional settings for uranium mineralization in the Fox Hills Sandstone are: (1) the landward side of barrier-island deposits where barrier sandstones thin and interfinger with back-barrier organic mudstones, and (2) the intersection of barrier-island and tidal channel sandstones. In both settings, sandstones were probably reduced during early burial by diagenesis of contained and adjacent organic matter. The change in permeability trends between the depositional strike-oriented barrier sandstones and the dip-oriented tidal-channel sandstones provided sites for dispersed groundwater flow and, as demonstrated in similar settings in other depositional systems, sites for uranium mineralization

  15. Study of petrological characteristics of uranium-bearing sandstone in the south of ordos basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Cheng; Jia Licheng; Li Song; Zhang Zimin

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the relation between uranium-bearing abundance and texture constituent of sedimentary rock, on the basis of the research of petrological characteristic of sandstone in the south of Ordos basin. The influence of infiltration of sandstone and uranium migration and accumulation by the major diagenesis of compaction and cementation, clay minerals evolution, corrosion and forming of secondary porosity are discussed. Uranium-bearing sandstones are divided into four types and their petrological characteristics are discussed. After mineralization conditions being summed up, the uranium-mineralization model of sandstone-type is built. Reliable petrological evidences for evaluating favourable uranium mineralization rich areas are furnished. (authors)

  16. First conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y. P.; Van Besien, A. [eds.

    1980-06-01

    The first conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin was held at the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Illinois, August 22-24, 1979. Twenty-one papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB; one had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  17. Sediment transport direction in fluviatile Karharbari sandstone, Giridih Basin, Bihar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewari, R C; Casshyap, S M

    1978-01-01

    The sandstone is pebbly, very coarse grained in the lower part, and coarse to medium grained in the upper part. Shale and coal respectively constitute 9 and 5% of the strata Small and large erosional channels and successive sets of large scale cross-bedding characterize the sandstone. Palaeo- currents reveal that the paleodrainage and sediment transport were dominantly directed from SSW to NNE.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

    2004-09-30

    This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems

  19. Structure and fluid evolution of Yili basin and their relation to sandstone type uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Juntang; Wang Chengwei; Feng Shirong

    2008-01-01

    Based on the summary of strata and structure distribution of Yili basin, the relation of structure and fluid evolution to sandstone type ur alum mineraliation are analyzed. It is found that uranium mineralization in Yili basin experienced ore hosting space forming, pre-alteration of hosting space, hosting space alteration and uranium formation stages. (authors)

  20. provenance of sandstone on the western flank of anambra basin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    GLOBAL JOURNAL OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES VOL. 14, 2016: 13-21. COPYRIGHT© ... from Fugar locality. The sandstones each classify as quartz arenites and sublitharenites. ... Tectonic movement in the Santonian times resulted in the ...

  1. Stable isotopic mass balance in sandstone-shale couplets. An example from the Neogene Pannonian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matyas, J.; Geologisches Institut.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic ratios of carbonate cements in the Neogene sandstones of the Pannonian Basin show distinct variations: early calcites 3-6 per mille lighter than the late calcites from the same location and depth. This shift is thought to be related to the isotopically heavy oxygen released from the mixed-layer illite/smectite during illitisation. For sandstones dominated by compactional flow, closed system mass balance calculations predict an isotopic shift comparable to that deducted from petrographic and geochemical observations. The model suggests that variations of geothermal gradient has little effect on isotopic evolution; much more significant is the sandstone: shale ratio in the couplets. (author)

  2. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2013-12-17

    The Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) is designed to confirm the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline-water-bearing formation in the Illinois Basin, to store 1 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected over a period of three years. The CO{sub 2} will be provided by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from its Decatur, Illinois, ethanol plant. In order to transport CO{sub 2} from the capture facility to the injection well (also located within the ADM plant boundaries), a high-pressure pipeline of length 3,200 ft (975 m) has been constructed, running above the ground surface within the ADM plant footprint. We have qualitatively evaluated risks associated with possible pipeline failure scenarios that lead to discharge of CO{sub 2} within the real-world environment of the ADM plant in which there are often workers and visitors in the vicinity of the pipeline. There are several aspects of CO{sub 2} that make its transportation and potential leakage somewhat different from other substances, most notable is its non-flammability and propensity to change to solid (dry ice) upon strong decompression. In this study, we present numerical simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods of the release and dispersion of CO{sub 2} from individual hypothetical pipeline failures (i.e., leaks). Failure frequency of the various components of a pipeline transportation system over time are taken from prior work on general pipeline safety and leakage modeling and suggest a 4.65% chance of some kind of pipeline failure over the three-years of operation. Following the Precautionary Principle (see below), we accounted for full-bore leakage scenarios, where the temporal evolution of the mass release rate from the high-pressure pipeline leak locations was simulated using a state-of-the-art Pipe model which considers the thermodynamic effects of decompression in the entire pipeline. Failures have been simulated at four representative locations along

  3. Provenance of sandstone on the western flank of Anambra Basin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petrographic and heavy mineral studies were carried out on clastic deposits that crop out in Ikpeshi, Auchi and Fugar localities in order to determine the provenance of the ... The heavy mineral suites and the petrographic signatures of the sandstones suggest derivation mainly from acid igneous rocks, gneisses and older ...

  4. Sedimentological reservoir characteristics of the Paleocene fluvial/lacustrine Yabus Sandstone, Melut Basin, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, M. I.; Padmanabhan, E.; Abdullatif, O. M.

    2016-11-01

    Melut Basin in Sudan is regionally linked to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Central and Western African Rift System (CWARS). The Paleocene Yabus Formation is the main oil producing reservoir in the basin. It is dominated by channel sandstone and shales deposited in fluvial/lacustrine environment during the third phase of rifting in the basin. Different scales of sedimentological heterogeneities influenced reservoir quality and architecture. The cores and well logs analyses revealed seven lithofacies representing fluvial, deltaic and lacustrine depositional environments. The sandstone is medium to coarse-grained, poorly to moderately-sorted and sub-angular to sub-rounded, arkosic-subarkosic to sublitharenite. On the basin scale, the Yabus Formation showed variation in sandstone bodies, thickness, geometry and architecture. On macro-scale, reservoir quality varies vertically and laterally within Yabus Sandstone where it shows progressive fining upward tendencies with different degrees of connectivity. The lower part of the reservoir showed well-connected and amalgamated sandstone bodies, the middle to the upper parts, however, have moderate to low sandstone bodies' connectivity and amalgamation. On micro-scale, sandstone reservoir quality is directly affected by textures and diagenetic changes such as compaction, cementation, alteration, dissolution and kaolinite clays pore fill and coat all have significantly reduced the reservoir porosity and permeability. The estimated porosity in Yabus Formation ranges from 2 to 20% with an average of 12%; while permeability varies from 200 to 500 mD and up to 1 Darcy. The understanding of different scales of sedimentological reservoir heterogeneities might contribute to better reservoir quality prediction, architecture, consequently enhancing development and productivity.

  5. Architecture and quantitative assessment of channeled clastic deposits, Shihezi sandstone (Lower Permian, Ordos Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengye Jia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lower Permian Shihezi sandstone in Ordos Basin is the largest gas reservoir in China. Architecture elements of channel, overbank and floodplain facies of braided channel deposits were identified through an outcrops survey, and their proportion of channel facies have been quantitatively estimated from well logging. Characteristics of architecture elements, such as sand thickness, bounding surfaces and lithofacies were investigated through outcrops and core. Petrology of Shihezi sandstone has also been studied in detail. Analysis on sandstone components shows that monocrystalline quartz with approximately 76% bulk volume, and lithic up to 5%–45% bulk volume, are the two main components. Litharenite and lithic quartz sandstone are the main rock types. Compaction is concluded by former researchers as the control factor of low permeability. Examination through thin section reveals that secondary pores developed well in coarse sand. Inter-granular dissolution is included as the positive effect to increasing porosity, and is concluded as the control factor to the generation of net pay. Scale of coarse grained channel fills and channel bar sandstone bodies are quantitatively estimated. Strike-oriented, dip-oriented, and vertical distribution of channel fills and channel bar sandstone bodies have been investigated. The geometry of sand bodies can be depicted as an elongated lens. Subsurface mapping reveals that channel sandstone bodies distribute widely from both lateral and longitudinal cross section profiles, and are poorly connected.

  6. Sedimentological Characteristics and Re-interpretation of the Paleoenvironment of Lokoja Sandstone, Southern Bida Basin, Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, O. J.; Akande, S. O.

    2002-01-01

    Detail mapping of the Lokoja Formation consisting predominantly of sandstones exposed along Okene-Abuja highway near the confluence of Rivers Niger and Benue in the southern Bida Basin was undertaken in an attempt to reconstruct their depositional history. The analyses of the lithofacies characteristics, pebble morphogenesis and ichnofossil content of the Lokoja sandstones in the study area reveal their depositional environments which evolved from alluvial fans through braided stream into nearshore shallow marine conditions. The massive, immature, matrix to grain supported conglomerate subfacies can be interpreted as debris flow. The conglomeratic sandstone facies (massive, cross stratified and graded subfacies) reflect deposits of deep braided channels. The bioturbated and herringbone cross stratified conglomeratic sandstones indicate shallowing to marginal marine environments. The fine to medium grained sandstones, siltstones and claystones are interpreted as channel bars and floodplain deposits.Results of pebble morphogenesis analysis indicate predominance of fluvial processes. Minor high energy (probably beach) condition is indicated by some individual clasts from the conglomeratic sandstone facies with sphericity and OP index values less that 0.66 and -1.5 respectively.The study is significant because it represents the first sedimentological evidence of influence of shallow marine in the development of Lokoja sandstones during Campanian-Maastrichtian times

  7. Characteristics of isotope geology of sandstone-type uranium deposit in Turpan-Hami Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanbin; Xia Yuliang; Lin Jinrong; Fan Guang

    2003-01-01

    This paper expounds the isotope characteristics of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposit of Shihongtan in the southwestern part of Turpan-Hami basin. The results suggest that uranium mineralization age of 48 ± 2 Ma and 28 ± 4 Ma are obtained. The ages of the porphyritic granite and gneissic granite from the southwestern area are 422 ± 5 Ma and 268 ± 23 Ma. The U-Pb age of clastic zircons from ore-bearing sandstone is 283 ± 67 Ma, which is corresponding to the age of gneissic granite of the provenance area indicating the material source of uraniferous sandstone.Based. The sources are uraniferous sandstone accumulated during the deposition and the uranium leached from provenance area rocks by weathering. (authors)

  8. Tectono-sedimentary evolution of Erlian basin since late mesozoic and sandstone-hosted uranium metallogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Sanyuan; Qin Mingkuan; Li Yuexiang; He Zhongbo; Chen Anping; Shen Kefeng; Cao Jianying

    2006-01-01

    Various mineral resources in a basin are associated with its tectono-sedimentary evolution. Based on the analysis of the tectono-sedimentary evolution of Erlian basin, three evolutional stages of Erlian basin are classified, they are: the continental extensional down-faulting stage, the transitional stage from down-faulting to down-warping in Early Cretaceous, and slightly compressional differentiated uplifting-subsidence since Late Cretaceous. According to the mechanism of sandstone-hosted uranium metallogenesis it is suggested that the grey clastic rock series deposited at the stage of down-faulting down-warping transition must be the important target for uranium prospecting, and the differentiated uplifting-subsidence offers necessary conditions for sandstone-hosted uranium ore-formation. Then, types of uranium mineralization that could occur in Erlian basin are discussed, and uranium metallogenic model has been preliminarily summarized. (authors)

  9. Analysis on metallogenetic conditions of sandstone-type uranium deposit in Minhe Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Minzhong; Wang Huaiwu

    2002-01-01

    Little uranium prospecting has been performed so far in Minhe basin. However, at the marginal areas of the basin uranium mineralizations and lots of aero-radioactive anomalies have been found before, and the basin shows some prospecting potential. Based on the regional geological setting, by means of interpretation of high-precision aero-magnetic, aero-radiometric and Bouguer gravimetric data, and combined with hydrodynamic, lithofacies-palaeographic and paleo-climatic analyses, authors make a comprehensive evaluation of metallogenic conditions for sandstone-type uranium deposits, and propose metallogenically favourable areas in the basin

  10. Characteristics and model of sandstone type uranium deposit in south of Songliao basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wenbin; Yu Zhenqing

    2010-01-01

    Through analyzing the uranium deposit tectonic environment, upper cretaceous sequence stratigraphy, depositional system, evolutionary characteristics of sand bodies, the effect of subsequent transformation and the characteristic of uranium deposit, the sandstone type uranium deposit in southern basin is different from typical interlayer oxidation zone sandstone type uranium deposit. The formation and evolution of sandstone-type uranium deposit are controlled by structure fensters; the favorable sedimentary facies type is braided river facies, and the ore body is braided river sand body. The size of uranium deposits is controlled by the local oxidation zone with the characteristics of sandstone type uranium deposit in partial oxidation zone. Uranium ore bodies which distribute in the roof wings of structure fenstes, and occur in gray layers between the upper and lower oxidation zone, showing tabular, and the plate of uranium ore body is controlled by the local oxidation zone. Based on the geological features of sandstone-type uranium deposits, the metallogenic model of local oxidation zones sandstone-type uranium deposits has been set up in the south of Songliao Baisn. (authors)

  11. Prospect analysis for sandstone-type uranium mineralization in the northern margin of Qaidam basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lin; Song Xiansheng; Feng Wei; Song Zhe; Li Wei

    2010-01-01

    Affected by the regional geological structural evolution, a set of sedimentary structure, i.e. the construction of coal-bearing classic rocks which is in favor of the sandstone-type uranium mineralization has deposited in the northern margin of Qaidam Basin since Meso-Cenozoic. A NWW thrust nappe tectonic belt, i.e. the ancient tectonic belt which is the basis for the development of ancient interlayer oxidation zone formed by the tectonic reverse in late Jurassic and Cretaceous. The Mid and late Jurassic layer was buried by the weak extension in Paleogene and the depression in early Neogene. The extrusion reversal from late Neogene to Quaternary made the basin into the development era of the modern interlayer oxidation zone. It can be concluded that the layer of the northern margin of Qaidam Basin has the premise for the formation of sandstone-type uranium ore. Based on the analysis of the characteristics of the thrust belt, the structure of the purpose layer, the sand body, the hydrogeology, the interlayer oxidation zone and uranium mineralization, the results indicated that the ancient interlayer oxidation zone is the prospecting type of sandstone-type uranium ore. Beidatan and the east of Yuqia are the favorable prospective area of sandstone-type uranium mineralization. (authors)

  12. Ferroan dolomite cement in Cambrian sandstones: burial history and hydrocarbon generation of the Baltic sedimentary basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliaupa, S.; Cyziene, J.; Molenaar, Nicolaas

    2008-01-01

    The conditions and timing of carbonate cementation in Cambrian sandstones of the Baltic sedimentary basin were determined by oxygen and carbon stable isotope and chemical data in combination with optical and cathodoluminescence petrographic studies. Studied samples represent a range in present...... burial depth from 340 to 2150 m. The carbonate cement is dominantly ferroan dolomite that occurs as dispersed patches of poikilotopic crystals. Temperatures of dolomite precipitation, based on delta O-18 values, range from 27 degrees C in the shallow buried to 95 degrees C in the deep buried sandstones...

  13. Application potential of sequence stratigraphy to prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposit in continental depositional basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shengxiang; Chen Zhaobo; Chen Zuyi; Xiang Weidong; Cai Yuqi

    2001-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy has been widely used in hydrocarbon exploration and development, and great achievements have been achieved. However, its application to the prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits is just beginning. The metallogenic characteristics of sandstone-type uranium deposits and those of oil and gas are compared, and the relationship between sandstone-type uranium metallogenesis and the system tracts of sequence stratigraphy is studied. The authors propose that highest and system tracts are the main targets for prospecting interlayer oxidation zone type sandstone uranium deposits, and the incised valleys of low stand system tracts are favourable places for phreatic oxidation zone type sandstone uranium deposits, and transgressive system tracts are generally unfavorable to the formation of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits. Finally, the authors look ahead the application potential of sequence stratigraphy to the prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits in continental depositional basins

  14. Study on integrated evaluation of sandstone-hosted uranium metallogenic potential in southern Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Shaoyang; Ke Dan; Xu Jianguo; Zheng Enjiu; Li Shengxiang

    2008-01-01

    Plenty of geological data have been accumulated during mineral resource survey in China; under the guidance of new metallogenic theories, it is an important task of how to use these data most effectively for the new cycle uranium survey. In this paper, the flow of establishing the integrated mineral deposits prospecting model for sandstone-hosted uranium deposits is put forward. Based on studying geologic, hydrogeologic and regional geophysical field characteristics of representative uranium deposits No. 512 in southern Yili basin, its multi-source information descriptive model has been established, from which 512-type integrated prospecting models of sandstone-hosted uranium orefield and deposits are summarized. According to the established integrated prospecting models, the metallogenic information extraction of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits has completed in the study area. Finally, the integrated quantitative evaluation of sandstone-hosted uranium metallogenic potential is performed by using the evidence weighing method to integrate middle scale multi-source metallogenic information in the southern Yili basin, and good prediction effect is obtained. (authors)

  15. Study on metallogenetic prospect of interlayer oxidation zone sandstone type uranium deposit in Shanganning basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinping

    1998-01-01

    As Compared with orogenic zone basin, which the interlayer oxidation zone sandstone type uranium deposits are found, the Shanganning basin a continental platform type basin is distinct either in the geodynamic background and the post-basin hydrogeological evolution or in the appearance of the metallogenetic dynamics-orogenesis. The prediction criteria summarized for interlayer oxidation zone type U-deposits in Middle Asia therefore can not be completely applied in such a basin. Based on analysis of the typical regional geological setting, the hydrogeology of the Meso-Cenozoic cover is studied in detail. Three hydrogeological cycles have been divided, and prospects of uranium deposits have been clarified and the most promising target have been proposed

  16. Preliminary study on features of mineralogical zoning of epigenetic alteration at sandstone-type uranium deposit, Dongsheng area, Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xinjian; Li Ziying; Chen Anping

    2004-01-01

    Sandstone-type uranium deposits located in Dongsheng area, northern Ordos basin, occur in Zhiluo Formation, Middle Jurassic. The Zhiluo Formation is divided into two members. The lower member is further divided into two submembers. The lower submember is dominantly composed of grey sandstone being the ore-hosting horizon; the upper submember consists of grey-green sandstone and mudstone. The upper member of Zhiluo Formation is made of mottled medium-fine grained sandstone and mudstone. Through the microscopic observation and study on sandstones of Zhiluo Formation, authors have established a vertical zonation of epigenetic alteration (from the top to the bottom): the limonitization + clayization + carbonation in the mottled fine-grained sandstone of the upper member of Zhiluo Formation; the green alteration (II) (mainly the chloritization of biotite, as well as the chloritization and epidotization of feldspar) + clayization + carbonation in the grey-green sandstone of the upper submember of the lower member of Zhiluo Formation; and the green alteration (I) (mainly the epidotization of feldspar) + carbonation in grey, grey-white sandstone of the lower submember. The epigenetic alteration basically occurs in grey-green sandstone. The sandstone shows grey-green color because it contains much green biotite (not chlorite). The epigenetic alteration in sandstone layer is closely associated with the uranium ore-formation

  17. Reservoir heterogeneity in carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-06-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  18. Metallogenic geologic conditions and prospecting direction of sandstone type uranium mineralizations in Yili basin of Xinjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daisheng; Wang Ruiying; Li Shengxiang; Zhang Kefang

    1994-09-01

    Yili basin is a Mesozoic down-warped basin superimposed on the late Paleozoic volcanic taphrogenic basin. Uranium mineralizations are hosted in the Middle-Lower Jurassic coal-bearing series. The depositions environment in the basin is turbulent in the east and relatively stable in the west. It is characterized by coarse-grained sequence with thin thickness in the eastern part and fine-grained with thick thickness in the western part. On the analytical basis of sedimentary facies indices, it is the first time to present a sedimentary model of 'alluvial fan-braided stream-(narrow) lakeshore delta-lacustrine facies and marsh facies' for the coal-bearing series. The authors have summarized the basic geologic features of U-mineralizations in the interlayer oxidation zone, analyzed the difference and cause of U-mineralizations between the south and north, as well as the east and west. The genetic mechanism of U-mineralizations in the basin is discussed. Finally, seven items of geologic prerequisites for the formation of in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits have been suggested and the potential of sandstone type U-mineralizations in the basin has been evaluated. Four promising target areas are selected

  19. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  20. Application of comprehensive geophysical methods to prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposit in Bayanmaodu basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yifeng; Sun Zexuan; Chen Zhiguo; He Tao; Li Guoxin

    2003-01-01

    By using comprehensive geophysical methods including magnetic survey, resistivity sounding, self potential survey, 210 Po survey etc., the shape and the depth of the basement, the structure of the sedimentary cover, characteristics of prospecting target horizon, the development of interlayer oxidation zone at depth, as well as the information of uranium mineralization have been basically revealed, thus providing a basis for the prospect evaluation of sandstone-type uranium mineralization in the basin

  1. Analysis on depositional system and prospect of sandstone-type uranium deposits of Bayanhua formation in Yilemen basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zexuan; Li Guoxin; He Fayang; Wei Yunjie

    2002-01-01

    Yilemen basin is a typical Mesozoic intra-mountain one. The author analyses characteristics of depositional system and the prospect of sandstone-type uranium deposit in the sedimentary cover of the Bayanhua Formation, Lower Cretaceous. Authors suggest that the conglomerate, sandstone-conglomerate and sandstone beds of braided stream and delta are favourable horizons for locating phreatic and interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits, i.e. the northwestern side of Dalai uplifted zone, the Chagantaigebuqi narrow sag, and the southern area of Baolinbuqi

  2. Trap architecture of the Early Cretaceous Sarir Sandstone in the eastern Sirt Basin, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gras, R. [Schlumberger GeoQuest, Cedex (France); Thusu, B. [Arabian Gulf Oil Company, Benghazi (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1998-12-31

    The Sarir Sandstone is the principal reservoir for oil accumulations in the eastern Sirt Basin in Libya. The main phase of the rifting in this area took place in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, during which time the Sarir Sandstone was deposited as a non-marine, intra-continental clastic syn-rift sequence. Although successfully explored from 1959 onwards, the prolific eastern Sirt Basin is in a relatively immature stage of exploration regarding wildcat drilling and 3D seismic data acquisition. The most recent phase of exploration, utilizing 3D seismic techniques, revealed a complex structural development. The trap geometries are often related to E-W trending, basement-controlled fault systems, oblique to the NNW-SSE Sirt Basin trend. The fault systems were active during the Sarir Sandstone deposition, giving rise to structural as well as combined structural-traps. An increased understanding of trap architecture has led to both re-evaluation of older fields and new discoveries. (author)

  3. A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks [Part 1 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyler, Beverly; Harris, David; Keith, Brian; Huff, Bryan; Lasemi, Yaghoob

    2008-06-30

    Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

  4. Surface-water-quality assessment of the upper Illinois River basin in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin; project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mades, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986, the U.S. Geological Survey began a National Water-Quality Assessment program to (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of the current status of water quality for a large, diverse, and geographically distributed part of the Nation's surface- and ground-water resources; (2) define, where possible, trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relations of both status and trends in water quality to natural factors and the history of land use and land- and waste-management activities. The program is presently in a pilot phase that will test and modify, as necessary, concepts and approaches in preparation for possible full implementation of the program in the future. The upper Illinois River basin is one of four basins selected to test the concepts and approaches of the surface-water-quality element of the national program. The basin drains 10,949 square miles of Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin. Three principal tributaries are the Kankakee and Des Plaines Rivers that join to form the Illinois River and the Fox River. Land use is predominantly agricultural; about 75 percent of the basin is cultivated primarily for production of corn and soybeans. About 13 percent of the basin is urban area, most of which is located in the Chicago metropolitan area. The population of the basin is about 7 million. About 6 million people live in the Des Plaines River basin. Many water-quality issues in the upper Illinois River basin are related to sediment, nutrients, potentially toxic inorganic and organic constituents, and to water-management practices. Occurrence of sediment and the chemical constituents in the rivers and lakes within the basin has the potential to adversely affect the water's suitability for aquatic life, recreation, or, through the consumption of fish, human health. The upper Illinois River basin project consists of five major activities. The first activity--analysis of existing information and preparation of a report that describes

  5. Fission track dating of mesozoic sandstones and its tectonic significance in the Eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Chuanbo; Mei Lianfu; Xu Sihuang

    2009-01-01

    To establish the tectonic evolution of the eastern Sichuan basin, apatite fission track dating and time-temperature thermal history modeling were carried to analyze on 11 samples collected from Jurassic sandstones. The results indicate that the cooling and exhumation process of the eastern Sichuan basin can be divided into three stages since Cretaceous, (1) a rapid cooling phase between ∼100 and ∼70 Ma, (2) following by a period of relative thermal stability phase between ∼70 and ∼15 Ma, (3) and then a new rapid cooling stage after ∼15 Ma. Two rapid cooling events imply that the eastern Sichuan basin once underwent two tectonic movements since Cretaceous. The first rapid cooling is associated with Mesozoic tectonic reactivation beginning at 100 Ma, which result in folds and faults of the eastern Sichuan basin. The second tectonic movement occurred at 15 Ma, which is related to denudation by compression resulting from the eastward growth of Tibetan plateau uplift.

  6. Application research on remote sensing geology of sandstone-type uranium deposit in Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Huaiwu

    2002-01-01

    Based on remote sensing images and practical materials, and new ideas of laying particular emphasis on the research of regional geologic structures, and large in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits, applying the theory of plate tectonics, the author makes a comprehensive analysis on the uranium metallogenic environments, characteristics of regional geologic structures, the ore-controlling mechanism and factors, and uranium metallogeny. Authors propose that large interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits are controlled by the combination of the stable block in Meso-Cenozoic compressive-shearing faulted subsided basin on the Yili multiphase massif in Tianshan paleo-island arc system, and the specific paleo-geographic environments and its' structural terrace'. The origin of hydrogenic sandstone-type uranium deposits is summarized by the authors as the 'mixing and neutralization' genetic model, and the 'eight ore-controlling factors merge into an organic whole' prospecting model. The above mentioned provides clear prospecting direction and new ideas for the forecasting direction for prospecting large sandstone-type uranium deposits

  7. Analysis of metallogenic conditions of sandstone type uranium deposits in interlayer oxidation zone in the northwest of Junggar basin, Xinjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shuangxing

    1997-01-01

    From various aspects such as the basin structures, structure features of the sedimentary cover, lithofacies features of basin sediments, geochemical characteristics of sedimentary rocks, regional hydrogeologic conditions and epigenetic reworking of the sedimentary cover and so on, the author analyzes the metallogenic conditions of sandstone type uranium deposits in interlayer oxidation zone in the northwest of Junggar basin. The author proposes that the area has abundant uranium sources, and possesses favourable stratigraphic combinations for the development of interlayer oxidation zone. Secondarily oxidized sandstone bodies present universally at places from the source area to stream channel facies. Reducing beds and secondarily reducing barrier are developed at the front of the secondarily oxidized sandstone body. The tectonic features of the sedimentary cover indicate that the area belongs to a relatively-stable suborogenic region and possesses secondary mobilization and reworking conditions during the uplifting and contraction stage of the basin. Epigenetic metallization is evident in the sedimentary cover of the basin

  8. Proterozoic structure, cambrian rifting, and younger faulting as revealed by a regional seismic reflection network in the Southern Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, C.J.; Drahovzal, James A.; Sargent, M.L.; McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Four high-quality seismic reflection profiles through the southern Illinois Basin, totaling 245 km in length, provide an excellent regional subsurface stratigraphic and structural framework for evaluation of seismic risk, hydrocarbon occurrence, and other regional geologic studies. These data provide extensive subsurface information on the geometry of the intersection of the Cambrian Reelfoot and Rough Creek rifts, on extensive Proterozoic reflection sequences, and on structures (including the Fluorspar Area Fault Complex and Hicks Dome) that underlie a transitional area between the well-defined New Madrid seismic zone (to the southwest) and a more diffuse area of seismicity in the southern Illinois Basin. Our principal interpretations from these data are listed here in order of geologic age, from oldest to youngest: 1. Prominent Proterozoic layering, possibly equivalent to Proterozoic (???1 Ga) Middle Run Formation clastic strata and underlying (1.3-1.5 Ga) volcanic rocks of the East Continent rift basin, has been strongly deformed, probably as part of the Grenville foreland fold and thrust belt. 2. A well-defined angular unconformity is seen in many places between Proterozoic and Cambrian strata; a post-Grenville Proterozoic sequence is also apparent locally, directly beneath the base of the Cambrian. 3. We infer a major reversal in Cambrian rift polarity (accommodation zone) in the Rough Creek Graben in western Kentucky. 4. Seismic facies analysis suggests the presence of basin-floor fan complexes at and near the base of the Cambrian interval and within parts of a Proterozoic post-Grenville sequence in several parts of the Rough Creek Graben. 5. There is an abrupt pinchout of the Mount Simon Sandstone against crystalline basement beneath the Dale Dome (near the Texaco no. 1 Cuppy well, Hamilton County) in southeastern Illinois, and a more gradual Mount Simon pinchout to the southeast. 6. Where crossed by the seismic reflection line in southeast Illinois, some

  9. Remote sensing technology prospecting methods of interlayer oxidation zone type sandstone uranium deposit in Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xianfang; Huang Shutao; Pan Wei; Feng Jie; Liu Dechang; Zhang Jingbo; Xuan Yanxiu; Rui Benshan

    1998-12-01

    Taking Yili Basin as an example, remote sensing technology and method of interlayer oxidation zone type sandstone uranium deposit have systematically been summarized. Firstly, principle, methods and procedures of the second development of scientific experimental satellite photograph have been elaborated in detail. Three dimensional stereo simulation, display, and multi-parameters extraction have been recommended. Secondarily, the research is focused on prospective section image features in different type images and their geological implications and on establishing recognition keys of promising areas. Finally, based on above research results, three graded predictions, i.e. regional prospect, promising sections and favourable location in the deposit have been made step by step and reconnaissance and prospecting range are gradually reduced. The practice has indicated that breakthrough progress has been made in application to prospect prognosis of interlayer oxidation zone type sandstone uranium deposit and good verified results have been obtained

  10. A special kind of sandstone-type uranium deposit related to Jurassic palaeochannel systems in the northeastern Ordos Basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ziying; Fang Xiheng; Xia Yuliang; Sun Ye; Jiao Yangquan; Chen Anping; Zhang Ke

    2010-01-01

    Dongsheng sandstone-type uranium deposit is a large one discovered in recent years in the northeastern Ordos Basin, China. It is a special kind of sandstone-type uranium deposit,different from other ordinary sandstone-type deposits because of its unique signatures. It is generally controlled by a transitional zone between greenish and grayish sandstones, both of those two kinds of sandstones now indicate reduced geochemical environments. The greenish color of the palaeo-oxidized sandstones mainly results from chloritization and epidotization related to oil and gas secondary reduction processes. The deposit genetically is different from ordinary sandstone uranium deposits,which is of more complex origin,undergoing not only palaeo-oxidization mineralization process, but also oil-gas fluid and hydrothermal reworking processes. It is spatially related to Jurassic Zhiluo Formation with braided palaeo channel systems. The uranium mineralization zone with higher grade usually exists in the branching area of the distributary channels of main braided streams, whose sandstone heterogeneity shows a transfer sedimentary facies from the braided stream sedimentary system to the braided delta sedimentary system. Statistical results show that medium and fine-grained sandstones are the most favorable rock types for uranium mineralization. (authors)

  11. Early Cretaceous marine sediments of the Lower Saxony Basin. The Gildehaus Sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellepiane, S.; Weiel, D. [Wintershall Holding GmbH, Barnstorf (Germany); Gerwert, D.; Mutterlose, J. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geologie, Mineralogie und Geophysik

    2013-08-01

    During the Early Cretaceous (Berriasian - Aptian) the Lower Saxony Basin (LSB) formed the southernmost extension of the North Sea Basin. Sedimentation patterns of the LSB were controlled by divergent dextral shear movement causing differential subsidence related to early rifting in the North Sea. Up to 2000m of fine grained mudstones accumulated in the basin centre, while marginal marine, coarser grained siliciclastics were deposited along the western and southern margins of the LSB. The western marginal facies, outcropping along the Dutch-German border, is characterised by shallow marine sandstones of Valanginian - Hauterivian age. These units, which are separated by clay rich intervals, include the Bentheim Sdst., the Dichotomites Sdst., the Grenz Sdst., the Noricum Sdst. and the Gildehaus Sdst. These sandstones form a series of overall backstepping units, controlled by a main transgressive trend. Economically important are the Bentheim Sdst. and the Gildehaus Sdst., with a long oil producing history. The Bentheim Sdst. (early Valanginian) has been interpreted as an overall retrograding unit related to an incised valley infill with material mainly coming from the South. Tidal processes dominated the deposition of the Bentheim Sdst. The origin and genesis of the Gildehaus Sdst. (mid Hauterivian) is, however, less well understood. Here we present data from two wells drilled to the Gildehaus Sdst. (Emlichheim oil field) which provide evidence for a two fold subdivision of the unit. A well sorted massive quartz sandstone is followed by an interval composed of reworked coarse clastics of massflow origin. Micropalaeontological evidence suggests a fully marine, hemi-pelagic origin of the mud dominated matrix throughout the Gildehaus Sdst. These findings indicate a depositional environment quite different from that of the Bentheim Sdst. Short termed pulses of substantial input of clastic material from two different sources in the West to Southwest punctuated the overall

  12. Application of anatectic mineralization to prospecting in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium ore in South Songliao Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhonghua

    2001-01-01

    The deep ore-forming origin is a new theory for prospecting in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium. Tectonics, lithologic and geochemistry are basic forecasting criteria. Previous unconsolidated sand, source area and geochemical barrier are three essential conditions for forming uranium deposit. Metallogenic environment and prospective region are found. Tertiary system is prospective layer for prospecting in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium ore in south Songliao Basin

  13. Diagenetic history of the Surma Group sandstones (Miocene) in the Surma Basin, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Julleh Jalalur; McCann, Tom

    2012-02-01

    This study examines the various diagenetic controls of the Miocene Surma Group sandstones encountered in petroleum exploration wells from the Surma Basin, which is situated in the northeastern part of the Bengal Basin, Bangladesh. The principal diagenetic minerals/cements in the Surma Group sandstones are Fe-carbonates (with Fe-calcite dominating), quartz overgrowths and authigenic clays (predominantly chlorite, illite-smectite and minor kaolin). The isotopic composition of the carbonate cement revealed a narrow range of δ 18O values (-10.3‰ to -12.4‰) and a wide range of δ 13C value (+1.4‰ to -23.1‰). The δ 13C VPDB and δ 18O VPDB values of the carbonate cements reveal that carbon was most likely derived from the thermal maturation of organic matter during burial, as well as from the dissolution of isolated carbonate clasts and precipitated from mixed marine-meteoric pore waters. The relationship between the intergranular volume (IGV) versus cement volume indicates that compaction played a more significant role than cementation in destroying the primary porosity. However, cementation also played a major role in drastically reducing porosity and permeability in sandstones with poikilotopic, pore-filling blocky cements formed in early to intermediate and deep burial areas. In addition to Fe-carbonate cements, various clay minerals including illite-smectite and chlorite occur as pore-filling and pore-lining authigenic phases. Significant secondary porosity has been generated at depths from 2500 m to 4728 m. The best reservoir rocks found at depths of 2500-3300 m are well sorted, relatively coarse grained; more loosely packed and better rounded sandstones having good porosities (20-30%) and high permeabilities (12-6000 mD). These good quality reservoir rocks are, however, not uniformly distributed and can be considered to be compartmentalized as a result of interbedding with sandstone layers of low to moderate porosities, low permeabilities owing to poor

  14. Geological characteristics and prospecting potential of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the north margin of Qaidam basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lin; Song Xiansheng; Feng Wei

    2012-01-01

    The north margin of Qaidam Basin is composed with rift trough and Oulongbuluke landmass which is clamped by Qilian Mountain and Qaidam block Suture zone. The two activities provide a rich source of uranium for the basin area. The coal-bearing rocks as stratums of medium and lower Jurassic, is the main exploration target zones of sandstone-type uranium ore. Through geological survey and drilling, we think that the interlayer oxidation zone. being primary factors of sandstone-type uranium, can be divided into ancient type and modern type. The ancient interlayer oxidation zone type uranium deposit is the main prospecting types in the north margin of Qaidam Basin. Combined with analysis on geological conditions of sandstone-type uranium mineralization, we propose that eastern edge of Yuqia, southern edge of Lucao Mountain, Beidatan and northwest edge of Ulan depression are good prospects. (authors)

  15. Genetic models and their impact on uranium exploration in the Athabasca sandstone basin, Saskatchewan, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strnad, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    While the Beaverlodge area of Northern Saskatchewan became an important uranium-producing district during the 1950s, the Athabasca sandstone basin, located in the immediate vicinity, was considered to be non-prospective in Canada's regional assessment. Twenty years later, with the introduction of the supergene model into the basin's exploration strategy, the favourability of the host-rock for uranium deposits was shown. However, in some instances the search for local targets was enriched by implementing non-supergene models. Most geologists originally favoured the Middle Proterozoic (sub-Helikian) unconformity as a unique ore-controlling feature. Later, the concept of Lower Proterozoic (Aphebian) syngenetic protore, as represented by graphite-bearing strata in Archaean proximity, was added. In the author's view the combination of these factors is productive only within specialized segments of Archaean-Lower Proterozoic (Archaean-Aphebian) contact zones. (author)

  16. The Collyhurst Sandstone as a secondary storage unit for CCS in the East Irish Sea Basin (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, D.; Williams, J. D. O.; Kirk, K.; Gent, C. M. A.; Bentham, M.; Schofield, D. I.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is key technology for low-carbon energy and industry. The UK hosts a large CO2 storage potential offshore with an estimated capacity of 78 Gt. The East Irish Sea Basin (EISB) is the key area for CCS in the western UK, with a CO2 storage potential of 1.7 Gt in hydrocarbon fields and in saline aquifers within the Triassic Sherwood Sandstone Formation. However, this theoretical storage capacity does not consider the secondary storage potential in the lower Permian Collyhurst Sandstone Formation. 3D seismic data were used to characterise the Collyhurst Sandstone Formation in the EISB. On the southern basin domain, numerous fault-bound blocks limit the lateral continuity of the sandstone strata, while on the northern domain the sandstones are intersected by less faults. The caprock for the Collyhurst sandstones is variable. The Manchester Marls predominate in the south, transitioning to the St. Bees evaporites towards the north. The evaporites in the EISB cause overburden faults to terminate or detach along Upper Permian strata, limiting the deformation of the underlying reservoir units. Five main storage closures have been identified in the Permian strata. In the southern and central area these are predominantly fault bounded, occurring at depths over 1000m. Despite the higher Collyhurst sandstone thickness in the southern IESB, the dolomitic nature of the caprock constitutes a storage risk in this area. Closures in the northern area are deeper (around 2000-2500m) and wider, reaching areas of 34Km2, and are overlain by evaporitic caprocks. The larger Collyhurst closures to the north underlie large Triassic fields with high storage potential. The spatial overlap favours storage plans including secondary storage units in the EISB. The results of this work also expand the understanding of prospective areas for CO2 sequestration in the East Irish Sea Basin in locations where the primary Sherwood Sandstone Formation is either too shallow

  17. Metallogenic geologic prerequisites of sandstone-type uranium deposits and target area selection. Taking Erlian and Ordos basins as examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fazheng

    2002-01-01

    Sandstone-type uranium deposit is the main target of recent uranium prospecting and exploration. According to the metallogenic characteristics, sandstone-type uranium deposits are divided into three groups: paleo-channel type, interlayer oxidation zone type and phreatic interlayer oxidation type. The author makes an analysis on the geologic prerequisites of the three types of uranium deposits, the similarities and difference, and preliminarily summarizes genetic models of different types of uranium deposits. Finally, taking Erlian and Ordos basins as examples, the author makes an evaluation and a strategic analysis on the uranium metallogenic prospect of the above two basins

  18. Dzhezkazgan and associated sandstone copper deposits of the Chu-Sarysu basin, Central Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Stephen E.; Seltmann, Reimar; Zientek, Michael L.; Syusyura, Boris; Creaser, Robert A.; Dolgopolova, Alla

    2012-01-01

    Sandstone-hosted copper (sandstone Cu) deposits occur within a 200-km reach of the northern Chu-Sarysu basin of central Kazakhstan (Dzhezkazgan and Zhaman-Aibat deposits, and the Zhilandy group of deposits). The deposits consist of Cu sulfide minerals as intergranular cement and grain replacement in 10 ore-bearing members of sandstone and conglomerate within a 600- to 1,000-m thick Pennsylvanian fluvial red-bed sequence. Copper metal content of the deposits ranges from 22 million metric tons (Mt, Dzehzkazgan) to 0.13Mt (Karashoshak in the Zhilandy group), with average grades of 0.85 to 1.7% Cu and significant values for silver (Ag) and rhenium (Re). Broader zones of iron reduction (bleaching) of sandstones and conglomerates of the red-bed sequence extend over 10 km beyond each of the deposits along E-NE-trending anticlines, which began to form in the Pennsylvanian. The bleached zones and organic residues within them are remnants of ormer petroleum fluid accumulations trapped by these anticlines. Deposit sites along these F1anticlines are localized at and adjacent to the intersections of nearly orthogonal N-NW-trending F2synclines. These structural lows served to guide the flow of dense ore brines across the petroleum-bearing anticlines, resulting in ore sulfide precipitation where the two fluids mixed. The ore brine was sourced either from the overlying Early Permian lacustrine evaporitic basin, whose depocenter occurs between the major deposits, or from underlying Upper Devonian marine evaporites. Sulfur isotopes indicate biologic reduction of sulfate but do not resolve whether the sulfate was contributed from the brine or from the petroleum fluids. New Re-Os age dates of Cu sulfides from the Dzhezkazgan deposit indicate that mineralization took place between 299 to 309 Ma near the Pennsylvanian-Permian age boundary. At the Dzhezkazgan and some Zhilandy deposits, F2fold deformation continued after ore deposition. Copper orebodies in Lower Permian

  19. Integrated prediction based on GIS for sandstone-type uranium deposits in the northwest of Ordos Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Shaoyang; Ke Dan; Hu Shuiqing; Guo Qingyin; Hou Huiqun

    2005-01-01

    The integrated prediction model of sandstone-type uranium deposits and its integrated evaluation methods as well as flow of the work based on GIS are studied. A software for extracting metallogenic information is also developed. A multi-source exploring information database is established in the northwest of Ordos Basin, and an integrated digital mineral deposit prospecting model of sandstone-type uranium deposits is designed based on GIS. The authors have completed metallogenic information extraction and integrated evaluation of sandstone-type uranium deposits based on GIS in the study area. Research results prove that the integrated prediction of sandstone-type uranium deposits based on GIS may further delineate prospective target areas rapidly and improve the predictive precision. (authors)

  20. Regional diagenesis of sandstone in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansley, P.L.

    1990-01-01

    The author reports that early authigenic mineral assemblages and vitroclastic textures are very well preserved in upper sandstones of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation. The distributions of the authigenic minerals were controlled, in part, by chemical gradients in a large saline, alkaline lake (Lake T'oo'dichi) that existed in late Morrison time. Sandstones on lake margins were cemented by smectite and silica, whereas sandstones nearer the lake center, in which waters were most saline and alkaline, were cemented by zeolites. Diagenetic alterations in sandstones were promoted by alkaline interstitial waters that emanated from adjacent fine-grained, tuffaceous lake beds. Metastable phases that precipitated first were replaced relatively quickly by more stable, ordered phases in the geochemically favorable environment of the closed basin setting. Elevation of temperatures above the geothermal gradient was proved by the influx of warm, deep-basin waters that locally modified early diagenetic assemblages during burial diagenesis. In organic- (and commonly also uranium ore-) bearing sandstones located primarily in the southern part of the basin, complex diagenetic assemblages resulted from water/rock reactions involving soluble organic complexes

  1. Tectonic and sedimentological environments of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits, with special reference to the Karoo Basin of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    The principal tectonic and sedimentological settings for sandstone-hosted uranium deposits are described. Back-arc basins filled with post-Silurian, fluvial sediments bordering subduction zone magmatic arcs of calc-alkaline composition are considered favourable tectonic environments. The basins should be closed to prevent excessive oxidation of the sediments. Uranium deposits are concentrated near basin rims in the transition zone between uplift and basin subsidence, because of favourable sedimentary facies in those areas. Syn- and post-depositional deformation could have affected the localisation of uranium ore-bodies, while intrusive centres or uplifted arcs commonly have surrounding aprons of potential host rocks. Stratigraphic zoning is also related to source area tectonics and can be used to predict favourable sedimentary environments. Sedimentological processes had a direct influence on the permeability and carbonaceous matter content of sandstones and therefore have often controlled the localisation of ore-bodies. (author)

  2. Application of soil radon survey to searching for sandstone-type uranium deposit at western margin of Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hanbin; Yin Jinshuang; Cui Yonghui

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of condition tests of soil radon survey at certain uranium deposit in Ordos basin, regional soil radon survey was carried but in a study area of western margin of Ordos basin. By processing of soil radon survey data, five anomalous areas with certain metallogenic potential have been delineated. Then, discovered anomalies have been interpreted and evaluated for providing important reference for further drilling work. Research results indicate that by soil radon survey, anomalies may be distinguished in a basin, and soil radon survey could be an important geochemical prospecting method for rapid evaluation of sandstone-type uranium deposit in basin areas. (authors)

  3. An evaluation of the carbon sequestration potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leetaru, Hannes [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The studies summarized herein were conducted during 2009–2014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), a practice called CO2 sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy-funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional-scale and point-scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo-engineering information was developed through a small-scale test of CO2 injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial-scale flow rate of CO2 injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial-scale mass of CO2 (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO2 within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS-related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional-scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial-scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in

  4. Cyclicity recorded in the provenance sandstones in the sedimentary in fill of the Cameros basin (N. Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Acebron, L.; Arribas, J.; Omodeo-Sale, S.; Arribas, E.; Le Pera, E.; Mas, R.; Lopez-Elorza, M.; Fernandez-Diaz, P. R.

    2013-06-01

    The intra plate Cameros rift basin in the north of Spain was formed came into being between the Tithonian and the Early Albian and contains 9 000 m of mostly continental sediments. This basin is a good example of cyclicity of different depositional sequences (DSs) in sedimentary environments, which show clear repetition in their sandstone composition (petrofacies) and diagenetic patterns. The DSs are arranged in two mega sequences (MSs) separated by a tectonic unconformity. A similar vertical sandstone compositional evolution, subdivided into two stages that repeat cyclically, has been recognised in both MSs: the first comprises quartzo-sedimentolithic petrofacies and the second is made up of several quartzo-feldspathic petrofacies. This was caused by a progression from the recycling of the pre-rift sedimentary cover to the erosion of the mainly plutonic and metamorphic crystalline basement. These changes in the erosion of the different source areas were conditioned by the tectonics of the basin. Furthermore, the original sandstone framework composition conditioned the diagenetic pattern of the two stages: quartzo-sedimentolithic sandstones containing large amounts of very pervasive carbonate cement that reduce their original porosity considerably, and quartzo-feldspathic petrofacies with a rigid framework that maintained the original pores during burial diagenesis. This compositional and diagenetic pattern is probably applicable to other non-volcanic rifted basins, depending upon the original amount of carbonate rock fragments present. (Author)

  5. Properties and durability assessment of glauconitic sandstone: A case study on Zamel sandstone from Bohemian Cretaceous Basin (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martinec, Petr; Vavro, M.; Ščučka, Jiří; Mašláň, M.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 115, 3/4 (2010), s. 175-181 ISSN 0013-7952 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP101/07/P512; GA ČR(CZ) GA103/07/1662 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : building stone * sandstone * physical properties Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.442, year: 2010 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science

  6. Multielement statistical evidence for uraniferous hydrothermal activity in sandstones overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shishi; Hattori, Keiko; Grunsky, Eric C.

    2018-04-01

    The Phoenix U deposit, with indicated resources of 70.2 M lb U3O8, occurs along the unconformity between the Proterozoic Athabasca Group sandstones and the crystalline basement rocks. Principal component analysis (PCA) is applied to the compositions of sandstones overlying the deposit. Among PCs, PC1 accounts for the largest variability of U and shows a positive association of U with rare earth elements (REEs) + Y + Cu + B + Na + Mg + Ni + Be. The evidence suggests that U was dispersed into sandstones together with these elements during the uraniferous hydrothermal activity. Uranium shows an inverse association with Zr, Hf, Th, Fe, and Ti. Since they are common in detrital heavy minerals, such heavy minerals are not the major host of U. The elements positively associated with U are high in concentrations above the deposit, forming a "chimney-like" or "hump-like" distribution in a vertical section. Their enrichment patterns are explained by the ascent of basement fluids through faults to sandstones and the circulation of basinal fluids around the deposit. The Pb isotope compositions of whole rocks are similar to expected values calculated from the concentrations of U, Th, and Pb except for sandstones close to the deposit. The data suggest that in situ decay of U and Th is responsible for the Pb isotope compositions of most sandstones and that highly radiogenic Pb dispersed from the deposit to the proximal sandstones long after the mineralization. This secondary dispersion is captured in PC8, which has low eigenvalue. The data suggests that the secondary dispersion has minor effect on the overall lithogeochemistry of sandstones.

  7. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation tight sandstones in the southern Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Kelai; Cao, Yingchang; Jahren, Jens; Zhu, Rukai; Bjørlykke, Knut; Haile, Beyene Girma; Zheng, Lijing; Hellevang, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation in the southern Songliao Basin is the typical tight oil sandstone in China. For effective exploration, appraisal and production from such a tight oil sandstone, the diagenesis and reservoir quality must be thoroughly studied first. The tight oil sandstone has been examined by a variety of methods, including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, fluorescence, electron probing analysis, fluid inclusion and isotope testing and quantitative determination of reservoir properties. The sandstones are mostly lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites with fine to medium grain size and moderate to good sorting. The sandstones are dominated by feldspar, quartz, and volcanic rock fragments showing various stages of disintegration. The reservoir properties are quite poor, with low porosity (average 8.54%) and permeability (average 0.493 mD), small pore-throat radius (average 0.206 μm) and high displacement pressure (mostly higher than 1 MPa). The tight sandstone reservoirs have undergone significant diagenetic alterations such as compaction, feldspar dissolution, quartz cementation, carbonate cementation (mainly ferrocalcite and ankerite) and clay mineral alteration. As to the onset time, the oil emplacement was prior to the carbonate cementation but posterior to the quartz cementation and feldspar dissolution. The smectite to illite reaction and pressure solution at stylolites provide a most important silica sources for quartz cementation. Carbonate cements increase towards interbedded mudstones. Mechanical compaction has played a more important role than cementation in destroying the reservoir quality of the K1q4 sandstone reservoirs. Mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite reduced the porosity and permeability significantly, while chlorite preserved the porosity and permeability since it tends to be oil wet so that later carbonate cementation can be inhibited to some extent. It is likely that the oil emplacement occurred

  8. Digitization of uranium deposit information in basin. A new strategy of ISL sandstone-type uranium deposits exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2006-01-01

    The discovered ISL sandstone-type uranium deposits in the entire world are mostly blind deposits, many of them occur in bleak desert, gobi desert, and semi-hilly land area. Exploration methods for these deposits mainly depend on great and systematic drilling. There are many large-medium size Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary basins in northern China, and over twenty of them are thick overburden basins which are mostly the virgin land for ISL sandstone-type uranium deposit. Due to the comprehensive national power, geological background, uranium exploration ability, great and systematic drilling is not favorable for prospecting ISL sandstone-type uranium deposit in China. According to the exploration and prospecting experiences for mineral ore bodies at home and abroad, uranium information mapping based on geochemical survey of the basins is a new strategy for ISL sandstone-type uranium deposits. It is an economic, practical, fast and effective method, and has been manifested by the performing information digitization for oil and gas resources, gold mineral resources in China and the mapping of uranium information for whole Europe continent. (authors)

  9. An analysis of prominent prospect of in-situ sandstone type uranium deposits in Yanji basins group, Jilin province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Zhidong; Zhang Shuyi

    2003-01-01

    In Mesozoic-Cenozoic era, many medium-small-sized sedimentary basins had been formed in Yanbian draped-faulted region of Jilin Province. The basement of these basins is constituted of U-riched granite body produced during late Hercynian-early Yanshan period. Uranium-mineralization has been found in coal-bearing formation, oil-bearing formation and in tint layer of red formation. On the bases of analyzing of uranium source, geologic tectonic, paleoclimatology, paleogeography, hydrogeology and reconstruction, it is concluded that there is a prominent prospect to discover large in-situ sandstone-type uranium deposits in Yanji basins. (authors)

  10. Geochemistry of vanadium in an epigenetic, sandstone-hosted vanadium- uranium deposit, Henry Basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanty, R.B.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Northrop, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    The epigenetic Tony M vanadium-uranium orebody in south-central Utah is hosted in fluvial sandstones of the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic). Measurements of the relative amounts of V+3 and V +4 in ore minerals show that V+3 is more abundant. Thermodynamic calculations show that vanadium was more likely transported to the site of mineralization as V+4. The ore formed as V+4 was reduced by hydrogen sulfide, followed by hydrolysis and precipitation of V+3 in oxide minerals or chlorite. Uranium was transported as uranyl ion (U+6), or some complex thereof, and reduced by hydrogen sulfide, forming coffinite. Detrital organic matter in the rocks served as the carbon source for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Vanadium most likely was derived from the dissolution of iron-titanium oxides. Uranium probably was derived from the overlying Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation. Previous studies have shown that the ore formed at the density-stratified interface between a basinal brine and dilute meteoric water. The mineralization processes described above occurred within the mixing zone between these two fluids. -from Authors

  11. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of Bhuban sandstones (Neogene), Titas Gas Field, Bengal Basin, Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminul Islam, M.

    2009-06-01

    This study deals with the diagenesis and reservoir quality of sandstones of the Bhuban Formation located at the Titas Gas Field of Bengal Basin. Petrographic study including XRD, CL, SEM and BSE image analysis and quantitative determination of reservoir properties were carried out for this study. The sandstones are fine to medium-grained, moderately well to well sorted subfeldspathic arenites with subordinate feldspathic and lithic arenites. The diagenetic processes include clay infiltration, compaction and cementation (quartz overgrowth, chlorite, kaolinite, calcite and minor amount of pyrite, dolomite and K-feldspar overgrowth). Quartz is the dominant pore occluding cement and generally occurred as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Pressure solution derived from grain contact is the main contributor of quartz overgrowths. Chlorite occurs as pore-lining and pore filling cement. In some cases, chlorite helps to retain porosity by preventing quartz overgrowth. In some restricted depth interval, pore-occlusion by calcite cement is very much intense. Kaolinite locally developed as vermiform and accelerated the minor porosity loss due to pore-occlusion. Kaolinite/chlorite enhances ineffective microporosity. Kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene or deeper Oligocene source rocks. The relation between diagenesis and reservoir quality is as follows: the initial porosity was decreased by compaction and cementation and then increased by leaching of the metastable grains and dissolution of cement. Good quality reservoir rocks were deposited in fluvial environment and hence quality of reservoir rocks is also environment selective. Porosity and permeability data exhibit good inverse correlation with cement. However, some data points indicate multiple controls on permeability. Reservoir quality is thus controlled by

  12. Hydrogeology of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone in the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, William L.; Kernodle, J.M.; Thorn, C.R.; Levings, G.W.; Craigg, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series resulting from the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer System Analysis (RASA) study of the San Juan structural basin that began in October 1984. The purposes of the study (Welder, 1986) are to: (1) Define and evaluate the aquifer system; (2) assess the effects of past, present, and potential ground-water use on aquifers and streams, and (3) determine the availability and quality of ground water. Previous reports in this series describe the hydrogeology of the Dakota Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1989), Gallup Sandstone (Kernodle and others, 1989), Morrison Formation (Dam and others, 1990), Point Lookout Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1990), Kirtland Shale and Fruitland Formation (Kernodle and others, 1990), Menefee Formation (Levings and others, 1990), Cliff House Sandstone (Thorn and others, 1990), and Ojo Alamo Sandstone (Thorn and others, 1990) in the San Juan structural basin. This report summarizes information on the geology and the occurrence and quality of water in the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, one of the primary water-bearing units in the regional aquifer system. Data used in this report were collected during the RASA study or derived from existing records in the U.S. Geological Survey's computerized National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, the Petroleum Information Corporation's data base, and the Dwight's ENERGYDATA Inc. BRIN database. Although all data available for the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone were considered in formulating the discussions in the text, not all those data could be plotted on the illustrations. The San Juan structural basin in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah has an area of about 21,600 square miles (fig. 1). The structural basin is about 140 miles wide and about 200 miles long. The study area is that part of the structural basin that contains rocks of Triassic and younger age; therefore, the study area is less extensive than the structural basin. Triassic through Tertiary

  13. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Finley

    2005-09-30

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline

  14. Water-quality assessment of the lower Illinois River Basin; environmental setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Kelly L.

    1998-01-01

    The lower Illinois River Basin (LIRB) encompasses 18,000 square miles of central and western Illinois. Historical and recent information from Federal, State, and local agencies describing the physiography, population, land use, soils, climate, geology, streamflow, habitat, ground water, water use, and aquatic biology is summarized to describe the environmental setting of the LIRB. The LIRB is in the Till Plains Section of the Central Lowland physiographic province. The basin is characterized by flat topography, which is dissected by the Illinois River. The drainage pattern of the LIRB has been shaped by many bedrock and glacial geologic processes. Erosion prior to and during Pleistocene time created wide and deep bedrock valleys. The thickest deposits and most major aquifers are in buried bedrock valleys. The Wisconsinan glaciation, which bisects the northern half of the LIRB, affects the distribution and characteristics of glacial deposits in the basin. Agriculture is the largest land use and forested land is the second largest land use in the LIRB. The major urban areas are near Peoria, Springfield, Decatur, and Bloomington-Normal. Soil type and distribution affect the amount of soil erosion, which results in sedimentation of lakes and reservoirs in the basin. Rates of soil erosion of up to 2 percent per year of farmland soil have been measured. Many of the 300 reservoirs, lakes, and wetlands are disappearing because of sedimentation resulting from agriculture activities, levee building, and urbanization. Sedimentation and the destruction of habitat appreciably affect the ecosystem. The Illinois River is a large river-floodplain ecosystem where biological productivity is enhanced by annual flood pulses that advance and retreat over the flood plain and temporarily expand backwater and flood-plain lakes. Ground-water discharge to streams affects the flow and water quality of the streams. The water budget of several subbasins show variability in ground

  15. Summer Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) species richness and community structure in the lower Illinois River basin of Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWalt, R.E.; Webb, D.W.; Harris, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) species richness is useful for monitoring stream health, but no published studies in Illinois quantitatively document EPT richness or assemblage structure. The objectives of this study were to characterize adult EPT richness and structure and relate these to relative water quality at eight stream sites (160-69,300 km3 area) in the lower Illinois River basin. Adults were ultra-violet light trapped in June, July, and August 1997. Nutrient enrichment by nitrate and nitrite nitrogen was strongly evident, especially in smaller drainages, while critical loss of stable habitat was observed in larger water bodies. Seventy EPT species were identified from 17,889 specimens. Trichoptera were by far the most speciose (41 species), followed by Ephemeroptera (26), and Plecoptera (3). Caddisflies also dominated species richness across sites, contributing 18.0 of the average 28.9 total EPT species collected. Site EPT richness varied significantly (F = 5.51, p = 0.003, df = 7), with smaller drainages supporting greater richness, generally. Differences were also evident for months (F = 21.7, p = 0.0001, df = 2), with June being lower (11.8 average) than either July (20.6) or August (18.1) values. Hilsenhoff biotic index (HBI) scores did not vary significantly across sites (F = 0.7, p = 0.7, df = 7), but were different across months (F = 5.4, p = 0.02, df = 2). June (4.23) and July (4.53) means were not different, but both were lower (of better quality) than August (5.33) scores. The relationship of EPT to HBI scores was not investigated statistically due to problems of sample size and interdependence of monthly samples, but graphical analysis suggested no consistent relationship. This suggested a decoupling of the HBI from the EPT and implied that the gain in taxonomic resolution achieved by using adults outstripped the resolution of the HBI. Use of the HBI to characterize adult aquatic insect communities is discouraged. New state

  16. Athabasca basin unconformity-type uranium deposits. A special class of sandstone-type deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeve, J.

    1980-01-01

    Two major episodes of uranium metallogenesis are recognized in Northern Saskatchewan. The first is of late-Hudsonian age and gave rise to metamorphic-hydrothermal pitchblende deposits of simple mineralogy at Beaverlodge (primary mineralization: 1780+-20 m.y.). The second and more important episode of approximately Grenvillian age rendered unconformity-type deposits in the Athabasca Basin (primary mineralization: 1000-1300 m.y.). The late-Hudsonian deposits at Beaverlodge were overprinted by this second event and new deposits of complex mineralogy were formed in that area. The metallogenetic importance of a third and much later episode which gave rise to mineralization within the Athabasca Formation is uncertain at the moment. With regards to metallogenesis of the unconformity-type deposits, presently available evidence favours a diagenetic-hydrothermal rather than a near-surface supergene or a magmatic/metamorphic hydrothermal model. The diagenetic-hydrothermal model relates uranium mineralization to 'red bed-type' diagenetic processes in the Athabasca Formation involving post-depositional oxidation and leaching, which continued for several hundred million years after deposition. Ore deposits were formed by interaction, under conditions of deep burial at elevated temperatures and pressures, of a uraniferous oxidizing Athabasca aquifer with reducing, graphite-bearing, metamorphic rocks of the basin floor. The large-scale convection required for such interaction may have been induced by mafic magmatic activity coeval with the episode of mineralization. The diagenetic-hydrothermal model displays close similarities with metallogenetic models developed for certain sandstone-type deposits. (author)

  17. Diagenetic Evolution and Reservoir Quality of Sandstones in the North Alpine Foreland Basin: A Microscale Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Doris; Grundtner, Marie-Louise; Misch, David; Riedl, Martin; Sachsenhofer, Reinhard F; Scheucher, Lorenz

    2015-10-01

    Siliciclastic reservoir rocks of the North Alpine Foreland Basin were studied focusing on investigations of pore fillings. Conventional oil and gas production requires certain thresholds of porosity and permeability. These parameters are controlled by the size and shape of grains and diagenetic processes like compaction, dissolution, and precipitation of mineral phases. In an attempt to estimate the impact of these factors, conventional microscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and wavelength dispersive element mapping were applied. Rock types were established accordingly, considering Poro/Perm data. Reservoir properties in shallow marine Cenomanian sandstones are mainly controlled by the degree of diagenetic calcite precipitation, Turonian rocks are characterized by reduced permeability, even for weakly cemented layers, due to higher matrix content as a result of lower depositional energy. Eocene subarkoses tend to be coarse-grained with minor matrix content as a result of their fluvio-deltaic and coastal deposition. Reservoir quality is therefore controlled by diagenetic clay and minor calcite cementation.Although Eocene rocks are often matrix free, occasionally a clay mineral matrix may be present and influence cementation of pores during early diagenesis. Oligo-/Miocene deep marine rocks exhibit excellent quality in cases when early cement is dissolved and not replaced by secondary calcite, mainly bound to the gas-water contact within hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  18. Characterizing near-surface CO2 conditions before injection - Perspectives from a CCS project in the Illinois Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, R.A.; Krapac, I.G.; Lewicki, J.L.; Curtis-Robinson, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is conducting a large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) project in Decatur, Illinois, USA to demonstrate the ability of a deep saline formation to store one million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) from an ethanol facility. Beginning in early 2011, CO2 will be injected at a rate of 1,000 tonnes/day for three years into the Mount Simon Sandstone at a depth of approximately 2,100 meters. An extensive Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) program has been undertaken for the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) and is focused on the 0.65 km2 project site. Goals include establishing baseline conditions to evaluate potential impacts from CO2 injection, demonstrating that project activities are protective of human health and the environment, and providing an accurate accounting of stored CO2. MVA efforts are being conducted pre-, during, and post- CO2 injection. Soil and net CO2 flux monitoring has been conducted for more than one year to characterize near-surface CO2 conditions. More than 2,200 soil CO2 flux measurements have been manually collected from a network of 118 soil rings since June 2009. Three ring types have been evaluated to determine which type may be the most effective in detecting potential CO 2 leakage. Bare soil, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm into the ground and were prepared to minimize surface vegetation in and near the rings. Bare soil, deep-depth rings were prepared similarly, but were driven 46 cm. Natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings were driven 8 cm and are most representative of typical vegetation conditions. Bare-soil, shallow-depth rings had the smallest observed mean flux (1.78 ??mol m-2 s-1) versus natural-vegetation, shallow-depth rings (3.38 ??mol m-2 s-1). Current data suggest bare ring types would be more sensitive to small CO2 leak signatures than natural ring types because of higher signal to noise ratios. An eddy covariance (EC) system has been in use since June

  19. The relationship between tectonic-thermal evolution and sandstone-type uranium ore-formation in Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Honggang

    2005-01-01

    The comprehensive study of the volcanic activities, the geothermal field, the thermal flow field, the paleogeo-thermal activity and the tectonic evolution of the Ordos basin indicates that the tectonic-thermal evolution of the Ordos basin has offered the basis for the fluid-fluid and fluid-rock mutual reactions, and has created favourable conditions for the formation of organic mineral resources and sandstone-type uranium deposits. Especially, the tectonic-thermal event during middle-Late Jurassic to Cretaceous played an important role in providing uranium source material, and assisting the migration, the concentration and precipitation of uranium and uranium ore-formation. (authors)

  20. Trilobites from the Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Grube; Nielsen, Arne Thorshøj; Harper, David Alexander Taylor

    2014-01-01

    During the Middle Ordovician (Darriwilian) sandstones and siltstones were deposited in the epicontinental Larapintine Sea, which covered large parts of central Australia. The Darriwilian Stairway Sandstone has, for the first time, been sampled stratigraphically for macrofossils to track marine...... benthic biodiversity in this clastic-dominated shallow-water palaeoenvironment situated along the margin of northeastern Gondwana. The faunas from the Stairway Sandstone are generally of low diversity and dominated by bivalves but include several animal groups, with trilobites representing 25......% of the entire shelly fauna. Thirteen trilobite taxa are described from the Stairway Sandstone; the fauna displays a high degree of endemism. One new species, Basilicus (Parabasilicus) brumbyensis sp. nov. is described....

  1. Electrofacies vs. lithofacies sandstone reservoir characterization Campanian sequence, Arshad gas/oil field, Central Sirt Basin, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki, Milad; Darwish, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    The present study focuses on the vertically stacked sandstones of the Arshad Sandstone in Arshad gas/oil field, Central Sirt Basin, Libya, and is based on the conventional cores analysis and wireline log interpretation. Six lithofacies types (F1 to F6) were identified based on the lithology, sedimentary structures and biogenic features, and are supported by wireline log calibration. From which four types (F1-F4) represent the main Campanian sandstone reservoirs in the Arshad gas/oil field. Lithofacies F5 is the basal conglomerates at the lower part of the Arshad sandstones. The Paleozoic Gargaf Formation is represented by lithofacies F6 which is the source provenance for the above lithofacies types. Arshad sediments are interpreted to be deposited in shallow marginal and nearshore marine environment influenced by waves and storms representing interactive shelf to fluvio-marine conditions. The main seal rocks are the Campanian Sirte shale deposited in a major flooding events during sea level rise. It is contended that the syn-depositional tectonics controlled the distribution of the reservoir facies in time and space. In addition, the post-depositional changes controlled the reservoir quality and performance. Petrophysical interpretation from the porosity log values were confirmed by the conventional core measurements of the different sandstone lithofacies types. Porosity ranges from 5 to 20% and permeability is between 0 and 20 mD. Petrophysical cut-off summary of the lower part of the clastic dominated sequence (i. e. Arshad Sandstone) calculated from six wells includes net pay sand ranging from 19.5‧ to 202.05‧, average porosity from 7.7 to 15% and water saturation from 19 to 58%.

  2. CO2-induced mechanical behaviour of Hawkesbury sandstone in the Gosford basin: An experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnaweera, T.D.; Ranjith, P.G.; Perera, M.S.A.; Haque, A.; Lashin, A.; Al Arifi, N.; Chandrasekharam, D; Yang, SQ; Xu, T; Wang, SH; Yasar, E

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestered in saline aquifers undergoes a variety of chemically-coupled mechanical effects, which may cause CO 2 -induced mechanical changes and time-dependent reservoir deformation. This paper investigates the mineralogical and microstructural changes that occur in reservoir rocks following injection of CO 2 in deep saline aquifers and the manner in which these changes influence the mechanical properties of the reservoir rocks. In this study, cylindrical sandstone specimens, 38 mm in diameter and 76 mm high, obtained from the Gosford basin, were used to perform a series of unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests. Different saturation conditions: dry, water- and brine-saturated sandstone samples with and without scCO 2 (super-critical carbon dioxide) injection, were considered in the study to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the impact of scCO 2 injection during the CO 2 sequestration process on saline aquifer mechanical properties. An acoustic emission (AE) system was employed to identify the stress threshold values of crack closure, crack initiation and crack damage for each testing condition during the whole deformation process of the specimens. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses were performed to evaluate the chemical and mineralogical changes that occur in reservoir rocks during CO 2 injection. From the test results, it is clear that the CO 2 -saturated samples possessed a lower peak strength compared to non-CO 2 saturated samples. According to SEM, XRD and XRF analyses, considerable quartz mineral corrosion and dissolution of calcite and siderite were observed during the interactions of the CO 2 /water/rock and CO 2 /brine/rock systems, which implies that mineralogical and geochemical rock alterations affect rock mechanical properties by accelerating the collapse mechanisms of the pore matrix. AE results also reveal the weakening effect of rock pore

  3. Hydrocarbon Potential in Sandstone Reservoir Isolated inside Low Permeability Shale Rock (Case Study: Beruk Field, Central Sumatra Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diria, Shidqi A.; Musu, Junita T.; Hasan, Meutia F.; Permono, Widyo; Anwari, Jakson; Purba, Humbang; Rahmi, Shafa; Sadjati, Ory; Sopandi, Iyep; Ruzi, Fadli

    2018-03-01

    Upper Red Bed, Menggala Formation, Bangko Formation, Bekasap Formation and Duri Formationare considered as the major reservoirs in Central Sumatra Basin (CSB). However, Telisa Formation which is well-known as seal within CSB also has potential as reservoir rock. Field study discovered that lenses and layers which has low to high permeability sandstone enclosed inside low permeability shale of Telisa Formation. This matter is very distinctive and giving a new perspective and information related to the invention of hydrocarbon potential in reservoir sandstone that isolated inside low permeability shale. This study has been conducted by integrating seismic data, well logs, and petrophysical data throughly. Facies and static model are constructed to estimate hydrocarbon potential resource. Facies model shows that Telisa Formation was deposited in deltaic system while the potential reservoir was deposited in distributary mouth bar sandstone but would be discontinued bedding among shale mud-flat. Besides, well log data shows crossover between RHOB and NPHI, indicated that distributary mouth bar sandstone is potentially saturated by hydrocarbon. Target area has permeability ranging from 0.01-1000 mD, whereas porosity varies from 1-30% and water saturation varies from 30-70%. The hydrocarbon resource calculation approximates 36.723 MSTB.

  4. Hydrogeology of the Cliff House Sandstone in the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, Conde R.; Levings, G.W.; Craigg, S.D.; Dam, W.L.; Kernodle, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series resulting from the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) study of the San Juan structural basin that began in October 1984. Previous reports in the series describe the hydrogeology of the Dakota Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1989), Point Lookout Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1990), Morrison Formation (Dam and others, 1990), Gallup Sandstone (Kernodle and others, 1989), and Menefee Formation (Levings and others, 1990) in the San Juan structural basin. The purposes of the RASA (Welder, 1986) are to: (1) Define and evaluate the aquifer system; (2) assess the effects of past, present, and potential ground-water use on aquifers and streams; and (3) determine the availability and quality of ground water. This report summarizes information on the geology and the occurrence and quality of water in the Cliff House Sandstone, one of the primary water-bearing units in the regional aquifer system. Data used in this report were collected during the study or were derived from existing records in the U.S. Geological Survey's computerized National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, the Petroleum Information Corporation's data base, and the Dwight's ENERGYDATA Inc. BRIN data base. Although all data available for the Cliff House Sandstone were considered in formulating the discussions in the text, not all those data could be plotted on the illustrations. The San Juan structural basin is in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah and has an area of about 21,600 square miles (fig. 1). The structural basin is about 140 miles wide and about 200 miles long. The study area is that part of the structural basin that contains rocks of Triassic or younger age and, therefore, is less extensive than the structural basin. Triassic through Tertiary sedimentary rocks are emphasized in this study because the major aquifers in the basin are present in these rocks. The study area is about 140 miles wide (about the same as the

  5. Hydrogeology of the Point Lookout Sandstone in the San Juan structural basin, New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craigg, Steven D.; Dam, W.L.; Kernodle, J.M.; Thorn, C.R.; Levings, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    This report is one in a series resulting from the U.S. Geological Survey's Regional Aquifer-System Analysis (RASA) study of the San Juan structural basin that began in October 1984. Previous reports in the series describe the hydrogeology of the Dakota Sandstone (Craigg and others, 1989), Morrison Formation (Dam and others, 1990), Gallup Sandstone (Kernodle and others, 1989), Menefee Formation (Levings and others, 1990), and Cliff House Sandstone (Thorn and others, 1990), in the San Juan structural basin. The purposes of the RASA (Welder, 1986) are to: (1) Define and evaluate the aquifer system; (2) assess the effects of past, present, and potential ground-water use on aquifers and streams; and (3) determine the availability and quality of ground water. This report summarizes information on the geology and the occurrence and quality of water in the Point Lookout Sandstone, one of the primary water-bearing units in the regional aquifer system. Data used in this report were collected during the study or were derived from existing records in the U.S. Geological Survey's computerized National Water Information System (NWIS) data base, the Petroleum Information Corporation's database, and the Dwight's ENERGYDATA Inc. BRIN data base. Although all data available for the Point Lookout Sandstone were considered in formulating the discussions in the text, not all those data could be plotted on the illustrations. The San Juan structural basin is in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, and Utah and has an area of about 21,600 square miles (fig. 1). The structural basin is about 140 miles wide and about 200 miles long. The study area is that part of the structural basin that contains rocks of Triassic or younger age and, therefore, is less areally extensive than the structural basin. Triassic through Tertiary sedimentary rocks are emphasized in this study because the major aquifers in the basin are present in these rocks. The study area is about 140 miles wide (about the same as the

  6. Study on the relationship of the fault-block structure feature and sandstone uranium formation in Chaoshui basin north belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lin

    2006-12-01

    The mineralization conditions for three types of acclivity belt (Baojia Jing A' Lashan Youqi-Tangjia Gou and Taojia Jing CHAOSHUI BASIN NORTH BELT) are analyzed, according to the fault-block acclivity belt, the prospecting goal layer, the interlayer oxidized zone and uranium metallization characteristic and so on. It is considered that the positive fault-block acclivity belt favors containing oxygen and uranium water coming from eclipse source area to go into prospecting goal layer, and advanced the formation of interlayer oxidized zone and sandstone uranium metallization. The antithetic fault-block and the buried fault-block acclivity don't favors containing oxygen and uranium water into prospecting goal layer, and format difficultly interlayer oxidized belt and sandstone uranium metallization. Therefore A'Lashan Youqi-Tangjia Gou part is a uranium mineralization prospect sector. (authors)

  7. Perspective and resource evaluation and metallogenic studies on sandstone-type uranium deposit in Qianjiadian depression of Songliao Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuliang, Xia; Jinrong, Lin; Ziying, Li; Shengxiang, Li; Hanbin, Liu; Zhiming, Wang; Guang, Fan [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology, Beijing (China); Jiwei, Zheng; Zhenji, Li; Mingyu, Zhang [Liaohe Oil Field, Panjin (China)

    2003-07-01

    The geotectonic evolution history of the southeastern part of Songliao Basin has been clearly described and it is pointed out that both of the provenance rocks and evolution features of the studied area are favorable to the formation of U-rich sandstone bodies, development of interlayered oxidation and providing uranium source for mineralization. Yaojia Formation in Qianjiadian depression has been found out to be the favorable target ore bed for looking for sandstone-type uranium deposit. On the basis of analysis of metallogenetic conditions, the perspective target area has been circled and a sandstone-type uranium deposit with a certain amounts of uranium tonnages has been discovered. The achievements and data have been gotten in the following aspects: constitution and features of ore-forming beds and sandstone bodies, uranium existence forms and mineralogical and chemical compositions of the ores, associated elements and their economic values for comprehensive mining. The study of metallogenetic features and mechanism of the uranium deposit suggested that pre-enrichment of uranium during the depositional-diagenetic stage provide a good basis for uranium mineralization, and hereafter interlayered oxidation as well as oil-gas reduction processes played a decisive role to uranium mineralization. U-Pb isotopic studies indicate that the ores have two isochron ages of 53{+-}3 Ma and 7.0{+-}0 Ma, corresponding to the periods of arid and semiarid paleo-climates which are favorable to interlayered oxidation development and uranium mineralization. It is concluded that the Qianjiadian sandstone-type uranium deposit is genetically related to interlayered oxidation and secondary reduction of oil-gas. The metallogenic model of Qianjiadian uranium deposit was set up. (authors)

  8. Perspective and resource evaluation and metallogenic studies on sandstone-type uranium deposit in Qianjiadian depression of Songliao Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yuliang; Lin Jinrong; Li Ziying; Li Shengxiang; Liu Hanbin; Wang Zhiming; Fan Guang; Zheng Jiwei; Li Zhenji; Zhang Mingyu

    2003-01-01

    The geotectonic evolution history of the southeastern part of Songliao Basin has been clearly described and it is pointed out that both of the provenance rocks and evolution features of the studied area are favorable to the formation of U-rich sandstone bodies, development of interlayered oxidation and providing uranium source for mineralization. Yaojia Formation in Qianjiadian depression has been found out to be the favorable target ore bed for looking for sandstone-type uranium deposit. On the basis of analysis of metallogenetic conditions, the perspective target area has been circled and a sandstone-type uranium deposit with a certain amounts of uranium tonnages has been discovered. The achievements and data have been gotten in the following aspects: constitution and features of ore-forming beds and sandstone bodies, uranium existence forms and mineralogical and chemical compositions of the ores, associated elements and their economic values for comprehensive mining. The study of metallogenetic features and mechanism of the uranium deposit suggested that pre-enrichment of uranium during the depositional-diagenetic stage provide a good basis for uranium mineralization, and hereafter interlayered oxidation as well as oil-gas reduction processes played a decisive role to uranium mineralization. U-Pb isotopic studies indicate that the ores have two isochron ages of 53±3 Ma and 7.0±0 Ma, corresponding to the periods of arid and semiarid paleo-climates which are favorable to interlayered oxidation development and uranium mineralization. It is concluded that the Qianjiadian sandstone-type uranium deposit is genetically related to interlayered oxidation and secondary reduction of oil-gas. The metallogenic model of Qianjiadian uranium deposit was set up. (authors)

  9. Geologic-tectonic evolutional characteristics and prospecting potential for ISL-amenable sandstone-type uranium deposits; in Sichuan basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianhua; Zhu Xiyang; Wang Sili; Wei Jisheng

    2005-01-01

    Through the analysis on geologic-tectonic evolution of Sichuan basin, authors of this paper suggest: because of the heterogeneity of the basin basement and cover structures resulting from the lateral dividing, those segments in the basin that experienced only weak tectonic activation, and those that were uplifted and eroded earlier have not been intensely deformed, and have not experienced long-period burying. Rocks in those segments are poorly consolidated and there exist conditions for the formation of large-area artesian slope at the transitional sites between uplifted and subsided areas, possessing favourable hydrogeologic conditions for long-term infiltration of groundwater. These areas must be the targets for prospecting for ISL-amenable sandstone-type uranium deposits. Correspondingly, the Triassic and Jurassic where loose sand bodies are hosted are prospecting target horizons for uranium. (authors)

  10. Influences of structures on the interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits on the southern margin of Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mou; Li Shengfu

    2006-01-01

    Based on geology and the theory of hydromorphic origin uranium deposit, structural conditions of uranium formation on the southern margin of Yili Basin are analyzed from two aspects of structural movements and deformation. It is suggested that the subsidiary structures caused by the neotectonic movement are the major factor that control and reform the interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposit, and the differences lie in the tectonics at the eastern and western section on the southern margin of Yili Basin. At the western section, because Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata are tilted by the subsidiary structures, some strata on the margin of the basin outcrop at the surface and suffer from the weathering and erosion, which is favorable for the formation of large size uranium deposits. But at the eastern section, the fault and fold are predominant, outcropping at the surface, cause the redistribution of the uranium, which is favorable for the formation of small size uranium deposits. (authors)

  11. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian G. Jakobsen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of the molluscs comprise bivalves, especially nuculoids, which were biogeographically restricted to low latitudes during the Ordovician. The molluscan assemblage displays a very high degree of endemism at species level, though the bivalve Sthenodonta eastii also occurs in the Georgina Basin farther to the northeast. This indicates a possible marine connective seaway between the Georgina and Amadeus basins during the Darriwilian. Nuculites, Cyrtodonta, and Modiolopsis are cosmopolitan and previously reported from North China, Avalonia, and Southern Gondwana.

  12. Provenance of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation: implications for distribution and architecture of aeolian vs. fluvial reservoirs in the North German Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Zircon U–Pb geochronometry, heavy mineral analyses and conventional seismic reflection data were used to interpret the provenance of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation. The succession was sampled in five Danish wells in the northern part of the North German Basin. The results show...... Shield did not supply much sediment to the basin as opposed to what was previously believed. Sediment from the Variscan belt was transported by wind activity across the North German Basin when it was dried out during deposition of the aeolian part of the Volpriehausen Member (lower Bunter Sandstone......). Fluvial sand was supplied from the Ringkøbing-Fyn High to the basin during precipitation events which occurred most frequently when the Solling Member was deposited (upper Bunter Sandstone). Late Neoproterozoic to Carboniferous zircon ages predominate in the Volpriehausen Member where the dominant age...

  13. Fluvial sedimentology of a major uranium-bearing sandstone - A study of the Westwater Canyon member of the Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation, the main ore-bearing sandstone in the San Juan basin, consists of a sequence of vertically stacked braided stream deposits. Three fluvial units within the sequence can be delineated in the basin. Volcanic pebbles are abundant in the middle fluvial unit, in a zone that forms a crude time line. A pronounced thickening of sandstone in the Westwater Canyon Member north of Gallup, once believed to be the apex of a large alluvial fan, is now thought to merely reflect a greater accumulation of sediment in response to downwarping of the basin in that area. Provenance studies suggest that highlands that contributed detritus to Westwater Canyon streams were located several hundred kilometers to the west and southwest of the San Juan basin, and thus fan apices would also have been several hundred kilometers upstream. The fluvial units recognized in the basin may well be coalesced distal fan deposits, but are probably best interpreted as vertically stacked braided steam sequences. Facies changes in fine-grained interbeds of the Westwater Canyon probably have greater significance in terms of localizing ore than any special attribute of the fluvial sandstones themselves. Uranium ore generally occurs in sandstones that are interbedded with greenish-gray lacustrine mudstones. Pore waters that were expelled from these mudstones are thought to have been the source of the pore-filling organic matter (humate) associated with primary uranium ore in nearby sandstones

  14. Deformation bands in porous sandstone: case study in basins of northeast Brazil; Bandas de deformacao em arenitos porosos: estudo de casos em bacias do nordeste do Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Talles Souza [PETROBRAS, RN (Brazil). Interpretacao e Avaliacao de bacias da Costa Leste do Brasil E and P. Gerencia de Interpretacao], e-mail: tallesferreira@petrobras.com.br; Silva, Fernando Cesar Alves da [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN). Dept. de Geologia Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geodinamica e Geofisica (Brazil)], e-mail: fernando@geologia.ufrn.br

    2010-05-15

    The meso and microscopic scale sandstone characterizations of the deformation bands of three sedimentary basins in northeastern Brazil; the Potiguar and Sergipe-Alagoas basins (Brazilian Atlantic Margin) and the Tucano Basin (aborted rift basin) were compared for their similarities and differences. Deformation bands are structures commonly developed in porous sandstones that make up the main reservoir-rock in siliciclastic petroleum systems. These structures influence the permo-porous properties and consequently the migration pathway into a sandstone reservoir. To understand their formation process and development has been the focus of a great number of articles in recent petroleum geology literature. This study highlights the similarities and the differences in the features and deformation mechanisms that provoked the development of deformation bands in the damage zones of major faults in three different sedimentary basins. In terms of basin tectonics, the deformation bands' formation and geometric arrangements are associated with major structures. In the case of the Acu Formation, a correlation was observed with the dextral Afonso Bezerra fault system, whereas in the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin the normal dextral strike-slip faults can be associated with the faulting of the boarder basin. In the Tucano Basin case, the deformation basins are related to the Jeremoabo transpressional fault, a major structure a few kilometers to the north. This study applies structural geology tools to better understand the geometric arrangement and growing mechanisms of deformation bands in different lithological and tectonic settings. Although the deformation bands present a similar aspect in a macroscopic view, the interplay between depositional and mineralogical parameters of the host rock, as well as the basin's burial and tectonic history resulted in the development of different sandstone deformation bands in three northeastern brazilian basins. (author)

  15. Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO2 Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouke, Bruce [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2013-03-31

    An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross--disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-­Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-­scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-­age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-­tier international peer-­reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order

  16. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Part 1. Evaluation of Phase 2 CO2 Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2. Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowersox, Richard [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Hickman, John [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Leetaru, Hannes [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2012-12-20

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO2 in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO2 storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO2 were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO2 was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole – including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite – at 1152–2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO2 was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter.

  17. Mississippian carbonate buildups and development of cool-waterlike carbonate platforms in the Illinois Basin, Midcontinent U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasemi, Z.; Norby, R.D.; Utgaard, J.E.; Ferry, W.R.; Cuffey, R.J.; Dever, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous biohermal buildups occur in Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) strata in the Illinois Basin and adjacent regions. They developed as mud mounds, biodetrital calcisiltite mounds, and bryozoan frame thickets (fenestrate-frame coquina or rudstone) during the Kinderhookian and early Meramecian (Tournaisian and early Visean), and as microbial mud mounds, microbial- serpulidbryozoanboundstones, and solenoporoid (red algal) boundstones during the Chesterian (late Visean and Serpukhovian). True Waulsortian mounds did not develop in the Illinois Basin, but echinoderm (primarily crinoids)-bryozoan carbonate banks and bryozoan frame thickets generally occupied the same niche during the Kinderhookian-early Meramecian. Nutrient availability and the resulting increase in the productivity of echinoderms and bryozoans were apparently detrimental to Waulsortian mound development. Deposition of crinoidal-bryozoan carbonates during the Kinderhookian-Osagean initially occurred on a ramp setting that later evolved into a platform with a relatively steep margin through sediment aggradation and progradation. By mid-Osagean-early Meramecian, two such platforms, namely the Burlington Shelf and the Ullin Platform, developed adjacent to a deep, initially starved basin. Sedimentologic and petrographic characteristics of the Kinderhookian-earliest Meramecian carbonates resemble the modern cool-water Heterozoan Association. This is in contrast with post-earliest Meramecian carbonates, which are typically oolitic and peloidal with common peri tidal facies. The post-earliest Meramecian carbonates, therefore, resemble those of the warm-water Photozoan Association. The prevalence of Heterozoan carbonates in the Illinois Basin correlates with a rapid increase in the rate of subsidence and a major second-order eustatic sea-level rise that resulted in deep-water starved basins at this time. In the starved Illinois Basin, deposition was initially limited to a thin phosphatic shale that was

  18. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text

  19. Drilling, Completion, and Data Collection Plans An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin: Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkewicz, Nicholas; Kirksey, Jim; Finley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Executive Summary The Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) is managed by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) and is led by the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) at the University of Illinois. The project site is located on the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) property in Decatur, Illinois, and is a fully integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) project that uses CO₂ captured from the ethanol-producing fermentation process at the ADM corn-processing plant (Finley et. al., 2013). IBDP has a goal of injecting one million tonnes of CO₂ into the basal sands of the Mt. Simon Sandstone over a three-year period. This is a multifaceted project, and this report details the planning and results of the drilling, completions, well testing, log data acquisition, and the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) aspects of the project. Three deep wells were planned for the IBDP: • The injection well: Injection Well #1 (CCS1); • The monitoring well (both in-zone and above seal): Verification Well #1 (VW1); and • The geophone monitoring well: Geophysical Monitoring Well #1 (GM1). The detailed plans for these wells are attached to the appendices of this document. The wells were drilled successfully with little deviation from the original plans. The biggest change from the plan to execution was the need to adjust for larger-than-expected loss of circulation in the Potosi section of the Knox Formation. The completions reports also attached to this document detail the well constructions as they were actually built. Injectivity testing was carried out, and the perforating plans were adjusted based on the results. Additional perforations and acidizing were performed as a result of the injectivity testing. The testing plans are detailed in this report along with the actual testing results. The injectivity testing results were used in the modeling and simulation efforts. Detailed HSE plans were developed and implemented during the planning and

  20. Installation restoration program: Hydrologic measurements with an estimated hydrologic budget for the Joliet Army Ammunition Plant, Joliet, Illinois. [Contains maps of monitoring well locations, topography and hydrologic basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diodato, D.M.; Cho, H.E.; Sundell, R.C.

    1991-07-01

    Hydrologic data were gathered from the 36.8-mi{sup 2} Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (JAAP) located in Joliet, Illinois. Surface water levels were measured continuously, and groundwater levels were measured monthly. The resulting information was entered into a database that could be used as part of numerical flow model validation for the site. Deep sandstone aquifers supply much of the water in the JAAP region. These aquifers are successively overlain by confining shales and a dolomite aquifer of Silurian age. This last unit is unconformably overlain by Pleistocene glacial tills and outwash sand and gravel. Groundwater levels in the shallow glacial system fluctuate widely, with one well completed in an upland fluctuating more than 17 ft during the study period. The response to groundwater recharge in the underlying Silurian dolomite is slower. In the upland recharge areas, increased groundwater levels were observed; in the lowland discharge areas, groundwater levels decreased during the study period. The decreases are postulated to be a lag effect related to a 1988 drought. These observations show that fluid at the JAAP is not steady-state, either on a monthly or an annual basis. Hydrologic budgets were estimated for the two principal surface water basins at the JAAP site. These basins account for 70% of the facility's total land area. Meteorological data collected at a nearby dam show that total measured precipitation was 31.45 in. and total calculated evapotranspiration was 23.09 in. for the study period. The change in surface water storage was assumed to be zero for the annual budget for each basin. The change in groundwater storage was calculated to be 0.12 in. for the Grant Creek basin and 0. 26 in. for the Prairie Creek basin. Runoff was 7.02 in. and 7.51 in. for the Grant Creek and Prairie Creek basins, respectively. The underflow to the deep hydrogeologic system in the Grant Creek basin was calculated to be negligible. 12 refs., 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  1. Regional prognosis criteria for the sandstone type uranium deposits in interlayer oxidation zone and their application in the east of Junggar basin, Xinjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Deren; Bai Fengzhou; Lin Shuangxing

    1995-01-01

    Regional prognosis is of a very important role in the exploration work of the sandstone type uranium deposits of interlayer oxidation zone. This paper presents regional prognosis criteria on the basis of the authors' research in combination with the geological prediction in the east of Junggar Basin, Xinjiang (1:200000) which was jointly carried out with the Red Hill Geological Complex of the National Mineral Resources Commission of Uzbekistan Republic. It is advantageous to the exploration work of the sandstone type uranium deposits of interlayer oxidation zone in Meso-Cenozoic basins of China

  2. The Frasnian-Famennian boundary (Upper Devonian) in black shale sequences: US Southern Midcontinent, Illinois Basin, and northern Appalachian Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Over, D.J. (State Univ. of New York, Geneseo, NY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    The Frasnian-Famennian (F/F) boundary in the Woodford Shale of the US southern Midcontinent, Sweetland Creek Shale of the Illinois Basin, and the Hanover Shale of the northern Appalachian Basin is recognized to a discrete horizon. In each locality the boundary is marked by evidence of a disconformity: phosphate nodules, concentration of conodonts, or coated and corroded grains. The Woodford Shale consists of finely laminated pyritic organic-rich shale containing interbeds of greenish shale and chert. The F/F boundary horizon is marked by a concentration of conodonts and phosphatic nodules. The boundary lag horizon contains Pa. linguliformis, Pa. subperlobtata, Pa. delicatula delicatula, and Pa. triangularis. Underlying laminations contain Ancyrognathus ubiquitus and Pa. triangularis indicating that the disconformity is within the uppermost MN Zone 13 or Lower triangularis Zone. The upper portion of the Type Sweetland Creek Shale consists of dark organic-rich shales. The F/F boundary is located within an interval containing three green shale interbeds. Palmatolepis triangularis in the absence of Frasnian species first occurs in the middle green shale. In the thick Upper Devonian clastic sequence of the northern Appalachian Basin the F/F boundary is within an interval of interbedded pyritic green and organic-rich silty shales of the Hanover Shale. At Irish Gulf strata containing Pa. triangularis overlie finely laminated dark shales containing Pa. bogartensis, Pa. triangularis, Pa. winchell, Ancyrodella curvata, and Icriodus alternatus. The conodont fauna transition is below a conodont-rich laminae containing a Famennian fauna that marks the boundary horizon.

  3. Diagenesis and reservoir quality evolution of palaeocene deep-water, marine sandstones, the Shetland-Faroes Basin, British continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansurbeg, H. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, SE 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Morad, S. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, SE 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Petroleum Geosciences, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Salem, A. [Faculty of Education at Kafr El-Sheikh, Tanta University, Kafr El-Sheikh (Egypt); Marfil, R.; Caja, M.A. [Departmento Petrologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Geologia, UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-ghali, M.A.K. (Geology Department, Al-Fateh University, P.O. Box 13696, Libya); Nystuen, J.P. [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1047 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Amorosi, A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Zamboni 67, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Garcia, D. [Centre SPIN, Department GENERIC, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint Etienne 158, Cours Fauriel 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); La Iglesia, A. [Instituto de Geologia Economica (CSIC-UCM), Facultad de Geologia, UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    The Palaeocene, deep-water marine sandstones recovered from six wells in the Shetland-Faroes Basin represent lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tract turbiditic sediments. Mineralogic, petrographic, and geochemical analyses of these siliciclastics are used to decipher and discuss the diagenetic alterations and subsequent reservoir quality evolution. The Middle-Upper Palaeocene sandstones (subarkoses to arkoses) from the Shetland-Faroes Basin, British continental shelf are submarine turbiditic deposits that are cemented predominantly by carbonates, quartz and clay minerals. Carbonate cements (intergranular and grain replacive calcite, siderite, ferroan dolomite and ankerite) are of eogenetic and mesogenetic origins. The eogenetic alterations have been mediated by marine, meteoric and mixed marine/meteoric porewaters and resulted mainly in the precipitation of calcite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-10.9 permille and -3.8 permille), trace amounts of non-ferroan dolomite, siderite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-14.4 permille to -0.6 permille), as well as smectite and kaolinite in the lowstand systems tract (LST) and highstand systems tract (HST) turbiditic sandstone below the sequence boundary. Minor eogenetic siderite has precipitated between expanded and kaolinitized micas, primarily biotite. The mesogenetic alterations are interpreted to have been mediated by evolved marine porewaters and resulted in the precipitation of calcite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-12.9 permille to -7.8 permille) and Fe-dolomite/ankerite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-12.1 permille to -6.3 permille) at temperatures of 50-140 and 60-140 C, respectively. Quartz overgrowths and outgrowth, which post- and pre-date the mesogenetic carbonate cements is more common in the LST and TST of distal turbiditic sandstone. Discrete quartz cement, which is closely associated with illite and chlorite, is the final diagenetic phase. The clay minerals include intergranular and grain replacive

  4. Reconnaissance of promising areas for sandstone type uranium deposits in the Urmia-Naqadeh-Mahabad basin, NW Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hezareh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Urmia-Naqadeh-Mahabad basin is a part of the south and west Urmia Lake drainage basin that covers some parts of East-and-West Azerbaijan and northern Kurdistan. This study is the integration of geological, hydrological, remote sensing, geochemical and airborne geophysical data classifying promising areas that are related to sandstone type uranium (U mineralization in Iran. Based on positive factors such as favorable source, host rocks and suitable hydrological pattern, this basin is a favorable basin in Iran. According to the characteristics of lithology, tectonic, sedimentary environment, geotectonics and etc. the basin could be classified into favorable, promising and possible subbasins for mineralization of U sandstone type. Material and methods Geological data show that this region is a part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone and consists of Precambrian metamorphic rocks which are covered by younger sedimentary and volcano-sedimentary rocks that are influenced by different metamorphic phases. More than 7597 stream sediment samples from the area have been analyzed for Se،V، Mo، As،Cu، Ag، Zn، Co، Ni، Pb، Ti، Th، Zr، P and Sn. The basin is divided into 11 individual sub-basins. Radiometric data of the basin have been acquisitioned during 1976-1978 by an Australian-German- French Company with line separation of 500 meters and 120 meters of nominal terrain clearance. Remote sensing data reveals that the western subbasin is suitable for sandstone type uranium mineralization. Based on geochemical evidences, the Au, Zn, Sn, As and Pb elements were enriched. Geophysical investigation reveals that the Eastern basin includes high amounts of U and low amounts of Th. Hydrogeological study demonstrates that the trend of groundwater is from the west to the east. Geochemical data revealed that we can divide the basin into 11 subbasins which are characterized as follows: 1. Ghara Aghaj (126 Km2, North to south trend is situated at the

  5. Nitrate and herbicide loading in two groundwater basins of Illinois' sinkhole plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panno, S.V.; Kelly, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation was designed to estimate the mass loading of nitrate (NO3-) and herbicides in spring water discharging from groundwater basins in an agriculturally dominated, mantled karst terrain. The loading was normalized to land use and NO3- and herbicide losses were compared to estimated losses in other agricultural areas of the Midwestern USA. Our study area consisted of two large karst springs that drain two adjoining groundwater basins (total area of 37.7 km2) in southwestern Illinois' sinkhole plain, USA. The springs and stream that they form were monitored for almost 2 years. Nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations at three monitoring sites were almost always above the background concentration (1.9 mg/l). NO3-N concentrations at the two springs ranged from 1.08 to 6.08 with a median concentration of 3.61 mg/l. Atrazine and alachlor concentrations ranged from <0.01 to 34 ??g/l and <0.01 to 0.98 ??g/l, respectively, with median concentrations of 0.48 and 0.12 ??g/l, respectively. Approximately 100,000 kg/yr of NO3-N, 39 kg/yr of atrazine, and 2.8 kg/yr of alachlor were discharged from the two springs. Slightly more than half of the discharged NO3- came from background sources and most of the remainder probably came from fertilizer. This represents a 21-31% loss of fertilizer N from the groundwater basins. The pesticide losses were 3.8-5.8% of the applied atrazine, and 0.05-0.08% of the applied alachlor. The loss of atrazine adsorbed to the suspended solid fraction was about 2 kg/yr, only about 5% of the total mass of atrazine discharged from the springs. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Site Development, Operations, and Closure Plan Topical Report 5 An Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin. Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Robert [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Payne, William [Schlumberger Carbon Services, Houston, TX (United States); Kirksey, Jim [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has partnered with Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) and Schlumberger Carbon Services to conduct a large-volume, saline reservoir storage project at ADM’s agricultural products processing complex in Decatur, Illinois. The Development Phase project, named the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) involves the injection of 1 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a deep saline formation of the Illinois Basin over a three-year period. This report focuses on objectives, execution, and lessons learned/unanticipated results from the site development (relating specifically to surface equipment), operations, and the site closure plan.

  7. Biostratigraphic analysis of core samples from wells drilled in the Devonian shale interval of the Appalachian and Illinois Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, S.J.; Zielinski, R.E.

    1978-07-14

    A palynological investigation was performed on 55 samples of core material from four wells drilled in the Devonian Shale interval of the Appalachian and Illinois Basins. Using a combination of spores and acritarchs, it was possible to divide the Middle Devonian from the Upper Devonian and to make subdivisions within the Middle and Upper Devonian. The age of the palynomorphs encountered in this study is Upper Devonian.

  8. Crustal layering and gravity highs in the Midcontinent of North America - implications for the formation of the Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, H. J.; Boschelli, J.; Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.; Marshak, S.; Chen, C.; Yang, X.; DeLucia, M. S.; Larson, T. H.; Rupp, J.

    2017-12-01

    The emerging picture of crustal and lithospheric structure beneath the North American cratonic platform resulting from recent increases in the resolution of seismic studies is revealing a scale of complexity and heterogeneity not previously recognized. Examples of novel images of the lithosphere allowed by this increased sampling come from the results of the OIINK project, an EarthScope FlexArray experiment. OIINK data provides new insight into tectonic relationships among the Reelfoot Rift, Ozark Plateau, Rough Creek Graben, and Illinois Basin. Making use of ambient-noise tomography from data recorded by the OIINK Array and surrounding stations we produced a new shear-wave velocity model of the region. This model indicates detailed variations in crustal wavespeeds align with the regional tectonic features. Beyond corroborating previous observations of high-speed material in the mid- to lower crust of the southern Illinois Basin, this new model demonstrates that these anomalous velocities extend continuously from the Reelfoot, beneath the Mississippi Embayment, into southern Indiana. This model also includes a separate area characterized by a similarly thickened layer of increased velocities in the middle and lower crust beneath the LaSalle Deformation Belt, a north-south band of faults and folds that runs along the axis of the Illinois Basin. At depths of about 20 km, the top of these areas of thickened high-velocity crust align with a midcrustal discontinuity identified by receiver functions. Additionally, the lateral extent of these structures correlates with regions of increased Bouguer gravity. If the high-velocity structures contain high-density material, this configuration provides an explanation for the source of these positive gravity anomalies. These observations support a model in which Late Proterozoic rifting beneath the region of the Illinois Basin provided an opportunity for high-density material to enter the crust as residuum from melt extraction

  9. The red bed-type and sandstone-type uranium deposits in the inland basins of the northwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhilong.

    1988-01-01

    On the basis of the study on the relationship between the red bed-type and sandstone-type uranium deposits in the inland basins of the northwest China, a classification of red beds based on sedimentary facies and redding origin is presented. Red beds in the inland badins can be divided into six types: 1. alluvial plain and 2. shallow lake red beds formed at the stage of continental disintegration; 3. fluvial alluvial red bed, 4. delta plain and 5. desert red beds formed at the diagenetic-epigenetic stage; 6. spattered red (secondaty red beds) formed at the hypergenic weathering stage. According to the characteristics, structural environments of these six types of red beds, and changes of various geochemical characteristic values (Eh, pH, Th/U, Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ , Sr/Ba, etc.) from host rocks to different kinds of red beds , the relationship between these values and sandstone-type uranium deposits was determined. it is an open system, the mobile uranium is easily leached, thus it is unfavoutable for mineralization; but when the rock reddens at the diagenetic epigenetic stage (closed system) that is favourable for mineraizaltion, the mobile uranium can be concentrated to form uranium deposits

  10. The organic geochemistry characteristic simple analyse of Shihongtan sandstone-type uranium deposit in Turpan-Hami basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Haiming; Cai Jinfang; Shang Gaofeng; Song Zhe

    2007-12-01

    The Shihongtan uranium deposit in Turpan-Hami basin is an interlayer oxi- dized zone type sandstone uranium deposit. The deposit occurs in the coal-bear- ing detrital rocks of braided meandering steam facies in the Middle Jurassic Xishanyao formation. There is a great deal of organic matter in the ore-hosting bed. There is distinct content of organic carbon, soluble organic matter, acidolysis hydrocarbon in various geochemistry belt rock, and the maximum content in the ore belt. Organics carbon mother-material type is sapropelic humus, organic matter is under mature stage, Acidolysis hydrocarbon is coal-gas type. Uranium content in rock is positive correlativity to soluble organics and acidolysis hydrocarbon by statistical count, The role of organic matter in sandstone type uranium metallogenetic process is analysed, it is thought that material decomposed under oxygenic coalition is advantage to uranium dissolution and migration in groundwater, material decomposed and polymerized under oxygen-deficient condition forms reducing and adsorption geochemistry barrier for uranium precipitation, play a important role in uranium metallogenetic process. (authors)

  11. Asymmetrical cross-current turbidite facies tract in a structurally-confined mini-basin (Priabonian-Rupelian, Ranzano Sandstone, northern Apennines, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinterri, R.; Laporta, M.; Ogata, K.

    2017-01-01

    This work discusses the stratigraphy and facies analysis of the Ranzano Sandstone, in the northern Apennines (Italy), a confined low-efficiency turbidite system deposited in a series of small piggy-back basins, which show strong analogies with intraslope minibasins commonly observed in divergent

  12. The relationship between depositional system and ore-formation of sandstone-type uranium deposits in Dongsheng area, Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Honggang; Ou Guangxi

    2006-01-01

    The analysis on depositional system plays a very important role in studying sandstone-type uranium deposits. Based on depositional system analysis and sequence stratigraphy, and through the study of depositional system characteristics and the spatial distribution of sedimentary facies, the evolution of sedimentary environments as well as the sequence stratigraphy of Zhiluo Formation in Dongsheng area, Ordos basin, authors have come to the following conclusions, (1) the spatial distribution of sand bodies is controlled by the planar distribution of sedimentary facies, which, in turn, affects the spatial distribution of ore-hosting sand bodies; (2) the evolution of sedimentary facies and sedimentary environments creates good lithofacies and lithological conditions favorable for interlayer oxidation; (3) the spatial lithologic combination of 'three layer structure' is controlled by sedimentary sequence. (authors)

  13. The experimental modeling of gas percolation mechanisms in a coal-measure tight sandstone reservoir: A case study on the coal-measure tight sandstone gas in the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizhen Tao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tight sandstone gas from coal-measure source rock is widespread in China, and it is represented by the Xujiahe Formation of the Sichuan Basin and the Upper Paleozoic of the Ordos Basin. It is affected by planar evaporative hydrocarbon expulsion of coal-measure source rock and the gentle structural background; hydrodynamics and buoyancy play a limited role in the gas migration-accumulation in tight sandstone. Under the conditions of low permeability and speed, non-Darcy flow is quite apparent, it gives rise to gas-water mixed gas zone. In the gas displacing water experiment, the shape of percolation flow curve is mainly influenced by core permeability. The lower the permeability, the higher the starting pressure gradient as well as the more evident the non-Darcy phenomenon will be. In the gas displacing water experiment of tight sandstone, the maximum gas saturation of the core is generally less than 50% (ranging from 30% to 40% and averaging at 38%; it is similar to the actual gas saturation of the gas zone in the subsurface core. The gas saturation and permeability of the core have a logarithm correlation with a correlation coefficient of 0.8915. In the single-phase flow of tight sandstone gas, low-velocity non-Darcy percolation is apparent; the initial flow velocity (Vd exists due to the slippage effect of gas flow. The shape of percolation flow curve of a single-phase gas is primarily controlled by core permeability and confining pressure; the lower the permeability or the higher the confining pressure, the higher the starting pressure (0.02–0.08 MPa/cm, whereas, the higher the quasi-initial flow speed, the longer the nonlinear section and the more obvious the non-Darcy flow will be. The tight sandstone gas seepage mechanism study shows that the lower the reservoir permeability, the higher the starting pressure and the slower the flow velocity will be, this results in the low efficiency of natural gas migration and accumulation as well as

  14. Moho Depth and Geometry in the Illinois Basin Region Based on Gravity and Seismic Data from an EarthScope FlexArray Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, D. D.; Pavlis, G. L.; Yang, X.; Hamburger, M. W.; Zhang, H.; Ravat, D.

    2017-12-01

    We present results from a combined analysis of seismic and gravity in the Illinois Basin region that demonstrate the presence of an unusually deep and highly variable Moho discontinuity. We construct a new, high-resolution image of the Earth's crust beneath the Illinois Basin using teleseismic P-wave receiver functions from the EarthScope OIINK (Ozarks, Illinois, INdiana, Kentucky) Flexible Array and the USArray Transportable Array. Our seismic analyses involved data from 143 OIINK stations and 80 USArray stations, using 3D plane-wave migration and common conversion point (CCP) stacking of P-to-S conversion data. Seismic interpretation has been done using the seismic exploration software package Petrel. One of the most surprising results is the anomalous depth of the Moho in this area, ranging from 41 to 63 km, with an average depth of 50 km. This thickened crust is unexpected in the Illinois Basin area, which has not been subject to convergence and mountain building processes in the last 900 Ma. This anomalously thick crust in combination with the minimal topography requires abnormally dense lower crust or unusually light upper mantle in order to retain gravitational equilibrium. Combining gravity modeling with the seismically identified Moho and a ubiquitous lower crustal boundary, we solve for the density variation of the middle and lower crust. We test the hypothesis that the anomalously thick crust and its high lower crustal layer observed in most of the central and southeastern Illinois Basin predates the formation and development of the current Illinois Basin. Post-formation tectonic activity, such as late Precambrian rifting or underplating are inferred to have modified the crustal thickness as well. The combination of high-resolution seismic data analysis and gravity modeling promises to provide additional insight into the geometry and composition of the lower crust in the Illinois Basin area.

  15. The influence of climate on early and burial diagenesis of Triassic and Jurassic sandstones from the Norwegian – Danish Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kjøller, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Climate changes preserved in sandstones are documented by comparing the sediment composition and early diagenetic changes in sandstones deposited during arid to semi-arid conditions, the Skagerrak Formation, with sandstones of the Gassum Formation deposited in a humid well-vegetated environment...

  16. Characterization of the Qishn sandstone reservoir, Masila Basin-Yemen, using an integrated petrophysical and seismic structural approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashin, Aref; Marta, Ebrahim Bin; Khamis, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    This study presents an integrated petrophysical and seismic structural analysis that is carried out to evaluate the reservoir properties of Qishn sandstone as well as the entrapment style of the hydrocarbons at Sharyoof field, Sayun-Masila Basin that is located at the east central of Yemen. The reservoir rocks are dominated by clean porous and permeable sandstones zones usually intercalated with some clay stone interbeds. As identified from well logs, Qishn sandstone is classified into subunits (S1A, S1B, S1C and S2) with different reservoir characteristics and hydrocarbon potentiality. A number of qualitative and quantitative well logging analyses are used to characterize the different subunits of the Qishn reservoir and identify its hydrocarbon potentiality. Dia-porosity, M-N, Pickett, Buckles plots, petrophysical analogs and lateral distribution maps are used in the analysis. Shale volume, lithology, porosity, and fluid saturation are among the most important deduced parameters. The analysis revealed that S1A and S1C are the main hydrocarbon-bearing units. More specifically, S1A unit is the best, as it attains the most prolific hydrocarbon saturations (oil saturation "SH″ up to 65) and reservoir characteristics. An average petrophysical ranges of 4-21%, 16-23%, 11-19%, 0-65%, are detected for S1A unit, regarding shale volume, total and effective porosity, and hydrocarbon saturation, respectively. Meanwhile, S1B unit exhibits less reservoir characteristics (Vsh>30%, ϕEff<15% and SH< 15%). The lateral distribution maps revealed that most of the hydrocarbons (for S1A and S1C units) are indicated at the middle of the study area as NE-SW oriented closures. The analysis and interpretation of seismic data had clarified that the structure of study area is represented by a big middle horst bounded by a group of step-like normal faults at the extreme boundaries (faulted anticlinal-structure). In conclusion, the entrapment of the encountered hydrocarbon at Sharyoof oil

  17. The development condition of longitudinal channels of a Lower Cretaceous formation and its perspective for sandstone type uranium deposits in the Erlian basin, northern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Xu, Q.; Liu, W.; Song, J.; Chen, D.; Wei, S.

    2014-01-01

    The palaeochannel, which is classified as basal and interformational types on the basis of geological setting, is an important host for the sandstone type uranium deposit. Diversities exist in development conditions and uranium minerogenetic potential of the two types of palaeochanneles. The Erlian basin, about 105 km"2 and adjacent to channel-type uranium deposit provinces in Russia and Mongolia, is one of main uraniferous basins in the north of China. It is significant to research into development conditions of palaeochannels for uranium mineral exploration in the Erlian basin. 1. Geological background: The Erlian basin consists of five depressions which divide the basin and form alternations with uplifts and depressions. Sedimentary capping strata of the basin mainly is the Lower Cretaceous Bayanhua group (K1b) which consists of the Aershan group (K1ba), Tenger group (K1bt) and Saihan group (K1bs) from bottom to top. The Saihan group, which is the product in the phase of depression, is the most important uranous strata in the Erlian basin. 2. Development characteristic and condition of the longitudinal palaeochannel of the Saihan formation: Large-scale longitudinal multi-palaeochannels are identified in the center and northeast of the basin, such as the QiHaRiGeTu-SaiHanGaoBi palaeochannel (CH01), BaYanWuLa palaeochannel (CH02) and GaoLiHan palaeochanne l(CH03), et al., which character the length from several 10s of km to 100 km, width of several 10s of km and thickness of sand bodies from 20 m to 130 m, more or less. Palaeochannels of the Saihan formation are interformational type because the underlay is argillite at the top of the Tenggeer formation. Restrictive geological environments and conditions are necessary to form longitudinal channels and mainly are as follows: (1) the basin in the sustained step of depression; (2) sharp gradient (>5°?) in parts of sub-depressions and sufficient sedimentary supply from the upstream; (3) elongate erosional lowlands or

  18. Geological characteristic of the main oil and gas producing formations of the upper Austrian molasse basin. Pt. 1. The Eocene sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, L [Rohoel-Aufsuchungs-Gesellschaft m.b.H., Vienna (Austria)

    1980-09-01

    The sandstones of the Upper Eocene are the main oil carriers within RAG's Upper Austrian concession area. The attempt is being made to reconstruct the paleogeography of the Eocene-in which time the sea transgressed the Molasse basin towards N and E - from core and log evidence. From deep Lower Tertiary onwards the mesozoic and older sediments were exposed to intensive erosion, which resulted in a slightly undulating peneplane sloping in a S to SW direction. This erosion plane was - still in Lower Tertiary times - in some areas dissected into horst and graben structures which greatly influenced the deposition of the early Eocene sediments. During the Upper Eocene the Molasse basin began to subside and subsided more strongly in the SW than in the N and NE, so that neritic deposits could form in the first area, whereas lagoonal and brackish sedimentation still prevailed in the latter. The Eocene sandstones are being classified according to their environment of deposition, and their reservoir, characteristics are being studied. Sandstones are absent in the neritic environment of the Discocyclina-marls only. Sand deposits have been encountered as: 1) transgressive horizons directly overlying the pretertiary substrate, 2) infills of channels cut into limnic-brackish sediments, 3) littoral deposits, partly interfingering with Lithothamnium limestone, 4) fine grained sandy marls and nummulitic sandstones within sublittoral to neritic sediments.

  19. Remote-sensing and geological information for prospective area selection of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposit in Songliao and Liaohe faulted-depressed basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Baoshan

    1998-01-01

    On the basis of remote-sensing information and geological environments for the formation of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits such as geomorphic features, distribution of drainage system, and paleo-alluvial (diluvial) fans and time-space distribution regularities of orehosting rocks and sandstone bodies in Songliao and Liaohe faulted-depressed basins, image features, tectonic patterns and paleo-geographic environment of the prospective areas are discussed for both basins, and based on a great number of petroleum-geological data and comparison analysis, a remote sensing-geological prospecting model for in-situ leachable sandstonetype uranium deposits in the region is established, providing indications for selection of prospective area

  20. Hydrogeology of an ancient arid closed basin: Implications for tabular sandstone-hosted uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogeologic modeling shows that tabular-type uranium deposits in the grants uranium region of the San Juan basin, New Mexico, formed in zones of ascending and discharging regional ground-water flow. The association of either lacustrine mudstone or actively subsiding structures and uranium deposits can best be explained by the occurrence of lakes at topographic depressions where ground water having different sources and compositions is likely to converge, mix, and discharge. Ascending and discharging flow also explains the association of uranium deposits with underlying evaporites and suggests a brine interface. The simulations contradict previous suggestions that ground water moved downward in the mudflat

  1. Material-balance assessment of the New Albany-Chesterian petroleum system of the Illinois basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewan, M.D.; Henry, M.E.; Higley, D.K.; Pitman, Janet K.

    2002-01-01

    The New Albany-Chesterian petroleum system of the Illinois basin is a well-constrained system from which petroleum charges and losses were quantified through a material-balance assessment. This petroleum system has nearly 90,000 wells penetrating the Chesterian section, a single New Albany Shale source rock accounting for more than 99% of the produced oil, well-established stratigraphic and structural frameworks, and accessible source rock samples at various maturity levels. A hydrogen index (HI) map based on Rock-Eval analyses of source rock samples of New Albany Shale defines the pod of active source rock and extent of oil generation. Based on a buoyancy-drive model, the system was divided into seven secondary-migration catchments. Each catchment contains a part of the active pod of source rock from which it derives a petroleum charge, and this charge is confined to carrier beds and reservoirs within these catchments as accountable petroleum, petroleum losses, or undiscovered petroleum. A well-constrained catchment with no apparent erosional or leakage losses is used to determine an actual petroleum charge from accountable petroleum and residual migration losses. This actual petroleum charge is used to calibrate the other catchments in which erosional petroleum losses have occurred. Petroleum charges determined by laboratory pyrolysis are exaggerated relative to the actual petroleum charge. Rock-Eval charges are exaggerated by a factor of 4-14, and hydrouspyrolysis charges are exaggerated by a factor of 1.7. The actual petroleum charge provides a more meaningful material balance and more realistic estimates of petroleum losses and remaining undiscovered petroleum. The total petroleum charge determined for the New Albany-Chesterian system is 78 billion bbl, of which 11.4 billion bbl occur as a accountable in place petroleum, 9 billion bbl occur as residual migration losses, and 57.6 billion bbl occur as erosional losses. Of the erosional losses, 40 billion bbl

  2. Cyclostratigraphic calibration of the Famennian stage (Late Devonian, Illinois Basin, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Damien; Hinnov, Linda; Day, James E. (Jed); Kodama, Kenneth; Sinnesael, Matthias; Liu, Wei

    2018-04-01

    The Late Devonian biosphere was affected by two of the most severe biodiversity crises in Earth's history, the Kellwasser and Hangenberg events near the Frasnian-Famennian (F-F) and the Devonian-Carboniferous (D-C) boundaries, respectively. Current hypotheses for the causes of the Late Devonian extinctions are focused on climate changes and associated ocean anoxia. Testing these hypotheses has been impeded by a lack of sufficient temporal resolution in paleobiological, tectonic and climate proxy records. While there have been recent advances in astronomical calibration that have improved the accuracy of the Frasnian time scale and part of the Famennian, the time duration of the entire Famennian Stage remains poorly constrained. During the Late Devonian, a complete Late Frasnian-Early Carboniferous succession of deep-shelf deposits accumulated in the epieric sea in Illinois Basin of the central North-American mid-continent. A record of this sequence is captured in three overlapping cores (H-30, Sullivan and H-32). The H-30 core section spans the F-F boundary; the Sullivan section spans almost all of the Famennian and the H-32 section sampled spans the interval of the Upper Famennian and the D-C boundary. To have the best chance of capturing Milankovitch cycles, 2000 rock samples were collected at minimum 5-cm-interval across the entire sequence. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) was measured on each sample and the preservation of climatic information into the MS signal was verified through geochemical analyses and low-temperature magnetic susceptibility acquisition. To estimate the duration of the Famennian Stage, we applied multiple spectral techniques and tuned the MS signal using the highly stable 405 kyr cycle for Sullivan and the obliquity cycle for the H-30 and H-32 cores. Based on the correlation between the cores we constructed a Famennian floating astronomical time scale, which indicates a duration of 13.5 ± 0.5 myr. An uncertainty of 0.5 myr was estimated for

  3. Study on exploration theory and SAR technology for interlayer oxidation zone sandstone type uranium deposit and its application in Eastern Jungar Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Wei; Liu Dechang; Rui Benshan; Zhao Yingjun; Huang Xianfang; Huang Shutao

    2001-01-01

    Started with analyzing the features of metallogenetic epoch and space distribution of typical interlayer oxidation zone sandstone type uranium deposit both in China and abroad and their relations of basin evolution, the authors have proposed the idea that the last unconformity mainly controls the metallogenetic epoch and the strength of structure activity after the last unconformity determines the deposit space. An exploration theory with the kernel from new events to the old one is put forward. The means and method to use SAR technology to identify ore-controlling key factors are discussed. An application study in Eastern Jungar Basin is performed

  4. Forecasting sandstone uranium deposits in oil-and-gas bearing basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechenkin, I.

    2014-01-01

    . Such work was carried out within the limits of the Ordos oil and gas basin and adjacent structures, where a set of paleontological maps and cross-sections was created. They reflect the relationship between hydrogenic redox processes over long periods in the geological history of the region. Comparative analysis of the sequence of multidirectional epigenetic alterations in sedimentary basins in Central Asia and adjacent territories was instrumental in forming the overall picture of uranium ore genesis complicated by the intrusion of various reducing agents. The methods used in the study of epigenetic alterations in the formations of oil and gas sedimentary basins were developed on uranium rock bodies in Central Asia. These methods were successfully applied during forecasting on the fringes of oil-and-gas basins across the whole of the Asian continent. They made it possible to carry out metallogenic zoning of a large territory in terms of uranium and at the same time to estimate the role of hydrocarbons. The interrelation of epigenetic processes determines the distinctive characteristics of ore genesis in different parts of oil and gas basins. Their detection by means of mapping creates the necessary conditions for determining the prospects for both local regions of subsoil assets and large geological structures. (author)

  5. CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical behaviour of Hawkesbury sandstone in the Gosford basin: An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathnaweera, T.D. [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Building 60, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Ranjith, P.G., E-mail: ranjith.pg@monash.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Building 60, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Perera, M.S.A.; Haque, A. [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Building 60, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lashin, A. [King Saud University, College of Engineering-Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Department, P.O. Box 800, Riyadh 11421, Saudi Arabia. (Saudi Arabia); Benha University, Faculty of Science-Geology Department, P.O. Box 13518, Benha (Egypt); Al Arifi, N. [King Saud University, College of Science-Geology and Geophysics Department, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. (Saudi Arabia); Chandrasekharam, D [King Saud University, College of Science-Geology and Geophysics Department, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. (Saudi Arabia); Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, 400076 India (India); Yang, SQ [Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University, Building 60, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Xu, T; Wang, SH [Center for Rock Instability & Seismicity Research, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Yasar, E [Iskenderun Technical University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Dept. of Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, 31200 (Turkey)

    2015-08-12

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestered in saline aquifers undergoes a variety of chemically-coupled mechanical effects, which may cause CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical changes and time-dependent reservoir deformation. This paper investigates the mineralogical and microstructural changes that occur in reservoir rocks following injection of CO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers and the manner in which these changes influence the mechanical properties of the reservoir rocks. In this study, cylindrical sandstone specimens, 38 mm in diameter and 76 mm high, obtained from the Gosford basin, were used to perform a series of unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests. Different saturation conditions: dry, water- and brine-saturated sandstone samples with and without scCO{sub 2} (super-critical carbon dioxide) injection, were considered in the study to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the impact of scCO{sub 2} injection during the CO{sub 2} sequestration process on saline aquifer mechanical properties. An acoustic emission (AE) system was employed to identify the stress threshold values of crack closure, crack initiation and crack damage for each testing condition during the whole deformation process of the specimens. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyses were performed to evaluate the chemical and mineralogical changes that occur in reservoir rocks during CO{sub 2} injection. From the test results, it is clear that the CO{sub 2}-saturated samples possessed a lower peak strength compared to non-CO{sub 2} saturated samples. According to SEM, XRD and XRF analyses, considerable quartz mineral corrosion and dissolution of calcite and siderite were observed during the interactions of the CO{sub 2}/water/rock and CO{sub 2}/brine/rock systems, which implies that mineralogical and geochemical rock alterations affect rock mechanical properties by accelerating the collapse mechanisms of the pore matrix. AE results

  6. Metallogenic condition and regularity of inter layered oxidation zone-type sandstone uranium deposit in southwestern part of Turpan-Hami basin, Northwestern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang Weidong; Chen Zhaobo; Chen Zuyi; Yin Jinshuang

    2001-01-01

    Regional geological surveying and drilling evaluation in recent years show that there are very large potential resources of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the southwestern part of Turpan-Hami basin. According to the characteristics of tectonic evolution and sedimentary cover of the basin, the evolution stages and types of the basin are divided, and the favorable development stages for the ore-bearing formation and the formation of uranium deposits in the evolution process are identified. The metallogenic conditions of uranium deposits are deeply discussed from four aspects: basic tectonics, paleoclimate evolution, hydrogeology and uranium source of the region. All these have laid an important foundation for accurate prediction and evaluation of uranium resources in this region. The research indicates that the uranium metallogeny is a process of long-term, multi-stage and pulsation. The authors try to ascertain the role of organic matter in concentrating uranium. The organic matter is of humic type in sandstone host-rock in the studied area, whose original mother material mainly belongs to terrestrial high plant. The maturity of the organic matter is very low, being in low-grade stage of thermal evolution. Correlation analysis and separation experiments show that uranium concentration is closely related with the organic matter, and the organic matter in uranium ore is mainly in the form of humic acid adsorption and humate. For this reason the total organic carbon content is often increased in the geochemical redox zone in epigenetic sandstone-type uranium deposits. It is suggested that the north of China is of great potential for sandstone-type uranium resources

  7. Muddy and dolomitic rip-up clasts in Triassic fluvial sandstones: Origin and impact on potential reservoir properties (Argana Basin, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henares, Saturnina; Arribas, Jose; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Viseras, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    The significance of rip-up clasts as sandstone framework grains is frequently neglected in the literature being considered as accessory components in bulk sandstone composition. However, this study highlights the great value of muddy and dolomitic rip-up clast occurrence as: (a) information source about low preservation potential from floodplain deposits and (b) key element controlling host sandstone diagenetic evolution and thus ultimate reservoir quality. High-resolution petrographic analysis on Triassic fluvial sandstones from Argana Basin (T6 and T7/T8 units) highlights the significance of different types of rip-up clasts as intrabasinal framework components of continental sediments from arid climates. On the basis of their composition and ductility, three main types are distinguished: (a) muddy rip-up clasts, (b) dolomitic muddy rip-up clasts and (c) dolomite crystalline rip-up clasts. Spatial distribution of different types is strongly facies-related according to grain size. Origin of rip-up clasts is related to erosion of coeval phreatic dolocretes, in different development stages, and associated muddy floodplain sediments. Cloudy cores with abundant inclusions and clear outer rims of dolomite crystals suggest a first replacive and a subsequent displacive growth, respectively. Dolomite crystals are almost stoichiometric. This composition is very similar to that of early sandstone dolomite cement, supporting phreatic dolocretes as dolomite origin in both situations. Sandstone diagenesis is dominated by mechanical compaction and dolomite cementation. A direct correlation exists between: (1) muddy rip-up clast abundance and early reduction of primary porosity by compaction with irreversible loss of intergranular volume (IGV); and (2) occurrence of dolomitic rip-up clasts and dolomite cement nucleation in host sandstone, occluding adjacent pores but preserving IGV. Both processes affect reservoir quality by generation of vertical and 3D fluid flow baffles and

  8. Lack of inhibiting effect of oil emplacement on quartz cementation: Evidence from Cambrian reservoir sandstones, Paleozoic Baltic Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; Cyziene, Jolanta; Sliaupa, Saulius

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the question of whether or not the presence of oil in sandstone inhibits quartz cementation and preserves porosity is still debated. Data from a number of Cambrian sandstone oil fields and dry fields have been studied to determine the effects of oil emplacement on quartz cementation. T...

  9. New geochronologic and stratigraphic evidence confirms the paleocene age of the dinosaur-bearing ojo alamo sandstone and animas formation in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dinosaur fossils are present in the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and Animas Formation in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and Colorado. Evidence for the Paleo-cene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone includes palynologic and paleomagnetic data. Palynologic data indicate that the entire Ojo Alamo Sandstone, including the lower dinosaur-bearing part, is Paleocene in age. All of the palynomorph-productive rock samples collected from the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at multiple localities lacked Creta-ceous index palynomorphs (except for rare, reworked specimens) and produced Paleocene index palynomorphs. Paleocene palynomorphs have been identified strati-graphically below dinosaur fossils at two separate localities in the Ojo Alamo Sand-stone in the central and southern parts of the basin. The Animas Formation in the Colorado part of the basin also contains dinosaur fossils, and its Paleocene age has been established based on fossil leaves and palynology. Magnetostratigraphy provides independent evidence for the Paleocene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone and its dinosaur-bearing beds. Normal-polarity magnetochron C29n (early Paleocene) has been identified in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at six localities in the southern part of the San Juan Basin. An assemblage of 34 skeletal elements from a single hadrosaur, found in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone in the southern San Juan Basin, provided conclusive evidence that this assemblage could not have been reworked from underlying Cretaceous strata. In addition, geochemical studies of 15 vertebrate bones from the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and 15 bone samples from the underlying Kirtland Formation of Late Creta-ceous (Campanian) age show that each sample suite contained distinctly different abundances of uranium and rare-earth elements, indicating that the bones were miner-alized in place soon after burial, and that none of the Paleocene dinosaur bones ana-lyzed had been reworked. ?? U.S. Geological Survey, Public Domain April 2009.

  10. Dilatant shear band formation and diagenesis in calcareous, arkosic sandstones, Vienna Basin (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lommatzsch, Marco; Exner, Ulrike; Gier, Susanne; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines deformation bands in calcareous arkosic sands. The investigated units can be considered as an equivalent to the Matzen field in the Vienna Basin (Austria), which is one of the most productive oil reservoirs in central Europe. The outcrop exposes carbonate-free and carbonatic sediments of Badenian age separated by a normal fault. Carbonatic sediments in the hanging wall of the normal fault develop dilation bands with minor shear displacements (< 2 mm), whereas carbonate-free sediments in the footwall develop cataclastic shear bands with up to 70 cm displacement. The cataclastic shear bands show a permeability reduction up to 3 orders of magnitude and strong baffling effects in the vadose zone. Carbonatic dilation bands show a permeability reduction of 1-2 orders of magnitude and no baffling structures. We distinguished two types of deformation bands in the carbonatic units, which differ in deformation mechanisms, distribution and composition. Full-cemented bands form as dilation bands with an intense syn-kinematic calcite cementation, whereas the younger loose-cemented bands are dilatant shear bands cemented by patchy calcite and clay minerals. All analyzed bands are characterized by a porosity and permeability reduction caused by grain fracturing and cementation. The changed petrophysical properties and especially the porosity evolution are closely related to diagenetic processes driven by varying pore fluids in different diagenetic environments. The deformation band evolution and sealing capacity is controlled by the initial host rock composition. PMID:26300577

  11. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    interpretation of the Mt. Simon and Knox sections difficult. The data quality also gradually decreased moving westward across the state. To meet evolving project objectives, in 2012 the seismic data was re-processed using different techniques to enhance the signal quality thereby rendering a more coherent seismic profile for interpreters. It is believed that the seismic degradation could be caused by shallow natural gas deposits and Quaternary sediments (which include abandoned river and stream channels, former ponds, and swamps with peat deposits) that may have complicated or changed the seismic wavelet. Where previously limited by seismic coverage, the seismic profiles have provided valuable subsurface information across central Illinois. Some of the interpretations based on this survey included, but are not limited to: - Stratigraphy generally gently dips to the east from Morgan to Douglas County. - The Knox Supergroup roughly maintains its thickness. There is little evidence for faulting in the Knox. However, at least one resolvable fault penetrates the entire Knox section. - The Eau Claire Formation, the primary seal for the Mt. Simon Sandstone, appears to be continuous across the entire seismic profile. - The Mt. Simon Sandstone thins towards the western edge of the basin. As a result, the highly porous lowermost Mt. Simon section is absent in the western part of the state. - Overall basement dip is from west to east. - Basement topography shows evidence of basement highs with on-lapping patterns by Mt. Simon sediments. - There is evidence of faults within the lower Mt. Simon Sandstone and basement rock that are contemporaneous with Mt. Simon Sandstone deposition. These faults are not active and do not penetrate the Eau Claire Shale. It is believed that these faults are associated with a possible failed rifting event 750 to 560 million years ago during the breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia.

  12. Anomalies of natural gas compositions and carbon isotope ratios caused by gas diffusion - A case from the Donghe Sandstone reservoir in the Hadexun Oilfield, Tarim Basin, northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyang; Chen, Jianfa; Pang, Xiongqi; Zhang, Baoshou; Wang, Yifan; He, Liwen; Chen, Zeya; Zhang, Guoqiang

    2018-05-01

    Natural gases in the Carboniferous Donghe Sandstone reservoir within the Block HD4 of the Hadexun Oilfield, Tarim Basin are characterized by abnormally low total hydrocarbon gas contents ( δ13C ethane (C2) gas has never been reported previously in the Tarim Basin and such large variations in δ13C have rarely been observed in other basins globally. Based on a comprehensive analysis of gas geochemical data and the geological setting of the Carboniferous reservoirs in the Hadexun Oilfield, we reveal that the anomalies of the gas compositions and carbon isotope ratios in the Donghe Sandstone reservoir are caused by gas diffusion through the poorly-sealed caprock rather than by pathways such as gas mixing, microorganism degradation, different kerogen types or thermal maturity degrees of source rocks. The documentation of an in-reservoir gas diffusion during the post entrapment process as a major cause for gas geochemical anomalies may offer important insight into exploring natural gas resources in deeply buried sedimentary basins.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE RESERVOIRS FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY: THE PERMIAN UPPER MINNELUSA FORMATION, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Scheffler, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Upper Minnelusa sandstones form a complex group of reservoirs because of variations in regional setting, sedimentology, and diagenetic alteration. Structural lineaments separate the reservoirs into northern and southern zones. Production in the north is from a single pay sand, and in the south from multi-pay sands due to differential erosion on top of the Upper Minnelusa. The intercalation of eolian dune, interdune, and sabkha sandstones with marine sandstones, carbonates, and anhydrites results in significant reservoir heterogeneity. Diagenetic alterations further enhance heterogeneity, because the degree of cementation and dissolution is partly facies-related.

  14. Effect of pore structure on the seepage characteristics of tight sandstone reservoirs: A case study of Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm reservoirs in the western Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Sima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tight sandstone reservoirs are characterized by complex pore structures and strong heterogeneity, and their seepage characteristics are much different from those of conventional sandstone reservoirs. In this paper, the tight sandstone reservoirs of Upper Jurassic Penglaizhen Fm in western Sichuan Basin were analyzed in terms of their pore structures by using the data about physical property, mercury injection and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests. Then, the seepage characteristics and the gas–water two-phase migration mechanisms and distribution of tight sandstone reservoirs with different types of pore structures in the process of hydrocarbon accumulation and development were simulated by combining the relative permeability experiment with the visual microscopic displacement model. It is shown that crotch-like viscous fingering occurs in the process of gas front advancing in reservoirs with different pore structures. The better the pore structure is, the lower the irreducible water saturation is; the higher the gas-phase relative permeability of irreducible water is, the more easily the gas reservoir can be developed. At the late stage of development, the residual gas is sealed in reservoirs in the forms of bypass, cutoff and dead end. In various reservoirs, the interference between gas and water is stronger, so gas and water tends to be produced simultaneously. The sealed gas may reduce the production rate of gas wells significantly, and the existence of water phase may reduce the gas permeability greatly; consequently, the water-bearing low-permeability tight sandstone gas reservoirs reveal serious water production, highly-difficult development and low-recovery percentage at the late stage, which have adverse impacts on the effective production and development of gas wells.

  15. Preliminary analysis of the sandstone accumulation situation at Sha-3 of the Paleogene Series Shakhetsze in the Khekou basin of the Tsziyan region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S

    1984-01-01

    The Khekou basin of the second order which is located in the Eastern part of the Tsziyan basin in the oil and gas Bokhayvan'skiy pool has an area of about 900 km/sup 2/. The main productive level occurs in sandstone beds in the Sha-3 subseries (reaching thickness of about 400 m) of the Shakhetsze series. The Bonan oil field was discovered in this region in 1975. The initially productive deposits were viewed as fluvial-delta; however, studies of recent years, including investigation of the sedimentation sequences and the structures that mark the surfaces of the microscopic level in the core sample, together with an analysis of borehole geophysical data, indicated that the sandy bodies of the productive beds in the basin must be viewed as deposits of turbidite flows and deposits of gravitational flows in channels. Insofar as distribution of the turbidite sandstones differs significantly from the delta, this led to a review of the long-term trends in the neighboring fields.

  16. Summary of Surface-Water Quality Data from the Illinois River Basin in Northeast Oklahoma, 1970-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, William J.; Becker, Mark F.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Tortorelli, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    The quality of streams in the Illinois River Basin of northeastern Oklahoma is potentially threatened by increased quantities of wastes discharged from increasing human populations, grazing of about 160,000 cattle, and confined animal feeding operations raising about 20 million chickens. Increasing numbers of humans and livestock in the basin contribute nutrients and bacteria to surface water and groundwater, causing greater than the typical concentrations of those constituents for this region. Consequences of increasing contributions of these substances can include increased algal growth (eutrophication) in streams and lakes; impairment of habitat for native aquatic animals, including desirable game fish species; impairment of drinking-water quality by sediments, turbidity, taste-and-odor causing chemicals, toxic algal compounds, and bacteria; and reduction in the aesthetic quality of the streams. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission, prepared this report to summarize the surface-water-quality data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey at five long-term surface-water-quality monitoring sites. The data summarized include major ions, nutrients, sediment, and fecal-indicator bacteria from the Illinois River Basin in Oklahoma for 1970 through 2007. General water chemistry, concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus compounds, chlorophyll-a (an indicator of algal biomass), fecal-indicator bacteria counts, and sediment concentrations were similar among the five long-term monitoring sites in the Illinois River Basin in northeast Oklahoma. Most water samples were phosphorus-limited, meaning that they contained a smaller proportion of phosphorus, relative to nitrogen, than typically occurs in algal tissues. Greater degrees of nitrogen limitation occurred at three of the five sites which were sampled back to the 1970s, probably due to use of detergents containing greater concentrations of phosphorus than in subsequent

  17. Implementation and Evaluation of the Streamflow Statistics (StreamStats) Web Application for Computing Basin Characteristics and Flood Peaks in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Audrey L.; Soong, David T.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.

    2010-01-01

    Illinois StreamStats (ILSS) is a Web-based application for computing selected basin characteristics and flood-peak quantiles based on the most recently (2010) published (Soong and others, 2004) regional flood-frequency equations at any rural stream location in Illinois. Limited streamflow statistics including general statistics, flow durations, and base flows also are available for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations. ILSS can be accessed on the Web at http://streamstats.usgs.gov/ by selecting the State Applications hyperlink and choosing Illinois from the pull-down menu. ILSS was implemented for Illinois by obtaining and projecting ancillary geographic information system (GIS) coverages; populating the StreamStats database with streamflow-gaging station data; hydroprocessing the 30-meter digital elevation model (DEM) for Illinois to conform to streams represented in the National Hydrographic Dataset 1:100,000 stream coverage; and customizing the Web-based Extensible Markup Language (XML) programs for computing basin characteristics for Illinois. The basin characteristics computed by ILSS then were compared to the basin characteristics used in the published study, and adjustments were applied to the XML algorithms for slope and basin length. Testing of ILSS was accomplished by comparing flood quantiles computed by ILSS at a an approximately random sample of 170 streamflow-gaging stations computed by ILSS with the published flood quantile estimates. Differences between the log-transformed flood quantiles were not statistically significant at the 95-percent confidence level for the State as a whole, nor by the regions determined by each equation, except for region 1, in the northwest corner of the State. In region 1, the average difference in flood quantile estimates ranged from 3.76 percent for the 2-year flood quantile to 4.27 percent for the 500-year flood quantile. The total number of stations in region 1 was small (21) and the mean

  18. Kaolinite, illite and quartz dissolution in the karstification of Paleozoic sandstones of the Furnas Formation, Paraná Basin, Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mário Sérgio de; Guimarães, Gilson Burigo; Chinelatto, Adilson Luiz; Giannini, Paulo César Fonseca; Pontes, Henrique Simão; Chinelatto, Adriana Scoton Antonio; Atencio, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Karstification processes in sandstones of the Furnas Formation, Silurian to Devonian of the Paraná Basin, have been described since the mid-twentieth century. However, some geologists still doubt the idea of true karst in sandstones. Studies carried out in the Campos Gerais region, Paraná State, Southern Brazil, aimed at investigating the nature of erosion processes in Furnas Formation and the role of the dissolution in the development of their notorious erosive features and underground cavities. These studies have led to the recognition of dissolution macro to micro features ('furnas', caves, ponds, sinks, ruiniform relief on cliffs and rocky surfaces, grain corrosion, speleothems, mineral reprecipitation and incrustation). The analysis (scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry and x-ray diffractometry) of sandstones and their alterites has indicated significant dissolution of clay cement along with discrete quartz grain dissolution. This mesodiagenetic cement (kaolinite and illite) is dissolved and reprecipitated as clay minerals with poorly developed crystallinity along with other minerals, such as variscite and minerals of the alunite supergroup, suggesting organic participation in the processes of dissolution and incrustation. The mineral reprecipitation usually forms centimetric speleothems, found in cavities and sheltered rocky surfaces. The cement dissolution associated with other factors (fractures, wet weather, strong hydraulic gradient, antiquity of the landforms) leads to the rock arenisation, the underground erosion and the appearance of the karst features. Carbonate rocks in the basement may locally be increasing the karst forms in the overlying Furnas Formation. The recognition of the karst character of the Furnas Formation sandstones has important implications in the management of underground water resources (increasingly exploited in the region), in the use of the unique geological heritage and in the prevention of geo

  19. Mathematical programming (MP) model to determine optimal transportation infrastructure for geologic CO2 storage in the Illinois basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmer, Donald E.

    Analysis of results from a mathematical programming model were examined to 1) determine the least cost options for infrastructure development of geologic storage of CO2 in the Illinois Basin, and 2) perform an analysis of a number of CO2 emission tax and oil price scenarios in order to implement development of the least-cost pipeline networks for distribution of CO2. The model, using mixed integer programming, tested the hypothesis of whether viable EOR sequestration sites can serve as nodal points or hubs to expand the CO2 delivery infrastructure to more distal locations from the emissions sources. This is in contrast to previous model results based on a point-to- point model having direct pipeline segments from each CO2 capture site to each storage sink. There is literature on the spoke and hub problem that relates to airline scheduling as well as maritime shipping. A large-scale ship assignment problem that utilized integer linear programming was run on Excel Solver and described by Mourao et al., (2001). Other literature indicates that aircraft assignment in spoke and hub routes can also be achieved using integer linear programming (Daskin and Panayotopoulos, 1989; Hane et al., 1995). The distribution concept is basically the reverse of the "tree and branch" type (Rothfarb et al., 1970) gathering systems for oil and natural gas that industry has been developing for decades. Model results indicate that the inclusion of hubs as variables in the model yields lower transportation costs for geologic carbon dioxide storage over previous models of point-to-point infrastructure geometries. Tabular results and GIS maps of the selected scenarios illustrate that EOR sites can serve as nodal points or hubs for distribution of CO2 to distal oil field locations as well as deeper saline reservoirs. Revenue amounts and capture percentages both show an improvement over solutions when the hubs are not allowed to come into the solution. Other results indicate that geologic

  20. Discussion on age and paleo geographical environment of ore bearing strata for sandstone-type uranium deposits in Bayanwula area, Erlian basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xiujun; Nie Fengjun; Chen Yiping; Wang Wei

    2008-01-01

    The sandstone-type uranium ore-bearing strata of Erlian basin is a suit of coarse crumb rocks that are mainly of river and marsh sedimentary faces, age of ore-bearing strata in this area is in dispute. By studying the palynology of ore-bearing strata in Bayanwula area, particularly the distribution of the spore and the pollen in the stratum and the comparison of domestic and the international palynology as- semblage, its age of the strata was identified belong to aptian-albian stages of the Later Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) under substropic warm humid climate with the tendency to semihumid and semi-dryhot. The paleo geography was of the low-fiat and undulating topography, a few middling and high mountains distributing around the basin. (authors)

  1. Study on the relationships between the structural evolution and sandstone-type uranium mineralization in mesozoic era and cenozoic era in the northern of Chaidam basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lin; Song Zhe; Song Xiansheng; Feng Wei

    2008-01-01

    By detailed expounding the characteristics of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic structural evolution in northern of Chaidam basin, the author inquires into its relationships with the sandstone-type uranium mineralization, analyzes the prospect of forming uranium deposit, and thinks that the Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata are mainly controlled by the tectonic role of the later Yanshan movement and the later Cenozoic era. The north-west palaeo-structural slope belt is formed in the later Cretacous Epoch that is favorable for developing palaeo-interlayer oxidized zone. After the slightly extensional role of the oldest Tertiary and the early Plioeene, the middle and lower Jurassic were buried, and the block-imbricated slope belts are formed in the tectonic movement of the later Cenozoic, which are favorable for developing recent interlayer oxidized zone. According to drilling, it has the conditions for forming palaeo-recent interlayer oxidized zone sandstone-type uranium deposit at the northern of Chaidam basin. Finally, the author lays his finger on the prospecting of uranium. (authors)

  2. Water in urban planning, Salt Creek Basin, Illinois water management as related to alternative land-use practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieker, Andrew Maute

    1970-01-01

    Water management can be an integral part of urban comprehensive planning in a large metropolitan area. Water both imposes constraints on land use and offers opportunities for coordinated land and water management. Salt Creek basin in Cook and Du Page Counties of the Chicago metropolitan area is typical of rapidly developing suburban areas and has been selected to illustrate some of these constraints and opportunities and to suggest the effects of alternative solutions. The present study concentrates on the related problems of ground-water recharge, water quality, management of flood plains, and flood-control measures. Salt Creek basin has a drainage area of 150 square miles. It is in flat to. gently rolling terrain, underlain by glacial drift as much as 200 feet thick which covers a dolomite aquifer. In 1964, the population of the basin was about 400,000, and 40 percent of the land was in urban development. The population is expected to number 550,000 to 650,000 by 1990, and most of the land will be taken by urban development. Salt Creek is a sluggish stream, typical of small drainage channels in the headwaters area of northeastern Illinois. Low flows of 15 to 25 cubic feet per second in the lower part of the basin consist largely of sewage effluent. Nearly all the public water supplies in the basin depend on ground water. Of the total pumpage of 27.5 million gallons per day, 17.5 million gallons per day is pumped from the deep (Cambrian-Ordovician) aquifers and 10 million gallons per day is pumped from the shallow (Silurian dolomite and glacial drift) aquifers. The potential yield of the shallow aquifers, particularly glacial drift in the northern part of the basin, far exceeds present use. The largest concentration of pumpage from the shallow ,aquifers is in the Hinsdale-La Grange area. Salt Creek serves as an important source of recharge to these supplies, particularly just east of Hinsdale. The entire reach of Salt Creek south and east of Elmhurst can be

  3. Preliminary discussion on prospecting potential for sandstone-type uranium deposits in meso-cenozoic basins, northern Ordos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Yongqiang

    2002-01-01

    Characteristics of the regional stratigraphy, tectonic movement, geologic evolution and hydrogeology are briefly introduced. Using the metallogenic theory and prospecting criteria for interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits, the author analyses the prospecting potential and main prospecting targets in the region, and proposes suggestions for further prospecting work as well

  4. Isotopic composition of salt efflorescence from the sandstone castellated rocks of the Bohemian Cretaceous Basin (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schweigstillová, Jana; Přikryl, R.; Novotná, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2009), s. 217-225 ISSN 0943-0105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : stable isotopes * salt efflorescence * sandstone Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.078, year: 2009

  5. Characterization and 3D reservoir modelling of fluvial sandstones of the Williams Fork Formation, Rulison Field, Piceance Basin, Colorado, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pranter, Matthew J; Vargas, Marielis F; Davis, Thomas L

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the stratigraphic characteristics and distribution of fluvial deposits of the Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation in a portion of Rulison Field and addresses 3D geologic modelling of reservoir sand bodies and their associated connectivity. Fluvial deposits include isolated and stacked point-bar deposits, crevasse splays and overbank (floodplain) mudrock. Within the Williams Fork Formation, the distribution and connectivity of fluvial sandstones significantly impact reservoir productivity and ultimate recovery. The reservoir sandstones are primarily fluvial point-bar deposits interbedded with shales and coals. Because of the lenticular geometry and limited lateral extent of the reservoir sandstones (common apparent widths of ∼500–1000 ft; ∼150–300 m), relatively high well densities (e.g. 10 acre (660 ft; 200 m) spacing) are often required to deplete the reservoir. Heterogeneity of these fluvial deposits includes larger scale stratigraphic variability associated with vertical stacking patterns and structural heterogeneities associated with faults that exhibit lateral and reverse offsets. The discontinuous character of the fluvial sandstones and lack of distinct marker beds in the middle and upper parts of the Williams Fork Formation make correlation between wells tenuous, even at a 10 acre well spacing. Some intervals of thicker and amalgamated sandstones within the middle and upper Williams Fork Formation can be correlated across greater distances. To aid correlation and for 3D reservoir modelling, vertical lithology proportion curves were used to estimate stratigraphic trends and define the stratigraphic zonation within the reservoir interval. Object-based and indicator-based modelling methods have been applied to the same data and results from the models were compared. Results from the 3D modelling indicate that sandstone connectivity increases with net-to-gross ratio and, at lower net-to-gross ratios (<30%), differences exist in

  6. Structural and microstructural evolution of fault zones in Cretaceous poorly lithified sandstones of the Rio do Peixe basin, Paraiba, NE Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Fabrizio; Nogueira, Francisco; Storti, Fabrizio; Bezerra, Francisco H. R.; De Carvalho, Bruno R.; André De Souza, Jorge

    2017-04-01

    In this contribution we describe the structural architecture and microstructural features of fault zones developed in Cretaceous, poorly lithified sandstones of the Rio do Peixe basin, NE Brazil. The Rio do Peixe basin is an E-W-trending, intracontinental half-graben basin developed along the Precambrian Patos shear zone where it is abutted by the Porto Alegre shear zone. The basin formed during rifting between South America and Africa plates and was reactivated and inverted in a strike-slip setting during the Cenozoic. Sediments filling the basin consist of an heterolithic sequence of alternating sandstones, conglomerates, siltstone and clay-rich layers. These lithologies are generally poorly lithified far from the major fault zones. Deformational structures in the basin mostly consist of deformation band-dominated fault zones. Extensional and strike-slip fault zones, clusters of deformation bands, and single deformation bands are commonly well developed in the proximity of the basin-boundary fault systems. All deformation structures are generally in positive relief with respect to the host rocks. Extensional fault zones locally have growth strata in their hangingwall blocks and have displacement generally <10 m. In map view, they are organized in anastomosed segments with high connectivity. They strike E-W to NE-SW, and typically consist of wide fault cores (< 1 m in width) surrounded by up to few-meter wide damage zones. Fault cores are characterized by distributed deformation without pervasive strain localization in narrow shear bands, in which bedding is transposed into foliation imparted by grain preferred orientation. Microstructural observations show negligible cataclasis and dominant non-destructive particulate flow, suggesting that extensional fault zones developed in soft-sediment conditions in a water-saturated environment. Strike-slip fault zones commonly overprint the extensional ones and have displacement values typically lower than about 2 m. They

  7. The Cottage Grove fault system (Illinois Basin): Late Paleozoic transpression along a Precambrian crustal boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchek, A.B.; McBride, J.H.; Nelson, W.J.; Leetaru, H.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois has long been interpreted as an intracratonic dextral strike-slip fault system. We investigated its structural geometry and kinematics in detail using (1) outcrop data, (2) extensive exposures in underground coal mines, (3) abundant borehole data, and (4) a network of industry seismic reflection profiles, including data reprocessed by us. Structural contour mapping delineates distinct monoclines, broad anticlines, and synclines that express Paleozoic-age deformation associated with strike slip along the fault system. As shown on seismic reflection profiles, prominent near-vertical faults that cut the entire Paleozoic section and basement-cover contact branch upward into outward-splaying, high-angle reverse faults. The master fault, sinuous along strike, is characterized along its length by an elongate anticline, ???3 km wide, that parallels the southern side of the master fault. These features signify that the overall kinematic regime was transpressional. Due to the absence of suitable piercing points, the amount of slip cannot be measured, but is constrained at less than 300 m near the ground surface. The Cottage Grove fault system apparently follows a Precambrian terrane boundary, as suggested by magnetic intensity data, the distribution of ultramafic igneous intrusions, and patterns of earthquake activity. The fault system was primarily active during the Alleghanian orogeny of Late Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time, when ultramatic igneous magma intruded along en echelon tensional fractures. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  8. Water quality in the Sugar Creek basin, Bloomington and Normal, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugh, Byron J.

    1978-01-01

    Urban runoff and overflows from combined sewers affect water quantity and quality in Sugar Creek within the twin cities of Bloomington and Normal, Illinois. Water-quality data from five primary and eight secondary locations showed three basic types of responses to climatic and hydrologic stresses. Stream temperatures and concentrations of dissolved oxygen, ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, biochemical oxygen demand, and fecal bacteria showed seasonal variations. Specific conductivity, pH, chloride, and suspended solids concentrations varied more closely with stream discharges. Total organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, biochemical oxygen demand, and fecal coliform and fecal streptococcal bacteria concentrations exhibited variations indicative of intial flushing action during storm runoff. Selected analyses for herbicides, insecticides, and other complex organic compounds in solution and in bed material showed that these constituents were coming from sources other than the municipal sanitary treatment plant effluent. Analyses for 10 common metals: arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, and zinc showed changes in concentrations below the municipal sanitary plant outfall. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. High-resolution sequence stratigraphic character and sandstone-type uranium ore formation. A case from Saihan Formation in Baiyinwula area, Erlian Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhongbo; Qin Mingkuan

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution sequence stratigraphy has been applied widely in the petroleum exploration and development, many achievements have been achieved. However, it is in the beginning stage that high-resolution sequence stratigraphy is applied to explore the sandstone-type uranium deposits in Erlian Basin. By applying principles of high-resolution sequence stratigraphy and taking typical boreholes as an example, sedimentary cycles of Saihan Formation, the ore-bearing formation in Baiyinwula area are divided and correlated through cross sections. One long-term cycle (LSC 1 ), two middle-term cycles (MSC 1 , MSC 2 ) have been identified in this study. Based on this and combined with the mineralization character of sandstone uranium deposits in this area, it is presented that the interlayer oxidation zone is developed mainly in the rising hemicycle of MSC 1 and uranium ore bodies predominantly in channel sand bodies that were developed in the system tract with low accommodation; furthermore, it is recognized that these sand bodies are moderate (10-15 m) in thickness, fairly good in interconnectivity, relatively thin (<3 m) with the argillaceous interbed, and good in permeability, abundant in the organic matter and thus it is favorable for the development of the interlayer oxidization zone. (authors)

  10. A preliminary analysis and assessment of hydrogeological conditions for in-situ leach mining of sandstone-type uranium deposit in northern Ordos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fazheng; Zhao Jinfeng; Chang Baocheng; Gao Junyi

    2006-01-01

    A systematic analysis and assessment on hydrogeologic condition, the lithology and hydrogeologic structure of ore-hosting aquitfers, hydrodynamic condition, hydrochemical characteristics at a sandstone-type uranium deposit in northern Ordos basin is made in this paper. It has been concluded, that hydrogeologic condition in the study area is favorable, meeting the requirements for in-situ leach mining of the deposit. Aimed at the low artesian pressure head and low water output and based on the results of pumping-injection tests which led to the significant increase of water output, a technical scheme of pressured water injection has been proposed to artificially raise the artesian pressure head and increase the output of groundwater to satisfy the requirements of in-situ leach mining. (authors)

  11. Interpretation of massive sandstones in ephemeral fluvial settings: A case study from the Upper Candelária Sequence (Upper Triassic, Paraná Basin, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Bruno Ludovico Dihl; Goldberg, Karin; Schultz, Cesar Leandro

    2018-01-01

    Ephemeral rivers display a wide range of upper- and lower-flow regime structures due to great flow-velocity changes during the floods. The development of flow structures in these setting is yet to be understood, especially in the formation of thick, massive sandstones. The Upper Triassic of Southern Gondwana was marked by a climate with great seasonal changes, yet there is no description of river systems with seasonal characteristics in Southern Gondwana. This work aims to characterize a ephemeral alluvial system of the Upper Triassic of the Paraná Basin. The characteristics of the deposits are discussed in terms of depositional processes through comparison with similar deposits from literature, flow characteristics and depositional signatures compared to flume experiments. The alluvial system is divided in four facies associations: (1) channels with wanning fill, characterized by low width/thickness ratio, tabular bodies, scour-and-fill structures with upper- and lower-flow regime bedforms; (2) channels with massive fill, characterized by low w/t ratio, sheet-like bodies, scour-and-fill structures with massive sandstones; (3) proximal sheetfloods, characterized by moderate w/t ratio, sheet-like bodies with upper- and lower-flow regime bedforms and (4) distal sheetfloods, characterized by high w/t ratio, sheet-like bodies with lower-flow regime bedforms. Evidence for the seasonal reactivation of the riverine system includes the scarcity of well-developed macroforms and presence of in-channel mudstones, thick intraformational conglomerates, and the occurrence of well- and poorly-preserved vertebrate bones in the same beds. The predominantly massive sandstones indicate deposition from a hyperconcentrated flow during abrupt changes in flow speed, caused by de-confinement or channel avulsion, whereas turbulent portions of the flow formed the upper- and lower-flow regime bedforms after the deposition of the massive layers. The upper portion of the Candelária Sequence

  12. An assessment of potential CO2 Sources throughout the Illinois Basin Subtask 5.1 – CO2 Source Assessment Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Vinodkumar [University of Illinois; O?Brien, Kevin; Korose, Christopher

    2018-05-09

    Large-scale anthropogenic CO2 sources (>100,000 tonnes/year) were catalogued and assessed for the Illinois East Sub-Basin project area. The portfolio of sources is quite diverse, and contains not only fossil-based power generation facilities but also ethanol, chemical, and refinery facilities. Over 60% of the facilities are relatively new (i.e. post year 2000 construction) hence increasing the likelihood that retrofitting the facility with a carbon capture plant is feasible. Two of the facilities have indicated interest in being “early adopters” should the CarbonSAFE project eventually transition to a build and operate phase: the Prairie State Generating Company’s electricity generation facility near Marissa, Illinois, and Quasar Syngas, LLC’s Wabash ammonia/direct-reduced iron plant, currently in development north of Terre Haute, Indiana.

  13. Risk Evaluation for CO2 Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup, Illinois Basin Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnottavange-Telleen, Ken; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently

  14. Geochemical constraints on the origin and volume of gas in the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian), eastern Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, Maria; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hasenmueller, N.R.

    2010-01-01

    This study involved analyses of kerogen petrography, gas desorption, geochemistry, microporosity, and mesoporosity of the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the eastern part of the Illinois Basin. Specifically, detailed core analysis from two locations, one in Owen County, Indiana, and one in Pike County, Indiana, has been conducted. The gas content in the locations studied was primarily dependent on total organic carbon content and the micropore volume of the shales. Gas origin was assessed using stable isotope geochemistry. Measured and modeled vitrinite reflectance values were compared. Depth of burial and formation water salinity dictated different dominant origins of the gas in place in the two locations studied in detail. The shallower Owen County location (415-433 m [1362-1421 ft] deep) contained significant additions of microbial methane, whereas the Pike County location (832-860 m [2730-2822 ft] deep) was characterized exclusively by thermogenic gas. Despite differences in the gas origin, the total gas in both locations was similar, reaching up to 2.1 cm3/g (66 scf/ton). Lower thermogenic gas content in the shallower location (lower maturity and higher loss of gas related to uplift and leakage via relaxed fractures) was compensated for by the additional generation of microbial methane, which was stimulated by an influx of glacial melt water, inducing brine dilution and microbial inoculation. The characteristics of the shale of the Maquoketa Group (Ordovician) in the Pike County location are briefly discussed to provide a comparison to the New Albany Shale. Copyright ??2010. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Dike intrusions into bituminous coal, Illinois Basin: H, C, N, O isotopic responses to rapid and brief heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Gao, L.; Sauer, P.E.; Topalov, K.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike long-term heating in subsiding sedimentary basins, the near-instantaneous thermal maturation of sedimentary organic matter near magmatic intrusions is comparable to artificial thermal maturation in the laboratory in terms of short duration and limited extent. This study investigates chemical and H, C, N, O isotopic changes in high volatile bituminous coal near two Illinois dike contacts and compares observed patterns and trends with data from other published studies and from artificial maturation experiments. Our study pioneers in quantifying isotopically exchangeable hydrogen and measuring the D/H (i.e., 2H/1H) ratio of isotopically non-exchangeable organic hydrogen in kerogen near magmatic contacts. Thermal stress in coal caused a reduction of isotopically exchangeable hydrogen in kerogen from 5% to 6% in unaltered coal to 2-3% at contacts, mostly due to elimination of functional groups (e.g., {single bond}OH, {single bond}COOH, {single bond}NH2). In contrast to all previously published data on D/H in thermally matured organic matter, the more mature kerogen near the two dike contacts is D-depleted, which is attributed to (i) thermal elimination of D-enriched functional groups, and (ii) thermal drying of hydrologically isolated coal prior to the onset of cracking reactions, thereby precluding D-transfer from relatively D-enriched water into kerogen. Maxima in organic nitrogen concentration and in the atomic N/C ratio of kerogen at a distance of ???2.5 to ???3.5 m from the thicker dike indicate that reactive N-compounds had been pyrolytically liberated at high temperature closer to the contact, migrated through the coal seam, and recombined with coal kerogen in a zone of lower temperature. The same principle extends to organic carbon, because a strong ??13Ckerogen vs. ??15Nkerogen correlation across 5.5 m of coal adjacent to the thicker dike indicates that coal was functioning as a flow-through reactor along a dynamic thermal gradient facilitating back

  16. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-01-01

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development

  17. Discussion on hydrogeological conditions of metallogenesis of the sandstone type uranium deposit in Burqin basin, Xinjiang autonomous region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qirong

    2000-01-01

    Based on a brief introduction to the occurrence and distribution of groundwater, the characteristics of the tectonic-hydrogeological layers of the basin are discussed. Then, the author expounds the groundwater hydrodynamic conditions including recharge, runoff and drainage, and hydrogeochemical characteristics. In the end, the hydrogeological conditions favorable for uranium metallogenesis are summarized

  18. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  19. Composition of natural gas and crude oil produced from 10 wells in the Lower Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone, Trumbull County, Ohio: Chapter G.7 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burruss, Robert A.; Ryder, Robert T.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gases and associated crude oils in the “Clinton” sandstone, Medina Group sandstones, and equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone in the northern Appalachian basin are part of a regional, continuous-type or basin-centered accumulation. The origin of the hydrocarbon charge to regional continuoustype accumulations is poorly understood. We have analyzed the molecular and stable isotopic composition of gases and oils produced from 10 wells in the “Clinton” sandstone in Trumbull County, Ohio, in an initial attempt to identify the characteristics of the accumulated fluids. The analyses show that the fluids have remarkably uniform compositions that are similar to previously published analyses of oils (Cole and others, 1987) and gases (Laughrey and Baldasarre, 1998) in Early Silurian reservoirs elsewhere in Ohio; however, geochemical parameters in the oils and gases suggest that the fluids have experienced higher levels of thermal stress than the present-day burial conditions of the reservoir rocks. The crude oils have an unusual geochemical characteristic: they do not contain detectable levels of sterane and triterpane biomarkers. The origin of these absences is unknown.

  20. Ruiniform relief in sandstones: the examples of Vila Velha, Carboniferous of the Paraná Basin, Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    DE MELO, M.S.; COIMBRA, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Vila Velha is a remarkable group of natural sculptures in Palaeozoicsandstones of the Paraná. Basin in Southern Brazil. The sculptures,which resemble the ruins of an old stone city, have resulted from thecombination of Cenozoic weathering and erosive processes with the existing attributes of the sedimentary rocks (texture, cementing oxides,sedimentary and brittle structures). A particular geomorphologic settingwith eroded inselbergs, and a differential iron and manganese cementationduring lat...

  1. The Comparison of Detrital Zircon Ages to Point Count Provenance Analysis for the Pottsville Sandstone in the Northern Appalachian Foreland Basin Venango County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, S.; Harris, D. B.; Schiappa, T.; Pecha, M.

    2017-12-01

    The specific sources of sediments deposited in the Appalachian basin prior to and immediately following the Alleghenian orogeny has long been a topic of debate. Recent advances in U-Pb dating of detrital zircons have greatly helped to determine some of the sources of these sediments. For this study, sandstone samples were collected from the Pottsville Formation in the northern Appalachian Foreland Basin, Venango County, Pennsylvania to provide supplementary data for previous work that sought to describe the provenance of the same sediments by point counts of thin sections of the same units. Results of this previous work established that the provenance for these units was transitional recycled orogenic, including multiple recycled sediments, and that a cratonic contribution was not able to be determined clearly. The previous results suggested that the paleoenvironment was a fluvial dominated delta prograding in the northern direction. However, no geochronologic data was found during this study to confirm this interpretation. We sought to verify these results by U-Pb analysis of detrital zircons. Samples were collected from the areas where the previous research took place. U-Pb ages were found from sample at the highest elevation and lowest elevation. In the first sample, sample 17SL01 (younger sample stratigraphically), the zircons yield U-Pb age range peaks at 442-468 ma and 1037-1081 ma. The probability density plot for this specific sample displays a complete age gap from 500 ma to 811 ma. In the second sample, sample 17SL03 (older rock stratigraphically), the zircons yield U-Pb ages range peaks of 424-616 ma and 975-1057 ma. This sample doesn't show any ages younger than 424 ma and it doesn't display the sample age gap as sample 17SL01 does. The ages of zircons are consistent with thin section point counting provenance results from previous research suggesting zircon transport from the northern direction.

  2. An interpretation of core and wireline logs for the Petrophysical evaluation of Upper Shallow Marine sandstone reservoirs of the Bredasdorp Basin, offshore South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoba, Moses; Opuwari, Mimonitu

    2017-04-01

    This paper embodies a study carried out to assess the Petrophysical evaluation of upper shallow marine sandstone reservoir of 10 selected wells in the Bredasdorp basin, offshore, South Africa. The studied wells were selected randomly across the upper shallow marine formation with the purpose of conducting a regional study to assess the difference in reservoir properties across the formation. The data sets used in this study were geophysical wireline logs, Conventional core analysis and geological well completion report. The physical rock properties, for example, lithology, fluid type, and hydrocarbon bearing zone were qualitatively characterized while different parameters such as volume of clay, porosity, permeability, water saturation ,hydrocarbon saturation, storage and flow capacity were quantitatively estimated. The quantitative results were calibrated with the core data. The upper shallow marine reservoirs were penetrated at different depth ranging from shallow depth of about 2442m to 3715m. The average volume of clay, average effective porosity, average water saturation, hydrocarbon saturation and permeability range from 8.6%- 43%, 9%- 16%, 12%- 68% , 32%- 87.8% and 0.093mD -151.8mD respectively. The estimated rock properties indicate a good reservoir quality. Storage and flow capacity results presented a fair to good distribution of hydrocarbon flow.

  3. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, S.R.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Three overall factors are necessary for formation of uranium deposits in sandstone: a source of uranium, host rocks capable of transmitting uranium-bearing solutions, and a precipitant. Possible sources of uranium in sandstone-type deposits include groundwaters emanating from granitic highlands, arkosic sediments, tuffaceous material within or overlying the host rocks, connate fluids, and overlying black shales. The first three sources are considered the most likely. Host rocks are generally immature sandstones deposited in alluvial-fan, intermontane-basin or marginal-marine environments, but uranium deposits do occur in well-winnowed barrier-bar or eolian sands. Host rocks for uranium deposits generally show coefficients of permeability on the order of 1 to 100 gal/day/ft 2 . Precipitants are normally agents capable of reducing uranium from the uranyl to the uranous state. The association of uranium with organic matter is unequivocal; H 2 S, a powerful reductant, may have been present at the time of formation of some deposits but may go unnoticed today. Vanadium can serve to preserve the tabular characteristics of some deposits in the near-surface environment, but is considered an unlikely primary precipitant for uranium. Uranium deposits in sandstone are divided into two overall types: peneconcordant deposits, which occur in locally reducing environments in otherwise oxidized sandstones; and roll-type deposits, which occur at the margin of an area where an oxidized groundwater has permeated an otherwise reduced sandstone. Uranium deposits are further broken down into four subclasses; these are described

  4. Place vs. time and vegetational persistence: A comparison of four tropical mires from the Illinois Basin during the height of the Pennsylvanian Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMichele, W.A.; Phillips, T.L.; Nelson, W. John

    2002-01-01

    Coal balls were collected from four coal beds in the southeastern part of the Illinois Basin. Collections were made from the Springfield, Herrin, and Baker coals in western Kentucky, and from the Danville Coal in southwestern Indiana. These four coal beds are among the principal mineable coals of the Illinois Basin and belong to the Carbondale and Shelburn Formations of late Middle Pennsylvanian age. Vegetational composition was analyzed quantitatively. Coal-ball samples from the Springfield, Herrin, and Baker are dominated by the lycopsid tree Lepidophloios, with lesser numbers of Psaronius tree ferns, medullosan pteridosperms, and the lycopsid trees Synchysidendron and Diaphorodendron. This vegetation is similar to that found in the Springfield and Herrin coals elsewhere in the Illinois Basin, as reported in previous studies. The Danville coal sample, which is considerably smaller than the others, is dominated by Psaronius with the lycopsids Sigillaria and Synchysidendron as subdominants. Coal balls from the Springfield coal were collected in zones directly from the coal bed and their zone-by-zone composition indicates three to four distinct plant assemblages. The other coals were analyzed as whole-seam random samples, averaging the landscape composition of the parent mire environments. This analysis indicates that these coals, separated from each other by marine and terrestrial-clastic deposits, have essentially the same floristic composition and, thus, appear to represent a common species pool that persisted throughout the late Middle Pennsylvanian, despite changes in baselevel and climate attendant the glacial interglacial cyclicity of the Pennsylvanian ice age. Patterns of species abundance and diversity are much the same for the Springfield, Herrin, and Baker, although each coal, both in the local area sampled, and regionally, has its own paleobotanical peculiarities. Despite minor differences, these coals indicate a high degree of recurrence of assemblage

  5. Lacustrine Environment Reservoir Properties on Sandstone Minerals and Hydrocarbon Content: A Case Study on Doba Basin, Southern Chad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumery, N. F. Mohd; Lo, S. Z.; Salim, A. M. A.

    2017-10-01

    The contribution of lacustrine environment as the hydrocarbon reservoir has been widely known. However, despite its growing importance, the lacustrine petroleum geology has received far less attention than marine due to its sedimentological complexity. This study therefore aims in developing an understanding of the unique aspects of lacustrine reservoirs which eventually impacts the future exploration decisions. Hydrocarbon production in Doba Basin, particularly the northern boundary, for instance, has not yet succeeded due to the unawareness of its depositional environment. The drilling results show that the problems were due to the: radioactive sand and waxy oil/formation damage, which all are related to the lacustrine depositional environment. Detailed study of geological and petrophysical integration on wireline logs and petrographic thin sections analysis of this environment helps in distinguishing reservoir and non-reservoir areas and determining the possible mechanism causing the failed DST results. The interpretations show that the correlation of all types> of logs and rho matrix analysis are capable in identifying sand and shale bed despite of the radioactive sand present. The failure of DST results were due to the presence of arkose in sand and waxy oil in reservoir bed. This had been confirmed by the petrographic thin section analysis where the arkose has mineral twinning effect indicate feldspar and waxy oil showing bright colour under fluorescent light. Understanding these special lacustrine environment characteristics and features will lead to a better interpretation of hydrocarbon prospectivity for future exploration.

  6. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

  7. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study

  8. Research on geochronology and uranium source of sandstone-hosted uranium ore-formation in major uranium-productive basins, Northern-China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yuliang; Liu Hanbin; Lin Jinrong; Fan Guang; Hou Yanxian

    2004-12-01

    A method is developed for correcting uranium content in uranium ore samples by considering the U-Ra equilibrium coefficient, then a U-Pb isochron is drawn up. By performing the above correction ore-formation ages of sandstone-hosted uranium mineralization which may be more realistic have been obtained. The comparative research on U-Pb isotopic ages of detritic zircon in ore-hosting sandstone and zircon in intermediate-acid igneous rocks in corresponding provenance area indicates that the ore-hosting sandstone is originated from the erosion of intermediate-acid igneous rocks and the latters are the material basis for the formation of the uranium-rich sandstone beds. On the basis of the study on U-Pb isotopic system evolution of the provenance rocks and sandstones from ore-hosting series, it is verified that the uranium sources of the sandstone-hosted uranium deposit are: the intermediate-acid igneous rocks with high content of mobile uranium, and the sandstone bodies pre-concentrated uranium. (authors)

  9. Comparison of fluid geochemistry and microbiology of multiple organic-rich reservoirs in the Illinois Basin, USA: Evidence for controls on methanogenesis and microbial transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, M.E.; McIntosh, J.C.; Bates, B.L.; Kirk, M.F.; Martini, A.M. [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The Illinois Basin, USA, is an ideal location to investigate hydrogeochemical factors controlling methanogenesis as microbial methane accumulations occur: (1) in three organic-rich reservoirs of different geologic ages and organic matter types - Upper Devonian New Albany Shale (up to 900 m depth), Pennsylvanian coals (up to 600 m depth), and Quaternary glacial sediments (shallow aquifers); (2) across steep salinity gradients; and (3) with variable concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. For all three organic-rich reservoirs aqueous geochemical conditions are favorable for microbial methanogenesis, with near neutral pH, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations {gt}2 mM, and Cl{sup -} concentrations {lt}3 M. Also, carbon isotopic fractionation of CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and DIC is consistent with microbial methanogenesis, and increased carbon isotopic fractionation with average reservoir depth corresponds to a decrease of groundwater flushing rates with average depth of reservoir. Plots of stable isotopes of water and Cl{sup -} show mixing between a brine endmember and freshwater, suggesting that meteoric groundwater recharge has affected all microbial methanogenic systems. Additionally, similar methanogenic communities are present in all three reservoirs with comparable cell counts (8.69E3-2.58E6 cells/mL). TRFLP results show low numbers of archaea species with only two dominant groups of base pairs in coals, shale, and limestone aquifers. These results compare favorably with other methanogen-containing deep subsurface environments. The matching of variations between methanogenic TRFLP data and conservative tracers suggests that deep circulation of meteoric waters influenced archaeal communities in the Illinois Basin.

  10. Effect of CH4 on the CO2 breakthrough pressure and permeability of partially saturated low-permeability sandstone in the Ordos Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yu, Qingchun

    2018-01-01

    The behavior of CO2 that coexists with CH4 and the effect of CH4 on the CO2 stream need to be deeply analyzed and studied, especially in the presence of water. Our previous studies investigated the breakthrough pressure and permeability of pure CO2 in five partially saturated low-permeability sandstone core samples from the Ordos Basin, and we concluded that rocks with a small pore size and low permeability show considerable sealing capacity even under unsaturated conditions. In this paper, we selected three of these samples for CO2-CH4 gas-mixture breakthrough experiments under various degrees of water saturation. The breakthrough experiments were performed by increasing the gas pressure step by step until breakthrough occurred. Then, the effluent gas mixture was collected for chromatographic partitioning analysis. The results indicate that CH4 significantly affects the breakthrough pressure and permeability of CO2. The presence of CH4 in the gas mixture increases the interfacial tension and, thus, the breakthrough pressure. Therefore, the injected gas mixture that contains the highest (lowest) mole fraction of CH4 results in the largest (smallest) breakthrough pressure. The permeability of the gas mixture is greater than that for pure CO2 because of CH4, and the effective permeability decreases with increased breakthrough pressure. Chromatographic partitioning of the effluent mixture gases indicates that CH4 breaks through ahead of CO2 as a result of its weaker solubility in water. Correlations are established between (1) the breakthrough pressure and water saturation, (2) the effective permeability and water saturation, (3) the breakthrough pressure and effective permeability, and (4) the mole fraction of CO2/CH4 in the effluent mixture gases and water saturation. These results deepen our understanding of the multi-phase flow behavior in the porous media under unsaturated conditions, which have implications for formulating emergency response plans for gas

  11. The tide-influenced Pétervására sandstone, early Miocene, Northern Hungary : sedimentology, palaeogeography and basin development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sztanó, O.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis are: - to determine the main sedimentary units, the dominant depositional processes, and to reconstruct the depositional environment of the Lower Miocene Petervasara Sandstone (Chapter 3), - to show the pattern of sediment dispersal in connection with the potential

  12. Evidence for the potential influence of chemocline fluctuations on the Frasnian-Famennian Biotic Crisis in the Illinois and Appalachian Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uveges, B. T.; Junium, C. K.; Boyer, D.; Cohen, P.; Day, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    The Frasnian-Famennian Biotic Crisis (FFBC) is among the `Big Five' mass extinctions in ecological severity, and was particularly devastating to shallow water tropical faunas and reefs. The FFBC is associated with two organic rich black shale beds collectively known as the Lower and Upper Kellwasser Events(KWEs). Sedimentary N and C isotopes offer insight into the biogeochemical processing of nutrients, and therefore the oceanographic conditions in a basin. In particular, biological production within and around the chemocline can impart a distinct signature to the particulate organic matter (POM) preserved in sediments. Here we present bulk δ15N and δ13Corg isotope data from the Late Devonian Appalachian, and Illinois Basins (AB and IB), with a focus on intervals encompassing the KWEs. Broadly, δ15N values were depleted (-1.0 to +4.0‰), and are consistent with other intervals of black shale deposition, such as OAEs, with the IB being generally more enriched. In both the IB and AB, black shales were 15N depleted compared to the interbedded grey shales on average by 2.3 and 1.0‰ respectively. Organic carbon isotopes exhibit the broad, positive excursions that are typical of the KWEs globally ( 3.5‰ from background). Superimposed over the increase in δ13Corg are sharp decreases in δ13Corg, to as low as -30‰, found at the base of the black shale beds in the both basins. In the context of the pattern of δ15N, this suggests that the mobility of the chemocline and the degree of stratification exert a primary control on both δ15N and δ13Corg. Chemocline movement, or alternatively chemocline collapse, would lead to greater areal extent/upwelling of low oxygen deep waters, rich in isotopically depleted remineralized nutrients (DIN and DIC), leading to the production and eventual preservation of depleted POM in the black shales. Applying this model to the KWEs, which saw more expansive deposits of anoxic facies, we propose that the black shales associated with

  13. Geologic report of the Maquoketa Shale, New Albany Shale, and Borden Group rocks in the Illinois Basin as potential solid waste repository sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droste, J.B.; Vitaliano, C.J.

    1976-06-01

    We have evaluated the Illinois Basin in order to select a ''target site'' for a possible solid nuclear waste repository. In the process we have been mindful of geology (particularly stratigraphy and lithology and structure), terrane, population density, land use, land ownership and accessibility. After taking these restrictions into account, we have singled out a strip of land in south central Indiana in which we have selected four potential sites worthy of further exploration. In three of the sites the geology, lithology, and depth below the surface are more than adequate for crypt purposes in two separate formations--the Maquoketa Shale of the Ordovician System and the New Albany Shale-Borden Group of the Upper Devonian-Mississippian Systems. The interval between the two is several hundred feet. The geology and associated features in the fourth site are undoubtedly similar to those in the first three. In all four selections a sizeable proportion of the land is in public ownership and the population density in the nonpublicly owned land is low. The geology, lithology, and position of the target formations have been projected into the sites in question from data provided by drill core records of the Indiana Geological Survey. Precise details would, of course, require exploratory drilling on the selected site

  14. Effects of land use, stream habitat, and water quality on biological communities of wadeable streams in the Illinois River Basin of Arkansas, 2011 and 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, James C.; Justus, B.G.; Meredith, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    The Illinois River Basin includes an area of diverse land use in northwestern Arkansas. Land-use data collected in 2006 indicate that most of the land in the basin is agricultural. The agricultural land is used primarily for production of poultry and cattle. Eighteen sites were selected from the list of candidate sites based on drainage area, land use, presence or absence of an upstream wastewater-treatment plant, water quality, and other information gathered during the reconnaissance. An important consideration in the process was to select sites along gradients of forest to urban land use and forest to agricultural land use. Water-quality samples were collected for analysis of nutrients, and a multiparameter field meter was used to measure water temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved oxygen. Streamflow was measured immediately following the water-quality sampling. Macroalgae coverage was estimated and periphyton, macroinvertebrate, and fish communities were sampled at each site. Stream habitat also was assessed. Many types of land-use, water-quality, and habitat factors affected one or more aspects of the biological communities. Several macroinvertebrate and fish metrics changed in response to changes in percent forest; sites that would be considered most disturbed, based on these metrics, are sites with the highest percentages of urban land use in their associated basins. The presence of large mats of macroalgae was one of the most noticeable biological characteristics in several streams within the Illinois River Basin. The highest macroalgae percent cover values were recorded at four sites downstream from wastewater-treatment plants. Macroalgae percent cover was strongly correlated only with bed substrate size, canopy closure, and specific conductance. Periphyton metrics were most often and most strongly correlated with riparian shading, specific conductance, substrate turbidity, percent agriculture, poultry house density, and unpaved road density

  15. Relationship between characteristics of fan-delta sandstone bodies and in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Fengjun; Zhou Weixun; Guan Taiyang; Li Sitian

    2000-01-01

    Like normal deltas, fan-deltas are composed of three parts, i.e., fan-delta plain, fan-delta front and pre-fin-delta, In-situ leachable uranium deposits are commonly distributed along the margins of in-land basins. The author analyzes the possible relationship between the basic characteristics of fan-delta sandstone bodies and uranium mineralization. Two examples, e.g., the fan delta depositional systems in the eastern part of Jungger basin and the southern part of Yili basin, are given to illustrate the fan-delta vertical sequence and planar distribution of sedimentary facies. It has been pointed out that the braided channel sandstone bodies on delta plain, sub-aqueous distributional channel sandstone bodies and delta front sandstone bodies may be the favourable host rocks for in-situ leachable sandstone uranium deposits

  16. Analysis on depositional system and discussion on ore-formation conditions of channel sandstone type uranium deposit. Taking Dongsheng area, Ordos meso-cenozoic basin as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Rengui; Yu Dagan; Zhu Minqiang; Zhou Wanpeng; Chen Anping

    2003-01-01

    Applying the theory of depositional system, the depositional facies and depositional systems of the Zhiluo Formation in Dongsheng area are systematically analysed, and the authors proposed that sediments of the Zhiluo Formation are of fluvial facies, and streams of the Zhiluo time experienced three evolution stages, namely: the early braided stream, the middle low sinuosity meandering stream and the late high sinuosity meandering stream. Based on features of paleoclimatic evolution, the Zhiluo Formation is divided into two lithological members. The lower lithological member consists of sediments of braided and low sinuosity meandering streams under humid-ward paleoclimatic conditions forming grey sedimentary formation. The upper member is composed of sediments of meandering streams under arid-hot paleoclimatic conditions representing complex-colored (mainly red) sedimentary formation. It is suggested that uranium mineralization in the study area is of channel sandstone type and controlled by braided channel sediments. Besides, the ore-formation conditions for channel sandstone type uranium deposit are preliminarily discussed

  17. Comparative organic petrology of interlayered sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals in the Upper Carboniferous Ruhr basin, northwest Germany, and their thermal history and methane generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidt, G.; Littke, R. (Harress Geotechnik GmbH, Floersheim (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-01-01

    In the coal-mining Ruhr-area, Upper Carboniferous rocks consist of interlayered sandstones, siltstones, mudstones and coals. They were deposited in a tropical, paralic environment where alternating fluvial sedimentation, occasional marine ingressions, and swamp growth resulted in an irregular cyclic succession. The total sedimentary package contains on an average 6 Vol.% of organic manner. About 70 Vol. % of the organic matter occurs in coal seams, the rest as dispersed organic matter in clastic rocks. The organic matter is autochthonous in the coals and allochthonous in associated sandstones and siltstones. It consists of about 70% vitrinite, 20% inertinite, and 10% liptinite. The overall maceral group composition is the same for coals and dispersed organic matter. This surprising similarity is caused by a nearly exclusive input of land-plant derived organic matter to swamps and fluvial systems and a similar degree of preservation. Highest average liptinite contents were found in unrooted mudstones, highest average inertinite contents in coarse-grained siltstones and highest average vitrinite percentages in sandstones. Maturities of the sediments studied are well within the hydrocarbon generation window, e.g. vitrinite reflectivities range from 0.6% to 1.6%. Reflectivities measured on dispersed particles in clastic rocks are similar to those measured in coal seams. Calculations of the amount of methane generated indicate that coal seams contributed more to the total hydrocarbon generation than dispersed organic matter. 51 refs., 13 figs.

  18. PALEOEVIRONMENT OF NIGERIA'S AJALI SANDSTONES: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ajali Sandstone is a major clastic formation of Campanian-Maastrichtian age occuring within the Anambra Basin, Southeastern Nigeria. ... The result is in line with earlier conclusions of fluvial or fluviodeltaic depositional environment based on analysis of faceis, sedimentary rock which are suitable for morphometrical ...

  19. Applying reaction condition index to predict sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Gongxin; Liu Jinhui; Cheng Hai

    2002-01-01

    On the basic of the explanation of reaction condition index, the deduction of reaction condition index calculation principle, the hydrogeological setting in Gongpoquan basin in Baishan, Gansu province and the study of reaction condition index of its water source point, the north Luotuoquan area in Gongpoquan basin seems to be a favourable place for sandstone type uranium deposit, and the prospect area for sandstone type uranium deposit is delimitated

  20. Petrography and microanalysis of Pennsylvanian coal-ball concretions (Herrin Coal, Illinois Basin, USA): Bearing on fossil plant preservation and coal-ball origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewers, Fredrick D.; Phillips, Tom L.

    2015-11-01

    Petrographic analyses of 25 coal balls from well-studied paleobotanical profiles in the Middle Pennsylvanian Herrin Coal (Westphalian D, Illinois Basin) and five select coal balls from university collections, indicate that Herrin Coal-ball peats were permineralized by fibrous and non-fibrous carbonates. Fibrous carbonates occur in fan-like to spherulitic arrays in many intracellular (within tissue) pores, and are best developed in relatively open extracellular (between plant) pore spaces. Acid etched fibrous carbonates appear white under reflected light and possess a microcrystalline texture attributable to abundant microdolomite. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microprobe analysis demonstrate that individual fibers have a distinct trigonal prism morphology and are notable for their magnesium content (≈ 9-15 mol% MgCO3). Non-fibrous carbonates fill intercrystalline spaces among fibers and pores within the peat as primary precipitates and neomorphic replacements. In the immediate vicinity of plant cell walls, non-fibrous carbonates cut across fibrous carbonates as a secondary, neomorphic phase attributed to coalification of plant cell walls. Dolomite occurs as diagenetic microdolomite associated with the fibrous carbonate phase, as sparite replacements, and as void-filling cement. Maximum dolomite (50-59 wt.%) is in the top-of-seam coal-ball zone at the Sahara Mine, which is overlain by the marine Anna Shale. Coal-ball formation in the Herrin Coal began with the precipitation of fibrous high magnesium calcite. The trigonal prism morphology of the carbonate fibers suggests rapid precipitation from super-saturated, meteoric pore waters. Carbonate precipitation from marine waters is discounted on the basis of stratigraphic, paleobotanical, and stable isotopic evidence. Most non-fibrous carbonate is attributable to later diagenetic events, including void-fill replacements, recrystallization, and post-depositional fracture fills. Evidence

  1. Characteristics of sandstone-type uranium mineralization and ore-controlling factors in Wukurqi ore district at southern margin of Yili basin, Xinjiang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xigen

    2002-01-01

    With the theories of hydrogenic uranium deposit in the nineties, Wukurqi ore district as a new area was found by the regional prediction and prospecting. Specially, through uranium ore prospecting of about three years, certain prospective reserves are generally controlled in the area. These reserves are hosted in V cyclothem of Middle-Lower Jurassic series, and some prospective reserves are hosted in II and VII cyclothems. By analyzing and summarizing characteristics of sandstone-type uranium mineralization and its ore-controlling factors in Wukurqi ore district, the author provides a foundation for developing further prospecting in this area

  2. Analysis on metallogenic conditions of paleochannel sandstone type uranium deposits in kelulun region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingyue, Feng [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology, Beijing (China)

    1999-07-01

    On the basis of comprehensively analyzing metallogenic conditions of paleochannel sandstone type uranium deposits, the author discusses regional geologic background, characteristics of the basement and sedimentary cover of Kelulun basin and Huchawula-Hulun Lake basin, and the metallogenic potential of paleochannel sandstone type uranium deposits is proposed.

  3. Analysis on metallogenic conditions of paleochannel sandstone type uranium deposits in kelulun region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Mingyue

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of comprehensively analyzing metallogenic conditions of paleochannel sandstone type uranium deposits, the author discusses regional geologic background, characteristics of the basement and sedimentary cover of Kelulun basin and Huchawula-Hulun Lake basin, and the metallogenic potential of paleochannel sandstone type uranium deposits is proposed

  4. Discussion on the genesis and mineralization of sandstone type uranium deposit in the southern-central Longchuanjiang basin, western Yunnan province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yuqi; Li Mangen

    2002-01-01

    The author mainly discusses the character of the depositional systems, geological structures and ore-bearing series in the south-central Longchuanjiang basin, and points out that the uranium mineralization is closely related to the two depositional discontinuities caused by the tectonic evolution. Based on the characteristics of uranium mineralization in the area, pitchblende, uranium blacks and phosphuranylite are discovered in No. 382 uranium deposit and radiometric super-micro-minerals in No. 381 deposit. The research on the uranium mineralization age in No. 382 deposit shows that the mineralization in the south-central part of the basin has genetically multi-staged

  5. Formation conditions and prospecting criteria for sandstone uranium deposit of interlayer oxidation type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shijie

    1994-01-01

    This paper comprehensively analyses the geotectonic setting and favourable conditions, such as structure of the basin, sedimentary facies and paleogeography, geomorphology and climate, hydrodynamics and hydrogeochemistry, the development of interlayered oxidation etc, necessary for the formation of sandstone uranium deposit of interlayered oxidation type. The following prospecting criteria is proposed, namely: abundant uranium source, arid climate, stable big basin, flat-lying sandstone bed, big alluvial fan, little change in sedimentary facies, intercalation of sandstone and mudstone beds, shallow burying of sandstone bed, well-aquiferous sandstone bed, high permeability of sandstone bed, development of interlayered oxidation, and high content of reductant in sandstone. In addition, the 6 in 1 hydrogenic genetic model is proposed

  6. Discussion on the origin of bleached sandstone of Qianjiadian uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Yaqing; Xiang Weidong; Li Tiangang; Chen Xiaolin; Xia Yuliang

    2007-01-01

    Qianjiadian uranium deposit is a sandstone-type uranium deposit that has been discovered in Songliao Basin in recent years. Uranium ore bodies are planar or lenticular in shape and under the control of the contact between gray sandstones and bleached sandstones. The bleached sandstone is white in color, cemented loosely, nearly without TOC and pyrite contained and rich in uranium. Geochemical characteristics and types and assemblages of clay minerals of the bleached sandstone reveal that the bleached sandstone is the product of oxidation of the interlayer oxidation zone, and it is a part of the interlayer oxidation zone. The main reasons for white color of the bleached sandstone are transfer of iron ion, oxidation of TOC and kaolinization of sandstone. (authors)

  7. Greybull Sandstone Petroleum Potential on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, David A.

    2002-05-13

    The focus of this project was to explore for stratigraphic traps that may be present in valley-fill sandstone at the top of the Lower Cretaceous Kootenai Formation. This sandstone interval, generally known as the Greybull Sandstone, has been identified along the western edge of the reservation and is a known oil and gas reservoir in the surrounding region. The Greybull Sandstone was chosen as the focus of this research because it is an excellent, well-documented, productive reservoir in adjacent areas, such as Elk Basin; Mosser Dome field, a few miles northwest of the reservation; and several other oil and gas fields in the northern portion of the Bighorn Basin.

  8. Isotopic investigation of ground water resources in the Ojo Alamo sandstone, Nacimiento, and San Jose Formations, San Juan Basin, New Mexico. Technical completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, F.M.; Peeters, L.A.; Tansey, M.K.

    1984-06-01

    The San Juan Basin, in northwest New Mexico, has vast reserves of strippable, low-sulfur coal. Development of the resource will require large quantities of water, from an area where water resources are not abundant. Since surface-water supplies are fully allocated, increased future water demands will have to be met through ground-water development. The study concentrates on the Ojo Alamo, Nacimiento, and San Jose Formations, the aquifers directly above the principal coal unit. Carbon-14 and tritium methods were used to date the ground water in these units. Initial radiocarbon activities were calculated using the models of Vogel, Tamers, Pearson, Mook and Fontes. The observation lends support to the hypothesis of isotopically lighter Pleistocene precipitation. Such lighter recharge was most likely due to a colder mean annual temperature and perhaps increased winter precipitation. A similar change is obtained from noble-gas paleothermometry

  9. Fractal properties of fractured sandstones of the Guartela Canyon, Parana Basin - Brazil; Propriedades fractais de arenitos fraturados do Canyon Guartela, Formacao Furnas, Bacia do Parana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Jeferson de; Figueira, Isabela Francoso Rebutini; Santos, Thais Borba [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (PPGG/DG/UFRN), Natal (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia. Programa de Pos-Graducao em Geologia; Rostirolla, Sidnei Pires [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (DG/UFRN), Natal (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia; Pierin, Andre Ramiro; Spisila, Andre Luis [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (DG/UFRN), Natal (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia. Programa de Iniciacao Cientifica

    2008-03-15

    The statistical and geometrical properties of fracture systems were obtained by analyzing remote sense images and outcrop data, in the Region of Guartela Canyon, in the central-eastern of Parana State. The probability distributions of fractures, with their parameters and attributes, were obtained through extensive statistical exploration of data. These parameters were used as input data for generating 3-D stochastic fractures models through the 'discrete fracture network - DFN' method. The modeling is performed by using the code FRED. To study the persistence of statistical parameters in multiple scales were used remote sensing images (SRTM, Landsat TM7 and aerial photos), covering a scale range from outcrops (few meters) to basin scales (hundreds of kilometers). The results indicated the presence of power-law (fractal) statistics for the spatial and size distributions. Fractals distributions were found for all sets studied, in some cases with different fractal exponents. The implications of fractal behavior for the generation of discrete fracture network, and consequently for the hydraulic properties, are briefly discussed. (author)

  10. Illinois travel statistics, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  11. Illinois travel statistics, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  12. Illinois travel statistics, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Illinois Travel Statistics publication is assembled to provide detailed traffic : information to the different users of traffic data. While most users of traffic data at this level : of detail are within the Illinois Department of Transporta...

  13. Sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, W.I.; Davis, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    World-class sandstone-type uranium deposits are defined as epigenetic concentrations of uranium minerals occurring as uneven impregnations and minor massive replacements primarily in fluvial, lacustrine, and deltaic sandstone formations. The main purpose of this introductory paper is to define, classify, and introduce to the general geologic setting for sandstone-type uranium deposits

  14. Material Exchange and Migration between Pore Fluids and Sandstones during Diagenetic Processes in Rift Basins: A Case Study Based on Analysis of Diagenetic Products in Dongying Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Meng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The exchange and migration of basin materials that are carried by pore fluids are the essence of diagenesis, which can alter physical properties of clastic rocks as well as control formation and distribution of favorable reservoirs of petroliferous basins. Diagenetic products and pore fluids, resulting from migration and exchange of basin materials, can be used to deduce those processes. In this study, 300 core samples from 46 wells were collected for preparation of casting thin sections, SEM, BSE, EDS, inclusion analysis, and isotope analysis in Dongying Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, East China. Combined with geochemical characteristics of pore fluids and geological background of the study area, the source and exchange mechanisms of materials in the pore fluids of rift basins were discussed. It was revealed that the material exchange of pore fluids could be divided into five stages. The first stage was the evaporation concentration stage during which mainly Ca2+, Mg2+, and CO32- precipitated as high-Mg calcites. Then came the shale compaction stage, when mainly Ca2+ and CO32- from shale compaction water precipitated as calcites. The third stage was the carboxylic acid dissolution stage featured by predominant dissolution of plagioclases, during which Ca2+ and Na+ entered pore fluids, and Si and Al also entered pore fluids and then migrated as clathrates, ultimately precipitating as kaolinites. The fourth stage was the organic CO2 stage, mainly characterized by the kaolinization of K-feldspar as well as dissolution of metamorphic lithic fragments and carbon cements. During this stage, K+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, HCO3-, and CO32- entered pore fluids. The fifth stage was the alkaline fluid stage, during which the cementation of ferro-carbonates and ankerites as well as illitization or chloritization of kaolinites prevailed, leading to the precipitation of K+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and CO32- from pore fluids.

  15. Characterization of application of acu sandstone in ceramic mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, L.F.P.M.; Souza, M.M.; Gomes, Y.S.; Fernandes, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    The sandstone is a sedimentary rock formed mainly by quartz grains. In Rio Grande do Norte, there is the Potiguar Basin with the Jandaira and Acu Formations. The latter consists of thick layers of whitish-colored sandstones. It stands out as a water storage facility in the state, but it is also used for building aggregates. This article aimed at the use of the sandstone of this formation in the ceramic mass for coating. Initially, the material was sampled. It went through the comminution process to achieve the required granulometry. After this, three formulations were made to incorporate this new material into the traditional ones. The methods were performed according to ISO 13816. After sintering at 1200 °C, the specimens were subjected to the physical tests. A positive result was obtained for the use of the Acu sandstone in low concentrations. It is clear, therefore, its use in ceramics for coating

  16. The Bentheim Sandstone: Geology, petrophysics, varieties and it's use as dimension stone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubelaar, C.W.; Nijland, T.G.

    2014-01-01

    The shallow-marine Bentheim Sandstone was deposited in one of the NW-SE trending basins north of the London-Brabant and Rhenish massifs during the Valanginian (Early Cretaceous). The Bentheim Sandstone forms an important reservoir rock for petroleum, but has also proven itself as a very durable

  17. Sedimentologie and stratigraphic s aspects of conglomeratic sandstones belong to the channel between of the Pirambora and Botucatu formations (mesozoic basin of Parana)district of Sao Paolo Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caetano Chang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The interest of present study is concerned to the sedimentogenic characterization of fluvial conglomeratic sandstones that occur close to the top of Piramboia Formation.These deposits are interpreted as braided channel bar facies, deposited on alluvial fans at the border of desertic environment. The sandstones are fine to coarse, with variable percentage of gravel. These are dominantly quart zones and median scale trough cross-bedded. (author)

  18. Depositional and diagenetic variability within the Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone: Implications for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, B.B.; Ochoa, R.I.; Wilkens, N.D.; Brophy, J.; Lovell, T.R.; Fischietto, N.; Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is the major target reservoir for ongoing geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations throughout the midwest United States. The potential CO2 reservoir capacity, reactivity, and ultimate fate of injected CO2 depend on textural and compositional properties determined by depositional and diagenetic histories that vary vertically and laterally across the formation. Effective and efficient prediction and use of the available pore space requires detailed knowledge of the depositional and diagenetic textures and mineralogy, how these variables control the petrophysical character of the reservoir, and how they vary spatially. Here, we summarize the reservoir characteristics of the Mount Simon Sandstone based on examination of geophysical logs, cores, cuttings, and analysis of more than 150 thin sections. These samples represent different parts of the formation and depth ranges of more than 9000 ft (>2743 m) across the Illinois Basin and surrounding areas. This work demonstrates that overall reservoir quality and, specifically, porosity do not exhibit a simple relationship with depth, but vary both laterally and with depth because of changes in the primary depositional facies, framework composition (i.e., feldspar concentration), and diverse diagenetic modifications. Diagenetic processes that have been significant in modifying the reservoir include formation of iron oxide grain coatings, chemical compaction, feldspar precipitation and dissolution, multiple generations of quartz overgrowth cementation, clay mineral precipitation, and iron oxide cementation. These variables provide important inputs for calculating CO2 capacity potential, modeling reactivity, and are also an important baseline for comparisons after CO2 injection. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  19. Geological principles of exploration for sandstone-hosted uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J.P.

    1982-10-01

    Although the importance of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits has seemingly faded in recent years due to the discovery of large, high -grade deposits elsewhere, a forecasted energy shortage in the near future will probably necessitate a new look at sedimentary basins as a source of uranium. Back-arc basins adjacent to calcalkaline source areas are especially favourable if they are filled with fluvial, post-Devonian sediments. Syn- and post-depositional tectonics play an important role in the sedimentation-mineralisation process and should be investigated. The oxidation-reduction state of the sandstones is a valid prospecting tool. Sedimentological environments govern the permeability and vegetal matter content of sandstones and directly control uranium mineralisation

  20. Integrated geomechanical, petrographical and petrophysical study of the sandstones of the Wajid Group, SW Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaafi, Mohammed; Hariri, Mustafa; Al-Shaibani, Abdulaziz; Abdullatif, Osman; Makkawi, Mohammed

    2018-07-01

    The Cambro-Permian siliciclastic succession in southwestern Saudi Arabia is represented by the Wajid Group, which consists mainly of fluvial, shallow marine, aeolian, and glacial sandstones. The Wajid Group comprises the Dibsiyah, Sanamah, Qalibah, Khusayyayn, and Juwayl Formations. It is exposed in the Wadi Al-Dawasir area and extends to Najran City. The sandstones of the Wajid Group serve as groundwater aquifers in the Wadi Al-Dawasir and Najran areas and host hydrocarbon (mainly gas) reservoirs in the Rub' Al-Khali Basin. This study aims to characterize the geomechanical properties (rock strength and Young's modulus) of the sandstones of the Wajid Group using field and experimental techniques. A further objective is to investigate the relationships between the geomechanical properties and the petrographical and petrophysical properties of the studied sandstones. The geomechanical properties of the studied sandstones vary from glacial to non-glacial sandstones, as the glacial sandstones display high values of the geomechanical properties with high variability indices. Four geological factors including grain size, cement content, porosity and permeability were observed as the main controls on the geomechanical behaviour of the studied sandstones except for the Khusayyayn sandstone, where the mineral composition was also important. Significant correlations were observed between the petrographical and petrophysical properties and the geomechanical properties of the glacial sandstones. Predictive models of the geomechanical properties (RN, UCS, and E) were generated using regression analysis to account for the glacial sandstones.

  1. Sedimentary uranium occurrences in Eastern Europe with special reference to sandstone formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, F.; Hahn, L.

    1985-01-01

    Sedimentary uranium deposits, especially in sandstones, play an important role in uranium mining in Eastern Europe. The paper reviews recent publications on uranium occurrences in sandstone formations in the German Democratic Republic, Poland, CSSR, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and Albania. The uranium deposits in sandstones in Yugoslavia are described in a separate paper in this volume. Sandstone deposits of the USSR are not reviewed. Uranium mineralizations occur in sandstones from Ordovician to Tertiary age. Major deposits are developed in Upper Carboniferous sandstones in association with coal (GDR, Poland), in Permian strata (CSSR, Hungary, Romania), in Cretaceous sandstones (GDR, CSSR), and in Tertiary sediments (CSSR). The Permian deposits can be compared with deposits of similar age in Northern Italy and Northern Yugoslavia. Roll-type orebodies are developed in some of the Cenomanian sandstones. Tertiary deposits are mainly associated with lignites. Uranium deposits in sandstones of Albania and Bulgaria are not described in the literature. Geologic similarities with sandstone basins in adjacent countries suggest the presence of uranium mineralizations in Permian, Lower Triassic, and Tertiary sandstones. (author)

  2. Meso and microscopic characterization of deformation bands in porous sandstones: an example on the Paleozoic, Pre- and Sin-rift sequences of the Araripe Basin, Northeast of Brazil; Caracterizacao meso e microscopica de bandas de deformacao em arenitos porosos: um exemplo nas tectonossequencias Paleozoica, Pre- e Sin-rifte da Bacia do Araripe, Nordeste do Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo Neto, Joao Marculino de; Silva, Fernando Cesar Alves da; Sa, Emanuel Ferraz Jardim de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Geodinamica e Geofisica], e-mails: jota_ex2@hotmail.com, fernando@geologia.ufrn.br, emanuel@ccet.ufrn.br

    2012-04-15

    Deformation bands are narrow tabular volumes developed in porous sandstones. Although these structures are a product of brittle deformation, they may have internally a continuous displacement gradient. When granular cataclasis is the dominant deformation mechanism, the initial properties of their host rocks (i.e., porosity and permeability) can change significantly. The deformation bands in sandstones from the pre- and syn-rift of the Araripe Basin were studied in meso and microscale in order to classify them and to understand the deformation mechanisms involved during their nucleation and development. Their geometric-spatial, kinematic, and rheological criteria allowed establishing relations between the origin of deformation bands and lithification of their host rocks. Additionally, some inferences on their influence to the fluid flow in the reservoir-scale were outlined. Moreover, the study of deformation bands contributed to the understanding of the tectonic evolution of the studied basin. Accordingly, the study of deformation bands can support research on local and regional aspects of the tectonosedimentary evolution of sedimentary basins. (author)

  3. Diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments of the Bunter Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    The Bunter Sandstone Formation in the northern North German Basin has large geothermal potential with high porosity and permeability (generally >15% and >100 mD, respectively) and with pore fluid temperatures that are adequate for geothermal energy production (c. 55–60˚C). A combined investigation...

  4. Anatomy of an intruded coal, I: Effect of contact metamorphism on whole-coal geochemistry, Springfield (No. 5) (Pennsylvanian) coal, Illinois Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmer, Susan M. [Department of Geology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Yoksoulian, Lois E. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Hower, James C. [Center for Applied Energy Research, University of Kentucky, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States)

    2009-08-01

    If time and heating rate are important agents in coal maturation, one might expect to see differences in chemical changes in response to maturation depending on the means of increased rank. Using a suite of samples obtained from an intruded Pennsylvanian-age coal in southern Illinois, we present whole-coal chemical data. Comparing these data to extant geochemical data for coals that have undergone normal burial maturation, we evaluated the hypothesis that if coal alteration occurs rapidly (due to intrusion) rather than gradually (burial maturation), then different relationships are seen in chemical composition (proximate and ultimate analyses) and vitrinite reflectance. The Pennsylvanian-age (Asturian [Westphalian D]) Springfield (No. 5) coal is mined at the Big Ridge Mine, near Eldorado, southern Illinois. This high volatile B bituminous coal was intruded by an ultramafic igneous intrusion during the early Permian. Alteration occurs out to {proportional_to} 1.2 x dike thickness and includes an increase in random vitrinite reflectance (R{sub m}) from levels {proportional_to} 0.7% to over 5.3%, loss of liptinites, and formation of devolatilization vacuoles and fine mosaic texture. Decreases in volatile matter (VM) and increases in fixed carbon (FC) appear to be less than would be expected for the level of reflectance seen within the alteration halo. Carbonate minerals have a major influence on proximate analyses but even following the removal of carbonates, the decrease in VM is still less than would be seen in coals of similar vitrinite reflectance that were altered by normal burial maturation. Carbonate mineralization also contributes to variability in ultimate analysis values approaching the intrusion, particularly for %C and %O. After carbonate removal, data for these coals do not appear to follow the normal burial coalification tracks when plotted on a van Krevelen diagram and on a Seyler chart. These differences suggest that a slightly different maturation

  5. The Ogaden Basin, Ethiopia: an underexplored sedimentary basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teitz, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    A brief article examines the Ogaden Basin in Ethiopia in terms of basin origin, basin fill and the hydrocarbon exploration history and results. The natural gas find in pre-Jurassic sandstones, which appears to contain substantial reserves, justifies continuing investigations in this largely underexplored basin. (UK).

  6. Hydrological modelling in sandstone rocks watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponížilová, Iva; Unucka, Jan

    2015-04-01

    The contribution is focused on the modelling of surface and subsurface runoff in the Ploučnice basin. The used rainfall-runoff model is HEC-HMS comprising of the method of SCS CN curves and a recession method. The geological subsurface consisting of sandstone is characterised by reduced surface runoff and, on the contrary, it contributes to subsurface runoff. The aim of this paper is comparison of the rate of influence of sandstone on reducing surface runoff. The recession method for subsurface runoff was used to determine the subsurface runoff. The HEC-HMS model allows semi- and fully distributed approaches to schematisation of the watershed and rainfall situations. To determine the volume of runoff the method of SCS CN curves is used, which results depend on hydrological conditions of the soils. The rainfall-runoff model assuming selection of so-called methods of event of the SCS-CN type is used to determine the hydrograph and peak flow rate based on simulation of surface runoff in precipitation exceeding the infiltration capacity of the soil. The recession method is used to solve the baseflow (subsurface) runoff. The method is based on the separation of hydrograph to direct runoff and subsurface or baseflow runoff. The study area for the simulation of runoff using the method of SCS CN curves to determine the hydrological transformation is the Ploučnice basin. The Ploučnice is a hydrologically significant river in the northern part of the Czech Republic, it is a right tributary of the Elbe river with a total basin area of 1.194 km2. The average value of CN curves for the Ploučnice basin is 72. The geological structure of the Ploučnice basin is predominantly formed by Mesozoic sandstone. Despite significant initial loss of rainfall the basin response to the causal rainfall was demonstrated by a rapid rise of the surface runoff from the watershed and reached culmination flow. Basically, only surface runoff occures in the catchment during the initial phase of

  7. CarbonSAFE Illinois - Macon County

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, Steve [University of Illinois; Illinois State Geological Survey

    2017-08-03

    CarbonSAFE Illinois is a a Feasibility study to develop an established geologic storage complex in Macon County, Illinois, for commercial-scale storage of industrially sourced CO2. Feasibility activities are focused on the Mt. Simon Storage Complex; a step-out well will be drilled near existing storage sites (i.e., the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium’s Illinois Basin – Decatur Project and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Project) to further establish commercial viability of this complex and to evaluate EOR potential in a co-located oil-field trend. The Archer Daniels Midland facility (ethanol plant), City Water, Light, and Power in Springfield, Illinois (coal-fired power station), and other regional industries are potential sources of anthropogenic CO2 for storage at this complex. Site feasibility will be evaluated through drilling results, static and dynamic modeling, and quantitative risk assessment. Both studies will entail stakeholder engagement, consideration of infrastructure requirements, existing policy, and business models. Project data will help calibrate the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Toolkit to better understand the risks of commercial-scale carbon storage.

  8. Changes in optical properties, chemistry, and micropore and mesopore characteristics of bituminous coal at the contact with dikes in the Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.; Schimmelmann, A.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in high-volatile bituminous coal (Pennsylvanian) near contacts with two volcanic intrusions in Illinois were investigated with respect to optical properties, coal chemistry, and coal pore structure. Vitrinite reflectance (Ro) increases from 0.62% to 5.03% within a distance of 5.5??m from the larger dike, and from 0.63% to 3.71% within 3.3??m from the small dike. Elemental chemistry of the coal shows distinct reductions in hydrogen and nitrogen content close to the intrusions. No trend was observed for total sulfur content, but decreases in sulfate content towards the dikes indicate thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). Contact-metamorphism has a dramatic effect on coal porosity, and microporosity in particular. Around the large dike, the micropore volume, after a slight initial increase, progressively decreases from 0.0417??cm3/g in coal situated 4.7??m from the intrusive contact to 0.0126??cm3/g at the contact. Strongly decreasing mesopore and micropore volumes in the altered zone, together with frequent cleat and fracture filling by calcite, indicate deteriorating conditions for both coalbed gas sorption and gas transmissibility. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluvial-deltaic sedimentation and stratigraphy of the ferron sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P.B.; Chidsey, T.C.; Ryer, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    East-central Utah has world-class outcrops of dominantly fluvial-deltaic Turonian to Coniacian aged strata deposited in the Cretaceous foreland basin. The Ferron Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale records the influences of both tidal and wave energy on fluvial-dominated deltas on the western margin of the Cretaceous western interior seaway. Revisions of the stratigraphy are proposed for the Ferron Sandstone. Facies representing a variety of environments of deposition are well exposed, including delta-front, strandline, marginal marine, and coastal-plain. Some of these facies are described in detail for use in petroleum reservoir characterization and include permeability structure.

  10. Effect of detention basin release rates on flood flows - Application of a model to the Blackberry Creek Watershed in Kane County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, David T.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Straub, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of stormwater detention basins with specified release rates are examined on the watershed scale with a Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF) continuous-simulation model. Modeling procedures for specifying release rates from detention basins with orifice and weir discharge configurations are discussed in this report. To facilitate future detention modeling as a tool for watershed management, a chart relating watershed impervious area to detention volume is presented. The report also presents a case study of the Blackberry Creek watershed in Kane County, Ill., a rapidly urbanizing area seeking to avoid future flood damages from increased urbanization, to illustrate the effects of various detention basin release rates on flood peaks and volumes and flood frequencies. The case study compares flows simulated with a 1996 land-use HSPF model to those simulated with four different 2020 projected land-use HSPF model scenarios - no detention, and detention basins with release rates of 0.08, 0.10, and 0.12 cubic feet per second per acre (ft3/s-acre), respectively. Results of the simulations for 15 locations, which included the downstream ends of all tributaries and various locations along the main stem, showed that a release rate of 0.10 ft3/s-acre, in general, can maintain postdevelopment 100-year peak-flood discharge at a similar magnitude to that of 1996 land-use conditions. Although the release rate is designed to reduce the 100-year peak flow, reduction of the 2-year peak flow is also achieved for a smaller proportion of the peak. Results also showed that the 0.10 ft3/s-acre release rate was less effective in watersheds with relatively high percentages of preexisting (1996) development than in watersheds with less preexisting development.

  11. Illinois | Solar Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. Public benefit projects may be eligible for low Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC) defines competitive and noncompetitive customer classes in the IOU expedited process to 25 kW to allow more projects to benefit from the streamlined process and exempting them

  12. Thermophysical behavior of St. Peter sandstone: application to compressed air energy storage in an aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erikson, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The long-term stability of a sandstone reservoir is of primary importance to the success of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers. The purpose of this study was to: develop experimental techniques for the operation of the CAES Porous Media Flow Loop (PMFL), an apparatus designed to study the stability of porous media in subsurface geologic environments, conduct experiments in the PMFL designed to determine the effects of temperature, stress, and humidity on the stability of candidate CAES reservoir materials, provide support for the CAES field demonstration project in Pittsfield, Illinois, by characterizing the thermophysical stability of Pittsfield reservoir sandstone under simulated field conditions.

  13. Brief analysis on relationship between red beds and sandstone-type uranium ore-formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Zengxian

    2006-01-01

    Red beds are sandy gravel beds deposited under the arid and hot climates and correspondent to the oxidation environment of continental basins. As an exogenetic epigenetic uranium deposit, the formation of the sandstone-type uranium deposit needs a large chronologic gap between the diagenesis and the subsequent uranium metallogenesis of the ore-hosting target layer with a sedimentary discontinuity and an alternative humid-arid climate. Red beds are the product of this time. The evolutionary times of red beds are in accordance with the formation of the sandstone-type uranium deposit. Both domestic and abroad researches indicate that each times evolution of a red bed might be associated with uranium ore-formation in one or more sandstone layers in the region. In China, red beds are developed in many geologic periods, but sandstone-type uranium mineralization occurs mostly in Mesozoic-Cenozoic. Taking five known sandstone-type uranium deposits as examples, the author makes a primary analysis on the relationship between red beds and the subsequent sandstone-type uranium mineralization. It is suggested that the deposition of red beds and sandstone-type uranium metallogenesis are of 'cogenesis and coexistence' and that the deposition of red beds and its evolutionary times can be regarded as the prerequisites to judge the potential of sandstone-type uranium mineralization in a Mesozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary basin. (authors)

  14. The controlling role of positive structures over the metallogenesis and emplacement of inter layer oxidation sandstone type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Kangheng; Chen Zuyi

    2010-01-01

    The positive structures in this paper mean the geological structures related to the occurrence of U-metallogenic zones or U-deposit such as anticlines, uplifts and uplifted fault-blocks. Occurrence features of interlayer oxidation sandstone type deposit at the southern margin of Yili basin and southwestern margin of Turpan-Hami basin, the northeastern margin of Jiudong basin illustrate that the sandstone-hosted uranium deposits, the U-mineralized sections and the uranium occurrences are always selectively emplaced on/in positive structures. The reasons for this lie in the formation mechanism of sandstone-hosted U-deposits. The positive structures raised the elevation of ore-hosting sandstone horizon and make it close to ground surface or exposed at the ground surface, which result in the infiltration of uranium and oxygen bearing groundwater from recharge area into host sandstone horizon, and the interlayer oxidation of host sandstone, as well as the dissolution and the migration of uranium in host sandstone, and the reduction mineralization at the oxidation-reduction interface. Sufficient attention should be paid to the controlling role of positive structures over the metallogenesis and emplacement of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits. They could act as an important criterion for recognizing and prognosticating potential uranium mineralized areas in uranium metallogenic zones or uranium-productive sedimentary basins. (authors)

  15. Sandstone Turning by Abrasive Waterjet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hlaváček, Petr; Cárach, J.; Hloch, Sergej; Vasilko, K.; Klichová, Dagmar; Klich, Jiří; Lehocká, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2015), s. 2489-2493 ISSN 0723-2632 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : turning away from the jet * conventional turning towards the jet * sandstone * abrasive water jet Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.386, year: 2015 http://www.springerprofessional.de/sandstone-turning-by-abrasive-waterjet/6038028.html

  16. Reworked Middle Jurassic sandstones as a marker for Upper Cretaceous basin inversion in Central Europe—a case study for the U-Pb detrital zircon record of the Upper Cretaceous Schmilka section and their implication for the sedimentary cover of the Lausitz Block (Saxony, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Mandy; Voigt, Thomas; Bittner, Lucas; Gärtner, Andreas; Zieger, Johannes; Linnemann, Ulf

    2018-04-01

    The Saxonian-Bohemian Cretaceous Basin (Elbsandsteingebirge, E Germany and Czech Republic, Elbtal Group) comprises Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks from Upper Cenomanian to Santonian age. These sandstones were deposited in a narrow strait of the sea linking the northern Boreal shelf to the southern Tethyan areas. They were situated between the West Sudetic Island in the north and the Mid-European Island in the south. As known by former studies (e.g. Tröger, Geologie 6/7:717-730, 1964; Tröger, Geologie von Sachsen, Schweizerbart, 311-358, 2008; Voigt and Tröger, Proceedings of the 4th International Cretaceous Symposium, 275-290, 1996; Voigt, Dissertation, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, 1-130, 1995; Voigt, Zeitschrift der geologischen Wissenschaften 37(1-2): 15-39, 2009; Wilmsen et al., Freiberger Forschungshefte C540: 27-45, 2011) the main sedimentary input came from the north (Lausitz Block, southern West-Sudetic Island). A section of Turonian to Coniacian sandstones was sampled in the Elbsandsteingebirge near Schmilka (Elbtal Group, Saxony, Germany). The samples were analysed for their U-Pb age record of detrital zircon using LA-ICP-MS techniques. The results show main age clusters typical for the Bohemian Massif (local material) and are interpreted to reflect the erosion of uniform quartz-dominated sediments and basement rocks. Surprisingly, these rocks lack an expected Upper Proterozoic to Lower Palaeozoic age peak, which would be typical for the basement of the adjacent Lausitz Block (c. 540-c. 560 Ma). Therefore, the Lausitz Block basement must have been covered by younger sediments that acted as source rocks during deposition of the Elbtal Group. The sandstones of the Elbe valley (Elbtal Group, Schmilka section) represent the re-deposited sedimentary cover of the Lausitz Block in inverse order. This cover comprised Permian, Triassic, Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous deposits, which are eroded already today and cannot be investigated. Within the samples of the

  17. Age, sedimentary environments, and other aspects of sandstone and related host rocks for uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Project II of the Uranium Geology Working Group was assigned to the study of sedimentary basins and sandstone - type uranium deposits. About 40% of the worlds's uranium resources are contained in sandstone-type deposits, which has led to extensive research. The research was carried out mainly by correspondence, and the results reported by 21 geologists from 10 nations are summarized in this report. It investigated five topics dealing with important aspects of the geology of uranium ores in sandstone host formations: age of host rock; partitioning of uranium between continental and marine sediments; latitude limitation on formation of sandstone deposits; effect of rock formation dip on sandstone ores; usefulness of stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies. The results of studies on these subjects form part of a wider programme of the Working Group, whose final results will be presented at the 27th International Geological Congress in Moscow in 1984

  18. Residual basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elboux, C.V.; Paiva, I.B.

    1980-01-01

    Exploration for uranium carried out over a major portion of the Rio Grande do Sul Shield has revealed a number of small residual basins developed along glacially eroded channels of pre-Permian age. Mineralization of uranium occurs in two distinct sedimentary units. The lower unit consists of rhythmites overlain by a sequence of black shales, siltstones and coal seams, while the upper one is dominated by sandstones of probable fluvial origin. (Author) [pt

  19. A method of quantitative prediction for sandstone type uranium deposit in Russia and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Shushuai; Jiang Minzhong; Li Xiaolu

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the foundational principle of quantitative predication for sandstone type uranium deposits in Russia. Some key methods such as physical-mathematical model construction and deposits prediction are described. The method has been applied to deposits prediction in Dahongshan region of Chaoshui basin. It is concluded that the technique can fortify the method of quantitative predication for sandstone type uranium deposits, and it could be used as a new technique in China. (authors)

  20. The Paleozoic-Mesozoic recycling of the Rakaia Terrane, South Island, New Zealand : sandstone clast and sandstone petrology, geochemistry, and geochronology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandres, A.M.; Bradshaw, J.D.; Ireland, T.

    2005-01-01

    The Torlesse terranes - part of the New Zealand Eastern Province - are accretionary complexes that comprise an enormous volume of quartzofeldspathic sandstones and mudstones with subsidiary conglomerates plus minor oceanic assemblages. Two terranes are recognised in the South Island - the Permian to Late Triassic Rakaia Terrane and the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Pahau Terrane. Sandstone clasts from two Rakaia Terrane and two Pahau Terrane conglomerates were collected. We present the first combined detailed information on petrography and geochemistry of Torlesse conglomerate sandstone clasts and use our own and published U-Pb SHRIMP detrital zircon age data to demonstrate the recycling of the Rakaia Terrane into Rakaia strata itself and into Pahau Terrane strata. Sandstone clast major and trace element chemical data largely support petrographic observations derived from thin-section analysis. The similarities of petrographic and geochemical data between sandstone clasts from the Rakaia Terrane and Rakaia sandstones suggest that clasts in the Permian Te Moana and Late Triassic Lake Hill Conglomerates were derived by autocannibalistic reworking of older, consolidated, Rakaia sediments. Data from sandstone clasts from the Pahau Terrane suggest that uplift of the Rakaia Terrane continued into the Cretaceous. These Pahau Terrane clasts indicate that at the time of the Pahau sedimentation Permian to early Late Triassic Rakaia rocks were exposed and recycled into the Pahau Basin. (author). 57 refs., 8 figs., 3 tables

  1. Dips, ramps, and rolls- Evidence for paleotopographic and syn-depositional fault control on the Western Kentucky No. 4 coal bed, tradewater formation (Bolsovian) Illinois Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Williams, D.A.; Nelson, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Western Kentucky No. 4 coal is a high-volatile B to high-volatile C bituminous coal that has been heavily mined along the southern margin of the Western Kentucky Coal Field. The seam has a reputation for rolling floor elevation. Elongate trends of floor depressions are referred to as "dips" and "rolls" by miners. Some are relatively narrow and straight to slightly curvilinear in plan view, with generally symmetric to slightly asymmetric cross-sections. Others are broader and asymmetric in section, with sharp dips on one limb and gradual, ramp-like dips on the other. Some limbs change laterally from gradual dip, to sharp dip, to offset of the coal. Lateral changes in the rate of floor elevation dip are often associated with changes in coal thickness, and in underground mines, changes in floor elevation are sometimes associated with roof falls and haulage problems. In order to test if coal thickness changes within floor depressions were associated with changes in palynology, petrography and coal quality, the coal was sampled at a surface mine across a broad. ramp-like depression that showed down-dip coal thickening. Increment samples of coal from a thick (150 cm), down-ramp and thinner (127 cm), up-ramp position at one surface mine correlate well between sample sites (a distance of 60 m) except for a single increment. The anomalous increment (31 cm) in the lower-middle part of the thick coal bed contained 20% more Lycospora orbicula spores. The rolling floor elevations noted in the study mines are inferred to have been formed as a result of pre-peat paleotopographic depressions, syn-depositional faulting, fault-controlled pre-peat paleotopography, and from compaction beneath post-depositional channels and slumps. Although the association of thick coal with linear trends and inferred faults has been used in other basins to infer syn-depositional faulting, changes in palynology within increment samples of the seam along a structural ramp in this study provide

  2. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  3. Elevated Uranium in Aquifers of the Jacobsville Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, H.; Gierke, J.

    2003-12-01

    The EPA has announced a new standard for uranium in drinking water of 30 parts per billion (ppb). This maximum contaminant level (MCL) takes effect for community water supplies December 2003. The EPA's ruling has heightened awareness among residential well owners that uranium in drinking water may increase the risk of kidney disease and cancer and has created a need for a quantified, scientific understanding of the occurrence and distribution of uranium isotopes in aquifers. The authors are investigating the occurrence of elevated uranium in northern Michigan aquifers of the Middle Proterozoic Jacobsville sandstone, a red to mottled sequence of sandstones, conglomerates, siltstones and shales deposited as basin fill in the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift. Approximately 25% of 300 well water samples tested for isotopic uranium have concentrations above the MCL. Elevated uranium occurrences are distributed throughout the Jacobsville sandstone aquifers stretching across Michigan's Upper Peninsula. However, there is significant variation in well water uranium concentrations (from 0.01 to 190 ppb) and neighboring wells do not necessarily have similar concentrations. The authors are investigating hydrogeologic controls on ground water uranium concentrations in the Jacobsville sandstone, e.g. variations in lithology, mineralogy, groundwater residence time and geochemistry. Approximately 2000' of Jacobsville core from the Amoco St. Amour well was examined in conjunction with the spectral gamma ray log run in the borehole. Spikes in equivalent uranium (eU) concentration from the log are frequently associated with clay and heavy mineral layers in the sandstone core. The lithology and mineralogy of these layers will be determined by analysis of thin sections and x-ray diffraction. A portable spectrometer, model GRS-2000/BL, will be used on the sandstone cliffs along Lake Superior to characterize depositional and lithologic facies of the Jacobsville sandstone in terms of

  4. Electric utilities in Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Although the conference dealt specifically with concerns of the electric utilities in Illinois, the issues were dealt with in the national context as well. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 5 sections of this proceeding. A total of 25 papers were presented. Section titles are: Forecasting, Planning and Siting, Reliability, Rates and Financing, and Future Developments.

  5. Illinois forest statistics, 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerold T. Hahn

    1987-01-01

    The third inventory of the timber resource of Illinois shows a 1% increase in commercial forest area and a 40% gain in growing-stock volume between 1962 and 1985. Presented are highlights and statistics on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  6. Illinois' Forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; David E. Haugen; Dick C. Little; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; Ronald J. Piva; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2009-01-01

    The first full, annualized inventory of Illinois' forests reports more than 4.5 million acres of forest land with an average of 459 trees per acre. Forest land is dominated by oak/hickory forest types, which occupy 65 percent of total forest land area. Seventy-two percent of forest land consists of sawtimber, 20 percent contains poletimber, and 8 percent contains...

  7. GREYBULL SANDSTONE PETROLEUM POTENTIAL ON THE CROW INDIAN RESERVATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL MONTANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Lopez

    2000-12-14

    Evaluation of the Lower Cretaceous Greybull Sandstone on the Crow Indian Reservation for potential stratigraphic traps in the valley-fill sandstone was the focus of this project. The Crow Reservation area, located in south-central Montana, is part of the Rocky Mountain Foreland structural province, which is characterized by Laramide uplifts and intervening structural basins. The Pryor and Bighorn mountains, like other foreland uplifts, are characterized by asymmetrical folds associated with basement-involved reverse faults. The reservation area east of the mountains is on the northwestern flank of the Powder River Basin. Therefore, regional dips are eastward and southeastward; however, several prominent structural features interrupt these regional dips. The nearly 4,000 mi{sup 2} reservation is under explored but has strong potential for increased oil and gas development. Oil and gas production is well established in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to the south as well as in the areas north and west of the reservation. However, only limited petroleum production has been established within the reservation. Geologic relations and trends indicate strong potential for oil and gas accumulations, but drilling has been insufficient for their discovery. The Greybull Sandstone, which is part of the transgressive systems tract that includes the overlying Fall River Sandstone, was deposited on a major regional unconformity. The erosional surface at the base of the Greybull Sandstone is the +100 Ma, late Aptian-Early Albian regional unconformity of Weimer (1984). This lowstand erosional surface was controlled by a basin-wide drop in sea level. In areas where incised Greybull channels are absent, the lowstand erosional unconformity is at the base of the Fall River Sandstone and equivalent formations. During the pre-Greybull lowstand, sediment bypassed this region. In the subsequent marine transgression, streams began to aggrade and deposit sand of the lower Greybull Sandstone

  8. Composition of natural gas and crude oil produced from 14 wells in the Lower Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone and Medina Group Sandstones, northeastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania: Chapter G.6 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burruss, Robert A.; Ryder, Robert T.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The geochemical processes that control the distribution of hydrocarbons in the regional accumulation of natural gas and crude oil in reservoirs of Early Silurian age in the central Appalachian basin are not well understood. Gas and oil samples from 14 wells along a down-dip transect through the accumulation in northeastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania were analyzed for molecular and stable isotopic compositions to look for evidence of hydrocarbon source, thermal maturation, migration, and alteration parameters. The correlation of carbon and hydrogen stable isotopic composition of methane with thermal maturation indicates that the deepest gases are more thermally mature than independent estimates of thermal maturity of the reservoir horizon based on the conodont alteration index. This correlation indicates that the natural gas charge in the deepest parts of the regional accumulation sampled in this study originated in deeper parts of the Appalachian basin and migrated into place. Other processes, including mixing and late-stage alteration of hydrocarbons, may also impact the observed compositions of natural gases and crude oils.

  9. Illinois' Forests 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan J. Crocker; Mark D. Nelson; Charles J. Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Grant M. Domke; Mark H. Hansen; Mark A. Hatfield; Tonya W. Lister; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Ronald J. Piva; Barry T. Wilson; Christopher W. Woodall

    2013-01-01

    The second full annual inventory of Illinois' forests, completed in 2010, reports more than 4.8 million acres of forest land and 97 tree species. Forest land is dominated by oak/hickory and elm/ash/cottonwood forest-type groups, which occupy 93 percent of total forest land area. The volume of growing stock on timberland totals 7.2 billion cubic feet. The average...

  10. ANALYSIS OF OIL-BEARING CRETACEOUS SANDSTONE HYDROCARBON RESERVOIRS, EXCLUSIVE OF THE DAKOTA SANDSTONE, ON THE JICARILLA APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, NEW MEXICO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennie Ridgley

    2000-01-01

    An additional 450 wells were added to the structural database; there are now 2550 wells in the database with corrected tops on the Juana Lopez, base of the Bridge Creek Limestone, and datum. This completes the structural data base compilation. Fifteen oil and five gas fields from the Mancos-ElVado interval were evaluated with respect to the newly defined sequence stratigraphic model for this interval. The five gas fields are located away from the structural margins of the deep part of the San Juan Basin. All the fields have characteristics of basin-centered gas and can be considered as continuous gas accumulations as recently defined by the U.S. Geological Survey. Oil production occurs in thinly interbedded sandstone and shale or in discrete sandstone bodies. Production is both from transgressive and regressive strata as redefined in this study. Oil production is both stratigraphically and structurally controlled with production occurring along the Chaco slope or in steeply west-dipping rocks along the east margin of the basin. The ElVado Sandstone of subsurface usage is redefined to encompass a narrower interval; it appears to be more time correlative with the Dalton Sandstone. Thus, it was deposited as part of a regressive sequence, in contrast to the underlying rock units which were deposited during transgression

  11. Sandstone-body and shale-body dimensions in a braided fluvial system: Salt wash sandstone member (Morrison formation), Garfield County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J.W.; McCabea, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Excellent three-dimensional exposures of the Upper Jurassic Salt Wash Sandstone Member of the Morrison Formation in the Henry Mountains area of southern Utah allow measurement of the thickness and width of fluvial sandstone and shale bodies from extensive photomosaics. The Salt Wash Sandstone Member is composed of fluvial channel fill, abandoned channel fill, and overbank/flood-plain strata that were deposited on a broad alluvial plain of low-sinuosity, sandy, braided streams flowing northeast. A hierarchy of sandstone and shale bodies in the Salt Wash Sandstone Member includes, in ascending order, trough cross-bedding, fining-upward units/mudstone intraclast conglomerates, singlestory sandstone bodies/basal conglomerate, abandoned channel fill, multistory sandstone bodies, and overbank/flood-plain heterolithic strata. Trough cross-beds have an average width:thickness ratio (W:T) of 8.5:1 in the lower interval of the Salt Wash Sandstone Member and 10.4:1 in the upper interval. Fining-upward units are 0.5-3.0 m thick and 3-11 m wide. Single-story sandstone bodies in the upper interval are wider and thicker than their counterparts in the lower interval, based on average W:T, linear regression analysis, and cumulative relative frequency graphs. Multistory sandstone bodies are composed of two to eight stories, range up to 30 m thick and over 1500 m wide (W:T > 50:1), and are also larger in the upper interval. Heterolithic units between sandstone bodies include abandoned channel fill (W:T = 33:1) and overbank/flood-plain deposits (W:T = 70:1). Understanding W:T ratios from the component parts of an ancient, sandy, braided stream deposit can be applied in several ways to similar strata in other basins; for example, to (1) determine the width of a unit when only the thickness is known, (2) create correlation guidelines and maximum correlation lengths, (3) aid in interpreting the controls on fluvial architecture, and (4) place additional constraints on input variables to

  12. Metallogenic characteristics, model and exploration prospect for the paleo-interlayer-oxidation type sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jingbai; Li Shengxiang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the paleo-interlayer-oxidation type sandstone-hosted uranium deposits occurred in the Meso-Cenozoic continental basins in China are divided into 3 subtype, they are stratum over lapping buried subtype, structure-uplifting destroy subtype and faulted-folding conserved subtype. The metallogenic characteristics, metallogenic model and exploration prospect for these 3 subtypes uranium deposits are discussed. It is proposed that the paleo-interlayer-oxidation type sandstone-hosted uranium deposits, besides the recent interlayer oxidation type sandstone-hosted uranium deposits, are of great prospecting potential in the Meso-Cenozoic continental basins in China. Therefore, the metallogenic theory of these types uranium deposits should be conscientiously summarized and replenished continuously so as to propel forward the exploration of the sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in China. (authors)

  13. A new biostratigraphical tool for reservoir characterisation and well correlation in permo-carboniferous sandstones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garming, J.F.L.; Cremer, H.; Verreussel, R.M.C.H.; Guasti, E.; Abbink, O.A.

    2010-01-01

    Permo-Carboniferous sandstones are important reservoir rocks for natural gas in the Southern North Sea basin. This is a mature area which makes tools for reservoir characterization and well to well correlation important for field optimalisation and ongoing exploration activities. Within the

  14. Sensibility test for uranium ores from Qianjiadian sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingyu

    2005-01-01

    Sensibility tests for uranium ores from Qianjiadian sandstone type uranium deposit in Songliao Basin which is suitable to in-situ leach are carried out, including water sensibility, velocity sensibility, salt sensibility, acid sensibility and alkaline sensibility. The sensibility critical value of this ore is determined. Some references on mining process and technical parameter are provided for in-situ leaching of uranium. (authors)

  15. Combined rock-physical modelling and seismic inversion techniques for characterisation of stacked sandstone reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Justiniano, A.; Jaya, Y.; Diephuis, G.; Veenhof, R.; Pringle, T.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to characterise the Triassic massive stacked sandstone deposits of the Main Buntsandstein Subgroup at Block Q16 located in the West Netherlands Basin. The characterisation was carried out through combining rock-physics modelling and seismic inversion techniques. The

  16. River Mileages and Drainage Areas for Illinois Streams. Volume 1. Illinois Except Illinois River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    SALINE MINES SALINE RIVER (MOUTH AT OHIO RIVER MILE 867.4) HARDIN COUNTY 0.0 HYDROLOGIC UNIT 05140204 SALINE MINES 0.0 AT MOUTH NEAR LAMB 1177 373416...ROA-) S3? TIIN W 6E STEWAPASON 1.2 QOAo 532 TIIN N bE SEAnO 2.2 -iOA’ S28 T1IN d~ 6E STEWARnSON 2.o3 RDA- S28 Tl~rl N 6F STEW AkNr SON 4.1 ROAn 522 T12N...50.9 ROAD S029TllN9Rl4W CASEY1151.2 LAMBS BRANCH R CASEY 51.4 RO40 SQ2,TllN9Rl4W CASEY 52.0 ROAD S029T~lN9Rl4W CASEY S2.8 ROAD S349Tl2N9RI4W CASEY

  17. Recent exploration progresses on sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in north-western China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z.

    2014-01-01

    The metallogenic target selection using multiple exploration techniques and drilling program for sandstone-hosted uranium deposits have been intensively carried out for recent years, and big progresses on new discoveries of uranium reserve/resource have been made in the Mesozoic sedimentary basins such as in Yili, Ordos etc. in North-western China The Yili basin is a depression one within the Tianshan Mountain belt in the western part of China. Its basement is composed of Proterozoic-Paleozoic metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, and covers of Mesozoic sediments. The early-middle Jurassic Shuixigou Group is major uranium-productive beds which are composed of three Formations such as Badaowan, Sangonghe, Xisanyao and eight sedimentary cycles. Uranium deposits are found in the south margin of the Basin and controlled by the redox zone. The combined exploration techniques of detailed sedimentary facies study, Rn-survey, high-precision magnetic and soil geochemical and seismic surveys have been successfully used to have locate the potential targets and mineralization zones. The enlargement of uranium reserve/resources in the known deposits and new resources in the selected new targets and cycles have been achieved through further drilling programs. The Ordos basin is a large Meso-Cenozoic basin developed in North China Platform, with its size of approximately 250,000 km"2 and is well known as an important “energy resources basin” because of abundance of coal, oil and gas deposits. The Dongsheng sandstone type uranium deposit is a large one discovered in recent years in northeastern Ordos basin. It is a special kind of sandstone type uranium deposit, different from other ordinary sandstone type deposits because of its unique signatures. It is generally controlled by a transitional zone between greenish and grayish sandstones, both of those two kinds of sandstones now indicate reduced geochemical environments. The greenish color of the paleooxidized sandstones mainly

  18. Interpreting Fracture Patterns in Sandstones Interbedded with Ductile Strata at the Salt Valley Anticline, Arches National Park, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenz, John C.; Cooper, Scott P.

    2001-01-01

    Sandstones that overlie or that are interbedded with evaporitic or other ductile strata commonly contain numerous localized domains of fractures, each covering an area of a few square miles. Fractures within the Entrada Sandstone at the Salt Valley Anticline are associated with salt mobility within the underlying Paradox Formation. The fracture relationships observed at Salt Valley (along with examples from Paleozoic strata at the southern edge of the Holbrook basin in northeastern Arizona, a...

  19. Controls on the variability of net infiltration to desert sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; McKinney, Tim S.; Zhdanov, Michael S.; Watt, Dennis E.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in arid climates and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration becomes critically important for accurately inventorying water resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. This paper presents a conceptual model of net infiltration to desert sandstone and then develops an empirical equation for its spatial quantification at the watershed scale using linear least squares inversion methods for evaluating controlling parameters (independent variables) based on estimated net infiltration rates (dependent variables). Net infiltration rates used for this regression analysis were calculated from environmental tracers in boreholes and more than 3000 linear meters of vadose zone excavations in an upland basin in southwestern Utah underlain by Navajo sandstone. Soil coarseness, distance to upgradient outcrop, and topographic slope were shown to be the primary physical parameters controlling the spatial variability of net infiltration. Although the method should be transferable to other desert sandstone settings for determining the relative spatial distribution of net infiltration, further study is needed to evaluate the effects of other potential parameters such as slope aspect, outcrop parameters, and climate on absolute net infiltration rates.

  20. Movement of fossil pore fluids in granite basement, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couture, R.A.; Seitz, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The compositions of pore fluids in granite cores from the Precambrian basement in northern Illinois were determined. The estimated chloride concentration in the aqueous phase increases from near zero at the upper contact with sandstone to 2.7 M at 624 m below the contact. Traces of aliphatic oil are present in the overlying sandstone and the upper 516 m of granite, and oil occupies most of the pore space in one sample of unaltered granite 176 m below the contact. The oil has a Δ 13 C of -25%, about the same as average petroleum. The high concentrations of salt more than 500 m below the contact imply that little or no fresh water has reached these levels of the granite by flow. Lower concentrations near the contact are consistent with replacement of brine in the sandstone by fresh water at least 11 m.y. ago and subsequent upward diffusion of salt from the granite. Geologic data suggest that the time of replacement was about 130 Ma. The purpose of the investigation is to study the record of movement of intergranular fluids within a granite pluton. The composition and movement of ground waters can determine the extent that hazardous or radioactive wastes disposed in igneous rock will remain isolated

  1. Diagenesis of the Mucuri Member sandstones, lower cretaceous in the Espirito Santo and Mucuri Basins; Diagenese dos arenitos do Membro Mucuri, cretaceo inferior das Bacias do Espirito Santo e de Mucuri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Carlos Manuel de Assis; Anjos, Sylvia Maria Couto dos [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas. Dib. de Geologia e Engenharia de Reservatorios

    1996-01-01

    The diagenetic evolution of the sandy conglomerate sediments belonging to the Mucuri Member was regionally defined in the basins of Espirito Santo and Mucuri from samples collected in 24 wells at depths varying from 500 m to 3,000 m. Nine hundred meters of core samples were described, and 600 thin sections were prepared to be studied at the petrographic microscope and later at the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Samples were also analyze using X-ray diffraction in order to determine the clay minerals content as well as carbon and oxygen isotopic determination of the carbonate cements. The Mucuri Member consists of Alagoas and pre-Alagoas age sediments from alluvial-fluvial-deltaic environments, of arid climate, deposited during the rift phase of the Espirito Santo and Mucuri basins. The Aptian portion (Alagoas age) presents intercalations of typically marine shales. Thus, the Alagoas age sediments present formation water with a distinctive composition from the pre-Alagoas age sediments (continental) responsible for different diagenetic changes in both packages. Moreover, the pre-Alagoas sediments had a burial history characterized by a longer residence time at greater depths than the Alagoas package, and thereby being more susceptible to mesodiagnetic processes. Most reservoirs of the Mucuri Member are of the Alagoas age, and because of better sampling a more detailed description is given. These reservoirs were also deeply affected by eodiagenesis, with particular emphasis in calcite precipitation in zones of sulfate reduction and methagenesis and authigenesis of smectites, which is the main agent responsible for the large amounts of clay minerals present in these reservoirs. several other diagenetic processes were identified in the Mucuri Member being however less efficient in reducing the pore space. The progressive utilization of the clay minerals, the albitization of the feldspar and the precipitation of quartz overgrowth were the mesodiagenetic features

  2. ANALYSIS OF OIL-BEARING CRETACEOUS SANDSTONE HYDROCARBON RESERVOIRS, EXCLUSIVE OF THE DAKOTA SANDSTONE, ON THE JICARILLA APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, NEW MEXICO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennie Ridgley

    2000-01-01

    A goal of the Mesaverde project was to better define the depositional system of the Mesaverde in hopes that it would provide insight to new or by-passed targets for oil exploration. The new, detailed studies of the Mesaverde give us a better understanding of the lateral variability in depositional environments and facies. Recognition of this lateral variability and establishment of the criteria for separating deltaic, strandplain-barrier, and estuarine deposits from each other permit development of better hydrocarbon exploration models, because the sandstone geometry differs in each depositional system. Although these insights will provide better exploration models for gas exploration, it does not appear that they will be instrumental in finding more oil. Oil in the Mesaverde Group is produced from isolated fields on the Chaco slope; only a few wells define each field. Production is from sandstone beds in the upper part of the Point Lookout Sandstone or from individual fluvial channel sandstones in the Menefee. Stratigraphic traps rather than structural traps are more important. Source of the oil in the Menefee and Point Lookout may be from interbedded organic-rich mudstones or coals rather than from the Lewis Shale. The Lewis Shale appears to contain more type III organic matter and, hence, should produce mainly gas. Outcrop studies have not documented oil staining that might point to past oil migration through the sandstones of the Mesaverde. The lack of oil production may be related to the following: (1) lack of abundant organic matter of the type I or II variety in the Lewis Shale needed to produce oil, (2) ineffective migration pathways due to discontinuities in sandstone reservoir geometries, (3) cementation or early formation of gas prior to oil generation that reduced effective permeabilities and served as barriers to updip migration of oil, or (4) erosion of oilbearing reservoirs from the southern part of the basin. Any new production should mimic that of

  3. Fault features and enrichment laws of narrow-channel distal tight sandstone gas reservoirs: A case study of the Jurassic Shaximiao Fm gas reservoir in the Zhongjiang Gas Field, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongping Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Jurassic Shaximiao Fm gas reservoir in the Zhongjiang Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, is the main base of Sinopec Southwest Oil & Gas Company for gas reserves and production increase during the 12th Five-Year Plan. However, its natural gas exploration and development process was restricted severely, since the exploration wells cannot be deployed effectively in this area based on the previous gas accumulation and enrichment pattern of “hydrocarbon source fault + channel sand body + local structure”. In this paper, the regional fault features and the gas accumulation and enrichment laws were discussed by analyzing the factors like fault evolution, fault elements, fault-sand body configuration (the configuration relationship between hydrocarbon source faults and channel sand bodies, trap types, and reservoir anatomy. It is concluded that the accumulation and enrichment of the Shaximiao Fm gas reservoir in this area is controlled by three factors, i.e., hydrocarbon source, sedimentary facies and structural position. It follows the accumulation laws of source controlling region, facies controlling zone and position controlling reservoir, which means deep source and shallow accumulation, fault-sand body conductivity, multiphase channel, differential accumulation, adjusted enrichment and gas enrichment at sweet spots. A good configuration relationship between hydrocarbon source faults and channel sand bodies is the basic condition for the formation of gas reservoirs. Natural gas accumulated preferentially in the structures or positions with good fault-sand body configuration. Gas reservoirs can also be formed in the monoclinal structures which were formed after the late structural adjustment. In the zones supported by multiple faults or near the crush zones, no gas accumulation occurs, but water is dominantly produced. The gas-bearing potential is low in the area with undeveloped faults or being 30 km away from the hydrocarbon source faults. So

  4. Clays as tracers of diagenetic and hydrothermal paleo-conditions. Search for mineralogical and geochemical evidences of hydrothermal circulations in clayey, sandstone-like and carbonated diagenetic Triassic formations of the Paris Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploquin, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Within the framework of the multi-organization TAPSS 2000 program - GNR-FORPRO, led on the Bure site (Meuse-France), the ANDRA Company realized a deep drilling (named EST 433) to investigate the local Trias because the grounds Triassic levels constituting the bed rock of Clayey level for the storage of the nuclear waste. The drilling cut the Trias rocks on a total thickness of 700 m, successively from the bottom up: (1) the Buntsandstein (120 m) is characterized by sandy-conglomerate facies; (2) the Muschelkalk (150 m) is essentially consisted of clayey-sandy-siltstone series headed by a dolomitic deposit system; (3) the Keuper part (450 m) is an alternation of sandy clay-stone or silty clay-stone deposits with insertions of saliferous levels; (4) finally the Rethian part of the drilling associated with Hettangian (80 m), are characterized by clayey-shale facies. This litho-stratigraphy can redraw the evolution of the sedimentary paleo-environments since fluviatile circles (Buntsandstein) then lagoon (upper Muschelkalk), to large floods plains systems occasionally invaded by sea (Keuper) and, finally, in an epi-continental sea context (Rhetian-Hettangian) announcing the generalized transgressive phase of which the progressive evolution coming from the border towards the center of the basin. The nearness of the continental areas is recorded in the detrital fraction of the Triassic sediments. The geochemistry of these materials signs their continental crust character and their associated isotopic Nd-Sm values gives a Hercynian meta-sediments and granites origin with from time to time a contribution of young forming rock. The mineralogy of the clayey fraction (< 0,2μm) shows that only the conglomerate on the base of the drilling consists of an assembly of dickite and illites strictly associated with regular illite / smectite mixed-layer of R=1 type illite-rich. These last ones are the main part of the clayey mineralogy of the draining facies of Buntsandstein and are

  5. Lithofacies palaeogeography of the Carboniferous and Permian in the Qinshui Basin, Shanxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long-Yi Shao

    2015-10-01

    The Xiashihezi, Shangshihezi, and Shiqianfeng Formations consist mainly of red mudstones with thick-interbedded sandstones. During the deposition of these formations, most areas of the basin were occupied by a fluvial channel, resulting in palaeogeographic units that include fluvial channel zones and flood basins. The fluvial channel deposits consist mainly of relatively-thick sandstones, which could have potential for exploration of tight sandstone gas.

  6. Understanding CO2 Plume Behavior and Basin-Scale Pressure Changes during Sequestration Projects through the use of Reservoir Fluid Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leetaru, H.E.; Frailey, S.M.; Damico, J.; Mehnert, E.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Jordan, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    Large scale geologic sequestration tests are in the planning stages around the world. The liability and safety issues of the migration of CO2 away from the primary injection site and/or reservoir are of significant concerns for these sequestration tests. Reservoir models for simulating single or multi-phase fluid flow are used to understand the migration of CO2 in the subsurface. These models can also help evaluate concerns related to brine migration and basin-scale pressure increases that occur due to the injection of additional fluid volumes into the subsurface. The current paper presents different modeling examples addressing these issues, ranging from simple geometric models to more complex reservoir fluid models with single-site and basin-scale applications. Simple geometric models assuming a homogeneous geologic reservoir and piston-like displacement have been used for understanding pressure changes and fluid migration around each CO2 storage site. These geometric models are useful only as broad approximations because they do not account for the variation in porosity, permeability, asymmetry of the reservoir, and dip of the beds. In addition, these simple models are not capable of predicting the interference between different injection sites within the same reservoir. A more realistic model of CO2 plume behavior can be produced using reservoir fluid models. Reservoir simulation of natural gas storage reservoirs in the Illinois Basin Cambrian-age Mt. Simon Sandstone suggest that reservoir heterogeneity will be an important factor for evaluating storage capacity. The Mt. Simon Sandstone is a thick sandstone that underlies many significant coal fired power plants (emitting at least 1 million tonnes per year) in the midwestern United States including the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, and Ohio. The initial commercial sequestration sites are expected to inject 1 to 2 million tonnes of CO2 per year. Depending on the geologic structure and

  7. Characterization of application of acu sandstone in ceramic mass; Caracterizacao da aplicacao do arenito acu na massa ceramica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobrega, L.F.P.M.; Souza, M.M.; Gomes, Y.S.; Fernandes, D.L., E-mail: junior.luiz09@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (DIAREN/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Laboratorio de Processamento Mineral e Residuo

    2016-07-01

    The sandstone is a sedimentary rock formed mainly by quartz grains. In Rio Grande do Norte, there is the Potiguar Basin with the Jandaira and Acu Formations. The latter consists of thick layers of whitish-colored sandstones. It stands out as a water storage facility in the state, but it is also used for building aggregates. This article aimed at the use of the sandstone of this formation in the ceramic mass for coating. Initially, the material was sampled. It went through the comminution process to achieve the required granulometry. After this, three formulations were made to incorporate this new material into the traditional ones. The methods were performed according to ISO 13816. After sintering at 1200 °C, the specimens were subjected to the physical tests. A positive result was obtained for the use of the Acu sandstone in low concentrations. It is clear, therefore, its use in ceramics for coating.

  8. Tertiary lithofacies and paleo-geographic framework and interlayer oxidation zone sandstone uranium deposits in Longjiang-Zhaozhou area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenqiang

    2003-01-01

    The main points of views for the experiment are: (1) Yi'an formation is mainly composed of limnetic facies of siltstone and fine sandstone, due to weak surface water, limited sedimentation and simple material source; (2) strengthened surface water and enormous material brought from north and west-north and enlarged sedimentation from north to south, the major deposition during Da'an period are channel facies of conglomerate and river bed facies of sandstone; (3) stronger surface water during Taikang period, led alluvial-flood plain facies brown-yellow conglomerate to develop along western margin of the basin, the channel facies of conglomerate and river bed facies of grey-green sandstone, pelitic siltstone were widely formed southward and eastward; (4) according to the lithofacies criterion for in-situ leachable sandstone uranium ore, Taikang formation is an ideal horizon, river bed facies is suitable for interlayer oxidation type uranium deposit. (author)

  9. Sandstone-filled normal faults: A case study from central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, Giuseppe; Alsop, G. Ian; Grippa, Antonio; Zvirtes, Gustavo; Phillip, Ruy Paulo; Hurst, Andrew

    2018-05-01

    Despite the potential of sandstone-filled normal faults to significantly influence fluid transmissivity within reservoirs and the shallow crust, they have to date been largely overlooked. Fluidized sand, forcefully intruded along normal fault zones, markedly enhances the transmissivity of faults and, in general, the connectivity between otherwise unconnected reservoirs. Here, we provide a detailed outcrop description and interpretation of sandstone-filled normal faults from different stratigraphic units in central California. Such faults commonly show limited fault throw, cm to dm wide apertures, poorly-developed fault zones and full or partial sand infill. Based on these features and inferences regarding their origin, we propose a general classification that defines two main types of sandstone-filled normal faults. Type 1 form as a consequence of the hydraulic failure of the host strata above a poorly-consolidated sandstone following a significant, rapid increase of pore fluid over-pressure. Type 2 sandstone-filled normal faults form as a result of regional tectonic deformation. These structures may play a significant role in the connectivity of siliciclastic reservoirs, and may therefore be crucial not just for investigation of basin evolution but also in hydrocarbon exploration.

  10. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and

  11. Characterizing flow pathways in a sandstone aquifer: Tectonic vs sedimentary heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, G.; West, L. J.; Mountney, N. P.

    2016-11-01

    Sandstone aquifers are commonly assumed to represent porous media characterized by a permeable matrix. However, such aquifers may be heavy fractured when rock properties and timing of deformation favour brittle failure and crack opening. In many aquifer types, fractures associated with faults, bedding planes and stratabound joints represent preferential pathways for fluids and contaminants. In this paper, well test and outcrop-scale studies reveal how strongly lithified siliciclastic rocks may be entirely dominated by fracture flow at shallow depths (≤ 180 m), similar to limestone and crystalline aquifers. However, sedimentary heterogeneities can primarily control fluid flow where fracture apertures are reduced by overburden pressures or mineral infills at greater depths. The Triassic St Bees Sandstone Formation (UK) of the East Irish Sea Basin represents an optimum example for study of the influence of both sedimentary and tectonic aquifer heterogeneities in a strongly lithified sandstone aquifer-type. This fluvial sedimentary succession accumulated in rapidly subsiding basins, which typically favours preservation of complete depositional cycles including fine grained layers (mudstone and silty sandstone) interbedded in sandstone fluvial channels. Additionally, vertical joints in the St Bees Sandstone Formation form a pervasive stratabound system whereby joints terminate at bedding discontinuities. Additionally, normal faults are present through the succession showing particular development of open-fractures. Here, the shallow aquifer (depth ≤ 180 m) was characterized using hydro-geophysics. Fluid temperature, conductivity and flow-velocity logs record inflows and outflows from normal faults, as well as from pervasive bed-parallel fractures. Quantitative flow logging analyses in boreholes that cut fault planes indicate that zones of fault-related open fractures characterize 50% of water flow. The remaining flow component is dominated by bed-parallel fractures

  12. Illinois Accelerator Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Cooper, Charlie A.

    The Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) hosts a new accelerator development program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. IARC provides access to Fermi's state-of-the-art facilities and technologies for research, development and industrialization of particle accelerator technology. In addition to facilitating access to available existing Fermi infrastructure, the IARC Campus has a dedicated 36,000 ft2 Heavy Assembly Building (HAB) with all the infrastructure needed to develop, commission and operate new accelerators. Connected to the HAB is a 47,000 ft2 Office, Technology and Engineering (OTE) building, paid for by the state, that has office, meeting, and light technical space. The OTE building, which contains the Accelerator Physics Center, and nearby Accelerator and Technical divisions provide IARC collaborators with unique access to world class expertise in a wide array of accelerator technologies. At IARC scientists and engineers from Fermilab and academia work side by side with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in accelerator science and translate them into applications for the nation's health, wealth and security.

  13. Experimental strain analysis of Clarens Sandstone colonised by endolithic lichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wessels

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Endolithic lichens occur commonly on Clarens Sandstone in South Africa, where they significantly contribute to the weathering of sandstone by means of mechanical and chemical weathering processes. This preliminary investigation reports on the success- ful use of strain gauges in detecting strain differences between sandstone without epilithic lichens and sandstone colonised by the euendolithic lichen Lecidea aff. sarcogynoides Korb. Mechanical weathering, expressed as strain changes, in Clarens Sandstone was studied during the transition from relatively dry winter to wet summer conditions. Daily weathering of sandstone due to thermal expansion and contraction of colonised and uncolonised sandstone could be shown. Our results show that liquid water in sandstone enhances the mechanical weathering of uncolonised Clarens Sandstone while water in the gaseous phase enhances mechanical weathering of sandstone by euendolithic lichens.

  14. Economic evaluation on tight sandstone gas development projects in China and recommendation on fiscal and taxation support policies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Yang; Lingfeng Kong; Min Du; Chenhui Zhao

    2016-01-01

    China is rich in tight sandstone gas resources (“tight gas” for short). For example, the Sulige Gasfield in the Ordos Basin and the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Fm gas reservoir in the Sichuan Basin are typical tight gas reservoirs. In the past decade, tight gas reserve and production both have increased rapidly in China, but tight gas reservoirs are always managed as conventional gas reservoirs without effective fiscal, taxation and policy supports. The potential of sustainable tight gas productio...

  15. Illinois highway materials sustainability efforts of 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report provides a summary of the sustainability efforts of the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) in recycling : reclaimed materials in highway construction during calendar year 2015. This report meets the requirements of Illinois Publ...

  16. Illinois highway materials sustainability efforts of 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This report presents the 2014 sustainability efforts of the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) in : recycling reclaimed materials in highway construction. This report meets the requirements of Illinois : Public Act 097-0314 by documenting I...

  17. Illinois highway materials sustainability efforts of 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-04

    This report provides a summary of the sustainability efforts of the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) in recycling : reclaimed materials in highway construction during calendar year 2016. This report meets the requirements of Illinois Publ...

  18. Illinois highway materials sustainability efforts of 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This report presents the sustainability efforts of the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) in : recycling and reclaiming materials for use in highway construction. This report meets the requirements of : Illinois Public Act 097-0314 by docum...

  19. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  20. Main types and metallogenetic characteristics of sandstone-type uranium deposits in central asian mobile belt and its neighbouring area, and the study on prospecting direction of northwest China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Chengming

    2007-01-01

    Based on the study of geotectonic setting, formation evolution model and metallogenic characteristics of uranium productive basins, important sandstone-type uranium deposits in Central Asian mobile belt and neighbouring area are divided into five types. The statial distribution pattern of different sandstone-type uranium deposits is analyzed in detail. Geotectonic setting and metallogenetic characteristics are discussed. Finally, the characteristics of basin geodynamics, prospecting type and ore-bearing stratigraphy in Northwest China have been proposed. (authors)

  1. Emplacement processes of tuffaceous sandstones at IODP Site C0011B, Nankai Trough, derived from modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindlbeck, J. C.; Kutterolf, S.; Freundt, A.

    2011-12-01

    Tuffaceous sandstones are characterized by their high amount (25 to 75%) of pyroclasts in their modal composition. During IODP Expedition 322 three interbeds of tuffaceous sandstones have been found within a moderately lithified and bioturbated silty claystone sequence in the late Miocene (>7.07 to ~9.0 Ma) upper part of the middle Shikoku Basin facies. Of the three sandstones, units 1 and 2 are single beds whereas unit 3 is composed of three beds. Modal analyses of 29 sandstone thin sections reveal systematic vertical changes within each bed. Generally low-density pyroclasts are enriched at the top (50-60 vol%) of each sandstone bed whereas dense lithic components (25-30 vol%) and minerals (25-30 vol%) are enriched at the bottom. The vertically varying abundance of various types of lithic fragments (sedimentary, volcanoclastic and metamorphic) suggests that these have also been segregated according to their respective densities. The highest amount of fine-grained matrix glass is found in the middle of each bed. Pumice and lithic fragments in the middle and upper parts of the sandstone beds carry ash coatings. For sandstone package 3, in contrast to 1 and 2, core pictures and thin section analyses indicate a subdivision in three units showing the same significant variations in top to bottom enrichment. This suggests three sedimentation events following each other in short time intervals. Glass and mineral chemistry of each sandstone bed show no significant vertical variations. Specifically the matrix glass-shard major element compositions are identical to the pumice clast composition in each tuffaceous sandstone bed. The compositions of amphibole and pyroxene crystals differ only slightly between the sandstone packages. Application of the Ridolfi et al. (2009) thermobarometric calculations to amphiboles of sandstone packages 1 and 2 suggests that each of these was derived from a volcanic system comprising both a deep and a shallow magma reservoir. Thickness and

  2. Himalayan tectonic evolution and uranium ore formation, south of Songliao basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Wanwen; Wang Liming; Tian Li

    2008-01-01

    Based on the analysis of stress field and geomorphic environment of Songliao Basin during Himalayan Movement, it is presented that Himalayan Movement supplied favorite structural and geomorphic conditions with Eocene and Pliocene being metallogenic epoch for sandstone-type uranium in Songliao Basin. Degradation inliers at the southern margin of Songliao Basin, where structure and mineralization developed well, are the target area for in-situ sandstone type uranium. (authors)

  3. Provenance, diagenesis, tectonic setting and reservoir quality of the sandstones of the Kareem Formation, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Samir M.

    2013-09-01

    The Middle Miocene Kareem sandstones are important oil reservoirs in the southwestern part of the Gulf of Suez basin, Egypt. However, their diagenesis and provenance and their impact on reservoir quality, are virtually unknown. Samples from the Zeit Bay Oil Field, and the East Zeit Oil Field represent the Lower Kareem (Rahmi Member) and the Upper Kareem (Shagar Member), were studied using a combination of petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical techniques. The Lower Rahmi sandstones have an average framework composition of Q95F3.4R1.6, and 90% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. By contrast, the Upper Shagar sandstones are only slightly less quartzose with an average framework composition of Q76F21R3 and 82% of the quartz grains are monocrystalline. The Kareem sandstones are mostly quartzarenite with subordinate subarkose and arkose. Petrographical and geochemical data of sandstones indicate that they were derived from granitic and metamorphic terrains as the main source rock with a subordinate quartzose recycled sedimentary rocks and deposited in a passive continental margin of a syn rift basin. The sandstones of the Kareem Formation show upward decrease in maturity. Petrographic study revealed that dolomite is the dominant cement and generally occurs as fine to medium rhombs pore occluding phase and locally as a grain replacive phase. Authigenic quartz occurs as small euhedral crystals, locally as large pyramidal crystals in the primary pores. Authigenic anhydrites typically occur as poikilotopic rhombs or elongate laths infilling pores but also as vein filling cement. The kaolinite is a by-product of feldspar leaching in the presence of acidic fluid produced during the maturation of organic matter in the adjacent Miocene rocks. Diagenetic features include compaction; dolomite, silica and anhydrite cementation with minor iron-oxide, illite, kaolinite and pyrite cements; dissolution of feldspars, rock fragments. Silica dissolution, grain replacement and

  4. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    Hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers is considered for seasonal energy storage in Denmark. However, an increase in the aquifer temperature might reduce permeability, and thereby increase production costs. An understanding of the factors that control permeability is required in order...... and the Klinkenberg procedure showed the expected correlation between the two measures, however, differences could be around one order of magnitude. In tight gas sandstones, permeability is often sensitive to net stress, which might change due to the pore pressure change in the Klinkenberg procedure. Besides...... affecting the Klinkenberg procedure, the combined effect of slip and changes in permeability would affect production during pressure depletion in tight gas sandstone reservoirs; therefore effects of gas slip and net stress on permeability were combined in a model based on the Klinkenberg equation. A lower...

  5. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Illinois single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  6. Estimation of Potential Carbon Dioxide Storage Capacities of Onshore Sedimentary Basins in Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The potential carbon dioxide storage capacities of the five main onshore sedimentary basins (Chungnam, Gyeongsang, Honam, Mungyeong, and Taebaeksan Basins) in Republic of Korea are estimated based on the methods suggested by the United States National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The target geologic formations considered for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in the sedimentary basins are sandstone and coal beds. The density of carbon dioxide is set equal to 446.4 kg/m3. The adsorption capacity and density of coal (anthracite) are set equal to 2.71 × 10-2 kg/kg and 1.82 × 103 kg/m3, respectively. The average storage efficiency factors for sandstone and coal are set equal to 2.5% and 34.0%, respectively. The Chungnam Basin has the sandstone volume of 72 km3 and the coal volume of 1.24 km3. The average porosity of sandstone in the Chungnam Basin is 3.8%. As a result, the potential carbon dioxide storage capacities of sandstone and coal in the Chungnam Basin are estimated to be 31 Mton and 21 Mton, respectively. The Gyeongsang Basin has the sandstone volume of 1,960 km3. The average porosity of sandstone in the Gyeongsang Basin is 4.6%. As a result, the potential carbon dioxide storage capacity of sandstone in the Gyeongsang Basin is estimated to be 1,011 Mton. The Honam Basin has the sandstone volume of 8 km3 and the coal volume of 0.27 km3. The average porosity of sandstone in the Honam Basin is 1.9%. As a result, the potential carbon dioxide storage capacities of sandstone and coal in the Honam Basin are estimated to be 2 Mton and 5 Mton, respectively. The Mungyeong Basin has the sandstone volume of 60 km3 and the coal volume of 0.66 km3. The average porosity of sandstone in the Mungyeong Basin is 2.0%. As a result, the potential carbon dioxide storage capacities of sandstone and coal in the Mungyeong Basin are estimated to be 13 Mton and 11 Mton, respectively. The Taebaeksan Basin has the sandstone volume of 71 km3 and the coal volume of 0.73 km3. The

  7. The effects of impure CO2 on reservoir sandstones: results from mineralogical and geomechanical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbler, H.; Erickson, K. P.; Schmidt, M.; Lempp, Ch.; Pöllmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    An experimental study of the behaviour of reservoir sandstones from deep saline aquifers during the injection and geological storage of CO2 with the inherent impurities SOX and NOX is part of the German national project COORAL*. Sample materials were taken from outcrops of possible reservoir formations of Rotliegend and Bunter Sandstones from the North German Basin. A combination of mineralogical alteration experiments and geomechanical tests was carried out on these rocks to study the potential effects of the impurities within the CO2 pore fluid. Altered rock samples after the treatment with CO2 + SOX/NOX in an autoclave system were loaded in a triaxial cell under in-situ pressure and temperature conditions in order to estimate the modifications of the geomechanical rock properties. Mineralogical alterations were observed within the sandstones after the exposure to impure supercritical (sc)CO2 and brine, mainly of the carbonatic, but also of the silicatic cements, as well as of single minerals. Besides the partial solution effects also secondary carbonate and minor silicate mineral precipitates were observed within the pore space of the treated sandstones. These alterations affect the grain structure of the reservoir rock. Results of geomechanical experiments with unaltered sandstones show that the rock strength is influenced by the degree of rock saturation before the experiment and the chemical composition of the pore fluid (scCO2 + SOX + NOX). After long-term autoclave treatment with impure scCO2, the sandstone samples exhibit modified strength parameters and elastic deformation behaviour as well as changes in porosity compared to untreated samples. Furthermore, the injected fluid volume into the pore space of sandstones from the same lithotype varies during triaxial loading depending on the chemistry of the pore fluid. CO2 with NOX and SOX bearing fluid fills a significantly larger proportion of the sandstone pore space than brine with pure scCO2. * The

  8. Clay squirt: Local flow dispersion in shale-bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Dispersion of elastic-wave velocity is common in sandstone and larger in shaly sandstone than in clean sandstone. Dispersion in fluid-saturated shaly sandstone often exceeds the level expected from the stress-dependent elastic moduli of dry sandstone. The large dispersion has been coined clay...... squirt and is proposed to originate from a pressure gradient between the clay microporosity and the effective porosity. We have formulated a simple model that quantifies the clay-squirt effect on bulk moduli of sandstone with homogeneously distributed shale laminae or dispersed shale. The model...... predictions were compared with the literature data. For sandstones with dispersed shale, agreement was found, whereas other sandstones have larger fluid-saturated bulk modulus, possibly due to partially load-bearing shales or heterogeneous shale distribution. The data that agree with the clay-squirt model...

  9. Petrography and geochemistry of Jurassic sandstones from the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Periasamy

    On the basis of geochemical results, sandstones are classified into arkose, ..... Geochemical classification diagram of sandstone samples from the Jhuran Formation based on log(SiO2/Al2O3)– ..... 1993) showing single trend for the Jhuran.

  10. Petrology and provenance of the Neogene fluvial succession in Pishin Belt (Katawaz Basin) western Pakistan: Implications for sedimentation in peripheral forelands basins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal Khan; Kassi, Aktar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Sandstones and conglomerates of the Neogene fluvial succession in Pishin Belt (Katawaz Basin), Pakistan were studied for the first time to understand the composition, provenance and tectonic settings of the source areas. Sandstones of the Miocene Dasht Murgha Group and Pliocene Malthanai Formatio...

  11. Monitoring of green infrastructure at The Grove in Bloomington, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseboom, Donald P.; Straub, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    The City of Bloomington, Illinois, restored Kickapoo Creek to a more natural state by incorporating green infrastructure—specifically flood-plain reconnection, riparian wetlands, meanders, and rock riffles—at a 90-acre park within The Grove residential development. A team of State and Federal agencies and contractors are collecting data to monitor the effectiveness of this stream restoration in improving water quality and stream habitat. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is collecting and analyzing water resources data; Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) is collecting fish population data; Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) is collecting macroinvertebrates and riparian habitat data; and Prairie Engineers of Illinois, P.C., is collecting vegetation data. The data collection includes conditions upstream, within, and downstream of the development and restoration. The 480-acre development was designed by the Farnsworth Group to reduce peak stormwater flows by capturing runoff in the reconnected flood plains with shallow wetland basins. Also, an undersized park bridge was built at the downstream end of the park to pass the 20-percent annual exceedance probability flows (historically referred to as the 5-year flood), but detain larger floods. This design also helps limit sediment deposition from sediments transported in the drainage ditches in the upper 9,000 acres of agricultural row crops. Maintaining sediment-transport capacity minimizes sediment deposition in the restored stream segments, which reduces the loss of riparian and wetland-plant communities and instream habitat. Two additional goals of the restoration were to reduce nutrient loads and maintain water quality to support a diverse community of biotic species. Overall, 2 miles of previously managed agricultural-drainage ditches of Kickapoo Creek were restored, and the park landscape maximizes the enhancement of native riparian, wetland, and aquatic species for the park’s trail

  12. Effects of Flood Control Works Failure in the Missouri River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    areas of the Mississippi River drainage basin. Widespread flooding began in mid-June and lasted through mid-September (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers...al., Impact of New Madrid Seismic Zone Earthquakes on the Central USA, vol. 2 ( Urbana , IL: University of Illinois, 2009), A7-210. 60 What FCW...response planning. Urbana , IL: University of Illinois. https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/8787 (accessed 14 March 2014). Creswell, John W

  13. Petroleum and natural gas in Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Presentations made at the 7th Annual Illinois Energy Conference are compiled and reported. Specific topics include: Illinois petroleum and natural gas supply; energy use patterns for Illinois and the nation; impacts of the National Energy Act on the natural gas industry; natural gas for North America; natural gas supply under the Natural Gas Policy; US access to international oil; deregulation and its impact on the US petroleum supply; the US Energy Policy; petroleum pricing and taxation policies in Illinois; the high cost of energy and its impact on the poor; impact of increased fuel prices on Illinois' industrial future; energy prices and inflation; opportunities for energy conservation in transportaton; overview of energy and synfuels from biomass and wastes; an inventory of energy potential from biomass in Illinois; problems and potential of alcohol from agriculture; liquid and gaseous fuels from coal; and alternatives to liquid and gaseous fuels.

  14. Research and application of information system for sandstone-type uranium exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Shaoyang; Huang Shutao; Hou Huiqun

    2003-01-01

    The GIS (Geographical Information System) technique is applied to the exploration and evaluation of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits and the GIS application system of desktop is created for non-GIS professionals. ArcView3.2 is taken as compositive platform of the information system. The secondary design is developed through the AVENUE language provided by ArcView3.2 on the software functions. According to the needs of multi-source information management and integrated evaluation, a series of new functions are appended to the basic platform through AVENUE language on a basis of sufficiently inheriting ArcView3.2 software functions and a friendly graphic user interface is also created, so that the system implements the following functions better, including information query, data base management, editing graphics, geologic mapping, image processing, spatial analysis, model analysis and result output. In order to manage the plenty of borehole data better and quickly realize the borehole mapping, a system software of borehole data management and mapping on the base of GIS software platform is developed. The system software has been applied to uranium survey project in the west of Hailaer basin. Based on multi-source geoscience information database including geologic, geophysical, geochemical and remote sensing data, the system software has been used to perform the integrated analysis of spatial data for realizing the deep analysis and studies of the metallogenic geologic environments of sandstone-type uranium deposits. In the Kelulun basin, the weights of evidence analysis have been used to quantitatively predict the prospective areas of sandstone uranium deposits. Information system has also been applied to the integrated evaluation of uranium resource in the south of Yili basin, Songliao basin and other areas. (authors)

  15. Uranium isotopes in groundwater: their use in prospecting for sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowart, J.B.; Osmond, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    The relative abundances of dissolved 238 U and its daughter 234 U appear to be greatly affected as the uranium is transported downdip in sandstone aquifers. In an actively forming uranium accumulation at a reducing barrier, an input of 234 U occurs in proximity to the isotopically non-selective precipitation of uranium from the water. The result is a downdip water much lower in uranium concentration but relatively enriched in 234 U. The measurement of isotopic as well as concentration changes may increase the effectiveness of hydrogeochemical exploration of uranium. The investigation includes the uranium isotopic patterns in aquifers associated with known uranium orebodies in the Powder River and Shirley Basins, Wyoming, and Karnes County, Texas, USA. In addition, the Carrizo sandstone aquifer of Texas was studied in detail and the presence of an uranium accumulation inferred

  16. Uranium deposits: northern Denver Julesburg basin, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reade, H.L.

    1978-01-01

    The Fox Hills Sandstone and the Laramie Formation (Upper Cretaceous) are the host rocks for uranium deposits in Weld County, northern Denver Julesburg basin, Colorado. The uranium deposits discovered in the Grover and Sand Creek areas occur in well-defined north--south trending channel sandstones of the Laramie Formation whereas the sandstone channel in the upper part of the Fox Hills Sandstone trends east--west. Mineralization was localized where the lithology was favorable for uranium accumulation. Exploration was guided by log interpretation methods similar to those proposed by Bruce Rubin for the Powder River basin, Wyoming, because alteration could not be readily identified in drilling samples. The uranium host rocks consist of medium- to fine-grained carbonaceous, feldspathic fluvial channel sandstones. The uranium deposits consist of simple to stacked roll fronts. Reserve estimates for the deposits are: (1) Grover 1,007,000 lbs with an average grade of 0.14 percent eU 3 O 8 ,2) Sand Creek 154,000 lbs with an average grade of 0.08 percent eU 3 O 8 , and 3) The Pawnee deposit 1,060,000 lbs with an average grade of 0.07 percent eU 3 O 8 . The configuration of the geochemical cells in the Grover and Sand Creek sandstones indicate that uraniferous fluids moved northward whereas in the Pawnee sandstone of the Fox Hills uraniferous fluids moved southward. Precipitation of uranium in the frontal zone probably was caused by downdip migration of oxygcnated groundwater high in uranium content moving through a favorable highly carbonaceous and pyritic host sandstone

  17. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  18. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of 3 H, /sup 95m/Tc, and 85 Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for 85 Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for 85 Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta

  19. Performance of Different Acids on Sandstone Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zaman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of sandstone formations is a challenging task, which involves several chemicals and physical interactions of the acid with the formation. Some of these reactions may result in formation damage. Mud acid has been successfully used to stimulate sandstone reservoirs for a number of years. It is a mixture of hydrofluoric (HF and hydrochloric (HCl acids designed to dissolve clays and siliceous fines accumulated in the near-wellbore region. Matrix acidizing may also be used to increase formation permeability in undamaged wells. The change may be up to 50% to 100% with the mud acid. For any acidizing process, the selection of acid (Formulation and Concentration and the design (Pre-flush, Main Acid, After-flush is very important. Different researchers are using different combinations of acids with different concentrations to get the best results for acidization. Mainly the common practice is combination of Hydrochloric Acid – Hydrofluoric with Concentration (3% HF – 12% HCl. This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Orthophosphoric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in one combination and the second combination is Fluoboric and formic acid and the third one is formic and hydrofluoric acid. The results are compared with the mud acid and the results calculated are porosity, permeability, and FESEM Analysis and Strength tests. All of these new combinations shows that these have the potential to be used as acidizing acids on sandstone formations.

  20. Cathodoluminescence characteristics of sandstone and the implications for sandstone type No. 512 uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaodong; Guan Taiyang

    1998-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) technique, as a special petrologic tool, has been applied to the studies of uranium hosted sandstone from No. 512 uranium deposit located in Xinjiang Autonomous Region, Northwest China. The detrital grains including quartz, feldspar, debris and cements display distinguishing CL properties. The quartz grains mainly demonstrate brown and dark blue CL, feldspar grains demonstrate blue and bright blue CL, calcite cement displays bright yellow-orange and orange-red CL with significant CL zoning, while the debris, mud and sand cements have dark red CL, multicolor CL or non-luminescence. The characteristics of overgrowth, fracture healing, and the original contact relations of detrital grains appear much more significant with CL than that with conventional visual methods. Much more information can be contributed by CL technique to decipher the provenance area, to explain the cementation, consolidation and other diagenesis processes of sandstone. The CL technique also provides and efficient tool for identifying detrital grains and cements, and for more precisely estimating the proportions of various detrital grains and cement components in sandstone. The CL emission of uranium hosted sandstone revealed the existence of radiation-damage rims of quartz grains at the places with a little or no uranium minerals nearby, which may imply a uranium-leaching episode during the diagenesis of sandstone

  1. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Mechanical Drafting Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the mechanical drafting cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  2. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Architectural Drafting Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the architectural drafting cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  3. Fusion and its future in Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1984-08-01

    This report was prepared by the Illinois Fusion Power Task Force under the sponsorship of the Governor's Commission on Sciences and Technology. The report presents the findings and recommendations of the Task Force, an explanation of the basic concepts of fusion, a summary of national and international programs and a description of ongoing fusion activities in Illinois

  4. Petrography of thoriferous hydrocarbon nodules in sandstones, and their significance for petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parnell, J.; Monson, B.; Tosswill, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Nodules of thorium-rich hydrocarbon are recorded in sandstone sequences from several basins. The hydrocarbon nodules contain mineral inclusions, particularly of thorite or monazite. There is evidence both for accretion of hydrocarbons around detrital heavy mineral grains and for epigenetic growth by interaction of hydrocarbons with thorium-bearing fluids. Both mechanisms depend upon the precipitation of solid hydrocarbons induced by irradiation from thorium. The nodules exhibit aggressive replacement of other grains, a characteristic of radioanomalous hydrocarbons. The occurrence of the nodules is dependent upon an appropriate (plutonic) source for the thorium, but given this constraint they are important evidence for hydrocarbon migration pathways. (author)

  5. Textural patterns, mineralogy, and chemistry of sandstone-related Calçadinha chalcedony (Piauí, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcondes Lima da Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Paleozoic sandstones of the Parnaíba Basin, in addition to hosting opal deposits, also have occurrences of chalcedonies with potential for mineral and ornamental handicrafts, in addition to assisting the understanding of the geological evolution of the basin. However, the chalcedonies were not investigated yet, and this study intended to fulfill this gap by the investigation of the chalcedonies of Calçadinha in Piauí. Fieldwork, microtexturals analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometry, chemical analysis, and gemological assessments were developed. Four distinct types of chalcedonies have been distinguished. They stand out for their well distribution of Fe and Mn dendrites, which involves opal nodules, and contains microcavities with well-formed microcrystalline quartz, nontronite, and palygorskite. The mesoscopic features of these chalcedonies and cabochon and free forms cutting show potential for use in mineral crafts and semi-jewels. As expected, the chalcedonies are dominated by high contents of SiO2, besides the low and variable contents of Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, and TiO2. Among trace elements that show high Ba contents, bound in barite, seem also to be a geochemical signature of the country sandstones in Parnaíba basin. These chalcedonies were formed during the partial solubilization of SiO2 of sandstones, which was promoted during their tectonic formation in faults and fractures zones.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Crack Extension Patterns in Hydraulic Fracturing with Shale, Sandstone and Granite Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is an important method of reservoir stimulation in the exploitation of geothermal resources, and conventional and unconventional oil and gas resources. In this article, hydraulic fracturing experiments with shale, sandstone cores (from southern Sichuan Basin, and granite cores (from Inner Mongolia were conducted to investigate the different hydraulic fracture extension patterns in these three reservoir rocks. The different reactions between reservoir lithology and pump pressure can be reflected by the pump pressure monitoring curves of hydraulic fracture experiments. An X-ray computer tomography (CT scanner was employed to obtain the spatial distribution of hydraulic fractures in fractured shale, sandstone, and granite cores. From the microscopic and macroscopic observation of hydraulic fractures, different extension patterns of the hydraulic fracture can be analyzed. In fractured sandstone, symmetrical hydraulic fracture morphology could be formed, while some micro cracks were also induced near the injection hole. Although the macroscopic cracks in fractured granite cores are barely observed by naked eye, the results of X-ray CT scanning obviously show the morphology of hydraulic fractures. It is indicated that the typical bedding planes well developed in shale formation play an important role in the propagation of hydraulic fractures in shale cores. The results also demonstrated that heterogeneity influenced the pathway of the hydraulic fracture in granite cores.

  7. INAA and petrological study of sandstones from the Angkor monuments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Kranda, K.; Soukal, L.; Novak, J.K.; Lang, M.; Poncar, J.; Krausova, I.; Cunin, O.

    2008-01-01

    We determined 35 major, minor and trace elements in sandstone samples taken from building blocks of 19 Angkor temples and from an old and a new quarry using INAA. We also characterized the sandstone samples with conventional microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. Using cluster analysis, we found no straightforward correlation between the chemical/petrological properties of the sandstones and a presumed period of individual temples construction. The poor correlation may result either from the inherent inhomogeneity of sandstone or just reflect the diversity of quarries that supplied building blocks for the construction of any particular temple. (author)

  8. The migration of uranium through sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.; Lawless, T.A.; Sims, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Three column experiments are described in which the migration of uranium through Clashach Sandstone was studied. A priori predictions of uranium migration in the experiments were made using an equilibrium chemical transport model. The experimental results showed that, even under oxidising conditions, the migration of uranium is strongly retarded owing to the affinity of uranium for mineral surfaces. For the relatively simple chemical system investigated, the chemical transport model was successful in predicting the migration of uranium and its distribution along the column. (author)

  9. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations

  10. Interpreting Fracture Patterns in Sandstones Interbedded with Ductile Strata at the Salt Valley Anticline, Arches National Park, Utah; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LORENZ, JOHN C.; COOPER, SCOTT P.

    2001-01-01

    Sandstones that overlie or that are interbedded with evaporitic or other ductile strata commonly contain numerous localized domains of fractures, each covering an area of a few square miles. Fractures within the Entrada Sandstone at the Salt Valley Anticline are associated with salt mobility within the underlying Paradox Formation. The fracture relationships observed at Salt Valley (along with examples from Paleozoic strata at the southern edge of the Holbrook basin in northeastern Arizona, and sandstones of the Frontier Formation along the western edge of the Green River basin in southwestern Wyoming), show that although each fracture domain may contain consistently oriented fractures, the orientations and patterns of the fractures vary considerably from domain to domain. Most of the fracture patterns in the brittle sandstones are related to local stresses created by subtle, irregular flexures resulting from mobility of the associated, interbedded ductile strata (halite or shale). Sequential episodes of evaporite dissolution and/or mobility in different directions can result in multiple, superimposed fracture sets in the associated sandstones. Multiple sets of superimposed fractures create reservoir-quality fracture interconnectivity within restricted localities of a formation. However, it is difficult to predict the orientations and characteristics of this type of fracturing in the subsurface. This is primarily because the orientations and characteristics of these fractures typically have little relationship to the regional tectonic stresses that might be used to predict fracture characteristics prior to drilling. Nevertheless, the high probability of numerous, intersecting fractures in such settings attests to the importance of determining fracture orientations in these types of fractured reservoirs

  11. Surface monitoring of microseismicity at the Decatur, Illinois, CO2 sequestration demonstration site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaven, Joern; Hickman, Stephen H.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Ellsworth, William L.

    2015-01-01

    provides an adequate event detection threshold. The formation targeted for injection is the Mount Simon Sandstone, which is laterally extensive, has high porosity and permeability and has the potential to host future CCS projects due to its favorable hydrologic characteristics and proximity to industrial sources of CO2 (Birkholzer and Zhou, 2009). At Decatur, CO2, a byproduct of ethanol production at the Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) facility, is compressed to supercritical state and injected at 2.1 km depth into the 460 m thick Mount Simon Sandstone. This sandstone has varying properties, ranging from the lower, fine- to coarse-grained sandstone with high permeability and porosity, to the middle and upper Mount Simon, which consist of planar, cross-bedded layers of varied permeability and porosity (Leetaru and Freiburg, 2014). The changes in permeability and porosity within the Mount Simon Sandstone, due to depositional and diagenetic differences, create horizontal baffles, which inhibit vertical flow and restrict the injected CO2 to remain near the injection horizon (Bowen et al., 2011). The lowest portion of the Mount Simon Sandstone overlying the Precambrian rhyolite basement is the Pre-Mount Simon interval, generally  carbon dioxide was injected at a rate of ∼1000 metric tons per day until November 2014 (Finley et al., 2011, 2013). ADM manages the Illinois Industrial CCS (ICCS) project, which will inject ∼3000 metric tons/day into a second injection well starting in the summer of 2015. The USGS began monitoring microseismicity with a 13- station seismic network at Decatur in July 2013 (Fig. 1). This network provides good detection capabilities and azimuthal (focal sphere) coverage for microseismicity with moment magnitudes (Mw) above about −0:5. Here, we report on 19 months of microseismicity monitoring at the Decatur CO2 sequestration site, which permits a detailed look at the evolution and character of injection-induced seismicity.

  12. Anatomy of an ancient aeolian sandstone on Mars: the Stimson formation, Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Banham, Steven; Rubin, David; Watkins, Jessica; Sumner, Dawn; Grotzinger, John P.; Lewis, Kevin; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Edgar, Lauren; Stack, Kathryn; Day, McKenzie; Ewing, Ryan; Lapotre, Mathieu

    2016-10-01

    Since landing in 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory's (MSL) rover Curiosity has traversed the plains and foothills of Aeolis Mons (informally known as Mt. Sharp) investigating the environments preserved in the stratigraphic record of Gale crater. Recently, the Curiosity team has been investigating the Stimson formation, a sandstone exhibiting abundant crossbedding that drapes the underlying Murray formation mudstones. The contact between the Stimson and underlying Murray formation exhibits several meters relief over several 100 m hundred metres where encountered thus far. The Stimson is observed to onlap onto this contact, indicating that accumulating Stimson sandstones unconformably onlapped or buried local palaeotopography.Facies and architectural elements observed within the Stimson are interpreted to represent deposition within an ancient dune field. The Stimson formation is typically composed of decimeter-scale and meter-scale crossbedded sandstones, (exhibiting wind-ripple lamination and well rounded particles up to granule size). Architectural elements are visible in outcrops oriented perpendicular to the regional northwest dip. These consist of undulating surfaces parallel to the regional dip with observed lateral extents up to 30 m that truncate underlying cross-sets and commonly act as basal surfaces to overlying cross-sets. Undulating surfaces are interpreted possibly to be deflationary supersurfaces, which formed in response to deflation or dune-field stabilisation across a regional extent. Surfaces inclined relative to the regional dip ascend between supersurfaces towards the north east at an observed angle of 3-4°. These surfaces are interpreted to be dune bounding surfaces, which are preserved when dunes climb as a result of dune-field aggradation. Aggradation of the system during the duration of the dune field's existence possibly occurred as a response to episodic increases of sediment supply into the basin, allowing dunes to climb and preserving

  13. River Mileages and Drainage Areas for Illinois Streams. Volume 2. Illinois River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    52.2 WALNUT FORK L LIBERTY 53.1 WALKER BRANCH P LIBERTY 53.3 ROAn S06,TO?S,R05W LIBERTY 54.0 CURL CREEK L LIBERTY 54.4 ROAn S06,T02SR05W LIBERTY 34 QI...33TOI01N 5OW AUGUSTA T13.3 US HWY 24 AUGUSTA 14.4 TOPOGRAPHIC DIVIDE AUGUSTA WALKER BRANCH (MOUTH AT MCKEE CREEK MILE 53.1) ADAMS COUNTY 1.0 ROAD S07T2SRO5W...VERMILION R TRIR L LA SALLE 10.5 (ISGS GAGF 05555500 LOWELL 1278 411519 0A90044 LA SALLE 10.5 IL kT 178 LA SALLE 17.2 USGS GAGE 05555300 NEAR LEONORE

  14. Examples from the 1.6 Ga Chorhat Sandstone, Vindhyan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper addresses macroscopic signatures of microbial mat-related structures within the 1.6 Ga-old Chorhat Sandstone of the Semri Group –the basal stratigraphic unit of the Vindhyan succession in Son valley.The Chorhat Sandstone broadly represents a prograding succession of three depositional facies ranging from ...

  15. Geothermal characteristics of Buntsandstein sandstone reservoir of Alsace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffen, Sebastien

    2012-01-01

    The Buntsandstein, located in the Upper Rhine Graben, appears to be an easy target for geothermal exploitation, linking sandstone and clay with the regional thermal anomaly. This study aims at characterizing petrophysical characteristics of these sandstones as well as the fracturing affecting them, with the intention of providing a conceptual model of the formation which will act as guide for future exploitation. The sedimentary facies are composed by five petrographical facies (clean sandstones, sandstones with clayey coating, clay matrix sandstones, silicified sandstones and carbonated matrix sandstones) which split with variable proportions and control a part of petrophysical properties measured at matrix scale. The comparison between petrophysical data, macroscopic data from temperature gradient analysis, modelling data and fracturing, allows the building of a Buntsandstein Sandstones fluids circulation conceptual model. This analysis points the role of the damage zone of fault zones for fluids transfer at large scale, but also that of two sedimentary facies: marginal erg and Playa Lake. The analysis of different outcrops shows that the fracturing evolves according to the situation in the sedimentary pile and according to the situation in comparison with major tectonic accidents. (author) [fr

  16. INTRODUCTION Sandstone beds within Auchi locality are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The major framework composition is Q F L which classifies the sandstone as Quartz ... The grains are texturally immature as depicted by their subangular edges but mineralogically ..... Fig 6 : Vertical Section of Bioturbated Sandstone Lithofacies Showing Trace Fossils ..... on Water Quality and Planktonic Production in an.

  17. Sandstone landforms shaped by negative feedback between stress and erosion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Soukup, J.; Vaculíková, J.; Filippi, Michal; Schweigstillová, Jana; Mayo, A. L.; Mašín, D.; Kletetschka, Günther; Řihošek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2014), s. 597-601 ISSN 1752-0894 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-28040S Institutional support: RVO:67985831 ; RVO:67985891 Keywords : sandstone * sandstone landsforms * stress * erosion Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 11.740, year: 2014

  18. Sandstone uranium deposits in the United States: a review of the history, distribution, genesis, mining areas, and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, R.A.

    1983-03-01

    Sandstone uranium deposits account for about 94 percent of uranium reserves in the United States. Most sandstone uranium districts had been found by the mid-1950s in response to incentives promulgated by the US Atomic Energy Commission. Principal uranium resource regions in the United States are the Colorado Plateau, Wyoming Basins, and Texas Coastal Plain. Statistical data published annually by the US Department of Energy show trends of uranium exploration and production, estimates of resources, and distributions and characteristics of reserves. At present, US exploration and production are curtailed because of uranium oversupply, a trend that will continue for the next few years. Although the outlook is more optimistic over the longer term, it is clouded by possible competition from foreign low-cost, nonsandstone uranium. Roll-type and peneconcordant are the two principal types of sandstone uranium deposits. Roll deposits are formed at geochemical fronts where oxidizing uranium-bearing groundwater penetrates reduced sandstone. Uranium is precipitated by reduction at the front. Under mildly reducing conditions, uranium may remain in solution until it is locally precipitated by reduction, chelation, or complexing to form peneconcordant deposits. Proposed precipitating agents include carbonaceous matter, humate, pyrite, and hydrogen sulfide. The uranium is thought to have been derived from leaching of tuffaceous or arkosic sediments, or of granitic rocks

  19. Application of base-level cycles to sandstone-type uranium deposit: taking Dongsheng uranium deposits as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Renchao; Han Zuozhen; Fan Aiping; Chang Xiangchun

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution sequence stratigraphy taking base-level cycles as interface of reference was developed rapidly in recent years. Its greatest predominance lies in that it can be applied to multi-controled continental sedimentary basins and can effectively improve accuracy and distinguishability of sequence stratigraphy analysis. Principles of base-level cycles can also be applied to the research and practice of the exploration and exploitation of sandstone-type uranium deposits as they control the spatial distribution, porosity, the permeability and the sealing ability of sandstone and mudstone, and stacking patterns of strata configuration. Taking Dongsheng uranium deposits as an example, the application of base-level cycles to exploration and exploitation of sandstone uranium deposits was analyzed. It is suggested that favorable strata framework of sandstone and mudstone was developed very well in the fluctuation of base-level cycles. Sand bodies were provided with good connectedness, coarse granularity, high debris content, low matrix content and good porosity-permeability becoming the most important uranium hosted strata. (authors)

  20. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  1. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H 2 S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H 2 S

  2. Bridge Programs in Illinois: Results of the 2010 Illinois Bridge Status Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. L.; Harmon, T.

    2010-01-01

    This report provides a summary of major results of the Illinois Bridge Status Survey, administered online between April and June 2010. The purpose of the survey was to understand the extent to which bridge programs are being implemented in Illinois, as well as to build an online directory of bridge programs. Bridge programs are an emerging…

  3. 75 FR 9276 - Harvard Illinois Bancorp, Inc., Harvard, Illinois; Approval of Conversion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision [AC-35: OTS No. H-4649] Harvard Illinois Bancorp, Inc., Harvard, Illinois; Approval of Conversion Application Notice is hereby given that on February 12, 2010, the Office of Thrift Supervision approved the application of Harvard Savings Bank...

  4. Preliminary discussion on uranium metallogenic models of China's in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jindai; Xu Gaozhong; Chen Anping; Wang Cheng

    2005-01-01

    By comprehensively analyzing metallogenic environments and main ore-controlling factors of important uranium metallogenic regions of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits at the southern margin of Yili basin, at the south-western margin of Turpan-Hami basin and in the northeastern Ordos basin, the authors of this paper discuss the metallogenic models of China's in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits, and suggest that the interlayer oxidation zone type uranium deposits in Yili and Turpan-Hami basins are basically controlled by favourable structures, sedimentary formations and interlayer oxidation zone, and are characterized by multistage uranium concentration, namely the uranium pre-concentration of ore-hosting sedimentary formation, the uranium ore-formation in the stage of supergenic epigenetic reworking, and the further superimposition enrichment of post-ore tectonic activity. However, the interlayer oxidation zone type uranium deposit in the northeastern Ordos was formed after the formation of the secondary reduction. So, paleo-interlayer oxidation zone type uranium mineralization has the mineralization size much greater than the former two. (authors)

  5. Hydrogeologic and geochemical studies of selected natural radioisotopes and barium in groundwater in Illinois. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilkeson, R.H.; Cartwright, K.; Cowart, J.B.; Holtzman, R.B.

    1983-05-01

    Dissolved concentrations of the natural radioisotopes 222 Rn, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 230 Th, 232 Th, 234 U and 238 U and the element Ba 2+ were investigated in a study of high concentrations of 226 Ra, 228 Ra, and Ba 2+ in groundwater from the Cambrian and Ordovician bedrock of northern Illinois. The high radium and barium concentrations are naturally present in the major aquifers - the sandstone bedrock; therefore, remedial well construction measures will not lower the concentrations. The combined concentrations of 226 Ra and 228 Ra range from 2.3 to 50.2 pCi/L; the majority of analyses exceed the limit in the drinking water regulations of 5.0 pCi/L. The 226 Ra/ 228 Ra activity ratio ranges from 0.2 to 41.0; a 226 Ra analysis has no validity for predicting the 228 Ra concentration. Important controls on dissolved 226 Ra concentrations are secondary U on the sandstone matrix and the ionic strength of groundwater. The distribution of accessory minerals that contain 232 Th is believed to be an important control on dissolved 228 Ra concentrations. Locally the dissolved 226 Ra and 228 Ra concentrations are affected by dissolution-precipitation of secondary barite. Dissolved concentrations of 222 Rn and U are less than proposed drinking water regulations. The extreme enrichment in 234 U that occurs widespread in groundwater from the Cambrian and Ordovician bedrock is unique and problematic. The enrichment may reflect recharge of uranium to the bedrock by glacial processes. Dissolved Ba 2+ concentrations range from 2+ concentrations occur in groundwater that is depleted in dissolved SO 4 2- by anaerobic microbial reactions. A map presents the distribution of Ba 2+ in groundwater from the Cambrian and Ordovician bedrock in northeastern Illinois. 60 references, 13 figures, 3 tables

  6. Alternative marine and fluvial models for the non-fossiliferous quartzitic sandstones of the Early Proterozoic Daspoort Formation, Transvaal Sequence of southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, P. G.; Schreiber, U. M.; van der Neut, M.; Labuschagne, H.; Van Der Schyff, W.; Potgieter, G.

    1993-04-01

    This paper discusses some of the problems related to the palaeoenvironmental interpretation of non-fossiliferous, early Precambrian, recrystallised quartzitic sandstones, using the Early Proterozoic Daspoort Formation, Transvaal Sequence of southern Africa as a case study. These cross-bedded and planar stratified rocks have been interpreted previously as shallow marine deposits, based on limited studies of areas with well-exposed, relatively undeformed outcrops. This postulate rests largely on the apparently mature nature of the recrystallised sandstones and their thin bedding. Examination of outcrops throughout the preserved basin, including those which have been deformed and metamorphosed, reveals the presence of subordinate immature sandstones. Lateral facies relationships permit an alternative distal fan-fluvial braidplain model to be proposed. This is compatible with collected palaeocurrent data, thicknes trends and results of thin section petrography.

  7. The computerized semi-quantitative comprehensive identification-evaluation model for the large-sized in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in Northern Xinjiang, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengbang, Wang; Mingkuan, Qin; Ruiquan, Zhao; Shenghuang, Tang [Beijing Research Inst. of Uranium Geology, CNNC (China); Baoqun, Wang; Shuangxing, Lin [Geo-prospecting Team No. 216, CNNC (China)

    2001-08-01

    The process of establishment of the model includes following steps: (1) Systematically studying a known typical in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit--Deposit No. 512 in Yili basin, analyzing its controlling factors and establishing its metallogenetic model; (2) Establishing the metallogenetic models of this type of uranium deposit and uranium-bearing area on the basis of comparison study on the deposit No. 512 with the same type uranium deposits in the world; (3) Creating the computerized semi-quantitative comprehensive identification-evaluation model for the large-sized in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in northern Xinjiang; (4) Determining the standards of giving a evaluation-mark for each controlling factor of in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit and uranium-bearing area; (5) Evaluating uranium potential and prospect of the unknown objective target.

  8. The computerized semi-quantitative comprehensive identification-evaluation model for the large-sized in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in Northern Xinjiang, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengbang; Qin Mingkuan; Zhao Ruiquan; Tang Shenghuang; Wang Baoqun; Lin Shuangxing

    2001-01-01

    The process of establishment of the model includes following steps: (1) Systematically studying a known typical in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit--Deposit No. 512 in Yili basin, analyzing its controlling factors and establishing its metallogenetic model; (2) Establishing the metallogenetic models of this type of uranium deposit and uranium-bearing area on the basis of comparison study on the deposit No. 512 with the same type uranium deposits in the world; (3) Creating the computerized semi-quantitative comprehensive identification-evaluation model for the large-sized in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in northern Xinjiang; (4) Determining the standards of giving a evaluation-mark for each controlling factor of in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit and uranium-bearing area; (5) Evaluating uranium potential and prospect of the unknown objective target

  9. Pharmacia Building Q, Skokie, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-12-01

    This case study was prepared as one in a series for the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new and retrofit laboratory buildings in both the public and the private sectors. The energy-efficient elements of the laboratory featured in this case study-Pharmacia Corporation's new Building Q in Skokie, Illinois-include sustainable design, light-filled interior spaces for daylighting, energy-efficient fume hoods and other equipment, occupancy sensors to reduce lighting loads, and spectrally selective glazing to allow more light and less heat into the building. Water-saving fixtures are used, as well. Building Q has been certified Gold (the second highest rating) through the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) system.

  10. Estimation of uranium migration parameters in sandstone aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malov, A I

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition and isotopes of carbon and uranium were investigated in groundwater samples that were collected from 16 wells and 2 sources in the Northern Dvina Basin, Northwest Russia. Across the dataset, the temperatures in the groundwater ranged from 3.6 to 6.9 °C, the pH ranged from 7.6 to 9.0, the Eh ranged from -137 to +128 mV, the total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 209 to 22,000 mg L(-1), and the dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged from 0 to 9.9 ppm. The (14)C activity ranged from 0 to 69.96 ± 0.69 percent modern carbon (pmC). The uranium content in the groundwater ranged from 0.006 to 16 ppb, and the (234)U:(238)U activity ratio ranged from 1.35 ± 0.21 to 8.61 ± 1.35. The uranium concentration and (234)U:(238)U activity ratio increased from the recharge area to the redox barrier; behind the barrier, the uranium content is minimal. The results were systematized by creating a conceptual model of the Northern Dvina Basin's hydrogeological system. The use of uranium isotope dating in conjunction with radiocarbon dating allowed the determination of important water-rock interaction parameters, such as the dissolution rate:recoil loss factor ratio Rd:p (a(-1)) and the uranium retardation factor:recoil loss factor ratio R:p in the aquifer. The (14)C age of the water was estimated to be between modern and >35,000 years. The (234)U-(238)U age of the water was estimated to be between 260 and 582,000 years. The Rd:p ratio decreases with increasing groundwater residence time in the aquifer from n × 10(-5) to n × 10(-7) a(-1). This finding is observed because the TDS increases in that direction from 0.2 to 9 g L(-1), and accordingly, the mineral saturation indices increase. Relatively high values of R:p (200-1000) characterize aquifers in sandy-clayey sediments from the Late Pleistocene and the deepest parts of the Vendian strata. In samples from the sandstones of the upper part of the Vendian strata, the R:p value is ∼ 24, i.e., sorption processes are

  11. Recharge and Groundwater Flow Within an Intracratonic Basin, Midwestern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panno, Samuel V; Askari, Zohreh; Kelly, Walton R; Parris, Thomas M; Hackley, Keith C

    2018-01-01

    The conservative nature of chloride (Cl - ) in groundwater and the abundance of geochemical data from various sources (both published and unpublished) provided a means of developing, for the first time, a representation of the hydrogeology of the Illinois Basin on a basin-wide scale. The creation of Cl - isocons superimposed on plan view maps of selected formations and on cross sections across the Illinois Basin yielded a conceptual model on a basin-wide scale of recharge into, groundwater flow within and through the Illinois Basin. The maps and cross sections reveal the infiltration and movement of freshwater into the basin and dilution of brines within various geologic strata occurring at basin margins and along geologic structures. Cross-formational movement of brines is also seen in the northern part of the basin. The maps and cross sections also show barriers to groundwater movement created by aquitards resulting in areas of apparent isolation/stagnation of concentrated brines within the basin. The distribution of Cl - within the Illinois Basin suggests that the current chemical composition of groundwater and distribution of brines within the basin is dependent on five parameters: (1) presence of bedrock exposures along basin margins; (2) permeability of geologic strata and their distribution relative to one another; (3) presence or absence of major geologic structures; (4) intersection of major waterways with geologic structures, basin margins, and permeable bedrock exposures; and (5) isolation of brines within the basin due to aquitards, inhomogeneous permeability, and, in the case of the deepest part of the basin, brine density effects. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  12. Analysis on the geological features and ore-forming conditions at the southern margin of Erdos basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhongxian; Shen Pingxi; Chen Fenling

    2014-01-01

    At the southern margin of Erdos basin, the paleo-interlayer-oxidation was developed in the medium-coarse-grained sandstone of Middle Jurassic System. High content uranium was enriched which are favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposit. There had been found multiple sandstone-type uranium deposits (ore occurrences) in this area. Uranium mineralization occurs in the sand body of braided fluvial facies in the lower member of Zhiluo Formation of Middle Jurassic System. It was controlled by the paleo-interlayer-oxidation. Uranium mineralization was closely related with the permeability of sandstone and occurs generally in the sandstones where is loose cementation and water permeability better. The stratum of Middle Jurassic System was extensively developed in the work area. Therefore it has great prospecting potential for the sandstone-type uranium deposit. (authors)

  13. The mass transportation problem in Illinois : a final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-06-01

    Prepared by the State Mass Transportation Commission for the Honorable William G. Stratton, Governor of Illinois and the Honorable Members of the 71st General Assembly. The study contains the findings and recommendations of the Illinois State Mass Tr...

  14. Public education and enforcement research study : Macomb, Illinois : analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The Public Education and Enforcement Research Study (PEERS) was a collaborative effort between the Federal Railroad Administration, the Illinois Commerce Commission, and local communities in the State of Illinois. This project was designed to promote...

  15. Petrology and geochemistry of the Miocene-Pliocene fluvial succession, Katawaz Basin, Western Pakistan: Implications on provenance and source area weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasi, Aimal K.; Kassi, Aktar Muhammad; Friis, Henrik

    Petrology and geochemistry of sandstones and mudstones of the Miocene Dasht Murgha Group (DMG) and Pliocene Malthanai Formation (MF) of the Pishin Belt (Katawaz Basin), northwestern Pakistan have been carried out to find out their provenance and source area weathering. Sandstones of the Dasht...

  16. The characteristics of ginger-like rock and its geological significance in Northern Zhungeer basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Rengui

    1998-01-01

    The author studies the characteristics of ginger-like stratum and its genesis in northern Zhungeer basin. There are many ginger-like strata of Tertiary-Quaternary exist in northern Zhungeer basin. It shows a good prospect for the formation of Tertiary sandstone type Uranium deposit which can be leached in-situ

  17. Water-borne radon and hydrogeochemical based uranium exploration in Rajamundry sandstone, W. Godavari district, Andhra Pradesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeyagopal, A.V.; Rajaraman, H.S.; Som, Anjan

    2010-01-01

    The lithology and sedimentary structures of the Rajamundry Formation of the Mio-Pliocene age covering an area of 1100 sq.km. indicate that it may be a typical valley fill sediment. It is about 600 m thick comprising sandstone and clay with lignite as the main lithounits. It is continental in onshore and marine in the offshore and is in contact with Gondwana sediments and Rajamundry traps. Tertiary sandstones are important hosts for uranium mineralisation. The reducing gas (Methane or other volatile hydrocarbon) moving to uraniferous oxidising water has precipitated uranium in the sediments in South Texas and Northwest Colorado, USA: (a) along faults, (b) above petroliferous aquifers, (c) vertically above hydrocarbon accumulations and (d) oil-water interface at hydrocarbon accumulations i.e., at the points of introduction of reducent into oxidising ground waters. In this context, Rajamundry sandstone lying above the natural gas and petroleum bearing Krishna Godavari basin with faults is an important geological setting for uranium mineralisation. The exploration strategies of hydrogeochemical survey and water-borne Radon (Rn) surveys were selected in this soil-covered area. Hydrogeochemical survey carried out in the Rajamundry sandstone has brought out four hydro-uranium anomalous zones with water samples (10-45ppb) falling around Kadiyadda, Madhavaram, Erramalla and Chinna Malapalle areas of West Godavari district, Andhra Pradesh. The zones vary from 9 to 24 sq km area. Water-borne Radon was utilized as a tool for exploration of uranium in this soil covered terrain. Rn contours cluster around two zones around Kadiyadda and SW of Gollagudem wherein the Rn value is >60 counts/50 sec/500 ml. These Rn anomalies fall within the above mentioned hydrouranium anomalous zones. Gamma-ray logging of private bore wells has recorded relatively higher radioactivity in Kommugudem, which also falls in the high hydrouranium - high waterborne radon zone. These data and

  18. Nodular features from Proterozoic Sonia Sandstone, Jodhpur Group ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corresponding author. e-mail: parthageology@gmail.com. The Sonia ..... cement variety in the form of dispersed dark brown clots and .... content within the nodule sandstones bear sig- nature in ..... Carbonates and Evaporites 21 133–143.

  19. Transport of silver nanoparticles in single fractured sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukum, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are used in various consumer products and are one of the most prevalent metallic nanoparticle in commodities and are released into the environment. Transport behavior of Ag-NP in groundwater is one important aspect for the assessment of environmental impact and protection of drinking water resources in particular. Ag-NP transport processes in saturated single-fractured sandstones using triaxial flow cell experiments with different kind of sandstones is investigated. Ag-NP concentration and size are analyzed using flow field-flow fractionation and coupled SEM-EDX analysis. Results indicate that Ag-NP are more mobile and show generally lower attachment on rock surface compared to experiments in undisturbed sandstone matrix and partially fractured sandstones. Ag-NP transport is controlled by the characteristics of matrix porosity, time depending blocking of attachment sites and solute chemistry. Where Ag-NP attachment occur, it is heterogeneously distributed on the fracture surface.

  20. Natural Erosion of Sandstone as Shape Optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostanin, Igor; Safonov, Alexander; Oseledets, Ivan

    2017-12-11

    Natural arches, pillars and other exotic sandstone formations have always been attracting attention for their unusual shapes and amazing mechanical balance that leave a strong impression of intelligent design rather than the result of a stochastic process. It has been recently demonstrated that these shapes could have been the result of the negative feedback between stress and erosion that originates in fundamental laws of friction between the rock's constituent particles. Here we present a deeper analysis of this idea and bridge it with the approaches utilized in shape and topology optimisation. It appears that the processes of natural erosion, driven by stochastic surface forces and Mohr-Coulomb law of dry friction, can be viewed within the framework of local optimisation for minimum elastic strain energy. Our hypothesis is confirmed by numerical simulations of the erosion using the topological-shape optimisation model. Our work contributes to a better understanding of stochastic erosion and feasible landscape formations that could be found on Earth and beyond.

  1. Failure Forecasting in Triaxially Stressed Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippen, A.; Bell, A. F.; Curtis, A.; Main, I. G.

    2017-12-01

    Precursory signals to fracturing events have been observed to follow power-law accelerations in spatial, temporal, and size distributions leading up to catastrophic failure. In previous studies this behavior was modeled using Voight's relation of a geophysical precursor in order to perform `hindcasts' by solving for failure onset time. However, performing this analysis in retrospect creates a bias, as we know an event happened, when it happened, and we can search data for precursors accordingly. We aim to remove this retrospective bias, thereby allowing us to make failure forecasts in real-time in a rock deformation laboratory. We triaxially compressed water-saturated 100 mm sandstone cores (Pc= 25MPa, Pp = 5MPa, σ = 1.0E-5 s-1) to the point of failure while monitoring strain rate, differential stress, AEs, and continuous waveform data. Here we compare the current `hindcast` methods on synthetic and our real laboratory data. We then apply these techniques to increasing fractions of the data sets to observe the evolution of the failure forecast time with precursory data. We discuss these results as well as our plan to mitigate false positives and minimize errors for real-time application. Real-time failure forecasting could revolutionize the field of hazard mitigation of brittle failure processes by allowing non-invasive monitoring of civil structures, volcanoes, and possibly fault zones.

  2. Electrical conductivity of sandstone, limestone, and granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duba, A.; Piwinskii, A.J.; Santor, M.; Weed, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of cylindrical cores of Westerly granite, Indiana limestone and Nugget, St Peter and Kayenta sandstones was measured at about 25/sup 0/C in vacuo, in air, and after saturation in distilled water, tap water, and 0.1 M NaCl solution. The three-electrode technique with a guard ring and the two-electrode technique without a guard ring were used. Core aspect ratio over the range of 2.00 to 0.25, as well as frequency over the range of 50 Hz to 10 kHz, influences the conductivity of all rocks, especially those measured in vacuo. Measurements from water-saturated samples using a guard ring are not appreciably different from those obtained without a guard ring. The conductivity of rocks saturated in 0.1 M NaCl solution changes least with a change in aspect ratio; for these rocks a linear relationship, known as Archie's Law, exists between log porosity and log conductivity. No simple correlation was found between those factors in rocks saturated with tap or distilled water. Thus, it appears Archie's Law is of questionable value for correlating laboratory data from rocks saturated with low-conductivity fluids.

  3. Quantitative mineralogical analysis of sandstones using x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, C.R.; Taylor, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: X-ray diffraction has long been used as a definitive technique for mineral identification based on the measuring the internal atomic or crystal structures present in powdered rocks; soils and other mineral mixtures. Recent developments in data gathering and processing, however, have provided an improved basis for its use as a quantitative tool, determining not only the nature of the minerals but also the relative proportions of the different minerals present. The mineralogy of a series of sandstone samples from the Sydney and Bowen Basins of eastern Australia has been evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) on a quantitative basis using the Australian-developed SIROQUANT data processing technique. Based on Rietveld principles, this technique generates a synthetic X-ray diffractogram by adjusting and combining full-profile patterns of minerals nominated as being present in the sample and interactively matches the synthetic diffractogram under operator instructions to the observed diffractogram of the sample being analysed. The individual mineral patterns may be refined in the process, to allow for variations in crystal structure of individual components or for factors such as preferred orientation in the sample mount. The resulting output provides mass percentages of the different minerals in the mixture, and an estimate of the error associated with each individual percentage determination. The chemical composition of the mineral mixtures indicated by SIROQUANT for each individual sandstone studied was estimated using a spreadsheet routine, and the indicated proportion of each oxide in each sample compared to the actual chemical analysis of the same sandstone as determined independently by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The results show a high level of agreement for all major chemical constituents, indicating consistency between the SIROQUANT XRD data and the whole-rock chemical composition. Supplementary testing with a synthetic corundum spike further

  4. Micropore Structure Representation of Sandstone in Petroleum Reservoirs Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Yong-Qiang; Zhu Xing; Wu Jun-Zheng; Bai Wen-Guang

    2011-01-01

    The pore structure of sandstone in an oil reservoir is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). At nanoscale resolution, AFM images of sandstone show us the fine structure. The real height data of images display the three-dimensional space structure of sandstone effectively. The three-dimensional analysis results show that the AFM images of sandstone have unique characteristics that, like fingerprints, can identify different structural properties of sandstones. The results demonstrate that AFM is an effective method used to represent original sandstone in petroleum reservoirs, and may help geologists to appreciate the sandstone in oil reservoirs fully. (general)

  5. Anatomy of anomalously thick sandstone units in the Brent Delta of the northern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaojie; Steel, Ronald J.; Ravnås, Rodmar; Jiang, Zaixing; Olariu, Cornel; Ma, Yinsheng

    2018-05-01

    Some potentially attractive reservoirs, containing anomalously thick (10s to a few 100 m), cross-stratified sandstone, have been locally encountered within both the classic regressive (lower Brent) and the transgressive (upper Brent) segments of the Brent Delta. Three documented cases of these sandstone bodies are re-examined. They are internally dominated by simple or compound dunes, and typified by two types of deepening-upward succession, recording a retrogradational or transgressive shoreline history. Type I is expressed as a single estuarine succession changing upwards from erosive, coarse-grained channelized deposits into outer estuary tidal bar deposits. The estuary is underlain and overlain by deltaic deposits. Type II lacks significant basal river deposits but is composed by stacked mixed-energy and tide-dominated estuarine deposits. It is underlain by deltaic deposits and overlain by open marine sediments. Considering the structural evolution in the northern North Sea basin, we suggest (as did some earlier researchers) that these sandstone bodies were local, but sometimes broad transgressive estuaries, formed at any time during large-scale Brent Delta growth and decay. The estuary generation was likely triggered by fluvial incision coupled with active faulting, producing variable accommodation embayments, where tidal currents became focused and deposition became transgressive. The spatial variations of the interpreted estuary deposits were linked with variable, fault-generated accommodation. The relatively simple, lower Brent estuarine units were created by short-lived, fault activity in places, whereas the complex, stacked upper-Brent estuarine units were likely a result of more long-lived, punctuated fault-induced subsidence leading into the northern North Sea main rifting stage. The thick cross-stratified units potentially accumulated in the hangingwall of large bounding faults.

  6. Channel sandstone and bar morphology of the Beaufort group uranium district near Beaufort West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stear, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Sheet-like and lenticular sandstone bodies in the Lower Beaufort Group (Adelaide Subgroup) uranium district occur in megacyclic repetition as superimposed systems of ephemeral fluvial channels that display characteristics of complex lateral and vertical accretion. Channel sandstone bodies are defined on morphological grounds into two types. Sheet sandstone bodies are the commonest type and comprise the bulk of sandstone packages in arenaceous zones of megacycles. Composite sandstone sheets result from multilateral coalescence of individual sandstone bodies. Isolated lenticular sandstone units in argillaceous zones of megacycles comprise sheet and ribbon sandstone types. Multi-storeying is a prominent feature of most channel sandstone bodies and often results in local sandstone thickening. Bedforms relate to the formation of compound bars and record periods of dynamic accretion and erosion. Rarely preserved palaeosurfaces vividly illustrate the fluctuating hydrodynamic conditions that typified ephemeral fluvial sedimentation in a semi-arid environment during Lower Beaufort times

  7. Channel sandstone and bar morphology of the Beaufort group uranium district near Beaufort West

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stear, W M

    1980-01-01

    Sheet-like and lenticular sandstone bodies in the Lower Beaufort Group (Adelaide Subgroup) uranium district occur in megacyclic repetition as superimposed systems of ephemeral fluvial channels that display characteristics of complex lateral and vertical accretion. Channel sandstone bodies are defined on morphological grounds into two types. Sheet sandstone bodies are the commonest type and comprise the bulk of sandstone packages in arenaceous zones of megacycles. Composite sandstone sheets result from multilateral coalescence of individual sandstone bodies. Isolated lenticular sandstone units in argillaceous zones of megacycles comprise sheet and ribbon sandstone types. Multi-storeying is a prominent feature of most channel sandstone bodies and often results in local sandstone thickening. Bedforms relate to the formation of compound bars and record periods of dynamic accretion and erosion. Rarely preserved palaeosurfaces vividly illustrate the fluctuating hydrodynamic conditions that typified ephemeral fluvial sedimentation in a semi-arid environment during Lower Beaufort times.

  8. Sensing, Measuring and Modelling the Mechanical Properties of Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, S. J.; Olugbenga, A.; Ozerkan, N. G.

    2018-02-01

    We present a hybrid framework for simulating the strength and dilation characteristics of sandstone. Where possible, the grain-scale properties of sandstone are evaluated experimentally in detail. Also, using photo-stress analysis, we sense the deviator stress (/strain) distribution at the micro-scale and its components along the orthogonal directions on the surface of a V-notch sandstone sample under mechanical loading. Based on this measurement and applying a grain-scale model, the optical anisotropy index K 0 is inferred at the grain scale. This correlated well with the grain contact stiffness ratio K evaluated using ultrasound sensors independently. Thereafter, in addition to other experimentally characterised structural and grain-scale properties of sandstone, K is fed as an input into the discrete element modelling of fracture strength and dilation of the sandstone samples. Physical bulk-scale experiments are also conducted to evaluate the load-displacement relation, dilation and bulk fracture strength characteristics of sandstone samples under compression and shear. A good level of agreement is obtained between the results of the simulations and experiments. The current generic framework could be applied to understand the internal and bulk mechanical properties of such complex opaque and heterogeneous materials more realistically in future.

  9. Production of carbon molecular sieves from Illinois coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizzio, A.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves (CMS) have become an increasingly important class of adsorbents for application in the separation of gas molecules that vary in size and shape. A study is in progress at the Illinois State Geological Survey to determine whether Illinois basin coals are suitable feedstocks for the production of CMS and to evaluate their potential application in gas separation processes of commercial importance. Chars were prepared from Illinois coal in a fixed-bed reactor under a wide range of heat treatment and activation conditions. The effects of various coal/char pretreatments, including coal demineralization, preoxidation, char activation, and carbon deposition, on the molecular sieve properties of the chars were also investigated. Chars with commercially significant BET surface areas of 1500 m2/g were produced by chemical activation using potassium hydroxide as the activant. These high-surface-area (HSA) chars had more than twice the adsorption capacity of commercial carbon and zeolite molecular sieves. The kinetics of adsorption of various gases, e.g., N2, O2, CO2, CH4, CO and H2, on these chars at 25??C was measured. The O2/N2 molecular sieve properties of one char prepared without chemical activation were similar to those of a commercial CMS. On the other hand, the O2/N2 selectivity of the HSA char was comparable to that of a commercial activated carbon, i.e., essentially unity. Carbon deposition, using methane as the cracking gas, increased the O2/N2 selectivity of the HSA char, but significantly decreased its adsorption capacity. Several chars showed good potential for efficient CO2/CH4 separation; both a relatively high CO2 adsorption capacity and CO2/CH4 selectivity were achieved. The micropore size distribution of selected chars was estimated by equilibrium adsorption of carbon dioxide, n-butane and iso-butane at O??C. The extent of adsorption of each gas corresponded to the effective surface area contained in pores with diameters greater than 3

  10. Effects of heat-flow and hydrothermal fluids from volcanic intrusions on authigenic mineralization in sandstone formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolela Ahmed

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic intrusions and hydrothermal activity have modified the diagenetic minerals. In the Ulster Basin, UK, most of the authigenic mineralization in the Permo-Triassic sandstones pre-dated tertiary volcanic intrusions. The hydrothermal fluids and heat-flow from the volcanic intrusions did not affect quartz and feldspar overgrowths. However, clay mineral-transformation, illite-smectite to illite and chlorite was documented near the volcanic intrusions. Abundant actinolite, illite, chlorite, albite and laumontite cementation of the sand grains were also documented near the volcanic intrusions. The abundance of these cementing minerals decreases away from the volcanic intrusions.In the Hartford Basin, USA, the emplacement of the volcanic intrusions took place simultaneous with sedimentation. The heat-flow from the volcanic intrusions and hydrothermal activity related to the volcanics modified the texture of authigenic minerals. Microcrystalline mosaic albite and quartz developed rather than overgrowths and crystals near the intrusions. Chlorite clumps and masses were also documented with microcrystalline mosaic albite and quartz. These features are localized near the basaltic intrusions. Laumontite is also documented near the volcanic intrusions. The reservoir characteristics of the studied sandstone formations are highly affected by the volcanic and hydrothermal fluids in the Hartford and the Ulster Basin. The porosity dropped from 27.4 to zero percent and permeability from 1350 mD to 1 mD.

  11. Stratigraphy of Guichon Formation (lower cretaceous) in litoral basin, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goso, C.; Perea, D.; Perinotto, J.

    1999-01-01

    This report is about the stratigraphic al analysis of the Guichon Formation (lower cretaceous, litoral basin in Uruguay). The facies association is represented by conglomerates mainly fine sandstones and mud stones wi ch is interpreted as an alluvial system. A regional palaeogeography and a new geochronological alternative are established for this formation. (author).

  12. interpretation of reflection seismic data from the usangu basin, east

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    basin, where the ages of the sedimentary sequences have been established on the basis of drill hole data. The Karoo beds, deposited on an undulating weathered basement surface, are relatively thin (- 200m). The Red Sandstone Group reach a maximum thickness of up to 420 m while the Lake Beds are up to 289 m thick.

  13. Provenance of Late Ordovician Sandstones along the southeastern Appalachian Mountains: Implications for the Tectonic Model of the Taconic Orogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, J. C.; Herrmann, A. D.; Haynes, J.

    2017-12-01

    A provenance study of sandstones along the southeastern Appalachian Mountains has been conducted in order to test the current volcanic arc-continent collision and foreland basin formation model of the Taconic Orogeny. Samples along the southeastern Appalachians were taken from sandstone sequences deposited between 460-450 Ma. Results from these sandstones show three dominate age ranges: 465-685 Ma, 980-1300 Ma, and 1300-1500 Ma. The 980-1300 Ma and 1300-1500 Ma ages are seen throughout the study area and are compatible with previously reported ages of the Grenville Orogeny and the Rhyolite-Granite Province. The northernmost samples have a small quantity of 465-685 Ma zircons which is attributed to an accretionary wedge that formed as a result of the continent-island arc collision and acted as a physical barrier keeping sediment from depositing within the basin. The younger age signal becomes stronger to the south, as samples in Georgia and Alabama show strong concentrations of 465-685 zircons. These ages are attributed to exotic terranes (Dalhonega Terrane and Carolina Terrane) that were accreted onto Laurentia during the Taconic Orogeny and/or a possible change in subduction direction leading to a back-arc basin model for the southern Appalachian Taconic Orogeny. The results from this provenance analysis support previous studies indicating that the model for the Taconic Orogeny is a combined A-type subduction for the north and a B-type subduction model for the southern part of the orogeny.

  14. Impact of sauropod dinosaurs on lagoonal substrates in the Broome Sandstone (Lower Cretaceous, Western Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Thulborn

    Full Text Available Existing knowledge of the tracks left by sauropod dinosaurs (loosely 'brontosaurs' is essentially two-dimensional, derived mainly from footprints exposed on bedding planes, but examples in the Broome Sandstone (Early Cretaceous of Western Australia provide a complementary three-dimensional picture showing the extent to which walking sauropods could deform the ground beneath their feet. The patterns of deformation created by sauropods traversing thinly-stratified lagoonal deposits of the Broome Sandstone are unprecedented in their extent and structural complexity. The stacks of transmitted reliefs (underprints or ghost prints beneath individual footfalls are nested into a hierarchy of deeper and more inclusive basins and troughs which eventually attain the size of minor tectonic features. Ultimately the sauropod track-makers deformed the substrate to such an extent that they remodelled the topography of the landscape they inhabited. Such patterns of substrate deformation are revealed by investigating fragmentary and eroded footprints, not by the conventional search for pristine footprints on intact bedding planes. For that reason it is not known whether similar patterns of substrate deformation might occur at sauropod track-sites elsewhere in the world.

  15. Origin of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits, Frome Embayment, South Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits in the Frome Embayment of South Australia is largely a result of tectonic events possibly as old as the Archean. Uranium deposits of several types and ages in the region demonstrate the importance of uranium enrichment in the source area. Mobile zones around the Archean terrane of the Gawler block have been the locus of intermittent tectonic activity from Early Proterozoic to recent time. Vein-type uranium deposits in basement source rocks are concentrated in these zones, because they favor deep crustal partial melting and ascent of Na-rich granitic magmas and hydrothermal solutions. Relatively stable areas bordered by mobile zones, are important for the formation of sandstone-hosted uranium deposits because they act as platforms for terrigenous sedimentation from the surrounding, uplifted, uranium-rich basement rocks. Wet, subtropical conditions prevailing at the time of uplift aided rapid erosion and subaerial deposition of channel sands with intermixed organic detritus. Later uplift accompanied by erosion of the recently deposited sands in the headwater area caused increased recharge of oxygenated uraniferous ground water, which led to the formation of geochemical-cell roll-front type deposits like those in the Wyoming basins. Subsequent arid conditions helped preserve the deposits. (author)

  16. Impact of Sauropod Dinosaurs on Lagoonal Substrates in the Broome Sandstone (Lower Cretaceous), Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulborn, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Existing knowledge of the tracks left by sauropod dinosaurs (loosely ‘brontosaurs’) is essentially two-dimensional, derived mainly from footprints exposed on bedding planes, but examples in the Broome Sandstone (Early Cretaceous) of Western Australia provide a complementary three-dimensional picture showing the extent to which walking sauropods could deform the ground beneath their feet. The patterns of deformation created by sauropods traversing thinly-stratified lagoonal deposits of the Broome Sandstone are unprecedented in their extent and structural complexity. The stacks of transmitted reliefs (underprints or ghost prints) beneath individual footfalls are nested into a hierarchy of deeper and more inclusive basins and troughs which eventually attain the size of minor tectonic features. Ultimately the sauropod track-makers deformed the substrate to such an extent that they remodelled the topography of the landscape they inhabited. Such patterns of substrate deformation are revealed by investigating fragmentary and eroded footprints, not by the conventional search for pristine footprints on intact bedding planes. For that reason it is not known whether similar patterns of substrate deformation might occur at sauropod track-sites elsewhere in the world. PMID:22662116

  17. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies

  18. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Accounting Services Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These Illinois skill standards for the accounting services cluster are intended to serve as a guide to workforce preparation program providers as they define content for their programs and to employers as they establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. They could also serve as a mechanism for communication among education,…

  19. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Welding Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These Illinois skill standards for the welding cluster are intended to serve as a guide to workforce preparation program providers as they define content for their programs and to employers as they establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. They could also serve as a mechanism for communication among education, business,…

  20. Elder Abuse and Neglect: The Illinois Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. on Aging, Springfield.

    This document outlines the ideas of the Illinois Department of Aging on the implementation and management of the Elder Abuse and Neglect Intervention Program. These topics are addressed in order to provide a basis for discussion of key elements of the proposed program and serve as a guide in the development of rules, policies, and procedures for…

  1. Illinois Walls in alternative market structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, M.P.; Tuinstra, J.

    2005-01-01

    This note extends on our paper Illinois Walls: How Barring Indirect Purchaser Suits Facilitates Collusion (Schinkel, Tuinstra and Rüggeberg, 2005, henceforth STR). It presents analyses of two alternative, more competitive, market structures to conclude that when the conditions for existence of

  2. Substitutes for School Nurses in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollinger, Linda Jeno; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Belmonte-Mann, Frances

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore utilization of nurse substitutes in the school setting in Illinois. The literature described personnel who staff the school health office in the absence of the school nurse and the barriers to obtaining nurse substitutes. There were no empirical studies conducted on school nurse substitutes in…

  3. Mathematics Placement at the University of Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren Reddy, Alison; Harper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Data from the ALEKS-based placement program at the University of Illinois is presented visually in several ways. The placement exam (an ALEKS assessment) contains precise item-specific information and the data show many interesting properties of the student populations of the placement courses, which include Precalculus, Calculus, and Business…

  4. Computer Activities in Illinois Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, J. Richard; And Others

    A brief, non-technical questionnaire was sent to 875 secondary school administrators (primarily principals) in the State of Illinois. Information was collected in four areas: (1) general school characteristics, (2) availability and use of computers, (3) perceived need for and qualifications of teachers of computer science, and (4) perceived need…

  5. Chapter 2. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources--Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley group, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system, in the East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyman, T.S.; Condon, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System is defined for this assessment to include (1) Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation carbonates and calcareous shales and (2) Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous Cotton Valley Group organic-rich shales. The Jurassic Smackover Interior Salt Basins Total Petroleum System includes four conventional Cotton Valley assessment units: Cotton Valley Blanket Sandstone Gas (AU 50490201), Cotton Valley Massive Sandstone Gas (AU 50490202), Cotton Valley Updip Oil and Gas (AU 50490203), and Cotton Valley Hypothetical Updip Oil (AU 50490204). Together, these four assessment units are estimated to contain a mean undiscovered conventional resource of 29.81 million barrels of oil, 605.03 billion cubic feet of gas, and 19.00 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The Cotton Valley Group represents the first major influx of clastic sediment into the ancestral Gulf of Mexico. Major depocenters were located in south-central Mississippi, along the Louisiana-Mississippi border, and in northeast Texas. Reservoir properties and production characteristics were used to identify two Cotton Valley Group sandstone trends across northern Louisiana and east Texas: a high-permeability blanket-sandstone trend and a downdip, low-permeability massive-sandstone trend. Pressure gradients throughout most of both trends are normal, which is characteristic of conventional rather than continuous basin-center gas accumulations. Indications that accumulations in this trend are conventional rather than continuous include (1) gas-water contacts in at least seven fields across the blanket-sandstone trend, (2) relatively high reservoir permeabilities, and (3) high gas-production rates without fracture stimulation. Permeability is sufficiently low in the massive-sandstone trend that gas-water transition zones are vertically extensive and gas-water contacts are poorly defined. The interpreted presence of gas-water contacts within the Cotton Valley

  6. Illinois reclaimed soil productivity: Restoration techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smout, G.

    1998-01-01

    Consolidation Coal Co. (Consol) has nearly 8,000 acres of high capability and prime farmland reclamation responsibility in Illinois. It has been involved in research in the area of restored soil productivity since 1976 with the University of Illinois and Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. Consol maintains an intensive program to demonstrate and test deep tillage equipment. The research and in-house demonstrations identified soil physical strength (compaction) as the main limiting factor to restoring a soil's productive capacity. There are two primary ways to address this issue, prevention and amelioration. The former was not an option for Consol because many acres were already reclaimed and the company had a major scraper fleet. Along with other operators in Illinois, Consol started an aggressive search for equipment and techniques that could loosen compacted soils. In 1987 Consol was the first to use the D.M.I.-Super Tiger deep soil plow, originally developed and manufactured by D.M.I., Inc. of Goodfield, Illinois. This plow is composed of a single parabolic, static shank with a 44-inch wide sweep weighing 1,200 pounds. It is capable of plowing 48 inches deep while leaving the top soil in place. A Caterpillar D9L tractor with 460 horsepower is used to pull the plow. In 1990 the decision was made to commit to this equipment as the best technology currently available. In 1994 Consol received a patent waiver from D.M.I. to build its own plow. The Consol built plow has been in use since the summer of 1995. To date, Consol has plowed over 3,900 acres with a D.M.I. plow

  7. Geochemical dispersion associated with uranium deposits in sandstone roll front type and its relationship to the Orinoco Oil Belt, Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, J.

    2014-01-01

    In Venezuela, there is a potential for the formation of uranium deposits in areas such as the Guiana Shield, the south of the Eastern Basin, the Andes and the massif of Baúl, among other areas. Especially great interest is the exploration of uranium redox interface type (roll front), in areas such as the southern part of the Orinoco Oil Belt, north and northwest of the Guiana Shield, where groundwater uranium collecting the weathering shield flowing northward in the sandstones and mudstones of the Cretaceous to Quaternary formations, which constitute the southern boundary of the Eastern basin Venezuela. The presence of gas, extra-heavy crude oil, bitumen and lignite of the Orinoco Oil Belt can be an effective barrier for uranium in solution, which may have precipitated at the redox interface of this groundwater. This process certainly was more effective before the Orinoco river take its course to the east and the waters of small rivers and large draining shield contributed to uranium aquifers became more deep north. This work was based on a qualitative model describing geochemical dispersion associated with uranium deposits in sandstone, roll front type, which indicates that the daughter isotopes "2"3"8U, which can migrate extensively are: "2"2"2Rn, "4He, and in a smaller proportion: "2"2"6Ra and "2"2"2Rn daughters ("2"1"4Bi, "2"1"0Pb). The main exploration methods were established, which can be applied in areas of the Orinoco Oil Belt, north of the Guiana Shield, and areas west of this, among the most important are: soil measurements of radon and helium near faults, sampling soils with gamma spectrometry analysis, log interpretation of oil wells in the area of interest to establish gamma – lithological anomalies, ground water analysis of uranium, radon, radium, helium, vanadium, selenium, molybdenum, analysis of samples oil drilling cores to locate anomalous stratigraphic levels. This research will provide the basis to establish methodologies for uraniferous

  8. Gondwana basins and their coal resources in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehaluddin, M.; Sultan-ul-Islam, M.

    1994-01-01

    Fault bounded five Gondwana basins have been discovered in the north western Bangladesh. Among these basins show considerable amount of coal deposits. The Gondwana rocks are highly formed during the Permo-carboniferous diastrophism and later on acquired dynamic characters. In almost all basins, the Permian rocks overlie the Precambrian basement and underlie either the Tertiary or the Cretaceous sediments, structural, stratigraphic, and depositional history of these basins is more or less similar. The sedimentary sequences are composed of light to dark gray, fine to very coarse grained, sub angular to sub rounded felspathic sandstone, dark grey carbonaceous shale and sandstone, variegated conglomerate and thick coal seams (single seam max. 42.38m). The rocks are often alternated and bear the characteristics of cyclic sedimentation. The depositional environments varied from restricted drainage to open fluvial dominated low to moderate sinuous drainage system. The coal bearing basins were flanked by vegetated and swampy over bank. Age of these coals is suggested to be the late permian. Proved and probable reserves of coal in Jamalganj-Paharpur basin are 670 and 1,460 million metric tons, in Barapukuria basin 303 and 3899 million metric tons; in Barapukuria basin 303 and 389 million metric tons; and in Khalaspir basin 143 and 685 million metric tons respectively. The coal is high volatile, low sulphur, bituminous type. It can be used for different forms of thermal conversion. (author)

  9. Factors controlling localization of uranium deposits in the Dakota Sandstone, Gallup and Ambrosia Lake mining districts, McKinley County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Charles Thomas; Green, Morris W.

    1977-01-01

    Geologic studies were made at all of the uranium mines and prospects in the Dakota Sandstone of Early(?) and Late Cretaceous age in the Gallup mining district, McKinley County, New Mexico. Dakota mines in the adjacent Ambrosia Lake mining district were visited briefly for comparative purposes. Mines in the eastern part of the Gallup district, and in the Ambrosia Lake district, are on the Chaco slope of the southern San Juan Basin in strata which dip gently northward toward the central part of the basin. Mines in the western part of the Gallup district are along the Gallup hogback (Nutria monocline) in strata which dip steeply westward into the Gallup sag. Geologic factors which controlled formation of the uranium deposits in the Dakota Sandstone are: (1) a source of uranium, believed to be uranium deposits of the underlying Morrison Formation of Late Jurassic age; (2) the accessibility to the Dakota of uranium-bearing solutions from the Morrison; (3) the presence in the Dakota of permeable sandstone beds overlain by impermeable carbonaceous shale beds; and (4) the occurrence within the permeable Dakota sandstone beds of carbonaceous reducing material as bedding-plane laminae, or as pockets of carbonaceous trash. Most of the Dakota uranium deposits are found in the lower part of the formation in marginal-marine distributary-channel sandstones which were deposited in the backshore environment. However, the Hogback no. 4 (Hyde) Mine (Gallup district) occurs in sandy paludal shale of the backshore environment, and another deposit, the Silver Spur (Ambrosia Lake district), is found in what is interpreted to be a massive beach or barrier-bar sandstone of the foreshore environment in the upper part of the Dakota. The sedimentary depositional environment most favorable for the accumulation of uranium is that of backshore areas lateral to main distributary channels, where levee, splay, and some distributary-channel sandstones intertongue with gray carbonaceous shales and

  10. New understanding in genesis of uranium deposit Bashblak in tarim basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Mingkuan; Zhao Ruiquan

    2000-01-01

    Using metallogenic theory of hydrogenic uranium deposit and theory of oil-gas reduction, the author makes a re-recognition of the metallogenic mechanism of the biggest uranium deposit in Tarim basin--uranium deposit Bashblak in order to give some reference guide in the prospecting for in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in the biggest intra-continental basin in China--Tarim basin

  11. Geology and oil and gas assessment of the Fruitland Total Petroleum System, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado: Chapter 6 in Geology and Oil and Gas Assessment of the Fruitland Total Petroleum System, San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, J.L.; Condon, S.M.; Hatch, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    The Fruitland Total Petroleum System (TPS) of the San Juan Basin Province includes all genetically related hydrocarbons generated from coal beds and organic-rich shales in the Cretaceous Fruitland Formation. Coal beds are considered to be the primary source of the hydrocarbons. Potential reservoir rocks in the Fruitland TPS consist of the Upper Cretaceous Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, Fruitland Formation (both sandstone and coal beds), and the Farmington Sandstone Member of the Kirtland Formation, and the Tertiary Ojo Alamo Sandstone, and Animas, Nacimiento, and San Jose Formations.

  12. Characterization of the Oriskany and Berea Sandstones: Evaluating Biogeochemical Reactions of Potential Sandstone–Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, Circe [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Harris, Aubrey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The Marcellus shale, located in the mid-Atlantic Appalachian Basin, has been identified as a source for natural gas and targeted for hydraulic fracturing recovery methods. Hydraulic fracturing is a technique used by the oil and gas industry to access petroleum reserves in geologic formations that cannot be accessed with conventional drilling techniques (Capo et al., 2014). This unconventional technique fractures rock formations that have low permeability by pumping pressurized hydraulic fracturing fluids into the subsurface. Although the major components of hydraulic fracturing fluid are water and sand, chemicals, such as recalcitrant biocides and polyacrylamide, are also used (Frac Focus, 2015). There is domestic concern that the chemicals could reach groundwater or surface water during transport, storage, or the fracturing process (Chapman et al., 2012). In the event of a surface spill, understanding the natural attenuation of the chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluid, as well as the physical and chemical properties of the aquifers surrounding the spill site, will help mitigate potential dangers to drinking water. However, reports on the degradation pathways of these chemicals are limited in existing literature. The Appalachian Basin Marcellus shale and its surrounding sandstones host diverse mineralogical suites. During the hydraulic fracturing process, the hydraulic fracturing fluids come into contact with variable mineral compositions. The reactions between the fracturing fluid chemicals and the minerals are very diverse. This report: 1) describes common minerals (e.g. quartz, clay, pyrite, and carbonates) present in the Marcellus shale, as well as the Oriskany and Berea sandstones, which are located stratigraphically below and above the Marcellus shale; 2) summarizes the existing literature of the degradation pathways for common hydraulic fracturing fluid chemicals [polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), glutaraldehyde

  13. Water pressure and ground vibrations induced by water guns at a backwater pond on the Illinois River near Morris, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebel, Carolyn M.; Egly, Rachel M.

    2016-09-27

    Three different geophysical sensor types were used to characterize the underwater pressure waves and ground velocities generated by the underwater firing of seismic water guns. These studies evaluated the use of water guns as a tool to alter the movement of Asian carp. Asian carp are aquatic invasive species that threaten to move into the Great Lakes Basin from the Mississippi River Basin. Previous studies have identified a threshold of approximately 5 pounds per square inch (lb/in2) for behavioral modification and for structural limitation of a water gun barrier.Two studies were completed during August 2014 and May 2015 in a backwater pond connected to the Illinois River at a sand and gravel quarry near Morris, Illinois. The August 2014 study evaluated the performance of two 80-cubic-inch (in3) water guns. Data from the 80-in3 water guns showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 feet (ft). The maximum recorded pressure was 13.7 lb/in2, approximately 25 ft from the guns. The produced pressure field took the shape of a north-south-oriented elongated sphere with the 5-lb/in2 target value extending across the entire study area at a depth of 5 ft. Ground velocities were consistent over time, at 0.0067 inches per second (in/s) in the transverse direction, 0.031 in/s in the longitudinal direction, and 0.013 in/s in the vertical direction.The May 2015 study evaluated the performance of one and two 100-in3 water guns. Data from the 100-in3 water guns, fired both individually and simultaneously, showed that the pressure field had the highest pressures and greatest extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value at a depth of 5 ft. The maximum pressure was 57.4 lb/in2, recorded at the underwater blast sensor closest to the water guns (at a horizontal distance of approximately 3 ft), as two guns fired simultaneously. Pressures and extent of the 5-lb/in2 target value decrease above and below this 5-ft depth

  14. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  15. Using chloride and other ions to trace sewage and road salt in the Illinois Waterway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W.R.; Panno, S.V.; Hackley, Keith C.; Hwang, H.-H.; Martinsek, A.T.; Markus, M.

    2010-01-01

    Chloride concentrations in waterways of northern USA are increasing at alarming rates and road salt is commonly assumed to be the cause. However, there are additional sources of Cl- in metropolitan areas, such as treated wastewater (TWW) and water conditioning salts, which may be contributing to Cl- loads entering surface waters. In this study, the potential sources of Cl- and Cl- loads in the Illinois River Basin from the Chicago area to the Illinois River's confluence with the Mississippi River were investigated using halide data in stream samples and published Cl- and river discharge data. The investigation showed that road salt runoff and TWW from the Chicago region dominate Cl- loads in the Illinois Waterway, defined as the navigable sections of the Illinois River and two major tributaries in the Chicago region. Treated wastewater discharges at a relatively constant rate throughout the year and is the primary source of Cl- and other elements such as F- and B. Chloride loads are highest in the winter and early spring as a result of road salt runoff which can increase Cl- concentrations by up to several hundred mg/L. Chloride concentrations decrease downstream in the Illinois Waterway due to dilution, but are always elevated relative to tributaries downriver from Chicago. The TWW component is especially noticeable downstream under low discharge conditions during summer and early autumn when surface drainage is at a minimum and agricultural drain tiles are not flowing. Increases in population, urban and residential areas, and roadways in the Chicago area have caused an increase in the flux of Cl- from both road salt and TWW. Chloride concentrations have been increasing in the Illinois Waterway since around 1960 at a rate of about 1 mg/L/a. The increase is largest in the winter months due to road salt runoff. Shallow groundwater Cl- concentrations are also increasing, potentially producing higher base flow concentrations. Projected increases in population and

  16. Electrokinetic desalination of sandstones for NaCl removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Christensen, Iben V.

    2012-01-01

    of reliable methods to remove the damaging salts in order to stop the decay. Electrokinetic desalination of fired clay bricks have previously shown efficient in laboratory scale and in the present work the method is tested for desalination of Cotta and Posta sandstones, which both have lower porosity than...... each stone, but electroosmosis in the poultices may have caused suction/pressure over the interface between stone and poultice causing the differences in poultice water content. The transport numbers for Cl− and Na+ differed in the two stones and were highest in the most porous Cotta sandstone in spite...... of similar high pore water concentrations and the same applied electric current. The hypotheses is that a layered structure of the sandstones could be the cause for this, as the electric current may preferentially flow in certain paths through the stone, which are thus desalinated first. After...

  17. On the migration of uranium isotopes in sandstone aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, K.; Gellermann, R.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of natural 238 U and 234 U activity in groundwater of sandstone aquifers have been used to study the migration of these uranium isotopes. Regarding the uranium exchange between liquid phase and rock surface during migration, two different models were applied for evaluating the experimental results. Values of corresponding parameters (retardation factor K, removal rate R) reflecting different behaviour concerning this exchange were determined. For example, the values obtained for 238 U in a Triassic sandstone aquifer of the GDR are K = 8.6 x 10 6 and R = 1.3 x 10 -3 a -1 , respectively. It was found that, under the conditions of the sandstone aquifer concerned, the removal rate model is better suited for calculating uranium-isotope migration in groundwater. (author)

  18. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting...... and permeability is caused by increased diagenetic changes of the sandstones due to increased burial depth and temperatures. Therefore, the highest water temperatures typically correspond with the lowest porosities and permeabilities. Especially the permeability is crucial for the performance of the geothermal......-line fractures. Continuous thin chlorite coatings results in less porosity- and permeability-reduction with burial than the general reduction with burial, unless carbonate cemented. Therefore, localities of sandstones characterized by these continuous chlorite coatings may represent fine geothermal reservoirs...

  19. Regional distribution regularity of sandstone uranium deposits in Asian continent and prospecting strategy for sandstone uranium deposits in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuyi

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1980's, after the discovery of numerous sandstone uranium deposits in Middle Asia (Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan) many large sandstone uranium deposits have been found in both Russia and Mongolia. So that Asia has become the most concentrated region of sandstone uranium deposits. The known sandstone uranium deposits occur mostly in a arcual tectonic belt constrained from the north by the Siberian continental block, and the Tarim-North China continental block from the south. This belt is named by Russian geologists as the Central Asian Mobile Belt, and some Chinese geologists call it the 'Mongolian Arc'. A lot of large and super large metallic, non-metallic, gold, polymetallic, porphyry copper and gold, massive sulphide and uranium deposits (of sandstone and volcanic types) with different origin and various types concentrated occur in this belt. The abundant and colourful mineral resources in the region are closely associated with the specific geologic-tectonic evolution of the above belt. It is necessary to strengthen the detailed geologic research and uranium prospecting in the region

  20. Sandstone-type uranium deposits. Summary and conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, W.I.

    1985-01-01

    The similarity of most of the deposits described in this report is striking even though they occur in sandstone host rocks ranging in age from Carboniferous to Tertiary and on every continent outside the polar regions. Geologic environments of the uranium deposits consist of distinctive sets of tectonic and sedimentary-depositional systems, all of which have some common threads of favorable geologic processes. In this summary paper it is hoped that this report has sharpened an understanding of the deposit's ''home environment'' that will aid future exploration for these resource-important sandstone-type uranium ores

  1. Hydrogeology of the Potsdam Sandstone in northern New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John H.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Franzi, David A.; Romanowicz, Edwin A.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2010-01-01

    The Potsdam Sandstone of Cambrian age forms a transboundary aquifer that extends across northern New York and into southern Quebec. The Potsdam Sandstone is a gently dipping sequence of arkose, subarkose, and orthoquartzite that unconformably overlies Precambrian metamorphic bedrock. The Potsdam irregularly grades upward over a thickness of 450 m from a heterogeneous feldspathic and argillaceous rock to a homogeneous, quartz-rich and matrix-poor rock. The hydrogeological framework of the Potsdam Sandstone was investigated through an analysis of records from 1,500 wells and geophysical logs from 40 wells, and through compilation of GIS coverages of bedrock and surficial geology, examination of bedrock cores, and construction of hydrogeological sections. The upper several metres of the sandstone typically is weathered and fractured and, where saturated, readily transmits groundwater. Bedding-related fractures in the sandstone commonly form sub-horizontal flow zones of relatively high transmissivity. The vertical distribution of sub-horizontal flow zones is variable; spacings of less than 10 m are common. Transmissivity of individual flow zones may be more than 100 m2/d but typically is less than 10 m2/d. High angle fractures, including joints and faults, locally provide vertical hydraulic connection between flow zones. Hydraulic head gradients in the aquifer commonly are downward; a laterally extensive series of sub-horizontal flow zones serve as drains for the groundwater flow system. Vertical hydraulic head differences between shallow and deep flow zones range from 1 m to more than 20 m. The maximum head differences are in recharge areas upgradient from the area where the Chateauguay and Chazy Rivers, and their tributaries, have cut into till and bedrock. Till overlies the sandstone in much of the study area; its thickness is generally greatest in the western part, where it may exceed 50 m. A discontinuous belt of bedrock pavements stripped of glacial drift extends

  2. A new bee species that excavates sandstone nests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Michael C; Griswold, Terry; Pitts, James P; Parker, Frank D

    2016-09-12

    Humanity has long been fascinated by animals with apparently unfavorable lifestyles [1]. Nesting habits are especially important because they can limit where organisms live, thereby driving population, community, and even ecosystem dynamics [2]. The question arises, then, why bees nest in active termite mounds [3] or on the rim of degassing volcanoes, seemingly preferring such hardship [4]. Here, we present a new bee species that excavates sandstone nests, Anthophora (Anthophoroides) pueblo Orr (described in Supplemental Information, published with this article online), despite the challenges already inherent to desert life. Ultimately, the benefits of nesting in sandstone appear to outweigh the associated costs in this system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Isopach map of interval between top of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone and the Huerfanito Bentonite bed of the Lewis Shale, La Plata County, Colorado, and Rio Arriba and San Juan counties, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    This thickness map of a Late Cretaceous interval in the northwestern part of the San Juan Basin is part of a study of the relationship between ancient shore 1ines and coal-forming swamps during the filial regression of the Cretaceous epicontinental sea. The top of the thickness interval is the top of the Pictured Cliffs Sands tone. The base of the interval is a thin time marker, the Huerfanito Bentonite Bed of the Lewis Shale. The interval includes all of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone and the upper part of the Lewis Shale. The northwest boundary of the map area is the outcrop of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone and the Lewis Shale.

  4. The nature of the Dakota-Morrison boundary, Southeastern San Juan basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubrey, W.M.

    1986-01-01

    A thin, discontinuous, fluvial locally conglomeratic sandstone at the vase of the Dakota Sandstone in the vicinity of the southeastern San Juan basin, New Mexico has been named the Encinal Canyon Member of the Dakota Sandstone. In the past, the sandstone beds, placed here in the Encinal Canyon, have been included in the Jackpile sandstone, (an economic unit in the Morrison Formation), in the Burro Canyon Formation, or in the Oak Canyon Member of the Dakota Sandstone. Distinction between the Encinal Canyon Member and the Jackpile sandstone, which are separated by an unconformity that probably spans most of the Early Cretaceous, is economically important. The Jackpile is a primary uranium exploration target, whereas the Dakota contains little known uranium. In the past, the sub-Dakota erosional surface in the southeastern San Juan basin generally was thought to be at the base of the marine and paralic Oak Canyon Member of the Dakota Sandstone, which overlies the Encinal Canyon Member. The unconformity is shown here to be at the base of the fluvial rocks of the Encinal Canyon Member. Local relief at the base of the Encinal Canyon indicates that the sub-Dakota erosional surface formed during a time of regional degradation. Easterly flowing streams scoured underlying units and in some places cut completely through the Jackpile sandstone and the Burro Canyon Formation. The Encinal Canyon was deposited in response to the initial transgression of the Dakota sea. As the sea inundated the area, a transgressive erosional surface formed, and the overlying paralic and marine sediments of the Oak Canyon Member were deposited

  5. Sequence and facies architecture of the upper Blackhawk Formation and the Lower Castlegate Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), Book Cliffs, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S.

    2000-11-01

    High-frequency stratigraphic sequences that comprise the Desert Member of the Blackhawk Formation, the Lower Castlegate Sandstone, and the Buck Tongue in the Green River area of Utah display changes in sequence architecture from marine deposits to marginal marine deposits to an entirely nonmarine section. Facies and sequence architecture differ above and below the regionally extensive Castlegate sequence boundary, which separates two low-frequency (106-year cyclicity) sequences. Below this surface, high-frequency sequences are identified and interpreted as comprising the highstand systems tract of the low-frequency Blackhawk sequence. Each high-frequency sequence has a local incised valley system on top of the wave-dominated delta, and coastal plain to shallow marine deposits are preserved. Above the Castlegate sequence boundary, in contrast, a regionally extensive sheet sandstone of fluvial to estuarine origin with laterally continuous internal erosional surfaces occurs. These deposits above the Castlegate sequence boundary are interpreted as the late lowstand to early transgressive systems tracts of the low-frequency Castlegate sequence. The base-level changes that generated both the low- and high-frequency sequences are attributed to crustal response to fluctuations in compressive intraplate stress on two different time scales. The low-frequency stratigraphic sequences are attributed to changes in the long-term regional subsidence rate and regional tilting of foreland basin fill. High-frequency sequences probably reflect the response of anisotropic basement to tectonism. Sequence architecture changes rapidly across the faulted margin of the underlying Paleozoic Paradox Basin. The high-frequency sequences are deeply eroded and stack above the Paradox Basin, but display less relief and become conformable updip. These features indicate that the area above the Paradox Basin was more prone to vertical structural movements during formation of the Blackhawk

  6. Study on tertiary in-situ leachable uranium mineralization conditions in South Songliao basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhenqiang; Li Guokuan; Zhao Zonghua; Zhang Jingxun

    2001-01-01

    Tertiary in-situ leachable mineralization in Songliao Basin was analyzed in theory in the past. Since 1998, regional investigation at 1:200000 scale has been done with about 120 holes drilled. Based on drill holes recording, section compiling and sample analysis, the authors investigate into the Tertiary in-situ leachable conditions including rock character, sedimentary facies, rock chemistry, organic substances, uranium content, sandstone porosity, sandstone bodies, interlayer oxidation, and hydro-dynamic value. The study would play important role in prospecting for in-situ leachable uranium in South Songliao basin

  7. Experimental evaluation on the damages of different drilling modes to tight sandstone reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The damages of different drilling modes to reservoirs are different in types and degrees. In this paper, the geologic characteristics and types of such damages were analyzed. Then, based on the relationship between reservoir pressure and bottom hole flowing pressure corresponding to different drilling modes, the experimental procedures on reservoir damages in three drilling modes (e.g. gas drilling, liquid-based underbalanced drilling and overbalanced drilling were designed. Finally, damage simulation experiments were conducted on the tight sandstone reservoir cores of the Jurassic Ahe Fm in the Tarim Basin and Triassic Xujiahe Fm in the central Sichuan Basin. It is shown that the underbalanced drilling is beneficial to reservoir protection because of its less damage on reservoir permeability, but it is, to some extent, sensitive to the stress and the empirical formula of stress sensitivity coefficient is obtained; and that the overbalanced drilling has more reservoir damages due to the invasion of solid and liquid phases. After the water saturation of cores rises to the irreducible water saturation, the decline of gas logging permeability speeds up and the damage degree of water lock increases. It is concluded that the laboratory experiment results of reservoir damage are accordant with the reservoir damage characteristics in actual drilling conditions. Therefore, this method reflects accurately the reservoir damage characteristics and can be used as a new experimental evaluation method on reservoir damage in different drilling modes.

  8. Petrographic study of core plugs from lower goru sandstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memon, M.K.; Tunio, A.; Leghari, A.

    2008-01-01

    Petrographic rock type description is a fundamental component in the reservoir description processes and typically included measurement to identify sediment source, texture, composition and mineralogy. Petroleum workers have long used the Petrographic microscope as an in put device to aid in the study of pore systems. Standard Petrographic thin sections are typically 30 micrometers thick and are usually illuminated by transmitted light. Experienced examiners have trained themselves to see information such as pore size, mineralogy, compaction, etc by disregarding artifacts produced by passing light through a section. This method is adequate for qualitative interpretation of data from thin sections. Rocks in thin section under a microscope display great complexity in pore sizes and shapes. Petrographic study provides measurement on rock texture. Texture deals with the size, shape and arrangement of the component minerals of a rock. It is essentially the micro geometry of the rock. Permeability of collected core plugs of lower Goru sandstones was measured. From this Petrographic study we have identified as the sandstone of Lower Goru constitute almost entirely of quartz. The grains range in size from very fine to medium, moderately well sorted to well sorted and rounded to sub rounded in shape. Particularly attention was paid to mineral content present in Lower Goru Sandstone. The mineral composition from these core plugs of Lower Goru Sandstone as identified contain about 70-80% Quartz with traces of feldspar, muscovite, biotite, Epidote and hornblende. Calcite was present as cementing material and it was about 15 -30% of the total rock. (author)

  9. A new bee species that excavates sandstone nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many wonder why animals act in seemingly injurious ways. Understanding the behavior of pollinators such as bees is especially important because of the necessary ecosystem service they provide. The new species Anthophora pueblo, discovered excavating sandstone nests, provides a model system for addre...

  10. Modal analysis and geochemistry of two sandstones of the Bhander ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and tectonic setting interpretations are based on modal analysis and whole rock geochemistry. The average ... that major part of the sediments were derived from the granitic source area. The sandstone ...... The geochemical gap shown by trace and rare ... of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research,. New Delhi, in ...

  11. Effect of Crushed Sandstone Sand on the Properties of High ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents results of the laboratory investigation on high performance concrete (HPC) using crushed sandstone sand as 20%, 40%, and 60% replacement of river sand together with superplastisizer and silica fume (SF). The fresh concrete properties such as slump, air content and fresh concrete density have been ...

  12. The effect of hot water injection on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Haugwitz, Christian; Jacobsen, Peter Sally Munch

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal energy storage can be achieved by hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers. We present an analysis of literature data in combination with new short-term flow through permeability experiments in order to address physical and physico-chemical mechanisms that can alter...

  13. Influence of fluvial sandstone architecture on geothermal energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, C.J.L.; Maghami Nick, Hamidreza M.; Weltje, G.J.; Donselaar, M.E.; Bruhn, D.F.

    2015-01-01

    Fluvial sandstone reservoirs composed of stacked meander belts are considered as potential geothermal resources in the Netherlands. Net-to-gross, orientation and stacking pattern of the channel belts is of major importance for the connectivity between the injection and production well in such

  14. A complex investigation of building sandstones from Saxony (Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetze, Jens; Siedel, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a methodology for the investigation and characterization of building sandstones. This analytical scheme was designed for distinguishing mature arenites, which in general show very similar properties and are difficult to distinguish. This is shown for Cretaceous sandstones from various occurrences in Saxony (Germany), which have been used for centuries as building materials. The procedure is mainly based on the combination of macroscopic rock description, thin section polarizing microscopy (phase composition, texture, grain-size distribution) and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy (quartz types, feldspar and kaolinite content) coupled with image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (accessories, pore cement, diagenetic grain surface features), and analysis of pore space data. Sometimes, additional data from X-ray diffraction or chemical analyses (major and trace elements) can be used. Especially in the case of quartz rich arenites, CL is a powerful tool for provenance analysis. The detailed analysis of sandstone material in most cases allows us to assign historically used building material to a specific sandstone occurrence. These results are important for both interpreting the weathering behaviour of the building material and the conservation, reconstruction and stone replacement of historical monuments

  15. Aeromagnetic gradient survey used in sandstone type uranium deposits prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaolu; Chang Shushuai

    2014-01-01

    The principle, advantage and data processing of aeromagnetic gradient survey approach is introduced in this paper which was used in sandstone type uranium deposits prospecting to study the shallow surface faults, uranium ore-forming environment and depth of magnetic body, which proved to be a good results. (authors)

  16. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew G. Cole; George B. Asquith; Jose I. Guzman; Mark D. Barton; Mohammad A. Malik; Shirley P. Dutton; Sigrid J. Clift

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based enhanced oil recovery. The study focused on the Ford Geraldine unit, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). Reservoirs in this and other Delaware Mountain Group fields have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Outcrop analogs were studied to better interpret the depositional processes that formed the reservoirs at the Ford Geraldine unit and to determine the dimensions of reservoir sandstone bodies. Facies relationships and bedding architecture within a single genetic unit exposed in outcrop in Culberson County, Texas, suggest that the sandstones were deposited in a system of channels and levees with attached lobes that initially prograded basinward, aggraded, and then turned around and stepped back toward the shelf. Channel sandstones are 10 to 60 ft thick and 300 to 3,000 ft wide. The flanking levees have a wedge-shaped geometry and are composed of interbedded sandstone and siltstone; thickness varies from 3 to 20 ft and length from several hundred to several thousands of feet. The lobe sandstones are broad lens-shaped bodies; thicknesses range up to 30 ft with aspect ratios (width/thickness) of 100 to 10,000. Lobe sandstones may be interstratified with laminated siltstones.

  17. Sandstone Relief Geohazards and their Mitigation: Rock Fall Risk Management in the Bohemian Switzerland National Park

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vařilová, Zuzana; Zvelebil, J.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 44, - (2005), s. 53-58 ISSN 1682-5519. [Sandstone Landscapes in Europe. Past, Present and Future. International Conference on Sandstone Landscapes /2./. Vianden, 25.05.2005-28.05.2005] Keywords : sandstones * rock-slope instability * rock fall * risk evalution and mitigation * monitoring net * remedial works Subject RIV: DO - Wilderness Conservation

  18. Sandstone uranium deposits of Eurasia – from genetic concepts to forecasting and new discoveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pechenkin, I.

    2014-01-01

    Along the Eurasian continent’s southern borders lie uranium ore provinces and regions controlling medium-sized and, on rare occasions, large sandstone deposits. Central French, Eastern Rhodope and other regions are known in the west. Large uranium ore provinces were discovered in the south of the Turan Plate and in the depressions of South Kazakhstan, viz. Central Kyzyl Kum, Syr Darya, Chu Sarysu. A common criterion has been established for all objects of the sandstone type, located in oil and gas, coal etc. sedimentary basins – the zone of interlayer or ground-interlayer oxidation, controlling uranium mineralization. In 2003 we were able to justify the concept that the formation of giant deposits in Chu Sarysu province was caused by the collision between the Indian Plate and the southern part of the Eurasian continent. Within the limits of Pacific ore belt there is a zonal distribution of ore deposits. Ordinary mineralization is drawn towards its eastern fringe: gold, tin, copper, tungsten etc. Volcanic and tectonic structures of central type of Mesozoic age are located further west, from the north to the south, that is large calderas – Streltsovskaya (Russia), Dornot (Mongolia), Sian Shan (China), which control large and unique endogene uranium deposits. In the far west, in the region of subsiding tectonic tensions, there are sandstone deposits of uranium in Transbaikalia, Mongolia and Yunnan, which are specially connected to young basalts. Infiltration deposits of Vitim region are adjacent to endogene deposits of Streltsovsky region in the southern-easterly direction, and to the east of the deposits of Yunnan at the same latitude lay the Sian Shan caldera with geothermal deposits of uranium and other metals. We combined them into the unified submeridional Baikal-Southern China uranium ore belt. After examining the southern extremities of the Eurasian continent, the region of the collision of the Indian Plate, a distinct similarity can be perceived between

  19. Eocene fluvial drainage patterns and their implications for uranium and hydrocarbon exploration in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeland, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    Paleocurrent maps of the fluvial lower Eocene Wind River Formation in the Wind River Basin of central Wyoming define promising uranium- and hydrocarbon-exploration target areas. The Wind River Formation is thought to have the greatest potential for uranium mineralization in areas where it includes arkosic channel sandstones derived from the granitic core of the Granite Mountains, as in the channel-sandstone bodies deposited in Eocene time by a 40-kilometer segment of the eastward-flowing paleo-Wind River that exended westward from near the town of Powder River on the east edge of the basin. Channel-sandstone bodies with a Granite Mountains source occur south of this segment of the paleo-Wind River and north of the Granite Mountains. The southwestern part of this area includes the Gas Hills uranium district, but the channel-sandstone bodies between the Gas Hills district and the 40-kilometer segment of the paleo-Wind River may also be mineralized. This area includes the southeasternmost part of the Wind River Basin southeast of Powder River and contains northeasterly trending channel-sandstone bodies derived from the Granite Mountains. Limited paleocurrent information from the margins of the Wind River Basin suggests that the paleo-Wind River in Paleocene time flowed eastward and had approximately the same location as the eastward-flowing paleo-Wind River of Eocene time. The channel-sandstone bodies of the paleo-Wind Rivers are potential hydrocarbon reservoirs, particularly where they are underlain or overlain by the organic-rich shale and siltstone of the Waltman Shale Member of the Fort Union Formation. If leaks of sulfur-containing gas have created a reducing environment in the Eocene paleo-Wind River channel-sandstone bodies, then I speculate that the areas of overlap of the channel-sandstone bodies and natural-gas fields in the underlying rocks may be particularly favorable areas in which to search for uranium deposits

  20. Eocene fluvial drainage patterns and their implications for uranium and hydrocarbon exploration in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeland, D.A.

    1975-01-01

    Paleocurrent maps of the fluvial early Eocene Wind River Formation in the Wind River Basin of central Wyoming define promising uranium and hydrocarbon exploration target areas. The Wind River Formation is thought to have the greatest potential for uranium mineralization in areas where it includes arkosic channel sandstones derived from the granitic core of the Granite Mountains as in the channel sandstones deposited by the 25-mile segment of the Eocene Wind River extending westward from near the town of Powder River on the east edge of the basin. Channel sandstones with a Granite Mountain source occur south of this segment of the Eocene Wind River and north of the Granite Mountains. The southwestern part of this area includes the Gas Hills uranium district but channel sandstones between the Gas Hills district and the 25-mile segment of the Eocene Wind River are potentially mineralized. This area includes the entire southeasternmost part of the Wind River Basin southeast of Powder River and contains northeasterly trending channel sandstones derived from the Granite Mountains. Limited paleocurrent information from the margins of the Wind River Basin suggests that the Paleocene Wind River flowed eastward and had approximately the same location as the eastward-flowing Eocene Wind River. If leaks of sulfur-containing gas have created a reducing environment in the Eocene Wind River channel sandstones, then I speculate that the areas of overlap of the channel sandstones and natural gas fields in the underlying rocks may be particularly favorable areas in which to search for uranium deposits. The channel sandstones of the Paleocene and Eocene Wind Rivers are potential hydrocarbon reservoirs, particularly where underlain or overlain by the organic-rich shale and siltstone of the Waltman Shale Member of the Fort Union Formation

  1. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Shuixigou group in Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinping; Min Maozhong

    2003-01-01

    The Shuixigou Group, Lower-Middle Jurassic is the uranium-hosting formation of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in Yili basin. Rocks of the Shuixigou Group were extensively corroded during the diagenesis by the CO 2 -and organic acid-rich water derived from the organic matter existing in the strata. As a result, sandstones became loose and porous. Data of geochemical background such as uranium, organic carbon and major element contents in this paper are the achievement of authors. The results indicate that the distribution of uranium, organic matter and major elements is closely associated with the formation of epigenetic interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits, and with the discrimination of ore-hosting and barren interlayer oxidation zones

  2. Fast evolving conduits in clay-bonded sandstone: Characterization, erosion processes and significance for the origin of sandstone landforms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Svetlik, D.; Soukup, J.; Schweigstillová, Jana; Válek, Jan; Sedláčková, M.; Mayo, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 177, December (2012), s. 178-193 ISSN 0169-555X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130806 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:68378297 Keywords : sandstone * erosion * piping * tensile strength * conduit * landform Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 2.552, year: 2012

  3. Palaeoclimatic trends deduced from the hydrochemistry of a Triassic sandstone aquifer, United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, A.H.; Edmunds, W.M.; Andrews, J.N.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed geochemical study (elemental, isotopic and dissolved inert gases) of unconfined and confined sections of the Triassic non-marine sandstone aquifer in eastern England has been undertaken. Aspects of the recharge history of this aquifer over the past 40,000 years are revealed by examination of the data. 14 C activity and delta 13 C values show downgradient decrease and increase, respectively, the latter from -12 to -13 per mille (PDB) at outcrop to -8.5 per mille in deep confined groundwaters, indicating a continuing reaction between water and carbonate mineral phases. Although the bulk carbonate contained in sandstone samples gives delta 13 C around -7 per mille, modelling of the carbon isotopic evolution and consideration of the resulting 14 C age corrections suggest that a carbonate with delta 13 C closer to 0 per mille has played a major role in at least the earlier stages of hydrochemical evolution. The corrected radiocarbon age ranges, generated by the computer program WATEQF-ISOTOP, are used as a framework in which the palaeo-environmental information from oxygen and hydrogen isotope data, inert gas contents, and chloride levels are discussed. The measurement of dissolved helium levels demonstrates an excess of 4 He in many samples, which correlates with radiocarbon ages. The assumption of bulk chemical and physical properties for the aquifer rock allows independent 'excess 4 He' ages to be computed, which are mostly in excess of the corrected 14 C ages. The trend of delta 18 O is from about -8 per mille at outcrop to -9.7 per mille (SMOW) downgradient, which is significantly more depleted than has been found in previous studies of UK basins. The delta 2 H and delta 18 O values are related by the regression line delta 2 H=6.6delta 18 O+1; data from other UK studies also lie close to this trend

  4. Nature, origin, and production characteristics of the Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation, central Appalachian basin, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, R.; Zagorski, W.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-permeability sandstones of the Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation cover about 45,000 mi2 (117,000 km2) of the Appalachian basin and may contain as much as 30 tcf of recoverable gas resources. Major reservoirs consist of the "Clinton" sandstone and Medina Group sandstones. The stratigraphically equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone increases the area of the Lower Silurian regional accumulation (LSRA) by another 30,000 mi2 (78,000 km2). Approximately 8.7 tcf of gas and 400 million bbl of oil have been produced from the Clinton/Medina reservoirs since 1880. The eastern predominantly gas-bearing part of the LSRA is a basin-center gas accumulation, whereas the western part is a conventional oil and gas accumulation with hybrid features of a basin-center accumulation. The basin-center accumulations have pervasive gas saturation, water near irreducible saturation, and generally low fluid pressures. In contrast, the hybrid-conventional accumulations have less-pervasive oil and gas saturation, higher mobile-water saturation, and both normal and abnormally low fluid pressures. High mobile-water saturation in the hybrid-conventional reservoirs form the updip trap for the basin-center gas creating a broad transition zone, tens of miles wide, that has characteristics of both end-member accumulation types. Although the Tuscarora Sandstone part of the basin-center gas accumulation is pervasively saturated with gas, most of its constituent sandstone beds have low porosity and permeability. Commercial gas fields in the Tuscarora Sandstone are trapped in naturally fractured, faulted anticlines. The origin of the LSRA includes (1) generation of oil and gas from Ordovician black shales, (2) vertical migration through an overlying 1000-ft (305-m)-thick Ordovician shale; (3) abnormally high fluid pressure created by oil-to-gas transformation; (4) updip displacement of mobile pore water by overpressured gas; (5) entrapment of pervasive gas in the basin center; (6) postorogenic

  5. Safe Driving in Illinois. A Manual to Accompany the Illinois Rules of the Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gail; Nowack, Linda

    Designed to accompany and supplement the Illinois Rules of the Road manual, this book is intended to better prepare future drivers for the written test for the instruction permit or driver's license. It includes many pictures and shows and describes driving situations a driver will probably face when behind the wheel. Parts dealing with important…

  6. Guide for Migrants in the State of Illinois = Guia para Migrantes en el Estado de Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemach, Sharon; Koepplinger, Jessica

    Prepared for migrant farmworkers traveling in the State of Illinois, the booklet, written in English and Spanish, provides basic information on (1) employment conditions--requirements of crew leaders and employers, deductions from wages, and laws regulating child labor; (2) housing--conditions of the camp grounds and of living units; (3)…

  7. Hydrogeology, ground-water flow, and tritium movement at low-level radioactive-waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garklavs, George; Healy, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Groundwater flow and tritium movement are described at and near a low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Sheffield, Illinois. Flow in the shallow aquifer is confined to three basins that ultimately drain into a stripmine lake. Most of the flow from the site is through a buried, pebbly sandfilled channel. Remaining flow is toward alluvium of an existing stream. Conceptual flow models for the two largest basins are used to improve definition of flow velocity and direction. Flow velocities range from about 25 to 2,500 ft/yr. Tritium was found in all three basins. The most extensive migration of tritium is coincident with buried channel. Tritium concentrations ranged from detection level to more than 300 nanocuries/L. (USGS)

  8. Multidisciplinary studies on ancient sandstone quarries of Western Sardinia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Silvana Maria; Del Vais, Carla; Naitza, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The ancient coastal quarries of Mediterranean are increasingly considered geosites of multidisciplinary relevance. They are sites of historical-archaeological interest that show ancient techniques of stone extraction; they are significant for cultural heritage conservation and restoration, as sources of the stones used in ancient buildings and monuments; they are sites of geological relevance, as often retain important stratigraphic sections; they are also useful markers of secular changes in the sea level. A multisciplinary study is in progress on the ancient quarries of the Sinis region (western Sardinia island), integrating archaeological, geological, minero-petrographical data. In Sardinia, coastal quarries have been established from Punic and Roman times. Many of them exploited Quaternary sediments along the southern and western coasts of the island. They consist of middle-late Pleistocene marine conglomerates and carbonate sandstones, and of coastal (aeolian) carbonate sandstones. Sandstone blocks of different sizes have been widely used in ancient cities for buildings, defensive works, harbours, etc. Three main areas of stone extraction (San Giovanni di Sinis, Punta Maimoni, Is Arutas) have been so far recognized in the Sinis. GIS-supported mapping and documentation of the sites includes their geology and stratigraphy, the extension and layout of the quarries, and an evaluation of volumes of extracted rocks. Documented archaeological evidences include ancient extraction fronts, spoil heaps, working areas, working traces in the old fronts, transport routes of blocks, and traces of loading facilities. The study is aimed at reconstructing the relationships of the quarries with the urban areas of Sinis, as the ancient Punic-Roman city of Tharros. Consequently, a minero-petrographical characterization (optical microscopy, XRD) is performed on sandstones sampled in each quarry, and in historical buildings in Tharros and other centres of the region (Cabras

  9. Characteristics of Illinois School Districts That Employ School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searing, Lisabeth M.; Guenette, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that school nursing services are cost-effective, but the National Association of School Nurses estimates that 25% of schools do not have a school nurse (SN). The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of Illinois school districts that employed SNs. This was a secondary data analysis of Illinois School Report…

  10. Financial Reporting Practices in Illinois Public Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeadas, Gus J.

    A study was conducted to determine how well Illinois' 38 community college districts satisfied the needs of board members, creditors, investors, and tax payers for financial information. A list of 38 financial reporting requirements was developed from the requirements of the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) and guidelines from the Audits of…

  11. 75 FR 52963 - Illinois; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... the damage in certain areas of the State of Illinois resulting from severe storms and flooding during... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Illinois (FEMA-1935-DR), dated August 19, 2010, and related... assistance is supplemental, any Federal funds provided under the Stafford Act for Hazard Mitigation and Other...

  12. 76 FR 57022 - Coastal Zone Management Program: Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration Coastal Zone Management Program: Illinois AGENCY: Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM), National Oceanic and...: Illinois has submitted a coastal management program to NOAA for approval under the Coastal Zone Management...

  13. Formal Dismissal Procedures Under Illinois Teacher Tenure Laws. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Newell N.; And Others

    This handbook, an updated and revised version of the 1975 original, contains the new statutory requirements, state board of education rules, and court decisions pertaining to teacher dismissal in Illinois. This handbook is designed to acquaint Illinois school administrators and school board members with the legal procedures necessary in dismissal…

  14. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: In-Store Retailing Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the in-store retailing cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards…

  15. 77 FR 2286 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 12717-002] Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Meeting a. Date and Time of Meeting: Thursday, January 26, 2012 from 11... Meeting: Commission staff will meet with Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC to discuss potentially moving...

  16. 75 FR 40816 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 12626-002; Project No. 12717-002] Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Meeting July 7, 2010. a. Date and Time of Meeting: Thursday, July 22, 2010 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. CDT. b. Place: Illinois Historic Preservation...

  17. Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution and its relation to sandstone-type uranium mineralization in northern Tarim area--Evidence from apatite fission track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hongxu; Dong Wenming; Liu Zhangyue; Chen Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    The apatite fission track dating and inversion result of geological thermal history of four rock specimens from Sawafuqi area and Talike area in northern Tarim Basin show that two areas uplifted at different ages. The apatite fission track ages of Sawafuqi range from 3.5 to 3.9 Ma, while the ages of Talike range from 53 to 59 Ma. The thermal history recorded by rock samples reveals that there are at least three prominent cooling phases since Late Cretaceous epoch. Detailed study was made on the division of uplifting stages during Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic evolution with the existing data in northern Tarim area. And new ideas on tectonic evolution and sandstone-type uranium mineralization have been put forward by combining with the sandstone-type uranium mineralization ages in this area.(authors)

  18. Continuous monitoring of sediment and nutrients in the Illinois River at Florence, Illinois, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrio, Paul J.; Straub, Timothy D.; Domanski, Marian M.; Siudyla, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    The Illinois River is the largest river in Illinois and is the primary contributing watershed for nitrogen, phosphorus, and suspended-sediment loading to the upper Mississippi River from Illinois. In addition to streamflow, the following water-quality constituents were monitored at the Illinois River at Florence, Illinois (U.S. Geological Survey station number 05586300), during May 2012–October 2013: phosphate, nitrate, turbidity, temperature, specific conductance, pH, and dissolved oxygen. The objectives of this monitoring were to (1) determine performance capabilities of the in-situ instruments; (2) collect continuous data that would provide an improved understanding of constituent characteristics during normal, low-, and high-flow periods and during different climatic and land-use seasons; (3) evaluate the ability to use continuous turbidity as a surrogate constituent to determine suspended-sediment concentrations; and (4) evaluate the ability to develop a regression model for total phosphorus using phosphate, turbidity, and other measured parameters. Reliable data collection was achieved, following some initial periods of instrument and data-communication difficulties. The resulting regression models for suspended sediment had coefficient of determination (R2) values of about 0.9. Nitrate plus nitrite loads computed using continuous data were found to be approximately 8 percent larger than loads computed using traditional discrete-sampling based models. A regression model for total phosphorus was developed by using historic orthophosphate data (important during periods of low flow and low concentrations) and historic suspended-sediment data (important during periods of high flow and higher concentrations). The R2of the total phosphorus regression model using orthophosphorus and suspended sediment was 0.8. Data collection and refinement of the regression models is ongoing.

  19. Distinguishing of uranium-bearing sandstone by the geochemical characteristics in northern Sichuan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wangzhang; Zhang Zhufeng; Wang Yunliang; Sun Shuqin.

    1994-01-01

    Expounding geochemical characteristics of sandstone-type uranium deposits in northern Sichuan, the authors demonstrate the favourable and unfavourable conditions for enrichment of uranium on the basis of element abundances and ratios of U, Th and K measured by the gamma-ray spectroscopy surveying. The differences between uranium-bearing and non-uranium sandstones and between red sandstone (clay stone) and greenish sandstone can be determined by the gamma-ray spectroscopy (measuring U, Th and K) and XRF analysis (measuring As and Ba). Therefore, the prospecting of the sandstone-type uranium deposits in northern Sichuan can be concentrated in a certain range

  20. Illinois energy conservation plan report: 1979 revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-02-01

    In response to Energy Policy and this Conservation Act (PL 94-163) and Energy Conservation and Production Act (PL 94-385), this paper describes the activities to be undertaken by Illinois to meet the mandatory requirements of the Acts and to carry out other activities to encourage energy conservation by energy-consuming sectors in the state. Programs reach the residential, commercial/industrial, agricultural, educational, transportation, and government sectors. The overall goal of the program is to reduce projected energy consumption in 1980 by 5% through information and educational activities.

  1. Traces of the heritage arising from the Macelj sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golež, Mateja

    2014-05-01

    The landscape of Southeast Slovenia and its stone heritage principally reveal itself through various Miocene sandstones. The most frequently found type on the borderline between Slovenia and Croatia, i.e. east of Rogatec, is the micaceous-quartz Macelj sandstone. This rock ranges in colour from greenish grey to bluish grey and yellowish, depending on the content of glauconite, which colours it green. In its composition, the rock is a heterogeneous mixture of grains of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, microcline, anorthite and glauconite. The average size of grains is 300μm. In cross-section, they are oblong, semi-rounded or round. The mechanical-physical and durability properties of the Macelj sandstone, which have been characterised pursuant to the applicable standards for natural stone, reveal that the rock exhibits poor resistance to active substances from the atmosphere, particularly in the presence of salt. In the surroundings of Rogatec, there are around 45 abandoned quarries of the Macelj sandstone, which are the result of the exploitation of this mineral resource from the 17th century on. The local quarrymen earned their bread until 1957, when the Kambrus quarry industry closed down. From the original use of this mineral resource as construction and decorative material, the useful value of the Macelj sandstone expanded during the development of the metals industry to the manufacture of large and small grindstones for the needs of the domestic and international market. Therefore, traces of quarrying can not only be seen in the disused quarries, but also in the rich architectural heritage of Rogatec and its surroundings, the stone furniture - from portals, window frames, wells, various troughs, pavements to stone walls - and other. The living quarrying heritage slowly passed into oblivion after World War II, although the analysis of the social image of the people residing in Rogatec and its surroundings revealed that there was an average of one stonemason in

  2. Paleozoic unconformities favorable for uranium concentration in northern Appalachian basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Unconformities can redistribute uranium from protore rock as ground water moves through poorly consolidated strata beneath the erosion surface, or later moves along the unconformity. Groundwater could migrate farther than in present-day lithified Paleozoic strata in the Appalachian basin, now locally deformed by the Taconic and Allegheny orogenies. Several paleoaquifer systems could have developed uranium geochemical cells. Sandstone mineralogy, occurrences of fluvial strata, and reduzate facies are important factors. Other possibilities include silcrete developed during desert exposure, and uranium concentrated in paleokarst. Thirteen unconformities are evaluated to determine favorable areas for uranium concentration. Cambrian Potsdam sandstone (New York) contains arkoses and possible silcretes just above crystalline basement. Unconformities involving beveled sandstones and possible fluvial strata include Cambrian Hardyston sandstone (New Jersey), Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone (New York), Ordovician Oswego and Juniata formations (Pennsylvania and New York), Silurian Medina Group (New York), and Silurian Vernon, High Falls, and Longwood formations (New York and New Jersey). Devonian Catskill Formation is beveled by Pennsylvanian strata (New York and Pennsylvania). The pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity also bevels Lower Mississippian Pocono, Knapp, and Waverly strata (Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio), truncates Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation (Pennsylvania), and forms paleokarst on Mississippian Loyalhanna Limestone (Pennsylvania) and Maxville Limestone (Ohio). Strata associated with these unconformities contain several reports of uranium. Unconformities unfavorable for uranium concentration occur beneath the Middle Ordovician (New York), Middle Devonian (Ohio and New York), and Upper Devonian (Ohio and New York); these involve marine strata overlying marine strata and probably much submarine erosion

  3. Distribution characteristics of Shihongtan uranium deposits calcareous sandstone and discussion on their genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Huanqiao; Jia Heng; Xu Gaozhong; Li Zhanyou

    2007-12-01

    It is considered that the calcareous sandstone appear at layer along of a bunch of pear lens on and off, localled near up and down surface of sandbody or washed surface, has sandstone of more macro-grain and more gradation through statistics and analysis of calcareous sandstone in goal layer in Shihongtan uranium deposits. The calcareous sandstone accumulation thickness chorogram demonstrated that the calcareous sandstone centralized distribution in the ore body growth area, thus it can be seen, in the oxidation reduction intermediate belt the calcareous sandstone forms with the uranium mine has the certain origin relation. Choropleth map of summed thickness of calcareous sandstone deserves that it mainly appear in area of uranium body and related cause of formation of ore body of interlayer deacidizing--oxidation belt. (authors)

  4. Effect Of Hot Water Injection On Sandstone Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    of published results regarding the effect of temperature on sandstone permeability. These tests are performed with mineral oil, nitrogen gas, distilled water and solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 as well as brines that contain a mixture of salts. Thirteen sandstone formations, ranging from quartz arenites...... to formations with a significant fraction of fine particles including clay minerals are investigated. The porosities range from 0.10 to 0.30 and permeabilities span the range from 1 to 1000 md. To compare different rock types, specific surface is determined from permeability and porosity using Kozeny’s equation...... not account for all the permeability reductions observed. Permeablity reduction occurs both when distilled water is the saturating fluid as well as in tests with NaCl, KCl or CaCl2 solutions, however, this is not the case in tests with mineral oil or nitrogen gas. The formation of a filter cake or influx...

  5. Strength curves for shales and sandstones under hydrostatic confining pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.C.; Sikka, S.K.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental data for the effect of confining pressures on the fracture stress have been analysed for shales and sandstones. The normalized compressive strengths are found to lie in a narrow region so that Ohnaka's equation for crystalline rocks, can be fitted to the data. The fitted parameters are physically reasonable and indicate that the functional dependence of strength on porosity, strain rate and temperature is independent of the confining pressures. (author)

  6. New Acid Combination for a Successful Sandstone Acidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. U.; Mahmud, H. K. B.; Rezaee, R.

    2017-05-01

    With the development of new enhanced oil recovery techniques, sandstone acidizing has been introduced and played a pivotal role in the petroleum industry. Different acid combinations have been applied, which react with the formation, dissolve the soluble particles; thus increase the production of hydrocarbons. To solve the problems which occurred using current preflush sandstone acidizing technology (hydrochloric acid); a new acid combination has been developed. Core flooding experiments on sandstone core samples with dimensions 1.5 in. × 3 in. were conducted at a flow rate of 2 cm3/min. A series of hydrochloric-acetic acid mixtures with different ratios were tested under 150°F temperature. The core flooding experiments performed are aimed to dissolve carbonate, sodium, potassium and calcium particles from the core samples. These experiments are followed by few important tests which include, porosity-permeability, pH value, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements). All the results are compared with the results of conventional hydrochloric acid technology. NMR and porosity analysis concluded that the new acid combination is more effective in creating fresh pore spaces and thus increasing the reservoir permeability. It can be seen from the pore distribution before and after the acidizing. Prior applying acid; the large size of pores appears most frequently in the pore distribution while with the applied acid, it was found that the small pore size is most the predominant of the pore distribution. These results are validated using ICP analysis which shows the effective removal of calcium and other positive ions from the core sample. This study concludes that the combination of acetic-hydrochloric acid can be a potential candidate for the preflush stage of sandstone acidizing at high temperature reservoirs.

  7. Lattice strain measurements on sandstones under load using neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischbutter, A.; Neov, D.; Scheffzük, Ch.; Vrána, M.; Walther, K.

    2000-11-01

    Neutron diffraction methods (both time-of-flight- and angle-dispersive diffraction) are applied to intracrystalline strain measurements on geological samples undergoing uniaxial increasing compressional load. The experiments were carried out on Cretaceous sandstones from the Elbezone (East Germany), consisting of >95% quartz which are bedded but without crystallographic preferred orientation of quartz. From the stress-strain relation the Young's modulus for our quartz sample was determined to be (72.2±2.9) GPa using results of the neutron time-of-flight method. The influence of different kinds of bedding in sandstones (laminated and convolute bedding) could be determined. We observed differences of factor 2 (convolute bedding) and 3 (laminated bedding) for the elastic stiffness, determined with angle dispersive neutron diffraction (crystallographic strain) and with strain gauges (mechanical strain). The data indicate which geological conditions may influence the stress-strain behaviour of geological materials. The influence of bedding on the stress-strain behaviour of a laminated bedded sandstone was indicated by direct residual stress measurements using neutron time-of-flight diffraction. The measurements were carried out six days after unloading the sample. Residual strain was measured for three positions from the centre to the periphery and within two radial directions of the cylinder. We observed that residual strain changes from extension to compression in a different manner for two perpendicular directions of the bedding plane.

  8. Petrographic and geochemical analysis of the Givetian-Frasnian sandstones in the Kuh-e-Tizi section, southeastern Central Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, S. H.; Adabi, M. H.; Moussavi Harami, S. R.; Khosro Tehrani, K.

    2009-04-01

    .P., Ramasamy, S., 2004. Geochemistry of sandstones from the Upper Miocene Kudankulam Formation, southern India: implication for provenance, weathering and tectonic setting. J. Sediment. Res. 74, 285-297. Basu, A., Young, S.W., Suttner, L.J., James, W.C., Mack, G.H., 1975. Re-evaluation of the use of undulatory extinction and polycrystallinity in detrital quartz for provenance interpretation. J. Sed. Petrol. 45, 873-882. Bhatia, M.R., 1983. Plate tectonics and geochemical composition of sandstones. J. Geol. 91, 611-627. Bhatia, M.R., Crook, K.A.W., 1986. Trace element characteristics of graywackes and tectonic setting discrimination of sedimentary basins. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 92, 181-193. Dickinson, W.R., Beard, L.S., Brakenridge, G.R., Erjavec, J.L., Ferguson, R.C., Inman, K.F., Knepp, R.A., Lindberg, F.A., Ryberg, P.T., 1983. Provenance of North American Phanerozoic sandstones in relation to tectonic setting. Bull. Am. Geol. Soc. 94, 222-235. Kroonenberg, S.B., 1994. Effects of provenance, sorting and weathering on the geochemistry of fluvial sands from different tectonic and climatic environments. Proceedings of the 29th International Geological Congress, Part A, 69-81. Roser, B.P., Korsch, R.J., 1986. Determination of tectonic setting of sandstonemudstone suites using SiO2 content and K2O/Na2O ratio. J. Geol. 94, 635-650. Wendt, J., Kaufmann, B., Belka, Z., Farsan, N. & Karimi bavandpur, A. 2002. Devonian/Lower Carboniferous stratigraphy, facies patterns and palaeogeography of Iran. Part I. Southeastern Iran. Acta Geol. Polo. 52, 129-168.

  9. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations.

  10. On the water saturation calculation in hydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalheim, Stein Ottar

    2002-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to identify the most important uncertainty sources in water saturation calculation and examine the possibility for developing new S{sub w} - equations or possibility to develop methods to remove weaknesses and uncertainties in existing S{sub w} - equations. Due to the need for industrial applicability of the equations we aimed for results with the following properties: The accuracy in S{sub w} should increase compared with existing S{sub w} - equations. The equations should be simple to use in petrophysical evaluations. The equations should be based on conventional logs and use as few as possible input parameters. The equations should be numerical stable. This thesis includes an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the most common S{sub w} equations. The results are addressed in chapter 3 and were intended to find the most important uncertainty sources in water saturation calculation. To increase the knowledge of the relationship between R{sub t} and S{sub w} in hydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs and to understand how the pore geometry affects the conductivity (n and m) of the rock a theoretical study was done. It was also an aim to examine the possibility for developing new S{sub w} - equations (or investigation an effective medium model) valid inhydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs. The results are presented in paper 1. A new equation for water saturation calculation in clean sandstone oil reservoirs is addressed in paper 2. A recommendation for best practice of water saturation calculation in non water wet formation is addressed in paper 3. Finally a new equation for water saturation calculation in thinly interbedded sandstone/mudstone reservoirs is presented in paper 4. The papers are titled: 1) Is the saturation exponent n a constant. 2) A New Model for Calculating Water Saturation In 3) Influence of wettability on water saturation modeling. 4) Water Saturation Calculations in Thinly Interbedded Sandstone/mudstone Reservoirs. A

  11. Experimental deformation in sandstone, carbonates and quartz aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Cecilia See Nga [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The first part of my thesis is mainly focused on the effect of grain size distribution on compaction localization in porous sandstone. To identify the microstructural parameters that influence compaction band formation, I conducted a systematic study of mechanical deformation, failure mode and microstructural evolution in Bleurswiller and Boise sandstones, of similar porosity (~25%) and mineralogy but different sorting. Discrete compaction bands were observed to develop over a wide range of pressure in the Bleurswiller sandstone that has a relatively uniform grain size distribution. In contrast, compaction localization was not observed in the poorly sorted Boise sandstone. My results demonstrate that grain size distribution exerts important influence on compaction band development, in agreement with recently published data from Valley of Fire and Buckskin Gulch, as well as numerical studies. The second part aimed to improve current knowledge on inelastic behavior, failure mode and brittle-ductile transition in another sedimentary rock, porous carbonates. A micritic Tavel (porosity of ~13%) and an allochemical Indiana (~18%) limestones were deformed under compaction in wet and dry conditions. At lower confining pressures, shear localization occurred in brittle faulting regime. Through transitional regime, the deformation switched to cataclastic flow regime at higher confining pressure. Specifically in the cataclastic regime, the (dry and wet) Tavel and dry Indiana failed by distributed cataclastic flow, while in contrast, wet Indiana failed as compaction localization. My results demonstrate that different failure modes and mechanical behaviors under different deformation regimes and water saturation are fundamental prior to any geophysical application in porous carbonates. The third part aimed to focus on investigating compaction on quartz aggregate starting at low (MPa) using X-ray diffraction. We report the diffraction peak evolution of quartz with increasing

  12. Depositional system of the Bayangobi formation, lower cretaceous and its control over in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in Chagandelesu area, Inner Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wanliang

    2002-01-01

    Chagandelesu area is situated in the eastern part of Bayangobi basin, Inner Mongolia. In the Early Cretaceous, a detrital rock series (Bayangobi Formation) with a thickness of about 1000 m was formed within a down-faulted basin under the extensional tectonic regime. The Bayangobi Formation is the prospecting target for interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits, and is divided into three lithologic members: the lower member-- proluvial (alluvial), subaqueous fan or fan-delta facies sediments; the middle member-shallow lacustrine-semi-deep lacustrine-deep lacustrine facies sediments; the upper member-littoral shallow lacustrine or delta facies sediments. The facies order of Bayangobi Formation represents the evolution process of basin water from the shallow (early period) to the deep (middle period) then again to the shallow (late period) level. The Bayangobi Formation composed of a third sequence order reflects respectively a lowstand system tract (LST), a transgressive system tract (TST) and a highstand system tract (HST). The author also makes an analysis on physical properties of psammites of Bayangobi Formation, and proposes that psammites of delta and littoral shallow lacustrine facies are favourable for the formation of interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits

  13. Devonian sand injections and volcanism in the Murzuq Basin (south-west Libya)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Ghienne, Jean-Francois

    system is original by its interaction with volcanism and its situation in an epicontinental intracratonic basin. The sand injections form a seal-bypass system between the Ordovician-Cambrian reservoirs and the Lower Devonian sandstones, breaching through the Silurian shale seal (and source rock...

  14. Permeability, compressibility and porosity of Jurassic shale from the Norwegian-Danish Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbia, Ernest Ncha; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Krogsbøll, Anette

    2014-01-01

    The Fjerritslev Formation in the Norwegian-Danish Basin forms the main seal to Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic sandstone reservoirs. In order to estimate the sealing potential and rock properties, samples from the deep wells Vedsted-1 in Jylland, and Stenlille-2 and Stenlille-5 on Sjael-land, were ...

  15. Heavy mineral sorting and distributions within massive sandstone divisions (Bouma A divisions) of Brushy Canyon Formation turbidites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motanated, K.; Tice, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    KANNIPA MOTANATED and MICHAEL M. TICE Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-3115, USA Sediment sorting data are commonly used for interpreting depositional environments, analyzing mechanisms of deposition and transportation, and inferring relative transport distance of sediments. Typically, sorting in sandstones is estimated by point-counting thin sections which is a time consuming procedure and requires cutting sections of rock samples. We demonstrate a new technique for quantifying sediment sorting using element distribution maps obtained by x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We show that hydraulic sorting of Zr- and Ti- bearing grains (probably zircon and rutile, respectively) results in characteristic vertical profiles of Zr and Ti abundances within the Bouma A divisions of turbidites of the Brushy Canyon Formation, Delaware Basin, southern New Mexico. Zr- and Ti- bearing grains decrease in abundance and diameter from bases to tops of A divisions in every sample examined in this study. These results contrast with previous observations which suggest that grading in Brushy Canyon Formation structureless sandstones is absent or rare. The data support turbiditic interpretations of these rocks against traction current interpretations which rely on the lack of textural grading. Grading is reflected in vertical profiles of Ti/Al, Zr/Al and Zr/Ti ratios, which each decrease upward. These compositional variations could potentially be used as geochemical proxies for physical sorting, and might be useful for inferring depositional processes and relative transport distances.

  16. Distribution and nature of fault architecture in a layered sandstone and shale sequence: An example from the Moab fault, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N.C.; Aydin, A.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the distribution of fault rock and damage zone structures in sandstone and shale along the Moab fault, a basin-scale normal fault with nearly 1 km (0.62 mi) of throw, in southeast Utah. We find that fault rock and damage zone structures vary along strike and dip. Variations are related to changes in fault geometry, faulted slip, lithology, and the mechanism of faulting. In sandstone, we differentiated two structural assemblages: (1) deformation bands, zones of deformation bands, and polished slip surfaces and (2) joints, sheared joints, and breccia. These structural assemblages result from the deformation band-based mechanism and the joint-based mechanism, respectively. Along the Moab fault, where both types of structures are present, joint-based deformation is always younger. Where shale is juxtaposed against the fault, a third faulting mechanism, smearing of shale by ductile deformation and associated shale fault rocks, occurs. Based on the knowledge of these three mechanisms, we projected the distribution of their structural products in three dimensions along idealized fault surfaces and evaluated the potential effect on fluid and hydrocarbon flow. We contend that these mechanisms could be used to facilitate predictions of fault and damage zone structures and their permeability from limited data sets. Copyright ?? 2005 by The American Association of Petroleum Geologists.

  17. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  18. Inventory of Rare of Endangered Vascular Plants Occurring in the Floodplain of the Mississippi River between Cairo, Illinois, and St. Paul, Minnesota, and in the Floodplain of the Illinois River between Grafton, Illinois, and Chicago,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    counties). ramily Cyperaceae Cyperus iria L. Illinois (Alexander). Family Ranunculaceae Ranunculus sardous Crantz. Illinois (Jackson, Union). Family ...adventive floodplain species is appended. P1 r 4 Sagittaria calycina Engelm. Arrowhead Family Alismataceae Status: Not rare nor endangered. This usually...spongia (Bosc) Steud. Frogbit Family Hydrocharitaceae Status: Rare (Illinois). This is a Coastal Plain species which ranges from Texas to Florida and

  19. How 60 Minutes ticked off Illinois Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A November 60 Minutes broadcast on CBS television asserting that costs are out of control at the Illinois Power Co's(IP) Clinton nuclear power project because of management incompetence triggered a series of rebuttals and counter-rebuttals. A review of the events and correspondence during the planning stage and after the broadcast explores the question of construction cost overruns and the economic impact the broadcast had on IP's investors, employees, and customers. A parallel filming by IP was aired to show how the CBS edited the interview with IP officials. IP personnel feel betrayed by what they consider misconceptions and errors in the broadcast and are unhappy that an employee morale problem was worsened. Counter-arguments by both parties indicate a disagreement on both facts and interpretations

  20. Illinois trauma centers and community violence resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennet Butler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elder abuse and neglect (EAN, intimate partner violence (IPV, and street-based community violence (SBCV are significant public health problems, which frequently lead to traumatic injury. Trauma centers can provide an effective setting for intervention and referral, potentially interrupting the cycle of violence. Aims: To assess existing institutional resources for the identification and treatment of violence victims among patients presenting with acute injury to statewide trauma centers. Settings and Design: We used a prospective, web-based survey of trauma medical directors at 62 Illinois trauma centers. Nonresponders were contacted via telephone to complete the survey. Materials and Methods: This survey was based on a survey conducted in 2004 assessing trauma centers and IPV resources. We modified this survey to collect data on IPV, EAN, and SBCV. Statistical Analysis: Univariate and bivariate statistics were performed using STATA statistical software. Results: We found that 100% of trauma centers now screen for IPV, an improvement from 2004 (P = 0.007. Screening for EAN (70% and SBCV (61% was less common (P < 0.001, and hospitals thought that resources for SBCV in particular were inadequate (P < 0.001 and fewer resources were available for these patients (P = 0.02. However, there was lack of uniformity of screening, tracking, and referral practices for victims of violence throughout the state. Conclusion: The multiplicity of strategies for tracking and referring victims of violence in Illinois makes it difficult to assess screening and tracking or form generalized policy recommendations. This presents an opportunity to improve care delivered to victims of violence by standardizing care and referral protocols.

  1. Health Literacy Based Communication by Illinois Pharmacists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Devraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Health literacy has received attention as an important issue for pharmacists to consider when interacting with patients. Yet, there is little information about methods pharmacists use to communicate with patients and their extent of use of health literacy based interventions during patient interactions. The purpose of this study was to examine methods of communication and types of health literacy based interventions that practicing pharmacists use in Illinois. Methods: A survey instrument addressing the study purpose was designed along with other items that were part of a larger study. Eleven items in the survey referred to pharmacist-patient communication. The instrument was pilot tested before administering to a random sample of 1457 pharmacists from the Illinois Pharmacists Association. Data were primarily collected via a mailed survey using Dillman’s five step total design method (TDM. Two reminder letters were mailed at two week intervals to non-respondents. Results: Usable responses were obtained from 701 respondents (48.1% response rate. Using simple words (96% and asking patients open-ended questions to determine comprehension (85% were the most frequent methods that pharmacists used to communicate with patients. Only 18% of respondents always asked patients to repeat medication instructions to confirm understanding. The various recommended types of health literacy interventions were “always” performed by only 8 to 33% of the respondents. More than 50% of respondents indicated that they rarely or never had access to an interpreter (51%, or employed bilingual pharmacists (59%. Only 11% of pharmacists said that they rarely/never pay attention to nonverbal cues that may suggest low health literacy. Conclusions: Pharmacists infrequently use action oriented health literacy interventions such as using visual aids, having interpreter access, medication calendars, etc. Additional training on health literacy, its scope, and

  2. A sedimentological analysis of sediments corresponding to the San Gregorio Formation )Lower Permian), located in the eastern border of the North Uruguayan Basin, Sierra Guazunambi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goso Aguilar, C.; Gama, E.

    1998-01-01

    A sedimentological analysis of sediments corresponding to the San Gregorio Formation (Lower Permian), located in the eastern border of the Norte Uruguayan Basin, Sierra Guazunambi, Cerro Largo Departament was made. Facies analysis of about 100 otucrops fand more than 1.300 meters, in an area of 45 square kilometers showed diamictites rhytmites and massive sandstones, formed by gravitational sedimentary flows. Also present are prodelta mudrocks and deltaic front sandstones.(author)

  3. Case history of natural analogue research on sandstone type uranium occurrences, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Y.; Kanai, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Previous fundamental studies on the ore genesis of uranium occurrences chiefly in Cenozoic sandstone formations in Japan, have been re-examined as the case history on natural analogue of radionuclides in high-level radioactive wastes (HLRW). Two principal mode of occurrences have been distinguished among Cenozoic uranium localities in Japan. In the Setouchi (Inland Sea) subregion, hot-spots are found in lacustrine to shallow sea facies of calm environment, corresponding to the first stage of formation of tectonic basins. As observed in Ningyo-toge and Tono area, stratabound ore bodies are generally arranged into paleo-channels. Another type of sporadic uranium indications are found within collapse basins in the 'Green-tuff' subregion, where intense volcanisms and block movements had been taken places throughout Middle miocene age. Well-developed fractures were to be favorable paths for uraniferous groundwater, as well as the suitable site for deposition of uranium. In both cases, the source material of uranium is granitic basement. Under oxidizing environment, uranium anomalies have been occasionally detected in surface- or fracture waters which passing through decomposed granite. In contrast to the behavior of uranium, one of the adequate analogues for mobile nuclides, thorium and REE are relatively immobile even under the same geologic and geochemical circumstances. In ore horizon, where reducing condition has still been kept, geochronological age of tetravalent uranium mineral is in concordance with the age of the host rock. Analysis of structural control shows that the principal factors for uranium concentration are the layout of redox front related to paleo-water tables. 234U/238U disequilibrium method has been proved to be the powerful tool for detecting mobility of uranium in the host rock throughout diagenesis and weathering process. The result of field and laboratory works on this is reported as an example. (author)

  4. Study on geochronology and uranium source of sandstone-type uranium deposit in Dongsheng area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haibin; Xia Yuliang; Tian Shifeng

    2007-01-01

    This paper studied the geochronology of sandstone-type uranium deposit in the Dongsheng area of Ordos Basin. In eastern segment, ages of mineralization at the wing of the ore-roll are found to be 120 ± 5 Ma and 80 ± 5 Ma, and at the front of the ore-roll are 20 ± 2 Ma and 8 ± 1 Ma; While in middle segment, ages of mineralization are 124 ± 6 Ma and 80 ± 5 Ma. This means that the main mineralization in Dongsheng area were formed at early Jurassic and late Cretaceous, and correspondent to the time of structure uplift. Mineralization of roll-front (rich ore) which formed in Miocene and Pliocene may related to tectonic-thermal event taken place at that time and reformed the early mineralization in this area. The isochron line age of sample with uranium grade 0 ) in the sandbody is 24.64 x 10 -6 also shows the uranium pre-concentration in the strata. The even value of ΔU of rocks in Zhiluo formation is -70.2%, this shows that non-mineralized rocks have migrated uranium and acted as important metallogenic uranium sources. (authors)

  5. Geology and recognition criteria for roll-type uranium deposits in continental sandstones. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harshman, E.N.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The study of roll-type deposits during the past 20 years, since the first description of a deposit in the United States, has developed general concepts of ore formation which are accepted widely and are compatible with available data. If this were not the case the concepts would not have endured and could not have been so successfully applied to exploration using the relations of altered-unaltered sandstone. The comparative simplicity of the model, and the ease with which it has been applied to exploration have, oddly enough, probably inhibited detailed studies of ore districts that would have provided data now needed for refinement of ore controls for exploration and resource assessment programs. The most thorough study of a roll-type district was that of the Shirley Basin which is drawn on heavily in this report. The general concept of roll-type formation provides a strong basis for the development of geological observations and guides, or recognition criteria, for resource studies and exploration. Indeed, industry has been developing and using them for 20 years. As the objective of this study was to identify the most useful recognition criteria and develop a method for their systematic use in resource studies and exploration, the study is best summarized by reference to the important geological observations about roll-type deposits

  6. Studies on hydrogeological conditions for mineralization of some sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiming; Li Sen; Xiao Feng; Qi Daneng; Yin Jinshuang

    1996-11-01

    Based on the analysis for regional geology, structural and hydrogeological conditions of Erennaoer Depression, Erlian Basin, the hydrogeological hydraulic zoning was carried out for groundwater in the study area, structural-palaeo-hydrogeological stages and the feature of deep-seated groundwater were studied, and, two important U-mineralization periods were determined. The conditions of recharge, runoff and discharge of groundwater in ore bearing aquifers and the hydraulic mechanism were revealed by isotope hydrology and single-well tracing technique. By study of hydrogeochemistry, it is indicated that both Subeng and Nuheting U-deposit are located at the parts where groundwater characteristics intensely variate, and the ore indicators are determined. Oil and gas transportation and the relationships between groundwater and U-metallogenetic process were discussed by using of organic geochemistry method. It shows that the bleeding of oil and gas is very important for the forming of U-deposits. It is suggested that the interlayered oxidation zone type sandstone U-deposit which is suitable for in-situ leaching could be existed in the Tenggeer formation, Bayanhua group of Lower Cretaceous, accordingly, two prospecting areas are delimited. (4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.)

  7. Discussion on distribution characteristics of calcareous sandstone in Shihongtan uranium deposit and its genesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Huanqiao; Qiao Haiming; Jia Heng; Xu Gaozhong

    2007-01-01

    Based on the observation and statistics on the calcareous sandstone in the ore host layer in Shihongtan uranium deposit, this paper finds that the calcareous sandstone occurs on and off near the top or wash surface of the sandbody as beads-strings lens along the layer and concentrates in the area where the ore bodies are rich. In lithology, the calcareous sandstone is of coarse grain and fairly well sorted. According to the analysis on the lithogeochemical features and the carbon and oxygen isotopes of calcareous sandstones, it is realized that there some genetic relation between the formation of calcareous sandstone and uranium mineralization in the oxidation-deoxidation transitional belt, that is the precipitation and enrichment of uranium is accompanied by the deposition of carbonate and formation of calcareous sandstone. (authors)

  8. Tectonic isolation from regional sediment sourcing of the Paradox Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T. M.; Saylor, J.; Sundell, K. E.; Lapen, T. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Appalachian and Ouachita-Marathon mountain ranges were created by a series of tectonic collisions that occurred through the middle and late Paleozoic along North America's eastern and southern margins, respectively. Previous work employing detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology has demonstrated that fluvial and eolian systems transported Appalachian-derived sediment across the continent to North America's Paleozoic western margin. However, contemporaneous intraplate deformation of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains (ARM) compartmentalized much of the North American western interior and mid-continent. We employ lithofacies characterization, stratigraphic thickness, paleocurrent data, sandstone petrography, and detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology to evaluate source-sink relationships of the Paradox Basin, which is one of the most prominent ARM basins. Evaluation of provenance is conducted through quantitative comparison of detrital zircon U-Pb distributions from basin samples and potential sources via detrital zircon mixture modeling, and is augmented with sandstone petrography. Mixing model results provide a measure of individual source contributions to basin stratigraphy, and are combined with outcrop and subsurface data (e.g., stratigraphic thickness and facies distributions) to create tectonic isolation maps. These maps elucidate drainage networks and the degree to which local versus regional sources influence sediment character within a single basin, or multiple depocenters. Results show that despite the cross-continental ubiquity of Appalachian-derived sediment, fluvial and deltaic systems throughout much of the Paradox Basin do not record their influence. Instead, sediment sourcing from the Uncompahgre Uplift, which has been interpreted to drive tectonic subsidence and formation of the Paradox Basin, completely dominated its sedimentary record. Further, the strong degree of tectonic isolation experienced by the Paradox Basin appears to be an emerging, yet common

  9. Evolution of Xihulitu basin and its control to uranium ore-formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qingyin; Li Ziying; Dong Wenming

    2003-01-01

    There is a close relationship between basin filling succession and evolution of the basin. Characteristics of basin evolution can be studied by analyzing the basin filling succession. Two major periods are recognized according to the filling succession and subsequent alteration of the Xihulitu Basin. Evolutionary characteristics of each stage of the basin formation and alteration have been discussed in details. The types and special distribution of uranium metallization are controlled by the scale, connection degree and distribution of sandstone units and impermeable mudstone beds. The environment of uranium ore-formation became favorable as the faults modified the hydrodynamic condition. The basin had been uplifted for a long time after it was filled. Intergranular pores are not destroyed due to the weak mechanical compaction, which is beneficial to groundwater penetrating. Montmorillonitization and zeolitization in some sandstone units are strong because of the high content of volcanic fragments. The major uranium metallization is the phreatic oxidation type. The northern zone of the second sub-basin in the central section of the basin is regarded as the first perspective target for subsequent exploration. (authors)

  10. Practice Characteristics of Recent Illinois College of Optometry Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailmard, Neil B.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Demographic information regarding mode of practice, income and satisfaction level is provided for 1978-82 graduates of the Illinois College of Optometry. A practice management questionnaire is appended. (Author/MLW)

  11. Franchise Agreements and Clean Energy: Issues in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluates the impact on energy efficiency of municipal franchise agreements that supply electricity or gas service without a direct charge (unbilled energy) for certain municipal government facilities in Illinois.)

  12. Ice Skating Instruction at the University of Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Char; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign conducts a instructional ice skating program for its students and the community. Activities include: a figure skating club; a speed skating club; ice hockey program; and ice skating classes. (CJ)

  13. 77 FR 61595 - Northern Illinois Municipal Power; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-10

    ... Illinois Municipal Power filed its Revised and Superseding Proposed Revenue Requirement for reactive supply... Reference Room in Washington, DC. There is an ``eSubscription'' link on the web site that enables...

  14. Taxation of forest and associated land in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David C. Baumgartner; Ronald I. Beazley

    1979-01-01

    Analyzes the operation and impact of the property tax on forest and associated land in Illinois and evaluates the potential of adjustments in the tax as an incentive to better management of forest and associated land.

  15. Teaching Pharmaceutical Biotechnology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Michael J.; Klegerman, Melvin E.

    1988-01-01

    The Department of Pharmaceutics at the University of Illinois at Chicago has been carrying out research in pharmaceutical biotechnology that has allowed unique student involvement and promises further interdisciplinary research and instructional activities. (MSE)

  16. Cense Explosion Test Program. Report 1. Cense 1. Explosions in Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    series, "Analysis and Summary of CENSE Data." 10 * _ CHAPTER 2 APPROACH 2.1 DESCRIPTION OF TEST SITE An exposed outcrop of Kayenta sandstone with 180...ft/s seismic velocity previously determined (References 12-14) for the unweathered upper zone of the Kayenta sandstone. 16 I The P-wave propagation...Propagation along the horizontal radial was 8400 ft/s. The seismic velocity pre- viously determined for Kayenta sandstone in this area was 7500 ft/s

  17. Oligocene Fluvio-Deltaic Depositional Environments Salin Sub-Basin, Central Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, A.; Hall, R.

    2017-12-01

    A recent increase in accessibility for research in Myanmar has allowed rapid advancements in the understanding of the geology of the country. Evolving depositional environments can be reconstructed in largely unstudied Oligocene deposits of the Salin sub-basin, of the Central Myanmar Basin. Data has been collected through a fieldwork campaign to target well-exposed sediments along the western margin of the basin. The studied outcrops span approximately one hundred kilometres from north to south, and a series of sedimentary logs, palaeocurrent data, 2D panel diagrams, and samples for petrographical analysis have been collected and interpreted. The Oligocene formations studied include the Shwezetaw, Paduang, and Okhmintaung, each of which show a broadly southwards-trending fluvio-deltaic environment of deposition. Towards the north, the lower Rupelian Shwezetaw Formation comprises thick fluviatile sandstones which grade southwards through macrotidal-dominated fluvio-deltaic interbedded siltstones and rare sandstones, into marine sandstones. Overlying this, the upper Rupelian Paduang Formation grades rapidly from rare fluvial sandstones towards the north of the basin into deltaic and marine interbedded sandstones and siltstones to the south. This formation is more marine in nature, suggesting a minor transgression throughout the lower Oligocene. By the time of deposition of the Okhmintaung Formation in the Chattian the observed deposits solely represent a tidally-influenced deltaic depositional environment, with very little temporal variation, suggesting a stable sea level. Despite the relatively unchanging depositional environment, the formations are approximately 4000 m thick, suggesting that sedimentation kept pace with relatively rapid subsidence. This current study, which will combine depositional environment reconstruction, provenance, and sediment routing analysis, will provide important insights into both the tectonic setting and the huge sediment accumulation

  18. Enhancing pavement performance prediction models for the Illinois Tollway System

    OpenAIRE

    Laxmikanth Premkumar; William R. Vavrik

    2016-01-01

    Accurate pavement performance prediction represents an important role in prioritizing future maintenance and rehabilitation needs, and predicting future pavement condition in a pavement management system. The Illinois State Toll Highway Authority (Tollway) with over 2000 lane miles of pavement utilizes the condition rating survey (CRS) methodology to rate pavement performance. Pavement performance models developed in the past for the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) are used by th...

  19. Energy policy options for Illinois. Proceedings. [26 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six papers presented at the Fifth Annual Oil Illinois Energy Conference are categorized into five sections, namely: An overview of U.S. and Illinois Energy Policy; Energy Policy; Conservation--Solar--Biomass and Solid Wastes; Energy Policy; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Energy Policy; Coal and Electric Utilities; and Economic and Consumer Concerns. One paper, A Perspective on Long-Range Nuclear Energy Options, by William O. Harms has previously appeared in EAPA 4: 1364. (MCW)

  20. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary

  1. Water Vapor Diffusion and Adsorption of Sandstones: Influence of Rock Texture and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keppert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The term sandstone is used for wide range of rocks containing quartz clasts which can be cemented by secondary precipitated quartz or calcite; moreover the space between clasts can be filled by matrix. These facts result in existence of numerous rocks having highly various properties. Sandstones have been used as construction materials due to their good accessibility and workability. Since most of sandstones are porous, water vapor can penetrate through sandstone constructions. The rate of water vapor diffusion, as well as the vapor sorption isotherm, was determined for range of sandstone types. The diffusion resistance factor was found to be dependent on the total porosity of sandstone but the sorption behavior was strongly influenced by nature of the particular sandstone; the specific surface area of stone and presence of clay matrix are determining its sorption isotherm. The published data enable estimating (i diffusion resistance factor of a sandstone via knowledge of its total porosity and (ii the sorption isotherm via knowledge of the stone’s nature and specific surface area. This approach can significantly reduce the time necessary to acquire vapor-related properties of a sandstone.

  2. Simulation of channel sandstone architecture in an incised valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frykman, P.; Johannessen, P.; Andsbjerg, J.

    1998-12-31

    The present report describes a geostatistical modelling study that is aimed at reflecting the architecture of the channel sandstones in an incised valley fill. The example used for this study is a part of the Middle Jurassic sandy succession of the Bryne Formation in the Danish central Graben. The succession consists mainly of fluvial sediments in the lower part, overlain by tidal influenced sediments, which again is overlain by shallow marine sediments. The modelling study has been performed on a sequence of incised valley sediments in the upper part of the Bryne Formation overlying fluvial sediments. (au) EFP-96. 19 refs.

  3. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  4. Thermal study of sandstones from different Czech localities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plevová, Eva; Vaculíková, Lenka; Kožušníková, Alena; Daněk, T.; Ritz, M.; Simha Martynková, G.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 3 (2011), s. 835-843 ISSN 1388-6150 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/08/1398; GA ČR GP105/07/P416 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GP105/09/397 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : thermomechanical and differential thermal analysis * optical microscopy * sandstones Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.604, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/71n5427j2707g331/

  5. 78 FR 68903 - Dynegy Inc., Illinois Power Holdings, LLC and Illinois Power Holdings II, LLC-Acquisition of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... and Western Railroad Company and Joppa & Eastern Railroad Company Dynegy Inc. (Dynegy), Illinois Power... Coffeen and Western Railroad Company (CWRC) and the Joppa & Eastern Railroad (JERR), both Class III rail...

  6. Petrophysical characterization of three commercial varieties of miocene sandstones from the Ebro valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisbert, J.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Miocene sandstones studied were used extensively to build Aragon’s architectural heritage, are still used in modern construction. The quarries presently located on the edge of the Ebro Valley depression. The present paper describes an exhaustive petrophysical study of these materials, which while, of the same age and from the same deposition basin, exhibit different mineralogical and textural characteristics and as a result, different physical and mechanical properties and durability. The petrographic and petrophysical characteristics of these materials were evaluated with tests prescribed in UNE (Spanish, NORMAL and ASTM standards. All the results were subjected to statistical analysis to identify possible textural and compositional nonuniformities in the material that may underlie behavioural changes. The results of the present paper show that their petrophysical characteristics afford these sandstones substantial industrial value as construction materials. Durability was found to be longest in the Alcañiz stone, as a result of the geometry of its pore network.Las areniscas miocenas estudiadas han sido y son ampliamente utilizadas en patrimonio histórico y en obra civil moderna, localizándose las canteras actuales en el borde de la depresión del Ebro. Se ha realizado un exhaustivo estudio de las características petrofísicas de estos materiales, que pese a presentar la misma edad y pertenecer a la misma cuenca sedimentaria presentan características mineralógicas y texturales diferentes que les confieren diferentes propiedades físicas, mecánicas y una diferente durabilidad. Las características petrográficas y petrofísicas se han evaluado mediante la realización de ensayos según las normas UNE, NORMAL y ASTM. Para todos los ensayos se ha realizado un tratamiento estadístico de los resultados para evaluar las posibles inhomogeneidades texturales y composicionales presentes en el material y que pueden originar modificaciones en

  7. Modelling of a diffusion-sorption experiment on sandstone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.A.

    1989-11-01

    The results of a diffusion-sorption experiment on a sample of Darley Dale sandstone, using simulated groundwater spiked with a mixture of 125 I, 85 Sr and 137 Cs, are modelled by a one-dimensional porous medium approach in which sorption is described by Freundlich isotherms. The governing equations are solved analytically for the special case of a linear isotherm, and numerically using the computer code RANCHDIFF for non-linear isotherms. A set of time-dependent, ordinary differential equations is obtained using the Lagrange interpolation technique and integrated by Gear's variable order predictor-corrector method. It is shown that the sorption behaviour of 85 Sr can be modelled successfully by a linear isotherm, using a sorption parameter consistent with batch-sorption tests. The behaviour of 137 Cs may be modelled by a non-linear isotherm, but the amount of 137 Cs sorbed is less than that anticipated from batch-sorption tests. 125 I is assumed to be non-sorbing and is used to determine the porosity of the sandstone. (author) 10 figs., 4 tabs., 6 refs

  8. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, Mian Umer; Mahmud, Hisham Khaled Ben; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-01-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H 3 PO 4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid. (paper)

  9. Selected trace and minor elements in sandstones from Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facetti-Masulli, J.F.; Gonzalez, E.; Kump, P.

    2010-01-01

    Selected trace and minor elements analyzed by XRF in sandstone samples were Rb-Sr-Zr-Nb-Ba-La-Ce-Nd as well as Ti-Mn-Fe with which they are often correlated. Refractory elements like REE are considered useful indicators of geochemical processes and, in this case, of provenance. Usually they maintain their original relationships and are transferred almost directly into sediments. The values here found, absolute and normalized, show correlations among the samples, allowing the establishment of their origin. Most of them in the spidergram patterns display positive spikes of Zr, and negative anomalies at Nb, Sr, Ti: differences in their height/depth could be in relation with the different Series or Formations. Strikingly, spidergrams of samples collected from the Patino Formation show marked negative anomalies interalia of Ba, as well as positive spikes of Nb and Zr, very similar to those found in magmatic specimens from Misiones, Carapegua-Acahay and Alto Paraguay Province and quite different from the other analyzed samples. In addition a remarkable presence of Precambrian signatures were found in the analyzed sandstones from the Paleozoic. (orig.)

  10. Selected trace and minor elements in sandstones from Paraguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facetti-Masulli, J.F.; Gonzalez, E. [Hydroconsult SRL, Asuncion (Paraguay); Kump, P. [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-07-01

    Selected trace and minor elements analyzed by XRF in sandstone samples were Rb-Sr-Zr-Nb-Ba-La-Ce-Nd as well as Ti-Mn-Fe with which they are often correlated. Refractory elements like REE are considered useful indicators of geochemical processes and, in this case, of provenance. Usually they maintain their original relationships and are transferred almost directly into sediments. The values here found, absolute and normalized, show correlations among the samples, allowing the establishment of their origin. Most of them in the spidergram patterns display positive spikes of Zr, and negative anomalies at Nb, Sr, Ti: differences in their height/depth could be in relation with the different Series or Formations. Strikingly, spidergrams of samples collected from the Patino Formation show marked negative anomalies interalia of Ba, as well as positive spikes of Nb and Zr, very similar to those found in magmatic specimens from Misiones, Carapegua-Acahay and Alto Paraguay Province and quite different from the other analyzed samples. In addition a remarkable presence of Precambrian signatures were found in the analyzed sandstones from the Paleozoic. (orig.)

  11. Clay minerals in sandstone uranium deposits: radwaste applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Clay minerals play an important role in the genesis of uranium deposits in sandstones. They incorporate the rate earths (REE), U, Sb, Th, Cs, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and even small amounts of chalcophiles. These minerals possess analog elements for many of the radwaste fission products as well as actinides and some actinide daughters. In sandstone uranium deposits, clay minerals are also associated with sulfide minerals, usually pyrite, and organic carbonaceous matter. The primary clay minerals are usually smectites, illites, chlorites and mixed layer varieties. The integrity of these clay minerals is demonstrated by their retention of formational-mineralization ages determined by Rb-Sr geochronologic investigation of the Grants Mineral Belt of the United States. The importance of the clay minerals as analog for parts of the multi-barrier concept in radwaste disposal is their ability to impede water penetration into - and movement of key elements out of uranium rich zones. The clay minerals further sorb and in other ways incorporate into their structures many fission products and actinide analogs from man-made nuclear wastes. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. Measuring the zeta potential. The relationships with sandstone fineness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luxán, M. P.

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of the zeta potential technique in the area of construction materials and Portland cement is quite recent. The initial research work involved the study of cement suspensions or suspensions of one of the components of cement, such as alite, tricalcium alumínate, in the presence of additives and, more specifically, superplasticizers. The studies of this sort were extended with the mixing of active additions into cement (fly ashes, etc.. The present study discusses the application of siliceous materials (sandstone as a basis of the research into the behaviour of sandstone mortars containing repair products.

    La aplicación de la técnica del potencial zeta en el campo de los materiales de construcción y del cemento portland es muy reciente. Las primeras investigaciones se refieren al estudio de suspensiones de cemento o de alguno de sus compuestos que lo forman como alita, aluminato tricálcico, en presencia de aditivos y, más concretamente, de superfluidificantes. Con la incorporación de adiciones activas al cemento (cenizas volantes,... se amplían los estudios de este tipo de cementos. En este trabajo se considera la aplicación a los materiales silíceos (arenisca como base para la investigación del comportamiento de los morteros de arenisca conteniendo productos de reparación.

  13. Pore network properties of sandstones in a fault damage zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossennec, Claire; Géraud, Yves; Moretti, Isabelle; Mattioni, Luca; Stemmelen, Didier

    2018-05-01

    The understanding of fluid flow in faulted sandstones is based on a wide range of techniques. These depend on the multi-method determination of petrological and structural features, porous network properties and both spatial and temporal variations and interactions of these features. The question of the multi-parameter analysis on fluid flow controlling properties is addressed for an outcrop damage zone in the hanging wall of a normal fault zone on the western border of the Upper Rhine Graben, affecting the Buntsandstein Group (Early Triassic). Diagenetic processes may alter the original pore type and geometry in fractured and faulted sandstones. Therefore, these may control the ultimate porosity and permeability of the damage zone. The classical model of evolution of hydraulic properties with distance from the major fault core is nuanced here. The hydraulic behavior of the rock media is better described by a pluri-scale model including: 1) The grain scale, where the hydraulic properties are controlled by sedimentary features, the distance from the fracture, and the impact of diagenetic processes. These result in the ultimate porous network characteristics observed. 2) A larger scale, where the structural position and characteristics (density, connectivity) of the fracture corridors are strongly correlated with both geo-mechanical and hydraulic properties within the damage zone.

  14. Gondwana sedimentation in the Chintalapudi sub-basin, Godavari Valley, Andhra Pradesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, G. [Geological Survey of India, Calcutta (India). Division of Monitoring

    1995-10-01

    A 3000 m thick Gondwana lithic fill consisting of multifacies associations were preserved in a NW-SE oriented intracratonic Chintalapudi sub-basin set across the Eastern Chat Complex (EGC). Sedimentation commenced with the deposition of diamictite-rhythmite sequence of the Talchir Formation in glacio-lacustrine environment. The succeeding sandstone-coal cyclothems of the Barakar Formation were formed in fluvial-coal swamps complex. The fluvial streams flowed across the EGC, originating somewhere in the southeast beyond the East Coast of India. Phase wise upliftment of the EGC during Mesozoic imparted changes to the Permian intercontinental drainage system which started supplying increased amount of detritus to the basin. Basin marginal faults were first formed at the beginning of Triassic. Alluvial fans originated in the east and southeast and northwesterly flowing braided streams deposited the conglomerate sandstone sequence of the Kamthi Formation. The Early Jurassic uplift of the Mailaram high in the north imparted westerly shift to the braided rivers during the Kota sedimentation. Due to prominence of Kamavarapukota ridge in the south by Early Cretaceous, the drainage pattern became centripetal and short-lived high sinuous rivers debouched into the basin. The silting up of the Chintalapudi sub-basin with the sandstone-claystone sequence of the Gangapur Formation marks the culmination of the Gondwana sedimentation, perhaps, coinciding with the breakup of India from the Gondwanaland.

  15. Evolution of tertiary intermontane fluvial system of Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, R.M.; Ethridge, F.G.

    1985-01-01

    Exploration and development of economic coal and uranium deposits of the Tertiary Fort Union and Wasatch Formations provided data related to the evolution of depositional systems in the Powder River Basin. In ascending order, the Paleocene Fort Union Formation consists of the Tullock, Lebo, and Tongue River Members. The overlying Eocene Wasatch Formation consists of the conglomeratic Kingsbury and Moncrief Members and laterally equivalent finer grained deposits. Evolution of fluvial deposition in the basin was determined from sandstone percent maps. A high proportion of sandstones in the Tullock Member and combined Tongue River Member and Wasatch Formation formed in interconnected east-west and north-south belts. The east-west belts represent alluvial fans, as well as braided and meandering tributary streams. The north-south belts reflect meandering and anastomosing trunk streams fed by basin margin tributaries. The sandstones of the Lebo Shale show east-west trends and represent deposits of fluvio-deltaic systems that filled a western, closed-lacustrine basin. The lake in this basin may have formed during localized subsidence along the Buffalo deep fault. These contrasting styles of fluvial deposition were largely controlled by extrabasinal and intrabasinal tectonics associated with Laramide orogeny

  16. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area

  17. Analysis of Eocene depositional environments - Preliminary TM and TIMS results, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Richard K.; Krishtalka, Leonard; Redline, Andrew D.; Lang, Harold R.

    1987-01-01

    Both Landsat TM and aircraft Thermal IR Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data have been used to map the lithofacies of the Wind River Basin's Eocene physical and biological environments. Preliminary analyses of these data have furnished maps of a fault contact boundary and a complex network of fluvial ribbon channel sandstones. The synoptic view thereby emerging for Eocene fluvial facies clarifies the relationships of ribbon channel sandstones to fossil-bearing overbank/floodplain facies and certain peleosols. The utility of TM and TIMS data is thereby demonstrated.

  18. Facies architecture of basin-margin units in time and space: Lower to Middle Miocene Sivas Basin, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çiner, A.; Kosun, E.

    2003-04-01

    The Miocene Sivas Basin is located within a collision zone, forming one of the largest basins in Central Turkey that developed unconformably on a foundered Paleozoic-Mesozoic basement and Eocene-Oligocene deposits. The time and space relationships of sedimentary environments and depositional evolution of Lower to Middle Miocene rocks exposed between Zara and Hafik towns is studied. A 4 km thick continuous section is subdivided into the Agilkaya and Egribucak Formations. Each formation shows an overall fining upward trend and contains three members. Although a complete section is present at the western part (near Hafik) of the basin, to the east the uppermost two members (near Zara) are absent. The lower members of both formations are composed of fluvial sheet-sandstone and red mudstone that migrate laterally on a flood basin within a semi-arid fan system. In the Agilkaya Formation that crops out near Zara, alluvial fans composed of red-pink volcanic pebbles are also present. The middle members are composed of bedded to massive gypsum and red-green mudstone of a coastal and/or continental sabkha environment. While the massive gypsum beds reach several 10’s of m in Hafik area, near Zara, they are only few m thick and alternate with green mudstones. In Hafik, bedded gypsums are intercalated with lagoonal dolomitic limestone and bituminous shale in the Agilkaya Formation and with fluvial red-pink sandstone-red mudstone in the Egribucak Formation. The upper members are made up of fossiliferous mudstone and discontinuous sandy limestone beds with gutter casts, HCS, and 3-D ripples. They indicate storm-induced sedimentation in a shallow marine setting. The disorganized accumulations of ostreid and cerithiid shells, interpreted as coquina bars, are the products of storm generated reworking processes in brackish environments. Rapid vertical and horizontal facies changes and the facies associations in both formations reflect the locally subsiding nature of this molassic

  19. Energy Impact Illinois - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Daniel [Senior Energy Efficiency Planner; Plagman, Emily [Senior Energy Planner; Silberhorn, Joey-Lin [Energy Efficiency Program Assistant

    2014-02-18

    Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) is an alliance of government organizations, nonprofits, and regional utility companies led by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) that is dedicated to helping communities in the Chicago metropolitan area become more energy efficient. Originally organized as the Chicago Region Retrofit Ramp-Up (CR3), EI2 became part of the nationwide Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) in May 2010 after receiving a $25 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) authorized through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The program’s primary goal was to fund initiatives that mitigate barriers to energy efficiency retrofitting activities across residential, multifamily, and commercial building sectors in the seven-county CMAP region and to help to build a sustainable energy efficiency marketplace. The EI2 Final Technical Report provides a detailed review of the strategies, implementation methods, challenges, lessons learned, and final results of the EI2 program during the initial grant period from 2010-2013. During the program period, EI2 successfully increased direct retrofit activity in the region and was able to make a broader impact on the energy efficiency market in the Chicago region. As the period of performance for the initial grant comes to an end, EI2’s legacy raises the bar for the region in terms of helping homeowners and building owners to take action on the continually complex issue of energy efficiency.

  20. Sedimentology and Reservoir Characteristics of Early Cretaceous Fluvio-Deltaic and Lacustrine Deposits, Upper Abu Gabra Formation, Sufyan Sub-basin, Muglad Rift Basin, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Mohamed; Abdullatif, Osman; Hariri, Mustafa

    2017-04-01

    Sufyan Sub-basin is an East-West trending Sub-basin located in the northwestern part of the Muglad Basin (Sudan), in the eastern extension of the West and Central Africa Rift System (WCARS). The Early Cretaceous Abu Gabra Formation considered as the main source rock in the Muglad Basin. In Sufyan Sub-basin the Early Cretaceous Upper Abu Gabra Formation is the main oil-producing reservoir. It is dominated by sandstone and shales deposited in fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine environment during the first rift cycle in the basin. Depositional and post-depositional processes highly influenced the reservoir quality and architecture. This study investigates different scales of reservoir heterogeneities from macro to micro scale. Subsurface facies analysis was analyzed based on the description of six conventional cores from two wells. Approaches include well log analysis, thin sections and scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations, grain-size, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the Abu Gabra sandstone. The cores and well logs analyses revealed six lithofacies representing fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine depositional environment. The sandstone is medium to coarse-grained, poorly to moderately sorted and sub-angular to subrounded, Sub-feldspathic arenite to quartz arenite. On macro-scale, reservoir quality varies within Abu Gabra reservoir where it shows progressive coarsening upward tendencies with different degrees of connectivity. The upper part of the reservoir showed well connected and amalgamated sandstone bodies, the middle to lower parts, however, have moderate to low sandstone bodies' connectivity and amalgamation. On micro-scale, sandstone reservoir quality is directly affected by textures and diagenesis.The XRD and SEM analyses show that kaolinite and chlorite clay are the common clay minerals in the studied samples. Clay matrix and quartz overgrowth have significantly reduced the reservoir porosity and permeability, while the dissolution of feldspars

  1. Different effects of temperature and salinity on permeability reduction by fines migration in Berea sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus; Riis, Jacob Fabricius

    2015-01-01

    Hot water injection into geothermal aquifers is considered in order to store energy seasonally. Berea sandstone is often used as a reference formation to study mechanisms that affect permeability in reservoir sandstones. Both heating of the pore fluid and reduction of the pore fluid salinity can...

  2. The sandstone's chromatic alteration of the florentine cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettori, S.; Pecchioni, E.; Cantisani, E.; Ricci, M.; Fratini, F.; Garzonio, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    Pietra Serena is one of the materials more used in Florentine architecture. It is a sandstone that outcrops in the hills north of the city in the municipality of Fiesole and it has been employed mainly for ornamental purposes. This litotype belongs to the the Macigno Formation (Oligocene Upper- Miocene Lower) which consists of beds of turbiditic sandstones separated by pelitic levels which are the finest components of each single turbidity layer. Petrographically, Pietra Serena can be defined as a medium-coarse-grained greywacke made of quartz, feldspars, micas, fragments of metamorphic and magmatic rocks. The clayey matrix is quite abundant, mainly composed by illite, kaolinite and chlorite-vermiculite (present only in some quarries). It is well known that the processes of decay of the sandstones are related to the type of matrix, the amount of cement, the kind of clay minerals and to the pore size distribution, which lead to water infiltrations, swelling of the clay minerals, separation of the clayey matrix, with resulting exfoliation and peeling of the stone artefacts. Pietra Serena has a bluish-grey colour in fresh cut, but many times it is easily oxidized acquiring an ochraceous-reddish brown colour on buildings. Such changes in colour, appear to be due in part to the oxidation of iron, proceeding very quickly from the surface to the inside, though the cohesion is not affected. It is possible to hypothesize that the chromatic changes not necessarily involve a progressive state of alteration of the artefact, but they may often to represents a natural patina acquired with the time. Nevertheless it is necessary to remember that the oxidized layer and its hardness could also be the result of treatments performed in the past. In Florence, several monuments and buildings are affected by such phenomenon, in particular it is possible to note an intense and diffuse reddish colouring on the Pietra Serena utilized for columns and for façade's decorations. In this work

  3. Elementary analysis on the main factors affecting the permeability of sandstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Binli

    2006-01-01

    Researches show that in the early stage of sandstone diagenesis, compaction, pressure solution, cementation and replacement reduce both the porosity and the permeability. The cementation of authigenic kaolinite may preserve the tiny intergranular pore-space, and slightly influence the porosity, and even increase the permeability. During the middle to late stage of diagenesis, the organic matter becomes matured, hydrocarbon and acidic water are produced, which forms secondary porosity by the dissolution and the corrosion, and greatly increases the permeability of sandstones and provides a favorable prerequisite for the formation of sandstone-type uranium deposits. The interlayered oxidation alteration, oil-gas reduction and low-temperature hydrothermal alteration also produce secondary porosity in epigenetic reforming stage, which finally decides the permeability after the formation of sandstone-type uranium deposits. This is an important condition for in-situ leaching of sandstone-type uranium deposit. (authors)

  4. Geochemistry of Precambrian sedimentary rocks used to solve stratigraphical problems: An example from the Neoproterozoic Volta basin, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsbeek, F.; Frei, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Volta basin of Ghana (not, vert, similar115,000 km2; depth up to 5–7 km) consists of flat-lying sedimentary rocks, mainly sandstones that unconformably overlie the crystalline basement of the West-African craton. The stratigraphical column has been subdivided into three main...... and Obosum Groups is used to solve one of the outstanding controversies regarding the stratigraphy of the Volta basin....

  5. Illinois perspective on low level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etchison, D.

    1984-01-01

    Illinois is a big generator of low level radioactive waste. It has had extensive experience with controversial waste disposal and storage facilities. This experience makes it difficult for the public and political leaders in Illinois to support the establishment of new disposal facilities in the state. Yet, with extensive debates and discussions concerning the Low Level Waste Policy Act of 1980 and the proposed Midwest Compact, political leaders and the public are facing up to the fact that they must be responsible for the disposal of the low level radioactive waste generated in the state. The Governor and many political leaders from Illinois support the regional approach and believe it can be an innovative and progressive way for the state to deal with the range of low level waste management and disposal problems. A version of the Midwest Interstate Low Level Waste Compact has become Illinois law, but it has significant differences from the one adopted by five other states. Like other states in the midwest and northeast, Illinois is opposed to Congressional consent of the four pending compacts before the remaining two compacts, the northeast and midwest are sent to Washington and interregional agreements are negotiated between the sited and non-sited regions. A new national system must be established before access to existing commercial disposal becomes restricted

  6. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Illinois. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Illinois.

  7. Benefits of a horizontal well in sandstone waterflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, K.L.

    1992-01-01

    This is a case study which describes the planning and results of a horizontal well in a shallow Wilcox sandstone waterflood unit in central Louisiana. The Tremont H-13-1 was OXY USA Inc.'s first horizontal well. Analysis will include examination of the selection criteria, planning, execution, completion, and production. A variety of well and field data is presented and reviewed to access the value of this information as it applies towards other applications. The Cruse Waterflood Unit is a 2100 ft. Wilcox formation in central Louisiana. Production improvements have been 500% or greater for the horizontal well versus adjacent vertical wells. The horizontal well paid out in less than 4 months Results from this well indicate that not only was this project an economic success, but that other fields will similar conditions can be produced in a more profitable manner with horizontal wells

  8. Ground-water levels in aquifers used for residential supply, Campton Township, Kane County, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robert T.; Kraske, Kurt A.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Campton Township Board of Trustees, measured water levels in the aquifers used for residential supply in Campton Township, Kane County, Illinois. Aquifers used for residential supply are the shallow and deep aquifers in the glacial drift, composed of unconsolidated sand and gravels; the Alexandrian-Maquoketa aquifer, composed of dolomite and shale of the Alexandrian Series and the Maquoketa Group; the Galena-Platteville aquifer, composed of dolomite of the Platteville and Galena Groups; and the Ancell aquifer, composed of sandstones of the Glenwood Formation and the St. Peter Sanstone. Water-level altitudes in the shallow drift aquifers generally follow surface topography. Analysis of water-level data does not clearly indicate overutilization of these aquifers. Water-level altitudes in the deep drift aquifers decrease from west to east. Comparison of historical depth to water measurements with current (1995) measurements indicates large decreases in water levels in some areas. The deep drift aquifers may be overutilized at these locations. Water-level altitudes in the Alexandrian-Maquoketa aquifer generally decrease from west to east. The potentiometric surface of the aquifer follows the bedrock-surface topography in some locations. Localized low water-level altitudes and large decreases in water levels indicate the Alexandrian-Maquoketa aquifer is overutilized in several areas. Water-level altitudes in the wells finished in the Galena- Platteville aquifer vary by more than 300 feet. Large decreases in water levels in wells finished in the Galena-Platteville aquifer indicate the Galena-Platteville and Alexandrian-Maquoketa aquifers are overutilized in the northern part of the township. Water-level altitudes in the wells finished in the Ancell aquifer are also highly variable. There is no indication that the Ancell aquifer is overutilized.

  9. Summary of Hydrologic Data for the Tuscarawas River Basin, Ohio, with an Annotated Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefner, Ralph J.; Simonson, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    The Tuscarawas River Basin drains approximately 2,600 square miles in eastern Ohio and is home to 600,000 residents that rely on the water resources of the basin. This report summarizes the hydrologic conditions in the basin, describes over 400 publications related to the many factors that affect the groundwater and surface-water resources, and presents new water-quality information and a new water-level map designed to provide decisionmakers with information to assist in future data-collection efforts and land-use decisions. The Tuscarawas River is 130 miles long, and the drainage basin includes four major tributary basins and seven man-made reservoirs designed primarily for flood control. The basin lies within two physiographic provinces-the Glaciated Appalachian Plateaus to the north and the unglaciated Allegheny Plateaus to the south. Topography, soil types, surficial geology, and the overall hydrology of the basin were strongly affected by glaciation, which covered the northern one-third of the basin over 10,000 years ago. Within the glaciated region, unconsolidated glacial deposits, which are predominantly clay-rich till, overlie gently sloping Pennsylvanian-age sandstone, limestone, coal, and shale bedrock. Stream valleys throughout the basin are filled with sands and gravels derived from glacial outwash and alluvial processes. The southern two-thirds of the basin is characterized by similar bedrock units; however, till is absent and topographic relief is greater. The primary aquifers are sand- and gravel-filled valleys and sandstone bedrock. These sands and gravels are part of a complex system of aquifers that may exceed 400 feet in thickness and fill glacially incised valleys. Sand and gravel aquifers in this basin are capable of supporting sustained well yields exceeding 1,000 gallons per minute. Underlying sandstones within 300 feet of the surface also provide substantial quantities of water, with typical well yields of up to 100 gallons per minute

  10. Depositional sequence stratigraphy and architecture of the cretaceous ferron sandstone: Implications for coal and coalbed methane resources - A field excursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, J.R.; Van Den, Bergh; Barker, C.E.; Tabet, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    of depositional parasequence sets in both near-marine and non-marine parts of fluvial-deltaic depositional sequences. Ongoing field studies, based on this concept of coal zone stratigraphy, and detailed stratigraphic mapping, have documented the existence of at least 12 parasequence sets within the Last Chance delta clastic wedge. These parasequence sets appear to form four high frequency, 4th-order depositional sequences. The dramatic erosional unconformities, associated with these 4th-order sequence boundaries, indicate that there was up to 20-30 m of erosion, signifying locally substantial base-level drops. These base-level drops were accompanied by a basin ward shift in paleo-shorelines by as much as 5-7 km. These 4th-order Upper Ferron Sequences are superimposed on the 3rd-order sea-level rise event and the 3rd-order, sediment supply/accommodation space driven, stratigraphie architecture of the Upper Ferron Sandstone. The fluvial deltaic architecture shows little response to these 4th-order sea-level events. Coal zones generally thicken landward relative to the mean position of the landward pinch-out of the underlying parasequence set, but after some distance landward, they decrease in thickness. Coal zones also generally thin seaward relative to the mean position of the landward pinch-out of the underlying parasequence set. The coal is thickest in the region between this landward pinch-out and the position of maximum zone thickness. Data indicate that the proportion of coal in the coal zone decreases progressively landward from the landward pinch-out. The effects of differential compaction and differences in original pre-peat swamp topography have the effect of adding perturbations to the general trends. These coal zone systematics have major impact on approaches to exploration and production, and the resource accessment of both coal and coalbed methane.

  11. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  12. Some problems on target-area selection for searching interstratified infiltration sandstone-type uranium deposits suitable to in-situ leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Shaokang

    2005-01-01

    The sandstone-type uranium deposits are widely distributed in the world, but only 3 regions where deposits reach uranium province size and are suitable for in-situ leaching have been found. Deposits are all of the interstratified-oxidation type, and developed at the combination sites of the most recent orogenic belt with young or old platforms in form of 'branching, inclining and disappearing' of the former. Geomorphologically, these regions consist of 3 big 'steps' from high mountain regions through lower mountains or hills to the margins of the basin, which are in form of declining slope and form a good hydrodynamic conditions. Climatically, an arid climate was always required for the period of sandstone-type uranium ore formation, while annual evaporation is higher than the annual precipitation, the high mountain regions with high potential energy of water melted from glacier and snow which is thought to be a long-term and steady underground water supplier for lower mountains or hill regions and the margins of the basin. However, in orogenic belt there is a good number of inter-mountain basins with at least two big 'steps' indicating a good potential to discover interstratified-oxidation sandstone-type uranium deposits in coal-bearing basins. Many Chinese and foreign uranium geologists have noticed that there is an east-west oriented Hercynian uranium mineralization belt lying across the middle of Europe, the eastern section is superimposed on the Ural-Tianshan-Mongolian mobile belt and together with the latter it was infected by the Alpine-Himalayan movement in Meso-Cenozoic. This resulted in a complicated metallogenic scene with different ore-forming times, multiple types of deposits, and spatial concentration. In addition, a sub-meridional-oriented 'Vebris belt' running through the eastern part of Asia is considered as combination part of the Central Asian mobile belt with the Western Pacific mobile belt which reflects inhomogeneity in crustal construction of

  13. 75 FR 64951 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Illinois; Voluntary Nitrogen Oxides Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    ...: I. What action is EPA taking? II. Did anyone comment on the proposed disapproval of the state's SIP... Illinois' 35 Illinois Administrative Code (IAC), part 217, subpart X (the Subpart X rule). II. Did anyone.... Together, these problems led us to propose disapproval of the Subpart X rule as a revision to the Illinois...

  14. Fiscal Year 2006 Salary Report for the Illinois Public Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Community College Board, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Data about compensation received by employees in Illinois' 48 Illinois public community colleges are gathered by the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB). Data in the Fiscal Year 2006 Salary Report reflect the census date of October 1, 2005. Data are presented by peer groups with statewide totals. Most of the 25 tables in this report contain…

  15. Danger! Automation at Work; Report of the State of Illinois Commission on Automation and Technological Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, William

    The 74th Illinois General Assembly created the Illinois Commission on Automation and Technological Progress to study and analyze the economic and social effects of automation and other technological changes on industry, commerce, agriculture, education, manpower, and society in Illinois. Commission members visited industrial plants and business…

  16. 75 FR 18193 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Motions To Intervene and... No.: 12626-002. c. Date filed: March 31, 2009. d. Applicant: Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC. e... Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791(a)-825(r). h. Applicant Contact: Damon Zdunich, Northern Illinois Hydropower...

  17. 75 FR 62516 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Ready for Environmental Analysis and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Ready for Environmental Analysis and Soliciting Comments...: Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC. e. Name of Project: Dresden Island Project. f. Location: U.S. Army Corps... Zdunich, Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC, 801 Oakland Avenue, Joliet, IL 60435, (312) 320-1610. i. FERC...

  18. Paleogene Vertebrate Paleontology, Geology and Remote Sensing in the Wind River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, R. K.; Krishtalka, L.

    1985-01-01

    Biostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic studies were used to correlate different events in the geologic evolution of the northeastern part of the Wind River Basin and have suggested several conclusions. Laterally equivalent exposures of the Lysite member from Cedar Ridge to Bridger Creek show a gradation in lithology from interbedded boulder conglomerates and sandstones to interbedded lenticular sandstones and mudstones to interbedded carbonaceous shales, coals and tabular sandstones. This gradation suggests a shift from alluvial fan to braided stream to paludal or lacustrine sedimentary environments during the late early Eocene. The Lysite and Lost Cabin members of the Wind River Formation are in fault contact in the Bridger Creek area and may intertongue to the east along Cedar Ridge. Ways in which remote sensing could be used in these studies are discussed.

  19. Study on fine geological modelling of the fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oilfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhoa Han-Qing [Daqing Research Institute, Helongjiang (China)

    1997-08-01

    These paper aims at developing a method for fine reservoir description in maturing oilfields by using close spaced well logging data. The main productive reservoirs in Daqing oilfield is a set of large fluvial-deltaic deposits in the Songliao Lake Basin, characterized by multi-layers and serious heterogeneities. Various fluvial channel sandstone reservoirs cover a fairly important proportion of reserves. After a long period of water flooding, most of them have turned into high water cut layers, but there are considerable residual reserves within them, which are difficult to find and tap. Making fine reservoir description and developing sound a geological model is essential for tapping residual oil and enhancing oil recovery. The principal reason for relative lower precision of predicting model developed by using geostatistics is incomplete recognition of complex distribution of fluvial reservoirs and their internal architecture`s. Tasking advantage of limited outcrop data from other regions (suppose no outcrop data available in oilfield) can only provide the knowledge of subtle changing of reservoir parameters and internal architecture. For the specific geometry distribution and internal architecture of subsurface reservoirs (such as in produced regions) can be gained only from continuous infilling logging well data available from studied areas. For developing a geological model, we think the first important thing is to characterize sandbodies geometries and their general architecture`s, which are the framework of models, and then the slight changing of interwell parameters and internal architecture`s, which are the contents and cells of the model. An excellent model should possess both of them, but the geometry is the key to model, because it controls the contents and cells distribution within a model.

  20. Metallogenetic prospecting in 1:2,000,000 scale for in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhengbang; Qin Mingkuan; Zhao Ruiquan; Dong Wenming; Li Tiangang; Zheng Dayu; Li Sen; Lin Shuangxing

    2002-01-01

    By introducing the advanced theory and technology of systematic geo-mapping which is popularized in Central-Asian countries, the project is aimed at metallogenic prospecting in 1:2,000,000 scale for in-situ leachable sandstone type uranium deposits in Xinjiang and its adjacent area. Based on the comprehensive understanding of accumulated data and on the field study in both the work area and the abroad nearby, the authors propose creatively a new concept that the uranium mineralization in the area is controlled by the moderate tectonic movements during the last large-scale orogenic movement, and set up a new epi-genetically metallogenic system of Meso-Cenozoic depositional basins. Furthermore, the temporal-spatial evolution of the ore-controlled Himalaya orogenic movement is brought to light, and a new method to reconstruct the palaeo-tectonic and palaeo-hydrodynamic systems is created. Accordingly, the main differences in metallogenic conditions and prospecting evaluation between the work area and the Central-Asian areas are illustrated, and the favorable and unfavorable influences of the reduction by the exudative oil and gas on the sandstone type uranium mineralization in the work area are explained in detail. Finally, on the basis of compiling the systematic geo-maps and summarizing the assessment criteria, 2 metallogenic provinces and 12 prospecting areas are predicted. This conclusion can provide a scientific foundation for strategic plans to be made by leading groups and other branches. Another achievement of the project is that a guidebook of the systematic geo-mapping theory and technology has been compiled, which is beneficial to the spreading of the method

  1. Geology of the Pennsylvanian and Permian Culter Group and Permian Kaibab Limestone in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    The Cutler Formation is composed of thick, arkosic, alluvial sandstones shed southwestward from the Uncompahgre highlands into the Paradox Basin. Salt tectonism played an important role in deposition of the Cutler in some areas. In the northeast part of the basin, more than 8,000 ft, and as much as 15,000 ft, of arkose was trapped between rising salt anticlines - this arkose is thin to absent over the crests of some anticlines. In the western and southern parts of the basin, the Cutler is recognized as a Group consisting of, in ascending order: the lower Cutler beds, Cedar Mesa Sandstone, Organ Rock Formation, White Rim Sandstone, and De Chelly Sandstone. The aggregate thickness of these formations is less than 2,000 ft. The formations of the Cutler Group were deposited in a complex system of alluvial, eolian, and marine environments characterized by abrupt vertical and lateral lithologic changes. The basal Cutler is Pennsylvanian in age, but the bulk of the Group was deposited during the Permian. The Cutler is conformably underlain by the Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group across most of the basin. It is overlain unconformably by the Permian Kaibab Limestone in the western part of the Paradox Basin. The Cutler or Kaibab are overlain unconformably by the Triassic Moenkopi or Chinle Formations.

  2. Diagenetic controls on porosity variations within an aeolian sandstone reservoir, borehole Kudu 9A-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marot, J.E.B.

    1990-01-01

    Three boreholes, Kudu 9A-1, 9A-2 and 9A-3, were drilled approximately 125 km west of the Orange River mouth to test a gas-bearing structure of Barremian age. The reservoir interval comprises an upper unit of interbedded shallow marine sandstones, limestones and volcaniclastic mass flow deposits, and a lower non-marine unit of interbedded aeolian sandstones, basaltic lavas and volcaniclastic deposits. Despite the overall good poroperm characteristics of the aeolian sandstone and its apparent mineralogical homogeneity, as implied by a gamma ray trace, the core analysis results show an extreme variation in porosity and permeability values. In order to assist in reservoir quality prediction and to assess the regional prospectivity of the sandstone, it was necessary to explain these variations. The resuls of the study indicate that compositionally and texturally the sandstones are extremely homogeneous. It is concluded that the marked variation in the poroperm characteristics of the aeolian sandstones is a result of a relatively complex diagenesis. A fluctuating water table resulted in the formation of a pattern of calcite, anhydrite and quartz cements within an aeolian dune sandstone. 7 refs., 1 fig

  3. Effects of Pisha sandstone content on solute transport in a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Qing; Zheng, Jiyong; He, Honghua; Han, Fengpeng; Zhang, Xingchang

    2016-02-01

    In sandy soil, water, nutrients and even pollutants are easily leaching to deeper layers. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of Pisha sandstone on soil solute transport in a sandy soil. The miscible displacement technique was used to obtain breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Br(-) as an inert non-adsorbed tracer and Na(+) as an adsorbed tracer. The incorporation of Pisha sandstone into sandy soil was able to prevent the early breakthrough of both tracers by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity compared to the controlled sandy soil column, and the impeding effects increased with Pisha sandstone content. The BTCs of Br(-) were accurately described by both the convection-dispersion equation (CDE) and the two-region model (T-R), and the T-R model fitted the experimental data slightly better than the CDE. The two-site nonequilibrium model (T-S) accurately fit the Na(+) transport data. Pisha sandstone impeded the breakthrough of Na(+) not only by decreasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity but also by increasing the adsorption capacity of the soil. The measured CEC values of Pisha sandstone were up to 11 times larger than those of the sandy soil. The retardation factors (R) determined by the T-S model increased with increasing Pisha sandstone content, and the partition coefficient (K(d)) showed a similar trend to R. According to the results of this study, Pisha sandstone can successfully impede solute transport in a sandy soil column. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Hydrology of and Current Monitoring Issues for the Chicago Area Waterway System, Northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, James J.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2015-10-28

    The Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) consists of a combination of natural and manmade channels that form an interconnected navigable waterway of approximately 90-plus miles in the metropolitan Chicago area of northeastern Illinois. The CAWS serves the area as the primary drainage feature, a waterway transportation corridor, and recreational waterbody. The CAWS was constructed by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). Completion of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (initial portion of the CAWS) in 1900 breached a low drainage divide and resulted in a diversion of water from the Lake Michigan Basin. A U.S. Supreme Court decree (Consent Decree 388 U.S. 426 [1967] Modified 449 U.S. 48 [1980]) limits the annual diversion from Lake Michigan. While the State of Illinois is responsible for the diversion, the MWRDGC regulates and maintains water level and water quality within the CAWS by using several waterway control structures. The operation and control of water levels in the CAWS results in a very complex hydraulic setting characterized by highly unsteady flows. The complexity leads to unique gaging requirements and monitoring issues. This report provides a general discussion of the complex hydraulic setting within the CAWS and quantifies this information with examples of data collected at a range of flow conditions from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gaging stations and other locations within the CAWS. Monitoring to address longstanding issues of waterway operation, as well as current (2014) emerging issues such as wastewater disinfection and the threat from aquatic invasive species, is included in the discussion.

  5. Strategic Floodplain Reconnection Along the Lower Tisza and Lower Illinois Rivers: Identifying Opportunities, Tradeoffs, and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, R.; Remo, J. W.; Secchi, S.; Swanson, T.; Kiss, T.

    2015-12-01

    During the late 19th and into the 20th Centuries, the Tisza and Illinois Rivers were highly altered through the construction of levees and dams to reclaim their floodplain-wetland systems for agriculture and to facilitate navigation. In recent decades, flood levels have continued to rise due to aggradation on the confined floodplains reducing flood-conveyance capacity. As a result, "Room for the River" proposals have gained more prominence. Our overarching hypothesis is that strategically reconnecting these rivers to their floodplains will reduce flood levels and increase ecological habitat while limiting socioeconomic impacts. In this study, we assessed several reconnection scenarios, including levee setbacks and removals, for the Lower Tisza River (LTR; Hungary) and the Lower Illinois River (LIR; Illinois, USA). To model water-surface elevations (WSELs) for the 5- through 500-year flood events, we employed HEC-RAS (1D) and SOBEK (1D/2D) hydraulic models. To determine socioeconomic tradeoffs using these modeled WSELs, we developed a corresponding suite of expected annual damages (EADs) using FEMA's Hazus-MH flood-loss modeling software for buildings and integrated geospatial and soil productivity indices to estimate agricultural losses. To assess ecosystem benefits of reconnection along the LTR, we used historic wetland extent as a proxy for increasing needed floodplain habitats. For the LIR, we performed habitat screening using Land Capability Potential Index and other assessment tools to estimate potential ecosystem benefits. Results indicate that levee removal and/or setbacks may reduce flood heights up to 1.6 m along the LTR and over 1.0 m along the LIR. While urban areas have the highest EADs, several lower-production agricultural areas show potential for reducing flood heights while minimizing damages. Strategic-floodplain reconnection benefits along the LTR and LIR include over half of historically-significant wetlands being reconnected and the creation of

  6. 57Fe Mössbauer and X-ray characterisation of sandstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulaba-Bafubiandi, A. F.; Waanders, F. B.

    2013-01-01

    Sandstones from the Free State province in South Africa have been mined and processed mainly by small scale and artisanal miners in the rural areas. In the present investigation basic fire proof and water absorption tests, X-ray and γ-ray based characterisation techniques were used to study the sandstones. The collected samples were grouped according to their apparent colour in day light conditions and the elemental analysis showed the presence of a high amount of oxygen (>52%) and silicon (>38%) with Mn, Al, Fe and Ca as major elements in proportions related to the colour distribution of the various sandstones. The uniaxial compressive stress was found to be the highest (56 MPa) for the greyish sandstone and the lowest (8 MPa) for the white sandstone sample, also associated with the lowest (Al+Fe)/Si value of 0.082. The humidity test showed that the 6 % water absorption was lower than the recommended ASTM value of 8 %. The sandstone samples were also subjected to various high temperatures to simulate possible fire conditions and it was found that the non alteration of the mineral species might be one of the reasons why the sandstones are regarded as the most refractory amongst the building materials typically used. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that iron is present in all the sandstones, mainly as Fe 3 +  with the black sandstone showing an additional presence of 3 % Fe 2 +  indicating that a higher iron content coupled to higher silicon content, contributes to an increase in the uniaxial compressive strength.

  7. Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Zirczy, Helena H.

    2000-05-24

    The objective of this Class 3 project was to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, was completed this year, and Phase 2 began. The project is focused on East Ford field, a representative Delaware Mountain Group field that produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 1960, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO{sub 2} flood is being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  8. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.; Mendez, Daniel L.

    2001-05-08

    The objective of this Class 3 project was demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstone's of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover oil more economically through geologically based field development. This project was focused on East Ford field, a Delaware Mountain Group field that produced from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The field, discovered in 9160, is operated by Oral Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit. A CO2 flood was being conducted in the unit, and this flood is the Phase 2 demonstration for the project.

  9. Physical and chemical properties for sandstone and bentonites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Haruo

    2004-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties such as porosity, pore-size distribution, dry density, solid density, mineralogy and chemical composition, which are important parameters for the understanding and analysis of the diffusion phenomena of radionuclides and ions in bentonite and in the geosphere, were measured. The measurements were performed for sandstone, of which fundamental data and information are limited. For bentonite, 3 kinds of bentonites with different smectite contents (Kunigel-V1, Kunipia-F, MX80) were used. In the measurements of the physical and chemical properties of rock, the measurements of solid density by pychnometer, the measurements of porosity, dry density and solid density by water saturation method, the measurements of porosity, dry density, solid density, pore-size distribution and specific surface area of pores by Hg porosimetry, the identifications of constituent minerals by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD), the measurement of chemical composition by whole rock analysis, the observations of micropore structure by Laser Confocal Microscope (LCM), the measurements of water vaporization curves and the measurements of the homogeneity of the rock by penetration of KMnO 4 were performed. While, in the measurements of the physical and chemical properties for bentonite, water basis water content, water content, porosity, dry density, solid density and their distributions in samples were measured, and the degree of inhomogeneity was quantitatively evaluated by comparing with data and information reported up to date. The porosities of sandstone are 15.6±0.21% for water saturation method and 15.5±0.2% for Hg porosimetry, and similar values were obtained in both methods. The solid densities ranged 2.65-2.69 Mg/m 3 for 3 methods, and the average value was 2.668±0.012 Mg/m 3 . The average pore size was 88.8±0.5nm, and pore sizes ≤10μm shared 80% of total pore volume and pore sizes ≤1μm shared 40%. The specific surface area of the pores is 4.09±0.017 m

  10. Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

  11. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...... sandstones....

  12. Hydrogeology and results of aquifer tests in the vicinity of a hazardous-waste disposal site near Byron, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robert T.; Olson, David N.; Ryan, Barbara J.

    1989-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, conducted an investigation of a Superfund Site near Byron, Illinois. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the hydrogeologic properties of the Galena-Platteville and St. Peter aquifers, the primary water-supply aquifers for domestic supply in the area. The Galena and Platteville Groups and older St. Peter Sandstone are separated by the Harmony Hill Shale Member of the Glenwood Formation. The Harmony Hill Shale Member is a semiconfining unit. Groundwater flow in the study area is from the site northwestward to the Rock River. Movement of groundwater in the dolomites is mainly through joints, fractures, and solution openings. Analysis of the Galena-Platteville aquifer-test data indicates that the calculated aquifer transmissivity ranges from 490 to 670 sq ft/day, and the calculated specific yield ranges from 0.017 to 0.140. Aquifer test data also indicate that the Galena-Platteville aquifer is heterogeneous and anisotropic. Analysis of the St. Peter aquifer-test data indicates that the calculated transmissivity of the aquifer ranges from 1,200 to 1 ,305 sq ft/day, storativity ranges from 0.000528 to 0.00128, horizontal hydraulic conductivity ranges from 2.9 to 3.1 ft/day, and leakage through the Harmony Hill Shale Member ranges from .000123 to .000217 ft/day/ft. (USGS)

  13. Paleohydrogeology of the San Joaquin basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A.M.; Garven, G.; Boles, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Mass transport can have a significant effect on chemical diagenetic processes in sedimentary basins. This paper presents results from the first part of a study that was designed to explore the role of an evolving hydrodynamic system in driving mass transport and chemical diagenesis, using the San Joaquin basin of California as a field area. We use coupled hydrogeologic models to establish the paleohydrogeology, thermal history, and behavior of nonreactive solutes in the basin. These models rely on extensive geological information and account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, tectonic uplift, sediment compaction, and clay dehydration. In our numerical simulations, tectonic uplift and ocean regression led to large-scale changes in fluid flow and composition by strengthening topography-driven fluid flow and allowing deep influx of fresh ground water in the San Joaquin basin. Sediment compaction due to rapid deposition created moderate overpressures, leading to upward flow from depth. The unusual distribution of salinity in the basin reflects influx of fresh ground water to depths of as much as 2 km and dilution of saline fluids by dehydration reactions at depths greater than ???2.5 km. Simulations projecting the future salinity of the basin show marine salinities persisting for more than 10 m.y. after ocean regression. Results also show a change from topography-to compaction-driven flow in the Stevens Sandstone at ca. 5 Ma that coincides with an observed change in the diagenetic sequence. Results of this investigation provide a framework for future hydrologic research exploring the link between fluid flow and diagenesis.

  14. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  15. Risk management in a large-scale CO2 geosequestration pilot project, Illinois, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnottavange-Telleen, K.; Chabora, E.; Finley, R.J.; Greenberg, S.E.; Marsteller, S.

    2011-01-01

    Like most large-scale infrastructure projects, carbon dioxide (CO 2) geological sequestration (GS) projects have multiple success criteria and multiple stakeholders. In this context "risk evaluation" encompasses multiple scales. Yet a risk management program aims to maximize the chance of project success by assessing, monitoring, minimizing all risks in a consistent framework. The 150,000-km2 Illinois Basin underlies much of the state of Illinois, USA, and parts of adjacent Kentucky and Indiana. Its potential for CO2 storage is first-rate among basins in North America, an impression that has been strengthened by early testing of the injection well of the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium's (MGSC's) Phase III large scale demonstration project, the Illinois Basin - Decatur Project (IBDP). The IBDP, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), represents a key trial of GS technologies and project-management techniques. Though risks are specific to each site and project, IBDP risk management methodologies provide valuable experience for future GS projects. IBDP views risk as the potential for negative impact to any of these five values: health and safety, environment, financial, advancing the viability and public acceptability of a GS industry, and research. Research goals include monitoring one million metric tonnes of injected CO2 in the subsurface. Risk management responds to the ways in which any values are at risk: for example, monitoring is designed to reduce uncertainties in parameter values that are important for research and system control, and is also designed to provide public assurance. Identified risks are the primary basis for risk-reduction measures: risks linked to uncertainty in geologic parameters guide further characterization work and guide simulations applied to performance evaluation. Formally, industry defines risk (more precisely risk criticality) as the product L*S, the Likelihood multiplied

  16. Illinois School Bus Driver Instructional Program. Trainee Guide. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This trainee guide contains six units of materials for use by those studying to become school bus drivers in the State of Illinois. Covered in the units are the following topics: school bus driver role and responsibility, passenger control, first aid, driving fundamentals, accidents and emergencies, and detecting hazards. Each unit contains a…

  17. Employee Benefits for Illinois Public Higher Education Faculty and Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Higher Education, Springfield.

    This report focuses on the group benefits available to Illinois public higher education employees. The study provides a perspective on the range of benefits and the differences in the administration of institutional benefits. Findings reveal the availability of retirement annuities that increase with each 10 years of service; optional retirement…

  18. Illinois Adult Education Bridges: Promising Practices. Transition Highlights. Issue 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Debra; Oertle, Kathleen Marie; Kim, Sujung; Kirby, Catherine; Taylor, Jason; Harmon, Tim; Liss, Loralea

    2011-01-01

    To enhance state-level adult education and employment policy, in 2007 the Joyce Foundation began the Shifting Gears (SG) initiative to assist six states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin) to integrate adult education, workforce development and postsecondary education policies and improve job opportunities for low-skilled…

  19. At Northern Illinois U., Leaders Grapple with a Tragedy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Libby

    2008-01-01

    At even the best-prepared universities, there is no playbook for handling the crush of tough decisions that comes after a mass shooting rocks an otherwise quiet campus. While colleges and universities have always had tragedies, recent occurences like the shootings at Northern Illinois University and Virginia Tech have fundamentally changed the way…

  20. No Child Left Behind: A Postmortem for Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Wm. Gregory; Boden, Camille; Karpenski, Jeremy; Muchowicz, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the outcomes of No Child Left Behind (NCLB), as implemented in Illinois, are evaluated in terms of high school standards testing results between 2003-2013. NCLB was a policy dedicated to closing the gap in schooling outcomes nationally in the space of a decade. There have been few systematic examinations of its macro-level results…