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Sample records for sandstone core samples

  1. Core-log integration for a Saudi Arabian sandstone reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, S.; Al-Kaabi, A.U.; Amabeoku, M.O.; Al-Fossail, K.

    1995-10-01

    For a detailed characterization of a reservoir, core-log integration is essential. In this paper, data integration from logs and cores of a Saudi Arabian sandstone reservoir is discussed with particular attention to effects of clay on resistivity logs and water saturation. There are four sources of data, namely, core resistivity measurement, clay study from cores (XRD, CEC), spectral core gamma ray, and well logs. In order to generate continuous cation exchange capacity (CEC) with depth, spectral gamma ray measurements (both from core and downhole log) and CEC from cores and correlated. Q{sub v} (CEC per unit pore volume) values are calculated utilizing only well logs by applying Waxman-Smits equation in water bearing zone. Log derived Q{sub v} values from water zone were then correlated with porosity to generate Q{sub v} values in the oil column and compared with core derived Z{sub v}. Finally, data from well logs (porosity, resistivity and Q{sub v}) and cores (resistivity parameters m, n, and Q{sub v}) were integrated for more accurate water saturation calculation. The core-log correlation can be applied to other wells avoiding expensive core analysis, and the technique developed in this project can be used in other sandstone reservoirs.

  2. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  3. Study of microwave response of coal and sandstone samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Singh, Ramesh P.; Singh, K. P.

    1980-07-01

    Detailed measurements of relative dielectric constant and loss tangent of coal and sandstone samples have been carried out in the X-band of microwave frequency range (8-10 GHz). The effect of moisture, saline and petrol content on the dielectric and loss tangent has been studied. The reflection and transmission coefficient of these samples have been computed. The application of such measurements to geophysical prospecting has been discussed.

  4. Initiation of acoustic emission in fluid-saturated sandstone samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, V. B.; Patonin, A. V.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Potanina, M. G.; Smirnov, V. B.; Stroganova, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    A rock behavior experiment with uniaxial compression revealed the effect of acoustic activity in loaded fluid-saturated Berea sandstone samples in response to an electric current. It is established that it is substantially intensified in periods of the current impact and decreases after its cut-off. The current impact also results in a growth of radial deformation indicating an increase in the sample volume. The effect of acoustic activation increases in response to increased heat emitted by the electric current during its flow through the sample, which allows the discovered effect to be explained by initiation of its destruction due to thermal expansion of the fluid in rock interstices and fissures.

  5. Porosity and Permeability Evolution in Cemented Rock Cores under Reactive Flowing Conditions: Comparative Analysis between Limestone and Sandstone Host Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, P.; Karpyn, Z.; Li, L.

    2013-12-01

    CO2-brine has the potential to alter wellbore cement in depleted oil and gas reservoirs under geological CO2 sequestration conditions. A better understanding of CO2-brine-cement-rock interaction is needed to evaluate the seal integrity of candidate sequestration formation in the long run. This work investigates possible alteration of wellbore cement when bonded by different host formation rock upon exposure to CO2-saturated brine. Composite cement-sandstone and cement-limestone core samples were created to perform reactive coreflood experiments. After an eight-day dynamic flow-through period, both cores had a similar extent of porosity increase, while the cement-limestone core experienced a ten-fold higher increase in permeability. With the aid of X-ray Micro-CT imaging and Scanning Electron Microscopy, it is observed that cement underwent greater degradation at the cement-sandstone interface. Degradation of cement-limestone core mainly took place on the host rock matrix. Worm holes were developed and a solution channel was formed in the limestone, creating a dominant flow path that altered both flow and reaction behavior. Limestone buffered the injected acidic brine preventing further deterioration of cement near the core outlet. Changes in fluid chemistry of limestone and sandstone coreflood effluents are compared. Results from this work are aimed at assisting the development and validation of robust reactive transport models through direct measurement of cemented rock core porosity and permeability evolution as well as the effluent aqueous chemistry change. This will subsequently improve predictive capabilities of reactive transport models associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic environments. Permeability Evolution of Cement-Rock Core Sample during Dynamic Flow of CO2-Brine

  6. Comparison of Measured and Modelled Hydraulic Conductivities of Fractured Sandstone Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraka-Lokmane, S.; Liedl, R.; Teutsch, G.

    - A new method for characterising the detailed fracture geometry in sandstone cores is presented. This method is based on the impregnation of samples with coloured resin, without significant disturbance of the fractures. The fractures are made clearly visible by the resin, thus allowing the fracture geometry to be examined digitally. In order to model the bulk hydraulic conductivity, the samples are sectioned serially perpendicular to the flow direction. The hydraulic conductivity of individual sections is estimated by summing the contribution of the matrix and each fracture from the digital data. Finally, the hydraulic conductivity of the bulk sample is estimated by a harmonic average in series along the flow path. Results of this geometrical method are compared with actual physical conductivity values measured from fluid experiments carried out prior to sectioning. The predicted conductivity from the fracture geometry parameters (e.g., fracture aperture, fracture width, fracture length and fracture relative roughness all measured using an optical method) is in good agreement with the independent physical measurements, thereby validating the approach.

  7. Nutrient Resuscitation and Growth of Starved Cells in Sandstone Cores: a Novel Approach to Enhanced Oil Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Lappin-Scott, H. M.; Cusack, F.; Costerton, J W

    1988-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, which was reduced in size (0.25 by 0.5 μm) by carbon deprivation, was injected into a series of sandstone cores and subjected to separate treatments. Scanning electron microscopy of 400-mD cores showed these small starved cells in nearly every core section. The cells were a mixture of small rods and cocci with little or no biofilm production. Continuous or dose stimulation with sodium citrate allowed the cells to grow throughout the sandstone and completely plug the len...

  8. Reservoir condition special core analyses and relative permeability measurements on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on Almond formation and Fontainebleu sandstone plugs. Almond formation plug tests were performed to evaluate multiphase, steady-state,reservoir-condition relative permeability measurement techniques and to examine the effect of temperature on relative permeability characteristics. Some conclusions from this project are as follows: An increase in temperature appeared to cause an increase in brine relative permeability results for an Almond formation plug compared to room temperature results. The plug was tested using steady-state oil/brine methods. The oil was a low-viscosity, isoparaffinic refined oil. Fontainebleu sandstone rock and fluid flow characteristics were measured and are reported. Most of the relative permeability versus saturation results could be represented by one of two trends -- either a k{sub rx} versus S{sub x} or k{sub rx} versus Sy trend where x and y are fluid phases (gas, oil, or brine). An oil/surfactant-brine steady-state relative permeability test was performed to examine changes in oil/brine relative permeability characteristics from changes in fluid IFTS. It appeared that, while low interfacial tension increased the aqueous phase relative permeability, it had no effect on the oil relative permeability. The BOAST simulator was modified for coreflood simulation. The simulator was useful for examining effects of variations in relative permeability and capillary pressure functions. Coreflood production monitoring and separator interface level measurement techniques were developed using X-ray absorption, weight methods, and RF admittance technologies. The three types of separators should be useful for routine and specialized core analysis applications.

  9. Core Flooding Experiments and Reactive Transport Modeling of Seasonal Heat Storage in the Hot Deep Gassum Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmslykke, Hanne D.; Kjøller, Claus; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Seasonal storage of excess heat in hot deep aquifers is considered to optimize the usage of commonly available energy sources. The chemical effects of heating the Gassum Sandstone Formation to up to 150 degrees C is investigated by combining laboratory core flooding experiments with petrographic...

  10. Experimental Study and Mathematical Modeling of Asphaltene Deposition Mechanism in Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari Behbahani T.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental studies were conducted to determine the effect of asphaltene deposition on the permeability reduction and porosity reduction of carbonate, sandstone and dolomite rock samples using an Iranian bottom hole live oil sample which is close to reservoir conditions, whereas in the majority of previous work, a mixture of recombined oil (a mixture of dead oil and associated gas was injected into a core sample which is far from reservoir conditions. The effect of the oil injection rate on asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction was studied. The experimental results showed that an increase in the oil injection flow rate can result in an increase in asphaltene deposition and permeability reduction. Also, it can be observed that at lower injection flow rates, a monotonic decrease in permeability of the rock samples can be attained upon increasing the injection flow rate, while at higher injection rates, after a decrease in rock permeability, an increasing trend is observed before a steady-state condition can be reached. The experimental results also showed that the rock type can affect the amount of asphaltene deposition, and the asphaltene deposition has different mechanisms in sandstone and carbonate core samples. It can be seen that the adsorption and plugging mechanisms have a more important role in asphaltene deposition in carbonate core samples than sandstone core samples. From the results, it can be observed that the pore volumes of the injected crude oil are higher for sandstone cores compared with the carbonate cores. Also, it can be inferred that three depositional types may take place during the crude oil injection, i.e., continuous deposition for low-permeability cores, slow, steady plugging for high-permeability cores and steady deposition for medium-permeability cores. It can be seen from the experimental results that damage to the core samples was found to increase when the production pressures were

  11. Micro-scale experimental investigation of the effect of flow rate on trapping in sandstone and carbonate rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khishvand, Mahdi; Akbarabadi, Morteza; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a pore-scale experimental study of residual trapping in consolidated sandstone and carbonate rock samples under confining stress. We investigate how the changes in wetting phase flow rate impacts pore-scale distribution of fluids during imbibition in natural, water-wet porous media. We systematically study pore-scale trapping of the nonwetting phase as well as size and distribution of its disconnected globules. Seven sets of drainage-imbibition experiments were performed with brine and oil as the wetting and nonwetting phases, respectively. We utilized a two-phase miniature core-flooding apparatus integrated with an X-ray microtomography system to examine pore-scale fluid distributions in small Bentheimer sandstone (D = 4.9 mm and L = 13 mm) and Gambier limestone (D = 4.4 mm and L = 75 mm) core samples. The results show that with increase in capillary number, the residual oil saturation at the end of the imbibition reduces from 0.46 to 0.20 in Bemtheimer sandstone and from 0.46 to 0.28 in Gambier limestone. We use pore-scale displacement mechanisms, in-situ wettability characteristics, and pore size distribution information to explain the observed capillary desaturation trends. The reduction was believed to be caused by alteration of the order in which pore-scale displacements took place during imbibition. Furthermore, increase in capillary number produced significantly different pore-scale fluid distributions during imbibition. We explored the pore fluid occupancies and studied size and distribution of the trapped oil clusters during different imbibition experiments. The results clearly show that as the capillary number increases, imbibition produces smaller trapped oil globules. In other words, the volume of individual trapped oil globules decreased at higher brine flow rates. Finally, we observed that the pore space in the limestone sample was considerably altered through matrix dissolution at extremely high brine flow rates. This

  12. Nutrient resuscitation and growth of starved cells in sandstone cores: a novel approach to enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin-Scott, H M; Cusack, F; Costerton, J W

    1988-06-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, which was reduced in size (0.25 by 0.5 mum) by carbon deprivation, was injected into a series of sandstone cores and subjected to separate treatments. Scanning electron microscopy of 400-mD cores showed these small starved cells in nearly every core section. The cells were a mixture of small rods and cocci with little or no biofilm production. Continuous or dose stimulation with sodium citrate allowed the cells to grow throughout the sandstone and completely plug the length of the core. The resuscitated cells were larger than the starved cells (up to 1.7 mum) and were encased in glycocalyx. Scanning electron microscopic results of resuscitation in situ with half-strength brain heart infusion broth showed that a shallow "skin" plug of cells formed at the core inlet and that fewer cells were located in the lower sections. Starved cells also penetrated 200-mD cores and were successfully resuscitated in situ with sodium citrate, so that the entire core was plugged. Nutrient resuscitation of injected starved cells to produce full-size cells which grow and block the rock pores may be successfully applied to selective plugging and may effectively increase oil recovery.

  13. Methane Hydrate Dissociation by Depressurization in a Mount Elbert Sandstone Sample: Experimental Observations and Numerical Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-15

    A preserved sample of hydrate-bearing sandstone from the Mount Elbert Test Well was dissociated by depressurization while monitoring the internal temperature of the sample in two locations and the density changes at high spatial resolution using x-ray CT scanning. The sample contained two distinct regions having different porosity and grain size distributions. The hydrate dissociation occurred initially throughout the sample as a result of depressing the pressure below the stability pressure. This initial stage reduced the temperature to the equilibrium point, which was maintained above the ice point. After that, dissociation occurred from the outside in as a result of heat transfer from the controlled temperature bath surrounding the pressure vessel. Numerical modeling of the test using TOUGH+HYDRATE yielded a gas production curve that closely matches the experimentally measured curve.

  14. Determination of water-lock critical value of low-permeability sandstones based on digital core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglin Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research and development of water lock inhibiting measures is very crucial in verifying the link mechanism between the internal factors of water lock and its extent of damage. Based on conventional water-lock physics experiments, however, only the consequence of macro water lock damage can be investigated, while the microscopic mechanism cannot be studied. In this paper, 3D digital cores of low-permeability sandstones were prepared by means of high-resolution micro-CT scan, and their equivalent pore network model was built as well. Virtual “imbibition” experiments controlled by capillary force were carried out by using pore-scale flow simulation. Then the link mechanism between the microscopic internal factors (e.g. wettability, water saturation and pore–throat structure parameters and the water-lock damage degree was discussed. It is shown that the damage degree of water lock reduces gradually as the wettability transits from water wet to gas wet. Therefore, the water lock damage can be reduced effectively and gas-well productivity can be improved so long as the capillary environment is changed from strong water wettability to weak gas wettability. The more different the initial water saturation is from the irreducible water saturation, the more serious the water lock damage is. The damage degree of water lock is in a negative correlation with the coordinate number, but a positive correlation with the pore–throat ratio. Based on the existing research results, water lock tends to form in the formations composed of medium-sized throats. It is concluded that there is a critical throat radius, at which the water lock is the most serious.

  15. Study of adsorption Ag and Pb in liquid sample using Berea sandstone by commercial laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyanto, H.; Wendri, N.; Agustiningrum, U.; Manurung, M.

    2016-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of Pb and Ag elements in liquid samples had been done by commercial laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) using adsorption method on a Berea Sandstone. The aim of this study is to identify the thickness of the Berea Sandstone for adsorbing Pb and Ag elements in liquid. The experiment was started with characterizing the Berea Sandstone that contains Si, Na, H, Li, K, Ca, O, N, Be, Ti, Al, Mg and Ba. Some of these elements have ability to adsorb Pb and Ag elements in the liquid. To prove this phenomenon, it is required to look for the experiment parameter optimum conditions such as laser energy, adsorption time and sample temperature. The experiment was conducted by dropping 2 ml standard liquid containing 1000 ppm of Pb and Ag to the Berea Sandstone surface. The result showed that the parameter optimum conditions for analyzing Pb and Ag elements in liquid sample with adsorption method were adsorption delay-time of 15 minutes, laser energy of 120 mJ and sample heating of 80 °C. The next experiment was focused on the number of adsorption as a function of depth. The data showed that Pb and Ag elements in liquid sample of 2 ml, 1000 ppm were fully adsorbed by the Berea Sandstone until the depth of 0.372 mm and 10.40 mm from the surface, respectively. The data also showed that the limit of detection predicted to about 22.76 ppm.

  16. Provenance analysis of the SMS ANDRILL core: Trends in sandstone composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, K. N.; Barnard, S.

    2010-12-01

    Supergroup sandstones and Ferrar Dolerites respectively. A second increase occurs at ~420 m (LSU7 to 8). A decrease occurs at ~580 m (within LSU8) followed by an increase at ~640 m then a decrease at ~680 m (LSU9 to 10) and another increase at ~740 m (within LSU10). Dolerite lithics follow the quartz/orthopyroxene trends. Some of these changes occur at LSU boundaries that are erosional in nature but some do not. The Beacon/Ferrar grains were most likely locally derived and delivered via the Blue and Koettlitz Glaciers. The changes in concentration may correspond to the alternating glaciations in the Miocene. The loss of Beacon/Ferrar and increasing abundance of marble and other basement-derived grains higher in the core indicate an overall unroofing sequence of the Transantarctic Mountains. Our high concentrations of Beacon/Ferrar derived grains indicate local Koettlitz/Blue derivation alternating with periods lacking them during the Miocene. This echoes the changes in basement clast compositions observed by Sandroni et al. (2010) of derivation alternating between the Koettlitz/Blue and Skelton/Mulock Glacier regions suggesting growth and collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

  17. Frictional behaviour of sandstone: A sample-size dependent triaxial investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Hamid; Masoumi, Hossein; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Frictional behaviour of rocks from the initial stage of loading to final shear displacement along the formed shear plane has been widely investigated in the past. However the effect of sample size on such frictional behaviour has not attracted much attention. This is mainly related to the limitations in rock testing facilities as well as the complex mechanisms involved in sample-size dependent frictional behaviour of rocks. In this study, a suite of advanced triaxial experiments was performed on Gosford sandstone samples at different sizes and confining pressures. The post-peak response of the rock along the formed shear plane has been captured for the analysis with particular interest in sample-size dependency. Several important phenomena have been observed from the results of this study: a) the rate of transition from brittleness to ductility in rock is sample-size dependent where the relatively smaller samples showed faster transition toward ductility at any confining pressure; b) the sample size influences the angle of formed shear band and c) the friction coefficient of the formed shear plane is sample-size dependent where the relatively smaller sample exhibits lower friction coefficient compared to larger samples. We interpret our results in terms of a thermodynamics approach in which the frictional properties for finite deformation are viewed as encompassing a multitude of ephemeral slipping surfaces prior to the formation of the through going fracture. The final fracture itself is seen as a result of the self-organisation of a sufficiently large ensemble of micro-slip surfaces and therefore consistent in terms of the theory of thermodynamics. This assumption vindicates the use of classical rock mechanics experiments to constrain failure of pressure sensitive rocks and the future imaging of these micro-slips opens an exciting path for research in rock failure mechanisms.

  18. Rotary Mode Core Sample System availability improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, W.W.; Bennett, K.L.; Potter, J.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cross, B.T.; Burkes, J.M.; Rogers, A.C. [Southwest Research Institute (United States)

    1995-02-28

    The Rotary Mode Core Sample System (RMCSS) is used to obtain stratified samples of the waste deposits in single-shell and double-shell waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The samples are used to characterize the waste in support of ongoing and future waste remediation efforts. Four sampling trucks have been developed to obtain these samples. Truck I was the first in operation and is currently being used to obtain samples where the push mode is appropriate (i.e., no rotation of drill). Truck 2 is similar to truck 1, except for added safety features, and is in operation to obtain samples using either a push mode or rotary drill mode. Trucks 3 and 4 are now being fabricated to be essentially identical to truck 2.

  19. Kaolinite Mobilisation in Sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Kets, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The effect of temperature and salinity on sandstone permeability is critical to the feasibility of heat storage in geothermal aquifers. Permeability reduction has been observed in Berea sandstone when the salinity of the pore water is reduced as well as when the sample is heated. Several authors...

  20. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  1. Correlative multiple porosimetries for reservoir sandstones with adoption of a new reference-sample-guided computed-tomographic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jae Hwa; Kim, Junho; Lee, Jeong-Yil; Oh, Young Min

    2016-07-01

    One of the main interests in petroleum geology and reservoir engineering is to quantify the porosity of reservoir beds as accurately as possible. A variety of direct measurements, including methods of mercury intrusion, helium injection and petrographic image analysis, have been developed; however, their application frequently yields equivocal results because these methods are different in theoretical bases, means of measurement, and causes of measurement errors. Here, we present a set of porosities measured in Berea Sandstone samples by the multiple methods, in particular with adoption of a new method using computed tomography and reference samples. The multiple porosimetric data show a marked correlativeness among different methods, suggesting that these methods are compatible with each other. The new method of reference-sample-guided computed tomography is more effective than the previous methods when the accompanied merits such as experimental conveniences are taken into account.

  2. Correlative multiple porosimetries for reservoir sandstones with adoption of a new reference-sample-guided computed-tomographic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jae Hwa; Kim, Junho; Lee, Jeong-Yil; Oh, Young Min

    2016-07-22

    One of the main interests in petroleum geology and reservoir engineering is to quantify the porosity of reservoir beds as accurately as possible. A variety of direct measurements, including methods of mercury intrusion, helium injection and petrographic image analysis, have been developed; however, their application frequently yields equivocal results because these methods are different in theoretical bases, means of measurement, and causes of measurement errors. Here, we present a set of porosities measured in Berea Sandstone samples by the multiple methods, in particular with adoption of a new method using computed tomography and reference samples. The multiple porosimetric data show a marked correlativeness among different methods, suggesting that these methods are compatible with each other. The new method of reference-sample-guided computed tomography is more effective than the previous methods when the accompanied merits such as experimental conveniences are taken into account.

  3. Pollutant plume delineation from tree core sampling using standardized ranks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahyudi, Agung; Bogaert, Patrick; Trapp, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    There are currently contradicting results in the literature about the way chloroethene (CE) concentrations from tree core sampling correlate with those from groundwater measurements. This paper addresses this issue by focusing on groundwater and tree core datasets in CE contaminated site, Czech R...... groundwater and tree core measurements. Nonetheless, tree core sampling and analysis proved to be a quick and inexpensive semi-quantitative method and a useful tool.......There are currently contradicting results in the literature about the way chloroethene (CE) concentrations from tree core sampling correlate with those from groundwater measurements. This paper addresses this issue by focusing on groundwater and tree core datasets in CE contaminated site, Czech...

  4. Method of monitoring core sampling during borehole drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, A.; Barnes, D.; Gennings, T.L.

    1991-04-30

    This paper describes a method of monitoring the acquisition of a core sample obtained from a coring tool on a drillstring in a borehole. It comprises: measuring the weight of a portion of the drillstring at a pre-selected borehole depth when the drillstring is off bottom to define a first measurement; drilling to acquire a core sample; measuring the weight of a portion of the drillstring at a pre-selected borehole depth when the drillstring is off-bottom to define a second measurement; determining the difference between the first and second measurements, the difference corresponding to the weight of the core sample; and comparing the measured core sample weight to a calculated weight of a full core sample to determine if the core sample has been acquired.

  5. Radon-222 content of natural gas samples from Upper and Middle Devonian sandstone and shale reservoirs in Pennsylvania—preliminary data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, E.L.; Kraemer, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Samples of natural gas were collected as part of a study of formation water chemistry in oil and gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. Nineteen samples (plus two duplicates) were collected from 11 wells producing gas from Upper Devonian sandstones and the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania. The samples were collected from valves located between the wellhead and the gas-water separator. Analyses of the radon content of the gas indicated 222Rn (radon-222) activities ranging from 1 to 79 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) with an overall median of 37 pCi/L. The radon activities of the Upper Devonian sandstone samples overlap to a large degree with the activities of the Marcellus Shale samples.

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A.; Duncan, A.

    2010-01-28

    During the month of September 2008, grout core samples were collected from the Saltstone Disposal Facility, Vault 4, cell E. This grout was placed during processing campaigns in December 2007 from Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment Batch 2 salt solution. The 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria sample collected on 11/16/07 represents the salt solution in the core samples. Core samples were retrieved to initiate the historical database of properties of emplaced Saltstone and to demonstrate the correlation between field collected and laboratory prepared samples. Three samples were collected from three different locations. Samples were collected using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit. In April 2009, the core samples were removed from the evacuated sample container, inspected, transferred to PVC containers, and backfilled with nitrogen. Samples furthest from the wall were the most intact cylindrically shaped cored samples. The shade of the core samples darkened as the depth of coring increased. Based on the visual inspection, sample 3-3 was selected for all subsequent analysis. The density and porosity of the Vault 4 core sample, 1.90 g/cm{sup 3} and 59.90% respectively, were comparable to values achieved for laboratory prepared samples. X-ray diffraction analysis identified phases consistent with the expectations for hydrated Saltstone. Microscopic analysis revealed morphology features characteristic of cementitious materials with fly ash and calcium silicate hydrate gel. When taken together, the results of the density, porosity, x-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic analysis support the conclusion that the Vault 4, Cell E core sample is representative of the expected waste form.

  7. Buckling and dynamic analysis of drill strings for core sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziada, H.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-15

    This supporting document presents buckling and dynamic stability analyses of the drill strings used for core sampling. The results of the drill string analyses provide limiting operating axial loads and rotational speeds to prevent drill string failure, instability and drill bit overheating during core sampling. The recommended loads and speeds provide controls necessary for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic field operations.

  8. Stochastic reconstruction of sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwart; Torquato; Hilfer

    2000-07-01

    A simulated annealing algorithm is employed to generate a stochastic model for a Berea sandstone and a Fontainebleau sandstone, with each a prescribed two-point probability function, lineal-path function, and "pore size" distribution function, respectively. We find that the temperature decrease of the annealing has to be rather quick to yield isotropic and percolating configurations. A comparison of simple morphological quantities indicates good agreement between the reconstructions and the original sandstones. Also, the mean survival time of a random walker in the pore space is reproduced with good accuracy. However, a more detailed investigation by means of local porosity theory shows that there may be significant differences of the geometrical connectivity between the reconstructed and the experimental samples.

  9. Measurement of electrical impedance of a Berea sandstone core during the displacement of saturated brine by oil and CO2 injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Xue, Ziqiu; Park, Hyuck; Kiyama, Tamotsu; Zhang, Yi; Nishizawa, Osamu; Chae, Kwang-seok

    2015-12-01

    Complex electrical impedance measurements were performed on a brine-saturated Berea sandstone core while oil and CO2 were injected at different pressures and temperatures. The saturations of brine, oil, and CO2 in the core were simultaneously estimated using an X-ray computed tomography scanner. The formation factor of this Berea core and the resistivity indexes versus the brine saturations were calculated using Archie's law. The experimental results found different flow patterns of oil under different pressures and temperatures. Fingers were observed for the first experiment at 10 MPa and 40 °C. The fingers were restrained as the viscosity ratio of oil and water changed in the second (10 MPa and 25 °C) and third (5 MPa and 25 °C) experiments. The resistivity index showed an exponential increase with a decrease in brine saturation. The saturation exponent varied from 1.4 to 4.0 at different pressure and temperature conditions. During the oil injection procedure, the electrical impedance increased with oil saturation and was significantly affected by different oil distributions; therefore, the impedance varied whether the finger was remarkable or not, even if the oil saturation remained constant. During the CO2 injection steps, the impedance showed almost no change with CO2 saturation because the brine in the pores became immobile after the oil injection.

  10. In-situ measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of oil-sandstone samples under simulated conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuxia Cheng; Zhilan Li; Xinshi Ge; Jiangan Li; Yongzhong Zhang; Xingan Liang; Youwang Song; Huangqing Feng (University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China). Dept. of Engineering Thermophysics)

    1990-01-01

    A transient-state thermal test apparatus for the in situ measurement of the thermal conductivity of core samples, under simulated conditions has been developed. It has an operational temperature range of 293 to 523k. Confinement pressures of 10 -11 MPa can be applied to the sample to simulate overburden load. Pore fluid pressures up to 8-9 MPa can be generated within the test cell to ensure fluid saturation of the sample throughout a test. The variation of degree of oil/water saturation in a sample can be easily achieved within the test cell. The test apparatus can be used to measure the effects of the material itself, its degree of fluid saturation, and ambient conditions. (author).

  11. Dose Rate Calculations for Rotary Mode Core Sampling Exhauster

    CERN Document Server

    Foust, D J

    2000-01-01

    This document provides the calculated estimated dose rates for three external locations on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) exhauster HEPA filter housing, per the request of Characterization Field Engineering.

  12. Permeability testing of drilling core sample from pavement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suda WANG; Zhengguang TANG; Xiaojun NING; Peiguan WU; Pingyi XING

    2008-01-01

    The permeability coefficient of pavement material is a very important parameter in designing the drainage of pavement structures and is also used to evalu-ate the quality of road construction. New equipment is used to measure the permeability coefficient of the pave-ment drilling core sample and relevant testing methods are introduced. Testing drilling core samples from a certain highway of Yunnan province has been proven to be feas-ible. The test results are also analyzed.

  13. Development of core sampling technique for ITER Type B radwaste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. G.; Hong, K. P.; Oh, W. H.; Park, M. C.; Jung, S. H.; Ahn, S. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Type B radwaste (intermediate level and long lived radioactive waste) imported from ITER vacuum vessel are to be treated and stored in basement of hot cell building. The Type B radwaste treatment process is composed of buffer storage, cutting, sampling/tritium measurement, tritium removal, characterization, pre-packaging, inspection/decontamination, and storage etc. The cut slices of Type B radwaste components generated from cutting process undergo sampling process before and after tritium removal process. The purpose of sampling is to obtain small pieces of samples in order to investigate the tritium content and concentration of Type B radwaste. Core sampling, which is the candidates of sampling technique to be applied to ITER hot cell, is available for not thick (less than 50 mm) metal without use of coolant. Experimented materials were SS316L and CuCrZr in order to simulate ITER Type B radwaste. In core sampling, substantial secondary wastes from cutting chips will be produced unavoidably. Thus, core sampling machine will have to be equipped with disposal system such as suction equipment. Core sampling is considered an unfavorable method for tool wear compared to conventional drilling.

  14. Investigating the effect of unloading on artificial sandstone behaviour using the Discrete Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueqin; Cheng, Yi Pik; Coop, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) was used to simulate the mechanical behaviour of a reservoir sandstone. Triaxial tests were carried out using 3D-DEM to simulate the stress-strain behaviour of a sandstone with comparisons made between the numerical tests and the laboratory tests. The influence of isotropic unloading was investigated, which was found to have impacts on bond breakages and was successfully captured in the 3D shearing processes. It was found that bond breakages correlated strongly with the stress-strain behaviour of the sandstone affecting the peak strength. It was also found that unloading affected the bond breakages, which then changed the mechanical behaviour of sandstone. The tangent stiffnesses of simulated virgin and cored samples under different confining stresses were compared. From the tangent stiffnesses, gross yield envelopes and the yielding surfaces for unloaded samples and virgin samples were plotted and analysed in detail.

  15. NEW SOIL VOC SAMPLERS: EN CORE AND ACCU CORE SAMPLING/STORAGE DEVICES FOR VOC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

    2006-06-01

    Soil sampling and storage practices for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from samples. The En Core{reg_sign} sampler is designed to collect and store soil samples in a manner that minimizes loss of contaminants due to volatilization and/or biodegradation. An ASTM International (ASTM) standard practice, D 6418, Standard Practice for Using the Disposable En Core Sampler for Sampling and Storing Soil for Volatile Organic Analysis, describes use of the En Core sampler to collect and store a soil sample of approximately 5 grams or 25 grams for volatile organic analysis and specifies sample storage in the En Core sampler at 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours; -7 to -21 C for up to 14 days; or 4 {+-} 2 C for up to 48 hours followed by storage at -7 to -21 C for up to five days. This report discusses activities performed during the past year to promote and continue acceptance of the En Core samplers based on their performance to store soil samples for VOC analysis. The En Core sampler is designed to collect soil samples for VOC analysis at the soil surface. To date, a sampling tool for collecting and storing subsurface soil samples for VOC analysis is not available. Development of a subsurface VOC sampling/storage device was initiated in 1999. This device, which is called the Accu Core{trademark} sampler, is designed so that a soil sample can be collected below the surface using a dual-tube penetrometer and transported to the laboratory for analysis in the same container. Laboratory testing of the current Accu Core design shows that the device holds low-level concentrations of VOCs in soil samples during 48-hour storage at 4 {+-} 2 C and that the device is ready for field evaluation to generate additional performance data. This report discusses a field validation exercise that was attempted in Pennsylvania in 2004 and activities being performed to plan and conduct a field validation study in 2006. A draft ASTM

  16. System Would Acquire Core and Powder Samples of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Randolph, James; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Ritz, Chuck; Cook, Greg

    2006-01-01

    A system for automated sampling of rocks, ice, and similar hard materials at and immediately below the surface of the ground is undergoing development. The system, denoted a sample preparation, acquisition, handling, and delivery (SPAHD) device, would be mounted on a robotic exploratory vehicle that would traverse the terrain of interest on the Earth or on a remote planet. The SPAHD device would probe the ground to obtain data for optimization of sampling, prepare the surface, acquire samples in the form(s) of cores and/or powdered cuttings, and deliver the samples to a selected location for analysis and/or storage.

  17. Towards an integrated petrophysical tool for multiphase flow properties of core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenormand, R. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01

    This paper describes the first use of an Integrated Petrophysical Tool (IPT) on reservoir rock samples. The IPT simultaneously measures the following petrophysical properties: (1) Complete capillary pressure cycle: primary drainage, spontaneous and forced imbibitions, secondary drainage (the cycle leads to the wettability of the core by using the USBM index); End-points and parts of the relative permeability curves; Formation factor and resistivity index. The IPT is based on the steady-state injection of one fluid through the sample placed in a Hassler cell. The experiment leading to the whole Pc cycle on two reservoir sandstones consists of about 30 steps at various oil or water flow rates. It takes about four weeks and is operated at room conditions. Relative permeabilities are in line with standard steady-state measurements. Capillary pressures are in accordance with standard centrifuge measurements. There is no comparison for the resistivity index, but the results are in agreement with literature data. However, the accurate determination of saturation remains the main difficulty and some improvements are proposed. In conclusion, the Integrated Petrophysical Tool is as accurate as standard methods and has the advantage of providing the various parameters on the same sample and during a single experiment. The FIT is easy to use and can be automated. In addition, it can be operated in reservoir conditions.

  18. New Acid Combination for a Successful Sandstone Acidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. U.; Mahmud, H. K. B.; Rezaee, R.

    2017-05-01

    With the development of new enhanced oil recovery techniques, sandstone acidizing has been introduced and played a pivotal role in the petroleum industry. Different acid combinations have been applied, which react with the formation, dissolve the soluble particles; thus increase the production of hydrocarbons. To solve the problems which occurred using current preflush sandstone acidizing technology (hydrochloric acid); a new acid combination has been developed. Core flooding experiments on sandstone core samples with dimensions 1.5 in. × 3 in. were conducted at a flow rate of 2 cm3/min. A series of hydrochloric-acetic acid mixtures with different ratios were tested under 150°F temperature. The core flooding experiments performed are aimed to dissolve carbonate, sodium, potassium and calcium particles from the core samples. These experiments are followed by few important tests which include, porosity-permeability, pH value, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements). All the results are compared with the results of conventional hydrochloric acid technology. NMR and porosity analysis concluded that the new acid combination is more effective in creating fresh pore spaces and thus increasing the reservoir permeability. It can be seen from the pore distribution before and after the acidizing. Prior applying acid; the large size of pores appears most frequently in the pore distribution while with the applied acid, it was found that the small pore size is most the predominant of the pore distribution. These results are validated using ICP analysis which shows the effective removal of calcium and other positive ions from the core sample. This study concludes that the combination of acetic-hydrochloric acid can be a potential candidate for the preflush stage of sandstone acidizing at high temperature reservoirs.

  19. Advanced Pressure Coring System for Deep Earth Sampling (APRECOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, E.; Rothfuss, M.; Müller, W. H.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays the recovery of cores from boreholes is a standard operation. However, during that process the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties as well as living conditions for microorganisms are significantly altered. In-situ sampling is one approach to overcome the severe scientific limitations of conventional, depressurized core investigations by recovering, processing, and conducting experiments in the laboratory, while maintaining unchanged environmental parameters. The most successful equipment today is the suite of tools developed within the EU funded projects HYACE (Hydrate Autoclave Coring Equipment) and HYACINTH (Deployment of HYACE tools In New Tests on Hydrates) between 1997 and 2005. Within several DFG (German Research Foundation) projects the Technical University Berlin currently works on concepts to increase the present working pressure of 250 bar as well as to reduce logistical and financial expenses by merging redundant and analogous procedures and scaling down the considerable size of key components. It is also proposed to extend the range of applications for the wireline rotary pressure corer and the sub-sampling and transfer system to all types of soil conditions (soft to highly-consolidated). New modifications enable the tools to be used in other pressure related fields of research, such as unconventional gas exploration (coal-bed methane, tight gas, gas hydrate), CO2 sequestration, and microbiology of the deep biosphere. Expedient enhancement of an overall solution for pressure core retrieval, process and investigation will open the way for a complete on-site, all-purpose, in-situ equipment. The advanced assembly would allow for executing the whole operation sequences of coring, non-destructive measurement, sub-sampling and transfer into storage, measurement and transportation chambers, all in sterile, anaerobic conditions, and without depressurisation in quick succession. Extensive post-cruise handling and interim storage would be

  20. Preliminaries on core image analysis using fault drilling samples; Core image kaiseki kotohajime (danso kussaku core kaisekirei)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, T.; Ito, H. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper introduces examples of image data analysis on fault drilling samples. The paper describes the following matters: core samples used in the analysis are those obtained from wells drilled piercing the Nojima fault which has moved in the Hygoken-Nanbu Earthquake; the CORESCAN system made by DMT Corporation, Germany, used in acquiring the image data consists of a CCD camera, a light source and core rotation mechanism, and a personal computer, its resolution being about 5 pixels/mm in both axial and circumferential directions, and 24-bit full color; with respect to the opening fractures in core samples collected by using a constant azimuth coring, it was possible to derive values of the opening width, inclination angle, and travel from the image data by using a commercially available software for the personal computer; and comparison of this core image with the BHTV record and the hydrophone VSP record (travel and inclination obtained from the BHTV record agree well with those obtained from the core image). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-04-10

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

  2. Dosimetry Evaluation of In-Core and Above-Core Zirconium Alloy Samples in a PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri Benjamin W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A description of the neutron fluence analysis of activated zirconium alloys samples at a Westinghouse 3-loop reactor is presented. These samples were irradiated in the core and in the fuel plenum region, where dosimetry measurements are relatively rare compared with regions radially outward of the core. Dosimetry measurements performed by Batelle/PNNL are compared to the calculational models. Good agreement is shown with the in-core measurements when using analysis conditions expected to best represent this region, such as an assembly-specific axial power distribution. However, the use of these conditions to evaluate dosimetry in the fuel plenum region can lead to significant underestimation of the fluence. The use of a flat axial power distribution, however, does not underestimate the fluence in the fuel plenum region.

  3. Description and Analysis of Core Samples: The Lunar Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Allton, Judith H.

    1997-01-01

    Although no samples yet have been returned from a comet, extensive experience from sampling another solar system body, the Moon, does exist. While, in overall structure, composition, and physical properties the Moon bears little resemblance to what is expected for a comet, sampling the Moon has provided some basic lessons in how to do things which may be equally applicable to cometary samples. In particular, an extensive series of core samples has been taken on the Moon, and coring is the best way to sample a comet in three dimensions. Data from cores taken at 24 Apollo collection stations and 3 Luna sites have been used to provide insight into the evolution of the lunar regolith. It is now well understood that this regolith is very complex and reflects gardening (stirring of grains by micrometeorites), erosion (from impacts and solar wind sputtering), maturation (exposure on the bare lunar surface to solar winds ions and micrometeorite impacts) and comminution of coarse grains into finer grains, blanket deposition of coarse-grained layers, and other processes. All of these processes have been documented in cores. While a cometary regolith should not be expected to parallel in detail the lunar regolith, it is possible that the upper part of a cometary regolith may include textural, mineralogical, and chemical features which reflect the original accretion of the comet, including a form of gardening. Differences in relative velocities and gravitational attraction no doubt made this accretionary gardening qualitatively much different than the lunar version. Furthermore, at least some comets, depending on their orbits, have been subjected to impacts of the uppermost surface by small projectiles at some time in their history. Consequently, a more recent post-accretional gardening may have occurred. Finally, for comets which approach the sun, large scale erosion may have occurred driven by gas loss. The uppermost material of these comets may reflect some of the features

  4. Impact Metamorphism of Sandstones at Amguid Crater, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoui, R.; Belhai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Amguid is a 450 m diameter sample crater; it is emplaced in Lower Devonian sandstones.We have carried out a petrographic study in order to investigate shock effects recorded in these sandstones and define shock stages in Amguid.

  5. The activity concentrations of 222Rn and corresponding health risk in groundwater samples from basement and sandstone aquifer; the correlation to physicochemical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurabu, Wedad Ali; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Heryansyah, Arien

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the activity concentrations of 222Rn and to assess the corresponding health risk in groundwater samples obtained in Juban District, Ad Dali' Governorate, Yemen. The measurements were performed by RAD 7 radon detector manufactured by DURRIDGE COMPANY Inc. The activity concentrations of 222Rn ranged from 1.0±0.2 Bq l-1 to 896.0±0.8 Bq l-1. 57% of the groundwater samples were above the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) recommended value for Rn in water. Induced coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to determine the concentrations of uranium in groundwater samples. The measured concentration of U ranged from 0.33±0.01 μg l-1 to 24.6±0.6 μg l-1. The results were comparable to internationally recommended values. The highest concentration of U and 222Rn were found to be in the basement aquifer, while the lowest concentrations of both radionuclides were in the sandstone aquifer. High concentrations of Rn are found along fault zones. The relationship between the activity concentration of 222Rn, concentration of U and physicochemical parameters were investigated. The results showed a very strong relationship between activity concentrations of 222Rn with concentrations of U and the salinity of water.

  6. δ13C-CH4 in ice core samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperlich, Peter

    Ice core records of δ13C-CH4 reflect the variability of CH4 biogeochemistry in response to climate change and show this system is far more complex than expected. The first part of this work is concerned with the development of analytical techniques that allow 1) precise referencing and 2) measure......Ice core records of δ13C-CH4 reflect the variability of CH4 biogeochemistry in response to climate change and show this system is far more complex than expected. The first part of this work is concerned with the development of analytical techniques that allow 1) precise referencing and 2......) measurements of δ13C-CH4 in ice core samples as is required when δ13C-CH4 records that are measured in several laboratories are merged for analysis. Both the referencing and measurement techniques have been compared to further laboratories which proofed the accuracy of the analytical systems. The second part...

  7. δ13C-CH4 in ice core samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperlich, Peter

    Ice core records of δ13C-CH4 reflect the variability of CH4 biogeochemistry in response to climate change and show this system is far more complex than expected. The first part of this work is concerned with the development of analytical techniques that allow 1) precise referencing and 2) measure......Ice core records of δ13C-CH4 reflect the variability of CH4 biogeochemistry in response to climate change and show this system is far more complex than expected. The first part of this work is concerned with the development of analytical techniques that allow 1) precise referencing and 2......) measurements of δ13C-CH4 in ice core samples as is required when δ13C-CH4 records that are measured in several laboratories are merged for analysis. Both the referencing and measurement techniques have been compared to further laboratories which proofed the accuracy of the analytical systems. The second part...

  8. Acquisition and Retaining Granular Samples via a Rotating Coring Bit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    This device takes advantage of the centrifugal forces that are generated when a coring bit is rotated, and a granular sample is entered into the bit while it is spinning, making it adhere to the internal wall of the bit, where it compacts itself into the wall of the bit. The bit can be specially designed to increase the effectiveness of regolith capturing while turning and penetrating the subsurface. The bit teeth can be oriented such that they direct the regolith toward the bit axis during the rotation of the bit. The bit can be designed with an internal flute that directs the regolith upward inside the bit. The use of both the teeth and flute can be implemented in the same bit. The bit can also be designed with an internal spiral into which the various particles wedge. In another implementation, the bit can be designed to collect regolith primarily from a specific depth. For that implementation, the bit can be designed such that when turning one way, the teeth guide the regolith outward of the bit and when turning in the opposite direction, the teeth will guide the regolith inward into the bit internal section. This mechanism can be implemented with or without an internal flute. The device is based on the use of a spinning coring bit (hollow interior) as a means of retaining granular sample, and the acquisition is done by inserting the bit into the subsurface of a regolith, soil, or powder. To demonstrate the concept, a commercial drill and a coring bit were used. The bit was turned and inserted into the soil that was contained in a bucket. While spinning the bit (at speeds of 600 to 700 RPM), the drill was lifted and the soil was retained inside the bit. To prove this point, the drill was turned horizontally, and the acquired soil was still inside the bit. The basic theory behind the process of retaining unconsolidated mass that can be acquired by the centrifugal forces of the bit is determined by noting that in order to stay inside the interior of the bit, the

  9. SALT CORE SAMPLING EVOLUTION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nance, T; Daniel Krementz, D; William Cheng, W

    2007-11-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility, has over 30 million gallons of legacy waste from its many years of processing nuclear materials. The majority of waste is stored in 49 buried tanks. Available underground piping is the primary and desired pathway to transfer waste from one tank to another until the waste is delivered to the glass plant, DWPF, or the grout plant, Saltstone. Prior to moving the material, the tank contents need to be evaluated to ensure the correct destination for the waste is chosen. Access ports are available in each tank top in a number of locations and sizes to be used to obtain samples of the waste for analysis. Material consistencies vary for each tank with the majority of waste to be processed being radioactive salts and sludge. The following paper describes the progression of equipment and techniques developed to obtain core samples of salt and solid sludge at SRS.

  10. SALT CORE SAMPLING EVOLUTION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nance, T; Daniel Krementz, D; William Cheng, W

    2007-11-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), a Department of Energy (DOE) facility, has over 30 million gallons of legacy waste from its many years of processing nuclear materials. The majority of waste is stored in 49 buried tanks. Available underground piping is the primary and desired pathway to transfer waste from one tank to another until the waste is delivered to the glass plant, DWPF, or the grout plant, Saltstone. Prior to moving the material, the tank contents need to be evaluated to ensure the correct destination for the waste is chosen. Access ports are available in each tank top in a number of locations and sizes to be used to obtain samples of the waste for analysis. Material consistencies vary for each tank with the majority of waste to be processed being radioactive salts and sludge. The following paper describes the progression of equipment and techniques developed to obtain core samples of salt and solid sludge at SRS.

  11. Mineralogical controls on NMR rock surface relaxivity: A case study of the Fontainebleau Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livo, Kurt

    Pore size distribution is derived from nuclear magnetic resonance, but is scaled by surface relaxivity. While nuclear magnetic resonance studies generally focus on the difficulty of determining pore size distribution in unconventional shale reservoirs, there is a lack of discussion concerning pure quartz sandstones. Long surface relaxivity causes complications analyzing nuclear magnetic resonance data for pore size distribution determination. Currently, I am unaware of research that addresses the complicated pore size distribution determination in long relaxing, pure sandstone formations, which is essential to accurate downhole petrophysical modeling. The Fontainebleau sandstone is well known for its homogenous mineralogical makeup and wide range of porosity and permeability. The Hibernia sandstone exhibits a similar mineralogy and is characterized by a similar and porosity-permeability range to the Fontainebleau sandstones, but with a significantly higher portion of clay minerals (1-6%). I present systematic petrophysical properties such as porosity, pore size distribution from nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation times, permeability, and volumetric magnetic susceptibility to aide in characterization of the Fontainebleau sandstone. Analysis of collected nuclear magnetic resonance data is then compared to other petrophysical studies from literature such as helium porosity and permeability, magnetic susceptibility, and electrical conductivity. I find that the lack of impurities on the grain surfaces of pure quartz samples imparts a lower surface relaxivity as compared to clay containing sandstones and makes nuclear magnetic resonance analysis more complex. Thus, inverted nuclear magnetic resonance data from cleaner outcrop samples incorrectly models pore size distribution without accounting for wider surface relaxivity variation and is improperly used when characterizing the Fontainebleau sandstone. This is further supported by evidence from less

  12. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We build an interface between an Infra Red Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (IR-CRDS and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100 % efficiency in a home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on humidity levels. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 ‰ and 0.5 ‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to be deployed for field ice core studies. We present data acquired in the

  13. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gkinis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneuous water isotopic analysis of δ18O and δD on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub μl amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a~home made oven at a temperature of 170 °C. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW–SLAP scale. We apply the necessary corrections based on the assessed performance of the system regarding instrumental drifts and dependance on the water concentration in the optical cavity. The melt rates are monitored in order to assign a depth scale to the measured isotopic profiles. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1‰ and 0.5‰ for δ18O and δD, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sample in the transfer lines limits the temporal resolution of the technique. In this work we investigate and assess these dispersion effects. By using an optimal filtering method we show how the measured profiles can be corrected for the smoothing effects resulting from the sample dispersion. Considering the significant advantages the technique offers, i.e. simultaneuous measurement of δ18O and δD, potentially in combination with chemical components that are traditionally measured on CFA systems, notable reduction on analysis time and power consumption, we consider it as an alternative to traditional isotope ratio mass spectrometry with the possibility to

  14. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and

  15. A special core liner for sub-sampling of aqueous sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    tubes or syringes, (b) cutting windows in the side of the core liner with a vibrating saw blade and inserting small coring tubes or syringes, or (c) splitting 1 m sections of the core open for core description and sub-sampling from the exposed half... sediments. Although hand-operated push core sub- sampling method is popular, it has limitations and cannot be used for sub-sampling the sediments from gravity or piston core. Further, the gravity and piston core samplers do have problems with them 3 . A...

  16. Mineralogy, provenance, and diagenesis of a potassic basaltic sandstone on Mars: CheMin X‐ray diffraction of the Windjana sample (Kimberley area, Gale Crater)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David T.; Chipera, Steve J.; Blake, David F.; Ming, Doug W.; Morris, Richard V.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Morrison, Shaunna M.; Baker, Michael B.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Downs, Robert T.; Filiberto, Justin; Glazner, Allen F.; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy M.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Le Deit, Laetitia; Wiens, Roger C.; McAdam, Amy C.; Achilles, Cherie N.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Farmer, Jack D.; Fendrich, Kim V.; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Morookian, John Michael; Newcombe, Megan E.; Rice, Melissa S.; Spray, John G.; Stolper, Edward M.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Yen, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Windjana drill sample, a sandstone of the Dillinger member (Kimberley formation, Gale Crater, Mars), was analyzed by CheMin X‐ray diffraction (XRD) in the MSL Curiosity rover. From Rietveld refinements of its XRD pattern, Windjana contains the following: sanidine (21% weight, ~Or95); augite (20%); magnetite (12%); pigeonite; olivine; plagioclase; amorphous and smectitic material (~25%); and percent levels of others including ilmenite, fluorapatite, and bassanite. From mass balance on the Alpha Proton X‐ray Spectrometer (APXS) chemical analysis, the amorphous material is Fe rich with nearly no other cations—like ferrihydrite. The Windjana sample shows little alteration and was likely cemented by its magnetite and ferrihydrite. From ChemCam Laser‐Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) chemical analyses, Windjana is representative of the Dillinger and Mount Remarkable members of the Kimberley formation. LIBS data suggest that the Kimberley sediments include at least three chemical components. The most K‐rich targets have 5.6% K2O, ~1.8 times that of Windjana, implying a sediment component with >40% sanidine, e.g., a trachyte. A second component is rich in mafic minerals, with little feldspar (like a shergottite). A third component is richer in plagioclase and in Na2O, and is likely to be basaltic. The K‐rich sediment component is consistent with APXS and ChemCam observations of K‐rich rocks elsewhere in Gale Crater. The source of this sediment component was likely volcanic. The presence of sediment from many igneous sources, in concert with Curiosity's identifications of other igneous materials (e.g., mugearite), implies that the northern rim of Gale Crater exposes a diverse igneous complex, at least as diverse as that found in similar‐age terranes on Earth. PMID:27134806

  17. Mineralogy, provenance, and diagenesis of a potassic basaltic sandstone on Mars: CheMin X-ray diffraction of the Windjana sample (Kimberley area, Gale Crater)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Bish, David L.; Vaniman, David T.; Chipera, Steve J.; Blake, David F.; Ming, Doug W.; Morris, Richard V.; Bristow, Thomas F.; Morrison, Shaunna M.; Baker, Michael B.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Downs, Robert T.; Filiberto, Justin; Glazner, Allen F.; Gellert, Ralf; Thompson, Lucy M.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Le Deit, Laetitia; Wiens, Roger C.; McAdam, Amy C.; Achilles, Cherie N.; Edgett, Kenneth S.; Farmer, Jack D.; Fendrich, Kim V.; Grotzinger, John P.; Gupta, Sanjeev; Morookian, John Michael; Newcombe, Megan E.; Rice, Melissa S.; Spray, John G.; Stolper, Edward M.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Yen, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    The Windjana drill sample, a sandstone of the Dillinger member (Kimberley formation, Gale Crater, Mars), was analyzed by CheMin X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the MSL Curiosity rover. From Rietveld refinements of its XRD pattern, Windjana contains the following: sanidine (21% weight, ~Or95); augite (20%); magnetite (12%); pigeonite; olivine; plagioclase; amorphous and smectitic material (~25%); and percent levels of others including ilmenite, fluorapatite, and bassanite. From mass balance on the Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) chemical analysis, the amorphous material is Fe rich with nearly no other cations—like ferrihydrite. The Windjana sample shows little alteration and was likely cemented by its magnetite and ferrihydrite. From ChemCam Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) chemical analyses, Windjana is representative of the Dillinger and Mount Remarkable members of the Kimberley formation. LIBS data suggest that the Kimberley sediments include at least three chemical components. The most K-rich targets have 5.6% K2O, ~1.8 times that of Windjana, implying a sediment component with >40% sanidine, e.g., a trachyte. A second component is rich in mafic minerals, with little feldspar (like a shergottite). A third component is richer in plagioclase and in Na2O, and is likely to be basaltic. The K-rich sediment component is consistent with APXS and ChemCam observations of K-rich rocks elsewhere in Gale Crater. The source of this sediment component was likely volcanic. The presence of sediment from many igneous sources, in concert with Curiosity's identifications of other igneous materials (e.g., mugearite), implies that the northern rim of Gale Crater exposes a diverse igneous complex, at least as diverse as that found in similar-age terranes on Earth.

  18. Water isotopic ratios from a continuously melted ice core sample

    CERN Document Server

    Gkinis, V; Blunier, T; Bigler, M; Schüpbach, S; Kettner, E; Johnsen, S J

    2014-01-01

    A new technique for on-line high resolution isotopic analysis of liquid water, tailored for ice core studies is presented. We built an interface between a Wavelength Scanned Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (WS-CRDS) purchased from Picarro Inc. and a Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) system. The system offers the possibility to perform simultaneous water isotopic analysis of $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D on a continuous stream of liquid water as generated from a continuously melted ice rod. Injection of sub ${\\mu}$l amounts of liquid water is achieved by pumping sample through a fused silica capillary and instantaneously vaporizing it with 100% efficiency in a home made oven. A calibration procedure allows for proper reporting of the data on the VSMOW--SLAP scale. Application of spectral methods yields the combined uncertainty of the system at below 0.1 permil and 0.5 permil for $\\delta^{18}$O and $\\delta$D, respectively. This performance is comparable to that achieved with mass spectrometry. Dispersion of the sampl...

  19. Physical characterization of core samples recovered from Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Tae Sup; Carlos Santamarina, J. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 790 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0355 (United States); Narsilio, Guillermo A. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Engineering Block D 321, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2006-12-15

    Seventy whole rounds from conventional cores obtained during drilling to 300mbsf at Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon in the Gulf of Mexico in April and May 2005 were tested to determine geophysical and geomechanical parameters (liquid and plastic limit, porosity, specific surface, pH, sediment electrical conductivity, P- and S-wave velocities and undrained shear strength). Available data from a pressure core are included as well. Results show that the sediments are high specific surface plastic clays, and exhibit pronounced time-dependent stiffness recovery. Strains during coring disturb specimens, yet, the water content retains the effective stress history and permits gaining stiffness and strength information from conventional cores. Remolding is exacerbated when gas expands upon decompression; the limited pressure core data available show the advantages of preserving the pore fluid pressure during core recovery and testing. Valuable parameters for sediment characterization and engineering analysis are extracted from the data using pre-existing soil models. (author)

  20. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. Phase 1...

  1. Improved Rock Core Sample Break-off, Retention and Ejection System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort advances the design of an innovative core sampling and acquisition system with improved core break-off, retention and ejection features. The...

  2. Identification of deformation mechanisms in ice core samples

    OpenAIRE

    Kuiper, E.N.; Weikusat, I.; Drury, M.R.; Pennock, G.M.; de Winter, Matthijs

    2014-01-01

    To determine active deformation mechanisms in polar ice. We use LM and Electron BackScattered Diffraction to identify possible slip systems of subgrain boundaries in EDML (Antarctica) and NEEM (Greenland) ice cores.

  3. Evidence of multi-stage faulting by clay mineral analysis: Example in a normal fault zone affecting arkosic sandstones (Annot sandstones)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buatier, Martine D.; Cavailhes, Thibault; Charpentier, Delphine; Lerat, Jérémy; Sizun, Jean Pierre; Labaume, Pierre; Gout, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Fault affecting silicoclastic sediments are commonly enriched in clay minerals. Clays are sensitive to fluid-rock interactions and deformation mechanisms; in this paper, they are used as proxy for fault activity and behavior. The present study focuses on clay mineral assemblages from the Point Vert normal fault zone located in the Annot sandstones, a Priabonian-Rupelian turbidite succession of the Alpine foredeep in SE France. In this area, the Annot sandstones were buried around 6-8 km below the front of Alpine nappes soon after their deposition and exhumed during the middle-late Miocene. The fault affects arkosic sandstone beds alternating with pelitic layers, and displays throw of about thirty meters. The fault core zone comprises intensely foliated sandstones bounding a corridor of gouge about 20 cm thick. The foliated sandstones display clay concentration along S-C structures characterized by dissolution of K-feldspar and their replacement by mica, associated with quartz pressure solution, intense microfracturation and quartz vein precipitation. The gouge is formed by a clayey matrix containing fragments of foliated sandstones and pelites. However, a detailed petrographical investigation suggests complex polyphase deformation processes. Optical and SEM observations show that the clay minerals fraction of all studied rocks (pelites and sandstones from the damage and core zones of the fault) is dominated by white micas and chlorite. These minerals have two different origins: detrital and newly-formed. Detrital micas are identified by their larger shape and their chemical composition with a lower Fe-Mg content than the newly-formed white micas. In the foliated sandstones, newly-formed white micas are concentrated along S-C structures or replace K-feldspar. Both types of newly formed micas display the same chemical composition confirmed microstructural observations suggesting that they formed in the same conditions. They have the following structural formulas: Na0

  4. Genetic distance sampling: a novel sampling method for obtaining core collections using genetic distances with an application to cultivated lettuce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.; Hintum, van T.J.L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel sampling method for obtaining core collections, entitled genetic distance sampling. The method incorporates information about distances between individual accessions into a random sampling procedure. A basic feature of the method is that automatically larger samples are

  5. Investigation effect of wettability and heterogeneity in water flooding and on microscopic residual oil distribution in tight sandstone cores with NMR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Pufu; Leng, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Hanmin; Sun, Linghui; Zhang, Haiqin; Mei, Shisheng; Zhang, Hanyu

    2017-08-01

    In order to explore the effect of wettability and pore throat heterogeneity on oil recovery efficiency in porous media, physical simulation experiment and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements were conducted to investigate how crude oil residing in different sized pores are recovered by water flooding. Experimental results indicate that the recovery factor of water flooding is governed by spontaneous imbibition and also pore throat heterogeneity. It is found that intermediate wetting cores lead to the highest final recovery factor in comparison with water wet cores and weak oil wet cores, and the recovery oil difference in clay micro pore is mainly because of the wettability, the difference in medium pore and large pore is affected by pore throat heterogeneity. Water wet core has a lower recovery factor in medium and large pore due to its poor heterogeneity, in spite of the spontaneous imbibition effect is very satisfying. Intermediate wetting cores has significant result in different sized pore and throat, the difference in medium pore and large pore is affected by pore throat heterogeneity.

  6. Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Core analyses for selected samples from the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, V.A.; Saulnier, G.J. Jr. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Two groups of core samples from the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at and near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant were analyzed to provide estimates of hydrologic parameters for use in flow-and-transport modeling. Whole-core and core-plug samples were analyzed by helium porosimetry, resaturation and porosimetry, mercury-intrusion porosimetry, electrical-resistivity techniques, and gas-permeability methods. 33 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  9. Helium Isotopic Ratios of Core Samples from IODP Exp. 319 (NanTroSEIZE Stage 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, K.; Matsuda, J.; Wiersberg, T.; Shimo, Y.; Tamura, H.; Kumagai, H.; Suzuki, K.; Saito, S.; Kinoshita, M.; Araki, E.; Byrne, T.; McNeill, L. C.; Saffer, D.; Takahashi, K.; Eguchi, N. O.; Toczko, S.

    2009-12-01

    IODP Exp.319 of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Drilling Program Stage 2 started at May 2009. Various advanced technologies including first riser-based scientific ocean drilling were carried out at this cruise. The Hole C0009A (Site C0009/ Hole A) recovered cutting and partly core samples from 703.9-1604 mbsf by riser-drilling. The core samples were collected between the depth of 1510.5 and 1593.9 mbsf. Here we report preliminary helium isotopic ratios of these cores. We collected three types of samples for our study: (1) gas of cores, (2) whole round cores (100 cc) and (3) small whole round cores (10 cc). The gas samples were taken immediately after the core recovery. The gas samples were collected from each core section by using a syringe, and it was transferred to the glass bottle using the water displacement method. The glass bottle was made by Pyrex glass with vacuum valve at each end. We collected two sizes of whole round core samples (100 cc and 10 cc) The 100 cc cores were collected from the bottom and top sections of coring. The 10 cc cores were taken from the other sections. The outer parts of these samples were carefully removed to avoid contaminations from drilling fluid. After the removal of contamination, we immediately stored the 100 cc samples into vacuum container and 10 cc samples into plastic bag under a dry condition, respectively. The gas samples were measured for helium isotopic ratios. The noble gas measurement was carried out at Osaka University by using VG5400 mass spectrometer. We measured helium isotopic ratio and 4He/20Ne ratio. The latter is useful for making correction of the air contamination. The obtained result of helium isotopic ratios shows that the radiogenic helium is prominent in all samples. In addition, the helium isotope ratios show a trend that the ratio at shallower part is slightly higher than that at deeper part. It is conceivable that this trend is due to the larger radiogenic ingrowths at the deeper part. However, the

  10. Trilobites from the Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Grube; Nielsen, Arne Thorshøj; Harper, David Alexander Taylor;

    2014-01-01

    During the Middle Ordovician (Darriwilian) sandstones and siltstones were deposited in the epicontinental Larapintine Sea, which covered large parts of central Australia. The Darriwilian Stairway Sandstone has, for the first time, been sampled stratigraphically for macrofossils to track marine be...

  11. Compact multipurpose sub-sampling and processing of in-situ cores with press (pressurized core sub-sampling and extrusion system)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, E.; Muller, W.H. [Technical Univ. of Berlin, Berlin (Germany). Chair of Continuum Mechanics and Material Theory

    2008-07-01

    Climate change, declining resources and over-consumption result in a need for sustainable resource allocation, habitat conservation and claim for new technologies and prospects for damage-containment. In order to increase knowledge of the environment and to define potential hazards, it is necessary to get an understanding of the deep biosphere. In addition, the benthic conditions of sediment structure and gas hydrates, temperature, pressure and bio-geochemistry must be maintained during the sequences of sampling, retrieval, transfer, storage and downstream analysis. In order to investigate highly instable gas hydrates, which decomposes under pressure and temperature change, a suite of research technologies have been developed by the Technische Universitat Berlin (TUB), Germany. This includes the pressurized core sub-sampling and extrusion system (PRESS) that was developed in the European Union project called HYACE/HYACINTH. The project enabled well-defined sectioning and transfer of drilled pressure-cores obtained by a rotary corer and fugro pressure corer into transportation and investigation chambers. This paper described HYACINTH pressure coring and the HYACINTH core transfer. Autoclave coring tools and HYACINTH core logging, coring tools, and sub-sampling were also discussed. It was concluded that possible future applications include, but were not limited to, research in shales and other tight formations, carbon dioxide sequestration, oil and gas exploration, coalbed methane, and microbiology of the deep biosphere. To meet the corresponding requirements and to incorporate the experiences from previous expeditions, the pressure coring system would need to be redesigned to adapt it to the new applications. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Opportunities and Challenges of Linking Scientific Core Samples to the Geoscience Data Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noren, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Core samples generated in scientific drilling and coring are critical for the advancement of the Earth Sciences. The scientific themes enabled by analysis of these samples are diverse, and include plate tectonics, ocean circulation, Earth-life system interactions (paleoclimate, paleobiology, paleoanthropology), Critical Zone processes, geothermal systems, deep biosphere, and many others, and substantial resources are invested in their collection and analysis. Linking core samples to researchers, datasets, publications, and funding agencies through registration of globally unique identifiers such as International Geo Sample Numbers (IGSNs) offers great potential for advancing several frontiers. These include maximizing sample discoverability, access, reuse, and return on investment; a means for credit to researchers; and documentation of project outputs to funding agencies. Thousands of kilometers of core samples and billions of derivative subsamples have been generated through thousands of investigators' projects, yet the vast majority of these samples are curated at only a small number of facilities. These numbers, combined with the substantial similarity in sample types, make core samples a compelling target for IGSN implementation. However, differences between core sample communities and other geoscience disciplines continue to create barriers to implementation. Core samples involve parent-child relationships spanning 8 or more generations, an exponential increase in sample numbers between levels in the hierarchy, concepts related to depth/position in the sample, requirements for associating data derived from core scanning and lithologic description with data derived from subsample analysis, and publications based on tens of thousands of co-registered scan data points and thousands of analyses of subsamples. These characteristics require specialized resources for accurate and consistent assignment of IGSNs, and a community of practice to establish norms

  13. Water column and bed-sediment core samples collected from Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosness, Ryan L.; Naymik, Jesse; Hopkins, Candice B.; DeWild, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Idaho Power Company, collected water-column and bed-sediment core samples from eight sites in Brownlee Reservoir near Oxbow, Oregon, during May 5–7, 2012. Water-column and bed-sediment core samples were collected at each of the eight sites and analyzed for total mercury and methylmercury. Additional bed-sediment core samples, collected from three of the eight sites, were analyzed for pesticides and other organic compounds, trace metals, and physical characteristics, such as particle size. Total mercury and methylmercury were detected in each of the water column and bed-sediment core samples. Only 17 of the 417 unique pesticide and organic compounds were detected in bed-sediment core samples. Concentrations of most organic wastewater compounds detected in bed sediment were less than the reporting level. Trace metals detected were greater than the reporting level in all the bed-sediment core samples submitted for analysis. The particle size distribution of bed-sediment core samples was predominantly clay mixed with silt.

  14. Core size effect on the dry and saturated ultrasonic pulse velocity of limestone samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercikdi, Bayram; Karaman, Kadir; Cihangir, Ferdi; Yılmaz, Tekin; Aliyazıcıoğlu, Şener; Kesimal, Ayhan

    2016-12-01

    This study presents the effect of core length on the saturated (UPVsat) and dry (UPVdry) P-wave velocities of four different biomicritic limestone samples, namely light grey (BL-LG), dark grey (BL-DG), reddish (BL-R) and yellow (BL-Y), using core samples having different lengths (25-125mm) at a constant diameter (54.7mm). The saturated P-wave velocity (UPVsat) of all core samples generally decreased with increasing the sample length. However, the dry P-wave velocity (UPVdry) of samples obtained from BL-LG and BL-Y limestones increased with increasing the sample length. In contrast to the literature, the dry P-wave velocity (UPVdry) values of core samples having a length of 75, 100 and 125mm were consistently higher (2.8-46.2%) than those of saturated (UPVsat). Chemical and mineralogical analyses have shown that the P wave velocity is very sensitive to the calcite and clay minerals potentially leading to the weakening/disintegration of rock samples in the presence of water. Severe fluctuations in UPV values were observed to occur between 25 and 75mm sample lengths, thereafter, a trend of stabilization was observed. The maximum variation of UPV values between the sample length of 75mm and 125mm was only 7.3%. Therefore, the threshold core sample length was interpreted as 75mm for UPV measurement in biomicritic limestone samples used in this study.

  15. Application of the IGSN for improved data - sample - drill core linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnken, Andree; Wallrabe-Adams, Hans-Joachim; Röhl, Ursula; Krysiak, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The large number of samples resulting from geoscientific research creates a need for a system that has the ability to allocate unique identifiers for individual samples (cores, core sections, rock samples...). In this abstract we present a solution that utilises the IGSN (1) Registry Metadata Store (2) to automatically register unique IGSN's for samples and submit corresponding metadata. An automated workflow has been set up to register IGSN's and submit metadata for cores stored for example at the IODP (3) Bremen Core Repository (BCR) in Bremen and the BGR National Core Repository for Research Drilling in Berlin, and partly transfer the core information to the GESEP (4) Virtual Core Repository (5). Detailed metadata for these cores are stored in a DIS (6), from which xml files containing all necessary information for IGSN and metadata submission are automatically generated. These files are automatically processed to extract and register the unique IGSN as well as the corresponding metadata. After this parsing process, the IGSN registration and metadata submission processes are triggered by posting the appropriate IGSN API (7) service calls. 1. International Geo Sample Number 2. https://doidb.wdc-terra.org/igsn/ 3. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program / International Ocean Discovery Program 4. German Scientific Earth Probing Consortium 5. http://www.gesep.org/infrastruktur/kernlager/portal/ 6. Drilling Information System 7. https://doidb.wdc-terra.org/igsn/static/apidoc

  16. Determination of the neutron activation profile of core drill samples by gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, D; Boden, S; Sima, O; Stanga, D

    2017-08-04

    This paper provides guidance for determining the neutron activation profile of core drill samples taken from the biological shield of nuclear reactors using gamma spectrometry measurements. Thus, it provides guidance for selecting a model of the right form to fit data and using least squares methods for model fitting. The activity profiles of two core samples taken from the biological shield of a nuclear reactor were determined. The effective activation depth and the total activity of core samples along with their uncertainties were computed by Monte Carlo simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A sample-freezing drive shoe for a wire line piston core sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F.; Herkelrath, W.N.

    1996-01-01

    Loss of fluids and samples during retrieval of cores of saturated, noncohesive sediments results in incorrect measures of fluid distributions and an inaccurate measure of the stratigraphic position of the sample. To reduce these errors, we developed a hollow drive shoe that freezes in place the lowest 3 inches (75 mm) of a 1.88-inch-diameter (48 mm), 5-foot-long (1.5 m) sediment sample taken using a commercial wire line piston core sampler. The end of the core is frozen by piping liquid carbon dioxide at ambient temperature through a steel tube from a bottle at the land surface to the drive shoe where it evaporates and expands, cooling the interior surface of the shoe to about -109??F (-78??C). Freezing a core end takes about 10 minutes. The device was used to collect samples for a study of oil-water-air distributions, and for studies of water chemistry and microbial activity in unconsolidated sediments at the site of an oil spill near Bemidji, Minnesota. Before freezing was employed, samples of sandy sediments from near the water table sometimes flowed out of the core barrel as the sampler was withdrawn. Freezing the bottom of the core allowed for the retention of all material that entered the core barrel and lessened the redistribution of fluids within the core. The device is useful in the unsaturated and shallow saturated zones, but does not freeze cores well at depths greater than about 20 feet (6 m) below water, possibly because the feed tube plugs with dry ice with increased exhaust back-pressure, or because sediment enters the annulus between the core barrel and the core barrel liner and blocks the exhaust.

  18. A Xhosa language translation of the CORE-OM using South African university student samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Megan M; Young, Charles

    2016-10-01

    The translation of well established psychometric tools from English into Xhosa may assist in improving access to psychological services for Xhosa speakers. The aim of this study was to translate the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation - Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), a measure of general distress and dysfunction developed in the UK, into Xhosa for use at South African university student counselling centres. The CORE-OM and embedded CORE-10 were translated into Xhosa using a five-stage translation design. This design included (a) forward-translation, (b) back-translation, (c) committee approach, (d) qualitative piloting, and (e) quantitative piloting on South African university students. Clinical and general samples were drawn from English-medium South African universities. Clinical samples were generated from university student counselling centres. General student samples were generated through random stratified cluster sampling of full-time university students. Qualitative feedback from the translation process and results from quantitative piloting of the 34-item CORE-OM English and Xhosa versions supported the reduction of the scale to 10 items. This reduced scale is referred to as the South African CORE-10 (SA CORE-10). A measurement and structural model of the SA CORE-10 English version was developed and cross-validated using an English-speaking university student sample. Equivalence of this model with the SA CORE-10 Xhosa version was investigated using a first-language Xhosa-speaking university sample. Partial measurement equivalence was achieved at the metric level. The resultant SA CORE-10 Xhosa and English versions provide core measures of distress and dysfunction. Additional, culture- and language-specific domains could be added to increase sensitivity and specificity.

  19. Physical-Property Measurements on Core samples from Drill-Holes DB-1 and DB-2, Blue Mountain Geothermal Prospect, North-Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, David A.; Watt, Janet T.; Casteel, John; Logsdon, Grant

    2009-01-01

    From May to June 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and measured physical properties on 36 core samples from drill-hole Deep Blue No. 1 (DB-1) and 46 samples from drill-hole Deep Blue No. 2 (DB-2) along the west side of Blue Mountain about 40 km west of Winnemucca, Nev. These data were collected as part of an effort to determine the geophysical setting of the Blue Mountain geothermal prospect as an aid to understanding the geologic framework of geothermal systems throughout the Great Basin. The physical properties of these rocks and other rock types in the area create a distinguishable pattern of gravity and magnetic anomalies that can be used to infer their subsurface geologic structure. Drill-holes DB-1 and DB-2 were spudded in alluvium on the western flank of Blue Mountain in 2002 and 2004, respectively, and are about 1 km apart. Drill-hole DB-1 is at a ground elevation of 1,325 m and was drilled to a depth of 672 m and drill-hole DB-2 is at a ground elevation of 1,392 m and was drilled to a depth of 1522 m. Diameter of the core samples is 6.4 cm. These drill holes penetrate Jurassic and Triassic metasedimentary rocks predominantly consisting of argillite, mudstone, and sandstone; Tertiary diorite and gabbro; and younger Tertiary felsic dikes.

  20. Attenuation of Landfill Leachate In Unsaturated Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A. P.; Brook, C.; Godley, A.; Lewin, K.; Young, C. P.

    feature of the sequences of porewater concentration profiles is the sharp leading front of the Cl plume. Thus indicating that very little solute dispersion appears to be occurring. This is probably to be due to the relatively uniform particle size of the sand matrix combined with the low moisture content, which has greatly constrained the available pore sizes in which flow occurs. A marked reduction in the mass of the chloride plume has been observed over the last 13 years. Analyses of core sample taken in 2000 show that the Cl profile has continued to lose mass and has now also separated into two peaks. The leading peak was located at a depth of 36 m below ground level (28 m below the base of the landfill) and in line with model predictions. The trailing peak was at a depth of 27 m bgl and was associated with a 0.3 m layer of marl and clay bands. Thus there is an indication that the changes in chloride mass are possibly due to the effects of heterogeneity, although other processes which could account for chloride removal from solution are also under consideration. The location of the TOC front up to 1992 was commensurate with that of Cl, indicating no effective retardation. This is consistent with the very low levels of organic carbon present in the sandstone. However, marked reductions in contaminant mass (substantially greater than those of Cl) have been observed. Analyses of volatile fatty acids has indicated a progressive breakdown of VFA components leading to simpler products so that by 1991 the dominant component was ethanoic acid (56% by mass). By 2000 the entire leading front of the TOC was absent. TOC was only found to be present at relatively low concentrations ( 100 mg.l-1) above the marl/clay band. Analyses of gas concentrations at the site have indicated that there has been a change in the redox potential in the volume of contaminated unsaturated sandstone below the waste cells during the last 10 years. With predominantly anaerobic conditions giving way to

  1. Cored Cottonwood Tree Sample Cluster Polygons at Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — A vector polygon dataset representing the location of sample clusters of cored trees at Sand Creek Massacre NHS as part of a University of Colorado research study.

  2. The accuracy of parameters determined with the core-sampling method application to Voronoi tessellations

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, A G; Madsen, S; Doroshkevich, Andrei G.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Madsen, Soeren

    1996-01-01

    The large-scale matter distribution represents a complex network of structure elements such as voids, clusters, filaments, and sheets. This network is spanned by a point distribution. The global properties of the point process can be measured by different statistical methods, which, however, do not describe directly the structure elements. The morphology of structure elements is an important property of the point distribution. Here we apply the core-sampling method to various Voronoi tessellations. Using the core-sampling method we identify one- and two-dimensional structure elements (filaments and sheets) in these Voronoi tessellations and reconstruct their mean separation along random straight lines. We compare the results of the core-sampling method with the a priori known structure elements of the Voronoi tessellations under consideration and find good agreement between the expected and found structure parameters, even in the presence of substantial noise. We conclude that the core-sampling method is a po...

  3. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Leg 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayles, Fred L.; Manheim, Frank T.; Waterman, Lee S.

    1973-01-01

    Analyses of pore fluids from reducing environments demonstrate that reduction of SO4 is accompanied by large increases in alkalinity and strong depletion of Ca and Mg. The data are compatible with a model of replacement of Fe3+ in clay lattices by Mg from the interstitial solutions and the precipitation of pyrite. Depletions of Na in the interstitial solutions are related to Mg losses by a ratio of approximately 1:3. Pore fluids from oxidizing pelagic sediments exhibit little SO4 depletion. Losses of Mg are accompanied by the addition of Ca to the pore solutions on a nearly 1:1 basis. Strong Sr enrichment is also found in these solutions. The magnitude of the Sr increase suggests that considerable carbonate recrystallization has occurred. As part of an extensive interlaboratory and analytical calibration, the effect of squeezing sediment at different temperatures has been studied in depth. Samples of a variety of lithologies have been included. Enrichment of K by as much as 24 percent and depletion of Mg and Ca by up to 7 percent occurs during warming. However, no significant effect upon Cl and SO4 could be detected. The strongest effects are seen in the minor constituents studied. On warming, Sr, Si, and B are enriched as much as 19, 40, and 60 percent, respectively. The size of the observed concentration changes varies with the mineralogy of the sediment, but is significant in all types studied, particularly with regards to Mg and K.

  4. Petrology and stratigraphy of Paleogene nonmarine sandstones, Cascade Range, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Virgil A.

    1979-01-01

    The Cascade Range of Washington north of 47? latitude is composed of probable Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic and Tertiary plutonic rocks. Several Paleogene nonmarine arkosic sandstone units fringe and in part occur within the complex crystalline core. The early to middle Eocene Chuckanut Formation is present on the west side of the crystalline core in the western foothills of the Cascades. The early to middle Eocene Swauk Formation partially encircles the Mt. Stuart massif of the central Cascades. In the western foothills of the Cascades, between the main body of Chuckanut Formation near Bellingham and the main outcrop area of the Swauk Formation south of Mt. Stuart, many smaller bodies of arkosic sandstone have variously been referred to either the Swauk or Chuckanut Formations. The early Eocene Manastash Formation occurs locally in an area south of the Yakima River. The middle to late Eocene Chumstick Formation is mostly confined to the Chiwaukum graben within the crystalline core and is separated from the Swauk Formation on the southwest by the Leavenworth Fault. The Oligocene Wenatchee Formation unconformably over lies the Chumstick Formation near Wenatchee. The middle to late Eocene Roslyn Formation crops out north of the Yakima River and is underlain by the Teanaway Basalt which separates the Roslyn from the older Swauk Formation. The middle Eocene to early Oligocene Naches Formation forms a north-trending body that crosses the Yakima River and is in fault contact with both the Swauk and Manastash Formations. The middle to late Eocene Puget Group underlies the Quaternary deposits of the Puget Lowland southeast of Seattle on the western flank of the Cascades. The various formations are all composed predominantly of fine- to medium-grained sandstones with lesser amounts of interbedded shale, conglomerate and coal. Compositionally, the units are predominantly either feldspathic or litho-feldspathic subquartzose sandstones. Volcanic rocks

  5. SAFOD Phase III Core Sampling and Data Management at the Gulf Coast Repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lockner

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFODproject is yielding new insight into the San Andreas Fault (Zoback et al., 2010; Zoback et al., this issue. SAFOD drilling started in 2002 with a pilot hole, and proceeded with three phrases of drilling and coring during the summers of 2004, 2005, and 2007 (Fig. 1. One key component of theproject is curation, sampling, and documentation of SAFOD core usage at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program’s (IODP Gulf Coast Repository (GCR at Texas A&M University. We present here the milestones accomplished over the past two years of sampling Phase III core at the GCR.

  6. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and

  7. DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

    2011-04-25

    Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and

  8. Tank 241-AZ-102 Privatization Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEMPLETON, A.M.

    1999-07-08

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for samples obtained from tank 241-AZ-102. The purpose of this sampling event is to obtain information about the characteristics of the contents of 241-AZ-102. Push mode core samples will be obtained from risers 15C and 24A to provide sufficient material for the chemical analyses and tests required to satisfy these data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory will extrude core samples, composite the liquids and solids, perform chemical analyses, and provide subsamples to the Process Chemistry Laboratory. The Process Chemistry Laboratory will prepare test plans and perform process tests to evaluate the behavior of the 241-AZ-102 waste undergoing the retrieval and treatment scenarios defined in the applicable DQOs. Requirements for analyses of samples originating in the process tests will be documented in the corresponding test plan.

  9. Test of Tree Core Sampling for Screening of Toxic Elements in Soils from a Norwegian Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Rein, Arno; Legind, Charlotte Nielsen

    2011-01-01

    Tree core samples have been used to delineate organic subsurface plumes. In 2009 and 2010, samples were taken at trees growing on a former dump site in Norway and analyzed for arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), and zinc (Zn). Concentrations in wood were in averag...

  10. Quantitative x-ray diffraction mineralogy of Los Angeles basin core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; McIntyre, Brandie R.; Edwards, Brian D.; Lakota, Orion I.

    2006-01-01

    This report contains X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of mineralogy for 81 sediment samples from cores taken from three drill holes in the Los Angeles Basin in 2000-2001. We analyzed 26 samples from Pier F core, 29 from Pier C core, and 26 from the Webster core. These three sites provide an offshore-onshore record across the Southern California coastal zone. This report is designed to be a data repository; these data will be used in further studies, including geochemical modeling as part of the CABRILLO project. Summary tables quantify the major mineral groups, whereas detailed mineralogy is presented in three appendices. The rationale, methodology, and techniques are described in the following paper.

  11. Using tree core samples to monitor natural attenuation and plume distribution after a PCE spill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten; Burken, J.; Machackova, J.;

    2008-01-01

    The potential of using tree core samples to detect and monitor natural attenuation of perchloroethene (PCE) in groundwater was investigated at a PCE-contaminated site. In the area of the known plume with PCE concentrations between 0.004 and >40 mg/L, cores were collected from tree trunks at a hei...... at a height of about 1 m above ground surface. Tree sampling of the site was completed in under six hours. Chlorinated ethenes were analyzed by headspace GC/MS. PCE (0.001 to 7 mg/kg) and natural attenuation products, TCE (...

  12. Comparison of tree coring and soil gas sampling for screening of contaminated sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Algreen; Stalder, Marcel; Riis, Charlotte;

    and then identify high risk areas. The uptake of BTEX into trees varies to a greater extent with the tree species and the site conditions than chlorinated solvents, which lead to greater uncertainty. Both methods have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the methods supplement each other. Based on results...... suitable as initial screening methods for site characterization. The aim of this study is to compare tree coring and soil gas sampling to evaluate to which extent tree coring may supplement or substitute soil gas sampling as a site contaminant screening tool. And where both methods are feasible, evaluate...

  13. Benthic foraminiferal census data from Mobile Bay, Alabama--counts of surface samples and box cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richwine, Kathryn A.; Osterman, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    A study was undertaken in order to understand recent environmental change in Mobile Bay, Alabama. For this study a series of surface sediment and box core samples was collected. The surface benthic foraminiferal data provide the modern baseline conditions of the bay and can be used as a reference for changing paleoenvironmental parameters recorded in the box cores. The 14 sampling locations were chosen in the bay to cover the wide diversity of fluvial and marine-influenced environments on both sides of the shipping channel.

  14. Baseline Design Compliance Matrix for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LECHELT, J.A.

    2000-10-17

    The purpose of the design compliance matrix (DCM) is to provide a single-source document of all design requirements associated with the fifteen subsystems that make up the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) system. It is intended to be the baseline requirement document for the RMCS system and to be used in governing all future design and design verification activities associated with it. This document is the DCM for the RMCS system used on Hanford single-shell radioactive waste storage tanks. This includes the Exhauster System, Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks, Universal Sampling System, Diesel Generator System, Distribution Trailer, X-Ray Cart System, Breathing Air Compressor, Nitrogen Supply Trailer, Casks and Cask Truck, Service Trailer, Core Sampling Riser Equipment, Core Sampling Support Trucks, Foot Clamp, Ramps and Platforms and Purged Camera System. Excluded items are tools such as light plants and light stands. Other items such as the breather inlet filter are covered by a different design baseline. In this case, the inlet breather filter is covered by the Tank Farms Design Compliance Matrix.

  15. Contamination assessment in microbiological sampling of the Eyreville core, Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronstal, A.L.; Voytek, M.A.; Kirshtein, J.D.; Von der, Heyde; Lowit, M.D.; Cockell, C.S.

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the deep subsurface biosphere is limited due to difficulties in recovering materials. Deep drilling projects provide access to the subsurface; however, contamination introduced during drilling poses a major obstacle in obtaining clean samples. To monitor contamination during the 2005 International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP)-U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deep drilling of the Chesapeake Bay impact structure, four methods were utilized. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mimic the ability of contaminant cells to enter samples through fractures in the core material during retrieval. Drilling mud was infused with a chemical tracer (Halon 1211) in order to monitor penetration of mud into cores. Pore water from samples was examined using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fl uorescence spectroscopy to characterize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) present at various depths. DOC signatures at depth were compared to signatures from drilling mud in order to identify potential contamination. Finally, microbial contaminants present in drilling mud were identified through 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) clone libraries and compared to species cultured from core samples. Together, these methods allowed us to categorize the recovered core samples according to the likelihood of contamination. Twenty-two of the 47 subcores that were retrieved were free of contamination by all the methods used and were subsequently used for microbiological culture and culture-independent analysis. Our approach provides a comprehensive assessment of both particulate and dissolved contaminants that could be applied to any environment with low biomass. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  16. Analysis of core samples from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert gas hydrate stratigraphic test well: Insights into core disturbance and handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Lu, Hailong; Winters, William; Boswell, Ray; Hunter, Robert; Collett, Timothy S.

    2009-09-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  17. Indirect Estimations of Frictional Coefficients of Fractures in Sandstones for Analysis of Injection Induced Microseismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Y.; Chang, C.; Koh, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    The frictional coefficient of fractures, a fundamental parameter needed to analyze a variety of geomechanical problems for microseismicity, is normally determined from laboratory shear tests. However, recovered rock cores are rarely available because of difficulties and high cost in getting undisturbed core samples. In that case, the frictional coefficient should be either assumed or estimated indirectly. We investigate the frictional property of fractures of various sandstones in laboratory tests and attempt to correlate that with other properties measureable relatively readily even without cores. We use various sandstones obtained from different depths of a 1 km deep borehole drilled for coal bed methane development in a Paleozoic sedimentary basin, South Korea. The sandstones have various physical properties (e.g. P-wave velocity (VP) of 2253-5038 m/s) and chemical compositions in terms of clay content (5-31%). We conduct direct shear tests in an artificial saw-cut fracture in the sandstones and determined frictional coefficients in a range of 0.36-0.57. The frictional coefficients have an inverse-linear correlation with clay contents measured from XRD analysis. These results are also quite consistent with those from previous clay gouge experiments (Takahashi et al., 2007; Tembe et al., 2010; Kohli & Zoback, 2013). They also have a linear correlation with VP. Our study demonstrates that frictional coefficients can be estimated empirically from such properties. To check feasibility of such an approach, we apply the obtained empirical relation to the borehole where cores were recovered. The clay contents in sandstone formations are estimated from the borehole gamma ray log calibrated using the XRD clay content data. Clay content estimated from gamma ray varies significantly with depth in a range of 0-45%. This range of clay content corresponds to frictional coefficients of 0.25-0.58. Comparison between estimated and measured frictional coefficients shows a

  18. Comparison of core sampling and visual inspection for assessment of sewer pipe condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanic, N.; Haan, C.; Tirion, M.; Langeveld, J.G.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Sewer systems are costly to construct and even more costly to replace, requiring proper asset management Sewer asset management relies to a large extent on available information. In sewer systems where pipe corrosion is the dominant failure mechanism, visual inspection (CCTV) and core sampling are a

  19. Comparison of core sampling and visual inspection for assessment of sewer pipe condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanic, N.; Haan, C.; Tirion, M.; Langeveld, J.G.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Sewer systems are costly to construct and even more costly to replace, requiring proper asset management Sewer asset management relies to a large extent on available information. In sewer systems where pipe corrosion is the dominant failure mechanism, visual inspection (CCTV) and core sampling are a

  20. Comparison of core sampling and visual inspection for assessment of sewer pipe condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanic, N.; Haan, C.; Tirion, M.; Langeveld, J.G.; Clemens, F.H.L.R.

    2012-01-01

    Sewer systems are costly to construct and even more costly to replace, requiring proper asset management Sewer asset management relies to a large extent on available information. In sewer systems where pipe corrosion is the dominant failure mechanism, visual inspection (CCTV) and core sampling are

  1. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediment: Uncontaminated RCRA Borehole Core Samples and Composite Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Williams, Bruce A.; Lanigan, David C.; Horton, Duane G.; Clayton, Ray E.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Legore, Virginia L.; O' Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Serne, Jennifer N.; Last, George V.; Smith, Steven C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Zachara, John M.; Burke, Deborah S.

    2008-09-11

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.14, 4.16, 5.20, 5.22, 5.43, and 5.45. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in February 2002. The overall goal of the of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. asked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediment from within the S-SX Waste Management Area. This report is one in a series of four reports to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) borehole bore samples and composite samples.

  2. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Laura C. Zahm; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2004-04-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), building on an initial gift from BP, and with the continuing support of the Department of Energy (DOE), has established the first regional core and sample research center in Houston, Texas. The Houston Research Center (HRC) provides a state-of-the-art core layout facility, two fully equipped meeting rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. This document summarizes the activities, upkeep, increase in staff, and public impact on industry and the community that were accomplished at the Houston Research Center during its first two years of operation.

  3. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Laura C. Zahm; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2004-04-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), building on an initial gift from BP, and with the continuing support of the Department of Energy (DOE), has established the first regional core and sample research center in Houston, Texas. The Houston Research Center (HRC) provides a state-of-the-art core layout facility, two fully equipped meeting rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. This document summarizes the activities, upkeep, increase in staff, and public impact on industry and the community that were accomplished at the Houston Research Center during its first two years of operation.

  4. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric determination of radiocarbon in stratospheric CO2, retrieved from AirCore sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Been, Henk A.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2015-04-01

    In this decade, understanding the impact of human activities on climate is one of the key issues of discussion globally. The continuous rise in the concentration of greenhouse gases, e.g., CO2, CH4, etc. in the atmosphere, predominantly due to human activities, is alarming and requires continuous monitoring to understand the dynamics. Radiocarbon is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases like CO2 and CH4. Measurement of 14C (or radiocarbon) in atmospheric CO2 generally requires collection of large air samples (few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined. Currently, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most precise, reliable and widely used technique for atmospheric radiocarbon detection. However, the regular collection of air samples from troposphere and stratosphere, for example using aircraft, is prohibitively expensive. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, developed by NOAA. It comprises of a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ~ 30 km) measurements of CH4and CO2(Karion et al. 2010). In Europe, AirCore measurements are being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of two such AirCore samples collected in July 2014, Finland, for determining the 14C concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore samples were collected on consecutive days. Each stratospheric AirCore sample was divided into six fractions, each containing ~ 35 μg CO2 (~9.5 μg C). Each fraction was separately trapped in 1 /4 inch coiled stainless steel tubing for radiocarbon measurements. The procedure for CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples; the sample preparation, with samples containing < 10

  5. A comparison of tonsillar surface swabbing, fine-needle aspiration core sampling, and dissected tonsillar core biopsy culture in children with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Saurav; Sil, Abheek; Sarkar, Soma; Sikder, Biswajit

    2017-06-01

    In recurrent tonsillitis, the pathogenic bacteria are harbored in the tonsil core, and therefore cultures of superficial swab samples are not particularly accurate in identifying specific types of core bacteria. On the other hand, the results of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cultures of core samples have been closely correlated with the findings of core cultures in excised tonsils, and both methods are far superior to surface swabbing. We conducted a prospective study to compare the accuracy of culture findings from tonsillar tissue obtained by surface swabbing, FNA sampling of the tonsil core in situ, and core sampling of the excised tonsil in children with recurrent tonsillitis. Our patient population was made up of 54 children-22 boys and 32 girls, aged 4 to 14 years (mean: 10.7)-who were undergoing elective tonsillectomy during a 1-year period. On the day of surgery, a surface swab, core FNA sample, and dissected core sample were obtained from each patient and sent for culture. Culture showed that the three methods were in agreement in 34 cases (63.0%). In 9 cases (16.7%) the surface swab culture grew different pathogens from those of the two core cultures, and in 3 other cases (5.6%) the surface swab culture was negative while the two core cultures were positive for the same pathogens. In all, the results of core FNA culture and dissected core culture were in agreement in 46 cases (85.2%); in only 4 cases (7.4%) did the core FNA culture fail to accurately identify the causative pathogens. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of core FNA sampling were 100 and 50% respectively, compared with 82.9 and 30.8% for the superficial tonsillar swab. We conclude that routine culture of surface swab specimens in patients with chronic or recurrent tonsillitis is neither reliable nor valid. We recommend that core FNA sampling be considered the diagnostic method of choice since it can be done on an outpatient basis, it would reliably allow for culture-directed antibiotic

  6. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from which CO2 is extracted and then the concentration of radiocarbon is determined using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). However, the regular collection of air samples from the stratosphere, for example using aircraft and balloons, is prohibitively expensive. Here we describe radiocarbon measurements in stratospheric CO2 collected by the AirCore sampling method. AirCore is an innovative atmospheric sampling system, which comprises a long tube descending from a high altitude with one end open and the other closed, and it has been demonstrated to be a reliable, cost-effective sampling system for high-altitude profile (up to ≈ 30 km) measurements of CH4 and CO2. In Europe, AirCore measurements have been being performed on a regular basis near Sodankylä (northern Finland) since September 2013. Here we describe the analysis of samples from two such AirCore flights made there in July 2014, for determining the radiocarbon concentration in stratospheric CO2. The two AirCore profiles were collected on consecutive days. The stratospheric part of the AirCore was divided into six sections, each containing ≈ 35 µg CO2 ( ≈ 9.6 µgC), and stored in a stratospheric air subsampler constructed from 1/4 in. coiled stainless steel tubing ( ≈ 3 m). A small-volume extraction system was constructed that enabled > 99.5 % CO2 extraction from the stratospheric air samples. Additionally, a new small-volume high-efficiency graphitization system was constructed for graphitization of these extracted CO2 samples, which were measured at the Groningen AMS facility. Since the stratospheric samples were very similar in mass, reference samples were also prepared in the same mass range for

  7. Tank 241-SY-101 push mode core sampling and analysis plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONNER, J.M.

    1998-10-09

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, laboratory analytical evaluation, and reporting requirements for push mode core samples from tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). It is written in accordance with Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue (Bauer 1998), Low Activity Waste Feed Data Quality Objectives (Wiemers and Miller 1997 and DOE 1998), Data Quality Objectives for TWRS Privatization Phase I: Confirm Tank T is an Appropriate Feed Source for Low-Activity Waste Feed Batch X (Certa 1998), and the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995). The Tank Characterization Technical Sampling Basis document (Brown et al. 1998) indicates that these issues apply to tank SY-101 for this sampling event. Brown et al. also identifies high-level waste, regulatory, pretreatment and disposal issues as applicable issues for this tank. However, these issues will not be addressed via this sampling event.

  8. 核磁共振岩心实验分析在低孔渗储层评价中的应用%Application of NMR core experimental analysis in evaluation of low-porosity and low-permeability sandstone reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振华; 陈刚; 李书恒; 章辉若; 黄得顺; 杨甫; 雷盼盼; 刘小伸

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance ( NMR) core experimental analysis is a new developing technique in experi⁃mental geology. Based on the principles and methods of NMR core experimental analysis, as well as some improved parametric models, a series of reservoir parameters of Chang6 low⁃porosity and low⁃permeability oil⁃bearing sand⁃stone core samples from well 3062 in the ZC Oil Field in the eastern Ordos Basin were systematically measured by NMR. Additionally, the accuracy and relative error of the NMR analysis were calculated and discussed by means of recognized exact method of conventional core experimental analysis as control group. It is revealed that the Chang6 oil⁃bearing sandstones are typical low⁃porosity and low⁃permeability reservoirs, with porosity ranging from 8.6% to 13.0%, and permeability from 0.07×10-3 to 1.27×10-3μm2 . NMR core experimental analysis has advantages of con⁃venience, high efficiency and accepted accuracy with a smaller relative error for testing the low⁃porosity and low⁃permeability reservoir parameters of porosity, microscopic pore structure and irreducible water saturation. However, compared with the results of conventional core analysis, there is a larger relative error in NMR prediction for the permeability parameters, which is most probably due to some uncertainty of the reservoir permeability predictive models.%根据核磁共振( NMR)岩心实验分析的基本原理、方法和相关参数模型的研究进展,对鄂尔多斯盆地东部ZC油田3062井延长组长6油层组低孔渗砂岩样品进行了储层物性、孔隙结构和束缚水饱和度等参数的NMR岩心实验分析,并将其与常规岩心测试参数进行了分析与对比,探讨了低孔渗储层NMR岩心实验分析的精度及其应用效果。结果表明,3062井长6油层组砂岩属于典型的低孔渗储层,孔隙度在8.6%~13.0%,渗透率在(0.07~1.27)×10-3μm2;低孔渗砂岩样品NMR岩

  9. Size effect of sandstone after high temperature under uniaxial compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Hai-jian; JING Hong-wen; MAO Xian-biao; ZHAO Hong-hui; YIN Qian; WANG Chen

    2015-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests on sandstone samples with five different sizes after high temperature processes were performed in order to investigate the size effect and its evolution. The test results show that the density, longitudinal wave velocity, peak strength, average modulus and secant modulus of sandstone decrease with the increase of temperature, however, peak strain increases gradually. With the increase of ratio of height to diameter, peak strength of sandstone decreases, which has an obvious size effect. A new theoretical model of size effect of sandstone material considering the influence of temperature is put forward, and with the increase of temperature, the size effect is more apparent. The threshold decreases gradually with the increase of temperature, and the deviations of the experimental values and the theoretical values are between 0.44% and 6.06%, which shows quite a credibility of the theoretical model.

  10. Estimating fugitive methane emissions from oil sands mining using extractive core samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew R.; Crosland, Brian M.; McEwen, James D.; Hager, Darcy B.; Armitage, Joshua R.; Karimi-Golpayegani, Mojgan; Picard, David J.

    2016-11-01

    Fugitive methane emissions from oil sands mining activities are a potentially important source of greenhouse gas emissions for which there are significant uncertainties and a lack of open data. This paper investigates the potential of a control-system approach to estimating fugitive methane emissions by analyzing releasable gas volumes in core samples extracted from undeveloped mine regions. Field experiments were performed by leveraging routine winter drilling activities that are a component of normal mine planning and development, and working in conjunction with an on-site drill crew using existing equipment. Core samples were extracted from two test holes, sealed at the surface, and transported for off-site lab analysis. Despite the challenges of the on-site sample collection and the limitations of the available drilling technology, notable quantities of residual methane (mean of 23.8 mgCH4/kg-core-sample (+41%/-35%) or 779 mgCH4/kg-bitumen (+69%/-34%) at 95% confidence) were measured in the collected core samples. If these factors are applied to the volumes of bitumen mined in Alberta in 2015, they imply fugitive methane emissions equivalent to 2.1 MtCO2e (as correlated with bitumen content) or 1.4 MtCO2e (as correlated with total mined material) evaluated on a 100-year time horizon. An additional ∼0.2 Mt of fugitive CO2 emissions could also be expected. Although additional measurements at a larger number of locations are warranted to determine whether these emissions should be considered as additive to, or inclusive of, current estimates based on flux chamber measurements at the mine face, these first-of-their-kind results demonstrate an intriguing alternate method for quantifying fugitive emissions from oil sands mining and extraction.

  11. HYACE - a novel autoclave coring equipment for systematic offshore gashydrate sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, H.; Hohnberg, H.J.; Reinelt, R. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Schiffs- und Meerestechnik, Fachgebiet Maritime Technik

    1997-12-31

    HYACE, the acronym for hydrate autoclave coring equipment system, is a research and development project sponsored by the European Union`s Marine Science and Technology Programme MAST. The project was to have started in the fourth quarter of 1997 and is to last 30 months. The main activities of the project will be in the development and prototype testing of an innovative down-hole controlled autoclave coring system. This system will be designed to sample marine sediments at extended down-hole conditions maintaining as many parameters constant as possible. In general terms, the main aim of the project is to contribute to systematic ground truthing of a necessarily ephemeral phenomenon of growing global significance: sampling and analysis of gas hydrates in their natural environment. (MSK)

  12. Sampling of brine in cores of Precambrian granite from northern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Rex A.; Seitz, Martin G.; Steindler, Martin J.

    1983-09-01

    The composition of groundwater in deep-seated rocks is of great interest, both geochemically and in connection with the disposal of radioactive waste. However, sampling of deep-seated groundwater is expensive and often difficult. We describe here a simple technique for the elution of pore fluid (groundwater) from cores of igneous rocks, and we describe brine eluted from a core of Precambrian granite from Northern Illinois drill hole UPH-3. The brine is predominantly NaCl and CaCl2, with a Ca/Na mole ratio of about 0.05 to 0.1. From analysis of soluble chloride in a crushed sample the chloride concentration in the pore water is estimated as 2.3 M. The brine is similar to brine in the Illinois Basin, and it was probably derived from the overlying sediments.

  13. CO2 sequestration in feldspar-rich sandstone: Coupled evolution of fluid chemistry, mineral reaction rates, and hydrogeochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutolo, Benjamin M.; Luhmann, Andrew J.; Kong, Xiang-Zhao; Saar, Martin O.; Seyfried, William E.

    2015-07-01

    To investigate CO2 Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) in sandstones, we performed three 150 °C flow-through experiments on K-feldspar-rich cores from the Eau Claire formation. By characterizing fluid and solid samples from these experiments using a suite of analytical techniques, we explored the coupled evolution of fluid chemistry, mineral reaction rates, and hydrogeochemical properties during CO2 sequestration in feldspar-rich sandstone. Overall, our results confirm predictions that the heightened acidity resulting from supercritical CO2 injection into feldspar-rich sandstone will dissolve primary feldspars and precipitate secondary aluminum minerals. A core through which CO2-rich deionized water was recycled for 52 days decreased in bulk permeability, exhibited generally low porosity associated with high surface area in post-experiment core sub-samples, and produced an Al hydroxide secondary mineral, such as boehmite. However, two samples subjected to ∼3 day single-pass experiments run with CO2-rich, 0.94 mol/kg NaCl brines decreased in bulk permeability, showed generally elevated porosity associated with elevated surface area in post-experiment core sub-samples, and produced a phase with kaolinite-like stoichiometry. CO2-induced metal mobilization during the experiments was relatively minor and likely related to Ca mineral dissolution. Based on the relatively rapid approach to equilibrium, the relatively slow near-equilibrium reaction rates, and the minor magnitudes of permeability changes in these experiments, we conclude that CCUS systems with projected lifetimes of several decades are geochemically feasible in the feldspar-rich sandstone end-member examined here. Additionally, the observation that K-feldspar dissolution rates calculated from our whole-rock experiments are in good agreement with literature parameterizations suggests that the latter can be utilized to model CCUS in K-feldspar-rich sandstone. Finally, by performing a number of reactive

  14. STUDIES ON PROPERTY OF SAMPLE SIZE AND DIFFERENT TRAITS FOR CORE COLLECTIONS BASED ON GENOTYPIC VALUES OF COTTON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted on specific core collections constructedon the basis of different traits and sample size by the method of stepwise cluster with three sampling strategies based on genotypic values of cotton.A total of 21 traits (11 agronomy traits,5 fiber traits and 5 seed traits) were used to construct main core collections.Specific core collections,as representative of the initial collection,were constructed by agronomy,fiber or seed trait,respectively.As compared with the main core collection,specific core collections tended to have similar property for maintaining genetic diversity of agronomy,seed or fiber traits.Core collections developed by about sample size of 17% (P2=0.17) and 24% (P1= 0.24) with three sampling strategies could be quite representative of the initial collection.

  15. Colloid and Phosphorus Leaching From Undisturbed Soil Cores Sampled Along a Natural Clay Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann;

    2011-01-01

    The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  16. Study on Chemical Speciation of Uranium in Samples from in-situ Leaching Sandstone-type Uranium Deposit in Xinjiang%新疆某地浸砂岩型铀矿中铀赋存形态的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马强; 冯志刚; 孙静; 谢二举; 李小军

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a method of studying uranium speciation from in-situ leaching sandstone-type uranium deposits by a sequential extraction procedure and demonstrates its application to sandstone uranium exploration. The chemical extraction procedure was modified from Tessier. Uranium in samples was classified into five speciations: exchangeable ions, bound to carbonates, bound to Fe-Mn oxides, bound to sulfide-organic matter and residual speciation. The first four phases consisted of active uranium with the residual uranium being stable uranium. The results show that the uranium distribution characteristics were significantly different whether they were in different samples or in the same sample. The average amounts of residual speciation, carbonates speciation, exchangeable speciation, sulfide-organic matter speciation and Fe-Mn speciation decreased in order as 37. 75% (RSD = 1. 80% ), 20. 56% (RSD = 2. 72%), 15. 51% ( RSD = 1. 85% ), 14. 26% ( RSD = 2. 08% ) and 11.91% ( RSD = 1.75% ) , respectively. According to the present technology of acid dipped processing, the active uranium was teachable and the inert uranium was unleachable. This study indicates that residual speciation is the primary component. The uranium extraction rate for uranium ore with a high proportion of residual uranium ( such as the No.4 sample with 57.17% residual uranium in this paper) is lower and the extraction rale does not increase significantly by improving the dissolve acidity and oxidants.%以新疆某地浸砂岩型铀矿为研究对象,参考Tessier逐级化学提取方法,对10件矿芯试样进行铀赋存形态的研究.将铀赋存形态分为可交换离子态、碳酸盐结合态、铁锰氧化物结合态、硫化物及有机物结合态和残渣态,其中前4种形态铀为活性铀,残渣态铀为惰性铀.研究结果显示,无论是试样间还是同一试样内,铀的形态分布特征都存在明显的差异.各形态铀的含量(平均值)

  17. Imaging pore space in tight gas sandstone reservoir: insights from broad ion beam cross-sectioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, G.; Enzmann, F.; Urai, J. L.; Baerle, C.; Kukla, P. A.; Konstanty, J.

    2010-06-01

    Monetization of tight gas reservoirs, which contain significant gas reserves world-wide, represents a challenge for the entire oil and gas industry. The development of new technologies to enhance tight gas reservoir productivity is strongly dependent on an improved understanding of the rock properties and especially the pore framework. Numerous methods are now available to characterize sandstone cores. However, the pore space characterization at pore scale remains difficult due to the fine pore size and delicate sample preparation, and has thus been mostly indirectly inferred until now. Here we propose a new method of ultra high-resolution petrography combining high resolution SEM and argon ion beam cross sectioning (BIB, Broad Ion Beam) which prepares smooth and damage free surfaces. We demonstrate this method using the example of Permian (Rotliegend) age tight gas sandstone core samples. The combination of Ar-beam cross-sectioning facility and high-resolution SEM imaging has the potential to result in a step change in the understanding of pore geometries, in terms of its morphology, spatial distribution and evolution based on the generation of unprecedented image quality and resolution enhancing the predictive reliability of image analysis.

  18. Imaging pore space in tight gas sandstone reservoir: insights from broad ion beam cross-sectioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstanty J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Monetization of tight gas reservoirs, which contain significant gas reserves world-wide, represents a challenge for the entire oil and gas industry. The development of new technologies to enhance tight gas reservoir productivity is strongly dependent on an improved understanding of the rock properties and especially the pore framework. Numerous methods are now available to characterize sandstone cores. However, the pore space characterization at pore scale remains difficult due to the fine pore size and delicate sample preparation, and has thus been mostly indirectly inferred until now. Here we propose a new method of ultra high-resolution petrography combining high resolution SEM and argon ion beam cross sectioning (BIB, Broad Ion Beam which prepares smooth and damage free surfaces. We demonstrate this method using the example of Permian (Rotliegend age tight gas sandstone core samples. The combination of Ar-beam cross-sectioning facility and high-resolution SEM imaging has the potential to result in a step change in the understanding of pore geometries, in terms of its morphology, spatial distribution and evolution based on the generation of unprecedented image quality and resolution enhancing the predictive reliability of image analysis.

  19. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  20. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  1. Multiplatform sampling (ship, aircraft, and satellite) of a Gulf Stream warm core ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Brown, Otis B.; Hoge, Frank E.; Baker, Karen S.; Evans, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to meet the need to measure distributions of physical and biological properties of the ocean over large areas synoptically and over long time periods by means of remote sensing utilizing contemporaneous buoy, ship, aircraft, and satellite (i.e., multiplatform) sampling strategies. A mapping of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll fields in a Gulf Stream warm core ring using the multiplatform approach is described. Sampling capabilities of each sensing system are discussed as background for the data collected by means of these three dissimilar methods. Commensurate space/time sample sets from each sensing system are compared, and their relative accuracies in space and time are determined. The three-dimensional composite maps derived from the data set provide a synoptic perspective unobtainable from single platforms alone.

  2. Restricted k-space sampling in pure phase encode MRI of rock core plugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2013-06-01

    In the study of rock core plugs with multidimensional MRI, the samples are of a regular cylindrical shape that yields well defined intensity distributions in reciprocal space. The high intensity k-space points are concentrated in the central region and in specific peripheral regions. A large proportion of the k-space points have signal intensities that are below the noise level. These points can be zero-filled instead of being collected experimentally. k-space sampling patterns that collect regions of high intensity signal while neglecting low intensity regions can be naturally applied to a wide variety of pure phase encoding measurements, such as T2 mapping SESPI, hybrid-SESPI and SPRITE, since all imaging dimensions can be under-sampled. With a shorter acquisition time, as fewer experimental data points are required, the RF and gradient duty cycles are reduced, while the image SNR is improved.

  3. Faulting processes in active faults - Evidences from TCDP and SAFOD drill core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Wenk, H. -R.; Morales, L.; Naumann, R.; Kienast, M.; Song, S. -R.; Dresen, G. [UCB; (GFZ); (NTU)

    2014-08-20

    The microstructures, mineralogy and chemistry of representative samples collected from the cores of the San Andreas Fault drill hole (SAFOD) and the Taiwan Chelungpu-Fault Drilling project (TCDP) have been studied using optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, XRD and XRF analyses. SAFOD samples provide a transect across undeformed host rock, the fault damage zone and currently active deforming zones of the San Andreas Fault. TCDP samples are retrieved from the principal slip zone (PSZ) and from the surrounding damage zone of the Chelungpu Fault. Substantial differences exist in the clay mineralogy of SAFOD and TCDP fault gouge samples. Amorphous material has been observed in SAFOD as well as TCDP samples. In line with previous publications, we propose that melt, observed in TCDP black gouge samples, was produced by seismic slip (melt origin) whereas amorphous material in SAFOD samples was formed by comminution of grains (crush origin) rather than by melting. Dauphiné twins in quartz grains of SAFOD and TCDP samples may indicate high seismic stress. The differences in the crystallographic preferred orientation of calcite between SAFOD and TCDP samples are significant. Microstructures resulting from dissolution–precipitation processes were observed in both faults but are more frequently found in SAFOD samples than in TCDP fault rocks. As already described for many other fault zones clay-gouge fabrics are quite weak in SAFOD and TCDP samples. Clay-clast aggregates (CCAs), proposed to indicate frictional heating and thermal pressurization, occur in material taken from the PSZ of the Chelungpu Fault, as well as within and outside of the SAFOD deforming zones, indicating that these microstructures were formed over a wide range of slip rates.

  4. A distance limited sample of massive star forming cores from the RMS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Maud, L T; Moore, T J T; Mottram, J C; Urquhart, J S; Cicchini, A

    2015-01-01

    We analyse C$^{18}$O ($J=3-$2) data from a sample of 99 infrared-bright massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) and compact HII regions that were identified as potential molecular-outflow sources in the Red MSX source (RMS) survey. We extract a distance limited (D $<$ 6 kpc) sample shown to be representative of star formation covering the transition between the source types. At the spatial resolution probed, Larson-like relationships are found for these cores, though the alternative explanation, that Larson's relations arise where surface-density-limited samples are considered, is also consistent with our data. There are no significant differences found between source properties for the MYSOs and HII regions, suggesting that the core properties are established prior to the formation of massive stars, which subsequently have little impact at the later evolutionary stages investigated. There is a strong correlation between dust-continuum and C$^{18}$O-gas masses, supporting the interpretation that both trace t...

  5. Silicate melt inclusions and glasses in lunar soil fragments from the Luna 16 core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1972-01-01

    More than 2000 fragments were studied microscopically, and electron microprobe analyses were made of 39 selected areas, from a few square mm of polished surface, through 75- to 425-??m fragments of lunar soil from two samples of the Luna 16 core. The silicate melt inclusions and glasses differ in important details from those observed earlier in the Apollo samples. Melt inclusions in olivine contain epitaxially oriented daughter crystals, but also show a similar epitaxy around the outside of the crystals not observed in previous lunar samples. Melt inclusions in ilmenite suggest trapping at successive stages in a differentiation sequence. There is abundant evidence for late-stage silicate liquid immiscibility, with melt compositions similar but not identical to those from Apollo 11 and 12. A comparison of the alkali ratio of any given bulk rock analysis with that of its late-stage, high-silica melt shows gross differences for different rocks. This is pertinent to understanding late-stage differentiation processes. Glass fragments and spherules exhibit a wide range of crystallization textures, reflecting their wide range of compositions and cooling histories. No significant differences were found between the two portions of core examined (Zones A and D). ?? 1972.

  6. The use of gamma ray computed tomography to investigate soil compaction due to core sampling devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Correchel, Vladia; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Brasil, Rene P. Camponez do [Sao Paulo Univ., Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz. Dept. de Engenharia Rural

    2004-09-15

    Compaction processes can influence soil physical properties such as soil density, porosity, pore size distribution, and processes like soil water and nutrient movements, root system distribution, and others. Soil porosity modification has important consequences like alterations in results of soil water retention curves. These alterations may cause differences in soil water storage calculations and matrix potential values, which are utilized in irrigation management systems. Because of this, soil-sampling techniques should avoid alterations of sample structure. In this work soil sample compaction caused by core sampling devices was investigated using the gamma ray computed tomography technique. A first generation tomograph with fixed source-detector arrangement and translation/rotational movements of the sample was utilized to obtain the images. The radioactive source is {sup 241}Am, with an activity of 3.7 GBq, and the detector consists of a 3 in. x 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Soil samples were taken from an experimental field utilizing cylinders 4.0 cm high and 2.6 cm in diameter. Based on image analyses it was possible to detect compacted regions in all samples next to the cylinder wall due to the sampling system. Tomographic unit profiles of the sample permitted to identify higher values of soil density for deeper regions of the sample, and it was possible to determine the average densities and thickness of these layers. Tomographic analyses showed to be a very useful tool for soil compaction characterization and presented many advantages in relation to traditional methods. (author)

  7. Temperature dependent elasticity and damping in dehydrated sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T. W.; Struble, W.

    2013-12-01

    Work reported previously at this conference, outlining our observation of anomalously large elastic softening and damping in dehydrated Berea sandstone at elevated temperatures, has been analysed to study shear and compressional effects separately. Modeling of the sample using COMSOL software was necessary to identify modes, as the vibration spectrum of the sample is poorly approximated by a uniform isotropic solid. The first torsional mode of our evacuated, dry, core softens at nearly twice the rate of Young's modulus modes (bending and compressional) and is also damped nearly twice as strongly as temperature increases. We consider two possible models for explaining this behavior, based on the assumption that the mechanical properties of the sandstone are dominated by the framework of quartz grains and polycrystalline cementation, neglecting initially the effects of clay and feldspar inclusions. The 20cm x 2.54cm diameter core is dry such that the pressure of water vapor in the experiment chamber is below 1e-6 Torr at 70C, suggesting that surface water beyond a small number of monolayers is negligible. Our models consider (1) enhanced sliding of grain boundaries in the cementation at elevated temperature and reduced internal water content, and (2) strain microcracking of the cementatioin at low water content due to anisotropic expansion in the quartz grains. In model (1) interfaces parallel to polyhedral grain surfaces were placed in the cement bonds and assigned frictional properties. Model (2) has not yet been implemented. The overall elasticity of a 3-D several-grain model network was determined by modeling quasistatic loading and measuring displacements. Initial results with a small number of grains/bonds suggests that only the first model provides softening and damping for all the modes, however the details of the effects of defect motioin at individual interfaces as the source for the frictional properties is still being evaluated. Nonlinear effects are

  8. Establish and Operate a Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Midland, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14

    Shell Oil Company donated its proprietary core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, in 1994. This collection of geologic materials is composed of 325,000 boxes of rocks and samples housed in a 32,700-ft{sup 2} warehouse in Midland, Texas. The material includes cores from more than 3,000 wells (75,000 boxes) and cuttings from more than 90,000 wells (260,000 boxes). In addition to the warehouse space, the repository consists of layout rooms, a processing room, and office space. The U.S. Department of Energy provided $375,000 under Grant Number DE-FG22-94BC14854 for organizing the collection, staffing the facility, and making the material available to the public for the first 5 years of operation. Shell Oil Company provided an endowment of $1.3 million to cover the cost of operating the facility after the fifth year of operation.

  9. Engineering task plan for rotary mode core sampling exhausters CAM high radiation interlock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-19

    The Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system is primarily made up of the Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) and the RMCS Exhausters. During RMCS operations an Exhauster is connected to a tank riser and withdraws gases from the tank dome vapor space at approximately 200 Standard Cubic Feet per Minute (SCFM). The gases are passed through two High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters before passing out the exhaust stack to the atmosphere. A Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) monitors the exhaust gases in the exhaust stack for beta particle and gamma radiation. The CAM has a high radiation alarm output and a detector fail alarm output. The CAM alarms are currently connected to the data logger only. The CAM alarms require operator response per procedure LMHC 1998 but no automatic functions are initiated by the CAM alarms. Currently, there are three events that can cause an automatic shut down of the Exhauster. These are, Low Tank Pressure, Highnow Stack Flow and High HEPA Filter Differential Pressure (DP).

  10. Rare earth element geochemistry of outcrop and core samples from the Marcellus Shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Clinton W; Jain, Jinesh C; Stegmeier, John; Hakala, J Alexandra; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the geochemistry of the rare earth elements (REE) was studied in eleven outcrop samples and six, depth-interval samples of a core from the Marcellus Shale. The REE are classically applied analytes for investigating depositional environments and inferring geochemical processes, making them of interest as potential, naturally occurring indicators of fluid sources as well as indicators of geochemical processes in solid waste disposal. However, little is known of the REE occurrence in the Marcellus Shale or its produced waters, and this study represents one of the first, thorough characterizations of the REE in the Marcellus Shale. In these samples, the abundance of REE and the fractionation of REE profiles were correlated with different mineral components of the shale. Namely, samples with a larger clay component were inferred to have higher absolute concentrations of REE but have less distinctive patterns. Conversely, samples with larger carbonate fractions exhibited a greater degree of fractionation, albeit with lower total abundance. Further study is necessary to determine release mechanisms, as well as REE fate-and-transport, however these results have implications for future brine and solid waste management applications.

  11. Characterization of tuyere-level core-drill coke samples from blast furnace operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Dong; N. Paterson; S.G. Kazarian; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2007-12-15

    A suite of tuyere-level coke samples have been withdrawn from a working blast furnace during coal injection, using the core-drilling technique. The samples have been characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-RS), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) extracts of the cokes sampled from the 'bosh', the rear of the 'bird's nest', and the 'dead man' zones were found by SEC to contain heavy soot-like materials (ca. 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} apparent mass units). In contrast, NMP extracts of cokes taken from the raceway and the front of the 'bird's nest' only contained a small amount of material of relatively lower apparent molecular mass (up to ca. 10{sup 5} u). Since the feed coke contained no materials extractable by the present method, the soot-like materials are thought to have formed during the reactions of volatile matter released from the injectant coal, probably via dehydrogenation and repolymerization of the tars. The Raman spectra of the NMP-extracted core-drilled coke samples showed variations reflecting their temperature histories. Area ratios of D-band to G-band decreased as the exposure temperature increased, while intensity ratios of D to G band and those of 2D to G bands increased with temperature. The graphitic (G), defect (D), and random (R) fractions of the carbon structure of the cokes were also derived from the Raman spectra. The R fractions decreased with increasing temperature, whereas G fractions increased, while the D fractions showed a more complex variation with temperature. These data appear to give clues regarding the graphitization mechanism of tuyere-level cokes in the blast furnace. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Fault rocks from the SAFOD core samples : implications for weakening at shallow depths along the San Andreas Fault, California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holdsworth, R.E.; van Diggelen, E.W.E.; Spiers, C.J.; Bresser, J.H.P. de; Walker, R.J.; Bown, L.

    2011-01-01

    The drilling of a deep borehole across the actively creeping Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ), California, and collection of core materials permit direct geological study of fault zone processes at 2–3 km depth. The three drill cores sample both host and fault rocks and pass th

  13. Fault rocks from the SAFOD core samples : implications for weakening at shallow depths along the San Andreas Fault, California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holdsworth, R.E.; van Diggelen, E.W.E.; Spiers, C.J.; Bresser, J.H.P. de; Walker, R.J.; Bown, L.

    2011-01-01

    The drilling of a deep borehole across the actively creeping Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault Zone (SAFZ), California, and collection of core materials permit direct geological study of fault zone processes at 2–3 km depth. The three drill cores sample both host and fault rocks and pass th

  14. Performance of the CORE-10 and YP-CORE measures in a sample of youth engaging with a community mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Aileen; Peiper, Nicholas; O'Keeffe, Lynsey; Illback, Robert; Clayton, Richard

    2016-12-01

    This article assesses the performance and psychometric properties of two versions of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE) measures that assess psychological distress: the Young Person's CORE (YP-CORE) for 11-16 year olds and the CORE-10 for those 17 or older. The sample comprised 1592 young people aged 12-25 who completed the YP-CORE and CORE-10 during their initial engagement with an early intervention service. Total and average scores were examined for both measures. Gender and age differences were evaluated using t-tests and analysis of variance. The factor structures were assessed with principal axis and confirmatory factor analyses. Multigroup confirmatory factor analyses were then employed to evaluate measurement invariance across age and gender. Analyses were supportive of the CORE measures as reliable instruments to assess distress in 12-25 year olds. Based upon eigenvalues in combination with the comparative fit index, the Tucker-Lewis Index, and the root-mean-square error of approximation, both measures were unidimensional. Analysis indicated the factor structure, loadings, item thresholds, and residuals were invariant across age and gender, although partial support for strict invariance was found for gender among 12-16 year olds. Results are compared to previous studies and discussed in the context of program planning, service delivery, and evaluation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Simultaneous stable isotope analysis of methane and nitrous oxide on ice core samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Sapart

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Methane and nitrous oxide are important greenhouse gases which show a strong increase in atmospheric mixing ratios since pre-industrial time as well as large variations during past climate changes. The understanding of their biogeochemical cycles can be improved using stable isotope analysis. However, high-precision isotope measurements on air trapped in ice cores are challenging because of the high susceptibility to contamination and fractionation.

    Here, we present a dry extraction system for combined CH4 and N2O stable isotope analysis from ice core air, using an ice grating device. The system allows simultaneous analysis of δD(CH4 or δ13C(CH4, together with δ15N(N2O, δ18O(N2O and δ15N(NO+ fragment on a single ice core sample, using two isotope mass spectrometry systems. The optimum quantity of ice for analysis is about 600 g with typical "Holocene" mixing ratios for CH4 and N2O. In this case, the reproducibility (1σ is 2.1‰ for δD(CH4, 0.18‰ for δ13C(CH4, 0.51‰ for δ15N(N2O, 0.69‰ for δ18O(N2O and 1.12‰ for δ15N(NO+ fragment. For smaller amounts of ice the standard deviation increases, particularly for N2O isotopologues. For both gases, small-scale intercalibrations using air and/or ice samples have been carried out in collaboration with other institutes that are currently involved in isotope measurements of ice core air. Significant differences are shown between the calibration scales, but those offsets are consistent and can therefore be corrected for.

  16. Radiocarbon sample data and calibrated ages of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore from Palos Verdes, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the data release is a spreadsheet including radiocarbon sample information and calibrated ages of sediment cores collected in 2009 offshore of Palos...

  17. Mechanical properties and failure characteristics of fractured sandstone with grouting and anchorage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong Yijiang; Han Lijun; Qu Tao; Yang Shengqi

    2014-01-01

    Based on uniaxial compression experimental results on fractured sandstone with grouting and anchorage, we studied the strength and deformation properties, the failure model, crack formation and evolution laws of fractured sandstone under different conditions of anchorage. The experimental results show that the strength and elastic modulus of fractured sandstone with different fracture angles are sig-nificantly lower than those of intact sandstone. Compared with the fractured samples without anchorage, the peak strength, residual strength, peak and ultimate axial strain of fractured sandstone under different anchorage increase by 64.5-320.0%, 62.8-493.0%, and 31.6-181.4%, respectively. The number of bolts and degree of pre-stress has certain effects on the peak strength and failure model of fractured sandstone. The peak strength of fractured sandstone under different anchorage increases to some extent, and the failure model of fractured sandstone also transforms from tensile failure to tensile-shear mixed failure with the number of bolts. The pre-stress can restrain the formation and evolution process of tensile cracks, delay the failure process of fractured sandstone under anchorage and impel the transformation of failure model from brittle failure to plastic failure.

  18. Erosion characteristic of slope sandstone soaking in acid mine drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li-chun; CHEN Jia-sheng; WU Ai-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Acid mine drainage(AMD) is one of the main reasons of slope instability in chemical mines with high sulfide. The pH values of the solution inside the mining pit decrease with the increasing of distance from ore body and vary from 1.2 to 4.6,according to the results of the water environmental investigation and the composition test of the slope sandstone in Xinqiao Pyrite Mine. Comparative experiments between original sandstone and AMD eroded sandstone samples show that after AMD erosion the uniaxial compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease by 30%-50% and 25%-45%, respectively, the cohesion and internal friction angle decrease obviously, and the Poisson ratio fluctuates between 0.20-0.29. The greater joints development, the higher residual stress after peak value, and the longer time to damage. Besides above, the reaction mechanism analysis of AMD eroded sandstone shows that the fillings in joints and fissures of sandstone are frequently decomposed and polyreacted, resulting in changes of interior molecule structure and framework composition, and decreases of cohesion and angle of internal friction between rock structure interfaces.

  19. Microbial Penetration through Nutrient-Saturated Berea Sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenneman, G E; McInerney, M J; Knapp, R M

    1985-08-01

    Penetration times and penetration rates for a motile Bacillus strain growing in nutrient-saturated Berea sandstone cores were determined. The rate of penetration was essentially independent of permeabilities above 100 mdarcys and rapidly declined for permeabilities below 100 mdarcys. It was found that these penetration rates could be grouped into two statistically distinct classes consisting of rates for permeabilities above 100 mdarcys and rates for those below 100 mdarcys. Instantaneous penetration rates were found to be zero order with respect to core length for cores with permeabilities above 100 mdarcys and first order with respect to core length for cores with permeabilities below 100 mdarcys. The maximum observed penetration rate was 0.47 cm . h, and the slowest was 0.06 cm . h; however, these rates may be underestimates of the true penetration rate, since the observed rates included the time required for growth in the flask as well as the core. The relationship of penetration time to the square of the length of the core suggested that cells penetrated high-permeability cores as a band and low-permeability cores in a diffuse fashion. The motile Enterobacter aerogenes strain penetrated Berea sandstone cores three to eight times faster than did the nonmotile Klebsiella pneumoniae strain when cores of comparable length and permeability were used. A penetration mechanism based entirely on motility predicted penetration times that were in agreement with the observed penetration times for motile strains. The fact that nonmotile strains penetrated the cores suggested that filamentous or unrestricted growth, or both, may also be important.

  20. Strategies on Sample Size Determination and Qualitative and Quantitative Traits Integration to Construct Core Collection of Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ling; LU Yong-gen; LI Jin-quan; Xu Hai-ming; Muhammad Qasim SHAHID

    2011-01-01

    The development of a core collection could enhance the utilization of germplasm collections in crop improvement programs and simplify their management.Selection of an appropriate sampling strategy is an important prerequisite to construct a core collection with appropriate size in order to adequately represent the genetic spectrum and maximally capture the genetic diversity in available crop collections.The present study was initiated to construct nested core collections to determine the appropriate sample size to represent the genetic diversity of rice landrace collection based on 15 quantitative traits and 34 qualitative traits of 2 262 rice accessions.The results showed that 50-225 nested core collections,whose sampling rate was 2.2%-9.9%,were sufficient to maintain the maximum genetic diversity of the initial collections.Of these,150 accessions (6.6%) could capture the maximal genetic diversity of the initial collection.Three data types,i.e.qualitative traits (QT1),quantitative traits (QT2) and integrated qualitative and quantitative traits (QTT),were compared for their efficiency in constructing core collections based on the weighted pair-group average method combined with stepwise clustering and preferred sampling on adjusted Euclidean distances.Every combining scheme constructed eight rice core collections (225,200,175,150,125,100,75 and 50).The results showed that the QTT data was the best in constructing a core collection as indicated by the genetic diversity of core collections.A core collection constructed only on the information of QT1 could not represent the initial collection effectively.QTT should be used together to construct a productive core collection.

  1. MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE AND CLAY, NORTH-EAST CONSTANTINE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M BENYAMINA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The north-east area of Constantine has a very complex geological setting. The variety of sedimentary rocks such as sandstone and clay in abundance, represent a big importance in the industry and road infrastructure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM/EDS, FTIR spectroscopy of sandstone and clay are required for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the existing phases. In addition, chemical analysis of the same samples is required to confirm the XRD, EDS (Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy results. The results of this multidisciplinary study, obtained by various analytical techniques, show a good agreement on the existing phases.

  2. ANALYSIS OF TANK 28F SALTCAKE CORE SAMPLES FTF-456 - 467

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C; Daniel McCabe, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Ralph Nichols, R

    2007-02-28

    Twelve LM-75 core samplers from Tank 28F sampling were received by SRNL for saltcake characterization. Of these, nine samplers contained mixtures of free liquid and saltcake, two contained only liquid, and one was empty. The saltcake contents generally appeared wet. A summary of the major tasks performed in this work are as follows: (1) Individual saltcake segments were extruded from the samplers and separated into saltcake and free liquid portions. (2) Free liquids were analyzed to estimate the amount of traced drill-string fluid contained in the samples. (3) The saltcake from each individual segment was homogenized, followed by analysis in duplicate. The analysis used more cost-effective and bounding radiochemical analyses rather than using the full Saltstone WAC suite. (4) A composite was created using an approximately equal percentage of each segment's saltcake contents. Supernatant liquid formed upon creation of the composite was decanted prior to use of the composite, but the composite was not drained. (5) A dissolution test was performed on the sample by contacting the composite with water at a 4:1 mass ratio of water to salt. The resulting soluble and insoluble fractions were analyzed. Analysis focused on a large subset of the Saltstone WAC constituents.

  3. Hydrochemical reactions and origin of offshore relatively fresh pore water from core samples in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Hiu Tung; Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    2016-06-01

    The existence of relatively fresh pore water offshore has been well recognised over the globe but studies on the chemistry of the pore water from offshore geological formations are extremely limited. This study aims to characterize the hydrochemistry of the submarine groundwater body in Hong Kong. It looks into the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water extracted from core samples from an offshore 42.30-m vibrocore in the southwestern Hong Kong waters. A minimum Cl- level of about one-third of that in typical seawater was noted in the terrestrial sediments, suggesting the presence of offshore relatively fresh water. Unexpectedly high NH4+ levels are attributed to organic matter decomposition in the terrestrial sediments. The leaching of shells due to exposure of marine sediments at sea-level low stands raises the Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentrations. Base Exchange Indices show weak cation exchange reactions in which Na+ and K+ are released while Mg2+ and Ca2+ are adsorbed. Isotopic compositions of pore water reveal that the low-salinity water is probably the relic water sequestered in fluvial systems during relative sea-level low stands. Cores properly stored in a freezer for a long time has been used to study the pore water chemistry. For the first time, this study introduces an approach to correct the measured data by considering the possible evaporation effect during the transportation and storage of the samples. Corrections for evaporation were applied to the major ion concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions of pore water measured. It is found that the corrections determined by the Cl- mass balance approach are more reliable. The corrected measurements give more reasonable observations and hence allow sensible conclusions on the hydrochemical reactions and the origin of pore water.

  4. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Soong, Yee [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Dilmore, Robert M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2016-01-14

    In this paper, a numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Finally, initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions.

  5. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO 2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Soong, Yee [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Dilmore, Robert M. [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA

    2016-01-14

    A numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions. 1

  6. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO 2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, OR (United States); Soong, Yee [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, OR (United States); Dilmore, Robert M. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, OR (United States)

    2016-01-14

    A numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions. 1

  7. Investigation on porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (Knox County, IN, USA) under geological CO 2 sequestration conditions: a numerical simulation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Soong, Yee [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA; Dilmore, Robert M. [US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh PA USA

    2016-01-14

    In this paper, a numerical model was developed to simulate reactive transport with porosity and permeability change of Mount Simon sandstone (samples from Knox County, IN) after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine under CO2 sequestration conditions. The model predicted formation of a high-porosity zone adjacent to the surface of the sample in contact with bulk brine, and a lower porosity zone just beyond that high-porosity zone along the path from sample/bulk brine interface to sample core. The formation of the high porosity zone was attributed to dissolution of quartz and muscovite/illite, while the formation of the lower porosity zone adjacent to the aforementioned high porosity zone was attributed to precipitation of kaolinite and feldspar. The model predicted a 40% permeability increase for the Knox sandstone sample after 180 days of exposure to CO2-saturated brine, which was consistent with laboratory-measured permeability results. Model-predicted solution chemistry results were also found to be consistent with laboratory-measured solution chemistry data. Finally, initial porosity, initial feldspar content and the exponent n value (determined by pore structure and tortuosity) used in permeability calculations were three important factors affecting permeability evolution of sandstone samples under CO2 sequestration conditions.

  8. A Review of Inflammatory Processes of the Breast with a Focus on Diagnosis in Core Biopsy Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M. D’Alfonso

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory and reactive lesions of the breast are relatively uncommon among benign breast lesions and can be the source of an abnormality on imaging. Such lesions can simulate a malignant process, based on both clinical and radiographic findings, and core biopsy is often performed to rule out malignancy. Furthermore, some inflammatory processes can mimic carcinoma or other malignancy microscopically, and vice versa. Diagnostic difficulty may arise due to the small and fragmented sample of a core biopsy. This review will focus on the pertinent clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features of the more commonly encountered inflammatory lesions of the breast that can be characterized in a core biopsy sample. These include fat necrosis, mammary duct ectasia, granulomatous lobular mastitis, diabetic mastopathy, and abscess. The microscopic differential diagnoses for these lesions when seen in a core biopsy sample will be discussed.

  9. 1st paleomagnetic investigation of Nubia Sandstone at Kalabsha, south Western Desert of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, R.; Khashaba, A.; El-Hemaly, I. A.; Takla, E. M.; Abdel Aal, E.; Odah, H.

    2016-06-01

    Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: the 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 °N, 32.75 °E). 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites) have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) and Sabaya Formation is of early Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian). The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7°, I = 36.6° with α95 = 5.2° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 82.8 °N and Long. = 283.1 °E. Five profile sections from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6°, I = 33.3° with α95 = 5.8° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 78.3 °N and Long. = 280.4 °E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at Lat. = 80.5 °N and Long. = 281.7 °E. The obtaind magnetic components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  10. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SEDIMENT SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY, ART'S MANUFACTURING, SPLIT CORE SAMPLER FOR SUBMERGED SEDIMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Split Core Sampler for Submerged Sediments (Split Core Sampler) designed and fabricated by Arts Manufacturing & Supply, Inc., was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program in April and May 1999 at ...

  11. Spatially resolved measurement of rock core porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marica, F; Chen, Q; Hamilton, A; Hall, C; Al, T; Balcom, B J

    2006-01-01

    Density weighted, centric scan, Conical SPRITE MRI techniques are applied in the current work for local porosity measurements in fluid saturated porous media. The methodology is tested on a series of sandstone core samples. These samples vary in both porosity and degree of local heterogeneity due to bedding plane structure. The MRI porosity measurement is in good agreement with traditional gravimetric measurements of porosity. Spatially resolved porosity measurements reveal significant porosity variation in some samples. This novel MRI technique should have applications to the characterization of local porosity in a wide variety of porous media.

  12. Distribution of Foraminifera in the Core Samples of Kollidam and Marakanam Mangrove Locations, Tamil Nadu, Southeast Coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowshath, M.

    2013-05-01

    In order to study the distribution of Foraminifera in the subsurface sediments of mangrove environment, two core samples have been collected i) near boating house, Pitchavaram, from Kollidam estuary (C2) and ii) backwaters of Marakanam (C2)with the help of PVC corer. The length of the core varies from a total of 25 samples from both cores were obtained and they were subjected to standard micropaleontological and sedimentological analyses for the evaluation of different sediment characteristics. The core sample No.C1 (Pitchavaram) yielded only foraminifera whereas the other one core no.C2 (Marakanam) has yielded discussed only the down core distribution of foraminifera. The widely utilized classification proposed by Loeblich and Tappan (1987) has been followed in the present study for Foraminiferal taxonomy and accordingly 23 foraminiferal species belonging to 18 genera, 10 families, 8 superfamilies and 4 suborders have been reported and illustrated. The foraminiferal species recorded are characteristic of shallow innershelf to marginal marine and tropical in nature. Sedimentological parameters such as CaCO3, Organic matter and sand-silt-clay ratio was estimated and their down core distribution is discussed. An attempt has been made to evaluate the favourable substrate for the Foraminifera population abundance in the present area of study. From the overall distribution of foraminifera in different samples of Kollidam estuary (Pitchavaram area), and Marakanam estuary it is observed that siltysand and sandysilt are more accommodative substrate for the population of foraminifera, respectively. The distribution of foraminifera in the core samples indicate that the sediments were deposited under normal oxygenated environment conditions.;

  13. Observation of asymmetrically imploded core plasmas with a two-dimensional sampling image x-ray streak camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Lee, Myongdok; Mahigashi, Norimitsu; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    A shell target with a cone for guiding the heating beam has been proposed for the fast ignition scheme. Implosion of such target is no longer symmetric because of the cone. A fast two-dimensional x-ray imaging technique, two-dimensional (2D) sampling image x-ray streak camera was applied for the first time to observation of the dynamics of implosion and core plasma. X-ray emission image of the plasma was sampled with two-dimensionally distributed image sampling points, streaked with the tube, and the recorded signals were reconstructed as sequential 2D frame images. Shape and movement of the core plasma were clearly observed.

  14. In-situ 1-D and 2-D mapping of soil core and rock samples using the LIBS long spark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodolfa, C. T. (Christopher T.); Cremers, D. A. (David A.); Ebinger, M. H. (Michael H.)

    2004-01-01

    LIBS is being developed for stand-off interrogation of samples up to 20 m from a lander or rover. Stand-off capability is important to access targets not conveniently located for in-situ analysis. On the other hand, in-situ techniques are still important and are being developed for future missions such as MSL. Retrieved samples may consist of loose soils, subsurface soil cores, drilled rock cores, and ice cores. For these sample types, it is possible to employ LIBS analysis and take advantage of LIBS capabilities. These include: (1) rapid analysis, (2) good detection sensitivity for many elements, (3) good spatial resolution (3-100 microns), and (4) ability to clean a surface prior to analysis. Using LIBS, it is possible to perform a 1-dimensional analysis, for example, determining element concentrations along a soil core, or a 2-dimensional mapping of the sample surface using a unique 'long' spark. Two-dimensional sampling has been developed previously by focusing the laser pulses as small spots on the sample and then moving the sample a short distance between sampling locations. Although demonstrated, this method is time consuming, requiring a large number of shots to span even a small region (for 3 micron resolution, an area 600 x 480 microns sampled in {approx} 30 min using a 20 Hz laser). For a spacecraft instrument, the ability to more rapidly prepare a 2D elemental spatial map will be desirable. Here they discuss the use of LIBS for sampling along a core in 1D (detection of carbon) and for 2D mapping of a rock face.

  15. Gamma ray spectrometry results from core samples collected for RESUME 95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Allyson, J.D. [SURRC, East Kilbride, Scotland (United Kingdom); Toivonen, H.; Honkamaa, T. [STUK, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Field sampling of an airfield at Vesivehmaa, near Vaeaeksy, Finland (Area I) was carried out between 26-29 May 1995, to establish the radionuclide deposition and inventory of Chernobyl derived {sup 137}Cs, and natural radionuclides. The objective was to establish a common calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometers, for Exercise RESUME 95 conducted in August 1995. The report presents the sampling details, handling and treatment. The analyses are discussed with particular emphasis given to {sup 137}Ca, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 208} radionuclides, and the quantification of their respective deposition and inventories. The results have been used to estimate the effective concentrations of nuclides at the calibration site for in-situ and airborne gamma spectrometry, and the depth distribution. For {sup 137}Cs the weighted mean activity per unit area takes on values of 50.7{+-}5.2 kBq m{sup -2} at 1 m ground clearance, 51.1{+-}6.9 kBq m{sup -2} at 50 m height and 47.9{+-}8.5 kBq m{sup -2} at 100 m. The similarity of these values confirms the suitability of the Vesivehmaa site for comparison of in-situ and airborne results despite variations of a factor of two between results from individual cores. The mean {alpha}/{rho} value for {sup 137}Cs in Area I is 0.77{+-}0.10 cm{sup 2}g{sup -1} (relaxation mass per unit area, {beta} 1.31{+-}0.15 gcm{sup -2}). Additional soil sampling across parts of Area II (a 6x3 km area selected for mapping Chernobyl deposition) was carried out. The mean level of {sup 137}Cs activity from these samples was 92.4{+-}63 kBq m{sup -2}, a sample taken near Laihansuo showing the largest value obtained at 172 kBq m{sup -2}. (EG). 17 refs.

  16. Reservoir assessment of the Nubian sandstone reservoir in South Central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Nader; Barakat, Moataz; Abdallah, Hamed

    2017-05-01

    The Gulf of Suez is considered as one of the most important petroleum provinces in Egypt and contains the Saqqara and Edfu oil fields located in the South Central portion of the Gulf of Suez. The Nubian sandstone reservoir in the Gulf of Suez basin is well known for its great capability to store and produce large volumes of hydrocarbons. The Nubian sandstone overlies basement rocks throughout most of the Gulf of Suez region. It consists of a sequence of sandstones and shales of Paleozoic to Cretaceous age. The Nubian sandstone intersected in most wells has excellent reservoir characteristics. Its porosity is controlled by sedimentation style and diagenesis. The cementation materials are mainly kaolinite and quartz overgrowths. The permeability of the Nubian sandstone is mainly controlled by grain size, sorting, porosity and clay content especially kaolinite and decreases with increase of kaolinite. The permeability of the Nubian Sandstone is evaluated using the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR technology) and formation pressure data in addition to the conventional logs and the results were calibrated using core data. In this work, the Nubian sandstone was investigated and evaluated using complete suites of conventional and advanced logging techniques to understand its reservoir characteristics which have impact on economics of oil recovery. The Nubian reservoir has a complicated wettability nature which affects the petrophysical evaluation and reservoir productivity. So, understanding the reservoir wettability is very important for managing well performance, productivity and oil recovery.

  17. Engineering task plan for upgrades to the leveling jacks on core sample trucks number 3 and 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KOSTELNIK, A.J.

    1999-02-24

    Characterizing the waste in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site is accomplished by obtaining a representative core sample for analysis. Core sampling is one of the numerous techniques that have been developed for use given the environmental and field conditions at the Hanford Site. Core sampling is currently accomplished using either Push Mode Core Sample Truck No.1 or; Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks No.2, 3 or 4. Past analysis (WHC 1994) has indicated that the Core Sample Truck (CST) leveling jacks are structurally inadequate when lateral loads are applied. WHC 1994 identifies many areas where failure could occur. All these failures are based on exceeding the allowable stresses listed in the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) code. The mode of failure is for the outrigger attachments to the truck frame to fail resulting in dropping of the CST and possible overturning (Ref. Ziada and Hundal, 1996). Out of level deployment of the truck can exceed the code allowable stresses in the structure. Calculations have been performed to establish limits for maintaining the truck level when lifting. The calculations and the associated limits are included in appendix A. The need for future operations of the CSTS is limited. Sampling is expected to be complete in FY-2001. Since there is limited time at risk for continued use of the CSTS with the leveling controls without correcting the structural problems, there are several design changes that could give incremental improvements to the operational safety of the CSTS with limited impact on available operating time. The improvements focus on making the truck easier to control during lifting and leveling. Not all of the tasks identified in this ETP need to be performed. Each task alone can improve the safety. This engineering task plan is the management plan document for implementing the necessary additional structural analysis. Any additional changes to meet requirements of standing orders shall require a

  18. Contribution of terrigenous rocks of South Belgian coal deposits in geological storage of CO2 : the sandstones case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, N.; Baele, J.-M.

    2009-04-01

    were performed on forty rock samples in order to determine their mineral compositions and petrophysical properties. Mineral compositions were determined by light and cathodoluminescence petrography (CL), XRD, SEM, EDS and TOC. Effective porosity and permeability were measured by lab tests on cylindrical core samples. Effective porosities measured in sandstones is ranging between 1.5% and 6% with an average of 3.5%, which is nearly twice the value taken in the previous capacity evaluation. The neutron porosity log of the Saint-Ghislain borehole yields porosity values ranging between 5 and 20% of limestone-equivalent porosity; these values suggest higher in-situ porosity, likely due to fractures in the coal measures. Permeability was estimated from lab permeameter tests to a few milli-darcies. Nevertheless this value, which is fairly low for a conventional reservoir, is higher than that of other Westphalian lithologies. Like porosity, in-situ permeability is expected to be higher. Westphalian sandstones mineral compositions shows mainly quartz, feldspars, clay minerals, coal grains that are cemented by either quartz overgrowth or a matrix consisting of fine detrital (mainly clays) and alteration minerals (authigenic carbonates, pyrite, and clays). These results are comparable to investigations of Westphalian C and D sandstones of North Belgium (Bertier et al., 2006). In the case of Westphalian sandstones, it was observed that the effective porosity is essentially located within this fine-grained matrix, explaining their weak permeability. Results from this study show other promising insights for the sequestration of CO2 within Westphalian sandstones of South Belgium. Carbonate minerals, which occur with 2% vol. in average, could significantly increase the porosity and especially the permeability, due to their dissolution by water acidification caused by CO2 injection. Adsorption onto coal fragments and clay minerals in the sandstones has an estimated sequestration

  19. Natural and Laboratory-Induced Compaction Bands in Aztec Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimson, B. C.; Lee, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Aztec sandstone used in this research is from the Valley of Fire State Park area, Nevada. This Jurassic aeolian sandstone is extremely weak (uniaxial compressive strength of 1-2 MPa); porosity averages 26%; grains are subrounded and have a bimodal size distribution (0.1 mm and 0.5 mm); its mineral composition (K. Sternlof, personal comm.) is 93% quartz, 5% k-spar, and 2% kaolinite, Fe carbonate and others; grain bonding is primarily through suturing. Sternlof et al. (EOS, November, 2001) observed substantial exposure of mainly compactive deformation bands in the Aztec sandstone. We studied an SEM image of a compaction band found in a hand sample of the Aztec sandstone. We also conducted a drilling test in a 130x130x180 mm prismatic specimen subjected to a preset far-field true triaxial stress condition (\\sigmah = 15 MPa, \\sigmav = 25 MPa, \\sigmaH = 40 MPa). Drilling of a 20 mm dia. vertical hole created a long fracture-like thin tabular breakout along the \\sigmah springline and perpendicular to \\sigmaH direction. SEM analysis of the zones ahead of the breakout tips revealed narrow bands of presumed debonded intact grains interspersed with grain fragments. We infer that the fragments were formed from multiple splitting or crushing of compacted grains in the band of high compressive stress concentration developed along the \\sigmah springline. SEM images away from the breakout tip surroundings showed no such fragments. SEM study of the natural compaction band showed a similar arrangement of mainly intact grains surrounded by grain fragments. Using the Optimas optical software package, we found the percentage of pore area within the band ahead of the breakout tips to average 17%; outside of this zone it was 23%. In the natural compaction band pore area occupied 8.5% of the band; in the host rock adjacent to the compaction band it averaged 19%. These readings strongly suggest porosity reduction due to compaction in both cases. The close resemblance between the

  20. Characteristics of chlorites in seismogenic fault zones: the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hashimoto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The iron content and the asymmetry of iron and magnesium ions in chlorites are examined for the Chelungpu Fault in Taiwan, which is a seismogenic fault. The samples are collected from the cores drilled for the Taiwan Chelungpu Fault Drilling Project (TCDP. Three fault zones are recognized as candidates for the source of seismogenic materials. The fault zones are composed of fractured-damaged rocks, breccia, gray gouge, black gouge, and black material. Chlorite from each type of rock was analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD. The iron content and asymmetry of the iron and magnesium ions in the chlorites were estimated from the XRD peak ratios. The hydroxide and silicate layers in the black gouge and black material have low iron contents. Many studies have suggested that a temperature rise occurred at the fault zones. In addition, the temperature rise can result in the production of iron oxides such as magnetite or maghemite, as reported by other studies. However, the temperature rise cannot explain the low value of iron content in the chlorites. Another reason for the low value of iron content is the variation in the pH of the fluid, which can be controlled by radical reactions. Therefore, the reactions at the seismogenic fault are due to not only the thermal decomposition resulting from the temperature rise and but also rock-fluid interactions based on the chlorite characteristics.

  1. Sampling strategy to develop a core collection of Uruguayan maize landraces based on morphological traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malosetti, M.; Abadie, T.

    2001-01-01

    Core collections were suggested to improve germplasm utilization. A core collection is a subset chosen to represent the diversity of a collection with a minimum of redundancies. Because diversity is distributed between and within groups with different degrees of organization, an adequate classificat

  2. Tank Vapor Sampling and Analysis Data Package for Tank 241-Z-361 Sampled 09/22/1999 and 09/271999 During Sludge Core Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VISWANATH, R.S.

    1999-12-29

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the September 22 and 27, 1999, headspace vapor sampling of Hanford Site Tank 241-2-361 during sludge core removal. The Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) sampling team collected the samples and Waste Management Laboratory (WML) analyzed the samples in accordance with the requirements specified in the 241-2361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan, (SAP), HNF-4371, Rev. 1, (Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Corporation, 1999). Six SUMMA{trademark} canister samples were collected on each day (1 ambient field blank and 5 tank vapor samples collected when each core segment was removed). The samples were radiologically released on September 28 and October 4, 1999, and received at the laboratory on September 29 and October 6, 1999. Target analytes were not detected at concentrations greater than their notification limits as specified in the SAP. Analytical results for the target analytes and tentatively identified compounds (TICs) are presented in Section 2.2.2 starting on page 2B-7. Three compounds identified for analysis in the SAP were analyzed as TICs. The discussion of this modification is presented in Section 2.2.1.2.

  3. Tank Vapor Sampling and Analysis Data Package for Tank 241-Z-361 Sampled 09/22/1999 and 09/271999 During Sludge Core Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VISWANATH, R.S.

    1999-12-29

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the September 22 and 27, 1999, headspace vapor sampling of Hanford Site Tank 241-2-361 during sludge core removal. The Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) sampling team collected the samples and Waste Management Laboratory (WML) analyzed the samples in accordance with the requirements specified in the 241-2361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan, (SAP), HNF-4371, Rev. 1, (Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Corporation, 1999). Six SUMMA{trademark} canister samples were collected on each day (1 ambient field blank and 5 tank vapor samples collected when each core segment was removed). The samples were radiologically released on September 28 and October 4, 1999, and received at the laboratory on September 29 and October 6, 1999. Target analytes were not detected at concentrations greater than their notification limits as specified in the SAP. Analytical results for the target analytes and tentatively identified compounds (TICs) are presented in Section 2.2.2 starting on page 2B-7. Three compounds identified for analysis in the SAP were analyzed as TICs. The discussion of this modification is presented in Section 2.2.1.2.

  4. A search at the millijansky level for milli-arcsecond cores in a complete sample of radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrle, A. E.; Preston, R. A.; Meier, D. L.; Gorenstein, M. V.; Shapiro, I. I.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Rius, A.

    1984-01-01

    A complete sample of 26 extended radio galaxies was observed at 2.29 GHz with the Mark III VLBI system. The fringe spacing was about 3 milli-arcsec, and the detection limit was about 2 millijanskys. Half of the galaxies were found to possess milli-arcsec radio cores. In all but three sources, the nuclear flux density was less than 0.04 of the total flux density. Galaxies with high optical luminosity (less than -21.2) were more likely than less luminous galaxies to contain a detectable milliparcsec radio core (69 percent vs. 20 percent). For objects with arcsec cores, 80 percent were found to have a milli-arcsec core, even though the milli-arcsec object did not always contribute the greater part of the arcsec flux density.

  5. Capillary pressure heterogeneity and hysteresis for the supercritical CO2/water system in a sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally M.

    2017-10-01

    We report results from an experimental investigation on the hysteretic behaviour of the capillary pressure curve for the supercritical CO2-water system in a Berea Sandstone core. Previous observations have highlighted the importance of subcore-scale capillary heterogeneity in developing local saturations during drainage; we show in this study that the same is true for the imbibition process. Spatially distributed drainage and imbibition scanning curves were obtained for mm-scale subsets of the rock sample non-invasively using X-ray CT imagery. Core- and subcore-scale measurements are well described using the Brooks-Corey formalism, which uses a linear trapping model to compute mobile saturations during imbibition. Capillary scaling yields two separate universal drainage and imbibition curves that are representative of the full subcore-scale data set. This enables accurate parameterisation of rock properties at the subcore-scale in terms of capillary scaling factors and permeability, which in turn serve as effective indicators of heterogeneity at the same scale even when hysteresis is a factor. As such, the proposed core-analysis workflow is quite general and provides the required information to populate numerical models that can be used to extend core-flooding experiments to conditions prevalent in the subsurface, which would be otherwise not attainable in the laboratory.

  6. Continuous ice core melter system with discrete sampling for major ion, trace element and stable isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, Erich C; Handley, Michael J; Sneed, Sharon B; Mayewski, Paul A; Kreutz, Karl J

    2006-05-15

    We present a novel ice/firn core melter system that uses fraction collectors to collect discrete, high-resolution (32 trace elements by inductively coupled plasma sectorfield mass spectrometry (ICP-SMS), and stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). The new continuous melting with discrete sampling (CMDS) system preserves an archive of each sample, reduces the problem of incomplete particle dissolution in ICP-SMS samples, and provides more precise trace element data than previous ice melter models by using longer ICP-SMS scan times and washing the instrument between samples. CMDS detection limits are similar to or lower than those published for ice melter systems coupled directly to analytical instruments and are suitable for analyses of polar and mid-low-latitude ice cores. Analysis of total calcium and sulfur by ICP-SMS and calcium ion, sulfate, and methanesulfonate by IC from the Mt. Logan Prospector-Russell Col ice core confirms data accuracy and coregistration of the split fractions from each sample. The reproducibility of all data acquired by the CMDS system is confirmed by replicate analyses of parallel sections of the GISP2 D ice core.

  7. Inelastic compaction, dilation and hysteresis of sandstones under hydrostatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Hamiel, Yariv; Zhu, Wenlu

    2014-05-01

    Sandstones display non-linear and inelastic behaviour such as hysteresis when subjected to cyclic loading. We present three hydrostatic compaction experiments with multiple loading-unloading cycles on Berea and Darley Dale sandstones and explain their hysteretic behaviour using non-linear inelastic compaction and dilation. Each experiment included eight to nine loading-unloading cycles with increasing maximum pressure in each subsequent cycle. Different pressure-volumetric strain relations during loading and unloading were observed. During the first cycles, under relatively low pressures, not all of the volumetric strain is recovered at the end of each cycle whereas at the last cycles, under relatively high pressures, the strain is recovered and the pressure-volumetric strain hysteresis loops are closed. The observed pressure-volumetric strain relations are non-linear and the effective bulk modulus of the sandstones changes between cycles. Observations are modelled with two inelastic deformation processes: irreversible compaction caused by changes in grain packing and recoverable compaction associated with grain contact adhesion, frictional sliding on grains or frictional sliding on cracks. The irreversible compaction is suggested to reflect rearrangement of grains into a more compact mode as the maximum pressure increases. Our model describes the `inelastic compaction envelope' in which sandstone sample will follow during hydrostatic loading. Irreversible compaction occurs when pressure is greater than a threshold value defined by the `inelastic compaction envelope'.

  8. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  9. Design Review Report for formal review of safety class features of exhauster system for rotary mode core sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JANICEK, G.P.

    2000-06-08

    Report documenting Formal Design Review conducted on portable exhausters used to support rotary mode core sampling of Hanford underground radioactive waste tanks with focus on Safety Class design features and control requirements for flammable gas environment operation and air discharge permitting compliance.

  10. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-13

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented.

  11. Provenance and weathering depth of carbonaceous gotland sandstone by use of carbon and oxygen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg, G.; Löfvendahl, R.; Stijfhoorn, D.; Råheim, A.

    Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios of carbonates (calcite) from different sites and stratigraphic levels of the Gotland sandstone show that it might be possible to fingerprint the different quarries. Preliminary tests of nine samples of Gotland sandstone from different buildings show that the laser microprobe is an excellent tool for estimating depth of weathering on this carbonaceous sandstone. Analyses perpendicular to the stone surface gave a similar trend for the carbon and oxygen isotope ratios, although changes go deeper with δ13C than δ18O. Depth of weathering is controlled by exposure, location, biologic overgrowth and salt efflorescence. The effect of earlier conservation treatment with linseed oil can also be traced.

  12. Preliminary stratigraphic and petrologic characterization of core samples from USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, A.C.; Carroll, P.R. (eds.)

    1981-11-01

    Tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation to determine their potential for long-term storage of radioactive waste. As part of this program, hole USW-G1 was drilled to a depth of 6000 ft below the surface, in the central part of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Petrographic study of the USW-G1 core is presented in this report and shows the tuffs (which generally were variably welded ash flows) are partly recrystallized to a variety of secondary minerals. The important alteration products are zeolites (heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime), smectite clays with minor interstratified illite, albite, micas, potassium feldspar, and various forms of silica. Iijima`s zeolite zones I through IV of burial metamorphism can be recognized in the core. Zeolites are first observed at about the 1300-ft depth, and the high-temperature boundary of zeolite stability in this core occurs at about 4350 ft. Analcime persists, either metastably or as a retrograde mineral, deeper in the core. The oxidation state of Fe-Ti oxide minerals, through most of the core, increases as the degree of welding decreases, but towards the bottom of the hole, reducing conditions generally prevail. Four stratigraphic units transected by the core may be potentially favorable sites for a waste repository. These four units, in order of increasing depth in the core, are (1) the lower cooling unit of the Topopah Spring Member, (2) cooling unit II of the Bullfrog Member, (3) the upper part of the Tram tuff, and (4) the Lithic-rich tuff.

  13. The pxarCore Library - Technical Documentation, Reference Manual, and Sample Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Spannagel, Simon; Perrey, Hanno Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This document describes the pxarCore library as of version 2.7, a versatile cross-platform library to program and read out devices featuring PSI46-type readout chips (ROCs) via the PSI digital test beoard (DTB). The design principles and features are presented together with an overview over possible configurations and use cases. The pxarCore library is built as flexible hardware interface and is capable of programming and reading out various combinations of ROCs. Most of the DTB firmware complexity is abstracted to allow users to address the attached devices via a simple yet versatile interface.

  14. Quantitative studies of hydrocarbon loss of the Silurian bitumen sandstone in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of Tarim Basin experienced several tectonic movements,of which Caledonian movement caused a serious damage to reservoirs of Silurian. The earlier reservoirs size and the later hydrocarbon loss are two key factors to exploration prospect of Silurian. On the basis of net thickness of bituminous sandstone and recovery coefficient of crude oil converting to bitumen,the scale of the hydrocarbon loss of palaeo-accumulation in bitumen sandstone of Silurian was calculated (86.30×108t). The deter-mination of net thickness of bitumen sandstone was completed mainly by several methods,such as physical property demarcation,observing lithology,grains with oil inclusion (GOI) technology,and quantitative grains fluorescence (QGF) technology. The samples of black sandstone and white sand-stone were collected and compared by means of the methods mentioned above. The results showed that there was little hydrocarbon,or none,in the white sandstone. The recovery coefficient was ob-tained by the analyses of plentiful physical parameters of crude oil and bitumen sandstone,based on the hypothesis that nonhydrocarbon compounds and bitumen were invariable in the process of bitu-men forming. The calculated result,which is more scientific and actual,indicates the exploration pros-pect is more promising in Silurian of the Tarim Basin.

  15. Diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments of the Bunter Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    The Bunter Sandstone Formation in the northern North German Basin has large geothermal potential with high porosity and permeability (generally >15% and >100 mD, respectively) and with pore fluid temperatures that are adequate for geothermal energy production (c. 55–60˚C). A combined investigation...... of diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments is used to identify the reservoir rocks that possess the best quality. This is accomplished by integrating various methods including: seismic reflection data, sedimentological description of cores, mineral quantification by point counting, measurement...

  16. Development of the RANCOR Rotary-Percussive Coring System for Mars Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Gale; Indyk, Stephen; Zacny, Kris

    2014-01-01

    A RANCOR drill was designed to fit a Mars Exploration Rover (MER) class vehicle. The low mass of 3 kg was achieved by using the same actuator for three functions: rotation, percussions, and core break-off. Initial testing of the drill exposed an unexpected behavior of an off-the-shelf sprag clutch used to couple and decouple rotary-percussive function from the core break off function. Failure of the sprag was due to the vibration induced during percussive drilling. The sprag clutch would back drive in conditions where it was expected to hold position. Although this did not affect the performance of the drill, it nevertheless reduced the quality of the cores produced. Ultimately, the sprag clutch was replaced with a custom ratchet system that allowed for some angular displacement without advancing in either direction. Replacing the sprag with the ratchet improved the collected core quality. Also, premature failure of a 300-series stainless steel percussion spring was observed. The 300-series percussion spring was ultimately replaced with a music wire spring based on performances of previously designed rotary-percussive drill systems.

  17. A new CF-IRMS system for quantifying stable isotopes of carbon monoxide from ice cores and small air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new analysis technique for stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from ice core samples. The technique is an online cryogenic vacuum extraction followed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS; it can also be used with small air samples. The CO extraction system includes two multi-loop cryogenic cleanup traps, a chemical oxidant for oxidation to CO2, a cryogenic collection trap, a cryofocusing unit, gas chromatography purification, and subsequent injection into a Finnigan Delta Plus IRMS. Analytical precision of 0.2‰ (±1δ for δ13C and 0.6‰ (±1δ for δ18O can be obtained for 100 mL (STP air samples with CO mixing ratios ranging from 60 ppbv to 140 ppbv (~268–625 pmol CO. Six South Pole ice core samples from depths ranging from 133 m to 177 m were processed for CO isotope analysis after wet extraction. To our knowledge, this is the first measurement of stable isotopes of CO in ice core air.

  18. Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

  19. Multidisciplinary studies on ancient sandstone quarries of Western Sardinia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Silvana Maria; Del Vais, Carla; Naitza, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The ancient coastal quarries of Mediterranean are increasingly considered geosites of multidisciplinary relevance. They are sites of historical-archaeological interest that show ancient techniques of stone extraction; they are significant for cultural heritage conservation and restoration, as sources of the stones used in ancient buildings and monuments; they are sites of geological relevance, as often retain important stratigraphic sections; they are also useful markers of secular changes in the sea level. A multisciplinary study is in progress on the ancient quarries of the Sinis region (western Sardinia island), integrating archaeological, geological, minero-petrographical data. In Sardinia, coastal quarries have been established from Punic and Roman times. Many of them exploited Quaternary sediments along the southern and western coasts of the island. They consist of middle-late Pleistocene marine conglomerates and carbonate sandstones, and of coastal (aeolian) carbonate sandstones. Sandstone blocks of different sizes have been widely used in ancient cities for buildings, defensive works, harbours, etc. Three main areas of stone extraction (San Giovanni di Sinis, Punta Maimoni, Is Arutas) have been so far recognized in the Sinis. GIS-supported mapping and documentation of the sites includes their geology and stratigraphy, the extension and layout of the quarries, and an evaluation of volumes of extracted rocks. Documented archaeological evidences include ancient extraction fronts, spoil heaps, working areas, working traces in the old fronts, transport routes of blocks, and traces of loading facilities. The study is aimed at reconstructing the relationships of the quarries with the urban areas of Sinis, as the ancient Punic-Roman city of Tharros. Consequently, a minero-petrographical characterization (optical microscopy, XRD) is performed on sandstones sampled in each quarry, and in historical buildings in Tharros and other centres of the region (Cabras

  20. Fracturing and Damage to Sandstone Under Coupling Effects of Chemical Corrosion and Freeze-Thaw Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tielin; Shi, Junping; Cao, Xiaoshan

    2016-11-01

    Rapid freeze-thaw (FT) cycles were adopted to explore the damage deterioration mechanism and mechanical properties of sandstone specimens under the coupling effects of different chemical solutions and FT cycles. The variation regularities of the FT cycles and physical and mechanical properties of sandstone specimens immersed in different chemical solutions were analyzed by using sandstone sampled from a Chinese riverbank slope. The damage variable based on porosity variation was used in the quantitative analysis of the damage to the sandstone under the coupling effects of chemical corrosion and FT cycles. Experimental results showed that the sandstone specimens weakened substantially under those effects. Their fracture toughness K IC, splitting tensile strength, and compressive strength showed a similar deteriorating trend with various numbers of FT cycles. However, a difference exists in the deterioration degree of their mechanical parameters, i.e., the deterioration degree of their fracture toughness K IC is the greatest followed by that of splitting tensile strength, and that of compressive strength is relatively small. Strong acid solutions may aggravate the deterioration of FT damage in sandstones, but at the early stage of the experiment, strong alkaline solutions inhibited sandstone damage deterioration. However, the inhibiting effect disappeared when the number of FT cycles exceeded 25. The different chemical solutions had a different effect on the FT damage degree of the sandstone specimens; for example, SO4 2- ions had a greater effect on FT damage than did HCO3 - ions. Water-chemical solutions and FT cycles promote each other in deteriorating rocks and simultaneously affect the damage deterioration degree of sandstones.

  1. Whole-rock analyses of core samples from the 1988 drilling of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, Rosalind Tuthill; Taggart, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents and evaluates 64 major-element analyses of previously unanalyzed Kilauea Iki drill core, plus three samples from the 1959 and 1960 eruptions of Kilauea, obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis during the period 1992 to 1995. All earlier major-element analyses of Kilauea Iki core, obtained by classical (gravimetric) analysis, were reported and evaluated in Helz and others (1994). In order to assess how well the newer data compare with this earlier suite of analyses, a subset of 24 samples, which had been analyzed by classical analysis, was reanalyzed using the XRF technique; those results are presented and evaluated in this report also. The XRF analyses have not been published previously. This report also provides an overview of how the chemical variations observed in these new data fit in with the chemical zonation patterns and petrologic processes inferred in earlier studies of Kilauea Iki.

  2. Synkinematic quartz cementation in partially open fractures in sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Laubach, Stephen E.; Fall, Andras; Eichhubl, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Faults and networks of naturally open fractures can provide open conduits for fluid flow, and may play a significant role in hydrocarbon recovery, hydrogeology, and CO2 sequestration. However, sandstone fracture systems are commonly infilled, at least to some degree, by quartz cement, which can stiffen and occlude fractures. Such cement deposits can systematically reduce the overall permeability enhancement due to open fractures (by reducing open fracture length) and result in permeability anisotropies. Thus, it is important to identify the factors that control the precipitation of quartz in fractures in order to identify potential fluid conduits under the present-day stress field. In many sandstones, quartz nucleates syntaxially on quartz grain or cement substrate of the fracture wall, and extends between fracture walls only locally, forming pillars or bridges. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images reveal that the core of these bridges are made up of bands of broken and resealed cement containing wall-parallel fluid inclusion planes. The fluid inclusion-rich core is usually surrounded by a layer of inclusion-poor clear quartz that comprises the lateral cement. Such crack-seal textures indicate that this phase was precipitating while the fractures were actively opening (synkinematic growth). Rapid quartz accumulation is generally believed to require temperatures of 80°C or more. Fluid inclusion thermometry and Raman spectroscopy of two-phase aqueous fluid-inclusions trapped in crack-seal bands may be used to track the P-T-X evolution of pore fluids during fracture opening and crack-seal cementation of quartz. Quartz cement bridges across opening mode fractures in the Cretaceous Travis Peak Formation of the tectonically quiescent East Texas Basin indicate individual fractures opened over a 48 m.y. time span at rates of 16-23 µm/m.y. Similarly, the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the Piceance Basin, Colorado contains fractures that

  3. Determination of Common Adulterants in Herbal Medicine and Food Samples using Core-shell Column Coupled to Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lawati, Haider A J; Al Busaidi, Idris; Kadavilpparampu, Afsal M; Suliman, FakhrEldin O

    2017-03-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used to develop and validate a rapid method to qualitatively and quantitatively analyse 18 common adulterants in herbal medicine and food samples. Initially, the mobile phase composition was optimized in three different columns: core-shell, monolithic and standard 3.5-µm-particle-size columns. The results show that the core-shell column provides the best separation. Moreover, the tandem mass spectrometry was optimized. The linear range for all adulterants was 0.5-500 μg mL-1. Finally, the samples that were supplied by the Public Authority of Customer Protection, Ministry of Health, and those collected from the local market were analysed. The results indicate that 7 of 33 analysed samples contained adulterants. The adulterated samples mainly contain sildenafil, tadalafil or vardenafil. The concentrations of these three adulterants in the samples were 0.18-39 wt%. This study is the first report in the Sultanate of Oman about adulteration in herbal medicine and food samples. The results clearly raise some concern and require proper plan of action to increase public awareness about this serious issue.

  4. Study of the Core of the Shapley Concentration I.the Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Bardelli, S; Vettolani, G; Zamorani, G

    1993-01-01

    We report the first results of a spectroscopic survey of galaxies in the core of the Shapley Concentration, the richest nearby supercluster of clusters of galaxies. We have measured 311 new galaxy redshifts in an area of $\\sim 4.5$ square degrees centered around the Abell cluster A3558. Considering also the data already available in the literature, the total number of galaxy redshifts in this area amounts to more than 500. On the basis of these data we estimate the mean velocities and the velocity dispersions of the Abell clusters A3556, A3558 and the poor cluster SC 1329 -314. Finally, from an analysis of the projected and three--dimensional distributions of galaxies in this region, we estimate the galaxy overdensity and find that the core of the Shapley Concentration has an interesting, very complex dynamical state: the main clusters appear to be interacting with each other, forming a single elongated structure containing many subcondensations.

  5. Data precision of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning of discrete samples with the ITRAX XRF core-scanner exemplified on loess-paleosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profe, Jörn; Ohlendorf, Christian

    2017-04-01

    XRF-scanning is the state-of-the-art technique for geochemical analyses in marine and lacustrine sedimentology for more than a decade. However, little attention has been paid to data precision and technical limitations so far. Using homogenized, dried and powdered samples (certified geochemical reference standards and samples from a lithologically-contrasting loess-paleosol sequence) minimizes many adverse effects that influence the XRF-signal when analyzing wet sediment cores. This allows the investigation of data precision under ideal conditions and documents a new application of the XRF core-scanner technology at the same time. Reliable interpretations of XRF results require data precision evaluation of single elements as a function of X-ray tube, measurement time, sample compaction and quality of peak fitting. Ten-fold measurement of each sample constitutes data precision. Data precision of XRF measurements theoretically obeys Poisson statistics. Fe and Ca exhibit largest deviations from Poisson statistics. The same elements show the least mean relative standard deviations in the range from 0.5% to 1%. This represents the technical limit of data precision achievable by the installed detector. Measurement times ≥ 30 s reveal mean relative standard deviations below 4% for most elements. The quality of peak fitting is only relevant for elements with overlapping fluorescence lines such as Ba, Ti and Mn or for elements with low concentrations such as Y, for example. Differences in sample compaction are marginal and do not change mean relative standard deviation considerably. Data precision is in the range reported for geochemical reference standards measured by conventional techniques. Therefore, XRF scanning of discrete samples provide a cost- and time-efficient alternative to conventional multi-element analyses. As best trade-off between economical operation and data quality, we recommend a measurement time of 30 s resulting in a total scan time of 30 minutes

  6. Comparative study between Botucatu and Berea sandstone properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Oldemar Ribeiro; Balaban, Rosangela de Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study is the analysis and comparison between Berea and Botucatu sandstone, concerning the problems with regard to the loss of permeability or water sensitivity or loss of hydraulic conductivity due to the presence of swelling or non-swelling clays. Some porous volumes of synthetic seawater of different salinities were displaced through the porous media of Berea and Botucatu formations. It was observed that even the plugs of Berea, with no-swelling clays in their composition, had the permeability reduced as soon as the brine salinity reached a lower limit. As expected, the same occurred with the Botucatu sandstone samples, however, in this case,the sensitivity to the low salinity was much more effective.

  7. Suggested protocol for collecting, handling and preparing peat cores and peat samples for physical, chemical, mineralogical and isotopic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givelet, Nicolas; Le Roux, Gaël; Cheburkin, Andriy; Chen, Bin; Frank, Jutta; Goodsite, Michael E; Kempter, Heike; Krachler, Michael; Noernberg, Tommy; Rausch, Nicole; Rheinberger, Stefan; Roos-Barraclough, Fiona; Sapkota, Atindra; Scholz, Christian; Shotyk, William

    2004-05-01

    For detailed reconstructions of atmospheric metal deposition using peat cores from bogs, a comprehensive protocol for working with peat cores is proposed. The first step is to locate and determine suitable sampling sites in accordance with the principal goal of the study, the period of time of interest and the precision required. Using the state of the art procedures and field equipment, peat cores are collected in such a way as to provide high quality records for paleoenvironmental study. Pertinent field observations gathered during the fieldwork are recorded in a field report. Cores are kept frozen at -18 degree C until they can be prepared in the laboratory. Frozen peat cores are precisely cut into 1 cm slices using a stainless steel band saw with stainless steel blades. The outside edges of each slice are removed using a titanium knife to avoid any possible contamination which might have occurred during the sampling and handling stage. Each slice is split, with one-half kept frozen for future studies (archived), and the other half further subdivided for physical, chemical, and mineralogical analyses. Physical parameters such as ash and water contents, the bulk density and the degree of decomposition of the peat are determined using established methods. A subsample is dried overnight at 105 degree C in a drying oven and milled in a centrifugal mill with titanium sieve. Prior to any expensive and time consuming chemical procedures and analyses, the resulting powdered samples, after manual homogenisation, are measured for more than twenty-two major and trace elements using non-destructive X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) methods. This approach provides lots of valuable geochemical data which documents the natural geochemical processes which occur in the peat profiles and their possible effect on the trace metal profiles. The development, evaluation and use of peat cores from bogs as archives of high-resolution records of atmospheric deposition of mineral dust and trace

  8. 1st paleomagnetic investigation of Nubia Sandstone at Kalabsha, south Western Desert of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mostafa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: the 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 °N, 32.75 °E. 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian and Sabaya Formation is of early Cretaceous (Albian–Cenomanian. The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7°, I = 36.6° with α95 = 5.2° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 82.8 °N and Long. = 283.1 °E. Five profile sections from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6°, I = 33.3° with α95 = 5.8° and the corresponding pole lies at Lat. = 78.3 °N and Long. = 280.4 °E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at Lat. = 80.5 °N and Long. = 281.7 °E. The obtaind magnetic components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  9. Experimental strain analysis of Clarens Sandstone colonised by endolithic lichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wessels

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Endolithic lichens occur commonly on Clarens Sandstone in South Africa, where they significantly contribute to the weathering of sandstone by means of mechanical and chemical weathering processes. This preliminary investigation reports on the success- ful use of strain gauges in detecting strain differences between sandstone without epilithic lichens and sandstone colonised by the euendolithic lichen Lecidea aff. sarcogynoides Korb. Mechanical weathering, expressed as strain changes, in Clarens Sandstone was studied during the transition from relatively dry winter to wet summer conditions. Daily weathering of sandstone due to thermal expansion and contraction of colonised and uncolonised sandstone could be shown. Our results show that liquid water in sandstone enhances the mechanical weathering of uncolonised Clarens Sandstone while water in the gaseous phase enhances mechanical weathering of sandstone by euendolithic lichens.

  10. Improvement of attenuation functions of a clayey sandstone for landfill leachate containment by bentonite addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Ana I; Fernández, Raúl; Sánchez Jiménez, Nicanor; Rodríguez Rastrero, Manuel; Regadío, Mercedes; de Soto, Isabel S; Cuevas, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Enhanced sand-clay mixtures have been prepared by using a sandstone arkosic material and have been evaluated for consideration as landfill liners. A lab-scale test was carried out under controlled conditions with different amended natural sandstones whereby leachate was passed through the compacted mixtures. The compacted samples consisted of siliceous sand (quartz-feldspar sand separated from the arkose sandstone) and clay (purified clay from arkose sandstone and two commercial bentonites) materials that were mixed in different proportions. The separation of mineral materials from a common and abundant natural source, for soil protection purposes, is proposed as an economic and environmentally efficient practice. The liner qualities were compared for their mineralogical, physicochemical and major ions transport and adsorption properties. Although all samples fulfilled hydraulic conductivity requirements, the addition of bentonite to arkose sandstone was determined to be an effective strategy to decrease the permeability of the soil and to improve the pollutants retention. The clay materials from arkose sandstone also contributed to pollutant retention by a significant improvement of the cation exchange capacity of the bulk material. However, the mixtures prepared with clay materials from the arkose, exhibited a slight increase of hydraulic conductivity. This effect has to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The influence of diagenesis on the reservoir quality of Cambrian and Carboniferous sandstones, southwest Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Earle F.; Abdel-Wahab, Antar; Salem, Alaa M. K.

    1996-04-01

    The diagenetic influence on hydrocarbon reservoir quality was investigated for the Cambrian and Lower Carboniferous sandstones of southwestern Sinai. These quartzose and feldspathic Palaeozoic sandstones were not buried more than 1 to 1.5 km until Late Cretaceous and more recent times, when the most deeply buried rocks may have reached 25 km. Porosity was reduced by compaction from an assumed original 45% to about 26%. In general, both Cambrian and Carboniferous sandstones lost more porosity by compaction (average of 19% for each) than by cementation (average of 17% and 13%, respectively). There is no significant difference in the degree of compaction shown by Cambrian (older, deeper buried) rather than Carboniferous sandstones. Cementation by iron oxide, quartz, calcite and kaolinite reduced porosity to 12-15%, except in silcretes and some ferricretes where porosity was reduced to <5%. Significant secondary porosity was created (5.8 and 5.1 % for Cambrian and Carboniferous sandstones, respectively ) chiefly by dissolution of feldspar. Kaolinite (maximum of 20%) is the most deleterious cement because it has high microporosity, which causes high residual water saturation, and occurs as tiny crystals that have the potential to break loose during rapid fluid flow and block the pore throats. The present-day porosity in these sandstones averages 19% and ranges from 1.5 to 32%. Many sandstone samples (47% of a total of 178 samples) have permeability values higher than 1000 md. The plot of porosity versus the log of permeability has a good correlation indicating that microporosity, even though locally important, does not significantly influence reservoir quality. In spite of their age and the large volumes of groundwater that probably passed through them, these Palaeozoic sandstones retain sufficient porosity and permeability to possess excellent reservoir quality.

  12. Dynamic Imaging of Fluid Flow in Sandstones by Nuclear Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Ronny; Benson, Sally; Druhan, Jenny; Hingerl, Ferdinand; O'Neil, James P.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.

    2014-05-01

    flow through a Berea Sandstone sample. Positron emission tomography (PET) is used to obtain near real-time dynamic 3D images of concentrations, while simultaneously measuring effluent profiles of a radioactive tracer that is injected into the core-sample through both delta- and step-like functions. The combination of these two data sets provides unparalleled insights about the effects of heterogeneity on tracer flows. It is shown that even for the homogeneous Berea Sandstone the effect of small-scale heterogeneity is significant. Numerical simulations in TOUGH2 of tracer flow in a medium with non-uniform porosity and permeability are carried out to support the experimental observations. Breakthrough curves are compared to those expected based on 3D permeability maps that have been previously obtained for the same core upon application of an independent technique based on multiphase flows. The potential is analyzed of combining various imaging techniques to visualize and quantify fluid flow in laboratory rock samples.

  13. A two scale analysis of tight sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Davy, C. A.; Song, Y.; Troadec, D.; Hauss, G.; Skoczylas, F.

    2015-12-01

    Tight sandstones have a low porosity and a very small permeability K. Available models for K do not compare well with measurements. These sandstones are made of SiO_2 grains, with a typical size of several hundreds of micron. These grains are separated by a network of micro-cracks, with sizes ranging between microns down to tens of nm. Therefore, the structure can be schematized by Voronoi polyhedra separated by plane and permeable polygonal micro-cracks. Our goal is to estimate K based on a two scale analysis and to compare the results to measurements. For a particular sample [2], local measurements on several scales include FIB/SEM [3], CMT and 2D SEM. FIB/SEM is selected because the peak pore size given by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry is of 350nm. FIB/SEM imaging (with 50 nm voxel size) identifies an individual crack of 180nm average opening, whereas CMT provides a connected porosity (individual crack) for 60 nm voxel size, of 4 micron average opening. Numerical modelling is performed by combining the micro-crack network scale (given by 2D SEM) and the 3D micro-crack scale (given by either FIB/SEM or CMT). Estimates of the micro-crack density are derived from 2D SEM trace maps by counting the intersections with scanlines, the surface density of traces, and the number of fracture intersections. K is deduced by using a semi empirical formula valid for identical, isotropic and uniformly distributed fractures [1]. This value is proportional to the micro-crack transmissivity sigma. Sigma is determined by solving the Stokes equation in the micro-cracks measured by FIB/SEM or CMT. K is obtained by combining the two previous results. Good correlation with measured values on centimetric plugs is found when using sigma from CMT data. The results are discussed and further research is proposed. [1] Adler et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Duan et al, Int. J. Rock Mech. Mining Sci., 65, p75, 2014. [3] Song et al, Marine and Petroleum Eng., 65, p63

  14. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Liu, T.J. H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-06-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  15. Examination of core samples from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope: Effects of retrieval and preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Lu, H.; Winters, W.; Boswell, R.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Collecting and preserving undamaged core samples containing gas hydrates from depth is difficult because of the pressure and temperature changes encountered upon retrieval. Hydrate-bearing core samples were collected at the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well in February 2007. Coring was performed while using a custom oil-based drilling mud, and the cores were retrieved by a wireline. The samples were characterized and subsampled at the surface under ambient winter arctic conditions. Samples thought to be hydrate bearing were preserved either by immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN), or by storage under methane pressure at ambient arctic conditions, and later depressurized and immersed in LN. Eleven core samples from hydrate-bearing zones were scanned using x-ray computed tomography to examine core structure and homogeneity. Features observed include radial fractures, spalling-type fractures, and reduced density near the periphery. These features were induced during sample collection, handling, and preservation. Isotopic analysis of the methane from hydrate in an initially LN-preserved core and a pressure-preserved core indicate that secondary hydrate formation occurred throughout the pressurized core, whereas none occurred in the LN-preserved core, however no hydrate was found near the periphery of the LN-preserved core. To replicate some aspects of the preservation methods, natural and laboratory-made saturated porous media samples were frozen in a variety of ways, with radial fractures observed in some LN-frozen sands, and needle-like ice crystals forming in slowly frozen clay-rich sediments. Suggestions for hydrate-bearing core preservation are presented.

  16. Dating of pollen samples from the sediment core of Lake St Anne in the East Carpathian Mountains, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubay, Katalin; Katalin Magyari, Enikö; Braun, Mihály; Schabitz, Frank; Molnár, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Lake St Anne (950 m a.s.l.) is situated in the Ciomadul volcano crater, the youngest volcano in the Carpathians. Aims driving forward the studies there are twofold, one is dating the latest eruption of the Ciomadul volcano and the other is the multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of this region. The sediment of Lake St Anne was sampled several times already, but never reached the bottom of the lake before. During the winter of 2013 at a new core location drilling started at 600 cm water depth and finally reached the bottom of the lake sediment at approximately 2300 cm including water depth. As for all multi-proxy studies essential requirement was to build a reliable chronology. Sediments were dated by radiocarbon method. Previous radiocarbon dates were measured on plant macrofossils, charcoal, Cladocera eggs, chironomid head capsules and bulk lake sediments. Lake St Anne has volcanic origin and there is intensive upwelling of CO2it is important to study and take into consideration, whether there is any local reservoir effect at the case of samples where it could be problematic. Furthermore the late part of the sediment section (between 15,000 and 30,000 cal. yr BP) has low organic matter content (less than 2-4%) with scarcity of datable plant macrofossil material. In this review a different fraction of pollen samples with terrestrial origin was tested and studied as a novel sample type for the radiocarbon dating. Pollen samples were extracted from the lake sediment cores. This type of organic material could be an ideal candidate for radiocarbon based chronological studies as it has terrestrial source and is present in the whole core in contrast with the terrestrial macrofossils. Although the pollen remains were present in the whole core, in many cases their amount give a challenge even for the AMS technic. Samples were measured with EnvironMICADAS AMS and its gas ion source in the HEKAL laboratory (Debrecen, Hungary). We examine the reliability the

  17. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  18. A Direct-Push Sample-Freezing Drive Shoe for Collecting Sediment Cores with Intact Pore Fluid, Microbial, and Sediment Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B. A.; Trost, J.; Christy, T. M.; Mason, B.

    2015-12-01

    Abiotic and biological reactions in shallow groundwater and bottom sediments are central to understanding groundwater contaminant attenuation and biogeochemical cycles. The laminar flow regime in unconsolidated surficial aquifers creates narrow reaction zones. Studying these reaction zones requires fine-scale sampling of water together with adjacent sediment in a manner that preserves in situ redox conditions. Collecting representative samples of these narrow zones with traditional subsurface sampling equipment is challenging. For example, use of a basket type core catcher for saturated, non-cohesive sediments results in loss of fluid and sediments during retrieval. A sample-freezing drive shoe designed for a wire line piston core sampler allowed collection of cores with intact sediment, microbial, and pore fluid distributions and has been the basis for studies documenting centimeter-scale variations in aquifer microbial populations (Murphy and Herkelrath, 1996). However, this freezing drive shoe design is not compatible with modern-day direct push sampling rigs. A re-designed sample-freezing drive shoe compatible with a direct-push dual-tube coring system was developed and field-tested. The freezing drive shoe retained sediment and fluid distributions in saturated sediment core samples by freezing a 10 centimeter plug below the core sample with liquid CO­2. Core samples collected across the smear zone at a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, Minnesota, were successfully extracted without loss of fluid or sediment. Multiple core sections from different depths in the aquifer were retrieved from a single hole. This new design makes a highly effective sampling technology available on modern-day direct push sampling equipment to inform myriad questions about subsurface biogeochemistry processes. The re-design of the freezing drive shoe was supported by the USGS Innovation Center for Earth Sciences. References: Murphy, Fred, and W. N. Herkelrath. "A sample

  19. Analytical Results for 42 Fluvial Tailings Cores and 7 Stream Sediment Samples from High Ore Creek, Northern Jefferson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fey, David L.; Church, Stan E.

    1998-01-01

    Metal-mining related wastes in the Boulder River basin study area in northern Jefferson County, Montana have been implicated in their detrimental effects on water quality with regard to acid-generation and toxic-metal solubility. Sediments, fluvial tailings and water from High Ore Creek have been identified as significant contributors to water quality degradation of the Boulder River below Basin, Montana. A study of 42 fluvial tailings cores and 7 stream sediments from High Ore Creek was undertaken to determine the concentrations of environmentally sensitive elements (i.e. Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) present in these materials, and the mineral phases containing those elements. Two sites of fluvial deposition of mine-waste contaminated sediment on upper High Ore Creek were sampled using a one-inch soil probe. Forty-two core samples were taken producing 247 subsamples. The samples were analyzed by ICP-AES (inductively coupled-plasma atomic emission spectroscopy) using a total mixed-acid digestion. Results of the core analyses show that the elements described above are present at very high concentrations (to 22,000 ppm As, to 460 ppm Ag, to 900 ppm Cd, 4,300 ppm Cu, 46,000ppm Pb, and 50,000 ppm Zn). Seven stream-sediment samples were also analyzed by ICP-AES for total element content and for leachable element content. Results show that the sediment of High Ore Creek has elevated levels of ore-related metals throughout its length, down to the confluence with the Boulder River, and that the metals are, to a significant degree, contained in the leachable phase, namely the hydrous amorphous iron- and manganese-hydroxide coatings on detrital sediment particles.

  20. Operation of a Public Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Houstion, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Tinker; Beverly DeJarnett

    2007-07-31

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the FY05 and FY06 technical progress reports to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 725,000 boxes of rock material (as of January 2008), and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong; the number of patrons averaged over 100 per month from June 1, 2006 to October 2007, and 90,000 boxes of core were donated to, and received by, the HRC during this time. Usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that UT is building in order to operate the HRC primarily off a portion of the interest generated by the fund. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing a major donation of rock material and cash in order to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling

  1. Operation of a Public Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Houstion, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Tinker; Beverly DeJarnett

    2007-07-31

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the FY05 and FY06 technical progress reports to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 725,000 boxes of rock material (as of January 2008), and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong; the number of patrons averaged over 100 per month from June 1, 2006 to October 2007, and 90,000 boxes of core were donated to, and received by, the HRC during this time. Usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that UT is building in order to operate the HRC primarily off a portion of the interest generated by the fund. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing a major donation of rock material and cash in order to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling

  2. The core self-evaluation scale: psychometric properties of the german version in a representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenger, Markus; Körner, Annett; Maier, Günter W; Hinz, Andreas; Stöbel-Richter, Yve; Brähler, Elmar; Hilbert, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The Core Self-Evaluation Scale (CSES) is an economical self-reporting instrument that assesses fundamental evaluations of self-worthiness and capabilities. The broad aims of this study were to test the CSES's psychometric properties. The study is based on a representative survey of the German general population. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted for different models with 1, 2, and 4 latent factors. The CSES was found to be reliable and valid, as it correlated as expected with measures of depression, anxiety, quality of life, self-report health status, and pain. A 2-factor model with 2 related factors (r = -.62) showed the best model fit. Furthermore, the CSES was measurement invariant across gender and age. In general, males had higher values of positive self-evaluations and lower negative self-evaluations than females. It is concluded that the CSES is a useful tool for assessing resource-oriented personality constructs.

  3. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett; Laura C. Zahm

    2005-04-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the 2003-2004 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently houses over 500,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 400,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has continued to increase during this third year of operation; over the past twelve months the HRC has averaged approximately 200 patrons per month. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and/or cash during this operating period. All of these funds went directly into the endowment. Outreach during 2004 and 2005 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing more donations of rock material and cash in order to fully fund the HRC endowment. BEG will also continue to increase the number of patrons using the facility, and we will strive to raise awareness of the HRC's 100,000-volume geoscience technical library.

  4. Sedimentological reservoir characteristics of the Paleocene fluvial/lacustrine Yabus Sandstone, Melut Basin, Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, M. I.; Padmanabhan, E.; Abdullatif, O. M.

    2016-11-01

    Melut Basin in Sudan is regionally linked to the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Central and Western African Rift System (CWARS). The Paleocene Yabus Formation is the main oil producing reservoir in the basin. It is dominated by channel sandstone and shales deposited in fluvial/lacustrine environment during the third phase of rifting in the basin. Different scales of sedimentological heterogeneities influenced reservoir quality and architecture. The cores and well logs analyses revealed seven lithofacies representing fluvial, deltaic and lacustrine depositional environments. The sandstone is medium to coarse-grained, poorly to moderately-sorted and sub-angular to sub-rounded, arkosic-subarkosic to sublitharenite. On the basin scale, the Yabus Formation showed variation in sandstone bodies, thickness, geometry and architecture. On macro-scale, reservoir quality varies vertically and laterally within Yabus Sandstone where it shows progressive fining upward tendencies with different degrees of connectivity. The lower part of the reservoir showed well-connected and amalgamated sandstone bodies, the middle to the upper parts, however, have moderate to low sandstone bodies' connectivity and amalgamation. On micro-scale, sandstone reservoir quality is directly affected by textures and diagenetic changes such as compaction, cementation, alteration, dissolution and kaolinite clays pore fill and coat all have significantly reduced the reservoir porosity and permeability. The estimated porosity in Yabus Formation ranges from 2 to 20% with an average of 12%; while permeability varies from 200 to 500 mD and up to 1 Darcy. The understanding of different scales of sedimentological reservoir heterogeneities might contribute to better reservoir quality prediction, architecture, consequently enhancing development and productivity.

  5. Diagenesis of Paleogene sandstone from Kong 1 Member of Southern Kongdian in Huanghua depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Huanghua depression is one of the richest areas in petroleum and natural gas in China. The Paleogene mainly consists of sandstone with facies of river, delta, fan delta and littoral-shallow lacustrine. Diagenesis played an important role in the properties of reservoir rocks. Applying X-ray diffraction, on the basis of analyzing many cores and thin sections, the authors studied diagenesis of Paleogene sandstone reservoir rocks in kongl Menber of southern Kongdian in Huanghua depression. Diagenetic complexity shows that the sandstone in this area underwent compaction, cementation, isolation, recrystallization during the burying of sediments, and the first three compose the major diagenesis. The compaction and cementation led to decreasing porosity, and the solution of unsteady minerals also results in increasing in porosity.

  6. Depositional Environments of the Upper Permian Quartzose Sandstone (Shandong Province, North China):Insight from Trace Element Geochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei L; Zengxue Li; Jitao Chen; Ying Liu; Zengqi Zhang; Jipo Liang; Haiyan Liu

    2015-01-01

    The depositional environment of the Upper Permian quartzose sandstone (Kuishan sand-stone in Shihezi Formation of Upper Permian) in the North China epicontinental basin is controversial. In order to test the previous hypotheses, we analyzed sedimentological characteristics of the Kuishan sandstones in outcrops and boreholes, and carried out trace element geochemical analysis by electron probe microanalyzer. Three lithofacies were recognized, including normal-graded conglomerate (Cng), trough and planar cross-bedded coarse sandstone (CStpc), and planar cross-bedded medium sandstone (MSpc). Normal-graded conglomerate (Cng) formed in the meandering river or deltaic distributary channels. Trough and planar cross-bedded coarse sandstone (CStpc) formed in meandering river or distributary channels of near-source deltaic plain. Planar cross-bedded medium sandstone (MSpc) formed in the siliciclastic beach with high-to moderate-energy conditions. By the petrology and trace elements analysis, three relatively large-scale transgressions were revealed. Each transgression was re-flected by the lower content of Ba and ratios of Fe/Mn, and the high content of B and ratios of B/Ga. The ratios of Ni/Co of all samples are all lower than 2, suggesting oxygen-enriched shallower water en-vironment during deposition of the Kuishan sandstones.

  7. Transport Mechanisms for CO2-CH4 Exchange and Safe CO2 Storage in Hydrate-Bearing Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Arne Birkedal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 injection in hydrate-bearing sediments induces methane (CH4 production while benefitting from CO2 storage, as demonstrated in both core and field scale studies. CH4 hydrates have been formed repeatedly in partially water saturated Bentheim sandstones. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and CH4 consumption from pump logs have been used to verify final CH4 hydrate saturation. Gas Chromatography (GC in combination with a Mass Flow Meter was used to quantify CH4 recovery during CO2 injection. The overall aim has been to study the impact of CO2 in fractured and non-fractured samples to determine the performance of CO2-induced CH4 hydrate production. Previous efforts focused on diffusion-driven exchange from a fracture volume. This approach was limited by gas dilution, where free and produced CH4 reduced the CO2 concentration and subsequent driving force for both diffusion and exchange. This limitation was targeted by performing experiments where CO2 was injected continuously into the spacer volume to maintain a high driving force. To evaluate the effect of diffusion length multi-fractured core samples were used, which demonstrated that length was not the dominating effect on core scale. An additional set of experiments is presented on non-fractured samples, where diffusion-limited transportation was assisted by continuous CO2 injection and CH4 displacement. Loss of permeability was addressed through binary gas (N2/CO2 injection, which regained injectivity and sustained CO2-CH4 exchange.

  8. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2006-04-14

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8

  9. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTION, TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker; Beverly Blakeney DeJarnett

    2006-04-14

    The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the HRC endowment now totals $8

  10. Two-dimensional T2 distribution mapping in rock core plugs with optimal k-space sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-07-01

    Spin-echo single point imaging has been employed for 1D T(2) distribution mapping, but a simple extension to 2D is challenging since the time increase is n fold, where n is the number of pixels in the second dimension. Nevertheless 2D T(2) mapping in fluid saturated rock core plugs is highly desirable because the bedding plane structure in rocks often results in different pore properties within the sample. The acquisition time can be improved by undersampling k-space. The cylindrical shape of rock core plugs yields well defined intensity distributions in k-space that may be efficiently determined by new k-space sampling patterns that are developed in this work. These patterns acquire 22.2% and 11.7% of the k-space data points. Companion density images may be employed, in a keyhole imaging sense, to improve image quality. T(2) weighted images are fit to extract T(2) distributions, pixel by pixel, employing an inverse Laplace transform. Images reconstructed with compressed sensing, with similar acceleration factors, are also presented. The results show that restricted k-space sampling, in this application, provides high quality results.

  11. Alteration of Crystalline and Glassy Basaltic Protolith by Seawater as Recorded by Drill Core and Drill Cutting Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, A. P.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.

    2015-12-01

    The major and trace element composition of hydrothermally altered basaltic drill core and drill cutting samples from the seawater recharged Reykjanes geothermal system in Iceland are compared to unaltered surface flows from the Reykjanes Peninsula compiled from the literature. Trace element characteristics of deep (>2000 m) core samples record bimodal compositions similar to trace element enriched and trace element depleted Reykjanes Ridge basalts. Drill cuttings (350-3000 m) overwhelmingly reflect the more common trace element enriched igneous precursor. Crystalline protoliths (dolerite dykes and pillow lava cores) are depleted in Cs, Rb, K, and Ba (± Pb and Th) relative to an unaltered equivalent, despite variations in the extent of alteration ranging from from minor chloritization with intact igneous precursor minerals through to extensive chloritization and uralitization. Glassy protoliths (dyke margins, pillow edges, and hyaloclastites) show similar depletions of Cs, Rb, K, and Ba, but also show selective depletions of the light rare earth elements (LREE) La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Eu due to extensive recrystallization to hydrothermal hornblende. Lower grade alteration shows less pronounced decoupling of LREE and is likely controlled by a combination of Cl complexation in the seawater-derived recharge fluid, moderated by anhydrite and epidote precipitation. These results suggest that alteration of glassy protolith in seawater-recharged systems is an important contribution to the consistently light rare earth and Eu enriched patterns observed in seafloor hydrothermal fluids from basaltic systems. An important conclusion of this study is that that drill cuttings samples are strongly biased toward unaltered rock and more resistant alteration minerals including epidote and quartz potentially resulting in misidentification of lithology and extent of alteration.

  12. A Comparative Study of Different Acids used for Sandstone Acid Stimulation: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hong, Leong; Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2017-07-01

    Matrix acidizing is an effective well stimulation technique, in which acids are injected at a pressure below the formation fracture pressure. The application of sandstone matrix acidizing has been widely used in the oil and gas industry for many decades. The application of mud acid, which is a combination of Hydrofluoric acid and Hydrochloric acid (HF:HCl) in well stimulation, has gained its popularity in improving the porosity and permeability of reservoir formation. In fact, this is driven by the effectiveness of HF in dissolving minerals in sandstone and HCl in controlling precipitation. Nonetheless, high temperature matrix acidizing approach is in growing need since many wells nowadays are producing from much deeper and hotter reservoir, with a temperature higher than 200°F. In such conditions, mud acid causes rapid reaction rates, hence becoming less efficient as the acids are consumed too early. Furthermore, mud acid is hazardous and very corrosive. On the contrary, previous studies had shown that Fluoroboric Acid (HBF4) and Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) offered numerous advantages in comparison to the conventional mud acid. HBF4 can hydrolyze to form HF whereas H3PO4 acts as a buffer acid; which is able to penetrate deeper into the formation before spending. Likewise, both acids cause more increase in the permeability, less change in the strength of core samples and significantly less corrosive. This paper had critically reviewed the experimental works which had been done on different types of acids. The advantages and disadvantages of these acids are evaluated. Therefore, a new acid combination (HBF4:H3PO4) is developed and the future work which can be done on it is proposed.

  13. Depositional and diagenetic variability within the Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone: Implications for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, B.B.; Ochoa, R.I.; Wilkens, N.D.; Brophy, J.; Lovell, T.R.; Fischietto, N.; Medina, C.R.; Rupp, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone is the major target reservoir for ongoing geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations throughout the midwest United States. The potential CO2 reservoir capacity, reactivity, and ultimate fate of injected CO2 depend on textural and compositional properties determined by depositional and diagenetic histories that vary vertically and laterally across the formation. Effective and efficient prediction and use of the available pore space requires detailed knowledge of the depositional and diagenetic textures and mineralogy, how these variables control the petrophysical character of the reservoir, and how they vary spatially. Here, we summarize the reservoir characteristics of the Mount Simon Sandstone based on examination of geophysical logs, cores, cuttings, and analysis of more than 150 thin sections. These samples represent different parts of the formation and depth ranges of more than 9000 ft (>2743 m) across the Illinois Basin and surrounding areas. This work demonstrates that overall reservoir quality and, specifically, porosity do not exhibit a simple relationship with depth, but vary both laterally and with depth because of changes in the primary depositional facies, framework composition (i.e., feldspar concentration), and diverse diagenetic modifications. Diagenetic processes that have been significant in modifying the reservoir include formation of iron oxide grain coatings, chemical compaction, feldspar precipitation and dissolution, multiple generations of quartz overgrowth cementation, clay mineral precipitation, and iron oxide cementation. These variables provide important inputs for calculating CO2 capacity potential, modeling reactivity, and are also an important baseline for comparisons after CO2 injection. Copyright ??2011. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Division of Environmental Geosciences. All rights reserved.

  14. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker

    2003-06-01

    In the spring of 2002, the Department of Energy provided an initial 1-year grant to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). The grant covered the one-year operational expenses of a worldclass core and cuttings facility located in Houston, Texas, that BP America donated to the BEG. The DOE investment of $300,000, matched by a $75,000 UT contribution, provided critical first-year funds that were heavily leveraged by the BP gift of $7.0 million in facilities and cash. DOE also provided a one-month extension and grant of $30,000 for the month of May 2003. A 5-year plan to grow a permanent endowment in order to manage the facility in perpetuity is well under way and on schedule. The facility, named the Houston Research Center, represents an ideal model for a strong Federal, university, and private partnership to accomplish a national good. This report summarizes the activities supported by the initial DOE grant during the first 13 months of operation and provides insight into the activities and needs of the facility in the second year of operation.

  15. OPERATION OF A PUBLIC GEOLOGIC CORE AND SAMPLE REPOSITORY IN HOUSTON TEXAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott W. Tinker

    2003-06-01

    In the spring of 2002, the Department of Energy provided an initial 1-year grant to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT). The grant covered the one-year operational expenses of a worldclass core and cuttings facility located in Houston, Texas, that BP America donated to the BEG. The DOE investment of $300,000, matched by a $75,000 UT contribution, provided critical first-year funds that were heavily leveraged by the BP gift of $7.0 million in facilities and cash. DOE also provided a one-month extension and grant of $30,000 for the month of May 2003. A 5-year plan to grow a permanent endowment in order to manage the facility in perpetuity is well under way and on schedule. The facility, named the Houston Research Center, represents an ideal model for a strong Federal, university, and private partnership to accomplish a national good. This report summarizes the activities supported by the initial DOE grant during the first 13 months of operation and provides insight into the activities and needs of the facility in the second year of operation.

  16. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Chan, K.M.; Kerr, D.; Sunda, W.

    1970-01-01

    Eleven samples of fluids which had been squeezed on board ship, and four, packaged sediment samples were received in our laboratories. As in Leg 2, the volumes of fluid available were scanty and did not permit multiple determinations of constituents in many of the samples; in Hole 21 the fluid available sufficed only for refractometer readings (a few tenths of a milliliter). Therefore, analytical scatter is again responsible for partially obscuring variations (and constancy) in the conservative constituents such as sodium. However, on the whole the results confirm the features which appeared in Legs 1 and 2. Central oceanic sediments display a remarkable constancy in total salinity, chlorinity and sodium concentration to the greatest depths and ages yet penetrated in the project drillings. Variations attributable to postburial reactions do occur in the remaining major ions, but they usually show little systematic trend with depth--with the exception of potassium, which will be discussed later. Methods remain similar to those employed for Leg 2; the detailed techniques are now being prepared for submission, but a brief description may be obtained from the previous Leg reports (Manheim and Sayles, 1969; Chan and Manheim, 1970). Results from four unsqueezed samples are not complete and, therefore, do not appear here.

  17. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon (C-14) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from

  18. Radiocarbon analysis of stratospheric CO2 retrieved from AirCore sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Dipayan; Chen, Huilin; Been, Henk A.; Kivi, Rigel; Meijer, Harro A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiocarbon (C-14) is an important atmospheric tracer and one of the many used in the understanding of the global carbon budget, which includes the greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4. Measurement of radiocarbon in atmospheric CO2 generally requires the collection of large air samples (a few liters) from w

  19. Standardization and optimization of core sampling procedure for carbon isotope analysis in eucalyptus and variation in carbon isotope ratios across species and growth conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Raju, M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available and optimization of core sampling procedure for carbon isotope analysis in eucalyptus and variation in carbon isotope ratios across species and growth conditions Mohan Raju, B#; Nuveshen Naidoo*; Sheshshaayee, M. S; Verryn, S. D*; Kamalkannan, R^; Bindumadhava... isotope analysis in Eucalyptus. Methods Expt 1: * Cores were taken from periphery to pith in 5 year old trees of Eucalyptus * Five half sib families of Eucalyptus grandis & E. urophylla were used ? Cores were further subdivided into 5 fragments...

  20. 阿海水电站碾压混凝土长心样取心技术%Coring Technology of Long Core Sample of Roller Compacted Concrete in A’ hai Hydropower Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹琳

    2013-01-01

    A 19.28m complete concrete core sample was successfully removed in RCC dam of A’hai hydropower station. The article introduces the coring technology for long concrete cores in drilling equipment selection, drilling material selec-tion, drilling parameter setting and adjustment, core samples pulling breaking and removing out, core positioning and post maintenance.%  阿海水电站碾压混凝土大坝成功钻取出了一根长19.28 m的完整混凝土心样.从钻孔设备选型、钻孔材料选择、钻进参数制定与调整、心样拔断与提取、出心摆放和后期养护等方面简要介绍了混凝土长心样的取心技术.

  1. Estimates of the hydrologic impact of drilling water on core samples taken from partially saturated densely welded tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which drill water might be expected to be imbibed by core samples taken from densely welded tuff. In a related experimental study conducted in G-Tunnel, drill water imbibition by the core samples was observed to be minimal. Calculations were carried out with the TOUGH code with the intent of corroborating the imbibition observations. Due to the absence of hydrologic data pertaining directly to G-Tunnel welded tuff, it was necessary to apply data from a similar formation. Because the moisture retention curve was not available for imbibition conditions, the drainage curve was applied to the model. The poor agreement between the observed and calculated imbibition data is attributed primarily to the inappropriateness of the drainage curve. Also significant is the value of absolute permeability (k) assumed in the model. Provided that the semi-log plot of the drainage and imbibition moisture retention curves are parallel within the saturation range of interest, a simple relationship exists between the moisture retention curve, k, and porosity ({phi}) which are assumed in the model and their actual values. If k and {phi} are known, we define the hysteresis factor {lambda} to be the ratio of the imbibition and drainage suction pressures for any saturation within the range of interest. If k and {phi} are unknown, {lambda} also accounts for the uncertainties in their values. Both the experimental and modeling studies show that drill water imbibition by the core has a minimal effect on its saturation state. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  3. Experimental determination of noble gas, SF6 and CO2 flow profiles through a porous sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgallon, Rachel; Gilfillan, Stuart; Edlmann, Katriona; McDermott, Chris

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe) and SF6 have recently been used as artificial and inherent tracers of CO2 flow and migration from within[1,2] and from geological reservoirs[3]. However, outstanding questions remain, particularly regarding the flow behaviour of the noble gases compared to CO2. Here we present results from specially constructed experimental equipment, which has been used to determine the factors affecting transport of noble gases relative to CO2 in a porous sandstone. The experimental setup consists of a sample loop that can be loaded with a desired gas mixture. This sample can be released as a pulse into a feeder gas stream through a flow cell. The flow cell consists of a 3.6 cm diameter core, which can be of any length. The sample is surrounded by aluminium foil and treated with epoxy resin inside stainless steel tubing. The flow cell is encased by two purpose designed dispersion end plates. Real-time analysis of the arrival peaks of the gases downstream is recorded using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS). For the experiments, a 0.96 m core of Fell Sandstone was selected to represent a porous media. Noble gases and SF6 pulses were flowed through a CO2 carrier gas at five different pressure gradients (10 - 50 kPa) with arrival profiles measured using the QMS. Surprisingly, peak arrival times of He were slower than the other noble gases at each pressure gradient. The differences in peak arrival times between He and other noble gases increased as pressure decreased and the curve profiles for each noble gas differ significantly. The heavier noble gases (Kr and Xe) along with SF6 show a steeper peak rise at initial appearance, but have a longer duration profile than the He curves. Interestingly, the breakthrough curve profiles for both Kr and Xe were similar to SF6 indicating that Kr and Xe could be substituted for SF6, which is a potent greenhouse gas, in tracing applications. In addition, CO2 pulses were passed through a N2 carrier gas. The

  4. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Chan, K.M.; Sayles, F.L.

    1970-01-01

    Leg 5 samples fall into two categories with respect to interstitial water composition: 1) rapidly deposited terrigenous or appreciably terrigenous deposits, such as in Hole 35 (western Escanaba trough, off Cape Mendocino, California); and, 2) slowly deposited pelagic clays and biogenic muds and oozes. Interstitial waters in the former show modest to slight variations in chloride and sodium, but drastic changes in non-conservative ions such as magnesium and sulfate. The pelagic deposits show only relatively minor changes in both conservative and non-conservative pore fluid constituents. As was pointed out in earlier Leg Reports, it is believed that much of the variation in chloride in pore fluids within individual holes is attributable to the manipulation of samples on board ship and in the laboratory. On the other hand, the scatter in sodium is due in part to analytical error (on the order of 2 to 3 per cent, in terms of a standard deviation), and it probably accounts for most of the discrepancies in total anion and cation balance. All constituents reported here, with the exception of bulk water content, were analyzed on water samples which were sealed in plastic tubes aboard ship and were subsequently opened and divided into weighed aliquots in the laboratory. Analytical methods follow the atomic absorption, wet chemical and emission spectrochemical techniques briefly summarized in previous reports, e.g. Manheim et al., 1969, and Chan and Manheim, 1970. The authors acknowledge assistance from W. Sunda, D. Kerr, C. Lawson and H. Richards, and thank D. Spencer, P. Brewer and E. Degens for allowing the use of equipment and laboratory facilities.

  5. Experimental deformation in sandstone, carbonates and quartz aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Cecilia See Nga [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    pressures. Through evaluating the unit cell lattice parameters and the volume of the quartz sample, macroscopic stress and strain were resolved. Moreover, we observed quartz peak broadened asymmetrically at low pressure, such extent is more prominent in axial than in radial direction. Our evaluation on peak [101] (highest intensity among peaks) demonstrated that full width at half maximum can be a good proxy for microscopic stress distribution. We observed deviations in the pressurevolume curves at P = ~0.4 GPa and speculated that it was the point of which onset of grain crushing and pore collapse occur in quartz. This is on the same order of which onset of grain crushing (commonly known as P*) is observed in sandstones in the rock mechanics literature. This demonstrated that there is potential in estimating grain crushing and pore collapse pressure with our technique.

  6. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from undisturbed soil cores sampled along a natural clay gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...... and the so-called degree of P saturation (oxalate-extractable P on iron and aluminum minerals). Because higher colloidal P concentration was countered by a lower colloidal leaching, the total amount of leached P stayed remarkably constant along the natural clay gradient....

  7. Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

  8. Lithological and Petrographic Analyses of Carbonates and Sandstones From the Southern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Avendaño, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present results of sedimentological and petrological studies of drill cores from the Bay of Campeche in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Based on reports on drill cores obtained from oil exploratory wells in the Cantarell Complex located 80 kilometres offshore in the Bay of Campeche and studies related to regional geology composite simplified stratigraphic columns for offshore Campeche region have been constructed up to depths of approximately 5000 m. The stratigraphic column is formed by a thick sediment sequence of Middle Jurassic age (evaporites, Callovian), Late Jurassic (terrigenous, calcareous clays and calcareous layers), Lower Cretaceous (carbonates), Upper Cretaceous-Paleogene (calcareous breccias), Paleogene-Neogene (terrigenous-carbonates intercalations) and Quaternary (terrigenous). The core samples studied come from wells in the Sihil and Akal fields in Cantarell. Analysis of reports on lithological descriptions indicates that these wells sample dolomitized sedimentary breccias from the Upper Cretaceous-Paleocene and fine-grained sandstones from the Late Jurassic Tithonian, respectively. Based on results of petrographic studies, the texture, cementing material and porosity of the units have been documented. The thin sections for carbonates were classified based on their texture according to Dunham (1962) for carbonate rocks, classified according to their components using the ternary diagrams of Folk (1974). Percentages refer to the data presented in tables, which were obtained by point-counting technique (with a total 250). Photomicrographs of scanning electron microscope (SEM) provide magnification for easy documentation of crystalline arrangements and description of micro-porous for different types of carbonates such as dolomite, in addition to the morphology of authigenic clays. Results of these studies and previous works in the area permit characterization of diagenetic processes of the carbonate sediments in the Campeche Bay, and provide

  9. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

    1992-05-01

    This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

  10. An Experimental and Modeling Study on the Response to Varying Pore Pressure and Reservoir Fluids in the Morrow A Sandstone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron V. Wandler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In mature oil fields undergoing enhanced oil recovery methods, such as CO2 injection, monitoring the reservoir changes becomes important. To understand how reservoir changes influence compressional wave (P and shear wave (S velocities, we conducted laboratory core experiments on five core samples taken from the Morrow A sandstone at Postle Field, Oklahoma. The laboratory experiments measured P- and S-wave velocities as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure, and fluid type (which included CO2 in the gas and supercritical phase. P-wave velocity shows a response that is sensitive to both pore pressure and fluid saturation. However, S-wave velocity is primarily sensitive to changes in pore pressure. We use the fluid and pore pressure response measured from the core samples to modify velocity well logs through a log facies model correlation. The modified well logs simulate the brine- and CO2-saturated cases at minimum and maximum reservoir pressure and are inputs for full waveform seismic modeling. Modeling shows how P- and S-waves have a different time-lapse amplitude response with offset. The results from the laboratory experiments and modeling show the advantages of combining P- and S-wave attributes in recognizing the mechanism responsible for time-lapse changes due to CO2 injection.

  11. Selected trace and minor elements in sandstones from Paraguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facetti-Masulli, J.F.; Gonzalez, E. [Hydroconsult SRL, Asuncion (Paraguay); Kump, P. [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-07-01

    Selected trace and minor elements analyzed by XRF in sandstone samples were Rb-Sr-Zr-Nb-Ba-La-Ce-Nd as well as Ti-Mn-Fe with which they are often correlated. Refractory elements like REE are considered useful indicators of geochemical processes and, in this case, of provenance. Usually they maintain their original relationships and are transferred almost directly into sediments. The values here found, absolute and normalized, show correlations among the samples, allowing the establishment of their origin. Most of them in the spidergram patterns display positive spikes of Zr, and negative anomalies at Nb, Sr, Ti: differences in their height/depth could be in relation with the different Series or Formations. Strikingly, spidergrams of samples collected from the Patino Formation show marked negative anomalies interalia of Ba, as well as positive spikes of Nb and Zr, very similar to those found in magmatic specimens from Misiones, Carapegua-Acahay and Alto Paraguay Province and quite different from the other analyzed samples. In addition a remarkable presence of Precambrian signatures were found in the analyzed sandstones from the Paleozoic. (orig.)

  12. Effective Wettability Measurements of CO2-Brine-Sandstone System at Different Reservoir Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Menhali, Ali; Krevor, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    , core-scale effective contact angle can be determined. In addition to providing a quantitative measure of the core-averaged wetting properties, the technique allows for the observation of shifts in contact angle with changing conditions. We examine the wettability changes of the CO2-brine system in Berea sandstone with variations in reservoir conditions including supercritical, gaseous and liquid CO2injection. We evaluate wettability variation within a single rock with temperature, pressure, and salinity across a range of conditions relevant to subsurface CO2 storage. This study will include results of measurements in a Berea sandstone sample across a wide range of conditions representative of subsurface reservoirs suitable for CO2 storage (5-20 MPa, 25-90 oC, 0-5 mol kg-1). The measurement uses X-ray CT imaging in a state of the art core flooding laboratory designed to operate at high temperature, pressure, and concentrated brines.

  13. Dynamic triggering during rupture nucleation in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubnel, Alexandre; Chanard, Kristel; Latour, Soumaya; Petrelis, François; Hatano, Takahiro; Mair, Karen; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Fluid induced stress perturbations in the crust at seismogenic depths can be caused by various sources, such as deglaciation unloading, magmatic intrusion or fluid injection and withdrawal. Numbers of studies have robustly shown their link to earthquake triggering. However, the role of small periodic stress variations induced by solid earth and oceanic tides or seasonal hydrology in the seismic cycle, of the order of a few kPa, remains unclear. Indeed, the existence or absence of correlation between these loading phenomena and earthquakes have been equally proposed in the literature. To investigate this question, we performed a set of triaxial deformation experiments on porous water-saturated Fontainebleau sandstones. Rock samples were loaded by the combined action of steps of constant stress (creep), intended to simulate tectonic loading and small sinusoidal pore pressure variations with a range of amplitudes, analogous to tides or seasonal loading. All tests were conducted at a regulated temperature of 35C and a constant 35 MPa confining pressure. Our experimental results show that (1) pore pressure oscillations do not seem to influence the deformation rate at which the rock fails, (2) they correlate with acoustic emissions. Even more interestingly, we observe a progressive increase of the correlation coefficient in time as the rock approaches failure. The correlation coefficient is also sensitive to the amplitude of pore pressure oscillations as larger oscillations produce higher correlation levels. Finally, we show that, in the last hours of creep before failure, acoustic emissions occur significantly more when the pore pressure is at its lowest. This suggest that the correlation of small stress perturbations and acoustic emissions depend on the state stress of a rock and the amplitude of the perturbations and that emissions occur more likely when cracks are unclamped.

  14. Magnetic Titanohematite Minerals in Uranium-Bearing Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    Detrital grains of the rhombohedral ilmenite (FeT1O3)--hematite (Fe2O3) solid solution series (titanohematites) have been identified by thermomagnetic, reflection microscopic, and X-ray diffraction analysis in six uranium-bearing sandstones in the western United States. Many of the titanohematites are ferrimagnetic and have Curie temperatures ranging from about 70 Deg C to 220 Deg C. Magnetic titanohematite is commonly more abundant than magnetite in many samples and, therefore, should be considered as a major source of the permanent magnetization in these units.

  15. Geometry of calcite cemented zones in shallow marine sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walderhaug, O.; Prestholm, E.; Oexnevad, I.E.I.

    1995-12-31

    In offshore oil production, tightly cemented calcite zones often form impermeable barriers to fluid flow an so adversely affect reservoir performance. Based on recent breakthroughs in the theory of the formation of calcite cemented zones, the project discussed in this paper was concerned with (1) Performing outcrop studies in order to increase the existing database on the geometry of calcite cemented zones, (2) Extending and refining methods of predicting the geometry of cored calcite cemented zones, and (3) Applying and illustrating the use of these methods by studying calcite cementation in shallow marine reservoir sandstones on the Norwegian shelf. The paper presents results from field work and applies these results and the criteria for recognizing geometrical forms of calcite cementation in cores to the Ula Formation of the Ula Field and the Rannoch Formation of the Gullfax Field. The results from the core and outcrop studies are integrated in a tentative identification key for cored calcite cemented zones. The work is part of PROFIT (Program for Research On Field oriented Improved recovery Technology), a research project conducted by RF - Rogaland Research in 1991-1994. 32 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Interstitial water studies on small core samples, Deep Sea Drilling Project, Leg 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F. T.; Sayles, F.L.

    1971-01-01

    Sediments from Leg 6 sites, west of the Hawaiian Islands, consisted primarily of various combinations of deep-sea biogenic oozes, volcanic ash, and its breakdown products. Pore fluids from most of the sites were similar in composition to present day ocean water, and in some sties almost identical. However, interstitial fluids from Site 53 (Philippine Sea) showed changes in ionic composition which were beyond those previously considered attributable to diagenetic influence. These samples show the beginnings of metamorphism by dramatic increases in calcium concentrations and corresponding decreases in alkali concentrations. Analytical methods were similar to those outlined in previous Leg Reports. However, obvious contamination of aliquots for sodium determination in the laboratory made it necessary to determine all sodium values by difference between anion and cation balances. These values are, if anything, more accurate than direct determinations which have been discussed in earlier legs. However, the authors will continue to analyze sodium directly, and in the future they may be able to improve the precision of the determinations to the point where small losses and gains of sodium in the pore fluids may be established accurately. Agreement between colorimetric and spectrometric determinations of silicon has improved, but there are still occasional marked differences for which the writers have no explanation. T. Takahashi has allowed the authors to compare total Carbon Dioxide (CO2) measurements from his laboratory with their alkalinity determinations: both sets of data were obtained from fluids from the same squeezings of sediments and should give similar values at the indicated pH levels. Some disturbingly large discrepancies in the two sets of data are evident. The authors do not think that their back-titration alkalinity technique alone is responsible for the differences. However, they have not evaluated the possible influence of the heat-sealed polyethylene

  17. Student Wellbeing at a University in Post-Apartheid South Africa: A Comparison with a British University Sample Using the GP-CORE Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Charles; Campbell, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This article provides GP-CORE norms for a South African university sample, which are compared to published data obtained from a United Kingdom university sample. The measure appears to be both reliable and valid for this multilingual and multicultural South African sample. The profiles of the psychological distress reported by white South African…

  18. Student Wellbeing at a University in Post-Apartheid South Africa: A Comparison with a British University Sample Using the GP-CORE Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Charles; Campbell, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This article provides GP-CORE norms for a South African university sample, which are compared to published data obtained from a United Kingdom university sample. The measure appears to be both reliable and valid for this multilingual and multicultural South African sample. The profiles of the psychological distress reported by white South African…

  19. CO2 breakthrough pressure and permeability for unsaturated low-permeability sandstone of the Ordos Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yu, Qingchun

    2017-07-01

    With rising threats from greenhouse gases, capture and injection of CO2 into suitable underground formations is being considered as a method to reduce anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. As the injected CO2 will remain in storage for hundreds of years, the safety of CO2 geologic sequestration is a major concern. The low-permeability sandstone of the Ordos Basin in China is regarded as both caprock and reservoir rock, so understanding the breakthrough pressure and permeability of the rock is necessary. Because part of the pore volume experiences a non-wetting phase during the CO2 injection and migration process, the rock may be in an unsaturated condition. And if accidental leakage occurs, CO2 will migrate up into the unsaturated zone. In this study, breakthrough experiments were performed at various degrees of water saturation with five core samples of low-permeability sandstone obtained from the Ordos Basin. The experiments were conducted at 40 °C and pressures of >8 MPa to simulate the geological conditions for CO2 sequestration. The results indicate that the degree of water saturation and the pore structure are the main factors affecting the rock breakthrough pressure and permeability, since the influence of calcite dissolution and clay mineral swelling during the saturation process is excluded. Increasing the average pore radius or most probable pore radius leads to a reduction in the breakthrough pressure and an increase by several orders of magnitude in scCO2 effective permeability. In addition, the breakthrough pressure rises and the scCO2 effective permeability decreases when the water saturation increases. However, when the average pore radius is greater than 0.151 μm, the degree of water saturation will has a little effect on the breakthrough pressure. On this foundation, if the most probable pore radius of the core sample reaches 1.760 μm, the breakthrough pressure will not be impacted by the increasing water saturation. We establish

  20. The Effect of Hydrous Supercritical Carbon Dioxide on the Mohr Coulomb Failure Envelope in Boise Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choens, R. C., II; Dewers, T. A.; Ilgen, A.; Espinoza, N.; Aman, M.

    2016-12-01

    Experimental rock deformation was used to quantify the relationship between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), water vapor, and failure strength in an analog for Tertiary sandstone saline formation reservoirs. Storing large volumes of carbon dioxide in depleted petroleum reservoirs and deep saline aquifers over geologic time is an important tool in mitigating effects of climate change. Carbon dioxide is injected as a supercritical phase, where it forms a buoyant plume. At brine-plume interfaces, scCO2 dissolves over time into the brine, lowering pH and perturbing the local chemical environment. Previous work has shown that the resulting geochemical changes at mineral-fluid interfaces can alter rock mechanical properties, generally causing a decrease in strength. Additionally, water from the native brine can dissolve into the scCO2 plume where it is present as humidity. This study investigates the effect of hydrous scCO2 and CO2-saturated brine on shear failure of Boise sandstone. Samples are held in a hydrostatic pressure vessel at 2250 PSI confining pressure (PC) and 70 C, and scCO2 at specific humidity is circulated through the core for 24 hours at 2000 PSI and 70 C. Experiments are conducted at relative humidity levels of 0, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70, 84, 98, and 100% relative humidity. After the scCO2 core flood is finished, triaxial compression experiments are conducted on the samples at room temperature and an axial strain rate of 10-5 sec-1. Experiments are conducted at 500, 1000, and 1500 PSI PC. The results demonstrate that water present as humidity in scCO2 can reduce failure strength and lower slopes of the Mohr-Coulomb failure envelope. These effects increase with increasing humidity, as dry scCO2 does not affect rock strength, and may be influenced by capillary condensation of water films from humid scCO2. The reductions in failure strength seen in this study could be important in predicting reservoir response to injection, reservoir caprock integrity, and

  1. Statistical analyses on sandstones: Systematic approach for predicting petrographical and petrophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stück, H. L.; Siegesmund, S.

    2012-04-01

    Sandstones are a popular natural stone due to their wide occurrence and availability. The different applications for these stones have led to an increase in demand. From the viewpoint of conservation and the natural stone industry, an understanding of the material behaviour of this construction material is very important. Sandstones are a highly heterogeneous material. Based on statistical analyses with a sufficiently large dataset, a systematic approach to predicting the material behaviour should be possible. Since the literature already contains a large volume of data concerning the petrographical and petrophysical properties of sandstones, a large dataset could be compiled for the statistical analyses. The aim of this study is to develop constraints on the material behaviour and especially on the weathering behaviour of sandstones. Approximately 300 samples from historical and presently mined natural sandstones in Germany and ones described worldwide were included in the statistical approach. The mineralogical composition and fabric characteristics were determined from detailed thin section analyses and descriptions in the literature. Particular attention was paid to evaluating the compositional and textural maturity, grain contact respectively contact thickness, type of cement, degree of alteration and the intergranular volume. Statistical methods were used to test for normal distributions and calculating the linear regression of the basic petrophysical properties of density, porosity, water uptake as well as the strength. The sandstones were classified into three different pore size distributions and evaluated with the other petrophysical properties. Weathering behavior like hygric swelling and salt loading tests were also included. To identify similarities between individual sandstones or to define groups of specific sandstone types, principle component analysis, cluster analysis and factor analysis were applied. Our results show that composition and porosity

  2. A method for combined Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic analysis of <10 mg dust samples: implication for ice core science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujvari, Gabor; Wegner, Wencke; Klötzli, Urs

    2017-04-01

    Aeolian mineral dust particles below the size of 10-20 μm often experience longer distance transport in the atmosphere, and thus Aeolian dust is considered an important tracer of large-scale atmospheric circulation. Since ice core dust is purely Aeolian in origin, discrimination of its potential source region(s) can contribute to a better understanding of past dust activity and climatic/environmental causes. Furthermore, ice core dust source information provides critical experimental constraints for model simulations of past atmospheric circulation patterns [1,2]. However, to identify dust sources in past dust archives such as ice cores, the mineralogy and geochemistry of the wind-blown dust material must be characterized. While the amount of dust in marine cores or common terrestrial archives is sufficient for different types of analyses and even for multiple repeat measurements, dust content in ice cores is usually extremely low even for the peak dusty periods such as the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) (5-8 mg dust/kg ice; [3]). Since the most powerful dust fingerprinting methods, such as REE composition and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic analyses are destructive there is a clear need to establish sequential separation techniques of Sr, Nd, Pb and other REEs to get the most information out of small (5-10 mg) dust samples recovered from ice cores. Although Hf isotopes have recently been added as a robust tool of aerosol/dust source discrimination (e.g. [4,5,6,7]), precise Hf isotopic measurements of small (Central Europe (NUS), China (BEI) and the US (JUD) were processed (all acetic acid treated for carbonate removal, i.e. aluminosilicate fractions were analysed). Sr isotopic compositions varied between the aliquots within a range of ˜0.00007 for the three samples. Comparison of these values with previously obtained 87Sr/86Sr isotopic ratios from the same samples (different acid/sample amounts) reveals that these values are very sensitive to the acetic acid treatment (acid

  3. Acoustic Emission Parameters of Three Gorges Sandstone during Shear Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental investigation of sandstone samples from the Three Gorges during shear failure was conducted using acoustic emission (AE and direct shear tests. The AE count rate, cumulative AE count, AE energy, and amplitude of the sandstone samples were determined. Then, the relationships among the AE signals and shearing behaviors of the samples were analyzed in order to detect micro-crack initiation and propagation and reflect shear failure. The results indicated that both the shear strength and displacement exhibited a logarithmic relationship with the displacement rate at peak levels of stress. In addition, the various characteristics of the AE signals were apparent in various situations. The AE signals corresponded with the shear stress under different displacement rates. As the displacement rate increased, the amount of accumulative damage to each specimen decreased, while the AE energy peaked earlier and more significantly. The cumulative AE count primarily increased during the post-peak period. Furthermore, the AE count rate and amplitude exhibited two peaks during the peak shear stress period due to crack coalescence and rock bridge breakage. These isolated cracks later formed larger fractures and eventually caused ruptures.

  4. Concentration of Antifouling Biocides and Metals in Sediment Core Samples in the Northern Part of Hiroshima Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Tsunemasa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of Ot alternative antifoulants in sediment is the focus of this research. Much research had been done on surface sediment, but in this report, the accumulation in the sediment core was studied. The Ot alternative antifoulants, Diuron, Sea-Nine211, and Irgarol 1051, and the latter’s degradation product, M1, were investigated in five samples from the northern part of Hiroshima Bay. Ot compounds (tributyltin (TBT and triphenyltin (TPT were also investigated for comparison. In addition, metal (Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe and Mn levels and chronology were measured to better understand what happens after accumulation on the sea floor. It was discovered that Ot alternative antifoulant accumulation characteristics in sediment were like Ot compounds, with the concentration in the sediment core being much higher than surface sediment. The concentration in sediment seems to have been affected by the regulation of Ot compounds in 1990, due to the concentration of Ot alternative antifoulants and Ot compounds at the survey point in front of the dock, showing an increase from almost the same layer after the regulation.

  5. Process-dependent residual trapping of CO2 in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lin; Benson, Sally M.

    2014-04-01

    This paper demonstrates that the nature and extent of residual CO2 trapping depend on the process by which the CO2 phase is introduced into the rock. We compare residual trapping of CO2 in Berea Sandstone by imbibing water into a core containing either exsolved CO2 or CO2 introduced by drainage. X-ray computed tomography measurements are used to map the spatial distribution of CO2 preimbibition and postimbibition. Unlike during drainage where the CO2 distribution is strongly influenced by the heterogeneity of the rock, the distribution of exsolved CO2 is comparatively uniform. Postimbibition, the CO2 distribution retained the essential features for both the exsolved and drainage cases, but twice as much residual trapping is observed for exsolved CO2 even with similar preimbibition gas saturations. Residually trapped exsolved gas also disproportionately reduced water relative permeability. Development of process-dependent parameterization will help better manage subsurface flow processes and unlock benefits from gas exsolution.

  6. Cosmogenic nuclides in core samples of the Chico L6 chondrite - Evidence for irradiation under high shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, D. H.; Bogard, D. D.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.; Klein, J.; Fink, D.; Dezfouly-Arjomandy, B.; Middleton, R.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from an analysis of core samples obtained from different depths of the Chico (New Mexico) L6 chondrite for various cosmogenic nuclides (Be-10, Al-26, and stable isotopes of He, Ne, and Ar). The relationships between the measured abundances of cosmogenic nuclides and cosmogenic Ne-22/Ne-21 ratio were compared with predictions of recent semiempirical models of Graf et al. (1990) and Reedy (1991), and it was found that both models closely reproduce the observed trends and absolute values of the data obtained. Noble gas data indicate that Chico experienced shielding similar to that of Jilin and greater than those of the Knyahinya or the Keyes chondrites. The exposure history for Chico is discussed.

  7. Fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy: An update on 2 common minimally invasive tissue sampling modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderLaan, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB) represent 2 of the most common minimally invasive tissue sampling modalities. Although similar in many ways, there are significant differences in the collection, processing, interpretation, and suitability for ancillary testing that exist between FNA and CNB. This review provides a brief overview of the strengths and weaknesses of FNA compared with CNB, as well as an update regarding the landscape of recently published studies that investigate the organ-specific comparative performance metrics of FNA and CNB. A current understanding of the benefits and limitations of FNA and CNB will help the cytopathologist and the clinician alike to select the right procedure for the right patient at the right time. Cancer Cytopathol 2016;124:862-870. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  8. Characteristics of bleaching of sandstone in northeast of Ordos Basin and its relationship with natural gas leakage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; YanPing; LIU; ChiYang; ZHAO; JunFeng; HUANG; Lei; YU; Lin; WANG; JianQiang

    2007-01-01

    Bleaching of sandstone has significant applications to tracing hydrocarbon pathways and evaluating the scale of natural gas seepage. Bleaching of sandstones in the northeast of Ordos Basin is mainly distributed in the Mesozoic Yan'an Formation. Studying on petrology, major elements, REEs and trace elements of bleached sandstones and comparing with adjacent sandstones, combining with geologic-geochemical evidences of gas seepage in the northeast of the basin, the bleached sandstones are formed in the acid environment and reducing fluids. Characteristics of petrology show that the contents of kaolinite are high and the color of margin of ferric oxide minerals is lighter than that of the center. Major elements of sandstone samples show high contents of Al2O3 and low ratio of Fe3+/Fe2+. The TFe2O3 content of the bleached sandstone is lower than that of red rock. REE data show that bleached sandstones have low ∑REE contents and Eu-depleted and slightly Ce-enriched. Trace elements show that the bleached sandstones enrich in Co, deplete in Sr, and slightly enrich in Zr and Hf which are close to the values for the green alteration sandstones, and slightly lower than ore-bearing sandstones. Geochemical characteristics of oil-bearing sandstone in the northern basin suggest that the oil-shows are formed by matured Carboniferous-Permian coal bed methane escaping to the surface, and natural gas in field could migrate to the north margin of the basin. The δ13C (PDB) andδ18O(PDB) values of calcite cement in the study area range from -11.729‰ to -10.210‰ and -14.104‰ to -12.481‰, respectively. Theδ13C (PDB) values less than -10‰ imply the carbon sources part from organic carbon. Comprehensive study suggests that the gas leakage has occurred in the northeastern basin, which is responsible for bleaching of the sandstone on top of the Yan'an Formation.

  9. A Model of the Chicxulub Impact Basin Based on Evaluation of Geophysical Data, Well Logs, and Drill Core Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpton, Virgil L.; Marin, Luis E.; Carney, John D.; Lee, Scott; Ryder, Graham; Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Sikora, Paul; Spudis, Paul D.

    1996-01-01

    Abundant evidence now shows that the buried Chicxulub structure in northern Yucatan, Mexico, is indeed the intensely sought-after source of the ejecta found world-wide at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary. In addition to large-scale concentric patterns in gravity and magnetic data over the structure, recent analyses of drill-core samples reveal a lithological assemblage similar to that observed at other terrestrial craters. This assemblage comprises suevite breccias, ejecta deposit breccias (Bunte Breccia equivalents), fine-grained impact melt rocks, and melt-matrix breccias. All these impact-produced lithologies contain diagnostic evidence of shock metamorphism, including planar deformation features in quartz, feldspar, and zircons; diaplectic glasses of quartz and feldspar; and fused mineral melts and whole-rock melts. In addition, elevated concentrations of Ir, Re, and Os, in meteoritic relative proportions, have been detected in some melt-rock samples from the center of the structure. Isotopic analyses, magnetization of melt-rock samples, and local stratigraphic constraints identify this crater as the source of K/T boundary deposits.

  10. Calculation of elastic properties in lower part of the Kola borehole from bulk chemical compositions of core samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babeyko, A.Yu.; Sobolev, S.V. [Shmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany); Sinelnikov, E.D. [Shmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Smirnov, Yu.P. [Scientific Center SG-3, Zapoliarniy (Russian Federation); Derevschikova, N.A. [Shmidt Institute of Physics of the Earth, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-09-01

    In-situ elastic properties in deep boreholes are controlled by several factors, mainly by lithology, petrofabric, fluid-filled cracks and pores. In order to separate the effects of different factors it is useful to extract lithology-controlled part from observed in-situ velocities. For that purpose we calculated mineralogical composition and isotropic crack-free elastic properties in the lower part of the Kola borehole from bulk chemical compositions of core samples. We use a new technique of petrophysical modeling based on thermodynamic approach. The reasonable accuracy of the modeling is confirmed by comparison with the observations of mineralogical composition and laboratory measurements of density and elastic wave velocities in upper crustal crystalline rocks at high confining pressure. Calculations were carried out for 896 core samples from the depth segment of 6840-10535m. Using these results we estimate density and crack-free isotropic elastic properties of 554 lithology-defined layers composing this depth segment. Average synthetic P-wave velocity appears to be 2.7% higher than the velocity from Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), and 5% higher than sonic log velocity. Average synthetic S-wave velocity is 1.4% higher than that from VSP. These differences can be explained by superposition of effects of fabric-related anisotropy, cracks aligned parallel to the foliation plain, and randomly oriented cracks, with the effects of cracks being the predominant control. Low sonic log velocities are likely caused by drilling-induced cracking (hydrofractures) in the borehole walls. The calculated synthetic density and velocity cross-sections can be used for much more detailed interpretations, for which, however, new, more detailed and reliable seismic data are required.

  11. Tree ring growth by core sampling at the CONECOFOR Permanent Monitoring Plots. The deciduous oak (Quercus cerris L. type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chiara MANETTI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Radial growth analysis evaluates the ability of trees to grow under different site and environmental conditions, thus contributing to bio-ecological studies aimed at increasing understanding of forest stand evolution. Tree ring growth is analysed in five Permanent Monitoring Plots (PMPs dominated by Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L.. Common structural features of these PMPs are their origin (coppice forest and their current physiognomy as stored coppice and transitory crop. A dendroecological approach was used to analyse past radial stem growth, the influence of silvicultural background and stand age, as well as to compare the growth rhythm of stands in different site-indexes and environmental conditions. Tree coring was carried out at the time of the first inventory (winter 1996/97 by sampling 8 to 11 dominant and co-dominant trees representative of the upper storey in the buffer area of each PMP. The basic stem and crown growth variables were measured for each tree sampled and two cores collected at 1.30 m. Annual ring width was determined by the Tree Ring Measurement System SMIL3 and the data were elaborated by the ANAFUS software. Site mean curves and growth trend per social class in each stand were defined both by visual comparison and statistical analysis among individual tree series. The main results were as follows: i social differentiation becomes established earlier with better site indexes and higher tree densities; ii sensitivity to external disturbances is higher and more defined in the dominant class than in the co-dominant tree layer; iii competition cycles are clearly discernible and related to both stand density and site-index in young stands under natural evolution (stored coppices; iv when silvicultural interventions were performed in the past is quite visible readable in the stands under conversion into high forest (transitory crops; v the mean series per site are statistically related and common periods characterized by a

  12. Weathering of Pisha-Sandstones in the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region on the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two types of pisha-sandstones of purple sandstones and gray sandstones, widely distributing in the wind-water erosion crisscross region of China, were selected and used in laboratory experiments for a better understanding of the drying-wetting-freezing weathering process resulting from the apportionment of water or salt solution to rock samples. Weathering experiments were carried out under the conditions of environment control (including temperature, moisture and salt solution). All rock samples were frequently subjected to 140 drying-wetting-freezing cycles. The influences of weathering process were evaluated. It was found that the different treatments of moisture and salt solution applications could affect the nature of the weathering products resulting from drying-wetting-freezing. It was also observed that salt solution could effectively alleviate the weathering of pisha-sandstones. Although not all the observations could be explained, it was apparent that simulated environmental factors had both direct and indirect effects on the weathering of rocks.

  13. Control On Fluid Flow Properties In Sandstone: Interactions Between Diagenesis Processes And Fracture Corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossennec, Claire; Géraud, Yves; Moretti, Isabelle; Mattioni, Luca

    2016-04-01

    During the development of a fault zone, processes occur at different scales: secondary faults and fractures development in the damage zone while "diagenetic" processes, i.e: fluid rock interaction at the grains size scale, contribute to modify the matrix features. Spatial distribution of these processes is clearly controlled by microstructural transformations induced by fractured corridors and their location. Understanding flowing properties in the associated damage zone contributes to the better modeling of the fluid flow in faulted and fractured reservoirs which could be oil, gas or water bearing. The Lower Triassic Buntsandstein sandstones outcrop of Cleebourg is located in the Hochwald Horst affected by a major NNE-SSW striking fault, and the structure globally dips with 30° toward Rhenish Fault (Upper Rhine Graben main western border fault). The study of the outcrop aims to decipher the fluid-flow scheme and interactions between fracture network and diagenetic features distribution in the damage zone of a fault, located close to major faulted areas, through field and laboratories petrophysical measurements (permeability, thermic conductivity), and samples microstructural and diagenetical descriptions. The outcrop is structurally divided into a 14 meters thick fault core, surrounded by 5 meters thick transition zones, and damage zone of minimum thickness of 40 meters (total thickness unknown, due to the limits of the outcrop). Damage zone includes three fractured corridors, perpendicular to bedding and from 2 to 5 meters thick. Results presented here were acquired in 2 different layers with similar lithology but only on damage zone samples. In entire damage zone, porosity results and thin section description allow to distinguish two different facies: • Fa1 Intermediate porous (porosity of 12%) sandstone with major illite cement and clay content up to 20% (detrital and diagenetic); • Fa2 High porous (porosity >15%) sandstone with quartz feeding

  14. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation tight sandstones in the southern Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Kelai; Cao, Yingchang; Jahren, Jens; Zhu, Rukai; Bjørlykke, Knut; Haile, Beyene Girma; Zheng, Lijing; Hellevang, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation in the southern Songliao Basin is the typical tight oil sandstone in China. For effective exploration, appraisal and production from such a tight oil sandstone, the diagenesis and reservoir quality must be thoroughly studied first. The tight oil sandstone has been examined by a variety of methods, including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, fluorescence, electron probing analysis, fluid inclusion and isotope testing and quantitative determination of reservoir properties. The sandstones are mostly lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites with fine to medium grain size and moderate to good sorting. The sandstones are dominated by feldspar, quartz, and volcanic rock fragments showing various stages of disintegration. The reservoir properties are quite poor, with low porosity (average 8.54%) and permeability (average 0.493 mD), small pore-throat radius (average 0.206 μm) and high displacement pressure (mostly higher than 1 MPa). The tight sandstone reservoirs have undergone significant diagenetic alterations such as compaction, feldspar dissolution, quartz cementation, carbonate cementation (mainly ferrocalcite and ankerite) and clay mineral alteration. As to the onset time, the oil emplacement was prior to the carbonate cementation but posterior to the quartz cementation and feldspar dissolution. The smectite to illite reaction and pressure solution at stylolites provide a most important silica sources for quartz cementation. Carbonate cements increase towards interbedded mudstones. Mechanical compaction has played a more important role than cementation in destroying the reservoir quality of the K1q4 sandstone reservoirs. Mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite reduced the porosity and permeability significantly, while chlorite preserved the porosity and permeability since it tends to be oil wet so that later carbonate cementation can be inhibited to some extent. It is likely that the oil emplacement occurred

  15. Imaging pore space in tight gas sandstone reservoir: insights from broad ion beam cross-sectioning

    OpenAIRE

    Konstanty J.; Kukla P.A.; Urai J.L.; Baerle C.; Enzmann F.; Desbois G.

    2010-01-01

    Monetization of tight gas reservoirs, which contain significant gas reserves world-wide, represents a challenge for the entire oil and gas industry. The development of new technologies to enhance tight gas reservoir productivity is strongly dependent on an improved understanding of the rock properties and especially the pore framework. Numerous methods are now available to characterize sandstone cores. However, the pore space characterization at pore scale remains difficult due to the f...

  16. Diagenesis of shallowly buried cratonic sandstones, southwest Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Alaa M. K.; Abdel-Wahab, Antar; McBride, Earle F.

    1998-08-01

    In spite of their age, quartzose and feldspathic Lower Carboniferous sandstones deposited on the Arabian shield in western Sinai remain friable and porous (average of 19%, maximum of 25%) except for strongly cemented ferricretes and silcretes. These fluvial and shallow-marine sandstones were not buried more than 1.5 km until Late Cretaceous and younger time, when the deepest rocks reached 2.5 km. Owing to shallow burial depths and episodic exposure, meteoric water dominated the pore system for most of geologic time: iron oxides had multiple diagenetic stages and yield Carboniferous and Late Cretaceous paleomagnetic signatures, and oxygen isotopic data for authigenic quartz, sparry calcite, and kaolinite yield meteoric signatures. The most significant diagenetic changes were: (1) cementation by iron oxide that locally reaches 40% in groundwater ferricretes; (2) reduction in porosity to 19% from an assumed original porosity 45% (19% porosity was lost by compaction and 7% by cementation); (3) generation of diagenetic quartzarenites by the loss of 7% detrital feldspar by kaolinization and dissolution; and (4) development of three thin mature silcretes apparently by thermal groundwaters. Some outcrop samples have halite and gypsum cements of young but uncertain origin: recycled from topographically higher younger rocks or from aerosols? Mature silcretes are strongly cemented by microcrystalline quartz, multiply zoned syntaxial quartz, and, originally, minor opal. Quartz overgrowths in most sandstones average only 2.2%, but display a variety of textures and in places overprint isopachous opal (now dissolved) grain coats. These features have more in common with incipient silcrete cement than normal burial quartz cement. Most silica was imported in groundwater.

  17. Highly sensitive SERS detection of cancer proteins in low sample volume using hollow core photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U S, Dinish; Fu, Chit Yaw; Soh, Kiat Seng; Ramaswamy, Bhuvaneswari; Kumar, Anil; Olivo, Malini

    2012-03-15

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) are commonly used for detecting cancer proteins at concentration in the range of about ng-μg/mL. Hence it often fails to detect tumor markers at the early stages of cancer and other diseases where the amount of protein is extremely low. Herein, we report a novel photonic crystal fiber (PCF) based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer proteins in an extremely low sample volume. As a proof of concept, epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) in a lysate solution from human epithelial carcinoma cells were immobilized into the hollow core PCF. Highly sensitive detection of protein was achieved using anti-EGFR antibody conjugated SERS nanotag. This SERS nanotag probe was realized by anchoring highly active Raman molecules onto the gold nanoparticles followed by bioconjugation. The proposed sensing method can detect low amount of proteins at ∼100 pg in a sample volume of ∼10 nL. Our approach may lead to the highly sensitive protein sensing methodology for the early detection of diseases.

  18. Effects of Re-heating Tissue Samples to Core Body Temperature on High-Velocity Ballistic Projectile-tissue Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Caitlin; Henneberg, Maciej; Wachsberger, Christian; Maiden, Nicholas; Kumaratilake, Jaliya

    2017-02-23

    Damage produced by high-speed projectiles on organic tissue will depend on the physical properties of the tissues. Conditioning organic tissue samples to human core body temperature (37°C) prior to conducting ballistic experiments enables their behavior to closely mimic that of living tissues. To minimize autolytic changes after death, the tissues are refrigerated soon after their removal from the body and re-heated to 37°C prior to testing. This research investigates whether heating 50-mm-cube samples of porcine liver, kidney, and heart to 37°C for varying durations (maximum 7 h) can affect the penetration response of a high-speed, steel sphere projectile. Longer conditioning times for heart and liver resulted in a slight loss of velocity/energy of the projectile, but the reverse effect occurred for the kidney. Possible reasons for these trends include autolytic changes causing softening (heart and liver) and dehydration causing an increase in density (kidney).

  19. Sampling design by the core-food approach for the Taiwan total diet study on veterinary drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Tsai, Ching-Lun; Chang, Chia-Chin; Ni, Shih-Pei; Chen, Yi-Tzu; Chiang, Chow-Feng

    2017-06-01

    The core-food (CF) approach, first adopted in the United States in the 1980s, has been widely used by many countries to assess the exposure to dietary hazards at a population level. However, the reliability of exposure estimates (C × CR) depends critically on sampling methods designed for the detected chemical concentrations (C) of each CF to match with the corresponding consumption rate (CR) estimated from the surveyed intake data. In order to reduce the uncertainty of food matching, this study presents a sampling design scheme, namely the subsample method, for the 2016 Taiwan total diet study (TDS) on veterinary drugs. We first combined the four sets of national dietary recall data that covered the entire age strata (1-65+ years), and aggregated them into 307 CFs by their similarity in nutritional values, manufacturing and cooking methods. The 40 CFs pertinent to veterinary drug residues were selected for this study, and 16 subsamples for each CF were designed by weighing their quantities in CR, product brands, manufacturing, processing and cooking methods. The calculated food matching rates of each CF from this study were 84.3-97.3%, which were higher than those obtained from many previous studies using the representative food (RF) method (53.1-57.8%). The subsample method not only considers the variety of food processing and cooking methods, but also it provides better food matching and reduces the uncertainty of exposure assessment.

  20. The effects of impure CO2 on reservoir sandstones: results from mineralogical and geomechanical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbler, H.; Erickson, K. P.; Schmidt, M.; Lempp, Ch.; Pöllmann, H.

    2012-04-01

    An experimental study of the behaviour of reservoir sandstones from deep saline aquifers during the injection and geological storage of CO2 with the inherent impurities SOX and NOX is part of the German national project COORAL*. Sample materials were taken from outcrops of possible reservoir formations of Rotliegend and Bunter Sandstones from the North German Basin. A combination of mineralogical alteration experiments and geomechanical tests was carried out on these rocks to study the potential effects of the impurities within the CO2 pore fluid. Altered rock samples after the treatment with CO2 + SOX/NOX in an autoclave system were loaded in a triaxial cell under in-situ pressure and temperature conditions in order to estimate the modifications of the geomechanical rock properties. Mineralogical alterations were observed within the sandstones after the exposure to impure supercritical (sc)CO2 and brine, mainly of the carbonatic, but also of the silicatic cements, as well as of single minerals. Besides the partial solution effects also secondary carbonate and minor silicate mineral precipitates were observed within the pore space of the treated sandstones. These alterations affect the grain structure of the reservoir rock. Results of geomechanical experiments with unaltered sandstones show that the rock strength is influenced by the degree of rock saturation before the experiment and the chemical composition of the pore fluid (scCO2 + SOX + NOX). After long-term autoclave treatment with impure scCO2, the sandstone samples exhibit modified strength parameters and elastic deformation behaviour as well as changes in porosity compared to untreated samples. Furthermore, the injected fluid volume into the pore space of sandstones from the same lithotype varies during triaxial loading depending on the chemistry of the pore fluid. CO2 with NOX and SOX bearing fluid fills a significantly larger proportion of the sandstone pore space than brine with pure scCO2. * The

  1. Downslope coarsening in aeolian grainflows of the Navajo Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, David B.; Elder, James F.; Sweeney, Mark R.

    2012-07-01

    Downslope coarsening in grainflows has been observed on present-day dunes and generated in labs, but few previous studies have examined vertical sorting in ancient aeolian grainflows. We studied the grainflow strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in the southern Utah portion of its outcrop belt from Zion National Park (west) to Coyote Buttes and The Dive (east). At each study site, thick sets of grainflow-dominated cross-strata that were deposited by large transverse dunes comprise the bulk of the Navajo Sandstone. We studied three stratigraphic columns, one per site, composed almost exclusively of aeolian cross-strata. For each column, samples were obtained from one grainflow stratum in each consecutive set of the column, for a total of 139 samples from thirty-two sets of cross-strata. To investigate grading perpendicular to bedding within individual grainflows, we collected fourteen samples from four superimposed grainflow strata at The Dive. Samples were analyzed with a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser diffraction particle analyser. The median grain size of grainflow samples ranges from fine sand (164 μm) to coarse sand (617 μm). Using Folk and Ward criteria, samples are well-sorted to moderately-well-sorted. All but one of the twenty-eight sets showed at least slight downslope coarsening, but in general, downslope coarsening was not as well-developed or as consistent as that reported in laboratory subaqueous grainflows. Because coarse sand should be quickly sequestered within preserved cross-strata when bedforms climb, grain-size studies may help to test hypotheses for the stacking of sets of cross-strata.

  2. Physical properties of two core samples from Well 34-9RD2 at the Coso geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C.A.; Lockner, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Coso geothermal field, located along the Eastern California Shear Zone, is composed of fractured granitic rocks above a shallow heat source. Temperatures exceed 640 ?F (~338 ?C) at a depth of less than 10000 feet (3 km). Permeability varies throughout the geothermal field due to the competing processes of alteration and mineral precipitation, acting to reduce the interconnectivity of faults and fractures, and the generation of new fractures through faulting and brecciation. Currently, several hot regions display very low permeability, not conducive to the efficient extraction of heat. Because high rates of seismicity in the field indicate that the area is highly stressed, enhanced permeability can be stimulated by increasing the fluid pressure at depth to induce faulting along the existing network of fractures. Such an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS), planned for well 46A-19RD, would greatly facilitate the extraction of geothermal fluids from depth by increasing the extent and depth of the fracture network. In order to prepare for and interpret data from such a stimulation experiment, the physical properties and failure behavior of the target rocks must be fully understood. Various diorites and granodiorites are the predominant rock types in the target area of the well, which will be pressurized from 10000 feet measured depth (MD) (3048m MD) to the bottom of the well at 13,000 feet MD (3962 m MD). Because there are no core rocks currently available from well 46A-19RD, we report here on the results of compressive strength, frictional sliding behavior, and elastic measurements of a granodiorite and diorite from another well, 34-9RD2, at the Coso site. Rocks cored from well 34-9RD2 are the deepest samples to date available for testing, and are representative of rocks from the field in general.

  3. Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Appendix C: Samples of Student Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This document presents writing samples that have been annotated to illustrate the criteria required to meet the Common Core State Standards for particular types of writing--argument, informative/explanatory text, and narrative--in a given grade. Each of the samples exhibits at least the level of quality required to meet the Writing standards for…

  4. An Effective Acid Combination for Enhanced Properties and Corrosion Control of Acidizing Sandstone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham

    2016-03-01

    To fulfill the demand of the world energy, more technologies to enhance the recovery of oil production are being developed. Sandstone acidizing has been introduced and it acts as one of the important means to increase oil and gas production. Sandstone acidizing operation generally uses acids, which create or enlarge the flow channels of formation around the wellbore. In sandstone matrix acidizing, acids are injected into the formation at a pressure below the formation fracturing pressure, in which the injected acids react with mineral particles that may restrict the flow of hydrocarbons. Most common combination is Hydrofluoric Acid - Hydrochloric with concentration (3% HF - 12% HCl) known as mud acid. But there are some problems associated with the use of mud acid i.e., corrosion, precipitation. In this paper several new combinations of acids were experimentally screened to identify the most effective combination. The combinations used consist of fluoboric, phosphoric, formic and hydrofluoric acids. Cores were allowed to react with these combinations and results are compared with the mud acid. The parameters, which are analyzed, are Improved Permeability Ratio, strength and mineralogy. The analysis showed that the new acid combination has the potential to be used in sandstone acidizing.

  5. Ferroan dolomite cement in Cambrian sandstones: burial history and hydrocarbon generation of the Baltic sedimentary basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliaupa, S.; Cyziene, J.; Molenaar, Nicolaas

    2008-01-01

    The conditions and timing of carbonate cementation in Cambrian sandstones of the Baltic sedimentary basin were determined by oxygen and carbon stable isotope and chemical data in combination with optical and cathodoluminescence petrographic studies. Studied samples represent a range in present...

  6. Middle Ordovician brachiopods from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Grube; Brock, Glenn A.; Nielsen, Arne Thorshøj

    2014-01-01

    Middle Ordovician brachiopod faunas from the Amadeus Basin, central Australia are poorly known. The Darriwilian Stairway Sandstone was sampled stratigraphically for macrofossils in order to provide new information on marine benthic diversity in this clastic-dominated, shallow-water palaeoenvironm...

  7. Experimental Analysis of Sandstone and Travertine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Doležel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandstone and travertine are sedimentary rocks. The former is clastic, while the latter is sourced by chemical precipitation from hot springs. Their applications in civil engineering structures are mostly influenced by the ability to carry compression loading. A three-point bending experiment is usually used to determine material characteristics. However it does not correspond very well to applicatiosn in structures. For this reason we used a uniaxial compression test to obtain the modulus of elasticity and the stress-strain diagram. To obtain detailed information about the crystalline structure of sandstone and travertine a microscopic analysis wascarried out, using optical microscopy and an EDAX multichannel spectrometer for elementary microanalysis. 

  8. Performance of Different Acids on Sandstone Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zaman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of sandstone formations is a challenging task, which involves several chemicals and physical interactions of the acid with the formation. Some of these reactions may result in formation damage. Mud acid has been successfully used to stimulate sandstone reservoirs for a number of years. It is a mixture of hydrofluoric (HF and hydrochloric (HCl acids designed to dissolve clays and siliceous fines accumulated in the near-wellbore region. Matrix acidizing may also be used to increase formation permeability in undamaged wells. The change may be up to 50% to 100% with the mud acid. For any acidizing process, the selection of acid (Formulation and Concentration and the design (Pre-flush, Main Acid, After-flush is very important. Different researchers are using different combinations of acids with different concentrations to get the best results for acidization. Mainly the common practice is combination of Hydrochloric Acid – Hydrofluoric with Concentration (3% HF – 12% HCl. This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Orthophosphoric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in one combination and the second combination is Fluoboric and formic acid and the third one is formic and hydrofluoric acid. The results are compared with the mud acid and the results calculated are porosity, permeability, and FESEM Analysis and Strength tests. All of these new combinations shows that these have the potential to be used as acidizing acids on sandstone formations.

  9. Dispersion analysis of velocity and attenuation in Berea sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Kenneth W.

    1985-07-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements were made on dry, brine- and oil-saturated Berea sandstone and fused glass beads. The results for fused glass beads are consistent with the predictions of Biot theory. They indicate that as predicted, the Biot absorption/dispersion mechanism shifts to higher frequencies as the fluid viscosity increases. Similar data for Berea sandstone are not consistent with Biot theory, since observed velocities are generally higher than predicted. Using the Biot theory, we calculate low- and high-frequency velocities for the liquid-saturated samples. "Biot dispersion" is then defined as the percent difference between the low- and high-frequency limits. "Apparent dispersion" is defined as the percent difference between the measured ultrasonic velocity and the low-frequency Biot limit. Comparison of these two measures of dispersion gives insight into the presence of a non-Biot absorption/dispersion mechanism. Whenever the apparent dispersion is larger than the Biot dispersion, the extra dispersion is interpreted as being caused by a local flow relaxation. To be consistent with attenuation data, this relaxation must be distributed over at least five to six decades in frequency.

  10. Preparation and characterisation of core-shell CNTs@MIPs nanocomposites and selective removal of estrone from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruixia; Su, Xiaoqian; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-01-15

    This paper reports the preparation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) functionalized with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for advanced removal of estrone. CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites with a well-defined core-shell structure were obtained using a semi-covalent imprinting strategy, which employed a thermally reversible covalent bond at the surface of silica-coated CNTs for a large-scale production. The morphology and structure of the products were characterised by transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The adsorption properties were demonstrated by equilibrium rebinding experiments and Scatchard analysis. The results demonstrate that the imprinted nanocomposites possess favourable selectivity, high capacity and fast kinetics for template molecule uptake, yielding an adsorption capacity of 113.5 μmol/g. The synthetic process is quite simple, and the different batches of synthesized CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites showed good reproducibility in template binding. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water using the CNTs@Est-MIPs nanocomposites was demonstrated using water samples spiked with estrone.

  11. Optical Emission Line Nebulae in Galaxy Cluster Cores 1: The Morphological, Kinematic and Spectral Properties of the Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Hamer, S L; Swinbank, A M; Wilman, R J; Combes, F; Salomé, P; Fabian, A C; Crawford, C S; Russell, H R; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J; McNamara, B; Bremer, M N

    2016-01-01

    We present an Integral Field Unit survey of 73 galaxy clusters and groups with the VIsible Multi Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on VLT. We exploit the data to determine the H$\\alpha$ gas dynamics on kpc-scales to study the feedback processes occurring within the dense cluster cores. We determine the kinematic state of the ionised gas and show that the majority of systems ($\\sim$ 2/3) have relatively ordered velocity fields on kpc scales that are similar to the kinematics of rotating discs and are decoupled from the stellar kinematics of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy. The majority of the H$\\alpha$ flux ($>$ 50%) is typically associated with these ordered kinematics and most systems show relatively simple morphologies suggesting they have not been disturbed by a recent merger or interaction. Approximately 20% of the sample (13/73) have disturbed morphologies which can typically be attributed to AGN activity disrupting the gas. Only one system shows any evidence of an interaction with another cluster member. A spect...

  12. A safety assessment of rotary mode core sampling in flammable gas single shell tanks: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R.E.

    1996-04-15

    This safety assessment (SA) addresses each of the required elements associated with the installation, operation, and removal of a rotary-mode core sampling (RMCS) device in flammable-gas single-shell tanks (SSTs). The RMCS operations are needed in order to retrieve waste samples from SSTs with hard layers of waste for which push-mode sampling is not adequate for sampling. In this SA, potential hazards associated with the proposed action were identified and evaluated systematically. Several potential accident cases that could result in radiological or toxicological gas releases were identified and analyzed and their consequences assessed. Administrative controls, procedures and design changes required to eliminate or reduce the potential of hazards were identified. The accidents were analyzed under nine categories, four of which were burn scenarios. In SSTS, burn accidents result in unacceptable consequences because of a potential dome collapse. The accidents in which an aboveground burn propagates into the dome space were shown to be in the ``beyond extremely unlikely`` frequency category. Given the unknown nature of the gas-release behavior in the SSTS, a number of design changes and administrative controls were implemented to achieve these low frequencies. Likewise, drill string fires and dome space fires were shown to be very low frequency accidents by taking credit for the design changes, controls, and available experimental and analytical data. However, a number of Bureau of Mines (BOM) tests must be completed before some of the burn accidents can be dismissed with high confidence. Under the category of waste fires, the possibility of igniting the entrapped gases and the waste itself were analyzed. Experiments are being conducted at the BOM to demonstrate that the drill bit is not capable of igniting the trapped gas in the waste. Laboratory testing and thermal analysis demonstrated that, under normal operating conditions, the drill bit will not create high

  13. Capillary ion chromatography with on-column focusing for ultra-trace analysis of methanesulfonate and inorganic anions in limited volume Antarctic ice core samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Estrella Sanz; Poynter, Sam; Curran, Mark; Haddad, Paul R; Shellie, Robert A; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2015-08-28

    Preservation of ionic species within Antarctic ice yields a unique proxy record of the Earth's climate history. Studies have been focused until now on two proxies: the ionic components of sea salt aerosol and methanesulfonic acid. Measurement of the all of the major ionic species in ice core samples is typically carried out by ion chromatography. Former methods, whilst providing suitable detection limits, have been based upon off-column preconcentration techniques, requiring larger sample volumes, with potential for sample contamination and/or carryover. Here, a new capillary ion chromatography based analytical method has been developed for quantitative analysis of limited volume Antarctic ice core samples. The developed analytical protocol applies capillary ion chromatography (with suppressed conductivity detection) and direct on-column sample injection and focusing, thus eliminating the requirement for off-column sample preconcentration. This limits the total sample volume needed to 300μL per analysis, allowing for triplicate sample analysis with anions, including fluoride, methanesulfonate, chloride, sulfate and nitrate anions. Application to composite ice-core samples is demonstrated, with coupling of the capillary ion chromatograph to high resolution mass spectrometry used to confirm the presence and purity of the observed methanesulfonate peak.

  14. Hydrofacies In Sandstones. Evidence For Feedback Between Sandstone Lithofacies and Permeability Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, J. P.; Newell, A.; Moreau, M.

    In order to enhance our ability to develop effective numerical models of flow and con- taminant transport in the Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifer of the UK, relationships between lithofacies, rock mass characteristics (such as porosity and pore-throat size distribution), and permeability have been investigated through a series of case studies. Flow in the Permo-Triassic sandstones is primarily through the matrix. Permeability distribution is principally a function of the pore-throat size distribution and there is a relatively weak correlation with primary sedimentary lithofacies. It is observed that matrix permeability data broadly fall into two, discontinuous, sub-populations above and below about 1 mD. It is proposed that modification of primary sedimentary litho- facies by circulation of groundwater is the main control on the development of these two permeability sub-populations or hydrofacies. Identification of these two hydrofa- cies has significant implications for numerical modelling of the sandstones.

  15. CO2-Driven Convection Produced the Vertical Distribution of Sandstone Colors and Iron Concretions in Navajo Sandstone at Zion National Park, Utah (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, R. M.; Loope, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Along cliff faces exposed in Zion National Park (SW Utah), the porous and permeable Navajo Sandstone (Jurassic) is 700 m thick, and is capped by impermeable mudrocks and evaporites of the Carmel Formation. Previous workers have documented an areally extensive color pattern that is easily visible across much of southwestern and south-central Utah: the uppermost Navajo Sandstone is nearly white, the middle third of the formation is pink, and the lowermost fraction is reddish brown. To the northwest of the park, however, the formation is uniformly red (likely its primary color; G.B. Nielsen et al., 2009). Spheroidal concretions with dense, iron-oxide-cemented rinds and iron-poor cores are abundant in the pink and brown sandstones. Rhomb-shaped clots of iron oxide cement that are pseudomorphous after siderite are present in the cores of the largest concretions. The color variations are evidence that iron was transported from the upper portion of the Navajo SS to the lower portion. The pseudomorphs are evidence that the concretions are the oxidized remains of siderite-cemented precursors. The vertical iron transport and the precipitation of siderite require similar vertical transport of reducing, CO2-rich formation waters through the Navajo Sandstone. We argue that this circulation was driven in part by groundwater convection beneath a CO2 accumulation that was trapped below the Navajo-Carmel contact. This circulation caused aqueous iron and aqueous carbonate to be displaced downward and to accumulate (in the form of siderite) in the lower Navajo Sandstone. There are numerous CO2 reservoirs in the Colorado Plateau region; the gas was derived mainly from mantle sources. We hypothesize that, in the late Tertiary, the Carmel Formation capped a broad, structurally high accumulation of CO2 and CH4 in the Navajo Sandstone. The CH4 bleached the upper portion of the sandstone, releasing Fe2+ into the formation water. CO2 dissolved in the water, thereby increasing its density

  16. Origin of gray-green sandstone in ore bed of sandstone type uranium deposit in north Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Dongsheng sandstone-type uranium deposit is located in the northern part of Ordos Basin, occurring in the transitional zones between gray-green and gray sandstones of Jurassic Zhiluo Formation. Sandstones in oxidized zone of the ore bed look gray-green, being of unique signature and different from one of ordinary inter-layered oxidation zone of sandstone-type uranium deposits. The character and origin of gray-green sandstones are systematically studied through their petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry. It is pointed out that this color of sandstones is originated from secondary oil-gas reduction processes after paleo-oxidation, being due to acicular-leaf chlorite covering surfaces of the sandstone grains. To find out the origin of gray-green sandstone and recognize paleo-oxidation zones in the ore bed are of not only theoretical significance for understanding metallogenesis of this kind of sandstone-type uranium deposit, but also very importantly practical significance for prospecting for similar kind of sandstone-type uranium deposit.

  17. The experimental modeling of gas percolation mechanisms in a coal-measure tight sandstone reservoir: A case study on the coal-measure tight sandstone gas in the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizhen Tao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tight sandstone gas from coal-measure source rock is widespread in China, and it is represented by the Xujiahe Formation of the Sichuan Basin and the Upper Paleozoic of the Ordos Basin. It is affected by planar evaporative hydrocarbon expulsion of coal-measure source rock and the gentle structural background; hydrodynamics and buoyancy play a limited role in the gas migration-accumulation in tight sandstone. Under the conditions of low permeability and speed, non-Darcy flow is quite apparent, it gives rise to gas-water mixed gas zone. In the gas displacing water experiment, the shape of percolation flow curve is mainly influenced by core permeability. The lower the permeability, the higher the starting pressure gradient as well as the more evident the non-Darcy phenomenon will be. In the gas displacing water experiment of tight sandstone, the maximum gas saturation of the core is generally less than 50% (ranging from 30% to 40% and averaging at 38%; it is similar to the actual gas saturation of the gas zone in the subsurface core. The gas saturation and permeability of the core have a logarithm correlation with a correlation coefficient of 0.8915. In the single-phase flow of tight sandstone gas, low-velocity non-Darcy percolation is apparent; the initial flow velocity (Vd exists due to the slippage effect of gas flow. The shape of percolation flow curve of a single-phase gas is primarily controlled by core permeability and confining pressure; the lower the permeability or the higher the confining pressure, the higher the starting pressure (0.02–0.08 MPa/cm, whereas, the higher the quasi-initial flow speed, the longer the nonlinear section and the more obvious the non-Darcy flow will be. The tight sandstone gas seepage mechanism study shows that the lower the reservoir permeability, the higher the starting pressure and the slower the flow velocity will be, this results in the low efficiency of natural gas migration and accumulation as well as

  18. Intersecting faults and sandstone stratigraphy at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonder Haar, S.; Howard, J.H.

    1980-02-01

    The northwest-southeast trending Cerro Prieto fault is part of a major regional lineament that extends into Sonaro and has characteristics of both a wrench fault and an oceanic transform fault. The distribution of lithologies and temperature within the field was studied by comparing data from well cuttings, cores, well logs, and geochemical analyses. Across the earliest developed portion of the field, in particular along a 1.25-km northeast-southwest section from well M-9 to M-10, interesting correlations emerge that indicate a relationship among lithology, microfracturing, and temperature distribution. In the upper portion of Reservoir A of this stratigraphic section, between 1200 and 1400 m, the percentage of sandstones ranges from 20 to 55. Temperatures are 225/sup 0/ to 275/sup 0/C based on well logs, calcite isotope maxima, and Na-K-Ca indices. The study shows that an isothermal high in this vicinity corresponds to the lowest total percentage of sandstones. Scanning electron microphotographs of well cores and cuttings from sandstone and shale units reveal clogging, mineral dissolution, and mineral precipitation along microfractures. The working hypothesis is that these sandy shale and siltstone facies are most amenable to increased microfracturing and, in turn, such microfracturing allows for higher temperature fluid to rise to shallower depths in the reservoir.

  19. Effect of kaolinite as a key factor controlling the petrophysical properties of the Nubia sandstone in central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassab, Mohamed A.; Abu Hashish, Mohamed F.; Nabawy, Bassem S.; Elnaggar, Osama M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive petrographical and petrophysical investigation for the Late Cretaceous Nubia sandstone from Wadi Kareem in central Eastern Desert to measure their fluid flow properties and to investigate the effect of kaolinite on their petrophysical characteristics. From the petrographical analyses, scanning electron microscope 'SEM' and the X-ray diffraction 'XRD' analysis, it is shown that the studied sandstone samples are quite homogeneous in mineralogy and can be distinguished into four sedimentary microfacies: quartz arenite as a clean sandstone as well as three kaolinitic microfacies; namely they are kaolinitic quartz arenite, kaolinitic subarkose, and calcareous to kaolinitc quartz arenite. The main recognized diagenetic processes that prevailed during the post-depositional history of the Nubia sandstone are; compaction, cementation, alteration and dissolution of feldspar into kaolinite. The petrophysical potentiality of the studied sandstones was studied using the helium pycnometer, gas permeability and mercury injection confining pressure 'MICP' techniques. The investigated sandstones can be classified into three petrophysical facies with varying reservoir performances. The petrophysical behaviour of these facies is dependent mostly on their kaolinite content and its impact on porosity, permeability, irreducible water saturation, R35 (pore aperture corresponding to mercury saturation of 35% pore volume), R50 (median pore-throat radius), and MHR (the mean hydraulic radius). Therefore, the studied petrophysical facies are comparable to the distinguished petrographical facies.

  20. Analysis of Radiation Exposure for Naval Personnel at Operation SANDSTONE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-15

    Operation SANDSTONE Dose Reconstruction Methodology I I 2-1 Enewetak Atoll Anchorage Areas 14 2-2 Destroyer Patrol Sector Chart for Operation SANDSTONE 18...2-3 Average Free-Field Radiation Intensity for Southern and Northern Anchorage Areas - Enewetak Atoll 24 2-4 Average Free-Field Radiation Intensity...Operation SANDSTONE was the second nuclear test series held in the Marshall 0 Islands. It consisted of three nuclear weapon tests at Enewetak * Atoll in

  1. Velocity field measurements in sedimentary rock cores by magnetization prepared 3D SPRITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Konstantin; Xiao, Dan; Balcom, Bruce J

    2012-10-01

    A time-efficient MRI method suitable for quantitative mapping of 3-D velocity fields in sedimentary rock cores, and granular samples is discussed. The method combines the 13-interval Alternating-Pulsed-Gradient Stimulated-Echo (APGSTE) scheme and three-dimensional Single Point Ramped Imaging with T(1) Enhancement (SPRITE). Collecting a few samples near the q-space origin and employing restricted k-space sampling dramatically improves the performance of the imaging method. The APGSTE-SPRITE method is illustrated through mapping of 3-D velocity field in a macroscopic bead pack and heterogeneous sandstone and limestone core plugs. The observed flow patterns are consistent with a general trend for permeability to increase with the porosity. Domains of low permeability obstruct the flow within the core volume. Water tends to flow along macroscopic zones of higher porosity and across zones of lower porosity.

  2. Electrofacies vs. lithofacies sandstone reservoir characterization Campanian sequence, Arshad gas/oil field, Central Sirt Basin, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki, Milad; Darwish, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    The present study focuses on the vertically stacked sandstones of the Arshad Sandstone in Arshad gas/oil field, Central Sirt Basin, Libya, and is based on the conventional cores analysis and wireline log interpretation. Six lithofacies types (F1 to F6) were identified based on the lithology, sedimentary structures and biogenic features, and are supported by wireline log calibration. From which four types (F1-F4) represent the main Campanian sandstone reservoirs in the Arshad gas/oil field. Lithofacies F5 is the basal conglomerates at the lower part of the Arshad sandstones. The Paleozoic Gargaf Formation is represented by lithofacies F6 which is the source provenance for the above lithofacies types. Arshad sediments are interpreted to be deposited in shallow marginal and nearshore marine environment influenced by waves and storms representing interactive shelf to fluvio-marine conditions. The main seal rocks are the Campanian Sirte shale deposited in a major flooding events during sea level rise. It is contended that the syn-depositional tectonics controlled the distribution of the reservoir facies in time and space. In addition, the post-depositional changes controlled the reservoir quality and performance. Petrophysical interpretation from the porosity log values were confirmed by the conventional core measurements of the different sandstone lithofacies types. Porosity ranges from 5 to 20% and permeability is between 0 and 20 mD. Petrophysical cut-off summary of the lower part of the clastic dominated sequence (i. e. Arshad Sandstone) calculated from six wells includes net pay sand ranging from 19.5‧ to 202.05‧, average porosity from 7.7 to 15% and water saturation from 19 to 58%.

  3. Porosities and permeability of Paleozoic sandstones derived from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorand, Rachel; Koch, Andreas; Mohnke, Oliver; Klitzsch, Norbert; Clauser, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    A major obstacle for an increased use of geothermal energy often lies in the high success risk for the development of geothermal reservoirs due to the unknown rock properties. In general, the ranges of porosity and permeability in existing compilations of rock properties are too large to be useful to constrain properties for specific sites. Usually, conservative assumptions are made about these properties, resulting in greater drilling depth and increased exploration cost. In this study, data from direct measurements on thirty-three sandstones from different borehole locations and depths enable to derive statistical values of the desired hydraulic properties for selected sandstones in the German subsurface. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements to estimate the porosity and the permeability of sandstones from North Rhine-Westphalia (Germany). Besides NMR standard poro-perm-measurements were performed on the samples to obtain independent data sets for comparison. Porosity was measured by Archimedes principle and pore-size distribution by mercury injection. Also permeability was determined by gas flow measurements taking into account the Klinkenberg effect. The porosities of the studied samples vary between 0 % and 16 %. NMR yields suitable porosity results whereas the porosities obtain by T1 relaxation measurements fit better to the Archimedes porosities than the porosities obtained by T2 relaxation measurements. For porosities up to 10 %, T2 relaxation measurements overestimate the porosity. Furthermore, we calculate the effective porosity using a cutoff time of 3 ms. This effective porosity agrees much better with Archimedes porosities, particularly for the low porosity samples. The gas permeability of studied sandstones varies between 10-21 m2 and 2.10-17 m2. A large number of empirical relationships between relaxation times and gas permeability have been published. We have applied several of these relationships to select the appropriate law for

  4. Non-destructive Analysis of Oil-Contaminated Soil Core Samples by X-ray Computed Tomography and Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry: a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhata, Yuji; Nishiwaki, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Utsuzawa, Shin; Jinguuji, Motoharu

    2010-01-01

    Non-destructive measurements of contaminated soil core samples are desirable prior to destructive measurements because they allow obtaining gross information from the core samples without touching harmful chemical species. Medical X-ray computed tomography (CT) and time-domain low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry were applied to non-destructive measurements of sandy soil core samples from a real site contaminated with heavy oil. The medical CT visualized the spatial distribution of the bulk density averaged over the voxel of 0.31 × 0.31 × 2 mm3. The obtained CT images clearly showed an increase in the bulk density with increasing depth. Coupled analysis with in situ time-domain reflectometry logging suggests that this increase is derived from an increase in the water volume fraction of soils with depth (i.e., unsaturated to saturated transition). This was confirmed by supplementary analysis using high-resolution micro-focus X-ray CT at a resolution of ∼10 μm, which directly imaged the increase in pore water with depth. NMR transverse relaxation waveforms of protons were acquired non-destructively at 2.7 MHz by the Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence. The nature of viscous petroleum molecules having short transverse relaxation times (T2) compared to water molecules enabled us to distinguish the water-saturated portion from the oil-contaminated portion in the core sample using an M0–T2 plot, where M0 is the initial amplitude of the CPMG signal. The present study demonstrates that non-destructive core measurements by medical X-ray CT and low-field NMR provide information on the groundwater saturation level and oil-contaminated intervals, which is useful for constructing an adequate plan for subsequent destructive laboratory measurements of cores. PMID:21258437

  5. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of Original Water Saturation and Mobile Water Saturation in Low Permeability Sandstone Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shu-Sheng; YE Li-You; XIONG Wei; GUO He-Kun; HU Zhi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    @@ We use nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR)and centrifugation to measure the original water saturation and mobile water saturation of cores from the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas reservoir,and compare the NMR results with the corresponding field data.It is shown that the NMR water saturation after 300 psi centrifugation effectively represents the original water saturation measured by weighing fresh cores.There is a good correlation between mobile water saturation and the water production performance of the corresponding gas wells.The critical mobile water saturation whether reservoir produces water of the Xujiahe low permeability sandstone gas is 6%.The higher the mobile water saturation,the greater the water production rate of gas well.This indicates that well's water production performance can be forecasted by mobile water saturation of cores.

  6. Late Quaternary paleoceanographic features as deduced from calcium carbonate and faunal changes of planktonic foraminifers in core samples from northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, K.K.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Singh, A.D.

    Two pelagic core samples, ARB-52 and ARB-54 from 2240 m and 800 m depths respectively from the Arabian Sea off Bombay were analysed for determining climatic changes during the past 30,000 yr. based on the interpretation of changes in calcium...

  7. Non-destructive infrared analyses: a method for provenance analyses of sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowitz, Jörg; Ehling, Angela

    2008-12-01

    used as dimension stones. All analyses have been done with the “portable infrared mineral analyser” (PIMA) of Integrated Spectronics Pty Ltd. at the Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe in Berlin. This spectrometer has been designed to be light, portable and easy to handle. Investigations can be performed without any sample preparation for complete buildings as well as at small samples with diameters up to about one centimeter. Analyses of pulverized samples and granules are also possible. Consequently, infrared reflectance spectroscopy provides a reliable working, non-destructive technique to identify and characterize sandstones used for buildings and monuments.

  8. AirCore-HR: a high-resolution column sampling to enhance the vertical description of CH4 and CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Membrive

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An original and innovative sampling system called AirCore was presented by NOAA in 2010 (Karion et al., 2010. It consists of a long (>  100 m and narrow (<  1 cm stainless steel tube that can retain a profile of atmospheric air. The captured air sample has then to be analyzed with a gas analyzer for trace mole fraction. In this study, we introduce a new AirCore aiming to improve resolution along the vertical with the objectives to (i better capture the vertical distribution of CO2 and CH4, (ii provide a tool to compare AirCores and validate the estimated vertical resolution achieved by AirCores. This (high-resolution AirCore-HR consists of a 300 m tube, combining 200 m of 0.125 in. (3.175 mm tube and a 100 m of 0.25 in. (6.35 mm tube. This new configuration allows us to achieve a vertical resolution of 300 m up to 15 km and better than 500 m up to 22 km (if analysis of the retained sample is performed within 3 h. The AirCore-HR was flown for the first time during the annual StratoScience campaign from CNES in August 2014 from Timmins (Ontario, Canada. High-resolution vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 up to 25 km were successfully retrieved. These profiles revealed well-defined transport structures in the troposphere (also seen in CAMS-ECMWF high-resolution forecasts of CO2 and CH4 profiles and captured the decrease of CO2 and CH4 in the stratosphere. The multi-instrument gondola also carried two other low-resolution AirCore-GUF that allowed us to perform direct comparisons and study the underlying processing method used to convert the sample of air to greenhouse gases vertical profiles. In particular, degrading the AirCore-HR derived profiles to the low resolution of AirCore-GUF yields an excellent match between both sets of CH4 profiles and shows a good consistency in terms of vertical structures. This fully validates the theoretical vertical resolution achievable by AirCores. Concerning CO2 although a

  9. AirCore-HR: a high-resolution column sampling to enhance the vertical description of CH4 and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrive, Olivier; Crevoisier, Cyril; Sweeney, Colm; Danis, François; Hertzog, Albert; Engel, Andreas; Bönisch, Harald; Picon, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    An original and innovative sampling system called AirCore was presented by NOAA in 2010 (Karion et al., 2010). It consists of a long (> 100 m) and narrow (air. The captured air sample has then to be analyzed with a gas analyzer for trace mole fraction. In this study, we introduce a new AirCore aiming to improve resolution along the vertical with the objectives to (i) better capture the vertical distribution of CO2 and CH4, (ii) provide a tool to compare AirCores and validate the estimated vertical resolution achieved by AirCores. This (high-resolution) AirCore-HR consists of a 300 m tube, combining 200 m of 0.125 in. (3.175 mm) tube and a 100 m of 0.25 in. (6.35 mm) tube. This new configuration allows us to achieve a vertical resolution of 300 m up to 15 km and better than 500 m up to 22 km (if analysis of the retained sample is performed within 3 h). The AirCore-HR was flown for the first time during the annual StratoScience campaign from CNES in August 2014 from Timmins (Ontario, Canada). High-resolution vertical profiles of CO2 and CH4 up to 25 km were successfully retrieved. These profiles revealed well-defined transport structures in the troposphere (also seen in CAMS-ECMWF high-resolution forecasts of CO2 and CH4 profiles) and captured the decrease of CO2 and CH4 in the stratosphere. The multi-instrument gondola also carried two other low-resolution AirCore-GUF that allowed us to perform direct comparisons and study the underlying processing method used to convert the sample of air to greenhouse gases vertical profiles. In particular, degrading the AirCore-HR derived profiles to the low resolution of AirCore-GUF yields an excellent match between both sets of CH4 profiles and shows a good consistency in terms of vertical structures. This fully validates the theoretical vertical resolution achievable by AirCores. Concerning CO2 although a good agreement is found in terms of vertical structure, the comparison between the various AirCores yields a large and

  10. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  11. The effect of acidified sample storage time on the determination of trace element concentration in ice cores by ICP-SFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglietti, C.; Gabrielli, P.; Lutton, A.; Olesik, J.; Thompson, L. G.

    2012-12-01

    Trace elements in micro-particles entrapped in ice cores are a valuable proxy of past climate and environmental variations. Inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) is generally recognized as a sensitive and accurate technique for the quantification of ultra-trace element concentrations in ice cores. Usually, ICP-SFMS analyses of ice core samples are performed by melting and acidifying aliquots. Acidification is important to transfer trace elements from particles into solution by partial and/or complete dissolution. Only elements in solution and in sufficiently small particles will be vaporized and converted to elemental ions in the plasma for detection by ICP-SFMS. However, experimental results indicate that differences in acidified sample storage time at room temperature may lead to the recovery of different trace element fractions. Moreover, different lithologies of the relatively abundant crustal material entrapped in the ice matrix could also influence the fraction of trace elements that are converted into elemental ions in the plasma. These factors might affect the determination of trace elements concentrations in ice core samples and hamper the comparison of results obtained from ice cores from different locations and/or epochs. In order to monitor the transfer of elements from particles into solution in acidified melted ice core samples during storage, a test was performed on sections from nine ice cores retrieved from low latitude drilling sites around the world. When compared to ice cores from polar regions, these samples are characterized by a relative high content of micro-particles that may leach trace elements into solution differently. Of the nine ice cores, five are from the Tibetan Plateau (Dasuopu, Guliya, Naimonanyi, Puruogangri and Dunde), two from the Andes (Quelccaya and Huascaran), one from Africa (Kilimanjaro) and one from the Eastern Alps (Ortles). These samples were decontaminated by triple rinsing, melted and

  12. Prospective evaluation of new 22 gauge endoscopic ultrasound core needle using capillary sampling with stylet slow-pull technique for intra-abdominal solid masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Woo Hyun; Park, Yangsoon; Park, Do Hyun; Hong, Seung-Mo; Lee, Byung Uk; Choi, Jun-Ho; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy and diagnostic yield of the histologic core obtained with a 22 G endoscopic ultrasound histology needle using capillary sampling with stylet slow-pull technique without on-site cytopathologist. No standard technique for new EUS histology needle has been established. A total of 125 consecutive patients with intra-abdominal solid masses were enrolled prospectively between October 2011 and March 2013. EUS-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) with a 22 G histology needle using capillary sampling with stylet slow-pull technique was performed. A total of 133 EUS-FNB procedures targeting the pancreas, lymph node, retroperitoneal mass, ampulla of Vater, gallbladder, common bile duct, duodenum, and liver were performed in 125 patients. EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases, and a visible core was obtained in 128 cases (96%). Histologic core specimens suitable for pathologic assessment were reported in 111 cases (83%). There were no procedure-related adverse events. According to the determinants of malignancy with EUS-FNB, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy were 85%, 98%, 99%, 77%, and 89%, respectively. In addition, histologic architecture with or without immunohistochemical staining of the core biopsy specimens was useful for pathologic confirmation in 101 cases (76%). A 22 G EUS-FNB using capillary sampling with stylet slow-pull technique showed a high diagnostic yield and histologic core acquisition for the histologic diagnosis of various intra-abdominal masses without an on-site cytopathologist. Furthermore, a histologic core with or without immunohistochemical staining was helpful for clinical decision making in 76% of the intra-abdominal solid masses.

  13. Mechanical compaction in Bleurswiller sandstone: effective pressure law and compaction localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Ji, Yuntao; Wong, Teng-fong

    2016-04-01

    We performed a systematic investigation of mechanical compaction and strain localization in Bleurswiller sandstone of 24% porosity. 70 conventional triaxial compression experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 200 MPa and pore pressures ranging from 5 to 100 MPa. Our new data show that the effective pressure principle can be applied in both the brittle faulting and cataclastic flow regimes, with an effective pressure coefficient close to but somewhat less than 1. Under relatively high confinement, the samples typically fail by development of compaction bands. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to resolve preexisting porosity clusters, as well as the initiation and propagation of the compaction bands in deformed samples. Synthesis of the CT and microstructural data indicates that there is no casual relation between collapse of the porosity clusters in Bleurswiller sandstone and nucleation of the compaction bands. Instead, the collapsed porosity clusters may represent barriers for the propagation of compaction localization, rendering the compaction bands to propagate along relatively tortuous paths so as to avoid the porosity clusters. The diffuse and tortuous geometry of compaction bands results in permeability reduction that is significantly lower than that associated with compaction band formation in other porous sandstones. Our data confirm that Bleurswiller sandstone stands out as the only porous sandstone associated with a compactive cap that is linear, and our CT and microstructural observation show that it is intimately related to collapse of the porosity clusters. We demonstrate that the anomalous linear caps and their slopes are in agreement with a micromechanical model based on the collapse of a spherical pore embedded in an elastic-plastic matrix that obeys the Coulomb failure criterion.

  14. Multiple stages of aqueous alteration along fractures in mudstone and sandstone strata in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, A. S.; Ming, D. W.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Edgett, K. S.; Treiman, A. H.; Clark, B. C.; Downs, R. T.; Farmer, J. D.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Rampe, E. B.; Schmidt, M. E.; Sutter, B.; Thompson, L. M.

    2017-08-01

    The Mars rover Curiosity in Gale crater conducted the first-ever direct chemical and mineralogical comparisons of samples that have clear parent (unaltered) and daughter (altered) relationships. The mineralogy and chemistry of samples within and adjacent to alteration halos in a sandstone formation were established by the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) X-ray diffraction (XRD) instrument and the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS), respectively. The Stimson formation sandstones unconformably overlie the Murray mudstone formation and represent the youngest stratigraphic unit explored by Curiosity to date. Aqueous alteration of the parent sandstone resulted in a loss of half of the original crystalline mineral phases and a three-fold increase in X-ray amorphous material. Aqueous fluids extensively leached Mg, Al, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn and other elements from the parent material, decreased the pyroxene to feldspar ratio by a factor of two, introduced Ca and mixed-cation sulfates, and both passively and actively enriched the silica content. Leaching of Mg, Al, Mn, Fe, Ni and Zn and enrichment of Si and S are also observed in alteration halos in the underlying mudstone. These observations are consistent with infiltration of subsurface fluids, initially acidic and then alkaline, propagating along fractures crosscutting the Stimson sandstone and Murray mudstone. The geochemistry and mineralogy suggest a complicated diagenetic history with multiple stages of aqueous alteration under a variety of environmental conditions (e.g. both low and moderate pH). The formation of these alteration halos post-dates lithification of the sandstones and mudstones and represents one of the youngest hydrogeologic events presently known to have occurred in Gale crater.

  15. The sandstone's chromatic alteration of the florentine cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettori, S.; Pecchioni, E.; Cantisani, E.; Ricci, M.; Fratini, F.; Garzonio, C. A.

    2012-04-01

    Pietra Serena is one of the materials more used in Florentine architecture. It is a sandstone that outcrops in the hills north of the city in the municipality of Fiesole and it has been employed mainly for ornamental purposes. This litotype belongs to the the Macigno Formation (Oligocene Upper- Miocene Lower) which consists of beds of turbiditic sandstones separated by pelitic levels which are the finest components of each single turbidity layer. Petrographically, Pietra Serena can be defined as a medium-coarse-grained greywacke made of quartz, feldspars, micas, fragments of metamorphic and magmatic rocks. The clayey matrix is quite abundant, mainly composed by illite, kaolinite and chlorite-vermiculite (present only in some quarries). It is well known that the processes of decay of the sandstones are related to the type of matrix, the amount of cement, the kind of clay minerals and to the pore size distribution, which lead to water infiltrations, swelling of the clay minerals, separation of the clayey matrix, with resulting exfoliation and peeling of the stone artefacts. Pietra Serena has a bluish-grey colour in fresh cut, but many times it is easily oxidized acquiring an ochraceous-reddish brown colour on buildings. Such changes in colour, appear to be due in part to the oxidation of iron, proceeding very quickly from the surface to the inside, though the cohesion is not affected. It is possible to hypothesize that the chromatic changes not necessarily involve a progressive state of alteration of the artefact, but they may often to represents a natural patina acquired with the time. Nevertheless it is necessary to remember that the oxidized layer and its hardness could also be the result of treatments performed in the past. In Florence, several monuments and buildings are affected by such phenomenon, in particular it is possible to note an intense and diffuse reddish colouring on the Pietra Serena utilized for columns and for façade's decorations. In this work

  16. Long-Term CO2 Exposure Experiments - Geochemical Effects on Brine-Saturated Reservoir Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Zemke, Kornelia; Liebscher, Axel; Wandrey, Maren

    2010-05-01

    The injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers is the most promising strategy for the reduction of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere via long-term geological storage. The study is part of the CO2SINK project conducted at Ketzin, situated 40 km west of Berlin. There, food grade CO2 has been pumped into the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation since June 2008. The main objective of the experimental program is to investigate the effects of long-term CO2 exposure on the physico-chemical properties of the reservoir rock. To achieve this goal, core samples from observation well Ktzi 202 have been saturated with synthetic brine and exposed to CO2 in high quality steel autoclaves at simulated reservoir P-T-conditions of 5.5 MPa and 40 ° C. The synthetic brine had a composition representative of the formation fluid (Förster et al., 2006) of 172.8 g/l NaCl, 8.0 g/l MgCl2×2H2O, 4.8 g/l CaCl2×2H2O and 0.6 g/l KCl. After 15 months, the first set of CO2-exposed samples was removed from the pressure vessels. Thin sections, XRD, SEM as well as EMP data were used to determine the mineralogical features of the reservoir rocks before and after the experiments. Additionally, NMR relaxation and MP was performed to measure poroperm and pore size distribution values of the twin samples. The analyzed samples are fine- to medium grained, moderately well- to well sorted and weakly consolidated sandstones. Quartz and plagioclase are the major components, while K-feldspar, hematite, white & dark mica, chlorite and illite are present in minor and varying amounts. Cements are composed of analcime, dolomite and anhydrite. Some samples show mm- to cm-scale cross-beddings. The laminae comprise lighter, quartz- and feldspar-dominated layers and dark-brownish layers with notably less quartz and feldspars. The results are consistent with those of Blaschke et al. (2008). The plagioclase composition indicates preferred dissolution of the Ca-component and a trend toward albite-rich phases or even pure

  17. A new CF-IRMS system for the quantification of the stable isotopes of carbon monoxide from ice cores and small air samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A new simultaneous analysis technique for stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ18O of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from ice core samples and small air samples is presented, based on an on-line cryogenic vacuum extraction followed by continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS. The CO extraction system includes two multi-loop cryogenic cleanup traps, a chemical oxidant for oxidation to CO2, a cryogenic collection trap, a cryofocusing unit, purification by gas chromatography, and subsequent injection into a Finnigan Delta Plus IRMS. Analytical precision of 0.2‰(±1σ for δ13C and 0.6‰(±1σ for δ18O can be obtained for 100 mL (STP air sample with CO mixing ratio ranging from 60 to 140 ppbv (~268–625 pmol CO. Six South Pole ice core samples with depth ranging from 133 to 177 m are also processed for CO isotope analysis based on a wet extraction line attached to the above cryogenic vacuum system. This is the first report on measuring isotope ratios of CO in ice core samples.

  18. Micro-Ct Imaging of Multi-Phase Flow in Carbonates and Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, M. G.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most important mechanisms that limits the escape of CO2 when injected into the subsurface for the purposes of carbon storage is capillary trapping, where CO2 is stranded as pore-scale droplets (ganglia). Prospective storage sites are aquifers or reservoirs that tend to be at conditions where CO2 will reside as a super-critical phase. In order to fully describe physical mechanisms characterising multi-phase flow during and post CO2 injection, experiments need to be conducted at these elevated aquifer/reservoir conditions - this poses a considerable experimental challenge. A novel experimental apparatus has been developed which uses μCT scanning for the non-invasive imaging of the distribution of CO2 in the pore space of rock with resolutions of 7μm at temperatures and pressures representative of the conditions present in prospective saline aquifer CO2 storage sites. The fluids are kept in chemical equilibrium with one-another and with the rock into which they are injected. This is done to prevent the dissolution of the CO2 in the brine to form carbonic acid, which can then react with the rock, particularly carbonates. By eliminating reaction we study the fundamental mechanisms of capillary trapping for an unchanging pore structure. In this study we present a suite of results from three carbonate and two sandstone rock types, showing that, for both cases the CO2 acts as the non-wetting phase and significant quantities of CO2 is trapped. The carbonate examined represent a wide variety of pore topologies with one rock with a very well connected, high porosity pore space (Mt Gambier), one with a lower porosity, poorly connected pore space (Estaillades) and one with a cemented bead pack type pore space (Ketton). Both sandstones (Doddington and Bentheimer) were high permeability granular quartzites. CO2 was injected into each rock, followed by brine injection. After brine injection the entire length of the rock core was scanned, processed and segmented into

  19. Laboratory study of fluid viscosity induced ultrasonic velocity dispersion in reservoir sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tao; Zou, Chang-Chun; Pei, Fa-Gen; Ren, Ke-Ying; Kong, Fan-Da; Shi, Ge

    2010-06-01

    Ultrasonic velocities of a set of saturated sandstone samples were measured at simulated in-situ pressures in the laboratory. The samples were obtained from the W formation of the WXS Depression and covered low to nearly high porosity and permeability ranges. The brine and four different density oils were used as pore fluids, which provided a good chance to investigate fluid viscosity-induced velocity dispersion. The analysis of experimental observations of velocity dispersion indicates that (1) the Biot model can explain most of the small discrepancy (about 2-3%) between ultrasonic measurements and zero frequency Gassmann predictions for high porosity and permeability samples saturated by all the fluids used in this experiment and is also valid for medium porosity and permeability samples saturated with low viscosity fluids (less than approximately 3 mP·S) and (2) the squirt flow mechanism dominates the low to medium porosity and permeability samples when fluid viscosity increases and produces large velocity dispersions as high as about 8%. The microfracture aspect ratios were also estimated for the reservoir sandstones and applied to calculate the characteristic frequency of the squirt flow model, above which the Gassmann’ s assumptions are violated and the measured high frequency velocities cannot be directly used for Gassmann’s fluid replacement at the exploration seismic frequency band for W formation sandstones.

  20. Mechanism of Solid Bitumen in Silurian Sandstones of Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jinglian; Zhu Bingquan

    1997-01-01

    @@ There are a large amount of solid bitumen within Silurian sandstones in Tabei, Tazhong, Kalpin uprifts of the Tarim Basin. Petroleum geochemists are interested in the super giant fossil oil pool. Unfortunately,some key questions have not been solved, such as: what generated the bitumen? When did the bitumen generate and when did the bitumen accumulated in the sandstones?

  1. Geochemical characteristics of Dongsheng sandstone-type uranium deposit, Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yuzhuang; LIU Chiyang; DAI Shifeng; QIN Peng

    2007-01-01

    Generally, sandstone-type uranium deposits can be divided into three zones according to their redox conditions: oxidized zone, ore zone and reduced zone. The Dongsheng uranium deposit belongs to this type. In order to study its geochemical characteristics, 11 samples were taken from the three zones of the Dongsheng uranium deposit. Five samples of them were collected from the oxidized zone, four samples from the ore zone and two samples from the reduced zone. These samples were analyzed using organic and inorganic geochemical methods. The results of GC traces and ICP-MASS indicate that the three zones show different organic and inorganic geochemical characteristics.

  2. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  3. Subsurface sandstone mapping by combination of GPR and ERT method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    It is important to know the shape and distribution of sandstone bodies in the subsurface when forma-tion and migration of a dune model are determined.The information plays a significant role in identification of the continental oil and gas accumulation.In this study,the combination of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography method (ERT)is used in mapping the distribution of sandstone bodies in Yanchang Formation.Six GPR profiles and seven ERT profiles are used to analysis.GPR data show clear re-flections from the top interface of sandstones.ERT data show a continuous high resistivity anomaly correspon-ding to the sandstone body.Combined the reconstructed 3D images by GPR and ERT,the spatial distribution of sandstone bodies is described.

  4. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    CERN Document Server

    Marti-Vidal, I; Marcaide, J M; Guirado, J C; Perez-Torres, M A; Ros, E

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of 10 years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of micro-as per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time)....

  5. Exploring the possibility to detect recent temporal changes in highly disturbed sedimentary records through sampling repetitions and core comparisons of porosity and sand content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, S; Bellucci, L G; Romano, S; Piazza, R; Turetta, C; Vecchiato, M; Nhon, D H; Frignani, M

    2015-07-01

    Dating of sediment cores in dynamic environments (such as tropical coastal lagoons) is often impossible to achieve, due to the difficulty to recover continuous and undisturbed records. Detailed temporal definition of environmental changes cannot be assured, but there is the possibility that information retained in such sediments can still provide useful insights on local or large-scale sedimentary dynamics, when a specific strategy is adopted. This latter consists in repeated core samplings at the same location and in the comparison of core profiles for basic and easily measurable parameters (porosity and sand content). This approach was tested on sediment cores, collected repeatedly during the period 2005-2010, at the same site of the Thi Nai Lagoon (central Vietnam). The proposed procedure was able to evidence the impact on lagoon sediments of activities linked to the construction of industrial settlements in the area, with dredging removing a consistent sediment layer from 2005 to 2008 and waste dumping providing additional sediment input in the following period. Simple statistic confirmed this scenario, together with core profiles of PCBs, As, Cd, Pb, and Zn. The procedure represents a simple tool to study coastal dynamics in places where the level of accuracy of traditional sediment radiodating cannot be reached. Several ameliorations are suggested in order to help developing the monitoring of sedimentary processes in poorly studied areas.

  6. Effect of water saturation and temperature in the range of 193 to 373 K on the thermal conductivity of sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, P. Y.; Zhang, N.; He, M. C.; Bai, B. H.

    2017-03-01

    The thermal conductivity of porous media is crucial for many geological and engineering projects. Although the thermal conductivity at low temperatures is often overlooked, it is of great significance to calculate the amount of heat that the ice sheet absorbs from the Earth. In this study, the thermal conductivity of dry and water-saturated sandstone was measured in the temperature range of 193 to 373 K using a transient hot wire method. All samples were collected from East China, with a sample porosity distribution of 5 to 13%. The effects of temperature, water saturation and phase transition of fluid in the pores were investigated. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity decreases with an increase in temperature and that the decrease is steeper when the temperature is below 273 K. Moreover, it is found that the thermal conductivity of the saturated sandstone is larger than that of the dry sandstone. With an increase in porosity, the thermal conductivity significantly increases in saturated sandstone but remains almost the same or even decreases in dry sandstones. Finally, it is revealed that the effect of phase transformation on the thermal conductivity is significant. When the water in pores becomes ice, the thermal conductivity increases significantly and increases further as the temperature decreases.

  7. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    assumptions would be required in order to estimate sandstone permeability based on the Kozeny equation. An effective specific surface area per pore volume for permeability was estimated by using image analysis and pore size distributions as from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation data...... be determined based on the Klinkenberg (1941) procedure, which accounts for effects on permeability of gas slip on the fluid-solid interface by means of several permeability measurements with different pore pressures. A comparison between the equivalent pore sizes as estimated using the Kozeny equation...... at 80°C than at 20°C; at 80°C the main effect might be due to an alteration of pore fluid rheology, whereas at 20°C particles might be filtered in pore constrictions. DLVO theory (Derjaguin and Landau (1941); Verwey and Overbeek (1948)) was used to compare effects of temperature and salinity on surface...

  8. Dilatant hardening of fluid-saturated sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhnenko, Roman Y.; Labuz, Joseph F.

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pore fluid in rock affects both the elastic and inelastic deformation processes, yet laboratory testing is typically performed on dry material even though in situ the rock is often saturated. Techniques were developed for testing fluid-saturated porous rock under the limiting conditions of drained, undrained, and unjacketed response. Confined compression experiments, both conventional triaxial and plane strain, were performed on water-saturated Berea sandstone to investigate poroelastic and inelastic behavior. Measured drained response was used to calibrate an elasto-plastic constitutive model that predicts undrained inelastic deformation. The experimental data show good agreement with the model: dilatant hardening in undrained triaxial and plane strain compression tests under constant mean stress was predicted and observed.

  9. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes.

  10. Use of thorium as tracer on study of groundwater of Botucatu sandstone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porto, Paulo Augusto d' A.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. de; Moreira, Rubens Martins; Reis Junior, Aluisio Souza; Kastner, Geraldo Frederico, E-mail: paap@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br, E-mail: reisas@cdtn.br, E-mail: gfk@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Thorium in some mineral compounds is very difficult to be dissolved in aqueous medium. To study the mobility of thorium in water, one alternative is to complex this element with EDTA, becoming possible to follow the behavior of thorium this medium. This way, in groundwater with low natural radioactivity and low {sup 232}Th activity, thorium can be used as a tracer. This paper describes the application of the complex Th-EDTA as a tracer applying the solution trough a sandstone sample made by rock from Botucatu Sandstone. The objective was to simulate the flow of groundwater inside the original rock aiming at future use of rare-earth elements complexed with EDTA as tracer. Alpha spectrometry technique was used to determine {sup 232}Th in the water samples with {sup 230}Th as inner-standard. (author)

  11. REE/trace element characteristics of sandstone-type uranium deposits in the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING Mingxing; YANG Xiaoyong; SUN Wei; MIAO Jianyu; LIU Chiyang

    2006-01-01

    The major elements, trace elements and REEs were analyzed on the samples collected from the sandstone-type uranium deposits in the Ordos Basin to constrain the mechanism of uranium enrichment. The total REE amount ranges from 36.7 to 701.8 μg/g and the REE distribution patterns of the sandstone-type uranium samples are characterized by LREE enrichment and high REE depletion. The results also indicated a high Y abundance and Eu anomalies between 0.77-1.81. High-precision ICP-MS results showed that U abundances are within the range of 0.73-150 μg/g, showing some strong correlation between U enrichment and related elements such as Ti, V, Zr, Mo, and Au. In addition, Th abundance is correlated with ΣREE.

  12. Hydrophobization by Means of Nanotechnology on Greek Sandstones Used as Building Facades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Karagiannis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern sustainable architecture indicates the use of local natural stones for building. Greek sandstones from Epirus (Demati, Greece, EN 12440 used as building facades meet aesthetic and have high mechanical properties, but the inevitable interaction between stone materials and natural or anthropogenic weathering factors controls the type, and extent of stone damages. In the present paper, samples of sandstone were treated with a conventional hydrophobic product and four solutions of the same product, enriched with nanosilica of different concentrations. The properties of the treated samples, such as porosity and pore size distribution, microstructure, static contact angle of a water droplet, and durability to deterioration cycles (freeze-thaw were recorded and conclusions were drawn. The research indicates the increased hydrophobic properties in nanosilica solutions but also the optimum content in nanoparticles that provides hydrophobicity without altering the properties of the stone.

  13. Giant weathering pits in the Entrada Sandstone, southeastern Utah: Preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netoff, D.I. (Sam Houston State Univ., Huntsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Geography and Geology); Shroba, R.R. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Giant weathering pits formed in outcrops of the lower Entrada Sandstone slickrock of Jurassic age are present in two areas in the Glen Canyon region of arid southeastern Utah. The pits are far larger than any previously described in the geologic literature. The pits near Cookie Jar Butte are commonly cylindrical, typically have low width-to-depth ratios (1.5--3.6), and have a depth of closure of as much as 18 m. There are no obvious lithologic or structural controls that determine their shape or location. Many of the pits at Rock Creek Bay are elongate; several of them have long axes in excess of 53 m, and the longest one is 74 m. Many of the pit walls are breached at the top, and the depth of closure is generally less than 6 m. The shapes of these pits are influenced by point orientation and pit coalescence. Thin-section analyses of near-surface sandstone cores taken near Cookie Jar Butte from pit walls, floors, and rims reveal no significant diagenetic alteration of the fine-grained to very fine frained quartzose sandstone (quartz arenite). Quartz grains appear fresh, and feldspar grains are only slightly weathered. The cement between the grains is mostly CaCO[sub 3]. In several of the pits in both areas sandy sediment veneers the bedrock floor. This sediment is similar in character to the adjacent sandstone and is probably locally derived. Possible origins of the giant pits include various physical, chemical, and biological weathering processes that initiate pit development, followed by excavation by plunge-pool action, wind deflation, dissolution, and piping. Preliminary field and laboratory data do not clearly identify and single process of group of processes that account for pit development.

  14. Effect of Sterilization by Dry Heat or Autoclaving on Bacterial Penetration through Berea Sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenneman, G E; McInerney, M J; Crocker, M E; Knapp, R M

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine why bacteria could penetrate lengths of consolidated sandstone (Berea) faster when the sandstone was sterilized by autoclaving than when dry heat (150 degrees C, 3 h) was used. Changes in permeability, porosity, and pore entrance size of the rock as a result of autoclaving were not sufficient to explain the differences in penetration times observed, but electron dispersion spectroscopy and electron microscopy of the rock revealed changes in mineral composition and clay morphology. Autoclaved cores contained more chloride than dry-heated cores, and the clays of autoclaved cores were aggregated and irregularly shaped. Therefore, the decreases in bacterial penetration rates caused by autoclave sterilization were probably the result of a change in surface charge of the pores of the rock and of a reduction in surface area of clays available for adhesion. The results implied that dry-heat sterilization was preferable to autoclaving when examining biotic and abiotic interactions in a native-state rock model.

  15. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: Depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E; Lacombe, Pierre J

    2014-12-15

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  16. High-resolution delineation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds in a dipping, fractured mudstone: depth- and strata-dependent spatial variability from rock-core sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Daniel J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Lacombe, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of rock-core sampling and chlorinated volatile organic compound (CVOC) analysis at five coreholes, with hydraulic and water-quality monitoring and a detailed hydrogeologic framework, was used to characterize the fine-scale distribution of CVOCs in dipping, fractured mudstones of the Lockatong Formation of Triassic age, of the Newark Basin in West Trenton, New Jersey. From these results, a refined conceptual model for more than 55 years of migration of CVOCs and depth- and strata-dependent rock-matrix contamination was developed. Industrial use of trichloroethene (TCE) at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) from 1953 to 1995 resulted in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) TCE and dissolved TCE and related breakdown products, including other CVOCs, in underlying mudstones. Shallow highly weathered and fractured strata overlie unweathered, gently dipping, fractured strata that become progressively less fractured with depth. The unweathered lithology includes black highly fractured (fissile) carbon-rich strata, gray mildly fractured thinly layered (laminated) strata, and light-gray weakly fractured massive strata. CVOC concentrations in water samples pumped from the shallow weathered and highly fractured strata remain elevated near residual DNAPL TCE, but dilution by uncontaminated recharge, and other natural and engineered attenuation processes, have substantially reduced concentrations along flow paths removed from sources and residual DNAPL. CVOCs also were detected in most rock-core samples in source areas in shallow wells. In many locations, lower aqueous concentrations, compared to rock core concentrations, suggest that CVOCs are presently back-diffusing from the rock matrix. Below the weathered and highly fractured strata, and to depths of at least 50 meters (m), groundwater flow and contaminant transport is primarily in bedding-plane-oriented fractures in thin fissile high-carbon strata, and in fractured, laminated strata of the gently

  17. PTEN loss and chromosome 8 alterations in Gleason grade 3 prostate cancer cores predicts the presence of un-sampled grade 4 tumor: implications for active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trock, Bruce J; Fedor, Helen; Gurel, Bora; Jenkins, Robert B; Knudsen, B S; Fine, Samson W; Said, Jonathan W; Carter, H Ballentine; Lotan, Tamara L; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2016-07-01

    Men who enter active surveillance because their biopsy exhibits only Gleason grade 3 (G3) frequently have higher grade tumor missed by biopsy. Thus, biomarkers are needed that, when measured on G3 tissue, can predict the presence of higher grade tumor in the whole prostate. We evaluated whether PTEN loss, chromosome 8q gain (MYC) and/or 8p loss (LPL) measured only on G3 cores is associated with un-sampled G4 tumor. A tissue microarray was constructed of prostatectomy tissue from patients whose prostates exhibited only Gleason score 3+3, only 3+4 or only 4+3 tumor (n=50 per group). Cores sampled only from areas of G3 were evaluated for PTEN loss by immunohistochemistry, and PTEN deletion, LPL/8p loss and MYC/8q gain by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Biomarker results were compared between Gleason score 6 vs 7 tumors using conditional logistic regression. PTEN protein loss, odds ratio=4.99, P=0.033; MYC/8q gain, odds ratio=5.36, P=0.010; and LPL/8p loss, odds ratio=3.96, P=0.003 were significantly more common in G3 cores derived from Gleason 7 vs Gleason 6 tumors. PTEN gene deletion was not statistically significant. Associations were stronger comparing Gleason 4+3 vs 6 than for Gleason 3+4 vs 6. MYC/8q gain, LPL/8p loss and PTEN protein loss measured in G3 tissue microarray cores strongly differentiate whether the core comes from a Gleason 6 or Gleason 7 tumor. If validated to predict upgrading from G3 biopsy to prostatectomy these biomarkers could reduce the likelihood of enrolling high-risk men and facilitate safe patient selection for active surveillance.

  18. A core invasiveness gene signature reflects epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition but not metastatic potential in breast cancer cell lines and tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike Marsan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Metastases remain the primary cause of cancer-related death. The acquisition of invasive tumour cell behaviour is thought to be a cornerstone of the metastatic cascade. Therefore, gene signatures related to invasiveness could aid in stratifying patients according to their prognostic profile. In the present study we aimed at identifying an invasiveness gene signature and investigated its biological relevance in breast cancer. METHODS & RESULTS: We collected a set of published gene signatures related to cell motility and invasion. Using this collection, we identified 16 genes that were represented at a higher frequency than observed by coincidence, hereafter named the core invasiveness gene signature. Principal component analysis showed that these overrepresented genes were able to segregate invasive and non-invasive breast cancer cell lines, outperforming sets of 16 randomly selected genes (all P<0.001. When applied onto additional data sets, the expression of the core invasiveness gene signature was significantly elevated in cell lines forced to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The link between core invasiveness gene expression and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was also confirmed in a dataset consisting of 2420 human breast cancer samples. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that CIG expression is not associated with a shorter distant metastasis free survival interval (HR = 0.956, 95%C.I. = 0.896-1.019, P = 0.186. DISCUSSION: These data demonstrate that we have identified a set of core invasiveness genes, the expression of which is associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines and in human tissue samples. Despite the connection between epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasive tumour cell behaviour, we were unable to demonstrate a link between the core invasiveness gene signature and enhanced metastatic potential.

  19. Evolution of pore space in sandstones in relation to diagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G.

    1982-01-01

    Results are described from studying the collector properties of a bed of sandstones of Yan-10 at the oil field Malin of the Ordosskiy oil and gas basin. The bed is represented by ancient river sandstones of the Jurassic age occurring on eroded surface of the Triassic deposits (Yangan series) and covered with bed of coal deposits Yan-9. The following conclusions were drawn from the results of the studies. Evolution of the pore space actually is the process of gradual substitution of the primary pores by secondary; in this case decrease in porosity in the quartz sandstones occurs mainly because of depositing in the pores of authigenic minerals, and in the sandstones whose grains consist of minerals with lower mechanical strength, because of packing. Secondary porosity develops because of dissolving and kaolinization in the sandstones with high content of feldspars. This process is possibly associated with decarboxilation of organic matter of interlayers of coal and calcareous shales under the influence of increased temperature in the submersion process. Since it has been established that considerable influence on porosity comes from the mineralogical position of the sandstones controlled by the sources of formation, in order to reveal the zones for development of primary and secondary porosity, it is very important to reveal the sources of removal of detrital rocks. A study was also made of the influence of diagenesis on uniformity and texture of the sandstones (by the methods of curves of capillary pressure).

  20. Fluid migration through sandstone fractures in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Albert; Blake, David; Bristow, Thomas; Chipera, Steve; Downs, Robert; Gellert, Ralf; Grotzinger, John P.; Ming, Doug; Morris, Richard; Morrison, Shaunna; Rampe, Liz; Thompson, Lucy; Treiman, Allan; Vaniman, David; MSL Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Curiosity Mars rover encountered numerous occurrences of light-toned fractures in lithified sediments along its traverse in Gale Crater. These alteration zones can be traced for tens of meters across the landscape and are generally less than a meter in width. Two of these features were investigated in detail by the rover instruments, including drilling to acquire samples both within and immediately outside the lighter-toned areas.The chemical composition established by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) on the arm of the rover shows that the alteration zones are significantly enhanced in silica (40% increase) and sulfur (factor of ~5) relative to the surrounding rocks. Concentrations of Fe, Mg, Al, Mn, Ni and Zn are reduced by a factor of two or more. The correlation between Ca and SO3 indicates the presence of Ca-sulfates, but with up to 15% SO3 (and only 6% to 9% CaO) in the APXS data, the presence of Mg and Fe sulfates in the altered fractures is likely.The Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) X-ray diffraction instrument analyzed the drill fines and found mostly plagioclase feldspar, pyroxenes and magnetite in the unaltered sandstones. X-ray amorphous material and minor hematite and Ca-sulfates are also present. Samples from the alteration zones, however, show a factor of two decrease in the pyroxene to feldspar ratio, abundant Ca-sulfates in various hydration states, and a majority fraction of amorphous material rich in silica and mixed-cation sulfates.The direct comparison of samples within and adjacent to the light toned fractures indicates an alteration process involving the dissolution of pyroxenes and removal of metal cations. The mobility of Al and the likely presence of Fe-sulfates suggest alteration in an acidic environment, but additional moderate pH episodes cannot be ruled out. These features post-date the sandstone lithification and are among the youngest fluid events studied thus far in Gale Crater.

  1. Relationships between stylolites and cementation in sandstone reservoirs: Examples from the North Sea, U.K. and East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Martin; Parnell, John

    2007-01-01

    The reservoir potential of hydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs may be significantly reduced by compartmentation as a result of the development of stylolites. A petrographic and fluid inclusion microthermometric study was performed on sandstones containing abundant stylolites from the Buchan, Galley and Scott Fields in the Outer Moray Firth, offshore Scotland, and from a palaeo-oil bearing sequence in East Greenland. The main objective of this study was to further constrain the temperatures and burial depths at which stylolitization occurs in sandstone reservoirs. The sandstones containing abundant stylolites are also characterized by their highly cemented nature. Numerous occurrences of quartz overgrowths clearly truncated by sutured stylolites are evident in all of the samples. Fluid inclusion microthermometry reveals that quartz cementation, which is interpreted to be coeval with stylolitization, occurred at minimum temperatures of between 86 and 136 °C. Basin modelling of the Scott and Galley Fields indicates that quartz cementation and stylolite development formed at depths greater than 2.5 km which were attained during rapid Tertiary burial. The occurrence of hydrocarbon fluid inclusions within healed microfractures orientated at high angles to the stylolites suggests that these microfractures provided pathways for hydrocarbon migration in the highly cemented, low permeability zones associated with highly stylolitized sandstones.

  2. Microfabric and anisotropy of elastic waves in sandstone - An observation using high-resolution X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Hinkes, Robert; Feeser, Volker; Holzheid, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Petrophysical experiments, using acoustic velocities to characterise anisotropies of mechanical behaviour of rocks are of essential relevance to understand the geomechanical behaviour of sandstone reservoirs under changing stress fields. Here, we present high-resolution X-ray microtomography (μ-CT) as a supplementary research tool to interpret anisotropic ultrasound velocities in sandstones with variation of isotopic stress. Specimens of two Lower Cretaceous sandstones (localities Bentheim and Obernkirchen, both Germany) have been used in petrophysical laboratory experiments under dry conditions to study ultrasonic sound velocities (frequency of signal input 1 MHz). Subsequently, oriented micro-plugs drilled from the sandstone samples were investigated using high-resolution X-ray microtomography. By means of image processing of the reconstructed scan images, geometric attributes such as mean structural thickness, orientation and tortuosity were evaluated from the μ-CT data for both pore space and grain skeleton. Our observations clearly indicate the different roles of pore space and grain skeleton in regard to the propagation of ultrasonic waves: because the pores do not transmit the waves, it was sufficient to investigate the average thickness of this fabric element. In contrast, as the ultrasonic waves traverse the rock via the adjacent grains, it was necessary to survey the actual travel lengths of seismic waves in the sandstone grain skeleton.

  3. Impedance imaging in core analysis. Imaging of phase distributions in samples of natural cores of North Sea chalk containing conducting as well as non-conducting fluids. Part: 1-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laursen, S. [DTU, Inst. for Kemi (Denmark)] Moeller Nielsen, C. [DTU, Inst. for Energiteknik (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    The present report documents the efforts to develop an impedance method for determining the distribution of the water saturation in a chalk core sample. Measurement of this distribution during a displacement process will make it possible to make numerical simulations of the process which may in turn reveal important rock parameters. The impedance method is one among other methods to determine saturation profiles in a research programme on rock parameters with participants from Danmarks Tekniske Universitet, DTU, and Danmarks og Groenlands Geologiske Undersoegelse, GEUS. The other methods investigated are nmr-scanning and {gamma}-logging. (au)

  4. Heat flow characterization and baseline of sandstone using infra-red thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Y.; Padmanabhan, E.; Ano, A. B.; Ismail, W.

    2016-11-01

    Infra-red thermography was applied to sandstone to characterize and obtain a baseline or a reference thermal image for sandstone. The sample was imaged at room temperature and then heated and imaged again at different time intervals. The thermal images and the optical gradient obtained were analyzed, calibrated, and equated to actual-temperature measured geothermal gradient under controlled heat flux. Heat flow propagation is not consistent in the first time intervals (below 25 minutes). However, after that, the difference in temperature in the distal part and the proximal parts to the heat source almost remained constant. In general, the heat flow could fit to a linear model that is directly proportional to time. The results can be useful when applied to borehole thermal imaging, as well as in thermal conductivity and geothermal gradient determination.

  5. Partially restricted diffusion in a permeable sandstone: observations by stimulated echo PFG NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordham, E J; Gibbs, S J; Hall, L D

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrate a variant, insensitive to eddy current effects, of an alternating pulsed field gradient technique designed to null the effect of background gradients in liquid-saturated porous media, using a 38 mm diameter sample of a natural sandstone. Measurements of the effective diffusivity confirm predictions of a decline as the square root of an effective diffusion time. A value of the ratio S/Vp for the dominant pores is extracted, yielding with T1 a value for the surface relaxivity. We test also a geometry-dependent data collapse recently suggested for a range of diffusion times and wavenumbers. The data agree with a sheet-like pore model for this granular sandstone, and fail to agree with a tube-like model; a pore length scale is also extracted.

  6. Note on the temporal relationships between sandstone compaction and precipitation of authigenic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, William; Dahl, Jeremy

    1990-11-01

    Several diagenetic minerals (i.e., calcite, kaolinite, illite/smectite, dolomite, quartz and chlorite) are present in the sandstones of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation (Miocene, southern Italy), but calcite and kaolinite are the only major cementing agents. Textural characteristics of calcite- and kaolinite-cemented sandstones are markedly different. Calcite-cemented samples have an average packing density of 82%, and most grains touch each other tangentially. On the other hand, kaolinite-cemented samples are closely packed (average packing density = 95%), and most commonly display long and concavo-convex intergranular contacts. Textural and geochemical data show that calcite precipitated during progressive burial of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation over temperatures ranging from 39° to 81°C ( δ18O PDB = -5 to -11%), while kaolinite represents the latest cementation episode. Sandstones of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation illustrate effectively the combined effects of compaction and cementation during progressive burial. Early formation of carbonate cement prevented further compaction, whereas the remaining uncemented portions underwent severe compaction before later precipitation of kaolinite cement.

  7. Absolute kinematics of radio-source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample. IV. Proper motions of the radio cores over a decade and spectral properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vidal, I.; Abellán, F. J.; Marcaide, J. M.; Guirado, J. C.; Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Ros, E.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out a high-precision astrometric analysis of two very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI) epochs of observation of the 13 extragalactic radio sources in the complete S5 polar cap sample. The VLBI epochs span a time baseline of ten years and enable us to achieve precisions in the proper motions of the source cores up to a few micro-arcseconds per year. The observations were performed at 14.4 GHz and 43.1 GHz, and enable us to estimate the frequency core-shifts in a subset of sources, for which the spectral-index distributions can be computed. We study the source-position stability by analysing the changes in the relative positions of fiducial source points (the jet cores) over a decade. We find motions of 0.1-0.9 mas among close-by sources between the two epochs, which imply drifts in the jet cores of approximately a few tens of μas per year. These results have implications for the standard Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jet model (where the core locations are supposed to be stable in time). For one of our sources, 0615+820, the morphological and spectral properties in year 2010, as well as the relative astrometry between years 2000 and 2010, suggest the possibility of either a strong parsec-scale interaction of the AGN jet with the ISM, a gravitational lens with 1 mas diameter, or a resolved massive binary black hole. Reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A27

  8. Diagnosis of Ovarian Carcinoma Histotype Based on Limited Sampling: A Prospective Study Comparing Cytology, Frozen Section, and Core Biopsies to Full Pathologic Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Lien N; Zachara, Susanna; Soma, Anita; Köbel, Martin; Lee, Cheng-Han; McAlpine, Jessica N; Huntsman, David; Thomson, Thomas; van Niekerk, Dirk; Singh, Naveena; Gilks, C Blake

    2015-11-01

    Growing insights into the biological features and molecular underpinnings of ovarian cancer has prompted a shift toward histotype-specific treatments and clinical trials. As a result, the preoperative diagnosis of ovarian carcinomas based on small tissue sampling is rapidly gaining importance. The data on the accuracy of ovarian carcinoma histotype-specific diagnosis based on small tissue samples, however, remains very limited in the literature. Herein, we describe a prospective series of 30 ovarian tumors diagnosed using cytology, frozen section, core needle biopsy, and immunohistochemistry (p53, p16, WT1, HNF-1β, ARID1A, TFF3, vimentin, and PR). The accuracy of histotype diagnosis using each of these modalities was 52%, 81%, 85%, and 84% respectively, using the final pathology report as the reference standard. The accuracy of histotype diagnosis using the Calculator for Ovarian Subtype Prediction (COSP), which evaluates immunohistochemical stains independent of histopathologic features, was 85%. Diagnostic accuracy varied across histotype and was lowest for endometrioid carcinoma across all diagnostic modalities (54%). High-grade serous carcinomas were the most overdiagnosed on core needle biopsy (accounting for 45% of misdiagnoses) and clear cell carcinomas the most overdiagnosed on frozen section (accounting for 36% of misdiagnoses). On core needle biopsy, 2/30 (7%) cases had a higher grade lesion missed due to sampling limitations. In this study, we identify several challenges in the diagnosis of ovarian tumors based on limited tissue sampling. Recognition of these scenarios can help improve diagnostic accuracy as we move forward with histotype-specific therapeutic strategies.

  9. Refuge Management Plan: Sandstone Unit Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Part I of this management plan for the Sandstone Unit of Rice Lake NWR summarizes background information on the location, history, environment, resources,...

  10. Study on the cutting plane friction law of sandstone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Ying-da (翟英达); KANG Li-xun(康立勋)

    2003-01-01

    The friction characteristics of rock damage plane have important impact on the stability of block structure formed after the stratum is broken. The mechanics properties of rock damage plane are described by parameters such as roughness coefficient, wall compress strength and basic friction angle. These three coefficients for fine grain sandstone and medium-granular sandstone and grit sandstone are test. The friction stress is researched at the condition of different normal compressive stress acting on the tension damage plane. The friction law of tension damage plane of sandstone abided by is summed up. This law will provide scientific basis for block structure stability judging in basic roof stratum and roof pressure intensity calculating.

  11. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF UPPER DEVONIAN GORDON SANDSTONE, JACKSONBURG STRINGTOWN OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN WEST VIRGINIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Ameri; K. Aminian; K.L. Avary; H.I. Bilgesu; M.E. Hohn; R.R. McDowell; D.L. Matchen

    2001-07-01

    The Jacksonburg-Stringtown oil field contained an estimated 88,500,000 barrels of oil in place, of which approximately 20,000,000 barrels were produced during primary recovery operations. A gas injection project, initiated in 1934, and a pilot waterflood, begun in 1981, yielded additional production from limited portions of the field. The pilot was successful enough to warrant development of a full-scale waterflood in 1990, involving approximately 8,900 acres in three units, with a target of 1,500 barrels of oil per acre recovery. Historical patterns of drilling and development within the field suggests that the Gordon reservoir is heterogeneous, and that detailed reservoir characterization is necessary for understanding well performance and addressing problems observed by the operators. The purpose of this work is to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production. Conventional stratigraphic correlation and core description shows that the Gordon sandstone is composed of three parasequences, formed along the Late Devonian shoreline of the Appalachian Basin. The parasequences comprise five lithofacies, of which one includes reservoir sandstones. Pay sandstones were found to have permeabilities in core ranging from 10 to 200 mD, whereas non-pay sandstones have permeabilities ranging from below the level of instrumental detection to 5 mD; Conglomeratic zones could take on the permeability characteristics of enclosing materials, or could exhibit extremely low values in pay sandstone and high values in non-pay or low permeability pay sandstone. Four electrofacies based on a linear combination of density and scaled gamma ray best matched correlations made independently based on visual comparison of geophysical logs. Electrofacies 4 with relatively high permeability (mean value > 45 mD) was

  12. 22-gauge core vs 22-gauge aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of abdominal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterlacci, William; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Veits, Lothar; Gönüllü, Pervin; Schachschal, Guido; Groth, Stefan; Anders, Mario; Kontos, Christos K; Topalidis, Theodoros; Hinsch, Andrea; Vieth, Michael; Rösch, Thomas; Denzer, Ulrike W

    2016-10-21

    To compare the aspiration needle (AN) and core biopsy needle (PC) in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of abdominal masses. Consecutive patients referred for EUS-FNA were included in this prospective single-center trial. Each patient underwent a puncture of the lesion with both standard 22-gauge (G) AN (Echo Tip Ultra; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) and the novel 22G PC (EchoTip ProCore; Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, United States) in a randomized fashion; histology was attempted in the PC group only. The main study endpoint was the overall diagnostic accuracy, including the contribution of histology to the final diagnosis. Secondary outcome measures included material adequacy, number of needle passes, and complications. Fifty six consecutive patients (29 men; mean age 68 years) with pancreatic lesions (n = 38), lymphadenopathy (n = 13), submucosal tumors (n = 4), or others lesions (n = 1) underwent EUS-FNA using both of the needles in a randomized order. AN and PC reached similar overall results for diagnostic accuracy (AN: 88.9 vs PC: 96.1, P = 0.25), specimen adequacy (AN: 96.4% vs PC: 91.1%, P = 0.38), mean number of passes (AN: 1.5 vs PC: 1.7, P = 0.14), mean cellularity score (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.1, P = 0.058), and complications (none). A diagnosis on the basis of histology was achieved in the PC group in 36 (64.3%) patients, and in 2 of those as the sole modality. In patients with available histology the mean cellularity score was higher for AN (AN: 1.7 vs PC: 1.0, P = 0.034); no other differences were of statistical significance. Both needles achieved high overall diagnostic yields and similar performance characteristics for cytological diagnosis; histological analysis was only possible in 2/3 of cases with the new needle.

  13. Sandstone petrofacies in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas, J.; Ochoa, M; R Mas; Arribas, Mª E.; González-Acebrón, L.

    2007-01-01

    [EN] During the most active rifting stages in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin (Cameros Basin and Aragonese Branch of the Iberian Range), thick sequences of continental clastic deposits were generated. Sandstone records from Rift cycle 1 (Permo-Triassic) and Rift cycle 2 (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) show similarities in composition. Based on the most recent data, this paper describes sandstone petrofacies developed during both rifting periods. Six petrofacies can be d...

  14. Sandstone petrofacies in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas Mocoroa, José; Ochoa, M; Mas Mayoral, José Ramón; Arribas Mocoroa, María Eugenia; González-Acebrón, L.

    2007-01-01

    During the most active rifting stages in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin (Cameros Basin and Aragonese Branch of the Iberian Range), thick sequences of continental clastic deposits were generated. Sandstone records from Rift cycle 1 (Permo-Triassic) and Rift cycle 2 (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) show similarities in composition. Based on the most recent data, this paper describes sandstone petrofacies developed during both rifting periods. Six petrofacies can be distinguishe...

  15. Micropore Structure Representation of Sandstone in Petroleum Reservoirs Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yong-Qiang; ZHU Xing; WU Jun-Zheng; BAI Wen-Guang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The pore structure of sandstone in an oil reservoir is investigated using atomic force microscopy(AFM).At nanoscale resolution,AFM images of sandstone show us the fine structure.The real height data of images display the three-dimensional space structure of sandstone effectively.The three-dimensional analysis results show that the AFM images of sandstone have unique characteristics that,like fingerprints,can identify different structural properties of sandstones.The results demonstrate that AFM is an effective method used to represent original sandstone in petroleum reservoirs,and may help geologists to appreciate the sandstone in oil reservoirs fully.

  16. Laboratory Analysis of Acoustic Emission Associated with the Hydraulic Fracturing of Sandstone Samples. The Problem of Fracture Location Étude au laboratoire de l'émission acoustique associée à la fracturation hydraulique d'échantillons de grès. Le problème de la localisation de la fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deflandre J. P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission associated with the hydraulic fracturing of sandstone samples (dry or saturated was investigated in the laboratory. The emission sources were located by triangulation from the differences in arrival time of the compressional wave at four sensors. On this experimental scale, the attenuation and dispersion factors, and the anisotropic character of the medium influence the choice of the method for measuring Delta t. For the same reason, the time measurements must be corrected for instrumentation effects. The velocity anisotropy of the medium is also taken into account for a simple geometric representation (ellipsoid. A comparison of the location results with the survey of the fracture after the test shows that the emission sources are located in the fracture plane. The tests also reveal a close correlation between acoustic activity and fracture behavior. The initiation and propagation of the fracture are accompanied by few events only, whereas the closure is characterized by very strong acoustic activity. Two types of event were observed, and those corresponding to the propagation of the fracture appear to confirm a tensile fracture mode. L'émission acoustique associée à la fracturation hydraulique d'échantillons de grès (secs ou saturés a été étudiée au laboratoire. Les sources d'émission sont localisées par triangulation à partir des différences de temps d'arrivée de l'onde de compression sur quatre capteurs. A cette échelle expérimentale, les phénomènes d'atténuation et de dispersion ainsi que le caractère anisotrope du milieu influent sur le choix de la méthode de mesure des Delta t. Pour cette même raison, les mesures de temps doivent être corrigées des effets de l'instrumentation. L'anisotropie de vitesse du milieu est également prise en compte dans le cas d'une représentation géométrique simple (ellipsoïde. La comparaison des résultats de la localisation avec le relevé de la fracture après l

  17. Diagenesis Along Fractures in an Eolian Sandstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Yen, A. S.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Downs, R.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Sutter, B.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring sedimentary deposits in Gale crater since August 2012. The rover has traversed up section through approx.100 m of sedimentary rocks deposited in fluvial, deltaic, lacustrine, and eolian environments (Bradbury group and overlying Mount Sharp group). The Stimson formation lies unconformable over a lacustrine mudstone at the base of the Mount Sharp group and has been interpreted to be a cross-bedded sandstone of lithified eolian dunes. Mineralogy of the unaltered Stimson sandstone consists of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxenes, and magnetite with minor abundances of hematite, and Ca-sulfates (anhydrite, bassanite). Unaltered sandstone has a composition similar to the average Mars crustal composition. Alteration "halos" occur adjacent to fractures in the Stimson. Fluids passing through these fractures have altered the chemistry and mineralogy of the sandstone. Silicon and S enrichments and depletions in Al, Fe, Mg, Na, K, Ni and Mn suggest aqueous alteration in an open hydrologic system. Mineralogy of the altered Stimson is dominated by Ca-sulfates, Si-rich X-ray amorphous materials along with plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and pyroxenes, but less abundant in the altered compared to the unaltered Stimson sandstone and lower pyroxene/plagioclase feldspar. The mineralogy and geochemistry of the altered sandstone suggest a complicated history with several (many?) episodes of aqueous alteration under a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., acidic, alkaline).

  18. Key Elements Controlling Oil Accumulation within the Tight Sandstones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Hu; Zhiping Zeng; Jianzhang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Tight oil sandstone reservoirs with low porosity and permeability, which are an uncon-ventional petroleum resource, have been discovered in the Jurassic intervals of the central Junggar Ba-sin, the northwestern China. To reveal the accumulation mechanism, a relatively comprehensive re-search was conducted, including oil-source correlation, porosity evolution, and hydrocarbon charging history. The results show that crude oil of these tight sandstone reservoirs were mainly from Permian source rocks with some contribution from Jurassic source rocks. The reservoirs were buried at shallow depth (5%). In contrast, the sandstone reservoir had already become tight and did not provide available space to ac-cumulate oil due to severe compaction and cementation when hydrocarbon from Jurassic source rock filled, evidenced by low GOI values (<5%). Therefore, reservoir porosity controls the oil accumulation within tight sandstone. Whether tight sandstone reservoirs accumulate oil depends on the reservoir quality when hydrocarbons charge. Before the exploration of tight oil sandstone reservoirs, it should be required to investigate the relationship between oil charging history and porosity evolution to reduce the exploration risk and figure out the available targets.

  19. Petroacoustic Modelling of Heterolithic Sandstone Reservoirs: A Novel Approach to Gassmann Modelling Incorporating Sedimentological Constraints and NMR Porosity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Lovell, M.; Davies, S. J.; Pritchard, T.; Sirju, C.; Abdelkarim, A.

    2012-12-01

    includes a capillary bound water porosity component, is used. The novel approach attempts to better address this assumption through incorporation of NMR porosity data which distinguishes between bound water and free (movable) fluid components of porosity. The simplistic approach to heterolithic sandstone sedimentology, with poor linkage between petrophysical and sedimentological analyses and ignorance of model caveats, compounds petroacoustic modelling issues. This research uses a single well dataset comprising a log suite including NMR and OBMI data, together with extensive core data including core-NMR, SEM images and detailed sedimentological analysis. Integration of log and core data enables better insight to the key sedimentological properties influencing reservoir elastic properties. This approach improves understanding of key sedimentological properties affecting acoustic propagation in heterolithic sandstones and in turn provides better models for describing these important reservoirs. This contributes to enhanced seismic data interpretation of reservoir properties, including fluid saturations, during exploration and development phases.

  20. Structural diagenesis in Upper Carboniferous tight gas sandstones. Lessons learned from the Piesberg analog study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steindorf, P.; Hoehne, M.; Becker, S.; Hilgers, C. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR); Koehrer, B. [Wintershall Holding GmbH, Barnstorf (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    Upper Carboniferous tight gas sandstone reservoirs in NW-Germany consist of thick successions of cyclothems. Our focus is the Westphalian D of the Piesberg quarry near Osnabrueck, which exposes cemented, faulted and jointed third-order coarse- to fine-grained sandstone cycles separated by anthracite coal seams. We characterize the rocks and the lateral variation of rock properties such as porosity to better constrain input data for reservoir modelling. Three cycles are exposed, each approximately 50 m thick. Rock types can be clearly distinguished by spectral gamma ray in the quarry. Sandstones are intensely compacted and cemented with quartz and generally characterized by low porosities < 8 % (Hepycnometry on plugs and cuttings). Porosities are secondary and mainly related to detrital carbonate dissolution. Around faults dissolution is higher and the porosities can increase to up to 25%. The normal faults show different throws in the quarry and bands of shale and coal have smeared into the fault at juxtaposed beds, which may result in compartments. They dominantly strike W-E and NNW-SSE, but subordinate NE-SW striking fault patterns are also present. Joints were analyzed in a 50 x 50 m section of the quarry wall using Lidar (Light detection and ranging) laser scanning, which allows the characterization of the lithology and quantitative measurement of bedding and fracture orientation data in inaccessible areas. NNE-SSW and W-E joint sets are accompanied by northeasterly and northwesterly striking sets. Around faults, fault planes and fractures are cemented with quartz veins, showing localized mass transport. Due to the intense cementation, the sandstones can reach uniaxial strengths of more than 100 MPa normal to bedding, and approximately 50 MPa parallel to bedding. Sandstone beds within and close to faults are leached by fluids, and their uniaxial strength is reduced by a factor of more than two. Our high resolution field data enables a better understanding of

  1. Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

    2011-05-01

    This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

  2. Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS) and its application to analysis of Δ17O(CO2) from small air samples collected with an AirCore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janina Mrozek, Dorota; van der Veen, Carina; Hofmann, Magdalena E. G.; Chen, Huilin; Kivi, Rigel; Heikkinen, Pauli; Röckmann, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present the set-up and a scientific application of the Stratospheric Air Sub-sampler (SAS), a device to collect and to store the vertical profile of air collected with an AirCore (Karion et al., 2010) in numerous sub-samples for later analysis in the laboratory. The SAS described here is a 20 m long 1/4 inch stainless steel tubing that is separated by eleven valves to divide the tubing into 10 identical segments, but it can be easily adapted to collect smaller or larger samples. In the collection phase the SAS is directly connected to the outlet of an optical analyzer that measures the mole fractions of CO2, CH4 and CO from an AirCore sampler. The stratospheric part (or if desired any part of the AirCore air) is then directed through the SAS. When the SAS is filled with the selected air, the valves are closed and the vertical profile is maintained in the different segments of the SAS. The segments can later be analysed to retrieve vertical profiles of other trace gas signatures that require slower instrumentation. As an application, we describe the coupling of the SAS to an analytical system to determine the 17O excess of CO2, which is a tracer for photochemical processing of stratospheric air. For this purpose the analytical system described by Mrozek et al. (2015) was adapted for analysis of air directly from the SAS. The performance of the coupled system is demonstrated for a set of air samples from an AirCore flight in November 2014 near Sodankylä, Finland. The standard error for a 25 mL air sample at stratospheric CO2 mole fraction is 0.56 ‰ (1σ) for δ17O and 0.03 ‰ (1σ) for both δ18O and δ13C. Measured Δ17O(CO2) values show a clear correlation with N2O in agreement with already published data.

  3. Mineral changes in cement-sandstone matrices induced by biocementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Thurber, A. R. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences; Alleau, Y. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences; Koley, D. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Science; Colwell, F. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences; Torres, M. E. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    2016-04-01

    Prevention of wellbore CO2 leakage is a critical component of any successful carbon capture, utilization, and storage program. Sporosarcina pasteurii is a bacterium that has demonstrated the potential ability to seal a compromised wellbore through the enzymatic precipitation of CaCO3. In this paper, we investigate the growth of S. pasteurii in a synthetic brine that mimics the Illinois Basin and on Mt. Simon sandstone encased in Class H Portland cement under high pressure and supercritical CO2 (PCO2) conditions. The bacterium grew optimum at 30 °C compared to 40 °C under ambient and high pressure (10 MPa) conditions; and growth was comparable in experiments at high PCO2. Sporosarcina pasteurii actively induced the biomineralization of CaCO3 polymorphs and MgCa(CO3)2 in both ambient and high pressure conditions as observed in electron microscopy. In contrast, abiotic (non-biological) samples exposed to CO2 resulted in the formation of surficial vaterite and calcite. Finally, the ability of S. pasteurii to grow under subsurface conditions may be a promising mechanism to enhance wellbore integrity.

  4. Potential bacterial core species associated with digital dermatitis in cattle herds identified by molecular profiling of interdigital skin samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Strube, Mikael Lenz; Isbrand, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Although treponemes are consistently identified in tissue from bovine digital dermatitis (DD) lesions, the definitive etiology of this debilitating polymicrobial disease is still unresolved. To study the microbiomes of 27 DD-infected and 10 healthy interdigital skin samples, we used a combination...

  5. New core@shell nanogel based 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulfonic acid for preconcentration of Pb(II) from various water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoueir, Kamel Rizq; Akl, Magda Ali; Sarhan, Ali Ali; Atta, Ayman Mohamdy

    2016-12-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) core coated with poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) shell to produce well-define PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) core shell nanogels with a core of 25 ± 0.5 nm and shell of 5 ± 0.5 nm. The synthetic approach was produced by a surfactant free emulsion polymerization (SFEP). The specific area was found to be 1685.8 m2/g. The nanogels were studied in a batch adsorption for removal of Pb(II) ions and characterized by SEM, TEM, TGA and BET measurements. The results showed that the adsorption equilibrium data fitted the Langmuir isotherm and the kinetic studies are well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The Pb(II) maximum adsorption was 510.2 (mg/g) for PVA@P(90AMPS-co-10NIPAm) (wt.: wt%). The PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) nanogels were applied for extracting of Pb(II) in real different environmental water samples successfully with high recoveries reaches 104.4%.

  6. Pore-scaling Modeling of Physical Property Changes During CO2 Injection into Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keehm, Y.; Yoo, G.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is a green-house gas and is believed to be an important factor in global warming and climate change. Many countries around the world are working on reducing and sequestrating CO2 to follow international regulations. One of promising area for CO2 sequestration is the storage in geological formation. To accurately determine the performance of geological injection and storage, quantification and monitoring of the physical property changes are essential. In this paper, we are presenting a new approach for the monitoring of CO2 sequestration in sandstone using pore-scale simulation techniques. The method consists of three steps: 1) acquisition of high-resolution pore microstructures by X-ray micro-tomography; 2) CO2 injection simulation using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) two-phase flow simulation; and 3) FEM property simulations (electrical and elastic) at different CO2 saturations during the injection. We use three different sandstone samples: sand-pack, Berea sandstone, and B2 sandstone from offshore of Korea. The porosity of the sand-pack is 42% and that of two sandstone samples is around 17%. The digital pore structures were obtained by X-ray micro-tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 micron. The LB two-phase flow simulation is then conducted by injecting CO2 into fully water-saturated samples and gives a realistic movement of CO2 in the pore structure. At each CO2 saturation, electrical and elastic properties are determined by pore-scale FEM simulation techniques. The electrical conductivity decreases almost linearly as CO2 saturations increases; however, the P-wave velocity decrease more rapidly at the low CO2 saturation (up to 30%), than at higher saturation. S-wave velocity does not show any significant changes. The higher porosity rock shows more sensitivity to saturation changes. The modeling shows that we can have quantitative relations between physical properties and CO2 saturation, which can be used to determine injection performance and

  7. Siderite (FeCO3)—the Hidden (but Primary) Player in Iron Diagenesis of Non-Marine Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, D.; Kettler, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Siderite precipitates in reducing pore waters in which iron reduction exceeds sulfate reduction. Abundant siderite should be expected in non-marine strata in which a reductant was present. The Triassic Shinarump Member (Chinle Fm) and Cretaceous Dakota Fm are fluvial and contain siderite in outcrops of floodplain mudstones. Siderite is present in cores of Dakota channel sandstones. Rinded and jointed iron-oxide concretions, Wonderstone patterns, and rhombic, iron-oxide pseudomorphs are present in outcrops of these sandstones. Vascular plants growing on floodplains provided the reductant. Similar concretions, patterns, and pseudomorphs are present in outcropping eolian cross-strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone and in fluvial sandstone of the Cambrian Umm Ishrin Fm. Bleached sandstones indicate reductant was present in both units during late diagenesis. Because Jurassic deserts and Cambrian river systems lacked vascular plants, extra-formational methane was the likely reductant. We interpret the various iron-oxide-cemented phenomena of the Shinarump, Dakota, Navajo, and Umm Ishrin as products of siderite oxidation that accompanied exhumation. In the Navajo, large concretions are enclosed in thick sheaths of iron-oxide cement. Through-going horizontal and vertical joints cut sheaths. Outside concretion sheaths, joints are unassociated with iron-oxide cements, but inside the sheaths, thick cement zones are present on both sides of (still-open) joints. Joints were conduits for oxidizing water entering the concretions. Redox gradients formed on both sides of joints and iron oxide accumulated as Fe+2 diffused from dissolving siderite toward joints and O2 diffused away from joints. Horizontal joints formed <100 m from the land surface. Iron-oxide accumulations on the horizontal joints and on the vertical joints that abut them (see figure) are evidence that siderite oxidation is ongoing and linked to exhumation.

  8. Optical Image Analysis Applied to Pore Network Quantification of Sandstones Under Experimental CO2 Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrezueta, E.; González, L.; Ordóñez, B.; Luquot, L.; Quintana, L.; Gallastegui, G.; Martínez, R.; Olaya, P.; Breitner, D.

    2015-12-01

    This research aims to propose a protocol for pore network quantification in sandstones applying the Optical Image Analysis (OIA) procedure, which guarantees the measurement reproducibility and its reliability. Two geological formations of sandstone, located in Spain and potentially suitable for CO2 sequestration, were selected for this study: a) the Cretaceous Utrillas unit, at the base of the Cenozoic Duero Basin and b) a Triassic unit at the base of the Cenozoic Guadalquivir Basin. Sandstone samples were studied before and after the CO2 experimental injection using Optical and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), while the quantification of petrographic changes was done with OIA. The first phase of the rersearch consisted on a detailed mineralogical and petrographic study of the sandstones (before and after CO2-injection), for which we observed thin sections. Later, the methodological and experimental processes of the investigation were focused on i) adjustment and calibration of OIA tools; ii) data acquisition protocol based on image capture with different polarization conditions (synchronized movement of polarizers), using 7 images of the same mineral scene (6 in crossed polarizer and 1 in parallel polarizer); and iii) automated identification and segmentation of pore in 2D mineral images, generating applications by executable macros. Finally, once the procedure protocols had been, the compiled data was interpreted through an automated approach and the qualitative petrography was carried out. The quantification of changes in the pore network through OIA (porosity increase ≈ 2.5%) has allowed corroborate the descriptions obtained by SEM and microscopic techniques, which consisted in an increase in the porosity when CO2 treatment occurs. Automated-image identification and quantification of minerals, pores and textures together with petrographic analysis can be applied to improve pore system characterization in sedimentary rocks. This research offers numerical

  9. Pathogen detection in complex samples by quartz crystal microbalance sensor coupled to aptamer functionalized core-shell type magnetic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozalp, Veli C; Bayramoglu, Gulay; Erdem, Zehra; Arica, M Yakup

    2015-01-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance sensor (QCM) was developed for sensitive and specific detection of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium cells in food samples by integrating a magnetic bead purification system. Although many sensor formats based on bioaffinity agents have been developed for sensitive and specific detection of bacterial cells, the development of robust sensor applications for food samples remained a challenging issue. A viable strategy would be to integrate QCM to a pre-purification system. Here, we report a novel and sensitive high throughput strategy which combines an aptamer-based magnetic separation system for rapid enrichment of target pathogens and a QCM analysis for specific and real-time monitoring. As a proof-of-concept study, the integration of Salmonella binding aptamer immobilized magnetic beads to the aptamer-based QCM system was reported in order to develop a method for selective detection of Salmonella. Since our magnetic separation system can efficiently capture cells in a relatively short processing time (less than 10 min), feeding captured bacteria to a QCM flow cell system showed specific detection of Salmonella cells at 100 CFU mL(-1) from model food sample (i.e., milk). Subsequent treatment of the QCM crystal surface with NaOH solution regenerated the aptamer-sensor allowing each crystal to be used several times.

  10. Nitrate levels and the age of groundwater from the Upper Devonian sandstone aquifer in Fife, Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, G W; Anderson, J; Elliot, T

    2003-03-01

    The tritium concentrations in 13 groundwater samples from boreholes throughout the Upper Devonian sandstone aquifer of Fife have been measured. Due to atmospheric variations in tritium concentrations over the last century, this radioactive tracer can be used as a groundwater age indicator. In this study, the groundwater tritium concentrations have allowed for the area to be divided into three zones, and the variable chemistry of the groundwater samples, including the problem of recent elevated nitrate levels in the Fife Aquifer, has been interpreted in terms of their relative ages.

  11. Sandstone Diagenesis at Gale Crater, Mars, As Observed By Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebach, K. L.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McLennan, S. M.; Hurowitz, J.; Kah, L. C.; Edgett, K. S.; Williams, R. M. E.; Wiens, R. C.; Schieber, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, has encountered a significant number of poorly-sorted and very well-lithified sandstones along its traverse on the floor of Gale Crater. We use images from the hand-lens imager (MAHLI) and elemental chemistry from the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument (LIBS) and the alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer (APXS) to begin to constrain the diagenetic history of these sandstones, including lithification and possible later dissolution. Investigation of MAHLI images reveals that the sediments are poorly-sorted and show very low apparent porosity, generally less than ~5%. However, in some cases, such as the Gillespie Lake sandstone identified in Yellowknife Bay, this apparent porosity includes a significant fraction of void spaces larger than typical sediment grain sizes (~30% by number or 75% of void spaces by area). One possible explanation of these larger pits is that they represent recent removal of soft intraclasts by eolian abrasion. Another possibility is that later diagenetic fluids caused dissolution of more soluble grains, and production of secondary porosity. Investigation into the elemental chemistry of the sandstones has shown that they have a relatively unaltered basaltic bulk composition in spite of possessing a variety of secondary minerals and amorphous material, indicating isochemical diagenetic processes. The chemistry and mineralogy of the cement is not immediately evident based on the initial analyses; there is not a high percentage of salts or evaporative minerals that may easily cement near-surface sandstones. Furthermore, these sandstones lack textures and compositions consistent with pedogenic processes, such as calcrete, silcrete, or ferricrete. Instead, they may record burial and cementation at depth. Cement composition may be constrained through comparison to terrestrial basaltic sandstones, and studying chemical variations along ChemCam and APXS transects of the rocks.

  12. Online technique for isotope and mixing ratios of CH4, N2O, Xe and mixing ratios of organic trace gases on a single ice core sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schmitt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Polar ice cores enclosing trace gas species offer a unique archive to study changes in the past atmosphere and in terrestrial/marine source regions. Here we present a new online technique for ice core and air samples to measure a suite of isotope ratios and mixing ratios of trace gas species on a single small sample. Isotope ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide and xenon with reproducibilities for ice core samples of 0.15‰ for δ13C-CH4, 0.22‰ for δ15N-N2O, 0.34 ‰ for δ18O-N2O, and 0.05‰ for δ136Xe. Mixing ratios are determined on methane, nitrous oxide, xenon, ethane, propane, methyl chloride and dichloro-difluoromethane with reproducibilities of 7 ppb for CH4, 3 ppb for N2O, 50 ppt for 136Xe, 70 ppt for C2H6, 70 ppt for C3H8, 20 ppt for CH3Cl, and 2 ppt for CCl2F2. The system consists of a vacuum extraction device, a preconcentration unit and a gas chromatograph coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. CH4 is combusted to CO2 prior to detection while we bypassed the oven for all other species. The highly automated system uses only ~160 g ice, equivalent to ~16 mL air, which is less than previous methods. This large suite of parameters on a single ice sample is new and helpful to study phase relationships of parameters which are usually not measured together. A multi-parameter dataset is also key to understand in situ production processes of organic species in the ice, a critical issue observable in many organic trace gases. Novel is the determination of xenon isotope ratios using doubly charged Xe ions. The attained precision for δ136Xe is suitable to correct the isotopic ratios and mixing ratios for gravitational firn effects, with the benefit that this information is derived from the same sample. Lastly, anomalies in the Xe mixing ratio, δXe/air, can be used to detect melt layers.

  13. Effect of hydrocarbon to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) logging in tight sandstone reservoirs and method for hydrocarbon correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liang; Mao, Zhi-qiang; Xie, Xiu-hong

    2017-04-01

    It is crucial to understand the behavior of the T2 distribution in the presence of hydrocarbon to properly interpret pore size distribution from NMR logging. The NMR T2 spectrum is associated with pore throat radius distribution under fully brine saturated. However, when the pore space occupied by hydrocarbon, the shape of NMR spectrum is changed due to the bulk relaxation of hydrocarbon. In this study, to understand the effect of hydrocarbon to NMR logging, the kerosene and transformer oil are used to simulate borehole crude oils with different viscosity. 20 core samples, which were separately drilled from conventional, medium porosity and permeability and tight sands are saturated with four conditions of irreducible water saturation, fully saturated with brine, hydrocarbon-bearing condition and residual oil saturation, and the corresponding NMR experiments are applied to acquire NMR measurements. The residual oil saturation is used to simulate field NMR logging due to the shallow investigation depth of NMR logging. The NMR spectra with these conditions are compared, the results illustrate that for core samples drilled from tight sandstone reservoirs, the shape of NMR spectra have much change once they pore space occupied by hydrocarbon. The T2 distributions are wide, and they are bimodal due to the effect of bulk relaxation of hydrocarbon, even though the NMR spectra are unimodal under fully brine saturated. The location of the first peaks are similar with those of the irreducible water, and the second peaks are close to the bulk relaxation of viscosity oils. While for core samples drilled from conventional formations, the shape of T2 spectra have little changes. The T2 distributions overlap with each other under these three conditions of fully brine saturated, hydrocarbon-bearing and residual oil. Hence, in tight sandstone reservoirs, the shape of NMR logging should be corrected. In this study, based on the lab experiments, seven T2 times of 1ms, 3ms, 10ms, 33ms

  14. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  15. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: Process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.

    1996-04-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs have been established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste is being performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  16. Comparison of simulants to actual neutralized current acid waste: process and product testing of three NCAW core samples from Tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrey, E.V.; Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    A vitrification plant is planned to process the high-level waste (HLW) solids from Hanford Site tanks into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Programs were established within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) Project to test and model simulated waste to support design, feed processability, operations, permitting, safety, and waste-form qualification. Parallel testing with actual radioactive waste was performed on a laboratory-scale to confirm the validity of using simulants and glass property models developed from simulants. Laboratory-scale testing has been completed on three radioactive core samples from tanks 101-AZ and 102-AZ containing neutralized current acid waste (NCAW), which is one of the first waste types to be processed in the high-level waste vitrification plant under a privatization scenario. Properties of the radioactive waste measured during process and product testing were compared to simulant properties and model predictions to confirm the validity of simulant and glass property ,models work. This report includes results from the three NCAW core samples, comparable results from slurry and glass simulants, and comparisons to glass property model predictions.

  17. Oskarshamn site investigation. Hydrogeochemical monitoring programme for core and percussion drilled boreholes 2009. Summary of ground water chemistry results from spring and autumn sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regander, Claes; Bergman, Bo (Sweco Environment AB (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    This report summarises the results obtained in 2009 from the hydrogeochemical monitoring programme for core and percussion drilled boreholes. During 2009 groundwater sampling has been performed in monitored (permanently installed) boreholes in two sampling periods, spring (May-June), and autumn (October-November). Both in spring and autumn groundwater sampling was carried out in the following 12 sections; HLX28:2, HLX35:2, HLX37:1, HLX39:1, KLX08:4, KLX10:2, KLX10:5, KLX12A:2, KLX15A:3, KLX15A:6, KLX18A:3, KLX19A:3. The programme started in 2005 and since then water sampling has been performed twice every year. The objective of the hydrogeochemical monitoring programme is to determine the groundwater composition in selected sections chosen for this purpose. In 2009 the sampling of core drilled borehole sections has been conducted in time series, where each borehole section has been sampled at seven occasions. Percussion drilled borehole sections has been sampled at three occasions. The final sample in each section was taken when the electric conductivity had reached a stable level. Obtained results from the activities presented here include groundwater chemistry data in accordance with SKB chemistry class 5 including options and SKB chemistry reduced class 5. SKB chemistry reduced class 5 includes analysis of pH, electric conductivity, alkalinity, density, drill water (uranine), major cations (Chapter 5.4), F-, Br-, Cl-, SO{sub 4}2-, Fe(II)/Fe(tot), HS-, DOC, TOC and the isotopes delta2H, delta18O and 3H. Options for SKB chemistry class 5 include even lanthanoids and other trace elements, As, In, I, environmental metals, NH{sub 4}+, nutrient salts and the isotopes delta34S, delta37Cl, 87Sr/86Sr, 10B/11B, delta13C, 226Ra, 222Rn, 238U, 234U, 230Th and 232Th. All data from the activity are stored in the SICADA database

  18. Diagnostic value of core biopsy histology and cytology sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes using 21-gauge EBUS-TBNA needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Preyas J; Saha, Avinandan; Kate, Arvind H; Pandey, Kamlesh; Chavhan, Vinod B; Leuppi, Joerg D; Chhajed, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the initial modality of choice in sampling mediastinal lymphadenopathy. It is possible to obtain both cytological and histological samples using both 21-gauge and 22-gauge EBUS-TBNA needles. The current study was undertaken to compare the diagnostic yield of cytology and histology samples obtained by the same EBUS-TBNA 21-gauge needle. One hundred sixty-six consecutive patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA with a 21-gauge EBUS-TBNA needle over a period of 3 years were included in this retrospective analysis. The diagnostic yields of EBUS-TBNA histology (EBUS-TBNA-H) and EBUS-TBNA cytology (EBUS-TBNA-C) specimens were compared using the McNemar test. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA were 89% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of EBUS-TBNA were 100% and 53%, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA-H were 85% and 100%, respectively. The PPV and NPV of EBUS-TBNA-H were 100% and 43%, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA-C were 65% and 100%, respectively. The PPV and NPV of EBUS-TBNA-C were 100% and 14%, respectively. The diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA-H over EBUS-TBNA-C was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). EBUS-TBNA-H with 21-gauge needle significantly improves the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. EBUS-TBNA-H improves the NPV of EBUS-TBNA. The combination of EBUS-TBNA-H and EBUS-TBNA-C improves the overall diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA.

  19. Behaviour of layered sandstone under Brazilian test conditions:Layer orientation and shape effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbass Tavallali; André Vervoort

    2013-01-01

    The experimental study in this paper focuses on the effects of the layer orientation and sample shape on failure strength and fracture pattern of samples tested under Brazilian test conditions (i.e. diametrical loading of cylindrical discs) for one particular layered sandstone which is from Modave in the south of Belgium. The variations of the strength in combination with the failure patterns are examined as a function of the inclination angle between the layer plane and the loading direction. The experimental, results clearly show that the induced fracture patterns are a combination of tensile and/or shear fractures. In shape effect experiments the layer thickness and the number of layer boundaries are investigated. Different blocks of Modave sandstone are used to prepare samples. The layer thickness is different among the various blocks, but the layer thickness in each studied rock block can be considered to be constant;hence, the number of layer boundaries changes according to the sample diameter for samples of the same block. The experimental study shows that the layer thickness plays a more important role than the number of layer boundaries per sample.

  20. Study of the Effect of Clay Particles on Low Salinity Water Injection in Sandstone Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Rezaei Gomari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for optimal recovery of crude oil from sandstone and carbonate reservoirs around the world has never been greater for the petroleum industry. Water-flooding has been applied to the supplement primary depletion process or as a separate secondary recovery method. Low salinity water injection is a relatively new method that involves injecting low salinity brines at high pressure similar to conventional water-flooding techniques, in order to recover crude oil. The effectiveness of low salinity water injection in sandstone reservoirs depends on a number of parameters such as reservoir temperature, pressure, type of clay particle and salinity of injected brine. Clay particles present on reservoir rock surfaces adsorb polar components of oil and modify wettability of sandstone rocks to the oil-wet state, which is accountable for the reduced recovery rates by conventional water-flooding. The extent of wettability alteration caused by three low salinity brines on oil-wet sandstone samples containing varying clay content (15% or 30% and type of clay (kaolinite/montmorillonite were analyzed in the laboratory experiment. Contact angles of mica powder and clay mixture (kaolinite/montmorillonite modified with crude oil were measured before and after injection with three low salinity sodium chloride brines. The effect of temperature was also analyzed for each sample. The results of the experiment indicate that samples with kaolinite clay tend to produce higher contact angles than samples with montmorillonite clay when modified with crude oil. The highest degree or extent of wettability alteration from oil-wet to intermediate-wet state upon injection with low salinity brines was observed for samples injected with brine having salinity concentration of 2000 ppm. The increase in temperature tends to produce contact angles values lying in the higher end of the intermediate-wet range (75°–115° for samples treated at 50 °C, while their corresponding

  1. Biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer under aerobic conditions and mixed nitrate and iron reducing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette; Arvin, Erik

    2000-01-01

    in the groundwater. The potential for biodegradation of the phenols in the sandstone aquifer at the site has been investigated in laboratory microcosms under aerobic (oxygen amended) and mixed nitrate and iron reducing (nitrate enriched and unamended) anaerobic conditions, at a range of concentrations (low: similar...... to 5 mg 1(-1): high: similar to 60 mg 1(-1), and very high: similar to 600 mg 1(-1)) and in the presence of other organic coal-tar compounds (mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs and PAHs) and heterocyclic compounds (NSOs)) and ammonia liquor. Sandstone cores and groundwater for the microcosms...... biodegradation of phenol, cresols, 3,4-xylenol and 3,5-xylenol was observed after short lag-phases in the anaerobic microcosms. 2,5-xylenol was partially degraded after a longer lag-phase and 2,6-xylenol persisted throughout the 3 month long experiments. The maximum rates of total phenols degradation...

  2. Molecular carbon isotope variations in core samples taken at the Permian-Triassic boundary layers in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiliang; Zhang, Shuichang; Brassell, Simon; Wang, Jiaxue; Lu, Zhengyuan; Ming, Qingzhong; Wang, Xiaomei; Bian, Lizeng

    2012-07-01

    Stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of carbonate sediments and the molecular (biomarker) characteristics of a continuous Permian-Triassic (PT) layer in southern China were studied to obtain geochemical signals of global change at the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB). Carbonate carbon isotope values shifted toward positive before the end of the Permian period and then shifted negative above the PTB into the Triassic period. Molecular carbon isotope values of biomarkers followed the same trend at and below the PTB and remained negative in the Triassic layer. These biomarkers were acyclic isoprenoids, ranging from C15 to C40, steranes (C27 dominates) and terpenoids that were all significantly more abundant in samples from the Permian layer than those from the Triassic layer. The Triassic layer was distinguished by the dominance of higher molecular weight (waxy) n-alkanes. Stable carbon isotope values of individual components, including n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids such as phytane, isop-C25, and squalane, are depleted in δ13C by up to 8-10‰ in the Triassic samples as compared to the Permian. Measured molecular and isotopic variations of organic matter in the PT layers support the generally accepted view of Permian oceanic stagnation followed by a massive upwelling of toxic deep waters at the PTB. A series of large-scale (global) outgassing events may be associated with the carbon isotope shift we measured. This is also consistent with the lithological evidence we observed of white thin-clay layers in this region. Our findings, in context with a generally accepted stagnant Permian ocean, followed by massive upwelling of toxic deep waters might be the major causes of the largest global mass extinction event that occurred at the Permian-Triassic boundary.

  3. Diagenetic characteristics and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Biyadh sandstones at Kharir oilfield in the western central Masila Basin, Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Shalaby, Mohamed Ragab; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah

    2012-06-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Biyadh Formation in the Masila Basin is an important hydrocarbon reservoir. However, in spite of its importance as a reservoir, published studies on the Biyadh Formation more specifically on the diagenesis and relate with reservoir quality, are limited. Based on core samples from one well in the Kharir oilfield, western central Masila Basin, this study reports the lithologic and diagenetic characteristics of this reservoir. The Biyadh sandstones are very fine to very coarse-grained, moderate to well sorted quartzarenite and quartzwacke. The diagenetic processes recognized include mechanical compaction, cementation (carbonate, clay minerals, quartz overgrowths, and a minor amount of pyrite), and dissolution of the calcite cement and feldspar grains. The widespread occurrences of early calcite cement suggest that the Biyadh sandstones lost a significant amount of primary porosity at a very early stage of its diagenetic history. Based on the framework grain-cement relationships, precipitation of the early calcite cement was either accompanied or followed by the development of part of the pore-lining and pore-filling clay cements. Secondary porosity development occurred due to partial to complete dissolution of early calcite cement and feldspar grains. In addition to calcite, several different clay minerals including kaolinite and chlorite occur as pore-filling and pore-lining cements. Kaolinite largely occurs as vermiform and accelerated the minor porosity loss due to pore-occlusion. Chlorite coating grains helps to retain primary porosity a by retarding the envelopment of quartz overgrowths. Porosity and permeability data exhibit good inverse correlation with cement. Thus, reservoir quality is controlled by pore occluding cement. Diagenetic history of the Biyadh sandstones as established here is expected to help better understanding and exploitation of this reservoir. The relation between diagenesis and reservoir quality is as follows: the

  4. Chemical analysis of black crust on the Angkor sandstone at the Bayon temple, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wonsuh; Oguchi, Chiaki; Waragai, Tetsuya

    2014-05-01

    The Angkor complex is the one of the greatest cultural heritages in the world. It is constructed in the early 12th century, designated as a world cultural heritage by UNESCO in 1992. The temples at the Angkor complex are mainly made of sandstone and laterite. However, due to the tropical climate, plants, lichens and various microorganisms are growing well on the rock surface. Black crusts are also easily found on the stone surface. The 21st technical session of the International Coordinating Committee for the Safeguarding and Development of the Historic Site of Angkor (ICC-Angkor) held in 2012 recommended that to preserve both the biofilms and the forest cover and to prohibit the biocides (chlorine-based) and organic biocides. However, there are many reports that lichens and microorganisms accelerate rock weathering. It is important to clarify that how the biofilm on the Angkor temples affect Angkor sandstones. We sampled Angkor sandstone covered by black crust at the Bayon temple, Angkor complex, and observed the section and the surface of the rock sample by using SEM. Surfaces of the samples are not polished in order to observe the original condition. The samples are coated with gold for 180 seconds. The depth of the black crust is up to 1 mm. Many filamentous materials were found on the black crust. Average energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data of the five areas of ca. 20 μm ×15 μm in the black crusts shows that over 80 % of the filamentous materials are compounds of carbon. It seems that these materials are hyphae. The shape of the hypha is like a thread and its size is few μm in diameter and up to several centimeters in length. Black crusts are consisted of elements and compounds of carbon, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, and Fe. Further research has to be done to find out the better and proper way of conservation for the Angkor complex.

  5. Drilling, Coring and Sampling Using Piezoelectric Actuated Mechanisms: From the USDC to a Piezo-Rotary-Hammer Drill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2012-01-01

    NASA exploration missions are increasingly including sampling tasks but with the growth in engineering experience (particularly, Phoenix Scout and MSL) it is now very much recognized that planetary drilling poses many challenges. The difficulties grow significantly with the hardness of sampled material, the depth of drilling and the harshness of the environmental conditions. To address the requirements for samplers that could be operated at the conditions of the various bodies in the solar system, a number of piezoelectric actuated drills and corers were developed by the Advanced Technologies Group of JPL. The basic configuration that was conceived in 1998 is known as the Ultrasonic/Sonic Driller/Corer (USDC), and it operates as a percussive mechanism. This drill requires as low preload as 10N (important for operation at low gravity) allowing to operate with as low-mass device as 400g, use an average power as low as 2- 3W and drill rocks as hard as basalt. A key feature of this drilling mechanism is the use of a free-mass to convert the ultrasonic vibrations generated by piezoelectric stack to sonic impacts on the bit. Using the versatile capabilities f the USDC led to the development of many configurations and device sizes. Significant improvement of the penetration rate was achieved by augmenting the hammering action by rotation and use of a fluted bit to remove cuttings. To reach meters deep in ice a wireline drill was developed called the Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher and it was demonstrated in 2005 to penetrate about 2-m deep at Antarctica. Jointly with Honeybee Robotics, this mechanism is currently being modified to incorporate rotation and inchworm operation forming Auto-Gopher to reach meters deep in rocks. To take advantage of the ability of piezoelectric actuators to operate over a wide temperatures range, piezoelectric actuated drills were developed and demonstrated to operate at as cold as -200oC and as hot as 500oC. In this paper, the developed mechanisms

  6. Seizure threshold in a large sample: implications for stimulus dosing strategies in bilateral electroconvulsive therapy: a report from CORE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrides, Georgios; Braga, Raphael J; Fink, Max; Mueller, Martina; Knapp, Rebecca; Husain, Mustafa; Rummans, Teresa; Bailine, Samuel; Malur, Chitra; O'Connor, Kevin; Kellner, Charles

    2009-12-01

    We sought to examine the relationship of seizure threshold (ST) to age and other demographic characteristics in a large sample where ST was determined by the dose titration (DT) method. We also compared the resulting stimulation levels to estimates predicted by an age-based formula, the half-age (HA) method. In a multicenter prospective study, patients received a standardized course of bilateral electroconvulsive therapy for major depression using a brief pulse device. The ST was determined at the first treatment using a fixed algorithm of stimulations. Subsequent seizures were induced at a level 50% higher than the empirically determined ST. We only included data from subjects receiving methohexital anesthesia. We correlated ST with demographic and clinical characteristics of the sample. The actual dosing levels at the second treatment were compared with estimates based on HA. Of the original 531 subjects, 402 met criteria for the current analysis. The ST was positively correlated with age. Male patients had slightly higher ST than female patients. Neither race, severity of illness, psychosis, nor use of psychotropic medications affected ST. Little variability in titrated ST was observed among our patients. An ST of 40 ("percent of charge") or lower was found in 97.5% of patients, with either 20 or 40 in 80% of patients. Ninety-six percent of the patients were treated at the 3 levels of 15%, 30%, or 60%. Estimated HA stimulus levels offered a wider range of choices compared with this particular algorithm used for ST determination at an average level of 18% above the determined ST. Seizure threshold correlates strongly with age, whereas there is a weaker relation between ST and sex. There was little individual variation of ST determined by the DT method among subjects, possibly because of the wide spacing between steps of this particular titration algorithm. Half-age estimates were 18% above the empirically determined ST. This suggests that the use of the HA

  7. Thermo-responsive polymer tethered metal-organic framework core-shell magnetic microspheres for magnetic solid-phase extraction of alkylphenols from environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuqian; Su, Hao; Wong, Y-L Elaine; Chen, Xiangfeng; Dominic Chan, T-W

    2016-07-22

    In this work, the thermo-responsive polymer PNIPAM tethered to Fe3O4@SiO2@MOF core-shell magnetic microspheres was first synthesized by a surface-selective post-synthetic strategy and underwent highly efficient magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) of alkylphenols from aqueous samples. Alkylphenols, including 4-tert-octylphenol (OP) and 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), were selected as target compounds. The sample quantification was carried out using LC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitor (MRM) mode. Under optimal working conditions, the developed method showed good linearity in the range of 5-1000ngL(-1), a low limit of detection (1.5ngL(-1)), and good repeatability (relative standard deviation, <8%, n=5) for NP and OP. Owning to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic switchable properties of the nanocomposite, high recoveries (78.7-104.3%) of alkylphenols were obtained under different extraction conditions. The levels of OP and NP in environmental samples collected from local river, lake and pond waters were analyzed using the developed method. It was believed that the synthesized material with the thermo-responsive coating, large surface areas and magnetic properties should have great potential in the extraction and removal of alkylphenols from environmental samples.

  8. High precision dual-inlet IRMS measurements of the stable isotopes of CO2 and the N2O/CO2 ratio from polar ice core samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Bauska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important constraint on mechanisms of past carbon cycle variability is provided by the stable isotopic composition of carbon in atmospheric carbon dioxide (δ13C-CO2 trapped in polar ice cores, but obtaining very precise measurements has proven to be a significant analytical challenge. Here we describe a new technique to determine the δ13C of CO2 at exceptional precision, as well as measuring the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios. In this method, ancient air is extracted from relatively large ice samples (~ 400 grams with a dry-extraction "ice-grater" device. The liberated air is cryogenically purified to a CO2 and N2O mixture and analyzed with a micro-volume equipped dual-inlet IRMS (Thermo MAT 253. The reproducibility of the method, based on replicate analysis of ice core samples, is 0.02‰ for δ13C-CO2 and 2 ppm and 4 ppb for the CO2 and N2O mixing ratios, respectively (1-sigma pooled standard deviation. Our experiments show that minimizing water vapor pressure in the extraction vessel by housing the grating apparatus in a ultra-low temperature freezer (−60 °C improves the precision and decreases the experimental blank of the method. We describe techniques for accurate calibration of small samples and the application of a mass spectrometric method based on source fragmentation for reconstructing the N2O history of the atmosphere. The oxygen isotopic composition of CO2 is also investigated, confirming previous observations of oxygen exchange between gaseous CO2 and solid H2O within the ice archive. These data offer a possible constraint on oxygen isotopic fractionation during H2O and CO2 exchange below the H2O bulk melting temperature.

  9. Persistent U(IV) and U(VI) following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining of a sandstone uranium deposit, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tanya J.; Campbell, Kate M.; Zielinski, Robert A.; Reimus, P.W.; J.T. Clay,; N. Janot,; J. J. Bargar,; Benzel, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Drill-core samples from a sandstone-hosted uranium (U) deposit in Wyoming were characterized to determine the abundance and distribution of uranium following in-situ recovery (ISR) mining with oxygen- and carbon dioxide-enriched water. Concentrations of uranium, collected from ten depth intervals, ranged from 5 to 1920 ppm. A composite sample contained 750 ppm uranium with an average oxidation state of 54% U(VI) and 46% U(IV). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated rare high uranium (∼1000 ppm U) in spatial association with P/Ca and Si/O attributed to relict uranium minerals, possibly coffinite, uraninite, and autunite, trapped within low permeability layers bypassed during ISR mining. Fission track analysis revealed lower but still elevated concentrations of U in the clay/silica matrix and organic matter (several 10 s ppm) and yet higher concentrations associated with Fe-rich/S-poor sites, likely iron oxides, on altered chlorite or euhedral pyrite surfaces (but not on framboidal pyrite). Organic C (samples. Although the uranium minerals persisting in low permeability areas in association with organic carbon were less affected by oxidizing solutions during mining, the likely sequestration of uranium within labile iron oxides following mining and sensitivity to changes in redox conditions requires careful attention during groundwater restoration.

  10. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  11. Optical coherence tomography for vulnerability assessment of sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemand, Elizabeth; Liang, Haida

    2013-05-10

    Sandstone is an important cultural heritage material, in both architectural and natural settings, such as neolithic rock art panels. The majority of deterioration effects in porous materials such as sandstone are influenced by the presence and movement of water through the material. The presence of water within the porous network of a material results in changes in the optical coherence tomography signal intensity that can be used to monitor the wetting front of water penetration of dry porous materials at various depths. The technique is able to detect wetting front velocities from 1 cm s(-1) to 10(-6) cm s(-1), covering the full range of hydraulic conductivities likely to occur in natural sandstones from pervious to impervious.

  12. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting...... and permeability is caused by increased diagenetic changes of the sandstones due to increased burial depth and temperatures. Therefore, the highest water temperatures typically correspond with the lowest porosities and permeabilities. Especially the permeability is crucial for the performance of the geothermal......-line fractures. Continuous thin chlorite coatings results in less porosity- and permeability-reduction with burial than the general reduction with burial, unless carbonate cemented. Therefore, localities of sandstones characterized by these continuous chlorite coatings may represent fine geothermal reservoirs...

  13. Discordant K-Ar and young exposure dates for the Windjana sandstone, Kimberley, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, P. M.; Farley, K. A.; Malespin, C. A.; Mahaffy, P.; Ming, D.; McLennan, S. M.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Rice, Melissa S.

    2016-10-01

    K-Ar and noble gas surface exposure age measurements were carried out on the Windjana sandstone, Kimberley region, Gale Crater, Mars, by using the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument on the Curiosity rover. The sandstone is unusually rich in sanidine, as determined by CheMin X-ray diffraction, contributing to the high K2O concentration of 3.09 ± 0.20 wt % measured by Alpha-Particle X-ray Spectrometer analysis. A sandstone aliquot heated to 915°C yielded a K-Ar age of 627 ± 50 Ma. Reheating this aliquot yielded no additional Ar. A second aliquot heated in the same way yielded a much higher K-Ar age of 1710 ± 110 Ma. These data suggest incomplete Ar extraction from a rock with a K-Ar age older than 1710 Ma. Incomplete extraction at 900°C is not surprising for a rock with a large fraction of K carried by Ar-retentive K-feldspar. Likely, variability in the exact temperature achieved by the sample from run to run, uncertainties in sample mass estimation, and possible mineral fractionation during transport and storage prior to analysis may contribute to these discrepant data. Cosmic ray exposure ages from 3He and 21Ne in the two aliquots are minimum values given the possibility of incomplete extraction. However, the general similarity between the 3He (57 ± 49 and 18 ± 32 Ma, mean 30 Ma) and 21Ne (2 ± 32 and 83 ± 24 Ma, mean 54 Ma) exposure ages provides no evidence for underextraction. The implied erosion rate at the Kimberley location is similar to that reported at the nearby Yellowknife Bay outcrop.

  14. Evaluation and prevention of formation damage in offshore sandstone reservoirs in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Shenglai; Sheng Zhichao; Liu Wenhui; Song Zhixue; Wu Ming; Zhang Jianwei

    2008-01-01

    Reduction in water injectivity would be harmful to the waterflood development of offshore sandstone oil reservoirs. In this paper the magnitude of formation damage during water injection was evaluated by analyzing the performance of water injection in the Bohai offshore oilfield, China. Two parameters, permeability reduction and rate of wellhead pressure rise, were proposed to evaluate the formation damage around injection wells. The pressure performance curve could be divided into three stages with different characteristics. Analysis of field data shows that formation damage caused by water injection was severe in some wells in the Bohai offshore oilfield, China. In the laboratory, the content of clay minerals in reservoir rock was analyzed and sensitivity tests (including sensitivity to water,flow rate, alkali, salt and acid) were also conducted. Experimental results show that the reservoir had a strong to medium sensitivity to water (i.e. clay swelling) and a strong to medium sensitivity to flow rate,which may cause formation damage. For formation damage prevention, three injection schemes of clay stabilizer (CS) were studied, i.e. continuous injection of low concentration CS (Ci), slug injection of high concentration CS (SI), and slug injection of high concentration CS followed by continuous injection of low concentration CS (SI-CI). Core flooding experiments show that SI-CI is an effective scheme to prevent formation damage and is recommended for the sandstone oil reservoirs in the Bohai offshore oilfield during water injection.

  15. The evolution of faults formed by shearing across joint zones in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rodrick; Aydin, Atilla

    2004-05-01

    The evolution of strike-slip and normal faults formed by slip along joint zones is documented by detailed field studies in the Jurassic Aztec Sandstone in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA. Zones of closely spaced planar sub-parallel joints arranged en échelon are sheared, forming faults. Fracturing occurs as a result of shearing, forming new joints. Later shearing along these joints leads to successively formed small faults and newer joints. This process is repeated through many generations of fracturing with increasing fault slip producing a hierarchical array of structures. Strain localization produced by shearing of joint zones at irregularities in joint traces, fracture intersections, and in the span between adjacent sheared joints results in progressive fragmentation of the weakened sandstone, which leads to the formation of gouge along the fault zone. The length and continuity of the gouge and associated slip surfaces is related to the slip magnitude and fault geometry with slip ranging from several millimeters to about 150 m. Distributed damage in a zone surrounding the gouge core is related to the original joint zone configuration (step sense, individual sheared joint overlaps and separation), shear sense, and slip magnitude. Our evolutionary model of fault development helps to explain some outstanding issues concerning complexities in faulting such as, the variability in development of fault rock and fault related fractures, and the failure processes in faults.

  16. Detecting to secret folded composite lamina package pairs in cores related slump dump structures and seismites with high resolution sampling of physical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namik; Feray Meydan, Aysegul; Eris, Kadir; Sari, Erol; Akcer, Sena; Makaroglu, Ozlem; Alkislar, Hakan; Biltekin, Demet; Nagehan Arslan, Tugce

    2016-04-01

    The core retrieved from Lake Van consists of seismites that were possibly deposited during the earthquakes around the Van region. Deformed parts of the core sediments display folded laminations that can be attributed to seismites. The problem arises that if the fold axis is deposited perpendicular to the liner and, if the hinge line is far enough, describing the true laminations might be impossible related to real age of basin evolution because extra laminae seem deposited to the area. Scientist must pay attention such problem that dating method like varve counting and basin evolution estimates can totally change due to extra laminae that explained before. For eliminate to wrong interpretations considering reversal reflected anomalies even with angularity effects to one package of pair can show significant difference than other symmetric one due to angle of the hinge line or soft sediment deformation. Considering the situation explained, p-wave is not enough to support the idea however; chemical analyses (x-ray florescence), ICP-MS (asdasd) analysis can provide appropriate results to identify laminae that appear on the limbs of the reversed micro folds. New easy designed extra U-Channel drive tray framework prepared by us. U-Channels are prepared well conditioned, saturated enough to well contact between sediment surface and plastic shield of u-channel samples from cores. Physical parameters are measured by Multi sensor core logger (MSCL) with high resolution step ratio fixed to 1mm. At the p- wave and gamma ray results, we observed together stair upwards form and reverse reflected downward data graphics, thus our interpretation of identifying the fold limbs are now visible. We understand that laminae packages are exactly the same. XRF and MSCL are totally supporting to origin of pairs generated after their sedimentation age with mechanical forces. For this reason, in this study, we attended to solve such problem to analyze deformed folded laminations that must be

  17. New geochronologic and stratigraphic evidence confirms the paleocene age of the dinosaur-bearing ojo alamo sandstone and animas formation in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dinosaur fossils are present in the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and Animas Formation in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and Colorado. Evidence for the Paleo-cene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone includes palynologic and paleomagnetic data. Palynologic data indicate that the entire Ojo Alamo Sandstone, including the lower dinosaur-bearing part, is Paleocene in age. All of the palynomorph-productive rock samples collected from the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at multiple localities lacked Creta-ceous index palynomorphs (except for rare, reworked specimens) and produced Paleocene index palynomorphs. Paleocene palynomorphs have been identified strati-graphically below dinosaur fossils at two separate localities in the Ojo Alamo Sand-stone in the central and southern parts of the basin. The Animas Formation in the Colorado part of the basin also contains dinosaur fossils, and its Paleocene age has been established based on fossil leaves and palynology. Magnetostratigraphy provides independent evidence for the Paleocene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone and its dinosaur-bearing beds. Normal-polarity magnetochron C29n (early Paleocene) has been identified in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at six localities in the southern part of the San Juan Basin. An assemblage of 34 skeletal elements from a single hadrosaur, found in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone in the southern San Juan Basin, provided conclusive evidence that this assemblage could not have been reworked from underlying Cretaceous strata. In addition, geochemical studies of 15 vertebrate bones from the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and 15 bone samples from the underlying Kirtland Formation of Late Creta-ceous (Campanian) age show that each sample suite contained distinctly different abundances of uranium and rare-earth elements, indicating that the bones were miner-alized in place soon after burial, and that none of the Paleocene dinosaur bones ana-lyzed had been reworked. ?? U.S. Geological Survey, Public Domain April 2009.

  18. Uranium migration through intact sandstone: effect of pollutant concentration and the reversibility of uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, R.; Lawless, T. A.; Alexander, J. L.; Bennett, D. G.; Read, D.

    1996-02-01

    A series of core flood experiments has been performed to investigate the migration behaviour of uranium under rigidly controlled conditions. Intact sandstone cores, pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater, were flooded with uranium solutions at varying concentrations and the transport process monitored as a function of pH, tracer concentration and the concentration of a competing ion, cadmium. In each case a substantial amount of uranium was retained by the core, implying a strong interaction with the rock matrix. The adsorption process was found to be highly concentration dependent; however, such that the finite retention capacity of an intact core can be exhausted within a relatively short time. The reversibility of uptake was studied by attempting to displace adsorbed uranium by injected cadmium and flushing with brine. Most of the uranium was readily recoverable but a small percentage is released very slowly on flushing, suggesting conversion to a more stable form. Prior to performing each experiment a simulation was carried out using a one-dimensional coupled chemical transport code, encompassing a thermodynamic description of the electrical double layer. The model was successful in predicting a priori the dominant trends in the uranium migration behaviour which may aid in model developments for more complex geochemical regimes than those studied here.

  19. Simultaneous determination of capillary pressure and relative permeability curves from core-flooding experiments with various fluid pairs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ronny Pini; Sally M Benson

    2013-01-01

      Capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves are simultaneously measured on a single Berea Sandstone core by using three different fluid pairs, namely g CO 2/water, g N 2/water and s c CO 2/brine...

  20. Cathodoluminescence investigations on quartz cement in sandstones of Khabour Formation from Iraqi Kurdistan region, northern Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omer, Muhamed Fakhri; Friis, Henrik

    The Ordovician deltaic to shallow marine Khabour Formation in Northern Iraq consists mainly of sandstone with minor siltstone and interbedded shale. The sandstones are pervasively cemented by quartz that resulted in very little preserved primary porosity. Cathodoluminescence and petrographic stud...

  1. Altitude of the bottom of the Trinidad Sandstone in the Raton Basin, Las Animas County, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of structure contours that show lines of equal altitude of the bottom of the Trinidad Sandstone, the contact between the Trinidad Sandstone...

  2. Reservoir quality and petrophysical properties of Cambrian sandstones and their changes during the experimental modelling of CO2 storage in the Baltic Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazbulat Shogenov

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were (1 to review current recommendations on storage reservoirs and classify their quality using experimental data of sandstones of the Deimena Formation of Cambrian Series 3, (2 to determine how the possible CO2 geological storage (CGS in the Deimena Formation sandstones affects their properties and reservoir quality and (3 to apply the proposed classification to the storage reservoirs and their changes during CGS in the Baltic Basin. The new classification of the reservoir quality of rocks for CGS in terms of gas permeability and porosity was proposed for the sandstones of the Deimena Formation covered by Lower Ordovician clayey and carbonate cap rocks in the Baltic sedimentary basin. Based on permeability the sandstones were divided into four groups showing their practical usability for CGS (‘very appropriate’, ‘appropriate’, ‘cautionary’ and ‘not appropriate’. According to porosity, eight reservoir quality classes were distinguished within these groups. The petrophysical, geochemical and mineralogical parameters of the sandstones from the onshore South Kandava and offshore E6 structures in Latvia and the E7 structure in Lithuania were studied before and after the CO2 injection-like alteration experiment. The greatest changes in the composition and properties were determined in the carbonate-cemented sandstones from the uppermost part of the South Kandava onshore structure. Partial dissolution of pore-filling carbonate cement (ankerite and calcite and displacement of clay cement blocking pores caused significant increase in the effective porosity of the samples, drastic increase in their permeability and decrease in grain and bulk density, P- and S-wave velocity, and weight of the dry samples. As a result of these alterations, carbonate-cemented sandstones of initially ‘very low’ reservoir quality (class VIII, ‘not appropriate’ for CGS, acquired an ‘appropriate’ for CGS

  3. Geological factors of core destruction in drilling tensioned rocks of the Donbas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabigailo, V.E.; Belyi, I.S.

    1981-01-01

    The results of scientific investigations in study of the geological conditions of the manifestation of ejections of rocks are set forth. Information on ejection of rocks, characteristics of the main genetic types of ejected rocks, their post-diagenetic changes, mineral composition of the structure of sandstones, collector, stability and elastic properties, gas content, and also characteristics of the tensioned state is presented. A geological model of the ejection hazard of rocks is proposed. A method of investigating the division of the core into disks as one of the factors of the danger of ejection of rocks is presented. The technological and natural factors of disking of the core are studied: tensioned state of the rocks, their structure, physical and mechanical properties, degree of saturability with moisture, surface-active substances and gas. A method of assessing the degree of danger of ejection of rocks according to results of drilling of samples in modelled conditions of the mountain (rock) mass is worked out.

  4. Petrologic and isotopic data from the Cretaceous (Campanian) Blackhawk Formation and Star Point Sandstone (Mesaverde Group), Wasatch Plateau, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Neil S.; Turner, Christine E.; Peterson, Fred

    2013-01-01

    overlying Blackhawk coals. Although some preliminary results were previously presented at scientific meetings, the petrologic and geochemical data have not been fully compiled and reported. The purpose of this report is to present the methods of data acquisition and the results of petrologic and isotopic analyses on coal and sandstone samples from the Blackhawk Formation as well as sandstones of the underlying Star Point Sandstone.

  5. Sandstone provenance and diagenesis in relation to Late Cretaceous regional depositional systems and paleogeography, Sacramento Basin, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, K.A. Jr. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA)); Nilsen, T.H. (Applied Earth Technology, Inc., Redwood City, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Petrographic modal analyses of sandstone samples from the Upper Cretaceous Guinda, Forbes, Kone, Marsh Creek, Chico, Starky, Winters, and Mokelumne River formations of the Sacramento basin reveal that samples are dominated by plutoniclastic and volcaniclastic detritus, have intermediate plagioclase-to-total=feldspar ratios (0.48-0.65), and have high but variable L{sub v}/L ratios (0.51-0.80). Forbes/Kione sandstones, in comparison to Starkey/Winters samples, have higher proportions of volcaniclastic (plagioclase) to plutoniclastic (Q{sub m}, K) detritus and higher W{sub p}/total Q and L{sub m}/L{sub v} ratios. The Chico Formation, like the Starkey/Winters, is dominated by plutoniclastic material; in comparison to Forbes/Kione samples, the Chico has higher total lithic values (L{sub t}), especially in the L{sub m} fraction. These data strongly support derivation of the sands from the Cordilleran magmatic arc system to the north and east. Sandstones from the Chico, Starkey, Winters, and Mokelumne River formations were derived primarily from the dissected Sierran magmatic arc complex to the east, with a minor but significant secondary source in foothill belt metamorphic complexes. Forbes and Kione sandstones, in contrast, appear to have been derived from the Idaho Batholith and Blue Mountain regions of Idaho/Oregon to the north and northeast. When corrections are applied to account for significant diagenetic dissolution of plagioclase and compactional alteration of lithic fragments (especially L{sub v}), the dissected or transitional arc provenance for most samples is strengthened. Modal data and paleogeographic reconstructions suggest that during the early and middle Campanian, most detritus in the Sacramento basin was derived from the north/northeast (erosion of the Idaho batholith arc system), reflecting southward progradation of the Kion/Forbes delta-submarine fan system into the longitudinal forearc basin.

  6. Cross-bedding Related Anisotropy and its Role in the Orientation of Joints in an Aeolian Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, S.; Cilona, A.; Mapeli, C.; Panfilau, A.; Aydin, A.; Prasad, M.

    2014-12-01

    Previous research revealed that the cross-bedding related anisotropy in aeolian sandstones affects the orientation of compaction bands, also known as anticracks. We hypothesize that cross-bedding should a have similar influence on the orientation of the joints within the same rock at the same location. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between the cross-beds and the cross-bed package confined joints in the Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone cropping out in the Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. The field data demonstrates that the cross-bed package confined joints occur at high-angle to bedding and trend roughly parallel to the dip direction of the cross-beds. This shows that the cross-bed orientation and the associated anisotropy also exert a strong control on the formation and orientation of the joints. In order to characterize the anisotropy due to cross-bedding in the Aztec Sandstone, we measured the P-wave velocities parallel and perpendicular to bedding from 11 samples in the laboratory using a bench-top ultrasonic assembly. The measured P-wave anisotropy is about 13% on average. Based on these results, a numerical model based on the generalized Hooke's law for anisotropic materials is analyzed assuming the cross-bedded sandstone to be transversely isotropic. Using this model, we tested various cross-bed orientations as well as different strain boundary conditions (uniaxial, axisymmetric and triaxial). It is possible to define a boundary condition under which the modeled results roughly match with the observed relationship between cross-bed package confined joints and cross-beds. These results have important implications for fluid flow through aeolian sandstones in reservoirs and aquifers.

  7. Interaction of oil components and clay minerals in reservoir sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changchun Pan; Linping Yu; Guoying Sheng; Jiamo Fu [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Lab. of Organic Geochemistry, Wushan, Guangzhou (China); Jianhui Feng; Yuming Tian [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Lab. of Organic Geochemistry, Wushan, Guangzhou (China); Zhongyuan Oil Field Co., Puyang, Henan (China); Xiaoping Luo [Zhongyuan Oil Field Co., Puyang, Henan (China)

    2005-04-15

    The free oil (first Soxhlet extract) and adsorbed oil (Soxhlet extract after the removal of minerals) obtained from the clay minerals in the <2 {mu}m size fraction as separated from eight hydrocarbon reservoir sandstone samples, and oil inclusions obtained from the grains of seven of these eight samples were studied via GC, GC-MS and elemental analyses. The free oil is dominated by saturated hydrocarbons (61.4-87.5%) with a low content of resins and asphaltenes (6.0-22.0% in total) while the adsorbed oil is dominated by resins and asphaltenes (84.8-98.5% in total) with a low content of saturated hydrocarbons (0.6-9.5%). The inclusion oil is similar to the adsorbed oil in gross composition, but contains relatively more saturated hydrocarbons (16.87-31.88%) and less resins and asphaltenes (62.30-78.01% in total) as compared to the latter. Although the amounts of both free and adsorbed oils per gram of clay minerals varies substantially, the residual organic carbon content in the clay minerals of the eight samples, after the free oil extraction, is in a narrow range between 0.537% and 1.614%. From the decrease of the percentage of the extractable to the total of this residual organic matter of the clay minerals with burial depth it can be inferred that polymerization of the adsorbed polar components occurs with the increase of the reservoir temperature. The terpane and sterane compositions indicate that the oil adsorbed onto the clay surfaces appears to be more representative of the initial oil charging the reservoir than do the oil inclusions. This phenomenon could possibly demonstrate that the first oil charge preferentially interacts with the clay minerals occurring in the pores and as coatings around the grains. Although the variation of biomarker parameters between the free and adsorbed oils could be ascribed to the compositional changes of oil charges during the filling process and/or the differential maturation behaviors of these two types of oils after oil

  8. A chemometric approach to determine the phenolic compounds in different barley samples by two different stationary phases: a comparison between C18 and pentafluorophenyl core shell columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Verardo, Vito; Berardinelli, Annachiara; Marconi, Emanuele; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2014-08-15

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) is a cereal crop that has been cultivated since ancient times. However, its interest as nutritional food and as food ingredient is relatively new. Thus, in this study, the phenolic compounds of eighteen different varieties of barley (4 waxy and 14 non-waxy) grown under the same agronomic conditions in the same experimental field have been determined by HPLC-DAD-MS. Two new methodologies were developed using new generation superficially porous HPLC columns with different stationary phases: C18 and pentafluorophenyl (PFP). Twelve free phenolic compounds and eight bound phenolic compounds could be identified in barley samples in less than 22min. The study of different method parameters showed that C18 column was more suitable for the analysis of phenolic compounds of barley. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was conducted in order to assess the different ability of the two different core shell HPLC columns in the discrimination between "waxy" and "non-waxy" varieties, and only HCA of C18 column could separate waxy and non-waxy genotypes. Significant differences in the content of phenolic compounds between waxy and non-waxy samples were found, being waxy barley samples the ones which presented higher content of free and bound phenolic compounds. Once the best discriminant HPLC column was established, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied and it was able to discriminate between "waxy" and "non-waxy" varieties; however it discriminated the barley samples based only in free phenolic compounds. Because of that, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were carried out. PLS-DA and ANN permitted the classification of waxy and non-waxy genotypes from both free and bound phenolic compounds.

  9. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N.

    1983-01-01

    The intrinsic properties of the genetic sandstone units that typify many geopressured geothermal aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Gulf Coast region were systematically investigated classified, and differentiated. The following topics are coverd: structural and stratigraphic limits of sandstone reservoirs, characteristics and dimensions of Gulf Coast sandstones; fault-compartment areas; comparison of production and geologic estimates of aquifer fluid volume; geologic setting and reservoir characteristics, Wells of Opportunity; internal properties of sandstones; and implications for geopressured fluid production. (MHR)

  10. Experimental investigation on the energy evolution of dry and water-saturated red sandstones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhizhen; Gao Feng

    2015-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of water content on the energy evolution of red sandstone, the axial loading–unloading experiments on dry and water-saturated sandstone samples were conducted, and the distribution and evolution of elastic energy and dissipated energy within the rock were measured. The results show that the saturation process from dry to fully-saturated states reduces the strength, rigid-ity and brittleness of the rock by 30.2%, 25.5%and 16.7%, respectively. The water-saturated sample has larger irreversible deformation in the pre-peak stage and smaller stress drop in the post-peak stage. The saturation process decreases the accumulation energy limit by 38.9%, but increases the dissipated energy and residual elastic energy density, thus greatly reducing the magnitude and rate of energy release. The water-saturated sample has lower conversion efficiency to elastic energy by 3%in the pre-peak region; moreover, the elastic energy ratio falls with a smaller range in the post-peak stage. Therefore, saturation process can greatly reduce the risk of dynamic disaster, and heterogeneous water content can lead to dynamic disaster possibly on the other hand.

  11. Evaluation of sandstone surface relaxivity using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Kathryn E; Sandor, Magdalena; Cheng, Yuesheng

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is a common technique used to assess the pore size of fluid-filled porous materials in a wide variety of fields. However, the NMR signal itself only provides a relative distribution of pore size. To calculate an absolute pore size distribution from the NMR data, the material's surface relaxivity needs to be known. Here, a method is presented using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to evaluate surface relaxivity in sandstones. NMR transverse and longitudinal relaxation was measured on a set of sandstone samples and the surface relaxivity was calculated from the pore size distribution determined with MICP measurements. Using multivariate analysis, it was determined that the LIBS data can predict with good accuracy the longitudinal (R(2)∼0.84) and transverse (R(2)∼0.79) surface relaxivity. Analysis of the regression coefficients shows significant influence from several elements. Some of these are elements previously established to have an effect on surface relaxivity, such as iron and manganese, while others are not commonly associated with surface relaxivity, such as cobalt and titanium. Furthermore, LIBS provides advantages compared to current methods to calibrate surface relaxivity in terms of speed, portability, and sample size requirements. While this paper focuses on geological samples, the method could potentially be expanded to other types of porous materials.

  12. Quantitative study on experimentally observed poroelastic behavior of Berea sandstone in two-phase fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hiroki; Aichi, Masaatsu; Tokunaga, Tomochika; Yamamoto, Hajime; Ogawa, Toyokazu; Aoki, Tomoyuki

    2014-08-01

    Coupled two-phase fluid flow and poroelastic deformation of Berea sandstone is studied through laboratory experiment and numerical simulation. In the experiment, compressed air was infiltrated from the bottom of a water-saturated cylindrical Berea sandstone sample under hydrostatic external stress condition. Both axial and circumferential strains at half the height of the sample showed sudden extension and monotonic and gradual extension afterward. Numerical simulation based on thermodynamically consistent constitutive equations was conducted in order to quantitatively analyze the experimental results. In a simulation assuming isotropy of material properties, the volumetric discharge rate of water at the outlet and one of the axial, circumferential, and volumetric strains at half the height of the sample were reproduced well by each parameter set, while the other two strains were not. When introducing transverse isotropy, all the experimental data were reproduced well. In addition, the effect of saturation dependency of Bishop's effective stress coefficient on the deformation behavior of porous media was discussed, and it was found that strains, both axial and circumferential, are sensitive to the coefficient.

  13. The effect of hot water injection on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Haugwitz, Christian; Jacobsen, Peter Sally Munch;

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal energy storage can be achieved by hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers. We present an analysis of literature data in combination with new short-term flow through permeability experiments in order to address physical and physico-chemical mechanisms that can alter...

  14. DELAYED POLYMER CROSSLINKING USED FOR PROFILE CONTROL IN SANDSTONE RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhongmao; Dong Bo; Fu Xiaofeng; Rong Jiashu

    1997-01-01

    @@ Most of the oil reservoirs in Jilin province occur in fractured sandstone with low permeability and heavy heterogeneity. In addition, with fracture development, the artificial fractures around producing wells and water injection wells have been increased, further aggravating the heterogeneity of oil reservoirs.

  15. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting ...

  16. Diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments of the Bunter Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    The Bunter Sandstone Formation in the northern North German Basin has large geothermal potential with high porosity and permeability (generally >15% and >100 mD, respectively) and with pore fluid temperatures that are adequate for geothermal energy production (c. 55–60˚C). A combined investigatio...

  17. Model building for Chang-8 low permeability sandstone reservoir in the Yanchang formation of the Xifeng oil field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Fan; HOU Jia-gen; SU Ni-na

    2009-01-01

    In order to build a model for the Chang-8 low permeability sandstone reservoir in the Yanchang formation of the Xifeng oil field, we studied sedlimentation and diagenesis of sandstone and analyzed major factors controlling this low permeability reser-voir. By doing so, we have made clear that the spatial distribution of reservoir attribute parameters is controlled by the spatial dis-tribution of various kinds of sandstone bodies. By taking advantage of many coring wells and high quality logging data, we used regression analysis for a single well with geological conditions as constraints, to build the interpretation model for logging data and to calculate attribute parameters for a single well, which ensured accuracy of the 1-D vertical model. On this basis, we built a litho-facies model to replace the sedimentary facies model. In addition, we also built a porosity model by using a sequential Gaussian simulation with the lithofacies model as the constraint. In the end, we built a permeability model by using Markov-Bayes simula-tion, with the porosity attribute as the covariate. The results show that the permeability model reflects very well the relative differ-ences between low permeability values, which is of great importance for locating high permeability zones and forecasting zones favorable for exploration and exploitation.

  18. Drilling the Thuringian Syncline, Germany: core processing during the INFLUINS scientific deep drilling campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abratis, Michael; Methe, Pascal; Aehnelt, Michaela; Kunkel, Cindy; Beyer, Daniel; Kukowski, Nina; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-05-01

    Deep drilling of the central Thuringian Syncline was carried out in order to gather substantial knowledge of subsurface fluid dynamics and fluid rock interaction within a sedimentary basin. The final depth of the borehole was successfully reached at 1179 m, just a few meters above the Buntsandstein - Zechstein boundary. One of the aspects of the scientific drilling was obtaining sample material from different stratigraphic units for insights in genesis, rock properties and fluid-rock interactions. Parts of the section were cored whereas cuttings provide record of the remaining units. Coring was conducted in aquifers and their surrounding aquitards, i.e. parts of the Upper Muschelkalk (Trochitenkalk), the Middle Muschelkalk, the Upper Buntsandstein (Pelitrot and Salinarrot) and the Middle Buntsandstein. In advance and in cooperation with the GFZ Potsdam team "Scientific Drilling" core handling was discussed and a workflow was developed to ensure efficient and appropriate processing of the valuable core material and related data. Core curation including cleaning, fitting, marking, measuring, cutting, boxing, photographing and unrolled scanning using a DMT core scanner was carried out on the drilling site in Erfurt. Due care was exercised on samples for microbiological analyses. These delicate samples were immediately cut when leaving the core tube and stored within a cooling box at -78°C. Special software for data input was used developed by smartcube GmbH. Advantages of this drilling information system (DIS) are the compatibility with formats of international drilling projects from the IODP and ICDP drilling programs and thus options for exchanges with the international data bases. In a following step, the drill cores were brought to the national core repository of the BGR in Berlin Spandau where the cores were logged for their physical rock properties using a GeoTek multi sensor core logger (MSCL). After splitting the cores into a working and archive half, the

  19. Power-law Scaling of Fracture Aperture Sizes in Otherwise-Undeformed Foreland Basin Sandstone: An Example From the Cozzette Sandstone, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, J. N.; Gale, J. F.; Laubach, S. E.; Gomez, L. A.; Marrett, R.; Reed, R. M.

    2007-12-01

    Power-law variation of aperture size with cumulative frequency has been documented in vein arrays, but such patterns have not been conclusively demonstrated from open or incompletely mineralized opening-mode fractures (joints) in otherwise-undeformed sedimentary rocks. We used subhorizontal core from the nearly flat- lying Cretaceous Cozzette Sandstone, Piceance Basin, Colorado, to document fracture aperture sizes over five orders of magnitude. We measured microfractures (0.0004-0.1164 mm in aperture) along a 276-mm-long scanline using scanning electron microscope-based cathodoluminescence; we measured macrofractures (0.5- 2.15 mm in aperture) in 35 m of approximately horizontal core cut normal to fracture strike. Microfractures are typically filled with quartz. Macrofractures are mostly open and resemble non-mineralized joints, except for thin veneers of quartz cement lining their walls. Micro- and macrofractures share both a common orientation and the same timing with respect to diagenetic sequence, only differing in size and the degree to which they are filled with quartz cement. Power-law scaling equations were derived by fitting trendlines to aperture vs. cumulative frequency data for the microfractures. These equations successfully predicted the cumulative frequencies of the macrofractures, accurate to within a factor of four in each test and within a factor of two in 75 percent of tests. Our results show that tectonic deformation is not prerequisite for power-law scaling of fractures, but instead suggest that scaling emerges from fracture interaction during propagation.

  20. Assessment of marine and urban-industrial environments influence on built heritage sandstone using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and complementary techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Héctor; García-Galan, Javier; Maguregui, Maite; Marcaida, Iker; García-Florentino, Cristina; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-09-01

    The sandstone used in the construction of the tower of La Galea Fortress (Getxo, north of Spain) shows a very bad conservation state and a high percentage of sandstone has been lost. The fortress is located just on a cliff and close to the sea, and it experiments the direct influence of marine aerosol and also the impact of acid gases (SOx and NOx) coming from the surrounding industry and maritime traffic. This environment seems to be very harmful for the preservation of the sandstone used in it, promoting different pathologies (disintegration, alveolization, cracking or erosion blistering, salts crystallization on the pores, efflorescences etc.). In this work, a multianalytical methodology based on a preliminary in-situ screening of the affected sandstone using a handheld energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (HH-ED-XRF) and a subsequent characterization of extracted sample in the laboratory using elemental (μ-ED-XRF, Scanning Electron Microscope coupled to an X-Max Energy-Dispersive (SEM-EDS) and Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) and molecular techniques (micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD)) was applied in order to characterize the original composition of this kind of stone and related deterioration products. With the whole methodology, it was possible to assess that the sandstone contain a notable percentage of calcite. The sulfation and nitration of this carbonate detected in the stone led to the dissolution process of the sandstone, promoting the observed material loss. Additionally, the presence of salts related with the influence of marine aerosol confirms that this kind of environment have influence on the conservation state of the sandstone building.

  1. Testing the ureilite projectile hypothesis for the El'gygytgyn impact: Determination of siderophile element abundances and Os isotope ratios in ICDP drill core samples and melt rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goderis, S.; Wittmann, A.; Zaiss, J.; Elburg, M.; Ravizza, G.; Vanhaecke, F.; Deutsch, A.; Claeys, P.

    2013-07-01

    The geochemical nature of the impactites from International Continental Scientific Drilling Project—El'gygytgyn lake drill core 1C is compared with that of impact melt rock fragments collected near the western rim of the structure and literature data. Concentrations of major and trace elements, with special focus on siderophile metals Cr, Co, Ni, and the platinum group elements, and isotope ratios of osmium (Os), were determined to test the hypothesis of an ureilite impactor at El'gygytgyn. Least squares mixing calculations suggest that the upper volcanic succession of rhyolites, dacites, and andesites were the main contributors to the polymict impact breccias. Additions of 2-13.5 vol% of basaltic inclusions recovered from drill core intervals between 391.6 and 423.0 mblf can almost entirely account for the compositional differences observed for the bottom of a reworked fallout deposit at 318.9 mblf, a polymict impact breccia at 471.4 mblf, and three impact melt rock fragments. However, the measured Os isotope ratios and slightly elevated PGE content (up to 0.262 ng g-1 Ir) of certain impactite samples, for which the CI-normalized logarithmic PGE signature displays a relatively flat (i.e., chondritic) pattern, can only be explained by the incorporation of a small meteoritic contribution. This component is also required to explain the exceptionally high siderophile element contents and corresponding Ni/Cr, Ni/Co, and Cr/Co ratios of impact glass spherules and spherule fragments that were recovered from the reworked fallout deposits and from terrace outcrops of the Enmyvaam River approximately 10 km southeast of the crater center. Mixing calculations support the presence of approximately 0.05 wt% and 0.50-18 wt% of ordinary chondrite (possibly type-LL) in several impactites and in the glassy spherules, respectively. The heterogeneous distribution of the meteoritic component provides clues for emplacement mechanisms of the various impactite units.

  2. Sampling in the Snow: High School Winter Field Experiences Provide Relevant, Real World Connections Between Scientific Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, E. W.; Burakowski, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the northern United States, the months surrounding the winter solstice are times of increased darkness, low temperatures, and frozen landscapes. It's a time when many high school science educators, who otherwise would venture outside with their classes, hunker down and are wary of the outdoors. However, a plethora of learning opportunities lies just beyond the classroom. Working collaboratively, a high school science teacher and a snow scientist have developed multiple activities to engage students in the scientific process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting the winter world using snow data to (1) learn about the insulative properties of snow, and (2) to learn about the role of snow cover on winter climate through its reflective properties while participating in a volunteer network that collects snow depth, albedo (reflectivity), and density data. These outdoor field-based snow investigations incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and disciplinary core ideas, including ESS2.C: The roles of water in Earth's surface processes and ESS2.D: Weather and Climate. Additionally, the lesson plans presented address Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics, including the creation and analysis of bar graphs and time series plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.A.1) and xy scatter plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.B.6). High school students participating in the 2013/2014 snow sampling season described their outdoor learning experience as "authentic" and "hands-on" as compared to traditional class indoors. They emphasized that learning outdoors was essential to their understanding of underlying content and concepts because they "learn through actual experience."

  3. Core biopsy needle versus standard aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of solid pancreatic masses: a randomized parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Nah; Moon, Jong Ho; Kim, Hee Kyung; Choi, Hyun Jong; Choi, Moon Han; Kim, Dong Choon; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo; Cho, Young Deok; Park, Sang-Heum

    2014-12-01

    An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) device using a core biopsy needle was developed to improve diagnostic accuracy by simultaneously obtaining cytological aspirates and histological core samples. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB with standard EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in patients with solid pancreatic masses. Between January 2012 and May 2013, consecutive patients with solid pancreatic masses were prospectively enrolled and randomized to undergo EUS-FNB using a core biopsy needle or EUS-FNA using a standard aspiration needle at a single tertiary center. The specimen was analyzed by onsite cytology, Papanicolaou-stain cytology, and histology. The main outcome measure was diagnostic accuracy for malignancy. The secondary outcome measures were: the median number of passes required to establish a diagnosis, the proportion of patients in whom the diagnosis was established with each pass, and complication rates. The overall accuracy of combining onsite cytology with Papanicolaou-stain cytology and histology was not significantly different for the FNB (n = 58) and FNA (n = 58) groups (98.3 % [95 %CI 94.9 % - 100 %] vs. 94.8 % [95 %CI 91.9 % - 100 %]; P = 0.671). Compared with FNA, FNB required a significantly lower median number of needle passes to establish a diagnosis (1.0 vs. 2.0; P < 0.001). On subgroup analysis of 111 patients with malignant lesions, the proportion of patients in whom malignancy was diagnosed on the first pass was significantly greater in the FNB group (72.7 % vs. 37.5 %; P < 0.001). The overall accuracy of FNB and FNA in patients with solid pancreatic masses was comparable; however, fewer passes were required to establish the diagnosis of malignancy using FNB.This study was registered on the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000014057). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Reservoir zonation based on statistical analyses: A case study of the Nubian sandstone, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sharawy, Mohamed S.; Gaafar, Gamal R.

    2016-12-01

    Both reservoir engineers and petrophysicists have been concerned about dividing a reservoir into zones for engineering and petrophysics purposes. Through decades, several techniques and approaches were introduced. Out of them, statistical reservoir zonation, stratigraphic modified Lorenz (SML) plot and the principal component and clustering analyses techniques were chosen to apply on the Nubian sandstone reservoir of Palaeozoic - Lower Cretaceous age, Gulf of Suez, Egypt, by using five adjacent wells. The studied reservoir consists mainly of sandstone with some intercalation of shale layers with varying thickness from one well to another. The permeability ranged from less than 1 md to more than 1000 md. The statistical reservoir zonation technique, depending on core permeability, indicated that the cored interval of the studied reservoir can be divided into two zones. Using reservoir properties such as porosity, bulk density, acoustic impedance and interval transit time indicated also two zones with an obvious variation in separation depth and zones continuity. The stratigraphic modified Lorenz (SML) plot indicated the presence of more than 9 flow units in the cored interval as well as a high degree of microscopic heterogeneity. On the other hand, principal component and cluster analyses, depending on well logging data (gamma ray, sonic, density and neutron), indicated that the whole reservoir can be divided at least into four electrofacies having a noticeable variation in reservoir quality, as correlated with the measured permeability. Furthermore, continuity or discontinuity of the reservoir zones can be determined using this analysis.

  5. Provenance shift in Cambrian mid-Baltica: detrital zircon chronology of Ediacaran–Cambrian sandstones in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Isozaki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the tectono-sedimentary history of Paleozoic Baltica, age spectra of detrital zircon grains from the Ediacaran (Kotlin Regional Stage and Lower Cambrian sandstones (lowermost Lontova and Lükati formations in western Estonia in central Baltica were analyzed by LA-ICPMS. The abundant occurrence of Archean to Mesoproterozoic (2800–1000 Ma zircon grains was confirmed in all samples. The new data provided the following information on the provenance of siliciclastic material as well as a major change in the sedimentary regime of the Paleo-Baltic basin during the Early Cambrian: (1 the Ediacaran–Lower Cambrian Paleo-Baltic basin received abundant terrigenous clastics from the core of Baltica underlain by the Archean–Mesoproterozoic crystalline crust, (2 the exposed surface area of the 1600 Ma Rapakivi granites apparently was more extensive during the Ediacaran–Early Cambrian than at present, (3 a major re-organization of the basin geometry occurred in the middle Early Cambrian (ca 530–515 Ma in central Baltica, inducing a change in the sediment supply system, (4 in contrast to the total absence of Neoproterozoic detrital zircon grains before the middle Early Cambrian, their sudden appearance at this time, together with consistent occurrence at least until the mid-Devonian, suggests a significant uplift event located in southeast Baltica and/or in a more easterly land domain (e.g., in Sarmatia, (5 possible sources for the Neoproterozoic zircon grains include the peripheral mobile belts with pan-African signatures around Baltica, e.g., the so-called Gondwanan fragments along the Tornquist margin to the southwest and the Timanian belt along the northeastern margin.

  6. Stone temperature and moisture variability under temperate environmental conditions: Implications for sandstone weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllister, Daniel; Warke, Patricia; McCabe, Stephen

    2017-03-01

    Temperature and moisture conditions are key drivers of stone weathering processes in both natural and built environments. Given their importance in the breakdown of stone, a detailed understanding of their temporal and spatial variability is central to understanding present-day weathering behaviour and for predicting how climate change may influence the nature and rates of future stone decay. Subsurface temperature and moisture data are reported from quarry fresh Peakmoor Sandstone samples exposed during summer (June-July) and late autumn/early winter (October-December) in a mid-latitude, temperate maritime environment. These data demonstrate that the subsurface thermal response of sandstone comprises numerous short-term (minutes), low magnitude fluctuations superimposed upon larger-scale diurnal heating and cooling cycles with distinct aspect-related differences. The short-term fluctuations create conditions in the outer 5-10 mm of stone that are much more 'energetic' in comparison to the more subdued thermal cycling that occurs deeper within the sandstone samples. Data show that moisture dynamics are equally complex with a near-surface region (5-10 mm) in which frequent moisture cycling takes place and this, combined with the thermal dynamism exhibited by the same region, may have significant implications for the nature and rate of weathering activity. Data indicate that moisture input from rainfall, particularly when it is wind-driven, can travel deep into the stone where it can prolong the time of wetness. This most often occurs during wetter winter months when moisture input is high and evaporative loss is low but can happen at any time during the year when the hydraulic connection between near-surface and deeper regions of the stone is disrupted with subsequent loss of moisture from depth slowing as it becomes reliant on vapour diffusion alone. These data illustrate the complexity of temperature and moisture conditions in sandstone exposed to the 'moderate

  7. Estimation of uranium migration parameters in sandstone aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malov, A I

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition and isotopes of carbon and uranium were investigated in groundwater samples that were collected from 16 wells and 2 sources in the Northern Dvina Basin, Northwest Russia. Across the dataset, the temperatures in the groundwater ranged from 3.6 to 6.9 °C, the pH ranged from 7.6 to 9.0, the Eh ranged from -137 to +128 mV, the total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 209 to 22,000 mg L(-1), and the dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged from 0 to 9.9 ppm. The (14)C activity ranged from 0 to 69.96 ± 0.69 percent modern carbon (pmC). The uranium content in the groundwater ranged from 0.006 to 16 ppb, and the (234)U:(238)U activity ratio ranged from 1.35 ± 0.21 to 8.61 ± 1.35. The uranium concentration and (234)U:(238)U activity ratio increased from the recharge area to the redox barrier; behind the barrier, the uranium content is minimal. The results were systematized by creating a conceptual model of the Northern Dvina Basin's hydrogeological system. The use of uranium isotope dating in conjunction with radiocarbon dating allowed the determination of important water-rock interaction parameters, such as the dissolution rate:recoil loss factor ratio Rd:p (a(-1)) and the uranium retardation factor:recoil loss factor ratio R:p in the aquifer. The (14)C age of the water was estimated to be between modern and >35,000 years. The (234)U-(238)U age of the water was estimated to be between 260 and 582,000 years. The Rd:p ratio decreases with increasing groundwater residence time in the aquifer from n × 10(-5) to n × 10(-7) a(-1). This finding is observed because the TDS increases in that direction from 0.2 to 9 g L(-1), and accordingly, the mineral saturation indices increase. Relatively high values of R:p (200-1000) characterize aquifers in sandy-clayey sediments from the Late Pleistocene and the deepest parts of the Vendian strata. In samples from the sandstones of the upper part of the Vendian strata, the R:p value is ∼ 24, i.e., sorption processes are

  8. Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous turbidite sandstones in the Central Graben, North Sea; with special focus on the Danish Gertrud Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannessen, P.

    1998-10-01

    Thick Late Jurassic - Early cretaceous turbidite sandstone successions in the Central Graben are uncommon except from the Moray Firth and Viking Graven north of the Central Graben, where several important hydrocarbon producing turbidite sandstone fields are known. The only hydrocarbon producing turbidite reservoir sandstones in the Central Graben is the up to 55 m thick Ribble Sandstone Member located in the British South-west Central Graben, where it is lying above thick shoreface reservoir sandstones of the Fulmar Formation, separated by offshore claystones of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation. The turbidite sandstones of the Ribble Sandstone Member derived from the more proximal thick reservoir sandstones of the Fulmar Formation located near the Mid North Sea High. It has not yet been possible to correlate thick shoreface sandstones of the Norwegian Ula Formation or the Danish Heno Formation to more distal thick turbidite sandstones derived from the shoreface sandstones. (au) 60 fig., 85 refs.

  9. Halomonas sulfidaeris-dominated microbial community inhabits a 1.8 km-deep subsurface Cambrian Sandstone reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yiran; Kumar, Charu Gupta; Chia, Nicholas; Kim, Pan-Jun; Miller, Philip A; Price, Nathan D; Cann, Isaac K O; Flynn, Theodore M; Sanford, Robert A; Krapac, Ivan G; Locke, Randall A; Hong, Pei-Ying; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Liu, Wen-Tso; Mackie, Roderick I; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Wright, Chris L; Mikel, Mark A; Walker, Jared L; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Yannarell, Anthony C; Fouke, Bruce W

    2014-06-01

    A low-diversity microbial community, dominated by the γ-proteobacterium Halomonas sulfidaeris, was detected in samples of warm saline formation porewater collected from the Cambrian Mt. Simon Sandstone in the Illinois Basin of the North American Midcontinent (1.8 km/5872 ft burial depth, 50°C, pH 8, 181 bars pressure). These highly porous and permeable quartz arenite sandstones are directly analogous to reservoirs around the world targeted for large-scale hydrocarbon extraction, as well as subsurface gas and carbon storage. A new downhole low-contamination subsurface sampling probe was used to collect in situ formation water samples for microbial environmental metagenomic analyses. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that this H. sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community is indigenous and not derived from drilling mud microbial contamination. Data to support this includes V1-V3 pyrosequencing of formation water and drilling mud, as well as comparison with previously published microbial analyses of drilling muds in other sites. Metabolic pathway reconstruction, constrained by the geology, geochemistry and present-day environmental conditions of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, implies that H. sulfidaeris-dominated subsurface microbial community may utilize iron and nitrogen metabolisms and extensively recycle indigenous nutrients and substrates. The presence of aromatic compound metabolic pathways suggests this microbial community can readily adapt to and survive subsurface hydrocarbon migration.

  10. Mesures de contraintes in-situ. Méthode de relaxation des carottes Measuring in-Situ Stresses. Relaxation Method with Core Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perreau P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article, on se propose de présenter les premiers résultats de l'étude de la méthode d'évaluation des contraintes par mesure de déformations différées d'une carotte après son extraction. Le travail correspondant a été réalisé dans le cadre du projet ARTEP Fracturation hydraulique . Les principes de cette méthode et les quelques éléments d'interprétation récemment publiés dans la littérature sont exposés dans un premier temps. Les résultats de deux campagnes de mesures sur deux puits de la SNEA-P (Soudron, novembre 1985 et Lanot, juillet 1986 sont ensuite présentés. Ces essais ont mis en évidence que les déformations différées d'une carotte dues au relachement des contraintes sont effectivement mesurables. Cependant, une interprétation quantitative de ces mesures nécessite une amélioration des conditions expérimentales (stabilisation thermique, stabilisation de l'état de saturation. This article describes the first results of research on a method of evaluating stresses by measuring the differred deformations of a core sample after it has been extracted. The corresponding research was done within the framework of an ARTEP project on Hydraulic Fracturing . The principles of this method and several interpretation aspects published recently in the literature are described in the first part. Then the results of two measurement campaigns using two SNEA-P wells (Soudron in November 1985 and Lanot in July 1986 are described. These tests revealed that the differed deformations of a core sample due to the relaxing of stresses can effectively be measured. However, a quantitative interpretation of these measurements requires an improvement to be made in the experimental conditions (thermal stabilization, stabilization of the state of saturation.

  11. Geochemical discriminations of sandstones from the Mohe Foreland basin, northeastern China: Tectonic setting and provenance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhengjun; LI Jinyi; MO Shenguo; Andrey A. Sorokin

    2005-01-01

    Discrimination of sandstone geochemistry to tectonic settings and provenance has become an effective method in the studies of complex geological circumstances because of its higher sensitivity for the stability of tectonic settings in the period of basin deposition. Results of geochemical analyses in this paper show that sandstone samples of the Mesozoic Mohe basin fall in active continental margin settings on several kinds of tectonic discriminatory diagrams (Bhatia et al. 1983, 1986; Roser et al. 1986,1988,1999). The samples are also characterized by binary-system provenances, whose terrigenous clastic materials mainly derived from the orogenic belt near the basin to the north and secondarily from the continental region in the south of the basin at the same time. The research results of rock geochemistry, combined with tectonic analysis, reflect that tectonic type of the basin is a foreland basin with nature of depositional accumulation of molass, but not continental rift basin considered in the past. This finding provides important evidence of rock geochemistry for the original structural linkage between the Mohe Foreland Basin and Mongol-Okhotsk Orogen in Mesozoic.

  12. Coring and High-Resolution Imaging of the Permian-Triassic Boundary in Deltadalen, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    The Permian-Triassic extinction was likely triggered by the voluminous igneous activity of the Siberian Traps. There are, however, limited information available about the effects of the Siberian Traps volcanism in Permian to Triassic sedimentary successions outside Siberia. We drilled two boreholes across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) in Deltadalen, Svalbard, in August 2014, to better document the extinction event and environmental changes in the sedimentary succession in this region. Even though the PTB event is studied in several outcrops to varying degree if scrutiny on Svalbard, a scientific core is important for understanding the details of the PTB event, as outcrops may not permit studies at the appropriate levels of resolution, exposure or confidence. The Deltadalen site was chosen as an optimal drilling location after field work in the Isfjorden area in 2013 and early 2014. The almost 100 m deep holes were fully cored and penetrated the Triassic Vikinghøgda Formation (about 85 m recovered) and the Permian Kapp Starostin Formation (about 15 m). The main lithologies include Permian chert-rich green glauconitic sandstones and Triassic mudstones. A 10 m thick sedimentary reference outcrop section across the PTB was further logged and sampled in a nearby river valley. A comprehensive core analysis program is now underway. High-resolution XRF, MST and hyperspectral core scanning has been completed along the entire core surface, while high-resolution CT scanning has been carried out for whole core sections. The DD-1 core has subsequently been split, photographed, described, and sampled for geochemical, micropaleontological, petrological and magnetic analyses. Almost 10 bentonite layers have furthermore been sampled for volcanological and geochronological studies. Our goal is that the cores will become an important future reference section of the PTB in Svalbard and the high-Arctic, and help constrain the extent of the regional effects of explosive volcanism

  13. Origin and implications of fluid inclusions from filled fractures, Oriskany Sandstone, Allegheny Plateau, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basilone, T.; Anderson, T.; Burruss, R.C.

    1984-12-01

    Two cores from the Lower Devonian Oriskany Sandstone underlying the Allegheny Plateau in south-central Somerset County, Pennsylvania, contain fractures that may either be filled with epigenetic minerals or unfilled. The 1 Sipe core, taken from an unproductive well drilled on the crest of an anticlinal structure, is characterized by numerous discontinuous vertical fractures. The 1 Romesburg core, taken from a productive well drilled on the flank of an anticlinal structure, contains numerous fractures that lie parallel with bedding planes. The walls of these fractures consist of smooth slickensided surfaces. Quartz and ferroan-calcite crystals filling fractures contain numerous hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions. The distribution of these fluid inclusions within most minerals allowed a determination to be made regarding the relative times of migration of fluid hydrocarbon phases in the subsurface with respect to the paragenetic sequence of mineralization events. Analysis of fluid inclusions indicates that fractures were opened at 22,000 ft (6700 m) and remained open throughout an extended period of uplift. Furthermore, inclusions contain hydrocarbon-rich fluids that are comparable to reservoir hydrocarbons in the nearby Shamrock field. This relationship implies that hydrocarbons that currently exist in reservoirs were conducted along fractures that were once open. Fractures crosscut diagenetic features, indicating that diagenesis, for the most part, preceded fracture events. Although they differ in origin and orientation, fractures characterizing Oriskany strata were healed by a consistent sequence of epigenetic minerals.

  14. Percolation experiments to determine fluid-matrix interaction (with particular regard to pretreatment of the drill core); Kerndurchstroemungsversuche zur Ermittlung von Fluid-Matrix-Wechselwirkungen (unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der Kernvorbehandlung)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.; Seibt, A. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bohrtechnik und Fluidbergbau; Hoth, P. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The injection of fluids into sandstone reservoirs leads to interactions between these waters, the reservoir rocks, and the formation fluids. Estimations about possible permeability reducing processes caused by these interactions are therefore of great importance for the exploitation of sandstone aquifers as geothermal reservoirs. Percolation experiments under in situ conditions with core samples from North German geothermal boreholes were done in order to investigate these fluid-rock interactions. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Die Injektion von Fluiden in Aquiferspeicher fuehrt zu Wechselwirkungen zwischen dem Speichergestein, den Formationsfluiden und den injizierten Loesungen. Fuer die Bewirtschaftung der Speicher sind insbesondere Kenntnisse ueber moegliche Permeabilitaetsreduzierungen durch diese Wechselwirkungen von Bedeutung. Mit Hilfe von Kern-Durchstroemungsexperimenten, durchgefuehrt unter lagerstaettenaehnlichen Bedingungen mit Original- bzw. modifizierten Fluiden, wurde daher das Durchstroemungsverhalten von unterschiedlich ausgebildeten Reservoirsandsteinen aus norddeutschen Geothermiebohrungen untersucht. (orig./AKF)

  15. Traces of the heritage arising from the Macelj sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golež, Mateja

    2014-05-01

    The landscape of Southeast Slovenia and its stone heritage principally reveal itself through various Miocene sandstones. The most frequently found type on the borderline between Slovenia and Croatia, i.e. east of Rogatec, is the micaceous-quartz Macelj sandstone. This rock ranges in colour from greenish grey to bluish grey and yellowish, depending on the content of glauconite, which colours it green. In its composition, the rock is a heterogeneous mixture of grains of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, microcline, anorthite and glauconite. The average size of grains is 300μm. In cross-section, they are oblong, semi-rounded or round. The mechanical-physical and durability properties of the Macelj sandstone, which have been characterised pursuant to the applicable standards for natural stone, reveal that the rock exhibits poor resistance to active substances from the atmosphere, particularly in the presence of salt. In the surroundings of Rogatec, there are around 45 abandoned quarries of the Macelj sandstone, which are the result of the exploitation of this mineral resource from the 17th century on. The local quarrymen earned their bread until 1957, when the Kambrus quarry industry closed down. From the original use of this mineral resource as construction and decorative material, the useful value of the Macelj sandstone expanded during the development of the metals industry to the manufacture of large and small grindstones for the needs of the domestic and international market. Therefore, traces of quarrying can not only be seen in the disused quarries, but also in the rich architectural heritage of Rogatec and its surroundings, the stone furniture - from portals, window frames, wells, various troughs, pavements to stone walls - and other. The living quarrying heritage slowly passed into oblivion after World War II, although the analysis of the social image of the people residing in Rogatec and its surroundings revealed that there was an average of one stonemason in

  16. Origins of massive-type sandstones in braided river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charlotte A. L.; Turner, Brian R.

    1998-07-01

    This study details largely ignored massive-type, predominantly structureless sandstones preserved within braided fluvial successions of Carboniferous to Triassic age. Architectural element analysis reveals that these sediments were deposited within sand-dominated perennial systems of low braiding index. Cross-stratified braid bar deposits are interbedded with, and laterally equivalent to geometrically distinct, largely structureless massive-type sandbodies identified as two separate architectural elements: channel-like (SMC) and sheet-like (SMS). Sub-divisions within these broad categories define six geometric units which are texturally distinct from each other and from the structured sediments of the same lithological unit. Since massive-type sandstone elements have many features in common with the deposits of highly concentrated, laminar sediment/water flows, they are interpreted in terms of similar depositional processes. SMC elements form elongate channel-like features which trend both at high angles to, and parallel with, the palaeoflow of host fluvial channels. The lower bounding surfaces of SMC elements may be either erosive or non-erosive, and describe symmetrical cross-sections with margins dipping debris flows related to fluvial bank and/or bar collapse. SMS elements form sandsheets up to 8 m in thickness which may be traced >250 m parallel and transverse to the fluvial palaeoflow direction established from cross-stratified sandstones of adjacent architectural elements. The basal surface of SMS elements may either be undulose (where the sandbodies are termed SMSU) or erosional (where they are termed SMSE). Internally SMSU elements preserve parallel laminae marginal to basal scours, diffuse sweeping laminae, isolated cross-sets and water escape structures. The SMSU sediments are compositionally identical to the structured sandstones with which they are associated and are interpreted as the result of deposition from highly concentrated stream flows

  17. Transport upscaling from pore- to Darcy-scale: Incorporating pore-scale Berea sandstone Lagrangian velocity statistics into a Darcy-scale transport CTRW model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyguiraud, Alexandre; Dentz, Marco; Gouze, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    For the past several years a lot of attention has been given to pore-scale flow in order to understand and model transport, mixing and reaction in porous media. Nevertheless we believe that an accurate study of spatial and temporal evolution of velocities could bring important additional information for the upscaling from pore to higher scales. To gather these pieces of information, we perform Stokes flow simulations on pore-scale digitized images of a Berea sandstone core. First, micro-tomography (XRMT) imaging and segmentation processes allow us to obtain 3D black and white images of the sample [1]. Then we used an OpenFoam solver to perform the Stokes flow simulations mentioned above, which gives us the velocities at the interfaces of a cubic mesh. Subsequently, we use a particle streamline reconstruction technique which uses the Eulerian velocity field previously obtained. This technique, based on a modified Pollock algorithm [2], enables us to make particle tracking simulations on the digitized sample. In order to build a stochastic pore-scale transport model, we analyze the Lagrangian velocity series in two different ways. First we investigate the velocity evolution by sampling isochronically (t-Lagrangian), and by studying its statistical properties in terms of one- and two-points statistics. Intermittent patterns can be observed. These are due to the persistance of low velocities over a characteristic space length. Other results are investigated, such as correlation functions and velocity PDFs, which permit us to study more deeply this persistence in the velocities and to compute the correlation times. However, with the second approach, doing these same analysis in space by computing the velocities equidistantly, enables us to remove the intermittency shown in the temporal evolution and to model these velocity series as a Markov process. This renders the stochastic particle dynamics into a CTRW [3]. [1] Gjetvaj, F., A. Russian, P. Gouze, and M. Dentz (2015

  18. Strain-induced kinetics of intergrain defects as the mechanism of slow dynamics in the nonlinear resonant response of humid sandstone bars

    CERN Document Server

    Vakhnenko, O O; Shankland, T J; Cate, J A T; Vakhnenko, Oleksiy O.; Vakhnenko, Vyacheslav O.; Shankland, Thomas J.; Cate, James A. Ten

    2004-01-01

    The closed description of nonlinear and slow dynamics effects exhibited by the sandstone bars in numerous resonant response experiments with the longitudinal strain configuration is proposed. Alongside with the fast subsystem of longitudinal nonlinear displacements we examine the strain dependent slow subsystem of broken intergrain and interlamina cohesive bonds and show that even the simplest but phenomenologically correct modelling of their mutual feedback elucidates the main experimental mysteries typical for the forced longitudinal oscillations of sandstone bars, namely (i) the hysteretic behaviour of resonance curve on both its slopes, (ii) the linear softening of resonant frequency with the driving level increase, and (iii) the gradual recovery (increase) of resonant frequency at low dynamical strains after the sample being conditioned by the high ones. In order to reproduce the highly nonlinear elastic features of sandstone grained structure the realistic nonperturbative form of strain potential energy...

  19. The impact of the core transformation process on spirituality, symptom experience, and psychological maturity in a mixed age sample in India: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braganza, Dinesh; Piedmont, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that spiritual and religious constructs have the potential to influence a broad range of outcomes such as health, well-being, and meaning, both positively and negatively. This study looked at the effect of an under studied psycho-spiritual approach, Core Transformation (CT), in reducing symptoms and promoting well-being. This study also examined whether the impact of CT would be moderated by age, with older participants evidencing better outcomes. Participants from an Indian convenience sample (N = 189) ranging in age from 18 to 65 (M = 34) received group training in CT and completed a battery of measures pretest and 4 weeks post-training, which included personality, spirituality, and psychosocial outcomes scales. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicated significant improvements over time for both spirituality and symptom experience. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for the predictive effects of personality, reaffirmed the incremental validity of Spiritual Transcendence and religious variables in predicting symptom change and outcome ratings. CT did not appear to effect participants levels of psychological maturity. Age was not found to mediate any of these relationships, indicating the age universality of CT's therapeutic effects.

  20. Immunohistochemistry for BRAF(V600E) antibody VE1 performed in core needle biopsy samples identifies mutated papillary thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Guidobaldi, L; Nasrollah, N; Taccogna, S; Cicciarella Modica, D D; Turrini, L; Nigri, G; Romanelli, F; Valabrega, S; Giovanella, L; Onetti Muda, A; Trimboli, P

    2014-05-01

    BRAF(V600E) is the most frequent genetic mutation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and has been reported as an independent predictor of poor prognosis of these patients. Current guidelines do not recommend the use of BRAF(V600E) mutational analysis on cytologic specimens from fine needle aspiration due to several reasons. Recently, immunohistochemistry using VE1, a mouse anti-human BRAF(V600E) antibody, has been reported as a highly reliable technique in detecting BRAF-mutated thyroid and nonthyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of VE1 immunohistochemistry on microhistologic samples from core needle biopsy (CNB) in identifying BRAF-mutated PTC. A series of 30 nodules (size ranging from 7 to 22 mm) from 30 patients who underwent surgery following CNB were included in the study. All these lesions had had inconclusive cytology. In all cases, both VE1 and BRAF(V600E) genotypes were evaluated. After surgery, final histology demonstrated 21 cancers and 9 benign lesions. CNB correctly diagnosed 20/20 PTC and 5/5 adenomatous nodules. One follicular thyroid cancer and 4 benign lesions were assessed at CNB as uncertain follicular neoplasm. VE1 immunohistochemistry revealed 8 mutated PTC and 22 negative cases. A 100% agreement was found when positive and negative VE1 results were compared with BRAF mutational status. These data are the first demonstration that VE1 immunohistochemistry performed on thyroid CNB samples perfectly matches with genetic analysis of BRAF status. Thus, VE1 antibody can be used on thyroid microhistologic specimens to detect BRAF(V600E)-mutated PTC before surgery.

  1. New chrysin-functionalized silica-core shell magnetic nanoparticles for the magnetic solid phase extraction of copper ions from water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ali, Layth Imad; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sulaiman, Azli; Kamboh, Muhammad Afzal; Sanagi, Mohd Marsin

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis, characterization and application of a new chrysin-based silica core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-N-chrysin) as an adsorbent for the preconcentration of Cu(II) from aqueous environment. The morphology, thermal stability and magnetic property of Fe3O4@SiO2-N-chrysin were analyzed using FTIR, FESEM, TEM, XRD, thermal analysis and VSM. The extraction efficiency of Fe3O4@SiO2-N-chrysin was analyzed using the batch wise method with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Parameters such as the pH, the sample volume, the adsorption-desorption time, the concentration of the desorption solvent, the desorption volume, the interference effects and the regeneration of the adsorbent were optimized. It was determined that Cu(II) adsorption is highly pH-dependent, and a high recovery (98%) was achieved at a pH 6. The limit of detection (S/N=3), the limit of quantification (S/N=10), the preconcentration factor and the relative standard deviation for Cu(II) extraction were 0.3 ng mL(-1), 1 ng mL(-1), 100 and 1.9% (concentration=30 ng mL(-1), n=7), respectively. Excellent relative recoveries of 97-104% (%RSD<3.12) were achieved from samples from a spiked river, a lake and tap water. The MSPE method was also validated using certified reference materials SLRS-5 with good recovery (92.53%).

  2. Provenance of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation: implications for distribution and architecture of aeolian vs. fluvial reservoirs in the North German Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Zircon U–Pb geochronometry, heavy mineral analyses and conventional seismic reflection data were used to interpret the provenance of the Lower Triassic Bunter Sandstone Formation. The succession was sampled in five Danish wells in the northern part of the North German Basin. The results show that s...

  3. Effect Of Hot Water Injection On Sandstone Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal imbalance between supply and demand of renewable energy requires temporary storage, which can be achieved by hot water injection in warm aquifers. This requires that the permeability and porosity of the aquifer are not reduced significantly by heating. We present an overview...... of published results regarding the effect of temperature on sandstone permeability. These tests are performed with mineral oil, nitrogen gas, distilled water and solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 as well as brines that contain a mixture of salts. Thirteen sandstone formations, ranging from quartz arenites...... not account for all the permeability reductions observed. Permeablity reduction occurs both when distilled water is the saturating fluid as well as in tests with NaCl, KCl or CaCl2 solutions, however, this is not the case in tests with mineral oil or nitrogen gas. The formation of a filter cake or influx...

  4. Strength and elastic properties of sandstone under different testing conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun-ping; WANG Si-jing; WANG En-zhi

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experimental program performed on Wuhan sandstones was presented under monotonic loading, partial cyclic loading during loading path and sine wave cyclic loading with different strain rates to compare uniaxial compression strength and elastic properties (elastic modulus and Poisson ratio) under different conditions and influence of pore fluid on them. When the loading strain rates are 10-5, 10-4 and 10-3/s, uniaxial compression strengths of dry sandstones are 82.3, 126.6 and 141.6 MPa,respectively, and that of water saturated sandstones are 70.5, 108.3 and 124.1 MPa, respectively. The above results show that the uniaxial compression strength increases with the increase of strain rate, however, variation of softening coefficient is insignificant.Under monotonic loading condition, tangent modulus increases with an increment of stress (strain) to a maximum value at a certain stress level, beyond which it starts to decline. Under the partial cyclic loading during loading path condition, unloading or reloading modulus is larger than loading modulus, and unloading and reloading moduli are almost constants with respect to stress level,especially unloading modulus. Under the sine wave cyclic loading condition, tangent modulus and Poisson ratio display asymmetric 'X' shape with various strain, and the average unloading modulus is larger than the average loading modulus.

  5. Calcium lignosulfonate adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Reid B; Bai, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes adsorption and desorption studies carried out with calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) on Berea sandstone. Circulation experiments were performed to determine CLS adsorption isotherms and the effects of CLS concentration, temperature, salinity, brine hardness, and injection rate on adsorption density. Flow-through experiments were performed to assess the reversibility of CLS adsorption and the influence of postflush rate, brine concentration, brine hardness, brine pH, and temperature on the desorption process. Results indicate that CLS adsorption isotherms on Berea sandstone follow the Freundlich isotherm law. The results presented in this paper on the effects of CLS adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone show that: (1) increasing CLS concentration and salinity increases CLS adsorption density; (2) increasing temperature will decrease adsorption density; (3) increasing injection rate of CLS solution will slightly decrease CLS adsorption density; (4) postflush rate and salinity of brine have a large impact on the CLS desorption process; (5) the adsorption and desorption process are not completely reversible; and (5) temperature and pH of the postflush brine have little effect on desorption.

  6. The Growth of Cool Cores and Evolution of Cooling Properties in a Sample of 83 Galaxy Clusters at 0.3 < z < 1.2 Selected from the SPT-SZ Survey

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, M; Vikhlinin, A; Stalder, B; Bleem, L E; Lin, H W; Aird, K A; Ashby, M L N; Bautz, M W; Bayliss, M; Bocquet, S; Brodwin, M; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Clocchiatti, A; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Desai, S; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J P; Foley, R J; Forman, W R; George, E M; Gettings, D; Gladders, M D; Gonzalez, A H; Halverson, N W; High, F W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hrubes, J D; Jones, C; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Liu, J; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; Mantz, A; Marrone, D P; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Miller, E D; Mocanu, L; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Murray, S S; Nurgaliev, D; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Reichardt, C L; Rest, A; Ruel, J; Ruhl, J E; Saliwanchik, B R; Saro, A; Sayre, J T; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Song, J; Suhada, R; Spieler, H G; Stanford, S A; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Williamson, R; Zahn, O; Zenteno, A

    2013-01-01

    We present first results on the cooling properties derived from Chandra X-ray observations of 83 high-redshift (0.3 0.75, consistent with earlier reports for clusters at z > 0.5 using similar definitions. Our measurements indicate that cool cores have been steadily growing over the 8 Gyr spanned by our sample, consistent with a constant, ~150 Msun/yr cooling flow that is unable to cool below entropies of 10 keV cm^2 and, instead, accumulates in the cluster center. We estimate that cool cores began to assemble in these massive systems at z ~ 1, which represents the first constraints on the onset of cooling in galaxy cluster cores. We investigate several potential biases which could conspire to mimic this cool core evolution and are unable to find a bias that has a similar redshift dependence and a substantial amplitude.

  7. Fragmentation characteristics analysis of sandstone fragments based on impact rockburst test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqiao Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Impact rockburst test on sandstone samples with a central hole is carried out under true triaxial static loads and vertical dynamic load conditions, and rock fragments after the test are collected. The fragments of sandstone generated from strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test are also collected. The fragments are weighed and the length, width and thickness of each piece of fragments are measured respectively. The fragment quantities with coarse, medium, fine and micro grains in different size ranges, mass and particles distributions are also analyzed. Then, the fractal dimension of fragments is calculated by the methods of size-frequency, mass-frequency and length-to-thickness ratio-frequency. It is found that the crushing degree of impact rockburst fragments is higher, accompanied with blocky characteristics observably. The mass percentage of small grains, including fine and micro grains, in impact rockburst test is higher than those in strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test. Energy dissipation from rockburst tests is more than that from uniaxial compression test, as the quantity of micro grains generated does.

  8. Fragmentation characteristics analysis of sandstone fragments based on impact rockburst test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongqiao Liu; Dejian Li; Fei Zhao; Chengchao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Impact rockburst test on sandstone samples with a central hole is carried out under true triaxial static loads and vertical dynamic load conditions, and rock fragments after the test are collected. The fragments of sandstone generated from strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test are also collected. The fragments are weighed and the length, width and thickness of each piece of fragments are measured respectively. The fragment quantities with coarse, medium, fine and micro grains in different size ranges, mass and particles distributions are also analyzed. Then, the fractal dimension of fragments is calculated by the methods of size-frequency, mass-frequency and length-to-thickness ratio-frequency. It is found that the crushing degree of impact rockburst fragments is higher, accompanied with blocky character-istics observably. The mass percentage of small grains, including fine and micro grains, in impact rock-burst test is higher than those in strain rockburst test and uniaxial compression test. Energy dissipation from rockburst tests is more than that from uniaxial compression test, as the quantity of micro grains generated does.

  9. Characterization of the Oriskany and Berea Sandstones: Evaluating Biogeochemical Reactions of Potential Sandstone–Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, Circe [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Harris, Aubrey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-07-07

    , guar gum, and isopropanol]; 3) reviews the known research about the interactions between several hydraulic fracturing chemicals [e.g. polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), and glutaraldehyde] with the minerals (quartz, clay, pyrite, and carbonates) common to the lithologies of the Marcellus shale and its surrounding sandstones; and 4) characterizes the Berea sandstone and analyzes the physical and chemical effects of flowing guar gum through a Berea sandstone core.

  10. Microstructure parameters evaluation of Botucatu formation sandstone by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Jaquiel S.; Appoloni, Carlos R.; Marques, Leonardo C., E-mail: jaquielfernandes@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: appoloni@uel.b, E-mail: leocarma@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada; Fernandes, Celso P., E-mail: celso@lmpt.ufsc.b [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Meios Porosos e Propriedades TermoFisicas (LMPT)

    2009-07-01

    Microstructural parameters evaluation of reservoir rocks are very important to petroleum industry. This work presents total porosity and pore size distribution measurement of a silicified sandstone sample from the Botucatu formation, collected at municipal district of Faxinal, Parana, Brazil. Porosity and pores size distribution were determined using X-Ray microtomography and imaging techniques. Acquired images had 2.9 mum spatial resolution. 800 2-D images where reconstructed for the microstructure analysis. The determined average porosity was 6.1 +- 2.1 %. 95 % of the porous phase refers to pores with radius ranging from 2.9 to 167.4 mum, presenting the larger frequency (6 %) at 5.9 mum radius. The 3-D volume of the sample was reconstructed and compared with the 3-D model obtained through the autocorrelation functions from the 2-D images analysis. (author)

  11. On the water saturation calculation in hydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalheim, Stein Ottar

    2002-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to identify the most important uncertainty sources in water saturation calculation and examine the possibility for developing new S{sub w} - equations or possibility to develop methods to remove weaknesses and uncertainties in existing S{sub w} - equations. Due to the need for industrial applicability of the equations we aimed for results with the following properties: The accuracy in S{sub w} should increase compared with existing S{sub w} - equations. The equations should be simple to use in petrophysical evaluations. The equations should be based on conventional logs and use as few as possible input parameters. The equations should be numerical stable. This thesis includes an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the most common S{sub w} equations. The results are addressed in chapter 3 and were intended to find the most important uncertainty sources in water saturation calculation. To increase the knowledge of the relationship between R{sub t} and S{sub w} in hydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs and to understand how the pore geometry affects the conductivity (n and m) of the rock a theoretical study was done. It was also an aim to examine the possibility for developing new S{sub w} - equations (or investigation an effective medium model) valid inhydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs. The results are presented in paper 1. A new equation for water saturation calculation in clean sandstone oil reservoirs is addressed in paper 2. A recommendation for best practice of water saturation calculation in non water wet formation is addressed in paper 3. Finally a new equation for water saturation calculation in thinly interbedded sandstone/mudstone reservoirs is presented in paper 4. The papers are titled: 1) Is the saturation exponent n a constant. 2) A New Model for Calculating Water Saturation In 3) Influence of wettability on water saturation modeling. 4) Water Saturation Calculations in Thinly Interbedded Sandstone/mudstone Reservoirs. A

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of 22/25-gauge core needle in endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Kang, Hyun; Lee, Jae Young; Choi, Geun Joo; Choi, Jung Sik

    2016-11-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core needle aspiration with that of standard fine-needle aspiration by systematic review and meta-analysis. Studies using 22/25-gauge core needles, irrespective of comparison with standard fine needles, were comprehensively reviewed. Pooled sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and summary receiver operating characteristic curves for the diagnosis of malignancy were used to estimate the overall diagnostic efficiency. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the core needle for the diagnosis of malignancy were 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84 to 0.90), 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96 to 1), and 167.37 (95% CI, 65.77 to 425.91), respectively. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, and DOR of the standard needle were 0.84 (95% CI, 0.79 to 0.88), 1 (95% CI, 0.97 to 1), and 130.14 (95% CI, 34.00 to 495.35), respectively. The area under the curve of core and standard needle in the diagnosis of malignancy was 0.974 and 0.955, respectively. The core and standard needle were comparable in terms of pancreatic malignancy diagnosis. There was no significant difference in procurement of optimal histologic cores between core and standard needles (risk ratio [RR], 0.545; 95% CI, 0.187 to 1.589). The number of needle passes for diagnosis was significantly lower with the core needle (standardized mean difference, -0.72; 95% CI, -1.02 to -0.41). There were no significant differences in overall complications (RR, 1.26; 95% CI, 0.34 to 4.62) and technical failure (RR, 5.07; 95% CI, 0.68 to 37.64). Core and standard needles were comparable in terms of diagnostic accuracy, technical performance, and safety profile.

  13. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in core sediment samples in Gulf of Izmir, Aegean Sea, Turkey (by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal Yumun, Zeki; Kam, Erol; Kurt, Dilek

    2017-04-01

    Heavy metal and radionuclide analysis studies are crucial in explaining biotic and abiotic interactions in ecosystems. This type of analysis is highly needed in environments such as coastal areas, gulfs or lakes where human activities are generally concentrated. Sediments are one of the best biological indicators for the environment since the pollution accumulates in the sediments by descent to the sea floor. In this study, sediments were collected from the Gulf of Izmir (Eastern Aegean Sea, Turkey) considering the accumulated points of domestic and industrial wastes to make an anthropogenic pollution analysis. The core sediments had different depths of 0.00-30.00 m at four different locations where Karsiyaka, Bayrakli, Incialti and Cesmealti in the Gulf of Izmir. The purpose of the study was determining Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the drilling samples to assess their levels and spatial distribution in crucial areas of the Aegean Sea by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with microwave digestion techniques. The heavy metal concentrations found in sediments varied for Cd:

  14. [Species Determination and Spectral Characteristics of Swelling Clay Minerals in the Pliocene Sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-wen; Chen, Jiang-jun; Fang, Qian; Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-lie

    2015-10-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) were conducted to deepen our research on specific species and spectral characteristics of swelling clay minerals in the Pliocene sandstones in Xinghai, Qinghai province. XRD results show that swelling clay minerals are dominant clay minerals in the sandstones, which can be up to 97% in percentage. XRD patterns show 060 reflections of the samples occur both remarkably at 1.534 Å and 1.498 Å, indicating the samples contain physical mixtures of trioctahedral and dioctahedral swelling clay minerals, respectively. Further treatment of Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation shows the swelling clay minerals collapse to 9.3-9.9 Å with a partial expansion to -18 Å. This indicates the swelling clay minerals dominate montmorillonite and contain minor saponite. The montmorillonite shows no swelling after Li-300 degrees C heat and glycerol saturation because of Li+ inserting into the octahedral layers, which balances the layer charge caused by the substitution of Mg to Al. FTIR results show the samples are composed of a kind of phyllosilicate with absorbed and structural water, which is in agreement with the results of XRD. Absorbed peaks at 913, 842, 880 cm(-1), corresponding to OH associated with Al-Al, Al-Mg, and Al-Fe pairs, further indicates the minerals are dominant dioctahedron in structure. Meanwhile, absorbed peaks at 625 and 519 cm(-1), corresponding to coupled Si-O and Al-O-Si deformation, indicates parts of Si is replaced by Al in tetrahedron. The spectral characteristics of the samples are against the presence of beidellite and nontronite based on the results of XRD and FTIR, while demonstrating an,existence of montmorillonite. This study, to distinguish the specific species of swelling clay species in clay minerals, would be of great importance when using clay mineralogy to interpret provenance and climatic information.

  15. Experimental Studies of the Effect of Permeability on Seismoelectric Conversion Coefficients in Natural and Synthetic Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Toksoz, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    Theoretical calculation of seismoelectric conversion coefficients is difficult because it requires a large number of parameters that are hard to obtain. Much laboratory data are needed to validate the theoretical results. The most critical issue is determining independently the effect of porosity and permeability on seismoelectric coefficients. In general, when the rock porosity increases, the permeability increases too, and vice versa. In this study, we make measurements on both synthetic sandstone and two Berea (500 and 100) samples. We built a man-made "sandstone" sample with round cracks which are distributed in a horizontal plane. Thus the small cube (1.7 cm^3 ) only has one value of porosity and different permeabilities in the three directions. It is a sample with anisotropy in permeability. Laboratory experiments in a water tank show that the seismoelectric conversion coefficient is related to permeabilities in the three directions. The seismoelectric coefficient is highest in the direction of maximum permeability and lowest in the direction of minimum permeability. The measurements with the isotropic Berea samples show that seismoelectric coefficient increases with both porosity and permeability. Application of the result to borehole logging measurements requires analysis of the data from P, S, and Stoneley waves. P and Stoneley waves give large seismoelectric signals in the presence of fractures or high permeability zones. Shear waves, that do not induce fluid flow, provide very small seismoelectric signals. If the fracture strike in the formation is along the borehole axis, the P-wave induces stronger seismoelectric signal. Seismoelectric well logging might prove help for exploring the fractures or micro fractures in a borehole wall.

  16. Laboratory methods for enhanced oil recovery core floods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1994-03-01

    Current research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is investigating microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to oil reservoirs. Laboratory corefloods are invaluable in developing technology necessary for a field application of MEOR. Methods used to prepare sandstone cores for experimentation, coreflooding techniques, and quantification of coreflood effluent are discussed in detail. A technique to quantify the small volumes of oil associated with laboratory core floods is described.

  17. 塔里木盆地库车坳陷致密砂岩气藏成因类型%Genetic Types of the Tight Sandstone Gas Reservoirs in the Kuqa Depression, Tarim Basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李卓; 姜振学; 庞雄奇; 李峰; 张宝收

    2013-01-01

    To further understand the genetic types of the tight sandstone gas reservoirs in Kuqa depression, the core from tight sandstone gas reservoirs is sampled to carry out the analysis on hydrocarbon charge history and porosity evolutioa The hydrocarbon charge history is investigated by analyzing the fluid inclusion petrography, and microther mometry and the porosity evolution is restored by using the model of deposition-structure -diagenesis. Combining with gas-water relationship and distribution of tight sandstone gas reservoirs. There are two charge events in the YN2 Jurassic tight sandstone reservoir, with the one of oil charge during 23-12 Ma, and the other gas charge during 5-0 Ma. The reservoir porosity dropped to less than 12% and became tight during the period of 12-8 Ma Two charge events have been recorded in the DN2 Paleogene tight sandstone reservoir; the former is oil charge during 23-12 Ma, and the latter is the gas charge during 5 - 0 Ma. The reservoir porosity dropped to less than 12% during the period of 2-0 Ma and became tight later. Two genetic types of tight sandstone gas reservoirs have been confirmed. The YN2 Jurassic tight sandstone reservoir is of the genetic type of "tight deep basin gas reservoir" with the accumulation process of gas charge after the reservoir tightened and the DN2 Paleogene tight sandstone reservoir is defined as "tight conventional gas reservoir" with the accumulation process of gas charge before the reservoir tightened. This study is of significance for further exploration and exploitation of tight sandstone gas in Kuqa depressioa.%为深化对库车坳陷致密砂岩气藏成因类型的认识,采集致密砂岩储层岩样,开展了油气充注史和孔隙度演化史研究.通过流体包裹体岩相学和显微测温厘定了油气充注史,利用沉积-构造-成岩一体化模型恢复了储层孔隙度演化史,根据两者的先后关系,划分了致密砂岩气藏的成因类型.结果表明,依南2侏罗系气藏

  18. Outcrop analogue study of Permocarboniferous geothermal sandstone reservoir formations (northern Upper Rhine Graben, Germany): impact of mineral content, depositional environment and diagenesis on petrophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretz, Achim; Bär, Kristian; Götz, Annette E.; Sass, Ingo

    2016-07-01

    The Permocarboniferous siliciclastic formations represent the largest hydrothermal reservoir in the northern Upper Rhine Graben in SW Germany and have so far been investigated in large-scale studies only. The Cenozoic Upper Rhine Graben crosses the Permocarboniferous Saar-Nahe Basin, a Variscan intramontane molasse basin. Due to the subsidence in this graben structure, the top of the up to 2-km-thick Permocarboniferous is located at a depth of 600-2900 m and is overlain by Tertiary and Quaternary sediments. At this depth, the reservoir temperatures exceed 150 °C, which are sufficient for geothermal electricity generation with binary power plants. To further assess the potential of this geothermal reservoir, detailed information on thermophysical and hydraulic properties of the different lithostratigraphical units and their depositional environment is essential. Here, we present an integrated study of outcrop analogues and drill core material. In total, 850 outcrop samples were analyzed, measuring porosity, permeability, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. Furthermore, 62 plugs were taken from drillings that encountered or intersected the Permocarboniferous at depths between 1800 and 2900 m. Petrographic analysis of 155 thin sections of outcrop samples and samples taken from reservoir depth was conducted to quantify the mineral composition, sorting and rounding of grains and the kind of cementation. Its influence on porosity, permeability, the degree of compaction and illitization was quantified. Three parameters influencing the reservoir properties of the Permocarboniferous were detected. The strongest and most destructive influence on reservoir quality is related to late diagenetic processes. An illitic and kaolinitic cementation and impregnation of bitumina document CO2- and CH4-rich acidic pore water conditions, which are interpreted as fluids that migrated along a hydraulic contact from an underlying Carboniferous hydrocarbon source rock. Migrating

  19. Caracterização petrográfica e aspectos diagenéticos dos arenitos do Grupo Bauru na região sudoeste do Estado de São Paulo Petrography and diagenetic aspects of the Bauru Group sandstones in the southwestern region of the São Paulo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Regina Stradioto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho apresenta a caracterização petrográfica e diagenética de arenitos pertencentes ao Grupo Bauru, tendo como material de estudo testemunhos de sondagem extraídos de um poço-pesquisa de 250m de profundidade, perfurado no município de Pirapozinho, região sudoeste do Estado de São Paulo. O estudo envolveu a utilização de microscopia óptica e microscopia eletrônica de varredura. O arcabouço detrítico desses arenitos é constituído essencialmente por quartzo e feldspatos e, em menor quantidade, por fragmentos líticos e minerais acessórios. Os arenitos do Grupo Bauru apresentam evidências de processos eodiagenéticos. Os principais processos diagenéticos observados foram: dissolução de minerais pesados, fragmentos líticos e aluminossilicatos; cimentação por calcita microcristalina; formação de argilominerais; cimentação poiquilotópica de calcita; e cimentação por zeólitas.This work presents a petrographic and diagenetic study of the Bauru Group sandstones. Core samples were collected from a 250m-deep well located in the City of Pirapozinho, southwestern region of State of São Paulo. Optical and scanning electron microscopy were applied to these studies. The detrital composition of these sandstones is constituted essentially by quartz and feldspars and in minor amounts by rock fragments and accessory minerals. The sandstones of Bauru Group underwent eodiagenesis. The main diagenetic processes identified are: dissolution of heavy minerals, rock fragments and aluminossilicate mineral; microcrystalline calcite cementation; formation of clay minerals; poikilotopic calcite cementation; and zeolite cementation.

  20. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  1. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  2. Muddy and dolomitic rip-up clasts in Triassic fluvial sandstones: Origin and impact on potential reservoir properties (Argana Basin, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henares, Saturnina; Arribas, Jose; Cultrone, Giuseppe; Viseras, Cesar

    2016-06-01

    The significance of rip-up clasts as sandstone framework grains is frequently neglected in the literature being considered as accessory components in bulk sandstone composition. However, this study highlights the great value of muddy and dolomitic rip-up clast occurrence as: (a) information source about low preservation potential from floodplain deposits and (b) key element controlling host sandstone diagenetic evolution and thus ultimate reservoir quality. High-resolution petrographic analysis on Triassic fluvial sandstones from Argana Basin (T6 and T7/T8 units) highlights the significance of different types of rip-up clasts as intrabasinal framework components of continental sediments from arid climates. On the basis of their composition and ductility, three main types are distinguished: (a) muddy rip-up clasts, (b) dolomitic muddy rip-up clasts and (c) dolomite crystalline rip-up clasts. Spatial distribution of different types is strongly facies-related according to grain size. Origin of rip-up clasts is related to erosion of coeval phreatic dolocretes, in different development stages, and associated muddy floodplain sediments. Cloudy cores with abundant inclusions and clear outer rims of dolomite crystals suggest a first replacive and a subsequent displacive growth, respectively. Dolomite crystals are almost stoichiometric. This composition is very similar to that of early sandstone dolomite cement, supporting phreatic dolocretes as dolomite origin in both situations. Sandstone diagenesis is dominated by mechanical compaction and dolomite cementation. A direct correlation exists between: (1) muddy rip-up clast abundance and early reduction of primary porosity by compaction with irreversible loss of intergranular volume (IGV); and (2) occurrence of dolomitic rip-up clasts and dolomite cement nucleation in host sandstone, occluding adjacent pores but preserving IGV. Both processes affect reservoir quality by generation of vertical and 3D fluid flow baffles and

  3. Imaging the Morrow A Sandstone Using Shear Wave VSP Data, Postle Field, Oklahoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Tamimi

    2012-01-01

    potential to enhance shear wave imaging of the thin heterogeneous Morrow A sandstone at Postle Field. The zero-offset VSP results confirm the advantages of shear wave over compressional wave in imaging the Morrow A sandstone. Also, the final shear wave VSP image shows that, applying the proposed processing flow, we are able to image the Morrow A sandstone where the thickness is as thin as 8.5 m.

  4. Appalachian Basin Low-Permeability Sandstone Reservoir Characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray Boswell; Susan Pool; Skip Pratt; David Matchen

    1993-04-30

    A preliminary assessment of Appalachian basin natural gas reservoirs designated as 'tight sands' by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) suggests that greater than 90% of the 'tight sand' resource occurs within two groups of genetically-related units; (1) the Lower Silurian Medina interval, and (2) the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Acadian clastic wedge. These intervals were targeted for detailed study with the goal of producing geologic reservoir characterization data sets compatible with the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS: ICF Resources, Inc.) reservoir simulator. The first phase of the study, completed in September, 1991, addressed the Medina reservoirs. The second phase, concerned with the Acadian clastic wedge, was completed in October, 1992. This report is a combined and updated version of the reports submitted in association with those efforts. The Medina interval consists of numerous interfingering fluvial/deltaic sandstones that produce oil and natural gas along an arcuate belt that stretches from eastern Kentucky to western New York. Geophysical well logs from 433 wells were examined in order to determine the geologic characteristics of six separate reservoir-bearing intervals. The Acadian clastic wedge is a thick, highly-lenticular package of interfingering fluvial-deltaic sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Geologic analyses of more than 800 wells resulted in a geologic/engineering characterization of seven separate stratigraphic intervals. For both study areas, well log and other data were analyzed to determine regional reservoir distribution, reservoir thickness, lithology, porosity, water saturation, pressure and temperature. These data were mapped, evaluated, and compiled into various TGAS data sets that reflect estimates of original gas-in-place, remaining reserves, and 'tight' reserves. The maps and data produced represent the first basin-wide geologic characterization for either interval. This report

  5. Time-dependent compaction band formation in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2015-07-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence, background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry and thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  6. Testing alternative tectonic models of Palaeotethys in the E Mediterranean region: new U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analyses of detrital zircons from Late Carboniferous and Late Triassic sandstones associated with the Anatolide and Tauride blocks (S Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustaömer, Timur; Ayda Ustaömer, Petek; Robertson, Alastair; Gerdes, Axel

    2016-04-01

    Alternative tectonic models of Palaeotethys during Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic time infer: 1. southward subduction beneath the north margin of Gondwana; 2. northward subduction beneath the south margin of Eurasia, or 3. double subduction (northwards and southwards), at least during Late Carboniferous. U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic analysis of detrital zircons, extracted from sandstones, can provide strong indications of age and identity of source terranes. Here, we consider the provenance of both Late Carboniferous and Late Triassic sandstones from both relatively allochthonous and relatively autochthonous units that are all spatially associated with the Anatolide and Tauride continental blocks. The relatively allochthonous units are sandstones (3 samples) from the Late Carboniferous Aladaǧ Nappe (Tauride; in the east), the Konya Complex (Anatolide; central area) and the Karaburun Mélange (Tauride-related; in the west). The relatively autochthonous units are Late Triassic sandstones (4 samples) from the Üzümdere Formation, the Kasımlar Formation (both western Taurides) and the Güvercinlik Formation (Karaburun Peninsula-Tauride related; far west). The Late Carboniferous sandstones from the three relatively allochthonous units are dominated by Precambrian zircon populations, the age distribution of which suggests derivation from two contrasting source regions: First, a NE African-type source (i.e. Saharan craton) for the sandstones of the Konya Mélange and the Aladaǧ Nappe because these sediments have prominent zircon populations dated at 0.5-0.7, 0.8 and 0.9-1.1 Ga. Palaeozoic zircons are minimal in the sandstones of the Aladaǧ Nappe and the Konya Complex (3 and 5% of the whole data, respectively) and are confined to Cambrian to Ordovician. Secondly, a contrasting NW African-type source is inferred for sandstone from the Karaburun Mélange because of the marked absence of Tonian-Stenian zircons and the predominance of ~2 Ga zircons over ~2.5 Ga zircons. In

  7. Population genetic structure of a sandstone specialist and a generalist heath species at two levels of sandstone patchiness across the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-López, Manuel Jesús; Segarra-Moragues, José Gabriel; Ojeda, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Many habitat specialist species are originally composed of small, discontinuous populations because their habitats are naturally fragmented or patchy. They may have suffered the long-term effects of natural patchiness. Mediterranean heathlands, a representative habitat in the Strait of Gibraltar region, are associated with nutrient-poor, acidic sandstone soils. Sandstone soil patches in the African side of the Strait (Tangier) are, in general, smaller and more scattered than in the European side (Algeciras). In this study, we analyze the effect of this sandstone patchiness on the population genetic diversity and structure of two Erica species from these Mediterranean heathlands that differ in their edaphic specificity, E. australis, sandstone specialist, and E. arborea, generalist. Average levels of within-population genetic diversity and gene flow between populations were significantly lower in Tangier (high sandstone patchiness) than in Algeciras (low patchiness) for the sandstone specialist, whereas no differences between both sides of the Strait were detected in the edaphic generalist. Since most endemic species in Mediterranean heathlands of the Strait of Gibraltar are sandstone specialists, these results highlight an increased vulnerability to loss of genetic diversity and local extinction of the heathland endemic flora in the Tangier side of the Strait of Gibraltar.

  8. Population genetic structure of a sandstone specialist and a generalist heath species at two levels of sandstone patchiness across the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Jesús Gil-López

    Full Text Available Many habitat specialist species are originally composed of small, discontinuous populations because their habitats are naturally fragmented or patchy. They may have suffered the long-term effects of natural patchiness. Mediterranean heathlands, a representative habitat in the Strait of Gibraltar region, are associated with nutrient-poor, acidic sandstone soils. Sandstone soil patches in the African side of the Strait (Tangier are, in general, smaller and more scattered than in the European side (Algeciras. In this study, we analyze the effect of this sandstone patchiness on the population genetic diversity and structure of two Erica species from these Mediterranean heathlands that differ in their edaphic specificity, E. australis, sandstone specialist, and E. arborea, generalist. Average levels of within-population genetic diversity and gene flow between populations were significantly lower in Tangier (high sandstone patchiness than in Algeciras (low patchiness for the sandstone specialist, whereas no differences between both sides of the Strait were detected in the edaphic generalist. Since most endemic species in Mediterranean heathlands of the Strait of Gibraltar are sandstone specialists, these results highlight an increased vulnerability to loss of genetic diversity and local extinction of the heathland endemic flora in the Tangier side of the Strait of Gibraltar.

  9. Selective sandstone deterioration in the cathedrals of Salamanca, Textural anisotropy as a cause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Patino, María Teresa

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available Textural sandstone anisotropy is related to the selective deterioration of such stone in buildings. The samples studied come from the Cathedrals of Salamanca. Stone fragments, cut in different directions with regard to the base supporting the ashlars in the wall, are studied by means of a binocular magnifying glass and the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. This shows that the sandstone microfabric has a granular and a laminar microtexture, which correspond to different directions in the plane in question as regards the position of the ashlar. Either of these circumstances coincides with the stone surface on the outside of the building and affect its surface deterioration in a different way. The SEM images of deteriorated stone were compared with those of unaffected stone, with both types coming from differently orientated cuts as regards the position of the ashlar. In conclusion, the position given to the block of stone in the building is of importance for the preservation of the stone. The speed of ultrasound transmission measured in samples from commercial quarries confirms the textural sandstone anisotropy to a greater or lesser extent.

    La anisotropía textural de las areniscas se relaciona con la selectividad de su deterioro en los edificios. Las muestras estudiadas pertenecen a las Catedrales de Salamanca. Fragmentos de piedra, cortados en direcciones diferentes respecto a la base sobre la que se asientan los sillares en el muro, son estudiados por medio de la lupa binocular y del microscopio electrónico de barrido (SEM. De éstos se deduce que la microfábrica de las areniscas tiene una microtextura granular y otra laminar, que corresponden a direcciones diferentes del plano respecto al asiento del sillar. Una u otra de estas situaciones coincide con la superficie de la piedra expuesta al exterior en el edificio, y afectan a su deterioro superficial de forma diferente. Las capas externas en las que predomina la arcilla

  10. Subsurface petroleum geology of Santa Rosa sandstone (Triassic), northeast New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhead, R. F.

    The Santa Rose Sandstone (Triassic) occurs at depths of less than 2,000 ft over most of northeast New Mexico. Two major petroleum accumulations are known to exist in it. These outcrops of oil impregnated sandstone are known as the Santa Rosa tar sands. The oil in the tar sands is viscous and heavy. The other known petroleum accumulation is a pool of heavy oil that occurs at depths of 400 ft to 800 ft in northeast Guadalupe County. Attempts are being made to recover the heavy oil with steamflooding in two small pilot fields. The lower and upper sandstone units are blanket deposits composed mostly of fine to medium grained porous sandstones and minor red siliciclastic mudstones. The middle mudstone unit is a blanket deposit composed chiefly of red siliciclastic mudstones and minor lenticular sandstones. Stratigraphic and petrographic studies indicate that good reservoirs are widespread in the lower and upper sandstone unit. The blanket geometry of the lower and upper sandstone units indicates that structure probably plays an important or even dominant role in the trapping of any undiscovered hydrocarbons in the Santa Rosa. Oil proximal to the outcrop belt of the Santa Rosa Sandstone has probably been flushed by recently recharged fresh ground water. Although the source of the oil in Santa Rosa Sandstone is not definitely known, geochemical studies point to the San Andres Formation (Permian) or possibly Pennsylanian rocks.

  11. Greybull Sandstone Petroleum Potential on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, David A.

    2002-05-13

    The focus of this project was to explore for stratigraphic traps that may be present in valley-fill sandstone at the top of the Lower Cretaceous Kootenai Formation. This sandstone interval, generally known as the Greybull Sandstone, has been identified along the western edge of the reservation and is a known oil and gas reservoir in the surrounding region. The Greybull Sandstone was chosen as the focus of this research because it is an excellent, well-documented, productive reservoir in adjacent areas, such as Elk Basin; Mosser Dome field, a few miles northwest of the reservation; and several other oil and gas fields in the northern portion of the Bighorn Basin.

  12. Water Vapor Diffusion and Adsorption of Sandstones: Influence of Rock Texture and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keppert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The term sandstone is used for wide range of rocks containing quartz clasts which can be cemented by secondary precipitated quartz or calcite; moreover the space between clasts can be filled by matrix. These facts result in existence of numerous rocks having highly various properties. Sandstones have been used as construction materials due to their good accessibility and workability. Since most of sandstones are porous, water vapor can penetrate through sandstone constructions. The rate of water vapor diffusion, as well as the vapor sorption isotherm, was determined for range of sandstone types. The diffusion resistance factor was found to be dependent on the total porosity of sandstone but the sorption behavior was strongly influenced by nature of the particular sandstone; the specific surface area of stone and presence of clay matrix are determining its sorption isotherm. The published data enable estimating (i diffusion resistance factor of a sandstone via knowledge of its total porosity and (ii the sorption isotherm via knowledge of the stone’s nature and specific surface area. This approach can significantly reduce the time necessary to acquire vapor-related properties of a sandstone.

  13. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  14. Simulation of channel sandstone architecture in an incised valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frykman, P.; Johannessen, P.; Andsbjerg, J.

    1998-12-31

    The present report describes a geostatistical modelling study that is aimed at reflecting the architecture of the channel sandstones in an incised valley fill. The example used for this study is a part of the Middle Jurassic sandy succession of the Bryne Formation in the Danish central Graben. The succession consists mainly of fluvial sediments in the lower part, overlain by tidal influenced sediments, which again is overlain by shallow marine sediments. The modelling study has been performed on a sequence of incised valley sediments in the upper part of the Bryne Formation overlying fluvial sediments. (au) EFP-96. 19 refs.

  15. The effects of Concentration and Salinity on Polymer Adsorption Isotherm at Sandstone Rock Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M.; Ben Mahmud, H.

    2015-04-01

    Adsorption of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (HPAM) polymers on sandstone rock surface was studied by static adsorption experiments. Total of 10 Runs of static experiments were conducted in test tubes by mixing the desired solution with crushed rock sample, at temperature of 25 °C, and salinity range from 0-4 wt%. The results are in conformity with Langmuir's isotherm. Ten different isotherms were generated at each Run. The initial polymer concentration was varied from 0.3-2.1 g/l. The effects of salinity have been studied by observation on Langmuir adsorption coefficients (Y and K). The results show that the adsorption coefficient (Y) was found to have linear relationship with salinity. The adsorption coefficient (K) was found to be related to salinity by a quadratic relationship.

  16. Influence of the properties of granite and sandstone in the desalination process by electrokinetic technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feijoo, J.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pozo-Antonio, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    such as sand disaggregation and superficial detachments. These problems can be solved by conservation technologies, which are aimed to decrease the salt concentration in rocks (desalination).The present study aimed to investigate the efficiency of electrokinetic techniques for desalination of two different......) achieved in both stones.From the results obtained, it was possible to find those inherent factors to each stone which could have an influence on the efficacy of the treatment. With this technique it was possible to reduce the salt concentration in the granite almost to 100%. However, in the sandstone...... samples the decreases were not equally high, mainly at the intermediate levels where slight enrichments were observed. The results indicate that although the used technique is efficient for salt removal regardless of the porosimetric distribution of the rock, the better interconnection between the pores...

  17. Frequency, pressure, and strain dependence of nonlinear elasticity in Berea Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Jacques; Pimienta, Lucas; Scuderi, Marco; Candela, Thibault; Shokouhi, Parisa; Fortin, Jérôme; Schubnel, Alexandre; Marone, Chris; Johnson, Paul A.

    2016-04-01

    Acoustoelasticity measurements in a sample of room dry Berea sandstone are conducted at various loading frequencies to explore the transition between the quasi-static (f→0) and dynamic (few kilohertz) nonlinear elastic response. We carry out these measurements at multiple confining pressures and perform a multivariate regression analysis to quantify the dependence of the harmonic content on strain amplitude, frequency, and pressure. The modulus softening (equivalent to the harmonic at 0f) increases by a factor 2-3 over 3 orders of magnitude increase in frequency. Harmonics at 2f, 4f, and 6f exhibit similar behaviors. In contrast, the harmonic at 1f appears frequency independent. This result corroborates previous studies showing that the nonlinear elasticity of rocks can be described with a minimum of two physical mechanisms. This study provides quantitative data that describes the rate dependency of nonlinear elasticity. These findings can be used to improve theories relating the macroscopic elastic response to microstructural features.

  18. Use of nanoparticles to improve the performance of sodium dodecyl sulfate flooding in a sandstone reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Ali

    2016-12-01

    One of the prominent enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods in oil reservoirs is surfactant flooding. The purpose of this research is to study the effect of nanoparticles on the surfactant adsorption. Real reservoir sandstone rock samples were implemented in adsorption tests. The ranges of the initial surfactant and nano silica concentrations were from 500 to 5000 ppm and 500 ppm to 2000 ppm, respectively. The commercial surfactant used is sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as an ionic surfactant and two different types of nano silica were employed. The rate of surfactant losses extremely depends on the concentration of surfactant in the system, and it was found that the adsorption of surfactant decreased with increasing the concentration of nano silica. Also, it was found that hydrophobic nano silica is more effective than hydrophilic nanoparticles.

  19. Fission track dating of mesozoic sandstones and its tectonic significance in the Eastern Sichuan Basin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Chuanbo, E-mail: cugshen@yahoo.c [Key Laboratory of Tectonics and Petroleum Resources, China University of Geosciences, Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430074 (China); Faculty of Earth Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430074 (China); Mei Lianfu [Key Laboratory of Tectonics and Petroleum Resources, China University of Geosciences, Ministry of Education, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xu Sihuang [Faculty of Earth Resources, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430074 (China)

    2009-10-15

    To establish the tectonic evolution of the eastern Sichuan basin, apatite fission track dating and time-temperature thermal history modeling were carried to analyze on 11 samples collected from Jurassic sandstones. The results indicate that the cooling and exhumation process of the eastern Sichuan basin can be divided into three stages since Cretaceous, (1) a rapid cooling phase between approx100 and approx70 Ma, (2) following by a period of relative thermal stability phase between approx70 and approx15 Ma, (3) and then a new rapid cooling stage after approx15 Ma. Two rapid cooling events imply that the eastern Sichuan basin once underwent two tectonic movements since Cretaceous. The first rapid cooling is associated with Mesozoic tectonic reactivation beginning at 100 Ma, which result in folds and faults of the eastern Sichuan basin. The second tectonic movement occurred at 15 Ma, which is related to denudation by compression resulting from the eastward growth of Tibetan plateau uplift.

  20. Heterogeneity, permeability patterns, and permeability upscaling: Physical characterization of a block of Massillon sandstone exhibiting nested scales of heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIDWELL,VINCENT C.; WILSON,JOHN L.

    2000-04-20

    Over 75,000 permeability measurements were collected from a meter-scale block of Massillon sandstone, characterized by conspicuous cross bedding that forms two distinct nested-scales of heterogeneity. With the aid of a gas minipermeameter, spatially exhaustive fields of permeability data were acquired at each of five different sample supports (i.e. sample volumes) from each block face. These data provide a unique opportunity to physically investigate the relationship between the multi-scale cross-stratified attributes of the sandstone and the corresponding statistical characteristics of the permeability. These data also provide quantitative physical information concerning the permeability upscaling of a complex heterogeneous medium. Here, a portion of the data taken from a single block face cut normal to stratification is analyzed. Results indicate a strong relationship between the calculated summary statistics and the cross-stratified structural features visible evident in the sandstone sample. Specifically, the permeability fields and semivariograms are characterized by two nested scales of heterogeneity, including a large-scale structure defined by the cross-stratified sets (delineated by distinct bounding surfaces) and a small-scale structure defined by the low-angle cross-stratification within each set. The permeability data also provide clear evidence of upscaling. That is, each calculated summary statistic exhibits distinct and consistent trends with increasing sample support. Among these trends are an increasing mean, decreasing variance, and an increasing semivariogram range. Results also clearly indicate that the different scales of heterogeneity upscale differently, with the small-scale structure being preferentially filtered from the data while the large-scale structure is preserved. Finally, the statistical and upscaling characteristics of individual cross-stratified sets were found to be very similar owing to their shared depositional environment

  1. Special core analyses and relative permeability measurement on Almond formation reservoir rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.; Brinkmeyer, A.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the results from special core analyses and relative permeability measurements conducted on samples of rock from the Almond Formation in Greater Green River Basin of southwestern Wyoming. The core was from Arch Unit Well 121 of Patrick Draw field. Samples were taken from the 4,950 to 4,965 ft depth interval. Thin section evaluation, X-ray diffraction, routine permeability and porosity, capillary pressure and wettability tests were performed to characterize the samples. Fluid flow capacity characteristics were measured during two-phase unsteady- and steady-state and three-phase steady-state relative permeability tests. Test results are presented in tables and graphs. Relative permeability results are compared with those of a 260-mD, fired Berea sandstone sample which was previously subjected to similar tests. Brine relative permeabilities were similar for the two samples, whereas oil and gas relative permeabilities for the Almond formation rock were higher at equivalent saturation conditions compared to Berea results. Most of the tests described in this report were conducted at 74{degrees}F laboratory temperature. Additional tests are planned at 150{degrees}F temperature. Equipment and procedural modifications to perform the elevated temperature tests are described.