WorldWideScience

Sample records for sands test facility

  1. Learning Design at White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotewiel, Shane

    2010-01-01

    During the Fall of 2010, I spent my time at NASA White Sands Test Facility in Las Cruces, NM as an Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP) Intern. During that time, I was given three projects to work on: Large Altitude Simulation System (LASS) basket strainer, log books, and the design of a case for touch screen monitors used for simulations. I spent most of my time on the LASS basket strainer. The LASS system has a water feed line with a basket strainer that filters out rust. In 2009, there were three misfires which cost approximately $27,000 and about 8% of the allotted time. The strainer was getting a large change in pressure that would result in a shutdown of the system. I have designed a new basket that will eliminate the large pressure change and it can be used with the old basket strainer housing. The LASS system has three steam generators (modules). Documents pertaining to these modules are stored electronically, and the majority of the documents are not able to be searched with keywords, so they have to be gone through one by one. I have come up with an idea on how to organize these files so that the Propulsion Department may efficiently search through the documents needed. Propulsion also has a LASS simulator that incorporates two touch screen monitors. Currently these monitors are in six foot by two foot metal cabinet on wheels. During simulation these monitors are used in the block house and need to be taken out of the block house when not in use. I have designed different options for hand held cases for storing and transporting the monitors in and out of the block house. The three projects previously mentioned demonstrate my contributions to the Propulsion Department and have taught me real world experience that is essential in becoming a productive engineer.

  2. Groundwater Remediation and Alternate Energy at White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Holger

    2008-01-01

    White Sands Test Facility Core Capabilities: a) Remote Hazardous Testing of Reactive, Explosive, and Toxic Materials and Fluids; b) Hypergolic Fluids Materials and Systems Testing; c) Oxygen Materials and System Testing; d) Hypervelocity Impact Testing; e)Flight Hardware Processing; and e) Propulsion Testing. There is no impact to any drinking water well. Includes public wells and the NASA supply well. There is no public exposure. Groundwater is several hundred feet below ground. No air or surface water exposure. Plume is moving very slowly to the west. Plume Front Treatment system will stop this westward movement. NASA performs on-going monitoring. More than 200 wells and zones are routinely sampled. Approx. 850 samples are obtained monthly and analyzed for over 300 different hazardous chemicals.

  3. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for NASA White Sands Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schey, Stephen [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Francfort, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report focuses on the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  4. Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  5. Aqueous Cleaning and Validation for Space Shuttle Propulsion Hardware at the White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Biesinger, Paul; Kirsch, Mike; Beeson, Harold; Leuders, Kathy

    1999-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) has developed an entirely aqueous final cleaning and verification process to replace the current chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) 113 based process. This process has been accepted for final cleaning and cleanliness verification of WSTF ground support equipment. The aqueous process relies on ultrapure water at 50 C (323 K) and ultrasonic agitation for removal of organic compounds and particulate. The cleanliness is verified bv determining the total organic carbon (TOC) content and filtration with particulate counting. The effectiveness of the aqueous methods for detecting hydrocarbon contamination and particulate was compared to the accepted CFC 113 sampling procedures. Testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and cutting and lubricating oils, to establish a correlation between aqueous TOC and CFC 113 nonvolatile residue (NVR) was performed. Particulate sampling on cleaned batches of hardware that were randomly separated and sampled by the two methods was performed. This paper presents the approach and results, and discusses the issues in establishing the equivalence of aqueous sampling to CFC 113 sampling, while describing the approach for implementing aqueous techniques on Space Shuttle Propulsion hardware.

  6. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...

  7. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  8. Infrared Camera Characterization of Bi-Propellant Reaction Control Engines during Auxiliary Propulsion Systems Tests at NASA's White Sands Test Facility in Las Cruces, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Elizabeth; Sharp, David; Sheller, Richard; Styron, Jason

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a FUR Systems A40M infrared (IR) digital camera for thermal monitoring of a Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and Ethanol bi-propellant Reaction Control Engine (RCE) during Auxiliary Propulsion System (APS) testing at the National Aeronautics & Space Administration's (NASA) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) near Las Cruces, New Mexico. Typically, NASA has relied mostly on the use of ThermoCouples (TC) for this type of thermal monitoring due to the variability of constraints required to accurately map rapidly changing temperatures from ambient to glowing hot chamber material. Obtaining accurate real-time temperatures in the JR spectrum is made even more elusive by the changing emissivity of the chamber material as it begins to glow. The parameters evaluated prior to APS testing included: (1) remote operation of the A40M camera using fiber optic Firewire signal sender and receiver units; (2) operation of the camera inside a Pelco explosion proof enclosure with a germanium window; (3) remote analog signal display for real-time monitoring; (4) remote digital data acquisition of the A40M's sensor information using FUR's ThermaCAM Researcher Pro 2.8 software; and (5) overall reliability of the system. An initial characterization report was prepared after the A40M characterization tests at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to document controlled heat source comparisons to calibrated TCs. Summary IR digital data recorded from WSTF's APS testing is included within this document along with findings, lessons learned, and recommendations for further usage as a monitoring tool for the development of rocket engines.

  9. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  10. THE WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE PULSED REACTOR FACILITY, MAY 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Robert L.; Boor, R.A.; Cole, W.M.; Elder, G.E.

    1963-05-15

    A brief statement of the mission of the White Sands Missile Range Nuclear Effects Laboratory is given. The new Nuclear Effects Laboratory Facility is described. This facility consists of two buildings-a laboratory and a reactor building. The White Sands Missile Range bare critical assembly, designated as the MoLLY-G, is described. The MoLLY-G, an unreflected, unmoderated right circular cylinder of uranium-molybdenum alloy designed for pulsed operation, will have a maximum burst capability of approximately 2 x 10/sup 17/ fissions with a burst width of 50 microseconds. The reactor construction and operating procedures are described. As designed, the MoLLY-G will provide an intense source of pulsed neutron and gamma radiation for a great variety of experimental and test arrangements. (auth)

  11. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  12. Undrained Triaxial Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    of frictional materials during monotonic loading. The tests conducted includes undrained and constant volume tests, starting from different initial states of stress and following various stress paths. All the tests are performed on reconstituted loose to medium dense specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand....

  13. Drained Triaxial Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praastrup, U.; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    In the process of understanding and developing models for geomaterials, the stress-strain behaviour is commonly studied by performing triaxial tests. In the present study static triaxial tests have been performed to gain knowledge of the stress-strain behaviour of frictional materials during mono...... monotonic loading. The tests reported herein are all drained tests, starting from different initial states of stress and following various stress paths. AIl the tests are performed on reconstituted medium dense specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand....

  14. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  15. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  16. Permeability Tests on Silkeborg Sand No. 0000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Willy; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends on the charact......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...... on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Silkeborg Sand No. 0000. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. The apparatus, test procedures and the analysis method are described...

  17. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends on the charact......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...... on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between...

  18. CLEAR test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien Marius

    2017-01-01

    A new user facility for accelerator R&D, the CERN Linear Electron Accelerator for Research (CLEAR), started operation in August 2017. CLEAR evolved from the former CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) used by the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The new facility is able to host and test a broad range of ideas in the accelerator field.

  19. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  20. Erosion/corrosion testing of materials for oil sands applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.; Wolodko, J.; Alemaskin, K.; Been, J.; Danysh, M. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Erosion and corrosion are common wear mechanisms for components used in oil sands processing facilities. This paper described a slurry jet test apparatus designed to evaluate and assess materials for oil sands service conditions. The jet testing apparatus was designed to mimic the wet erosion phenomena typically found in oil sands applications. Wear- and corrosion-resistant materials tested by the apparatus included carbon steel, tungsten carbide metal matrix composite (WC-MMC) overlays, and a range of polymer and rubber liner materials. Polymeric materials included hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR); polyurethane elastomer; and high density polyethylene (HDPE). Material losses were determined by measuring the mass of the samples before and after testing. Normalized rates of abrasion were calculated by dividing total mass lost in the specimens by the total mass of sand impinged on the sample surface. Samples were also visually assessed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to determine failure modes. Tests were conducted for a 2-hour period at an impingement angle of 90 degrees. Results of the study showed that the average abrasion rates of the polymeric samples are lower than rates seen with the carbon steel and overlay materials. Future work on the apparatus will include testing the materials under varying slurry jet parameters. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  1. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  2. Structural Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Provides a wide variety of testing equipment, fixtures and facilities to perform both unique aviation component testing as well as common types of materials testing...

  3. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural AnalysesThe ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide an...

  4. Ballistic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Ballistic Test Facility is comprised of two outdoor and one indoor test ranges, which are all instrumented for data acquisition and analysis. Full-size aircraft...

  5. Environmental Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Test Facility (ETF) provides non-isolated shock testing for stand-alone equipment and full size cabinets under MIL-S-901D specifications. The ETF...

  6. Corrosion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Corrosion Testing Facility is part of the Army Corrosion Office (ACO). It is a fully functional atmospheric exposure site, called the Corrosion Instrumented Test...

  7. Urban Test Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC has access to various facilities for use in urban testing applications,including an agreement with the Hazardous Devices School (HDS): a restrictedaccess Urban...

  8. Climatic Environmental Test Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — RTTC has an extensive suite of facilities for supporting MIL-STD-810 testing, toinclude: Temperature/Altitude, Rapid Decompression, Low/High Temperature,Temperature...

  9. Wind Tunnel Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NASA Ames Research Center is pleased to offer the services of our premier wind tunnel facilities that have a broad range of proven testing capabilities to customers...

  10. Triaxial and Torsional Shear Test Results for Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Hettler & Vardoulais Compression Behavior of dry sand (1994)__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Vaid & Chem (1985) Cyclic...1, 2 and 3, ELE Internationa Limited, 1985. Hettler , A. W., and Vardoulakis, I., "Behavior of Dry Sand Tested in a Larger Triaxial Apparatus

  11. National geothermal test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-03-01

    A brief description of the East Mesa test site is given. The test facility is supplied by brines from three of the existing production wells, each brine having distinctive physical characteristics. Some of the experimental programs involving heat exchangers and power cycles are briefly discussed. These include binary fluid cycles, two-phase expansion cycles, and combination cycles. (MOW)

  12. Advanced testing and characterization of transportation soils and bituminous sands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Modulus with Hydrostatic Stress for Oil Sands at 30oC. .......... 79 FIGURE 4.7 Bulk Modulus Model 3 Performances for Oil Sand Samples at 20oC................... 82 FIGURE 4.8 Bulk Modulus Model 3 Performances for Oil Sand Samples at 30o... of Resilient Modulus with Applied Deviator Stress at Two Test Temperatures for AU-14 Sample............................................................................................. 140 FIGURE 6.15 Performances of the SE-09 Oil sand Sample Resilient...

  13. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NREL's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility (DERTF) is a working laboratory for interconnection and systems integration testing. This state-of-the-art facility...

  14. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility in the United States of its type. This unique facility provides experimental engineering...

  15. 78 FR 76060 - Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-16

    ... Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii; Danger Zone. AGENCY: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, DoD..., Hawaii. The U.S. Navy conducts weapon systems testing and other military testing and training activities... Kauai, Hawaii. The proposed rule was published in the July 1, 2013 issue of the Federal Register (78 FR...

  16. Test Track Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    Gradients 48 16/19 3.17 Offset Towing Course 52 20 3.18 Straight and Level course 56 22 3.19 Suspension Courses 589a. Mrv 58 8 b. Boulder 59 8I c. Camera...Track 59 d. Setts 59 5/6t 3.20 Wading Pool 66 34 3.21 Field Dynamometer 68 39 3.22 Winch Test Facility 70 10 3.23 General Vehicle ( Dynamometer ) 73 4...PERCENT GRADE (1 IN 2) 18 TEST GRADIENT 33.3 PERCENT GRAD (1 IN 3) 19 TEST GRADIENT 25 PERCENT GRADE (I IN 4) 20 OFFSET TOWING SUSPENSION COURSE 21 OUTER

  17. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. David Swank

    2007-02-01

    The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

  18. Test Setup for Axially Loaded Piles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina

    The test setup for testing axially static and cyclic loaded piles in sand is described in the following. The purpose for the tests is to examine the tensile capacity of axially loaded piles in dense fully saturated sand. The pile dimensions are chosen to resemble full scale dimension of piles used...... in offshore pile foundations today....

  19. Laboratory Test Setup for Cyclic Axially Loaded Piles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive description and the considerations regarding the design of a new laboratory test setup for testing cyclic axially loaded piles in sand. The test setup aims at analysing the effect of axial one-way cyclic loading on pile capacity and accumulated displacements....... Another aim was to test a large diameter pile segment with dimensions resembling full-scale piles to model the interface properties between pile and sand correctly. The pile segment was an open-ended steel pipe pile with a diameter of 0.5 m and a length of 1 m. The sand conditions resembled the dense sand...... determined from the API RP 2GEO standard and from the test results indicated over consolidation of the sand. Two initial one-way cyclic loading tests provided results of effects on pile capacity and accumulated displacements in agreement with other researchers’ test results....

  20. Design, Construction and Testing of a Dry Sand Sieving Machine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    www.ajol.info and www.bioline.org.br/ja. Design, Construction and Testing of a Dry Sand Sieving Machine. OLADEJI AKANNI OGUNWOLE. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Minna, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: This paper reports on the design, construction and Testing of a dry sand sieving.

  1. Universal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughery, Mike

    A universal test facility (UTF) for Space Station Freedom is developed. In this context, universal means that the experimental rack design must be: automated, highly marketable, and able to perform diverse microgravity experiments according to NASA space station requirements. In order to fulfill these broad objectives, the facility's customers, and their respective requirements, are first defined. From these definitions, specific design goals and the scope of the first phase of this project are determined. An examination is first made into what types of research are most likely to make the UTF marketable. Based on our findings, the experiments for which the UTF would most likely be used included: protein crystal growth, hydroponics food growth, gas combustion, gallium arsenide crystal growth, microorganism development, and cell encapsulation. Therefore, the UTF is designed to fulfill all of the major requirements for the experiments listed above. The versatility of the design is achieved by taking advantage of the many overlapping requirements presented by these experiments.

  2. 78 FR 39198 - Pacific Ocean Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... Part 334 Pacific Ocean Off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii... of the Pacific Ocean off the Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii... Pacific Missile Range Facility at Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii by increasing the water area...

  3. CLIC Test Facility 3

    CERN Multimedia

    Kossyvakis, I; Faus-golfe, A; Nguyen, F

    2007-01-01

    The design of CLIC is based on a two-beam scheme, where short pulses of high power 30 GHz RF are extracted from a drive beam running parallel to the main beam. The 3rd generation CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) will demonstrate the generation of the drive beam with the appropriate time structure, the extraction of 30 GHz RF power from this beam, as well as acceleration of a probe beam with 30 GHz RF cavities. The project makes maximum use of existing equipment and infrastructure of the LPI complex, which became available after the closure of LEP.

  4. Qualitative risk assessment of Sandia`s rocket preparation and launch facility at Barking Sands, Kauai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    This paper demonstrates the application of a qualitative methodology for performing risk assessments using the consequence and probability binning criteria of DOE Order 5481.1B. The particular application that is the subject of this paper is a facility risk assessment conducted for Sandia National Laboratories` Kauai Test Facility (KTF). The KTF is a rocket preparation and launch facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy and is located on the US Navy`s Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) at Barking Sands on the western side of the island of Kauai, Hawaii. The KTF consists of an administrative compound and main launch facility located on the north end of the PMRF, as well as the small Kokole Point launch facility located on the south end of the PMRF. It is classified as a moderate hazard facility in accordance with DOE Order 5481.1B. As such, its authorization basis for operations necessitates a safety/risk assessment. This paper briefly addresses the hazards associated with KTF operations and the accidents selected for evaluation, introduces the principal elements of the accident assessment methodology, presents analysis details for two of the selected accidents, and provides a summary of results for all of the accidents evaluated.

  5. EURIPIDES, load tests on large driven piles in dense silica sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuidberg, H.M.; Vergobbi, P.

    1996-12-31

    In 1995 an extensive load testing program was conducted on 30 inch pipe piles in dense silica sands similar to those found in the southern North Sea. A highly instrumented pile was driven at one location, extracted and redriven at a second location. A total of twelve static compression and tension load tests were performed at three penetration depths between 30 and 47 meters. Test objectives included acquiring reliable data on capacity of offshore type piles in sands which hitherto were hardly available and to understand the failure mechanisms in order to improve current foundation design. The paper describes the design of the testing program and project organization and funding. Details of the test pile and instrumentation to measure the loads in the pile and the pile-sand interaction are highlighted with an emphasis on quality of the measurements. The field-work and innovative testing facilities are also described.

  6. Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Arc Heated Scramjet Test Facility is an arc heated facility which simulates the true enthalpy of flight over the Mach number range of about 4.7 to 8 for free-jet...

  7. Kauai Test Facility hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swihart, A

    1995-05-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55003A requires facility-specific hazards assessment be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Kauai Test Facility, Barking Sands, Kauai, Hawaii. The Kauai Test Facility`s chemical and radiological inventories were screened according to potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance to the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 4.2 kilometers. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency at the {open_quotes}Main Complex{close_quotes} and a Site Area Emergency at the Kokole Point Launch Site. The Emergency Planning Zone for the {open_quotes}Main Complex{close_quotes} is 5 kilometers. The Emergency Planning Zone for the Kokole Point Launch Site is the Pacific Missile Range Facility`s site boundary.

  8. Electronic Combat Integrated Test Facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1992-01-01

    ... and evaluating weapons systems hardware and software in a controlled ground test environment. These facilities consist of anechoic chambers connected to various simulation and instrumentation laboratories...

  9. The cone penetration test in unsaturated silty sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Very little is known about how to interpret the cone penetration test (CPT when performed in unsaturated soils. The few published studies on the CPT in unsaturated soils have focused on either clean sands or a silt. In this study new results of laboratory-controlled CPTs in an unsaturated silty sand are presented. The silty sand exhibits hydraulic hysteresis and suction hardening. Suction is observed to have a pronounced affect on measured cone penetration resistance. For an isotropic net confining stress of 60 kPa it is observed that higher suctions give rise to cone penetration resistances that are 50% larger than those for lower suctions. A semi-theoretical correlation is presented that links measured cone penetration resistances to initial relative density and mean effective stress. For this silty sand it is shown that failing to account for suction may result in significant overestimations and unsafe predictions of soil properties from measured cone penetration resistances.

  10. Electromagnetic Interface Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electromagnetic Interface Testing facilitysupports such testing asEmissions, Field Strength, Mode Stirring, EMP Pulser, 4 Probe Monitoring/Leveling System, and...

  11. AE Test of Calcareous Sands with Particle Rushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Fengyi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The particle of calcareous sands was forced to crush, then the energy from the crushing was released by the form of sound waves. Therefore the AE technique was used to detect the calcareous sands AE signal when it crushed. by to study the AE characteristics, the mechanics of calcareous sands was studied. Study showed that: (1 there was the AE activities on the low confining pressure condition at the beginnig of test, (2 there was more and more AE activities with the continuing of test until to the end, (3 the calcareous sands’ AE activities was on the whole testing, (4 the calcareous sands’ particle crushing and mutual friction played different roles for its AE activities. Then the AE model based on the calcarous sands’ particle crushing was discussed.

  12. 1g Model Tests with Foundations in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Damkilde, Lars; Clausen, Johan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series 1g model tests with both a circular and a strip foundation on dense sand. The test results have been compared with the results from finite element calculations based on a non linear Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion taking into account the dependence...

  13. Static Tension Tests on Axially Loaded Pile Segments in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    This paper provides laboratory test results of static axially loaded piles in sand. With a newly developed test setup, the pile-soil interface friction was investigated by using an open-ended steel pile segment with a diameter of 0.5 m. Use of a pile length of 1 m enabled the pile-soil interface...

  14. Drained True Triaxial Tests on Aalborg University Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praastrup, U.

    The paper presents the first series of true triaxial tests carried out on air-pluviated unfrozen and frozen specimens of Aalborg University Sand No O. The specimens have been tested in the newly improved version of the Danish rigid boundary true triaxial apparatus to optimise the preparation and ...

  15. EMI Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Supports electromagnetic interference/radio frequency interference (EMI/RFI) testing of flight hardware. It is also used to support custom RF testing up to...

  16. Static Loads Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides the capability to perform large-scale structural loads testing on spacecraft and other structures. Results from these tests can be used to verify...

  17. The Integral Test Facility Karlstein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Leyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Integral Test Facility Karlstein (INKA test facility was designed and erected to test the performance of the passive safety systems of KERENA, the new AREVA Boiling Water Reactor design. The experimental program included single component/system tests of the Emergency Condenser, the Containment Cooling Condenser and the Passive Core Flooding System. Integral system tests, including also the Passive Pressure Pulse Transmitter, will be performed to simulate transients and Loss of Coolant Accident scenarios at the test facility. The INKA test facility represents the KERENA Containment with a volume scaling of 1 : 24. Component heights and levels are in full scale. The reactor pressure vessel is simulated by the accumulator vessel of the large valve test facility of Karlstein—a vessel with a design pressure of 11 MPa and a storage capacity of 125 m3. The vessel is fed by a benson boiler with a maximum power supply of 22 MW. The INKA multi compartment pressure suppression Containment meets the requirements of modern and existing BWR designs. As a result of the large power supply at the facility, INKA is capable of simulating various accident scenarios, including a full train of passive systems, starting with the initiating event—for example pipe rupture.

  18. Solenoid Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Current Configuration: Accommodate a device under test up to 2.8 m diameter, 0.7 m height and 15,000 lbs. weight. Up to 10 g/s, 4.5 K helium flow. Up to 250 A test...

  19. Airborne Test Bed Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Laboratory operates the main hangar on the Hanscom Air Force Base flight line. This very large building (~93,000sqft) accommodates the Laboratory's airborne test...

  20. Elevated Fixed Platform Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Elevated Fixed Platform (EFP) is a helicopter recovery test facility located at Lakehurst, NJ. It consists of a 60 by 85 foot steel and concrete deck built atop...

  1. Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The very large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, is currently under construction and is due to...

  2. Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Freshwater Treatment and Test Facility, located at SANGB, has direct year-round access to water from Lake St. Clair and has a State of Michigan approved National...

  3. Design, Construction and Testing of a Dry Sand Sieving Machine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on the design, construction and Testing of a dry sand sieving machine. The sample to be sieved is uniformly graded. The coefficient of uniformity is 1.11, thus the machine design does not sieve larger particles such as gravel. The slip calculated is 36% which enabled the proper configuration of the V-belt.

  4. Tension Tests On Bored Piles In Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Clausen, Johan; Damkilde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The lengths of the bored piles varied from 2 m to 6 m and all were of a diameter of 140 mm. The piles were tested to failure in tension and the load-displacement relations were recorded. The investigation has shown pronounced differences between the load bearing capacities obtained by different...

  5. Aircraft Test & Evaluation Facility (Hush House)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Aircraft Test and Evaluation Facility (ATEF), or Hush House, is a noise-abated ground test sub-facility. The facility's controlled environment provides 24-hour...

  6. 33 CFR 165.1406 - Safety Zone: Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Range Facility (PMRF), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. 165.1406 Section 165.1406 Navigation and...), Barking Sands, Island of Kauai, Hawaii. (a) Location. The following area is established as a safety zone during launch operations at PMRF, Kauai, Hawaii: The waters bounded by the following coordinates: (22°01...

  7. Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Millimeter-wave Instrumentation Test Facility conducts basic research in propagation phenomena, remote sensing, and target signatures. The facility has a breadth...

  8. Sand Impact Tests of a Half-Scale Crew Module Boilerplate Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Hardy, Robin C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is being designed primarily for water landings, a further investigation of launch abort scenarios reveals the possibility of an onshore landing at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). To gather data for correlation against simulations of beach landing impacts, a series of sand impact tests were conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Both vertical drop tests and swing tests with combined vertical and horizontal velocity were performed onto beds of common construction-grade sand using a geometrically scaled crew module boilerplate test article. The tests were simulated using the explicit, nonlinear, transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material models for the sand utilized in the simulations were based on tests of sand specimens. Although the LSDYNA models provided reasonable predictions for peak accelerations, they were not always able to track the response through the duration of the impact. Further improvements to the material model used for the sand were identified based on results from the sand specimen tests.

  9. Test Procedure for Axially Loaded Piles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina

    The test procedure described in the following is used when examining the effects of static or cyclic loading on the skin friction of an axially loaded pile in dense sand. The pile specimen is only loaded in tension to avoid any contribution from the base resistance. The pile dimensions are chosen...... to resemble full scale dimension of piles used in offshore pile foundations today. In this report is given a detailed description of the soil preparation and pile installation procedures as well data acquisition methods....

  10. Axisymmetric Strain Path Tests on Nellis Baseline Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    USA. The present Commander and Director of WES is COL Dwayne G. Lee, CE. During this investigation, Mr. Fred R. Brown was Technical Director. The...Reference 5) as brown sand with clay (SW-SC). Two empirical gradation parameters, the coefficient of uniformity Cu and the coefficient of curvature Cc...Density Content Density Rato Saturation Air Solids ater 40. No. Test No. y, I/cc W, 2 Y d. g/cc Ratio Sturation vs, a V e . x V,. z 45SPOI 1. 13 HC 30

  11. Differences between measured and reported volatile organic compound emissions from oil sands facilities in Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Meng; Leithead, Amy; Moussa, Samar G; Liggio, John; Moran, Michael D; Wang, Daniel; Hayden, Katherine; Darlington, Andrea; Gordon, Mark; Staebler, Ralf; Makar, Paul A; Stroud, Craig A; McLaren, Robert; Liu, Peter S K; O'Brien, Jason; Mittermeier, Richard L; Zhang, Junhua; Marson, George; Cober, Stewart G; Wolde, Mengistu; Wentzell, Jeremy J B

    2017-05-09

    Large-scale oil production from oil sands deposits in Alberta, Canada has raised concerns about environmental impacts, such as the magnitude of air pollution emissions. This paper reports compound emission rates (E) for 69-89 nonbiogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for each of four surface mining facilities, determined with a top-down approach using aircraft measurements in the summer of 2013. The aggregate emission rate (aE) of the nonbiogenic VOCs ranged from 50 ± 14 to 70 ± 22 t/d depending on the facility. In comparison, equivalent VOC emission rates reported to the Canadian National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) using accepted estimation methods were lower than the aE values by factors of 2.0 ± 0.6, 3.1 ± 1.1, 4.5 ± 1.5, and 4.1 ± 1.6 for the four facilities, indicating underestimation in the reported VOC emissions. For 11 of the combined 93 VOC species reported by all four facilities, the reported emission rate and E were similar; but for the other 82 species, the reported emission rate was lower than E The median ratio of E to that reported for all species by a facility ranged from 4.5 to 375 depending on the facility. Moreover, between 9 and 53 VOCs, for which there are existing reporting requirements to the NPRI, were not included in the facility emission reports. The comparisons between the emission reports and measurement-based emission rates indicate that improvements to VOC emission estimation methods would enhance the accuracy and completeness of emission estimates and their applicability to environmental impact assessments of oil sands developments.

  12. Facility for testing ice drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Dennis L.; Delahunty, Chris; Goodge, John W.; Severinghaus, Jeffery P.

    2017-05-01

    The Rapid Access Ice Drill (RAID) is designed for subsurface scientific investigations in Antarctica. Its objectives are to drill rapidly through ice, to core samples of the transition zone and bedrock, and to leave behind a borehole observatory. These objectives required the engineering and fabrication of an entirely new drilling system that included a modified mining-style coring rig, a unique fluid circulation system, a rod skid, a power unit, and a workshop with areas for the storage of supplies and consumables. An important milestone in fabrication of the RAID was the construction of a North American Test (NAT) facility where we were able to test drilling and fluid processing functions in an environment that is as close as possible to that expected in Antarctica. Our criteria for site selection was that the area should be cold during the winter months, be located in an area of low heat flow, and be at relatively high elevation. We selected a site for the facility near Bear Lake, Utah, USA. The general design of the NAT well (NAT-1) started with a 27.3 cm (10.75 in.) outer casing cemented in a 152 m deep hole. Within that casing, we hung a 14 cm (5.5 in.) casing string, and, within that casing, a column of ice was formed. The annulus between the 14 and 27.3 cm casings provided the path for circulation of a refrigerant. After in-depth study, we chose to use liquid CO2 to cool the hole. In order to minimize the likelihood of the casing splitting due to the volume increase associated with freezing water, the hole was first cooled and then ice was formed in increments from the bottom upward. First, ice cubes were placed in the inner liner and then water was added. Using this method, a column of ice was incrementally prepared for drilling tests. The drilling tests successfully demonstrated the functioning of the RAID system. Reproducing such a facility for testing of other ice drilling systems could be advantageous to other research programs in the future.

  13. Volatile Organic Compound Observations near Oil Sands Mining, Upgrading and Refining Facilities in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, I. J.; Marrero, J.; Meinardi, S.; Barletta, B.; Krogh, E.; Blake, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    The oil sands of Alberta are the world's third-largest proven oil reserve. Even though the expansion of the oil sands industry has led to concerns about its impact on air quality, water quality and human health, emissions from the oil sands industry are very poorly characterized in the literature. During 2008-2012 our group collected 398 whole air samples downwind of (1) oil sands surface mining and upgrading facilities north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, and (2) chemical, petrochemical, and oil and gas facilities in the "Industrial Heartland" region of Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta. These high-precision measurements were made primarily in July 2008, August 2010, and July 2012 using canister sampling followed by multi-column gas chromatography analysis for 80 speciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs), with ppt-level detection limits. Strong VOC enhancements were measured downwind of upgrading operations near Fort McMurray, especially alkanes, aromatics and solvents. For example, maximum concentrations of 2,3-dimethylbutane, p-xylene and n-octane were 800-2400× the local background value (LBV), and the industrial solvent trichloroethene was up to 260× the LBV. We measured only small VOC enhancements at sites of naturally exposed oil sands, confirming that degraded air quality results from industrial activity rather than emission from natural sources. Remarkably strong VOC enhancements were detected in the Industrial Heartland, which is the largest hydrocarbon processing region in Canada. Some of the largest VOC excesses were measured in samples designated as "no smell", showing that absence of odor is not necessarily an indicator of good air quality. The maximum concentrations of methyl tert-butyl ether and ethylbenzene were 6200× the LBV, and concentrations of 1,3-butadiene, a known carcinogen, were 2400× the LBV. Thirty VOCs were present at levels above 1 ppbv, and maximum propene and i-pentane levels exceeded 100 ppbv. Remarkably, the maximum propene

  14. Non-standard tests for process control in chemically bonded sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramrattan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemically bonded sand cores and molds are more commonly referred to as precision sand systems in the high production automotive powertrain sector. Their behavior in contact with molten metal can lead to casting defects. Consequently, the interaction is of great interest and an important part of metal casting technology. The American Foundry Society (AFS sand testing is based on physical, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties of the sand system. Foundry engineers have long known that certain AFS sand tests provide limited information regarding control of molding and casting quality. The inadequacy is due to the fact that sand casting processes are inherently thermo-mechanical, thermo-chemical and thermo-physical. Non-standard foundry sand testing has proven useful for laboratory measurement of these characteristics in foundry sand using a disc-shaped specimen. Similarly, the equivalent disc-shaped specimens are used for casting trials. In order to accomplish near-net-shape casting with minimal defects, it is necessary to understand both the properties of the sand system, as well as the interface of molten metal when different binders, additives and/or refractory coatings are used. The methodology for the following non-standard chemically bonded sand tests is described: (1 disc transverse; (2 impact; (3 modified permeability; (4 abrasion; (5 thermal distortion; (6 quick loss on ignition. The data related to the non-standard sand tests were analyzed and interpreted. The test results indicate that there is relatively lower test-to-test variability with the disc-shaped specimens. The non-standard tests were able to discriminate between the chemically bonded polyurethane cold box sand specimens. Further studies should be conducted on various other sand and binder systems as well as on different specimen thicknesses.

  15. Research on testing method of resin sand high temperature compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High temperature compressive strength is one of the most important performances of resin sand; its value directly concerns the quality of castings. In order to seek the best testing method of resin sand high temperature compressive strength, a self-developed instrument was used to carry out experiments, and the sample shape and size were designed and studied. The results show that a hollow cylinder sample can reflect the strength difference of different resin sands better than a solid cylinder sample, and its data is stable. The experiments selected フ20/5】30 mm as the size of the hollow cylinder samples. The high temperature compressive strengths of phenol-formaldehyde resin coated sand, furan resin self-setting sand, and TEA resin sand were each tested. For the resin sand used for cast steel and cast iron, 1,000 ìC was selected as the test temperature; for the resin sand used for cast non-ferrous alloy, 800 ìC was selected as the test temperature; and for all the resin sand samples, 1 min was selected as the holding time. This testing method can truthfully reflect the high temperature performance of three kinds of resin sand; it is reproducible, and the variation coefficients of test values are under 10%.

  16. Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and TEMPEST Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Electromagnetic Interference (EMI), Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and TEMPEST testing are conducted at EPG's Blacktail Canyon Test Facility in one of its two...

  17. Successful start for new CLIC test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    A new test facility is being built to study key feasibility issues for a possible future linear collider called CLIC. Commissioning of the first part of the facility began in June 2003 and nominal beam parameters have been achieved already.

  18. MODELING OF PROCESS OF THE MOLDING SAND DEFORMATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS TESTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Melnikov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the ready-built mathematical model of molding sand will enable to control its characteristics and to make forecasting of technological parameters for providing of the given characteristics.

  19. Controlled Archaeological Test Site (CATS) Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CATS facility is at the Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL), Champaign, IL. This 1-acre test site includes a variety of subsurface features carefully...

  20. Test Procedure for Axially Loaded Bucket Foundations in Sand (Large Yellow Box)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkunaite, Evelina

    This is a practical guide for preparing the soil, running a CPT test, installing a scaled bucket foundation model and running a test in the large yellow sand box cos(Kristina) in the geotechnical laboratory at Aalborg University. The test procedure is used for the examination of statically...... and cyclically axially loaded bucket foundation model In dense sand. The foundation model in scale of approximately 1:10 compared to the prototype size. The guide describes the step-by-step procedure for tests with and without surface pressure. A detailed description of test setup using the large yellow sand box...

  1. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  2. Antenna Test Facility (ATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  3. Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF): User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelPapa, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the RHTF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  4. Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility (VATF): User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the VATF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  5. Sophisticated test facility to detect land mines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, W. de; Lensen, H.A.; Janssen, Y.H.L.

    1999-01-01

    In the framework of the Dutch government humanitarian demining project 'HOM-2000', an outdoor test facility has been realized to test, improve and develop detection equipment for land mines. This sophisticated facility, allows us to access and compare the performance of the individual and of a

  6. Instrumentation of VISTA test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seok; Choi, Ki Young; Park, Hyun Sik; Lee, Seong Jae; Park, Chun Kyong; Chung, Moon Ki

    2003-11-01

    VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents) is experimental facility to verify the performance and safety issues of SMART-P(Pilot plant of the System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor), basic design of which has been completed by KAERI. The present report provide instrumentation details of VISTA in order to improve understanding on the phenomena and to certify the experimental data.

  7. Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Power Systems Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Cindy H.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides a detailed description of the Johnson Space Center's Power Systems Facility located in the Energy Systems Test Area (ESTA). Facilities and the resources used to support power and battery systems testing are also shown. The contents include: 1) Power Testing; 2) Power Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 3) Source/Load; 4) Battery Facilities; 5) Battery Test Equipment Capabilities Summary; 6) Battery Testing; 7) Performance Test Equipment; 8) Battery Test Environments; 9) Battery Abuse Chambers; 10) Battery Abuse Capabilities; and 11) Battery Test Area Resources.

  8. Naval Aerodynamics Test Facility (NATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NATF specializes in Aerodynamics testing of scaled and fullsized Naval models, research into flow physics found on US Navy planes and ships, aerosol testing and...

  9. CryoModule Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CMTFis able to test complete SRF cryomodules at cryogenic operating temperatures and with RF Power. CMTF will house the PIP-II Injector Experiment allowing test of...

  10. Study on GMZ bentonite-sand mixture by undrained triaxial tests

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Wen-jing; Chen Chao; Liu Shi-qing; Sun De-an; Liang Xue-hai; Tan Yun-Zhi; Fatahi Behzad

    2016-01-01

    It is particularly necessary to study the deformation, strength and the changes of pore water pressure of bentonite-based buffer/backfill materials under the undrained condition. A series of isotropic compression tests and triaxial shear tests under undrained conditions were conducted on the compacted saturated/unsaturated GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures with dry mass ratio of bentonite/sand of 30:70. During the tests, the images of the sample were collected by photographic equipment and subseque...

  11. Construction and commissioning test report of the CEDM test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, C. H.; Kim, J. T.; Park, W. M.; Youn, Y. J.; Jun, H. G.; Choi, N. H.; Park, J. K.; Song, C. H.; Lee, S. H.; Park, J. K

    2001-02-01

    The test facility for performance verification of the control element drive mechanism (CEDM) of next generation power plant was installed at the site of KAERI. The CEDM was featured a mechanism consisting of complicated mechanical parts and electromagnetic control system. Thus, a new CEDM design should go through performance verification tests prior to it's application in a reactor. The test facility can simulate the reactor operating conditions such as temperature, pressure and water quality and is equipped with a test chamber to accomodate a CEDM as installed in the power plant. This test facility can be used for the following tests; endurance test, coil cooling test, power measurement and reactivity rod drop test. The commissioning tests for the test facility were performed up to the CEDM test conditions of 320 C and 150 bar, and required water chemistry was obtained by operating the on-line water treatment system.

  12. Sorption of fluoride by quartz sand: batch tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Usunoff

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many efforts of scientists, in particular those from the field of soil science, the fate and distribution of fluorine (F species in soils and aquifers remain relatively unraveled. As for groundwater systems, such a shortcoming makes difficult the finding and development of safe water supplies. Likewise, the use of transport models does not render acceptable results because of the many uncertainties related to the behavior of F in aqueous media. This paper presents the results of four batch test in which solutions of different pH and [F-] (concentration of fluoride were in contact during 48 hours with clean quartz sand grains. The resulting data were fitted by linear versions of the Freundlich, the Langmuir, and the Langmuir-Freundlich models. The [F-] was varied between 0,5 and 10 mg L-1, except in one batch where a large initial concentration of F was used (45 mg L-1, and the range of pH used was 2,95 to 5,02. From a sieve analysis, the quartz grains had a medium size (d50 of 0,25 mm, and a uniformity coefficient (d40/d90 of 1,65. According to the fits and some dedicated goodness of fit indices, the Langmuir-Freundlich approach gave the best results for the batch test at the lowest pH, whereas the three remaining tests data were fitted by the Freundlich equation. It has to be mentioned that the pH of the equilibrium solutions were higher than the pH of the initial solutions, which was interpreted as an exchange process of OH- by F- on the quartz sand surface. However, such an exchange does not stand out as the exclusive mechanism promoting the F- disappearance from solution. It is deemed that the obtained results can be used as initial estimates of parameters in models used for calibrating the transport of F- in aquifers.A pesar de los muchos esfuerzos de los científicos, en particular de aquellos dedicados a las ciencias del suelo, el destino y la distribución de las especies de F (flúor en suelos y acuíferos continúan siendo

  13. Fast flux test facility hazards assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-10-24

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for the Fast Flux Test Facility on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  14. Design Study of Beijing XFEL Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, J P

    2005-01-01

    As R&D of X-ray Free Electron Laser facility in China, the construction of Beijing XFEL Test Facility (BTF) has been proposed. And the start to end simulation of BTF was made with codes PARMELA, ELEGANT and TDA. This paper presents the motivation, the scheme and the simulation results of BTF.

  15. Ballast Water Treatment Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides functionality for the full-scale testing and controlled simulation of ship ballasting operations for assessment of aquatic nuisance species (ANS)...

  16. Battery Post-Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Post-test diagnostics of aged batteries can provide additional information regarding the cause of performance degradation, which, previously, could be only inferred...

  17. 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 400 Area at Hanford is home primarily to the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), a DOE-owned, formerly operating, 400-megawatt (thermal) liquid-metal (sodium)-cooled...

  18. A comparison between land and sand-based tests for beach volleyball assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, D

    2003-12-01

    Vertical-jumping ability is critical for success in beach volleyball. However, as beach volleyball is a relatively new sport, its testing procedures have largely been adopted from the indoor game and are consequently performed on firm surfaces. The purpose of this paper was to determine whether vertical-jumping ability is specific to the test surface (i.e., wood or sand). Eighteen beach volleyball players performed 4 different vertical jumps on a wood surface or on the sand, followed by the alternate surface, in a random, counterbalanced order. Correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the degree of association between the 4 jumps and between the test results on the 2 surfaces. When compared with the land condition, all jump heights were significantly lower when performed on sand (pjumps (mean r=0.93; pvertical jump variations were significantly correlated with each other (mean r=0.91; pjumps and the spike jump (3-step run up) tended to be lower. It is likely that vertical jump height on sand is lower than on land due to a reduction in the ground reaction force. However, despite this, the strong correlation between land and sand scores suggests that vertical-jumping ability exists as a general quality and is not greatly influenced by test surface in the subjects tested. This suggests that land-based tests can be used to assess sand jumping ability in experienced beach volleyball players.

  19. Cryogenic magnet test facility for fair

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, C; Marzouki, F; Stafiniac, A; Floch, E; Schnizer, P; Moritz, G; Xiang, Y; Kauschke, M; Meier, J; Hess, G ,

    2009-01-01

    For testing fast-pulsed superconducting model and pre-series magnets for FAIR (Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research), a cryogenic magnet test facility was built up at GSI. The facility is able to cool either cold masses in a universal cryostat or complete magnets in their own cryo-module. It is possible to operate bath cooled, 2 phase cooled, and supercritical cooled magnets with a maximum current up to 11 kA and a ramp rate up to 14 kA/s. Measurements of magnet heat loss, with calorimetric and a V-I methods, are available, as are quench and magnetic field measurements. Design and functionality of the test facility will be described. Results of measurements with a supercritical cooled magnet and with a 2 phase cooled SIS100 model magnet will be shown.

  20. Massachusetts Large Blade Test Facility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahul Yarala; Rob Priore

    2011-09-02

    Project Objective: The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (CEC) will design, construct, and ultimately have responsibility for the operation of the Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility, which is an advanced blade testing facility capable of testing wind turbine blades up to at least 90 meters in length on three test stands. Background: Wind turbine blade testing is required to meet international design standards, and is a critical factor in maintaining high levels of reliability and mitigating the technical and financial risk of deploying massproduced wind turbine models. Testing is also needed to identify specific blade design issues that may contribute to reduced wind turbine reliability and performance. Testing is also required to optimize aerodynamics, structural performance, encourage new technologies and materials development making wind even more competitive. The objective of this project is to accelerate the design and construction of a large wind blade testing facility capable of testing blades with minimum queue times at a reasonable cost. This testing facility will encourage and provide the opportunity for the U.S wind industry to conduct more rigorous testing of blades to improve wind turbine reliability.

  1. Automation of electromagnetic compatability (EMC) test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Efforts to automate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center are discussed. The present facility is used to accomplish a battery of nine standard tests (with limited variations) deigned to certify EMC of Shuttle payload equipment. Prior to this project, some EMC tests were partially automated, but others were performed manually. Software was developed to integrate all testing by means of a desk-top computer-controller. Near real-time data reduction and onboard graphics capabilities permit immediate assessment of test results. Provisions for disk storage of test data permit computer production of the test engineer's certification report. Software flexibility permits variation in the tests procedure, the ability to examine more closely those frequency bands which indicate compatibility problems, and the capability to incorporate additional test procedures.

  2. A combined cycle engine test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engers, R.; Cresci, D.; Tsai, C. [General Applied Science Laboratories Inc., Ronkonkoma, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) engines intended for missiles and/or space launch applications incorporate features of rocket propulsion systems operating in concert with airbreathing engine cycles. Performance evaluation of these types of engines, which are intended to operate from static sea level take-off to supersonic cruise or accerlerate to orbit, requires ground test capabilities which integrate rocket component testing with airbreathing engine testing. A combined cycle engine test facility has been constructed in the General Applied Science Laboratories, Inc. (GASL) Aeropropulsion Test Laboratory to meet this requirement. The facility was designed to support the development of an innovative combined cycle engine concept which features a rocket based ramjet combustor. The test requirements included the ability to conduct tests in which the propulsive force was generated by rocket only, the ramjet only and simultaneous rocket and ramjet power (combined cycle) to evaluate combustor operation over the entire engine cycle. The test facility provides simulation over the flight Mach number range of 0 to 8 and at various trajectories. The capabilities of the combined cycle engine test facility are presented.

  3. Real-Gas Aerothermodynamics Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, James O.; Seibert, George L.; Wendt, John F.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current ground-based aerothermodynamic testing capabilities in Western Europe and the United States. The focus is on facilities capable of producing real-gas effects (dissociation, ionization, and thermochemical nonequilibrium) pertinent to the study of atmospheric flight in the Mach number range of 5 < M < 50. Perceived mission needs of interest to the Americans and Western Europeans are described where such real-gas flows are important. The role of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in modern ground testing is discussed, and the capabilities of selected American and European real-gas facilities are described. An update on the current instrumentation in aerothermodynamic testing is also outlined. Comments are made regarding the use of new facilities which have been brought on line during the past 3-5 years. Finally, future needs for aerothermodynamic testing, including instrumentation, are discussed and recommendations for implementation are reported.

  4. Common Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.; Davis, Dawn M.; Turowski, Mark P.; Holladay, Wendy T.; Hughes, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the commercial space launch industry and NASA's more recent resumption of operation of Stennis Space Center's large test facilities after thirty years of contractor control resulted in a need for a non-proprietary data acquisition systems (DAS) software to support government and commercial testing. The software is designed for modularity and adaptability to minimize the software development effort for current and future data systems. An additional benefit of the software's architecture is its ability to easily migrate to other testing facilities thus providing future commonality across Stennis. Adapting the software to other Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Centers such as MSFC, White Sands, and Plumbrook Station would provide additional commonality and help reduce testing costs for NASA. Ultimately, the software provides the government with unlimited rights and guarantees privacy of data to commercial entities. The project engaged all RPT Centers and NASA's Independent Verification & Validation facility to enhance product quality. The design consists of a translation layer which provides the transparency of the software application layers to underlying hardware regardless of test facility location and a flexible and easily accessible database. This presentation addresses system technical design, issues encountered, and the status of Stennis development and deployment.

  5. Characterizing experiments of the PPOOLEX test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2008-07-15

    This report summarizes the results of the characterizing test series in 2007 with the scaled down PPOOLEX facility designed and constructed at Lappeenranta University of Technology. Air and steam/air mixture was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through a DN200 blowdown pipe to the condensation pool (wet well). Altogether eight air and four steam/air mixture experiments, each consisting of several blows (tests), were carried out. The main purpose of the experiment series was to study the general behavior of the facility and the performance of basic instrumentation. Proper operation of automation, control and safety systems was also tested. The test facility is a closed stainless steel vessel divided into two compartments, dry well and wet well. The facility is equipped with high frequency measurements for capturing different aspects of the investigated phenomena. The general behavior of the PPOOLEX facility differs significantly from that of the previous POOLEX facility because of the closed two-compartment structure of the test vessel. Heat-up by several tens of degrees due to compression in both compartments was the most obvious evidence of this. Temperatures also stratified. Condensation oscillations and chugging phenomenon were encountered in those tests where the fraction of non-condensables had time to decrease significantly. A radical change from smooth condensation behavior to oscillating one occurred quite abruptly when the air fraction of the blowdown pipe flow dropped close to zero. The experiments again demonstrated the strong diminishing effect that noncondensable gases have on dynamic unsteady loadings experienced by submerged pool structures. BWR containment like behavior related to the beginning of a postulated steam line break accident was observed in the PPOOLEX test facility during the steam/air mixture experiments. The most important task of the research project, to produce experimental data for code simulation purposes, can be

  6. Standard test method for conducting wet sand/rubber wheel abrasion tests

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers laboratory procedures for determining the resistance of metallic materials to scratching abrasion by means of the wet sand/rubber wheel test. It is the intent of this procedure to provide data that will reproducibly rank materials in their resistance to scratching abrasion under a specified set of conditions. 1.2 Abrasion test results are reported as volume loss in cubic millimeters. Materials of higher abrasion resistance will have a lower volume loss. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, T.

    1986-11-01

    The Plasma-Materials Interactions Test Facility (PMITF), recently designed and constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is an electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma system with densities around 10/sup 11/ cm/sup -3/ and electron temperatures of 10-20 eV. The device consists of a mirror cell with high-field-side microwave injection and a heating power of up to 0.8 kW(cw) at 2.45 GHz. The facility will be used for studies of plasma-materials interactions and of particle physics in pump limiters and for development and testing of plasma edge diagnostics.

  8. EBR-II Breached Fuel Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehto, W K; Koenig, J F; Seim, O S; Olp, R H; Strain, R V; Colburn, R P

    1979-01-01

    The Breached Fuel Test Facility (BFTF) is a multipurpose experimental facility, designed to provide the capability to conduct and monitor safety and fuel behavior experiments under move severe conditions than previously allowed in EBR-II. The facility consists of an outer thimble assembly with an internal instrument stalk which extends from the reactor floor through the primary tank cover to the top of the core. Coolant from a breached element test is directed upward to the instrument train above the core. The BFTF has the capability to measure flow, temperature, particle size distribution and deposition, and delayed neutron levels for breach site characterization. This paper describes the design, the instrumentation, the operational safety concerns and the initial experiments.

  9. Fluoride retardation from quartz sand-packed column tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Usunoff

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Inasmuch as both low and high concentrations of F- in groundwater have different detrimental effects on human health (increased dental caries, and mottled enamel or even severe structural bone deformations, respectively, many efforts have focused on the movement of such anion in aqueous systems. It is so because water drinking is the main intake of F- by humans. This paper presents the results of seven dynamic experiments in which solutions of varying [F-], pH, and flow velocities circulated through columns packed with clean quartz sand. The breakthrough data were analyzed by means of a computer code adapted to the estimation of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solute transport parameters from miscible displacement experiments in a steady-state, uniform flow field using a pulse-type or continuous source. It was found that larger retardation factors (R are associated with low pH, low [F-] in the feed solutions, and larger flow velocities. Such results appear to be related to the form of the F species, the rather weak bond between the adsorbate and the quartz sand, and stronger anion repulsion at low pore velocities. The estimated values for R vary between 1,22 and 1,50, whereas the distribution coefficients were in the range of 0,1 to 0,05 L kg-1. It should be said that the breakthrough curves display hysteresis, leading to a desorption behavior that proceeds faster than the adsorption process.Puesto que tanto valores bajos como altos de F- en las aguas subterráneas tienen efectos adversos en la salud de los humanos (mayor cantidad de caries, y manchas del esmalte dental e incluso deformaciones óseas, respectivamente, han sido muchos los esfuerzos destinados a dilucidar el movimiento de especies fluoradas en ambientes acuosos. Ello es así porque el consumo de agua por parte de seres humanos representa la mayor fuente de ingreso de F-. Este trabajo presenta los resultados de siete experimentos dinámicos en los que soluciones de diferentes [F

  10. Low power arcjet test facility impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morren, W. Earl; Lichon, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    Performance characterization of a flight-type 1.4 kW arcjet system were conducted at the Rocket Research Company (RRC) in Redmond, WA, and at the NASA LeRC in Cleveland, OH. The objectives of these tests were as follows: to compare low-power arcjet performance at two different test facilities; to compare arcjet performance obtained with a 2:1 mixture of gaseous hydrogen and nitrogen and hydrazine; and to quantify the effects of test cell pressure on thruster operating characteristics. Performance and thruster temperature distributions were measured at thruster input power levels and propellant mass flow rates ranging from 1274 to 1370 W and from 3.2 x 10(exp -5) to 5.1 x 10(exp -5) kg/s, respectively. Specific impulses measured at the two facilities, at comparable test cell pressures, using gaseous hydrogen-nitrogen propellant mixtures agreed to within 1 percent over the range of operating conditions tested. The specific impulses measured using hydrazine propellant were higher than that for the cold hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures. Agreement between by hydrazine and gas mixture data was good, however, when the differences in propellant enthalpies at the thruster inlet were considered. Specific impulse showed a strong dependence on test facility pressure, and was 3 to 4 percent higher below 0.1 Pa than for test cell pressures above 5 Pa.

  11. FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond L. Mazza

    2004-11-30

    These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

  12. Low-power arcjet test facility impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morren, W. E.; Lichon, Paul J.

    1992-01-01

    Performance characterizations of a flight-type 1.4 kW arcjet system were conducted. Performance and thruster temperature distributions were measured at thruster input power levels and propellant mass flow rates ranging from 1274 to 1370 W and from 3.2 x 10 exp -5 to 5.1 x 10 exp -5 kg/s, respectively. Specific impulses measured at the two facilities, at comparable test cell pressures, using gaseous hydrogen-nitrogen propellant mixtures agreed to within 1 percent over the range of operating conditions tested. The specific impulses measured using hydrazine propellant were higher than that for the cold hydrogen/nitrogen mixtures. Agreement between the hydrazine and gas mixture data was good, however, when the differences in propellant ethalpies at the thruster inlet were considered. Specific impulse showed a strong dependence on test facility pressure, and was 3 to 4 percent higher below 0.1 Pa than for test cell pressures above 5 Pa.

  13. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY DRIVER FUEL MEETING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1966-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory has convened this meeting to enlist the best talents of our laboratories and industry in soliciting factual, technical information pertinent to the Pacific Northwest's Laboratory's evaluation of the potential fuel systems for the Fast Flux Test Facility. The particular factors emphasized for these fuel systems are those associated with safety, ability to meet testing objectives, and economics. The proceedings includes twenty-three presentations, along with a transcript of the discussion following each, as well as a summary discussion.

  14. White Sands Missile Range Overview & Introduction: Test Capabilities Briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    Certified Chemistry Lab  Capabilities • Conformance Testing of materials • Toxic Gas testing of rocket/motor exhaust • Explosives Analysis...the explosion; and the McDonald ranch house, where the plutonium core to the bomb was assembled. The site is open to visitors twice a year on the

  15. Fuel cell hybrid drive train test facility

    OpenAIRE

    Bruinsma, J.; Tazelaar, Edwin; Veenhuizen, Bram; Zafina, I.; Bosma, H.

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in the near future as prime energy source on board of road-going vehicles. In order to be able to test all important functional aspects of a fuel cell hybrid drive train, the Automotive Institute of the HAN University has decided to realize a stationary test facility, comprising an 8 kW PEM stack and a 185 [Ah] 48 [V] NiCd battery, which is connected to an asynchronous motor, which is loaded by an eddy current brake. The objective of the test ...

  16. Tailings research at Shell's Muskeg River mine tailings testing facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J.; Masala, S. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada). Oil Sands Division

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed a non-segregating tailings (NST) pilot program conducted at the Muskeg River Mine tailings test facility. NST deposition performance and deposit characteristics were evaluated. NST fines are stored in the pore spaces in sandy deposits. Coagulants are used to enhance the yield stress of fine mineral solids-water suspension and improve the retention of fines in sand deposit pores. High solids slurries reduce fine mineral solids separation from the granular matrix. The use of NST increases the maximum volumetric storage of sand and clay fines and reduces the fluid fine tailings inventory. Performance metrics for NST include deposit homogeneity, overall fines capture, the time to consolidation, and strength after consolidation. It was concluded that NST is an effective means of reducing the rate of production of fluid fine tailings at oil sands mining operations. A simplified NST process flowsheet was presented, as well as photographs of NST slurry depositions. tabs., figs.

  17. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Monopiles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Roesen, Hanne Ravn; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    of small-scale laboratory tests. Six quasi-static tests are conducted on piles with diameters of 40mm and 100mm and a slenderness ratio, L/D, of 5. To minimise scale effects, the tests are carried out in a pressure tank at various stress levels. From the obtained load-deflection relationships...... it is revealed that the uncertainties of the results for the pile with a diameter of 40mm are large. The load-deflection relationships normalised as H/(L2Dγ’) and y/D indicate that the lateral load, H, is proportional to L2D. Comparison of the normalised load-deflection relationships for different stress levels...

  18. Advanced testing and characterization of shear modulus and deformation characteristics of oil sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available the need to characterize the stress dependent, visco-elastic and plastic behavior of oil sand materials under dynamic loading of off-road construction and mining equipment. This paper introduces a new cyclic triaxial test procedure for determining shear...

  19. Simulation Facilities and Test Beds for Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlarmann, Bernhard Kl.; Leonard, Arian

    2002-01-01

    Galileo is the European satellite navigation system, financed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the European Commission (EC). The Galileo System, currently under definition phase, will offer seamless global coverage, providing state-of-the-art positioning and timing services. Galileo services will include a standard service targeted at mass market users, an augmented integrity service, providing integrity warnings when fault occur and Public Regulated Services (ensuring a continuity of service for the public users). Other services are under consideration (SAR and integrated communications). Galileo will be interoperable with GPS, and will be complemented by local elements that will enhance the services for specific local users. In the frame of the Galileo definition phase, several system design and simulation facilities and test beds have been defined and developed for the coming phases of the project, respectively they are currently under development. These are mainly the following tools: Galileo Mission Analysis Simulator to design the Space Segment, especially to support constellation design, deployment and replacement. Galileo Service Volume Simulator to analyse the global performance requirements based on a coverage analysis for different service levels and degrades modes. Galileo System Simulation Facility is a sophisticated end-to-end simulation tool to assess the navigation performances for a complete variety of users under different operating conditions and different modes. Galileo Signal Validation Facility to evaluate signal and message structures for Galileo. Galileo System Test Bed (Version 1) to assess and refine the Orbit Determination &Time Synchronisation and Integrity algorithms, through experiments relying on GPS space infrastructure. This paper presents an overview on the so called "G-Facilities" and describes the use of the different system design tools during the project life cycle in order to design the system with respect to

  20. A New Acoustic Test Facility at Alcatel Space Test Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurat, A.; Jezequel, L.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the obsolescence of its acoustic test facility, Alcatel Space has initiated the investment of a large acoustic chamber on its test centre located in Cannes, south of France. This paper presents the main specification elaborated to design the facility, and the solution chosen : it will be located on a dedicated area of the existing test centre and will be based on technical solution already used in similar facilities over the world. The main structure consists in a chamber linked to an external envelope (concrete building) through suspension aiming at decoupling the vibration and preventing from seismic risks. The noise generation system is based on the use of Wyle modulators located on the chamber roof. Gaseous nitrogen is produced by a dedicated gas generator developed by Air-Liquide that could deliver high flow rate with accurate pressure and temperature controls. The control and acquisition system is based on existing solution implemented on the vibration facilities of the test centre. With the start of the construction in May 2004, the final acceptance tests are planned for April 2005, and the first satellites to be tested are planned for May 2005.

  1. Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuten, James Maner [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Haque, Imtiaz [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Rigas, Nikolaos [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2016-03-30

    In November of 2009, Clemson University was awarded a competitive grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to design, build and operate a facility for full-scale, highly accelerated mechanical testing of next-generation wind turbine drivetrain technologies. The primary goal of the project was to design, construct, commission, and operate a state-of-the-art sustainable facility that permits full-scale highly accelerated testing of advanced drivetrain systems for large wind turbines. The secondary goal was to meet the objectives of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, especially in job creation, and provide a positive impact on economically distressed areas in the United States, and preservation and economic recovery in an expeditious manner. The project was executed according to a managed cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy and was an extraordinary success. The resultant new facility is located in North Charleston, SC, providing easy transportation access by rail, road or ship and operates on an open access model such that it is available to the U.S. Wind Industry for research, analysis, and evaluation activities. The 72 m by 97 m facility features two mechanical dynamometer test bays for evaluating the torque and blade dynamic forces experienced by the rotors of wind turbine drivetrains. The dynamometers are rated at 7.5 MW and 15 MW of low speed shaft power and are configured as independent test areas capable of simultaneous operation. All six degrees of freedom, three linear and three rotational, for blade and rotor dynamics are replicated through the combination of a drive motor, speed reduction gearbox and a controllable hydraulic load application unit (LAU). This new LAU setup readily supports accelerated lifetime mechanical testing and load analysis for the entire drivetrain system of the nacelle and easily simulates a wide variety of realistic operating scenarios in a controlled laboratory environment. The development of these

  2. Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.

    1997-05-01

    This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process.

  3. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2014-01-30

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  4. Test facility for rewetting experiments at CDTN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Hugo C.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Ladeira, Luiz C.D.; Santos, Andre A.C., E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SETRE/CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores

    2015-07-01

    One of the most important subjects in nuclear reactor safety analysis is the reactor core rewetting after a Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) in a Light Water Reactor LWR. Several codes for the prediction of the rewetting evolution are under development based on experimental results. In a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) the reflooding phase of a LOCA is when the fuel rods are rewetted from the bottom of the core to its top after having been totally uncovered and dried out. Out-of-pile reflooding experiments performed with electrical heated fuel rod simulators show different quench behavior depending the rods geometry. A test facility for rewetting experiments (ITR - Instalacao de Testes de Remolhamento) has been constructed at the Thermal Hydraulics Laboratory of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), with the objective of performing investigations on basic phenomena that occur during the reflood phase of a LOCA in a PWR, using tubular and annular test sections. This paper presents the design aspects of the facility, and the current stage of the works. The mechanical aspects of the installation as its instrumentation are described. Two typical tests are presented and results compered with theoretical calculations using computer code. (author)

  5. The first wall test facility FIWATKA - description of the facility and report on commissioning tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, G.; Eggert, E.

    1994-09-01

    A facility for performing thermo-mechanical cycle tests (thermal fatigue tests) was designed and constructed. Such tests are in support of the design of first wall structures for fusion reactors. The requirements necessary to achieve the test goals are outlined. The facility and its components are described; its upgrading capabilities are discussed. The main commissioning tests are reported. It is concluded that the facility is ready to perform thermal fatigue tests; the capability of the facility includes the testing of specimens with high surface temperatures. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ein Pruefstand zur Durchfuehrung thermomechanischer Zyklus-Tests (Versuche zur thermischen Ermuedung) wurde entworfen und aufgebaut. Solche Tests begleiten und unterstuetzen den Entwurf von Erste-Wand-Strukturen fuer Fusionsreaktoren. Die Anforderungen, die zum Erreichen der Versuchsziele erfuellt sein muessen, werden umrissen. Der Pruefstand und seine Komponenten werden beschrieben; die Moeglichkeiten fuer Pruefstands-Erweiterungen werden diskutiert. Ueber die wichtigsten Inbetriebnahme-Versuche wird berichtet. Zusammenfassend wird festgestellt, dass der Pruefstand bereit ist fuer thermische Ermuedungs-Experimente; die besondere Faehigkeit des Pruefstandes liegt darin, dass Proben mit hohen Oberflaechentemperaturen untersucht werden koennen. (orig.)

  6. 40 CFR 792.31 - Testing facility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Testing facility management. 792.31... facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as... personnel, resources, facilities, equipment, materials and methodologies are available as scheduled. (f...

  7. Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Douglas T.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Usability Testing and Analysis Facility (UTAF) at NASA Johnson Space Center. It is one of the Space Human Factors Laboratories in the Habitability and Human Factors Branch (SF3) at NASA Johnson Space Center The primary focus pf the UTAF is to perform Human factors evaluation and usability testing of crew / vehicle interfaces. The presentation reviews the UTAF expertise and capabilities, the processes and methodologies, and the equipment available. It also reviews the programs that it has supported detailing the human engineering activities in support of the design of the Orion space craft, testing of the EVA integrated spacesuit, and work done for the design of the lunar projects of the Constellation Program: Altair, Lunar Electric Rover, and Outposts

  8. NASA Plum Brook's B-2 Test Facility: Thermal Vacuum and Propellant Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlac, Maureen T.; Weaver, Harold F.; Cmar, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77 K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/sq m. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

  9. V-2 at White Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-01-01

    A V-2 rocket is hoisted into a static test facility at White Sands, New Mexico. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under the direction of the U. S. Army, launching more than sixty V-2s.

  10. Small-Scale Quasi-Static Tests on Non-Slender Piles Situated in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    In the period from February 2009 till March 2011 a series of small-scale tests on pile foundations has been conducted at Aalborg University. In all the tests the piles have been exposed to quasi-static loading and all the tests have been conducted in a pressure tank. The objective of the tests has...... been to investigate the effect of pile diameter and length to diameter ratio on the soil response in sand for non-slender piles. Further, the tests have been conducted to calibrate a three-dimensional numerical model in the commercial program FLAC3D....

  11. Space technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Rodrigues, Annette T.

    1990-01-01

    The major space research and technology test facilities at the NASA Ames Research Center are divided into five categories: General Purpose, Life Support, Computer-Based Simulation, High Energy, and the Space Exploraton Test Facilities. The paper discusses selected facilities within each of the five categories and discusses some of the major programs in which these facilities have been involved. Special attention is given to the 20-G Man-Rated Centrifuge, the Human Research Facility, the Plant Crop Growth Facility, the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Facility, the Arc-Jet Complex and Hypersonic Test Facility, the Infrared Detector and Cryogenic Test Facility, and the Mars Wind Tunnel. Each facility is described along with its objectives, test parameter ranges, and major current programs and applications.

  12. Study on GMZ bentonite-sand mixture by undrained triaxial tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wen-jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is particularly necessary to study the deformation, strength and the changes of pore water pressure of bentonite-based buffer/backfill materials under the undrained condition. A series of isotropic compression tests and triaxial shear tests under undrained conditions were conducted on the compacted saturated/unsaturated GMZ bentonite-sand mixtures with dry mass ratio of bentonite/sand of 30:70. During the tests, the images of the sample were collected by photographic equipment and subsequently were cropped, binarized and centroids marked by image processing technique. Based on identification of the variation of the position of marked centroids, the deformation of the sample can be determined automatically in real-time. Finally, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of saturated and unsaturated bentonite-sand mixtures under the undrained condition can be obtained. From results of triaxial shear tests on unsaturated samples under constant water content, inflated volumetric deformation transforms to contractive volumetric deformation due to the increase of the confining pressure and lateral expansion deformation are observed due to the increase in the shearing stress. Moreover, the net mean stress affects the initial stiffness, undrained shear strength and deformation of the sample during the undrained shear tests.

  13. Cryogenic controls for the TESLA test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M.; Gerke, Chr.; Knopf, U.; Rettig, S.; Schoeneburg, B.

    1994-12-01

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) is designed to perform intensive testing of the superconducting cavities foreseen for the next generation of linear colliders. The cryogenic system is one part of this facility. The controls for this system will initially use the existing software and hardware to be able to cool down the first cavities fabricated in the TTF workshop. Later the control system will be modified to meet the current standards in process and accelerator controls. The hardware will be changed to use the VME system as the major platform. The operating system and the communication will be based on de-facto standards such as UNIX for the workstations and the front-end computers and TCP/IP for network communication. The application software (EPICS) will be part of a collaboration with several other institutes. The final goal is to port all the software to the POSIX standard and to use Object-Oriented tools wherever possible. The first part of this paper describes the migration from the existing control system to the future design. Special decisions on hardware and software solutions are highlighted. Nonproprietary field busses for remote process I/O are becoming usual for slow control. A suitable bus for our future basic I/O system had to be selected. Finally a new temperature monitor module working on the CAN-bus and its measurement procedure will be explained.

  14. Small-Scale Cyclic Tests on Nonslender Piles Situated in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Søren Peder Hyldal; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    In the period from August 2011 till October 2011 a series of small-scale tests on pile foundations has been conducted at Aalborg University. In all the tests, the piles have been exposed to cyclic loading consisting of 20-25 load cycles and all the tests have been conducted in a pressure tank....... The objective of the tests has been to investigate the effect of pile diameter, length to diameter ratio and cyclic loading on the soil response for non-slender piles in sand....

  15. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-04-05

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC07 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC07. Prior to TC07, the Transport Reactor was modified to allow operations as an oxygen-blown gasifier. Test Run TC07 was started on December 11, 2001, and the sand circulation tests (TC07A) were completed on December 14, 2001. The coal-feed tests (TC07B-D) were started on January 17, 2002 and completed on April 5, 2002. Due to operational difficulties with the reactor, the unit was taken offline several times. The reactor temperature was varied between 1,700 and 1,780 F at pressures from 200 to 240 psig. In TC07, 679 hours of solid circulation and 442 hours of coal feed, 398 hours with PRB coal and 44 hours with coal from the Calumet mine, and 33 hours of coke breeze feed were attained. Reactor operations were problematic due to instrumentation problems in the LMZ resulting in much higher than desired operating temperatures in the reactor. Both reactor and PCD operations were stable and the modifications to the lower part of the gasifier performed well while testing the gasifier with PRB coal feed.

  16. 40 CFR 160.31 - Testing facility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Testing facility management. 160.31... GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 160.31 Testing facility management. For each study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study director as described in § 160.33...

  17. 21 CFR 58.31 - Testing facility management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing facility management. 58.31 Section 58.31... LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES Organization and Personnel § 58.31 Testing facility management. For each nonclinical laboratory study, testing facility management shall: (a) Designate a study...

  18. Munitions Test Administrative Support Facility Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-03

    beds of eolian, fluvial, or marine sands on broad, nearly level to very steep uplands in the Lower Coastal Plain. Depth to seasonal water table is...adhesion, and aggregate stability) • Low fertility • Relatively low diversity, activity, and populations of soil organisms (bacteria, actinomycetes ...Manager 19 years Environmental Science with experience in freshwater, estuarine, and marine applications Brandenburg, Catherine Document Specialist 4

  19. Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The mission of this facility, which is composed of numerous specialized facilities, is to provide capabilities to simulate a wide range of environments for component...

  20. The negative ion source test facility ELISE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, B., E-mail: bernd.heinemann@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Falter, H.-D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Froeschle, M.; Kraus, W.; Martens, C.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Speth, E.; Staebler, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Postfach 1533, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    The ITER neutral beam system is using inductively coupled radio frequency (RF) ion sources, that have demonstrated the required ITER parameters on (small) sources with extraction areas up to 200 cm{sup 2}. As a next step towards the full size ITER source IPP is presently constructing the test facility ELISE ('Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment') operating with a 'half-size' source which has approximately the width but only half the height of the ITER source. The modular driver concept is expected to allow a further extrapolation to the full size in one direction to be made. The main aim of this experiment is to demonstrate the production of a large uniform negative ion beam with ITER relevant parameters in stable conditions up to one hour. Plasma operation of the source is foreseen to be performed continuously for 1 h; extraction and acceleration of negative ions up to 60 kV is only possible in pulsed mode (10 s every 180 s) due to limitations of the existing IPP HV system. The design of the source and extraction system implements a high experimental flexibility and a good diagnostic access while still staying as close as possible to the ITER design. The main differences are the source operating in air and the use of a large gate valve between the source and the target chamber. ELISE is expected to start operation at the end of 2011 and is an important step for the development of the ITER NBI system; the experience gained early will support the design as well as the commissioning and operating phases of the PRIMA NBI test facilities and the ITER neutral beam system.

  1. Laboratory coupling tests for optimum land streamer design over sand dunes surface

    KAUST Repository

    Almalki, Hashim

    2012-02-26

    The cost of data acquisition in land is becoming a major issue as we strive to cover larger areas with seismic surveys at high resolution. Over sand dunes the problem is compounded by the week coupling obtain using geophones, which often forces us to bury the phone. A major challenge is designing such a land streamer system that combines durability, mobility and the required coupling. We share a couple of such designs and discuss the merits behind such designs and test their capability. The testing includes, the level of coupling, mobility and drag over sand surfaces. For specific designs loose sand can accumulate inside the steamer reducing its mobility. On the other hand, poor coupling will attenuate the high frequencies and cause an effective delay in the signal. The weight of the streamer is also an important factor in both mobility and coupling as it adds to the coupling it reduces the mobility of the streamer. We study the impact of weight and base plate surface area on the seismic signal quality, as well as the friction factor of different designs.

  2. Wettability testing of unconsolidated oil sands using low field NMR technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, X.; Kantzas, A.; Bryan, J. [University of Calgary/TIPM Laboratory (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In an oil field it is important to understand wettability within the reservoir as it has an important impact on several parameters. However it is difficult to measure wettability in oil sands since conventional Amott/USBM testing cannot be applied. The aim of this paper is to develop protocols to assess wettability from NMR spectra in heavy oil reservoirs. Research was conducted on water wet and oil wet conditions; 3 sets of experiments were carried out with oil phases of different viscosity. Results showed that the signal from oil is insensitive to the location of the oil when viscosity increases but that water relaxation times are linked to the presence of water so water peak shifts can be used to determine different wettability states. This study determined that using water phase NMR relaxation presents several advantages to extract wettability information in unconsolidated sand systems and a technique was developed to interpret wettability.

  3. Gas cooled fast breeder reactor design for a circulator test facility (modified HTGR circulator test facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A GCFR helium circulator test facility sized for full design conditions is proposed for meeting the above requirements. The circulator will be mounted in a large vessel containing high pressure helium which will permit testing at the same power, speed, pressure, temperature and flow conditions intended in the demonstration plant. The electric drive motor for the circulator will obtain its power from an electric supply and distribution system in which electric power will be taken from a local utility. The conceptual design decribed in this report is the result of close interaction between the General Atomic Company (GA), designer of the GCFR, and The Ralph M. Parson Company, architect/engineer for the test facility. A realistic estimate of total project cost is presented, together with a schedule for design, procurement, construction, and inspection.

  4. The Influence of Acceleration on the Efficiency of Sand Compaction Tests Conducted on a Vibrating Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajna, Waldemar St.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents a standard vibrating table for fresh concrete testing adopted for determination of maximum dry density (ρdmax) of sand. Vibration is an efficient method for coarse soil compaction therefore vibrating tables are useful for ρdmax determination. Acceleration that the soil is subject to is one of the basic parameters of efficient compaction. A vibrating table with inertial excitation was supplemented by a frequency converter and subjected to dynamic tests. The results of measurements of dynamic parameters are included. The paper presents problems connected with this method and describes the relationship between efficiency of compaction and accelerations which the soil is subjected to.

  5. Testing Local Adaptation in Five Populations of Hyalella azteca in Northern Alberta's Oil Sands Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Steven R; Gauthier, Patrick T; Pyle, Gregory G

    2017-02-01

    Canada's oil sands hold the third largest petroleum reserves worldwide and have experienced rapid economic growth. The oil sands region provides an ideal location for studying local adaptations through reciprocal transplant (RT) because populations within the region have been historically exposed to naturally occurring bitumen. Our objectives were to (1) determine if Hyalella azteca from habitats within the oil sands region exhibited increased tolerance to constituents associated with industrial bitumen extraction compared with H. azteca from habitats outside the region; and (2) determine if any observed tolerance was attributable to local adaptation. Five populations of H. azteca were reciprocally transplanted from reclaimed and reference wetlands: four from local wetlands plus one naïve laboratory population. Survival, toxicity, and behaviour were measured before and after the RT period. Survival varied by population and site. These results show that the differences in responses among populations are likely not attributable to local adaptation and that laboratory populations of H. azteca provide ecologically relevant results when tested in the field.

  6. Electronics and Telemetry Engineering and Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electronics Laboratory is a fully equipped facility providing the capability to support electronic product development from highly complex weapon system sensors,...

  7. Common Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Test Facilities - A General Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Phillip W., Sr.; Hughes, Mark S.; Davis, Dawn M.; Turowski, Mark P.; Holladay, Wendy T.; Marshall, PeggL.; Duncan, Michael E.; Morris, Jon A.; Franzl, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the commercial space launch industry and NASA's more recent resumption of operation of Stennis Space Center's large test facilities after thirty years of contractor control resulted in a need for a non-proprietary data acquisition system (DAS) software to support government and commercial testing. The software is designed for modularity and adaptability to minimize the software development effort for current and future data systems. An additional benefit of the software's architecture is its ability to easily migrate to other testing facilities thus providing future commonality across Stennis. Adapting the software to other Rocket Propulsion Test (RPT) Centers such as MSFC, White Sands, and Plumbrook Station would provide additional commonality and help reduce testing costs for NASA. Ultimately, the software provides the government with unlimited rights and guarantees privacy of data to commercial entities. The project engaged all RPT Centers and NASA's Independent Verification & Validation facility to enhance product quality. The design consists of a translation layer which provides the transparency of the software application layers to underlying hardware regardless of test facility location and a flexible and easily accessible database. This presentation addresses system technical design, issues encountered, and the status of Stennis' development and deployment.

  8. To the question on the factors of formation of the sands density and their potential accounting by cone penetration test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashperyuk Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Undisturbed sampling of sands from boreholes is difficult. It is important to find methods for determining the sands density in-situ, in particular, by cone penetration test. According to the results of cone penetration test can be determined only the categories of relative density of sands depending on their size distribution and probing depth. Based on an extensive literary material and long-term studies of the authors were considered a number of factors, which form the natural density of sands with different particle size distribution and genesis. For improving the accuracy, it is necessary to consider not only the particle size distribution, but also morphological features of grains, primarily depending on the genesis. The most versatile and effective indicator of the morphological features of grains is generalized morphological index λ (by A.D. Potapov. Taking into account that the empirical formula for quantitative assessment of the sands density by cone resistance (by L.G. Mariupolskiy, in our opinion, applicable only for average-size sands without considering of their uniformity, genesis and generalized morphological index, content of silt and clay fraction, water saturation and presence of cohesion-hardening, we offer new correlations between dry soils density and cone resistance for different genetic types of sand.

  9. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  10. 10 CFR 61.81 - Tests at land disposal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tests at land disposal facilities. 61.81 Section 61.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR LAND DISPOSAL OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE Records, Reports, Tests, and Inspections § 61.81 Tests at land disposal facilities. (a) Each...

  11. Computational Modeling in Support of High Altitude Testing Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulation technology plays an important role in rocket engine test facility design and development by assessing risks, identifying failure modes and predicting...

  12. Computational Modeling in Support of High Altitude Testing Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Simulation technology plays an important role in propulsion test facility design and development by assessing risks, identifying failure modes and predicting...

  13. High-field conductor testing at the FENIX facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S. S.; Chaplin, M. R.; Felker, B.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Kishiyama, K. I.; Parker, J. M.

    1993-04-01

    The Fusion Engineering International experiments (FENIX) Test Facility, which was commissioned at the end of 1991, is the first facility in the world capable of testing prototype conductors for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) superconducting magnets. The FENIX facility provides test conditions that simulate the ITER magnet operating environment; more importantly, it also accommodates specific experiments to determine the operational margins for the prototype conductors. The FENIX facility generates magnetic fields close to 14 T, and transport currents over 40 kA for testing the prototype conductors. This paper describes an experimental program that measures critical currents, current-sharing temperatures, forced-flow properties, and cyclic effects.

  14. Potential for use of methylene blue index testing to enhance geotechnical characterization of oil sands ores and tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boxill, Lois [SRK Consulting (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    At the CONRAD conference held in Edmonton in 2011, clay scientist expressed their concern over the variability of clay structures and its impact both on oil sands ores and on tailings. This paper discusses the potential for using methylene blue index testing to enhance geotechnical understanding of the impact of the cation exchange capacity of clay present in oil sands ores and both solid and fluid components of the tailings stream. A description of the methylene blue index test procedure is provided. This process is most commonly used for characterization in the oil sands industry. The requirements for obtaining consistency in the test results are discussed. The test is often used to enhance geotechnical characterization of clays in other areas. The potential for developing correlations between methylene blue index test results and other geotechnical parameters is also discussed. It can be concluded from the study that geotechnical data on soil indicate the effect of clay minerals on the overall plasticity of the soil.

  15. Preliminary Design of the AEGIS Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dassa, Luca; Cambiaghi, Danilo

    2010-01-01

    The AEGIS experiment is expected to be installed at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator in a very close future, since the main goal of the AEGIS experiment is the measurement of gravity impact on antihydrogen, which will be produced on the purpose. Antihydrogen production implies very challenging environmental conditions: at the heart of the AEGIS facility 50 mK temperature, 1e-12 mbar pressure and a 1 T magnetic field are required. Interfacing extreme cryogenics with ultra high vacuum will affect very strongly the design of the whole facility, requiring a very careful mechanical design. This paper presents an overview of the actual design of the AEGIS experimental facility, paying special care to mechanical aspects. Each subsystem of the facility – ranging from the positron source to the recombination region and the measurement region – will be shortly described. The ultra cold region, which is the most critical with respect to the antihydrogen formation, will be dealt in detail. The assembly procedures will...

  16. An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, E., (ed.); /SLAC

    2007-03-14

    SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

  17. Test facility of thermal storage equipment for space power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Mochida, Y.; Ohtomo, F.; Shimizu, K.; Tanaka, K.; Abe, Y.; Nomura, O.; Kamimoto, M.

    A thermal storage equipment test facility has been built in connection with developing solar dynamic power systems (SDPSs). The test facility consists of a recuperative closed Brayton cycle system (CBC), with a mixture of helium and xenon with a molecular weight of 39.9 serving as the working fluid. CBC has been shown to be the most attractive power generation system among several types of SDPSs because of its ability to meet the required high power demand and its thermal efficiency, about 30 percent. The authors present a description of this test facility and give results of the preliminary test and the first-stage test with heat storage equipment.

  18. Overview of US fast-neutron facilities and testing capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Jackson, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Rather than attempt a cataloging of the various fast neutron facilities developed and used in this country over the last 30 years, this paper will focus on those facilities which have been used to develop, proof test, and explore safety issues of fuels, materials and components for the breeder and fusion program. This survey paper will attempt to relate the evolution of facility capabilities with the evolution of development program which use the facilities. The work horse facilities for the breeder program are EBR-II, FFTF and TREAT. For the fusion program, RTNS-II and FMIT were selected.

  19. NASA Ames-Dryden integrated test facility: Presentation outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Larry; Bolen, Dave

    1991-01-01

    The topics are presented in view graph form and include the following: (1) a Dryden overview; (2) the Integrated Tests Facility (ITF); (3) the ITF system architecture; (4) the computer aided system testing; and (5) the ITF system video.

  20. STG-ET: DLR electric propulsion test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Neumann

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available DLR operates the High Vacuum Plume Test Facility Göttingen – Electric Thrusters (STG-ET. This electric propulsion test facility has now accumulated several years of EP-thruster testing experience. Special features tailored to electric space propulsion testing like a large vacuum chamber mounted on a low vibration foundation, a beam dump target with low sputtering, and a performant pumping system characterize this facility. The vacuum chamber is 12.2m long and has a diameter of 5m. With respect to accurate thruster testing, the design focus is on accurate thrust measurement, plume diagnostics, and plume interaction with spacecraft components. Electric propulsion thrusters have to run for thousands of hours, and with this the facility is prepared for long-term experiments. This paper gives an overview of the facility, and shows some details of the vacuum chamber, pumping system, diagnostics, and experiences with these components.

  1. NASA Data Acquisition System Software Development for Rocket Propulsion Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Phillip W., Sr.; Elliot, Alex C.; Graves, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Current NASA propulsion test facilities include Stennis Space Center in Mississippi, Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, Plum Brook Station in Ohio, and White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico. Within and across these centers, a diverse set of data acquisition systems exist with different hardware and software platforms. The NASA Data Acquisition System (NDAS) is a software suite designed to operate and control many critical aspects of rocket engine testing. The software suite combines real-time data visualization, data recording to a variety formats, short-term and long-term acquisition system calibration capabilities, test stand configuration control, and a variety of data post-processing capabilities. Additionally, data stream conversion functions exist to translate test facility data streams to and from downstream systems, including engine customer systems. The primary design goals for NDAS are flexibility, extensibility, and modularity. Providing a common user interface for a variety of hardware platforms helps drive consistency and error reduction during testing. In addition, with an understanding that test facilities have different requirements and setups, the software is designed to be modular. One engine program may require real-time displays and data recording; others may require more complex data stream conversion, measurement filtering, or test stand configuration management. The NDAS suite allows test facilities to choose which components to use based on their specific needs. The NDAS code is primarily written in LabVIEW, a graphical, data-flow driven language. Although LabVIEW is a general-purpose programming language; large-scale software development in the language is relatively rare compared to more commonly used languages. The NDAS software suite also makes extensive use of a new, advanced development framework called the Actor Framework. The Actor Framework provides a level of code reuse and extensibility that has previously been difficult

  2. FY11 Facility Assessment Study for Aeronautics Test Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loboda, John A.; Sydnor, George H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the approach and results for the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) FY11 Facility Assessment Project. ATP commissioned assessments in FY07 and FY11 to aid in the understanding of the current condition and reliability of its facilities and their ability to meet current and future (five year horizon) test requirements. The principle output of the assessment was a database of facility unique, prioritized investments projects with budgetary cost estimates. This database was also used to identify trends for the condition of facility systems.

  3. Space Chemical Propulsion Test Facilities at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urasek, Donald C.; Calfo, Frederick D.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center, located in Cleveland, Ohio, has a number of space chemical propulsion test facilities which constitute a significant national space testing resource. The purpose of this paper is to make more users aware of these test facilities and to encourage their use through cooperative agreements between the government, industry, and universities. Research which is of interest to the government is especially encouraged and often can be done in a cooperative manner that best uses the resources of all parties. An overview of the Lewis test facilities is presented.

  4. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  5. Performance of rocking systems on shallow improved sand: Shaking table testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelos eTsatsis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have highlighted the potential benefits of inelastic foundation response during seismic shaking. According to an emerging seismic design scheme, termed rocking isolation, the foundation is intentionally under–designed to promote rocking and limit the inertia transmitted to the structure. Such reversal of capacity design may improve the seismic performance, drastically increasing the safety margins. However, the benefit comes at the expense of permanent settlement and rotation, which may threaten post-earthquake functionality. Such undesired deformation can be maintained within tolerable limits, provided that the safety factor against vertical loading FSV is adequately large. In such a case, the response is uplifting–dominated and the accumulation of settlement can be limited. However, this is not always feasible as the soil properties may not be ideal. Shallow soil improvement may offer a viable solution and is therefore worth investigating. Its efficiency is related to the nature of rocking, which tends to mobilize a shallow stress bulb. To this end, a series of shaking table tests are conducted, using an idealized slender bridge pier as conceptual prototype. Two systems are studied, both lying on a square foundation of width B. The first corresponds to a lightly-loaded and the second to a heavily-loaded structure. The two systems are first tested on poor and ideal soil conditions to demonstrate the necessity for soil improvement. Then, the efficiency of shallow soil improvement is studied by investigating their performance on soil crusts of depth z/B = 0.5 and 1. It is shown that a z/B = 1 dense sand crust is enough to achieve practically the same performance with the ideal case of dense sand. A shallower z/B = 0.5 improvement layer may also be considered, depending on design requirements. The efficiency of the soil improvement is ameliorated with the increase of rotation amplitude, and with the number of the cycles of the

  6. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  7. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development of the theory of building up pore pressure in sand....

  8. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  9. Major Range and Test Facility Base Summary of Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    V:ISHAM LINDER Director Defense Test and Evaluation *1 DoD 3200.11-D MAJOR RANGE AND TEST FACILITY BASE SUMMARY OF CAPABILITIES TABLE OF CONTENTS White...suitable for zero g testing and rocket plume signature studies. TYPICAL PROJECTS SUPPORTED B-i and F-15/16 Air-Launched Cruise Missile Global Position...rocket plumes , trucks, and other aerospace and ground-based objects. The RATSCAT facility is isolated physically and electromagnetically by its

  10. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Non-Slender Monopiles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Roesen, Hanne Ravn; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    In current design of offshore wind turbines, monopiles are often used as foundation. The behaviour of the monopiles when subjected to lateral loading has not been fully investigated, e.g. the diameter effect on the soil response. In this paper the behaviour of two non-slender aluminium piles...... in sand subjected to lateral loading are analysed by means of small-scale laboratory tests. The six quasi-static tests are conducted on piles with diameters of 40 mm and 100 mm and a slenderness ratio, L/D, of 5. In order to minimise scale effects, the tests are carried out in a pressure tank at stress...... levels of 0 kPa, 50 kPa, and 100 kPa, respectively. From the tests load-deflection relationships of the piles at three levels above the soil surface are obtained. The load-deflection relationships reveal that the uncertainties of the results for the pile with diameter of 40~mm are large due to the small...

  11. Propeller Test Facilities Â

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: Three electrically driven whirl test stands are used to determine propeller (or other rotating device) performance at various rotational speeds. These...

  12. Super Conducting and Conventional Magnets Test & Mapping Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vertical Magnet Test Facility: Accommodate a device up to 3.85 m long, 0.61 m diameter, and 14,400 lbs. Configured for 5 psig sub-cooled liquid helium bath cooling...

  13. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  14. Technical Evaluation of Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kriskovich, J R

    2002-01-01

    Two evaluations of the Oak Ridge Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Facility (FTF) were performed on December 11 and 12, 2001, and consisted of a quality assurance and a technical evaluation. This report documents results of the technical evaluation.

  15. Development of virtual reality simulator for spent fuel test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Byung Ha; Kang, Hyun Kuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the development of spent fuel management research and test facility simulator including hot cell configuration, engineering simulation of spent fuel management process and others. 4 figs.

  16. Micro-Combined Heat and Power Device Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has developed a test facility for micro-combined heat and power (micro-CHP) devices to measure their performance over a range of different operating strategies...

  17. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1997-03-06

    The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

  18. Preconceptual design of the new production reactor circulator test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurston, G.

    1990-06-01

    This report presents the results of a study of a new circulator test facility for the New Production Reactor Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. The report addresses the preconceptual design of a stand-alone test facility with all the required equipment to test the Main Circulator/shutoff valve and Shutdown Cooling Circulator/shutoff valve. Each type of circulator will be tested in its own full flow, full power helium test loop. Testing will cover the entire operating range of each unit. The loop will include a test vessel, in which the circulator/valve will be mounted, and external piping. The external flow piping will include a throttle valve, flowmeter, and heat exchanger. Subsystems will include helium handling, helium purification, and cooling water. A computer-based data acquisition and control system will be provided. The estimated costs for the design and construction of this facility are included. 2 refs., 15 figs.

  19. String 2, test facility for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    String 2 is the long chain seen to the right, representing one complete cell of bending dipoles, focusing quadrupoles and corrector magnets. On 17 June 2002 the test string reached the nominal running current of 11 860 A and magnetic field of 8.335 T for the LHC.

  20. Fuel cell hybrid drive train test facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bruinsma; Edwin Tazelaar; Bram Veenhuizen; I. Zafina; H. Bosma

    2009-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play an important role in the near future as prime energy source on board of road-going vehicles. In order to be able to test all important functional aspects of a fuel cell hybrid drive train, the Automotive Institute of the HAN University has decided to realize a

  1. Overview of the NASA AMES-Dryden Integrated Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackall, Dale; McBride, David; Cohen, Dorothea

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Test Facility (ITF), being built at the NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility (ADFRF), will provide new real-time test capabilities for emerging research aircraft. An overview of the ITF and the real-time systems being developed to operate this unique facility are outlined in this paper. The ITF will reduce flight test risk by minimizing the difference between the flight- and ground-test environments. The ground-test environment is provided by combining real-time flight simulation with the actual aircraft. The generic capabilities of the ITF real-time systems, the real-time data recording, and the remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) monitoring system will be discussed. The benefits of applying simulation to aircraft-in-the-loop testing and RAV monitoring system capabilities to the X-29A flight research program will also be discussed.

  2. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  3. System model of a natural circulation integral test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Mark R.

    The Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics (NE/RHP) at Oregon State University (OSU) has been developing an innovative modular reactor plant concept since being initiated with a Department of Energy (DoE) grant in 1999. This concept, the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR), is an integral pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant that utilizes natural circulation flow in the primary and employs advanced passive safety features. The OSU MASLWR test facility is an electrically heated integral effects facility, scaled from the MASLWR concept design, that has been previously used to assess the feasibility of the concept design safety approach. To assist in evaluating operational scenarios, a simulation tool that models the test facility and is based on both test facility experimental data and analytical methods has been developed. The tool models both the test facility electric core and a simulated nuclear core, allowing evaluation of a broad spectrum of operational scenarios to identify those scenarios that should be explored experimentally using the test facility or design-quality multi-physics tools. Using the simulation tool, the total cost of experimentation and analysis can be reduced by directing time and resources towards the operational scenarios of interest.

  4. Biaxial wheel/hub test facility. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.; Grubisic, V. [eds.

    2000-07-01

    The 4{sup th} meeting aims to exchange the experience and knowledge of engineers during several presentations and discussions about new developments required for a reliable, time and cost reducing validation of the wheel/hub assembly. Tremendous development of the wheel performance, described by the ratio of the rated load (kg) versus the wheel weight (kg) had taken place during the last 5000 years. Starting from the ratio of 3 for wooden 2-piece-disc-wheels in Mesopotamia it needed nearly 1000 years to increase the ratio to approx 5 at light-weight spoke wheels for fighting carriages, found in the grave of king Tutenchamon in Egypt. Modern light alloy wheels of commercial vehicles reach values up to 160 kg/kg. Additionally the comlex design of the modern systems for cars and commercial vehicles comprising wheel, brake, hub, bearing, spindle and hub carrier, including different materials and their treatment, fasteners, press-fits, require an appropriate testing procedure. The variable loading conditions, caused by operational wheel forces, brake and torque moments including heating, may result in changing tolerances and press-fits during operation and consequently in different damage mechanisms. This can be simulated in the Biaxial Wheel Test Machine, whereby corresponding load programs are necessary. An overview about all biaxial test machines in usage at the end of 1999 is shown in the introduction. The total number is 17 for cars, 7 for commercial vehicles and 1 for trains. The six presentations of this meeting were consequently concentrated on: (a) recommendations for a standardization of load programs of the German Wheel Committee, (b) the simulation of brake and torque events and (c) the possibility for a numerical stress analyses and fatigue life assessment. (orig./AKF)

  5. Antiscalent Field Testing for the LBNE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, William D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bahowick, Sally [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-10-12

    This paper was intended as an overview of options and considerations related to the field testing of an antiscalant injection system to be used on a cooling water system where minimal equipment, costs, energy, footprint, and maintenance are desired. It is anticipated that engineering oversight and judgment will be utilized to determine the applicability of each parameter and process suggested herein and modify the plan as necessary prior to implementation. Comparisons between options are given to weigh the benefits of each approach. Suggestions for equipment, materials, automation, monitoring and analytical are provided based on experience and industrial standards and may not be applicable for specific field applications.

  6. WIND TURBINE DRIVETRAIN TEST FACILITY DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcintosh, J.

    2012-01-03

    The Wind Turbine Drivetrain Test Facility (WTDTF) is a state-of-the-art industrial facility used for testing wind turbine drivetrains and generators. Large power output wind turbines are primarily installed for off-shore wind power generation. The facility includes two test bays: one to accommodate turbine nacelles up to 7.5 MW and one for nacelles up to 15 MW. For each test bay, an independent data acquisition system (DAS) records signals from various sensors required for turbine testing. These signals include resistance temperature devices, current and voltage sensors, bridge/strain gauge transducers, charge amplifiers, and accelerometers. Each WTDTF DAS also interfaces with the drivetrain load applicator control system, electrical grid monitoring system and vibration analysis system.

  7. Seismic response analysis of Ganga sand deposits using shake table tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anjali, M; Vivek, B; Raychowdhury, P

    2015-01-01

    ..., evaluating the possibility of ground failure and so on.The present study focuses on dynamic response analysis of local Ganga sand through performing a number of shake table experiments using a flexible laminar container...

  8. Aerospace Structures Test Facility Environmental Test Chambers (ETC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The ETCs test the structural integrity of aerospace structures in representative operating temperatures and aerodynamic load distributions. The test article...

  9. Research and test facilities for development of technologies and experiments with commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    One of NASA'S agency-wide goals is the commercial development of space. To further this goal NASA is implementing a policy whereby U.S. firms are encouraged to utilize NASA facilities to develop and test concepts having commercial potential. Goddard, in keeping with this policy, will make the facilities and capabilities described in this document available to private entities at a reduced cost and on a noninterference basis with internal NASA programs. Some of these facilities include: (1) the Vibration Test Facility; (2) the Battery Test Facility; (3) the Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator Facility; (4) the High Voltage Testing Facility; (5) the Magnetic Field Component Test Facility; (6) the Spacecraft Magnetic Test Facility; (7) the High Capacity Centrifuge Facility; (8) the Acoustic Test Facility; (9) the Electromagnetic Interference Test Facility; (10) the Space Simulation Test Facility; (11) the Static/Dynamic Balance Facility; (12) the High Speed Centrifuge Facility; (13) the Optical Thin Film Deposition Facility; (14) the Gold Plating Facility; (15) the Paint Formulation and Application Laboratory; (16) the Propulsion Research Laboratory; (17) the Wallops Range Facility; (18) the Optical Instrument Assembly and Test Facility; (19) the Massively Parallel Processor Facility; (20) the X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Auger Microscopy/Spectroscopy Laboratory; (21) the Parts Analysis Laboratory; (22) the Radiation Test Facility; (23) the Ainsworth Vacuum Balance Facility; (24) the Metallography Laboratory; (25) the Scanning Electron Microscope Laboratory; (26) the Organic Analysis Laboratory; (27) the Outgassing Test Facility; and (28) the Fatigue, Fracture Mechanics and Mechanical Testing Laboratory.

  10. Characterization of compacted silty sand via relative humidity-controlled triaxial testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Ujwalkumar D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rather limited experimental evidence is available of triaxial shear-induced response of unsaturated soils at suction states far beyond residual suction. In this work, a fully automated, relative-humidity (Auto-RH control unit is adapted to a newly implemented double-walled triaxial cell to test compacted silty sand specimens under consider-ably high total suction states via the vapor-pressure technique. The work is intended to gain critical insight into some of the most essential hydro-mechanical features of densely compacted intermediate geomaterials, such as post-peak softening and strain-induced dilatancy, under suction-controlled monotonic shearing. In general, peak strength is followed by large strain-induced softening until critical state is apparently reached. Strain-softening is observed to be-come considerably more pronounced with increasing total suction. The slope of critical state lines, however, remains virtually constant, regardless of induced total suction, in agreement with critical state-based constitutive frameworks previously postulated for unsaturated soils.

  11. Cryogenic turbulence test facilities at CEA/SBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, B.; Baudet, C.; Bon Mardion, M.; Bourgoin, M.; Braslau, A.; Daviaud, F.; Diribarne, P.; Dubrulle, B.; Gagne, Y.; Gallet, B.; Gibert, M.; Girard, A.; Lehner, T.; Moukharski, I.; Sy, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, CEA Grenoble SBT has designed, built and tested three liquid helium facilities dedicated to turbulence studies. All these experiments can operate either in HeI or HeII within the same campaign. The three facilities utilize moving parts inside liquid helium. The SHREK experiment is a von Kármán swirling flow between 0.72 m diameter counterrotating disks equipped with blades. The HeJet facility is used to produce a liquid helium free jet inside a 0.200 m I.D., 0.47 m length stainless steel cylindrical testing chamber. The OGRES experiment consists of an optical cryostat equipped with a particle injection device and an oscillating grid. We detail specific techniques employed to accommodate these stringent specifications. Solutions for operating these facilities without bubbles nor boiling/cavitation are described. Control parameters as well as Reynolds number and temperature ranges are given.

  12. Beam Line Design for the CERN Hiradmat Test Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Hessler, C.; Assmann, R.; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Weterings, W

    2009-01-01

    The LHC phase II collimation project requires beam shock and impact tests of materials used for beam intercepting devices. Similar tests are also of great interest for other accelerator components such as beam entrance/exit windows and protection devices. For this purpose a dedicated High Radiation Material test facility (HiRadMat) is under study. This facility may be installed at CERN at the location of a former beam line. This paper describes the associated beam line which is foreseen to de...

  13. 200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, A.F.

    1995-10-26

    This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

  14. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  15. Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility (EMI/EMC) Control Test and Measurement Facility: User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the EMI/EMC Test Facility. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  16. Test and evaluation facility for THAAD IR seekers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Arthur R.; Watson, W.; Florie, D.; Colosimo, J.; Hoschette, John A.; Murphy, G.

    1995-05-01

    The high performance requirements for the Theater High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) Seeker required the build and verification of a state-of-the-art infrared seeker test and evaluation facility. The test and evaluation facility is completely enclosed in a class 10,000 clean room and is divided into four major areas. These areas are the build and assembly area, goniometric test area, boresight test area, and analysis area. The build and assembly area is where parts are inspected, cleaned, kitted and finally assembled. After assembly is complete, the seeker is moved to the goniometric and boresight test areas for calibration and test. The goniometric/radiometric test area is where seeker gain and offset, IFOV, FOV, FOR, PSF's, dynamic range and uniformity tests are performed. The boresight test area is where the seeker boresight and servo rate tests are conducted. The seeker operation and performance is controlled and monitored via the Seeker Test Set (STS). The STS provides seeker power, controls all seeker functions, collects simultaneous servo and image data and controls table movements and blackbody target temperatures. For storage and further analysis of data, the STS has been networked via an ethernet connection to the data analysis area. The analysis area contains an off-line data processing and reduction lab consisting of networked high performance PC's. This paper discusses the test facility created for the THAAD IR seeker including requirements, layout and unique functionality.

  17. Large-Scale Cryogen Systems and Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. G.; Sass, J. P.; Hatfield, W. H.

    2007-01-01

    NASA has completed initial construction and verification testing of the Integrated Systems Test Facility (ISTF) Cryogenic Testbed. The ISTF is located at Complex 20 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The remote and secure location is ideally suited for the following functions: (1) development testing of advanced cryogenic component technologies, (2) development testing of concepts and processes for entire ground support systems designed for servicing large launch vehicles, and (3) commercial sector testing of cryogenic- and energy-related products and systems. The ISTF Cryogenic Testbed consists of modular fluid distribution piping and storage tanks for liquid oxygen/nitrogen (56,000 gal) and liquid hydrogen (66,000 gal). Storage tanks for liquid methane (41,000 gal) and Rocket Propellant 1 (37,000 gal) are also specified for the facility. A state-of-the-art blast proof test command and control center provides capability for remote operation, video surveillance, and data recording for all test areas.

  18. Upgrade and development of nuclear data production test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Won; Ko, I. S.; Cho, M. H.; Lee, Y. S.; Kang, H. S. [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. N. [Kyungpook National Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Koh, S. K. [Univ. of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Ro, T. I. [Donga Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, G. U. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: upgrade the electron linac, collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, the extension of the TOF beam line, and the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students.

  19. Upgrade and Development of Nuclear Data Production Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    It is necessary to improve the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF) in order to be used as a nuclear data production facility for users in both domestic and abroad. We improved following items: (1) upgrade the electron linac, (2) collimators inside the TOF beam pipe, (3) the development and installation of an automatic sample changer, (4) the extension of the TOF beam line, and (5) the data acquisition system. We would like to establish a utilization system for users to measure the nuclear data at the PNF. To do this, we made manuals for the accelerator operation and the data acquisition system. We also made an application form to apply for users to measure the nuclear data in both domestic and abroad. The main object of the Pohang Neutron Facility is to measure the nuclear data in the neutron energy region from thermal neutron to few hundreds of eV. In addition to neutron beams produced at the PNF, photon and electron beams are produced in this facility. We thus utilize this facility for other fields, such as test facility for detectors, activation experiments, polarized neutron beam source, and so on. In addition to these, we could use this facility for training students

  20. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Yoon W; Campisi, Isidoro E; Champion, Mark; Crofford, Mark; Davis, Kirk; Drury, Michael A; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Kasemir, Kay-Uwe; McCarthy, Michael P; Powers, Tom; Shajedul Hasan, S M; Stirbet, Mircea; Stout, Daniel; Tang, Johnny Y; Vassioutchenko, Alexandre V; Wezensky, Mark

    2005-01-01

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavitites have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducti...

  1. Constitutive Soil Properties for Unwashed Sand and Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael A.; Chitty, Daniel E.; Gildea, Martin L.; T'Kindt, Casey M.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate soil models are required for numerical simulations of land landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle. This report provides constitutive material models for one soil, unwashed sand, from NASA Langley's gantry drop test facility and three soils from Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The four soil models are based on mechanical and compressive behavior observed during geotechnical laboratory testing of remolded soil samples. The test specimens were reconstituted to measured in situ density and moisture content. Tests included: triaxial compression, hydrostatic compression, and uniaxial strain. A fit to the triaxial test results defines the strength envelope. Hydrostatic and uniaxial tests define the compressibility. The constitutive properties are presented in the format of LS-DYNA Material Model 5: Soil and Foam. However, the laboratory test data provided can be used to construct other material models. The four soil models are intended to be specific to the soil conditions discussed in the report. The unwashed sand model represents clayey sand at high density. The KSC models represent three distinct coastal sand conditions: low density dry sand, high density in-situ moisture sand, and high density flooded sand. It is possible to approximate other sands with these models, but the results would be unverified without geotechnical tests to confirm similar soil behavior.

  2. SSC string test facility for superconducting magnets: Testing capabilities and program for collider magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraushaar, P.; Burgett, W.; Dombeck, T.; McInturff, A.; Robinson, W.; Saladin, V.

    1993-05-01

    The Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) R&D Testing Facility has been established at the SSC Laboratory to test Collider and High Energy Booster (HEB) superconducting magnet strings. The facility is operational and has had two testing periods utilizing a half cell of collider prototypical magnets with the associated spool pieces and support systems. This paper presents a description of the testing capabilities of the facility with respect to components and supporting subsystems (cryogenic, power, quench protection, controls and instrumentation), the planned testing program for the collider magnets.

  3. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  4. R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

  5. Analyses of the OSU-MASLWR Experimental Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mascari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, considering the sustainability of the nuclear technology in the energy mix policy of developing and developed countries, the international community starts the development of new advanced reactor designs. In this framework, Oregon State University (OSU has constructed, a system level test facility to examine natural circulation phenomena of importance to multi-application small light water reactor (MASLWR design, a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR, relying on natural circulation during both steady-state and transient operation. The target of this paper is to give a review of the main characteristics of the experimental facility, to analyse the main phenomena characterizing the tests already performed, the potential transients that could be investigated in the facility, and to describe the current IAEA International Collaborative Standard Problem that is being hosted at OSU and the experimental data will be collected at the OSU-MASLWR test facility. A summary of the best estimate thermal hydraulic system code analyses, already performed, to analyze the codes capability in predicting the phenomena typical of the MASLWR prototype, thermal hydraulically characterized in the OSU-MASLWR facility, is presented as well.

  6. Irradiation test facility of the HTTR and possible international cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanokawa, Konomo; Fujishoro, Toshio; Arai, Taketoshi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Shiozawa, Shusaku [Oarai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    The HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor with a maximum helium coolant temperature of 950C at the reactor outlet. The construction of the HTTR started in March 1991 and its first criticality will be attained very soon. All of the components of the HTTR except fuels has been installed and an overall functional test of the components is under way. Fuel fabrication was finished and is ready to be installed in the reactor core. The HTTR project is intended to establish and upgrade the technology basis necessary for HTGR developments. At the same time new materials development, etc., are also planned for innovative basic research using the HTTR test facility. This paper describes the construction status of the HTTR, planned irradiation test facilities and possible international cooperation on irradiation test programs using the HTTR

  7. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  8. European accelerator facilities for single event effects testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, L.; Nickson, R.; Harboe-Sorensen, R. [ESA-ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Hajdas, W.; Berger, G.

    1997-03-01

    Single event effects are an important hazard to spacecraft and payloads. The advances in component technology, with shrinking dimensions and increasing complexity will give even more importance to single event effects in the future. The ground test facilities are complex and expensive and the complexities of installing a facility are compounded by the requirement that maximum control is to be exercised by users largely unfamiliar with accelerator technology. The PIF and the HIF are the result of experience gained in the field of single event effects testing and represent a unique collaboration between space technology and accelerator experts. Both facilities form an essential part of the European infrastructure supporting space projects. (J.P.N.)

  9. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report. FY 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2015-01-01

    Fermilab Test Beam Facility (FTBF) operations are summarized for FY 2014. It is one of a series of publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  10. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Stack Air Sampling System Qualification Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2001-01-24

    This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that the air monitoring system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility ventilation exhaust stack meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe, sample transport, and stack flow measurement accuracy.

  11. 40 CFR 160.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection of a testing facility. 160.15 Section 160.15 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE... not consider reliable for purposes of supporting an application for a research or marketing permit any...

  12. Cryogenic vertical test facility for the SRF cavities at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Than, R.; Liaw, CJ; Porqueddu, R.; Grau, M.; Tuozzolo, J.; Tallerico, T.; McIntyre, G.; Lederle, D.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.

    2011-03-28

    A vertical test facility has been constructed to test SRF cavities and can be utilized for other applications. The liquid helium volume for the large vertical dewar is approximate 2.1m tall by 1m diameter with a clearance inner diameter of 0.95m after the inner cold magnetic shield installed. For radiation enclosure, the test dewar is located inside a concrete block structure. The structure is above ground, accessible from the top, and equipped with a retractable concrete roof. A second radiation concrete facility, with ground level access via a labyrinth, is also available for testing smaller cavities in 2 smaller dewars. The cryogenic transfer lines installation between the large vertical test dewar and the cryo plant's sub components is currently near completion. Controls and instrumentations wiring are also nearing completion. The Vertical Test Facility will allow onsite testing of SRF cavities with a maximum overall envelope of 0.9 m diameter and 2.1 m height in the large dewar and smaller SRF cavities and assemblies with a maximum overall envelope of 0.66 m diameter and 1.6 m height.

  13. Direct sunlight facility for testing and research in HCPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciortino, Luisa, E-mail: luisa.sciortino@unipa.it; Agnello, Simonpietro, E-mail: luisa.sciortino@unipa.it; Bonsignore, Gaetano; Cannas, Marco; Gelardi, Franco Mario; Napoli, Gianluca; Spallino, Luisa [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 PA (Italy); Barbera, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123 PA, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo G. S. Vaiana, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 PA (Italy); Buscemi, Alessandro; Montagnino, Fabio Maria; Paredes, Filippo [IDEA s.r.l., Contrada Molara, Zona Industriale III Fase, 90018 Termini Imerese (Panama) (Italy); Candia, Roberto; Collura, Alfonso; Di Cicca, Gaspare; Cicero, Ugo Lo; Varisco, Salvo [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo G. S. Vaiana, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 PA (Italy)

    2014-09-26

    A facility for testing different components for HCPV application has been developed in the framework of 'Fotovoltaico ad Alta Efficienza' (FAE) project funded by the Sicilian Regional Authority (PO FESR Sicilia 2007/2013 4.1.1.1). The testing facility is equipped with an heliostat providing a wide solar beam inside the lab, an optical bench for mounting and aligning the HCPV components, electronic equipments to characterize the I-V curves of multijunction cells operated up to 2000 suns, a system to circulate a fluid in the heat sink at controlled temperature and flow-rate, a data logging system with sensors to measure temperatures in several locations and fluid pressures at the inlet and outlet of the heat sink, and a climatic chamber with large test volume to test assembled HCPV modules.

  14. The Development of an Information System Master Plan for the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    1 -0 0- "SANDS KAUAI NOTE (AENA PT.’ . KUALALONO _hIOAHUA P0RT PARK ALLEN CA WEL A IERtCA MT KAALA Are * (MAR61 ICANEOHE~1AAAA MACAS IAAUNA KAPU 0...DOD will be the watchword. The consolidation of functions and the reduction in services will lead the way. PMRF will not be immune to the effects of...meet both of these requirements. It will also provide a channel that is immune to electromagnetic interference. This fiber also will provide

  15. A simulation facility for testing Space Station assembly procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajare, Ankur R.; Wick, Daniel T.; Shehad, Nagy M.

    1994-11-01

    NASA plans to construct the Space Station Freedom (SSF) in one of the most hazardous environments known to mankind - space. It is of the utmost importance that the procedures to assemble and operate the SSF in orbit are both safe and effective. This paper describes a facility designed to test the integration of the telerobotic systems and to test assembly procedures using a real-world robotic arm grappling space hardware in a simulated microgravity environment.

  16. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  17. Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Test /SMEAT/ facility design and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinners, A. H., Jr.; Correale, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the design approaches and test facility operation methods used to successfully accomplish a 56-day test for Skylab to permit evaluation of selected Skylab medical experiments in a ground test simulation of the Skylab environment with an astronaut crew. The systems designed for this test include the two-gas environmental control system, the fire suppression and detection system, equipment transfer lock, ground support equipment, safety systems, potable water system, waste management system, lighting and power system, television monitoring, communications and recreation systems, and food freezer.

  18. Integral Test Facility PKL: Experimental PWR Accident Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Umminger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of pressurized water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany for many years. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a pressurized water reactor (PWR at a height scale of 1 : 1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1 : 145. The experimental facility consists of 4 primary loops with circulation pumps and steam generators (SGs arranged symmetrically around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV. The investigations carried out encompass a very broad spectrum from accident scenario simulations with large, medium, and small breaks, over the investigation of shutdown procedures after a wide variety of accidents, to the systematic investigation of complex thermal-hydraulic phenomena. This paper presents a survey of test objectives and programs carried out to date. It also describes the test facility in its present state. Some important results obtained over the years with focus on investigations carried out since the beginning of the international cooperation are exemplarily discussed.

  19. Production Facility Prototype Blower 1000 Hour Test Results II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-08

    Long duration tests of the Aerzen GM 12.4 roots style blower in a closed loop configuration provides valuable data and lessons learned for long-term operation at the Mo-99 production facility. The blower was operated in a closed loop configuration with the flow conditions anticipated in plant operation with a Mo-100 target inline. The additional thermal energy generated from beam heating of the Mo-100 disks were not included in these tests. Five 1000 hour tests have been completed since the first test was performed in January of 2016. All five 1000 hour tests have proven successful in exposing preventable issues related to oil and helium leaks. All blower tests to this date have resulted in stable blower performance and consistency. A summary of the results for each test, including a review of the first and second tests, are included in this report.

  20. Test facility for astronomical x-ray optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Lewis, Robert A.; Bordas, J.

    1990-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earth's atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source that is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... to approximate that encountered under working conditions; however, the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area while still retaining...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes, is described. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  1. A Test Facility For Astronomical X-Ray Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, R. A.; Bordas, J.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1989-01-01

    Grazing incidence x-ray optics for x-ray astronomical applications are used outside the earths atmosphere. These devices require a large collection aperture and the imaging of an x-ray source which is essentially placed at infinity. The ideal testing system for these optical elements has...... to approximate that encountered under working conditions, however the testing of these optical elements is notoriously difficult with conventional x-ray generators. Synchrotron Radiation (SR) sources are sufficiently brilliant to produce a nearly perfect parallel beam over a large area whilst still retaining...... a flux considerably higher than that available from conventional x-ray generators. A facility designed for the testing of x-ray optics, particularly in connection with x-ray telescopes is described below. It is proposed that this facility will be accommodated at the Synchrotron Radiation Source...

  2. 5-Megawatt solar-thermal test facility: environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-01-30

    An Environmental Assessment of the 5 Megawatt Solar Thermal Test Facility (STTF) is presented. The STTF is located at Albuquerque, New Mexico. The facility will have the capability for testing scale models of major subsystems comprising a solar thermal electrical power plant. The STTF capabilities will include testing a solar energy collector subsystem comprised of heliostat arrays, a receiver subsystem which consists of a boiler/superheater in which a working fluid is heated, and a thermal storage subsystem which includes tanks of high heat capacity material which stores thermal energy for subsequent use. The STTF will include a 200-foot receiver tower on which experimental receivers will be mounted. The Environmental Assessment describes the proposed STTF, its anticipated benefits, and the environment affected. It also evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with STTF construction and operation.

  3. I and C functional test facility user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ki Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    The objective of I and C functional test facility (FTF) is to validate newly developed digital control and protection algorithm, alarm reduction algorithm and the function of operator support system and so on. Test facility is divided into three major parts; software, hardware and graphic user interface. Software consists of mathematical modeling which simulates 3 loop pressurizer water reactor, 993 MWe Westinghouse plant and supervisory module which interpret user instructions and data interface program. FTF is implemented in HP747I workstation using FORTRAN77 and ``C`` language under UNIX operating system. This User Guide provides file structure, instructions and program modification method and provides initial data, malfunction list, process variables list and simulation diagram as an appendix to test developed prototype. 12 figs. (Author).

  4. Design of a test facility for probe calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimák Jan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A possibility to easily calibrate probes for flow field measurements is always welcome. From this reason, a design of a test facility for probe calibration was made. The probes will be calibrated in a free jet of known properties, which is created by an exchangeable nozzle to cover a wide range of Mach numbers up to Mach 2. The most important is to create a homogeneous flow across the test section. This is accomplished by a precise design of the nozzles carried out by numerical tools. The convergent nozzle part is common for all subsonic flow regimes while the divergent part (forming a de Laval nozzle is suited for a specific supersonic Mach number. These parts are designed using the method of characteristics. Numerical simulations performed by a CFD code show a feasibility and quality of the proposed test facility.

  5. Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST): MIST Facility Functional Specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, T F; Koksal, C G; Moskal, T E; Rush, G C; Gloudemans, J R [Babcock and Wilcox Co. (USA)

    1991-04-01

    The Multiloop Integral System Test (MIST) is part of a multiphase program started in 1983 to address small-break loss-of-coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) specific to Babcock and Wilcox designed plants. MIST is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Babcock Wilcox Owners Group, the Electric Power Research Institute, and Babcock and Wilcox. The unique features of the Babcock and Wilcox design, specifically the hot leg U-bends and steam generators, prevented the use of existing integral system data or existing integral facilities to address the thermal-hydraulic SBLOCA questions. MIST was specifically designed and constructed for this program, and an existing facility -- the Once Through Integral System (OTIS) -- was also used. Data from MIST and OTIS are used to benchmark the adequacy of system codes, such as RELAP5 and TRAC, for predicting abnormal plant transients. The MIST Functional Specification documents as-built design features, dimensions, instrumentation, and test approach. It also presents the scaling basis for the facility and serves to define the scope of work for the facility design and construction. 13 refs., 112 figs., 38 tabs.

  6. Integrated Disposal Facility FY 2012 Glass Testing Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kerisit, Sebastien N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krogstad, Eirik J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burton, Sarah D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bjornstad, Bruce N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freedman, Vicky L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Snyder, Michelle MV [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Crum, Jarrod V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westsik, Joseph H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-29

    PNNL is conducting work to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility for Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program, PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. Key activities in FY12 include upgrading the STOMP/eSTOMP codes to do near-field modeling, geochemical modeling of PCT tests to determine the reaction network to be used in the STOMP codes, conducting PUF tests on selected glasses to simulate and accelerate glass weathering, developing a Monte Carlo simulation tool to predict the characteristics of the weathered glass reaction layer as a function of glass composition, and characterizing glasses and soil samples exhumed from an 8-year lysimeter test. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and the first quarter of FY 2013 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of LAW glasses.

  7. Design study of an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E; Brüning, O; Calaga, R; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Goddard, B; Klein, M; Torres-Sanchez, R; Valloni, A

    2014-01-01

    The modern concept of an Energy Recovery Linac allows providing large electron currents at large beam energy with low power consumption. This concept is used in FEL’s, electron-ion colliders and electron coolers. CERN has started a Design Study of an ERL Test Facility with the purpose of 1) studying the ERL principle, its specific beam dynamics and operational issues, as relevant for LHeC, 2) providing a test bed for superconducting cavity modules, cryogenics and integration, 3) studying beam induced quenches in superconducting magnets and protection methods, 4) providing test beams for detector R&D and other applications. It will be complementary to existing or planned facilities and is fostering international collaboration. The operating frequency of 802 MHz was chosen for performance and for optimum synergy with SPS and LHC; the design of the cryomodule has started. The ERL Test Facility can be constructed in stages from initially 150 MeV to ultimately 1 GeV in 3 passes, with beam currents of up to 8...

  8. Fast Flux Test Facility fuel and test management: The first 10 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, R.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Campbell, L.R.; Dobbin, K.D.; Tang, E.L.

    1991-07-01

    Core design and fuel and test management have been performed efficiently at the Fast Flux Test Facility. No outages have been extended to adjust core loadings. Development of mixed oxide fuels for advanced liquid metal breeder reactors has been carried out successfully. In fact, the fuel performance is extraordinary. Failures have been so infrequent that further development and refinement of fuel requirements seem appropriate and could lead to a significant reduction in projected electrical busbar costs. The Fast Flux Test Facility is also involved in early metal fuel development tests and appears to be an ideal test bed for any further fuel development or refinement testing. 3 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. OPSys: optical payload systems facility for testing space coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, S.; Crescenzio, G.; Massone, G.; Capobianco, G.; Zangrilli, L.; Antonucci, E.; Anselmi, F.

    2011-10-01

    The Turin Astronomical Observatory, Italy, has implemented in ALTEC, Turin, a new Optical Payload Systems (OPSys) facility for testing of contamination sensitive optical space flight instrumentation. The facility is specially tailored for tests on solar instruments like coronagraphs. OPSys comprises an ISO 7 clean room for instrument assembly and a relatively large (4.4 m3) optical test and calibration vacuum chamber: the Space Optics Calibration Chamber (SPOCC). SPOCC consists of a test section with a vacuum-compatible motorized optical bench, and of a pipeline section with a sun simulator at the opposite end of the optical bench hosting the instrumentation under tests. The solar simulator is an off-axis parabolic mirror collimating the light from the source with the solar angular divergence. After vacuum conditioning, the chamber will operate at an ultimate pressure of 10-6 mbar. This work describes the SPOCC's vacuum system and optical design, and the post-flight stray-light tests to be carried out on the Sounding-rocket Experiment (SCORE). This sub-orbital solar coronagraph is the prototype of the METIS coronagraph for the ESA Solar Orbital mission whose closest perihelion is one-third of the Sun-Earth distance. The plans are outlined for testing METIS in the SPOCC simulating the observing conditions from the Solar Orbiter perihelion.

  10. A high resolution cavity BPM for the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Chritin, N.; Soby, L.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Wendt, M.; Yakovlev, V.

    2012-01-01

    In frame of the development of a high resolution BPM system for the CLIC Main Linac we present the design of a cavity BPM prototype. It consists of a waveguide loaded dipole mode resonator and a monopole mode reference cavity, both operating at 15 GHz, to be compatible with the bunch frequencies at the CLIC Test Facility. Requirements, design concept, numerical analysis, and practical considerations are discussed.

  11. Status of Centralized Environmental Creep Testing Facility Preparation and Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Battiste, Rick [ORNL

    2006-10-01

    Because the ASME Codes do not cover environmental issues that are crucial in the design and construction of VHTR system, investigation of long-term impure helium effects on metallurgical stability and properties becomes very important. The present report describes the development of centralized environmental creep testing facility, its close collaborations with the experiments in low velocity helium recirculation loop, important lessons learned, upgrades in system design in FY06, and current status of the development.

  12. First experimental data of the cryogenic safety test facility PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, C.; Henriques, A.; Stamm, M.; Grohmann, S.

    2017-02-01

    The test facility PICARD, which stands for Pressure Increase in Cryostats and Analysis of Relief Devices, has been designed and constructed for cryogenic safety experiments. With a cryogenic liquid volume of 100 L, a nominal design pressure of 16 bar(g) and the capacity of measuring helium mass flow rates through safety relief devices up to 4 kg/s, the test facility allows the systematic investigation of hazardous incidents in cryostats under realistic conditions. In the course of experiments, the insulating vacuum is vented with atmospheric air or gaseous nitrogen at ambient temperature under variation of the venting diameter, the thermal insulation, the cryogenic fluid, the liquid level and the set pressure in order to analyze the impact on the heat flux and hence on the process dynamics. A special focus will be on the occurrence and implications of two-phase flow during expansion and on measuring the flow coefficients of safety devices at cryogenic temperatures. This paper describes the commissioning and the general performance of the test facility at liquid helium temperatures. Furthermore, the results of first venting experiments are presented.

  13. Linear Accelerator Test Facility at LNF Conceptual Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Valente, Paolo; Bolli, Bruno; Buonomo, Bruno; Cantarella, Sergio; Ceccarelli, Riccardo; Cecchinelli, Alberto; Cerafogli, Oreste; Clementi, Renato; Di Giulio, Claudio; Esposito, Adolfo; Frasciello, Oscar; Foggetta, Luca; Ghigo, Andrea; Incremona, Simona; Iungo, Franco; Mascio, Roberto; Martelli, Stefano; Piermarini, Graziano; Sabbatini, Lucia; Sardone, Franco; Sensolini, Giancarlo; Ricci, Ruggero; Rossi, Luis Antonio; Rotundo, Ugo; Stella, Angelo; Strabioli, Serena; Zarlenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Test beam and irradiation facilities are the key enabling infrastructures for research in high energy physics (HEP) and astro-particles. In the last 11 years the Beam-Test Facility (BTF) of the DA{\\Phi}NE accelerator complex in the Frascati laboratory has gained an important role in the European infrastructures devoted to the development and testing of particle detectors. At the same time the BTF operation has been largely shadowed, in terms of resources, by the running of the DA{\\Phi}NE electron-positron collider. The present proposal is aimed at improving the present performance of the facility from two different points of view: extending the range of application for the LINAC beam extracted to the BTF lines, in particular in the (in some sense opposite) directions of hosting fundamental physics and providing electron irradiation also for industrial users; extending the life of the LINAC beyond or independently from its use as injector of the DA{\\Phi}NE collider, as it is also a key element of the electron/...

  14. Integrated Disposal Facility FY2011 Glass Testing Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Windisch, Charles F.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-29

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the disposal facility (e.g., source term). Vitrifying the low-activity waste at Hanford is expected to generate over 1.6 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3} of glass (Certa and Wells 2010). The volume of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) at Hanford is the largest in the DOE complex and is one of the largest inventories (approximately 8.9 x 10{sup 14} Bq total activity) of long-lived radionuclides, principally {sup 99}Tc (t{sub 1/2} = 2.1 x 10{sup 5}), planned for disposal in a low-level waste (LLW) facility. Before the ILAW can be disposed, DOE must conduct a performance assessment (PA) for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) that describes the long-term impacts of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. As part of the ILAW glass testing program PNNL is implementing a strategy, consisting of experimentation and modeling, in order to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the glass waste form in support of future IDF PAs. The purpose of this report is to summarize the progress made in fiscal year (FY) 2011 toward implementing the strategy with the goal of developing an understanding of the long-term corrosion behavior of low-activity waste glasses.

  15. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  16. Current Status and Performance Tests of Korea Heat Load Test Facility KoHLT-EB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sukkwon; Jin, Hyunggon; Shin, Kyuin; Choi, Boguen; Lee, Eohwak; Yoon, Jaesung; Lee, Dongwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duckhoi; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    A commissioning test has been scheduled to establish the installation and preliminary performance experiments of the copper hypervapotron mockups. And a qualification test will be performed to evaluate the CuCrZr duct liner in the ITER neutral beam injection facility and the ITER first wall small-scale mockups of the semi-prototype, at up to 1.5 and 5 MW/m{sup 2} high heat flux. Also, this system will be used to test other PFCs for ITER and materials for tokamak reactors. Korean high heat flux test facility(KoHLT-EB; Korea Heat Load Test facility - Electron Beam) by using an electron beam system has been constructed in KAERI to perform the qualification test for ITER blanket FW semi-prototype mockups, hypervapotron cooling devices in fusion devices, and other ITER plasma facing components. The commissioning and performance tests with the supplier of e-gun system have been performed on November 2012. The high heat flux test for hypervapotron cooling device and calorimetry were performed to measure the surface heat flux, the temperature profile and cooling performance. Korean high heat flux test facility for the plasma facing components of nuclear fusion machines will be constructed to evaluate the performance of each component. This facility for the plasma facing materials will be equipped with an electron beam system with a 60 kV acceleration gun.

  17. Embracing Safe Ground Test Facility Operations and Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Steven C.; Green, Donald R.

    2010-01-01

    Conducting integrated operations and maintenance in wind tunnel ground test facilities requires a balance of meeting due dates, efficient operation, responsiveness to the test customer, data quality, effective maintenance (relating to readiness and reliability), and personnel and facility safety. Safety is non-negotiable, so the balance must be an "and" with other requirements and needs. Pressure to deliver services faster at increasing levels of quality in under-maintained facilities is typical. A challenge for management is to balance the "need for speed" with safety and quality. It s especially important to communicate this balance across the organization - workers, with a desire to perform, can be tempted to cut corners on defined processes to increase speed. Having a lean staff can extend the time required for pre-test preparations, so providing a safe work environment for facility personnel and providing good stewardship for expensive National capabilities can be put at risk by one well-intending person using at-risk behavior. This paper documents a specific, though typical, operational environment and cites management and worker safety initiatives and tools used to provide a safe work environment. Results are presented and clearly show that the work environment is a relatively safe one, though still not good enough to keep from preventing injury. So, the journey to a zero injury work environment - both in measured reality and in the minds of each employee - continues. The intent of this paper is to provide a benchmark for others with operational environments and stimulate additional sharing and discussion on having and keeping a safe work environment.

  18. The LECCE cosmic ray testing facility for the ATLAS RPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, M.; Cataldi, G.; Chiodini, G.; Coluccia, M. R.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Perrino, R.; Primavera, M.; Spagnolo, S.; Tassielli, G.

    2006-09-01

    A detailed description of a dedicated facility built in the Lecce INFN and Physics Department High Energy Laboratory to test part of the Resistive Plate Counters (RPCs) of the ATLAS barrel muon spectrometer is presented. In this cosmic ray test stand the chambers are operated for the first time, after being assembled and equipped with all required services for gas and electrical connections. A complete set of measurements is performed on each chamber in order to certificate its quality and performances before the installation in the experiment.

  19. GENIUS-TF: a test facility for the GENIUS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H. V.; Baudis, L.; Dietz, A.; Heusser, G.; Krivosheina, I.; Majorovits, B.; Strecker, H.

    2002-04-01

    GENIUS is a proposal for a large scale detector of rare events. As a first step of the experiment, a small test version, the Genius Test-Facility will be built at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso. With about 40kg of natural Ge detectors operated in liquid nitrogen, GENIUS-TF could exclude (or directly confirm) the DAMA annual modulation seasonal modulation signature within about 2yr of measurement using both, signal and signature of the claimed WIMP Dark Matter. The construction of the experiment has already been started, and four 2.5kg germanium detectors with an extreme low threshold of 500eV have been produced.

  20. The Development of the Code Safety Valve Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Ae; Park, Jong Woon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The Pressurizer Safety Valves (PSV) in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) are required to provide the overpressure protection for the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) during the overpressure transients. According to the ASME OM code, all safety valves should be tested every 5 years with the acceptance tolerance of 1%. If one valve failed to meet this criterion, other two additional valves should be tested and if these valves don't meet the requirement, all valves should be tested. These frequent tests may make the valves decrepit and become a cause of leak. Therefore, increase of the acceptance tolerance is vital for the safe operation of the plant. In the United States, the acceptance tolerances are enlarged up to about 3% in most plants. This requires re-analysis of relevant accidents in FSAR. Also, the technical background data for the valve pop-up characteristics and the loop seal dynamics (if the plant has the loop seal in the upstream of PSV) are needed for the new safety analysis. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP) plans to build the PSV test facility for the purpose of providing the background data. This paper describes the preliminary design of the facility and studies on the system dynamics using GOTHIC-7.2a code to verify the pressure vessel capacities and to find the best operating condition.

  1. CLOSEOUT REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR PRESSURIZED BUTTON CELL TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeper, T.

    2010-09-15

    This document is the Close-Out Report for design and partial fabrication of the Pressurized Button Cell Test Facility at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This facility was planned to help develop the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) that is a key component of the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for generating hydrogen. The purpose of this report is to provide as much information as possible in case the decision is made to resume research. This report satisfies DOE Milestone M3GSR10VH030107.0. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by watersplitting. The HyS Cycle utilizes the high temperature (>800 C) thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both high thermodynamic efficiency and low hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. Sulfur dioxide from the decomposer is cycled back to electrolyzers. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. Anode and cathode are formed by spraying a catalyst, typically platinized carbon, on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). SRNL has been testing SDEs for several years including an atmospheric pressure Button Cell electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2} active area) and an elevated temperature/pressure Single Cell electrolyzer (54.8 cm{sup 2} active area). SRNL tested 37 MEAs in the Single Cell electrolyzer facility from June 2005 until June 2009, when funding was discontinued. An important result of the final months of testing was the development of a method that

  2. The development of an information system master plan for the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollo, Rolando A.; Bennett, Paul D.

    1992-03-01

    This thesis provides a general description of the communication facilities and systems currently used by the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). The system interface requirements to support current range operations are identified and a description of current communications system shortfalls is provided along with recommendations for short-term improvements. A vision of the future is also provided. It suggests that PMRF adopt a coordinated, integrated, and centralized approach to range communications. Current and future communications system technologies such as digital communications, applicability of different transmission media, and application of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) are mentioned as avenues for implementing a fully integrated data, voice, and video real-time information network that will support future PMRF users' requirements.

  3. 78 FR 59946 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug... the Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities (IITF) currently certified to meet the standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines...

  4. 78 FR 7795 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug... the Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities (IITF) currently certified to meet the standards of the Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs (Mandatory Guidelines...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  6. The ERDA/LeRC Photovoltaic Systems Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The ERDA/LeRC Photovoltaic Systems Test Facility (STF) provides a vital support function to the overall ERDA National Solar Photovoltaic Program. It allows preliminary investigation and checkout of components, subsystems, and complete photovoltaic systems before installation in actual service. The STF can also be used to determine optimum system configurations and operating modes. A facility description is presented, taking into account the solar cell array, the energy storage equipment, the power conditioning equipment, electric utility distribution network and loads, and instrumentation and data acquisition systems. Safety procedures which have been set up for maintenance and inspection of the solar array are discussed. Attention is also given to a number of investigations regarding the effect of environmental factors on solar cell array operation.

  7. Information on the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this report provides information related to the design of the Oregon State University Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) test facility. Information provided in this report have been pulled from the following information sources: Reference 1: R. Nourgaliev and et.al, "Summary Report on NGSAC (Next-Generation Safety Analysis Code) Development and Testing," Idaho National Laboratory, 2011. Note that this is report has not been released as an external report. Reference 2: O. Stevens, Characterization of the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX) Passive Residual Heat Removal System Heat Exchanger, Master Thesis, June 1996. Reference 3: J. Reyes, Jr., Q. Wu, and J. King, Jr., Scaling Assessment for the Design of the OSU APEX-1000 Test Facility, OSU-APEX-03001 (Rev. 0), May 2003. Reference 4: J. Reyes et al, Final Report of the NRC AP600 Research Conducted at Oregon State University, NUREG/CR-6641, July 1999. Reference 5: K. Welter et al, APEX-1000 Confirmatory Testing to Support AP1000 Design Certification (non-proprietary), NUREG-1826, August 2005.

  8. Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

  9. Fast Flux Test Facility Asbestos Location Tracking Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REYNOLDS, J.A.

    1999-04-13

    Procedure Number HNF-PRO-408, revision 0, paragraph 1.0, ''Purpose,'' and paragraph 2.0, ''Requirements for Facility Management of Asbestos,'' relate building inspection and requirements for documentation of existing asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) per each building assessment. This documentation shall be available to all personnel (including contractor personnel) entering the facility at their request. Corrective action was required by 400 Area Integrated Annual Appraisal/Audit for Fiscal Year 1992 (IAA-92-0007) to provide this notification documentation. No formal method had been developed to communicate the location and nature of ACBM to maintenance personnel in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) 400 Area. The scope of this Data Package Document is to locate and evaluate any ACBM found at FFTF which constitutes a baseline. This includes all buildings within the protected area. These findings are compiled from earlier reports, numerous work packages and engineering evaluations of employee findings.

  10. Upgrade of the BATMAN test facility for H- source development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, B.; Fröschle, M.; Falter, H.-D.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Kraus, W.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.

    2015-04-01

    The development of a radio frequency (RF) driven source for negative hydrogen ions for the neutral beam heating devices of fusion experiments has been successfully carried out at IPP since 1996 on the test facility BATMAN. The required ITER parameters have been achieved with the prototype source consisting of a cylindrical driver on the back side of a racetrack like expansion chamber. The extraction system, called "Large Area Grid" (LAG) was derived from a positive ion accelerator from ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) using its aperture size (ø 8 mm) and pattern but replacing the first two electrodes and masking down the extraction area to 70 cm2. BATMAN is a well diagnosed and highly flexible test facility which will be kept operational in parallel to the half size ITER source test facility ELISE for further developments to improve the RF efficiency and the beam properties. It is therefore planned to upgrade BATMAN with a new ITER-like grid system (ILG) representing almost one ITER beamlet group, namely 5 × 14 apertures (ø 14 mm). Additionally to the standard three grid extraction system a repeller electrode upstream of the grounded grid can optionally be installed which is positively charged against it by 2 kV. This is designated to affect the onset of the space charge compensation downstream of the grounded grid and to reduce the backstreaming of positive ions from the drift space backwards into the ion source. For magnetic filter field studies a plasma grid current up to 3 kA will be available as well as permanent magnets embedded into a diagnostic flange or in an external magnet frame. Furthermore different source vessels and source configurations are under discussion for BATMAN, e.g. using the AUG type racetrack RF source as driver instead of the circular one or modifying the expansion chamber for a more flexible position of the external magnet frame.

  11. High current test facility for superconductors at Saclay

    CERN Document Server

    Berriaud, C; Vieillard, L

    2001-01-01

    A high DC current (100 kA-design) test facility for superconducting material is under realisation. Aluminum stabilised conductor (as for LHC detectors) can be tested Including the stabiliser in a 4.75 T dipole field of 0.8 m length which can be rotated in both cable perpendicular directions. A superconductor transformer creates the high current with a primary current from -200 A to +200 A. The output power useable is 25 kJ so that junctions between cables or conductors can be measured at high current. Samples, with a cross sections up to 12 mm*30 mm, were 0.8 m long and were equipped with soldered cables of 0.4 m length at both ends. To test different samples without warming the dipole magnet, samples are placed in a separate dewar. The conception design is described and the first results without external dipole magnetic field are reported. (9 refs).

  12. The Testing Behind The Test Facility: The Acoustic Design of the NASA Glenn Research Center's World-Class Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozman, Aron D.; Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, USA. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA's space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 cu ft in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world's known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada's acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  13. Design of Pump as Turbine Experimental Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zariatin D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design process of experimental test facility for pump as turbine hydropower system. Three design possibilities that related to the PAT condition of operation was developed and analyzed by using CFD Software. It is found that the First Variant with a straight flow to the PAT will produce higher velocity, which is needed to generate more rotation of the shaft generator, in order to generate more electric power. The strength of PAT construction was analyzed by using FEM software. It was found that the maximum stress is 6 MPa and can be concluded that the construction is appropriate to the design requirement.

  14. Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-02

    Engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory’s (NREL’s) Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF) are developing strategies to address two separate but equally crucial areas of research: meeting the demands of electric vehicle (EV) grid integration and minimizing fuel consumption related to vehicle climate control. Dedicated to renewable and energy-efficient solutions, the VTIF showcases technologies and systems designed to increase the viability of sustainably powered vehicles. NREL researchers instrument every class of on-road vehicle, conduct hardware and software validation for EV components and accessories, and develop analysis tools and technology for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and industry partners.

  15. Airborne respirable silica near a sand and gravel facility in central California: XRD and elemental analysis to distinguish source and background quartz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Ryoji; Holmén, Britt A

    2002-12-01

    Despite the potential toxicity of respirable quartz to humans, little is known about the transport of airborne quartz from sources to receptors and how to distinguish anthropogenically generated quartz from natural background in a receptor sample. Airborne quartz emissions near a sand and gravel facility were determined using PM10 and PM2.5 filter samples collected at four downwind sites (D1: 22 m, D2: 62 m, D3: 259 m, and D4: 745 m from the facility) as well as one upwind site (U1: 1495 m) during summer sampling. X-ray diffraction was used to determine quartz concentration and elemental composition was analyzed using PIXE, XRF, PESA, and HIPS techniques. Elemental composition of the PM samples was used to determine the X-ray mass absorption coefficients that are essential for accurate quartz quantification by XRD. Elemental composition was found to be a useful tool to distinguish source and background crystalline silica. Both PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected at the D1, D2, and D3 sites contained more Si, Al, and Fe and less H, Na, and S, compared to those at the U1 site, whereas site D4 sample compositions were similar to those at the U1 site. A composite variable, SOIL/(H+Na+S), where SOIL = 2.20Al + 2.49Si + 1.63Ca + 1.94Ti + 2.42Fe, was used to distinguish source materials from background. Average dry season quartz concentrations in replicate PM10 samples were 4.6 +/- 0.9) microg m(-3) at U1, 60.6 (+/- 5.4) microg m(3) at D1, 62.4 (+/- 3.6) at D2, 32.6 (+/- 2.1) microg m(-3) at D3, and 9.41 (+/- 0.9) microg m(-3) at D4. The mass fraction of quartz was the highest at the D1 site and decreased with increasing distance from the facility. The mass of PM2.5 samples was too low to determine quartz concentrations. These results identify the facility as the main source of quartz and other silicate minerals downwind of the plant and that the air quality of the most remote sampling site, located approximately 750 m downwind, was still impacted by the facility's activity.

  16. Environmental Assessment for the LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patton, S.E.; Novo, M.G.; Shinn, J.H.

    1986-04-01

    The LGF Spill Test Facility at Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, is being constructed by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). In this Environmental Assessment, environmental consequences of spilling hazardous materials in the Frenchman Flat basin are evaluated and mitigations and recommendations are stated in order to protect natural resources and reduce land-use impacts. Guidelines and restrictions concerning spill-test procedures will be determined by the LGF Test Facility Operations Manager and DOE based on toxicity documentation for the test material, provided by the user, and mitigations imposed by the Environmental Assessment. In addition to Spill Test Facility operational procedures, certain assumptions have been made in preparation of this document: no materials will be considered for testing that have cumulative, long-term persistence in the environment; spill tests will consist of releases of 15 min or less; and sufficient time will be allowed between tests for recovery of natural resources. Geographic limits to downwind concentrations of spill materials were primarily determined from meteorological data, human occupational exposure standards to hazardous materials and previous spill tests. These limits were established using maximum spill scenarios and environmental impacts are discussed as worst case scenarios; however, spill-test series will begin with smaller spills, gradually increasing in size after the impacts of the initial tests have been evaluated.

  17. Engine testing the design, building, modification and use of powertrain test facilities

    CERN Document Server

    MARTYR, A J

    2012-01-01

    Engine Testing is a unique, well-organized and comprehensive collection of the different aspects of engine and vehicle testing equipment and infrastructure for anyone involved in facility design and management, physical testing and the maintenance, upgrading and trouble shooting of testing equipment. Designed so that its chapters can all stand alone to be read in sequence or out of order as needed, Engine Testing is also an ideal resource for automotive engineers required to perform testing functions whose jobs do not involve engine testing on a regular basis. This recognized standard refer

  18. Experimental facility for testing nuclear instruments for planetary landing missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Dmitry; Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Kozyrev, Alexander; Sanin, Anton; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    The experimental facility for testing and calibration of nuclear planetology instruments has been built in the frame of JINR and Space Research Institute (Moscow) cooperation. The Martian soil model from silicate glass with dimensions 3.82 x 3.21 m and total weight near 30 tons has been assembled in the facility. The glass material was chosen for imitation of dry Martian regolith. The heterogeneous model has been proposed and developed to achieve the most possible similarity with Martian soil in part of the average elemental composition by adding layers of necessary materials, such as iron, aluminum, and chlorine. The presence of subsurface water ice is simulated by adding layers of polyethylene at different depths inside glass model assembly. Neutron generator was used as a neutron source to induce characteristic gamma rays for testing active neutron and gamma spectrometers to define elements composition of the model. The instrumentation was able to detect gamma lines attributed to H, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca and Fe. The identified elements compose up to 95 wt % of total mass of the planetary soil model. This results will be used for designing scientific instruments to performing experiments of active neutron and gamma ray spectroscopy on the surface of the planets during Russian and international missions Luna-Glob, Luna-Resource and ExoMars-2020.

  19. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HALGREN DL

    2010-03-12

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  20. Manual for operation of the multipurpose thermalhydraulic test facility TOPFLOW (Transient Two Phase Flow Test Facility); Betriebshandbuch fuer die Mehrzweck-Thermohydraulikversuchsanlage TOPFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, M.; Carl, H.; Schuetz, H.; Pietruske, H.; Lenk, S. [SAAS Systemanalyse und Automatisierungsservice GmbH, Possendorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR) e. V. is constructing a new large-scale test facility, TOPFLOW, for thermalhydraulic single effect tests. The acronym stands for transient two phase flow test facility. It will mainly be used for the investigation of generic and applied steady state and transient two phase flow phenomena and the development and validation of models of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes. The manual of the test facility must always be available for the staff in the control room and is restricted condition during operation of personnel and also reconstruction of the facility. (orig./GL)

  1. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantant, M., E-mail: michel.chantant@cea.fr [CEA/DSM/IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Genini, L. [CEA/DSM/Irfu CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Bayetti, P. [CEA/DSM/IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Millet, F. [CEA/DSM/INAC, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex (France); Wanner, M. [F4E, Broader Fusion Development Department Boltzmannstr.2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Massaut, V. [SCK/CEN Boeretang 200 2400 Mol (Belgium); Corte, A. Della [ENEA CRE Frascati Via Enrico Fermi 45 CP65 00044 frascati Italy (Italy); Ardelier-Desage, F. [CEA/DSM/Irfu CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Catherine-Dumont, V. [CEA/DSM/IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Dael, A. [CEA/DSM/Irfu CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Decool, P. [CEA/DSM/IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Donati, A. [CEA/DSM/Irfu CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P. [CEA/DSM/IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Jamotton, P. [CSL-LIEGE Science Park, Avenue du Pre-Aily, 4031 Angleur (Belgium); Jourdheuil, L. [CEA/DSM/IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Juster, F.P. [CEA/DSM/Irfu CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  2. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2003-04-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC11 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). Test run TC11 began on April 7, 2003, with startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until April 18, 2003, when a gasifier upset forced the termination of the test run. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,650 and 1,800 F at pressures from 160 to 200 psig during air-blown operations and around 135 psig during enriched-air operations. Due to a restriction in the oxygen-fed lower mixing zone (LMZ), the majority of the test run featured air-blown operations.

  3. Analyses of Control Surface Seal Tested in the Ames Arc Jet Tunnel (Panel Test Facility)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Alton J.; Athavale, Mahesh; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Breen, Daniel P.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2002-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Rope Seal; 2) Improvements to porous medial simulation in CFD-ACE+; 3) Porous media heat transfer validation case-stead-state and transient flat plate; 4) Simulation of GRC cold flow seal test fixture; 5) Simulation of calibration plate in the Panel Test Facility (PTF); and 6) Simulation of rope seal test in the PTF. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  4. Hydro-mechanical constitutive model for unsaturated compacted bentonite-sand mixture (BSM): Laboratory tests, parameter calibrations, modifications, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanto, D. G.; Man, A. G.; Blatz, J. A.; Dixon, D. A.

    A bentonite-sand mixture (BSM) is one of the clay-based sealing components proposed for use in a Canadian deep geological repository (DGR) for used nuclear fuel. Numerical modelling to assess the overall design of the proposed DGR requires characterisation of the hydraulic-mechanical (H-M) of each of the components of the sealing system, including the BSM. The BSM currently under consideration is a 50/50 mixture (by dry mass) of bentonite and well-graded silica sand, compacted to a dry density of at least 1.67 Mg/m 3. This paper presents the H-M constitutive model parameters, calibrated for BSM specimens under saturated and unsaturated conditions, based on various laboratory tests. A set of parameters for an elastoplastic model for unsaturated soil, Basic Barcelona Model (BBM), have been determined to simulate the mechanical behaviour of the BSM specimen. A set of parameters for van Genuchten’s Soil-Water Characteristic Curve (SWCC) and Kozeny’s hydraulic permeability model have been determined to simulate the hydraulic behaviour of the BSM specimen. Using a finite element computer code, CODE_BRIGHT, these sets of parameters have been used to simulate H-M processes in BSM specimens during water infiltration under constant volume (CV) and constant mean stress (CMS) boundary conditions. The key features of the selected constitutive models that are different from the laboratory tests of the BSM specimen have been summarised. The functions to improve the capability of the selected constitutive models to match the laboratory test results of the BSM specimen have been proposed.

  5. The Fast Flux Test Facility shutdown program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guttenberg, S.; Jones, D.H.; Midgett, J.C.; Nielsen, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400 MWt sodium-cooled research reactor owned by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The decision was made by the DOE in December, 1993, to initiate shutdown of the FFTF. This paper describes the FFTF Transition Project Plan (1) (formerly the FFTF Shutdown Program Plan) which provides the strategy, major elements, and project baseline for transitioning the FFTF to an industrially and radiologically safe shutdown condition. The Plan, and its resource loaded schedule, indicate this transition can be achieved in a period of six to seven years at a cost of approximately $359 million. The transition activities include reactor defueling, fuel offload to dry cask storage, sodium drain and reaction, management of sodium residuals, shutdown of auxiliary systems, and preparation of appropriate environmental and regulatory documentation. Completion of these activities will involve resolution of many challenging and unique issues associated with shutdown of a large sodium reactor facility. At the conclusion of these activities, the FFTF will be in a safe condition for turnover to the Hanford Site Environmental Restoration Contractor for a long term surveillance and maintenance phase and decommissioning.

  6. Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility: A gun for hire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Calvin R.; Rose, M. F.; Hill, D. C.; Best, S.; Chaloupka, T.; Crawford, G.; Crumpler, M.; Stephens, B.

    1994-01-01

    An affordable technique has been developed to duplicate the types of impacts observed on spacecraft, including the Shuttle, by use of a certified Hypervelocity Impact Facility (HIF) which propels particulates using capacitor driven electric gun techniques. The fully operational facility provides a flux of particles in the 10-100 micron diameter range with a velocity distribution covering the space debris and interplanetary dust particle environment. HIF measurements of particle size, composition, impact angle and velocity distribution indicate that such parameters can be controlled in a specified, tailored test designed for or by the user. Unique diagnostics enable researchers to fully describe the impact for evaluating the 'targets' under full power or load. Users regularly evaluate space hardware, including solar cells, coatings, and materials, exposing selected portions of space-qualified items to a wide range of impact events and environmental conditions. Benefits include corroboration of data obtained from impact events, flight simulation of designs, accelerated aging of systems, and development of manufacturing techniques.

  7. Experiments with the HORUS-II test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alt, S.; Lischke, W. [Univ. for Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    1997-12-31

    Within the scope of the German reactor safety research the thermohydraulic computer code ATHLET which was developed for accident analyses of western nuclear power plants is more and more used for the accident analysis of VVER-plants particularly for VVER-440,V-213. The experiments with the HORUS-facilities and the analyses with the ATHLET-code have been realized at the Technical University Zittau/Goerlitz since 1991. The aim of the investigations was to improve and verify the condensation model particularly the correlations for the calculation of the heat transfer coefficients in the ATHLET-code for pure steam and steam-noncondensing gas mixtures in horizontal tubes. About 130 condensation experiments have been performed at the HORUS-II facility. The experiments have been carried out with pure steam as well as with noncondensing gas injections into the steam mass flow. The experimental simulations are characterized as accident simulation tests for SBLOCA for VVER-conditions. The simulation conditions had been adjusted correspondingly to the parameters of a postulated SBLOCA`s fourth phase at the original plant. 4 refs.

  8. Production Facility Prototype Blower 1000 Hour Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-18

    The roots blower in use at ANL for in-beam experiments and also at LANL for flow tests was sized for 12 mm diameter disks and significantly less beam heating. Currently, the disks are 29 mm in diameter, with a 12 mm FWHM Gaussian beam spot at 42 MeV and 2.86 μA on each side of the target, 5.72 μA total. The target design itself is reported elsewhere. With the increased beam heating, the helium flow requirement increased so that a larger blower was needed for a mass flow rate of 400 g/s at 2.76 MPa (400 psig). An Aerzen GM 12.4 blower was selected, and is now installed at the LANL facility for target and component flow testing. Two extended tests of >1000 hr operation have been completed. Those results and discussion thereof are reported herein. Also included in Appendix A is the detailed description of the blower and its installation, while Appendix B documents the pressure vessel design analysis. The blower has been operated for 1000 hours as a preliminary investigation of long-term performance, operation and possible maintenance issues. The blower performed well, with no significant change in blower head or mass flow rate developed under the operating conditions. Upon inspection, some oil had leaked out of the shaft seal of the blower. The shaft seal and bearing race have been replaced. Test results and conclusions are in Appendix B.

  9. Cryogenic system for the Cryomodule Test Facility at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael; Martinez, Alex; Bossert, Rick; Dalesandro, Andrew; Geynisman, Michael; Hansen, Benjamin; Klebaner, Arkadiy; Makara, Jerry; Pei, Liujin; Richardson, Dave; Soyars, William; Theilacker, Jay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current progress and near-future plans for the cryogenic system at the new Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) at Fermilab, which includes the helium compressors, refrigerators, warm vacuum compressors, gas and liquid storage, and a distribution system. CMTF will house the Project X Injector Experiment (PXIE), which is the front end of the proposed Project X. PXIE includes one 162.5 MHz half wave resonator (HWR) cryomodule and one 325 MHz single spoke resonator (SSR) cryomodule. Both cryomodules contain superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities and superconducting magnets operated at 2.0 K. CMTF will also support the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA), which is located in the adjacent New Muon Lab (NML) building. A cryomodule test stand (CMTS1) located at CMTF will be used to test 1.3 GHz cryomodules before they are installed in the ASTA cryomodule string. A liquid helium pump and transfer line will be used to provide supplemental liquid helium to ASTA.

  10. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaing TC18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2005-08-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high pressure solids handling systems. This report details Test Campaign TC18 of the PSDF gasification process. Test campaign TC18 began on June 23, 2005, and ended on August 22, 2005, with the gasifier train accumulating 1,342 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Some of the testing conducted included commissioning of a new recycle syngas compressor for gasifier aeration, evaluation of PCD filter elements and failsafes, testing of gas cleanup technologies, and further evaluation of solids handling equipment. At the conclusion of TC18, the PSDF gasification process had been operated for more than 7,750 hours.

  11. Conceptual design report, Sodium Storage Facility, Fast Flux Test Facility, Project F-031

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-14

    The Sodium Storage Facility Conceptual Design Report provides conceptual design for construction of a new facility for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

  12. A laboratory facility for electric vehicle propulsion system testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, N. B.

    1980-01-01

    The road load simulator facility located at the NASA Lewis Research Center enables a propulsion system or any of its components to be evaluated under a realistic vehicle inertia and road loads. The load is applied to the system under test according to the road load equation: F(net)=K1F1+K2F2V+K3 sq V+K4(dv/dt)+K5 sin theta. The coefficient of each term in the equation can be varied over a wide range with vehicle inertial representative of vehicles up to 7500 pounds simulated by means of flywheels. The required torque is applied by the flywheels, a hydroviscous absorber and clutch, and a drive motor integrated by a closed loop control system to produce a smooth, continuous load up to 150 horsepower.

  13. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  14. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  15. Beam Instrumentation for the Single Electron DAFNE Beam Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzitelli, G; Valente, P; Vescovi, M

    2003-01-01

    The DAΦNE Beam Test Facility (BTF) has been successfully commissioned in February 2002, and started operation in November of the same year. Although the BTF is a beam transfer line optimized for single particle production, mainly for high energy detectors calibration, it can provide electrons and positrons in a wide range of multiplicity: between 1-1010, with energies from a few tens of MeV up to 800 MeV. The large multiplicity range requires many different diagnostic devices, from high-energy calorimeters and ionization/fluorescence chambers in the few particles range, to standard beam diagnostics systems. The schemes of operation, the commissioning results, as well as the beam diagnostics are presented.

  16. Study of fast reactor safety test facilities. Preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.; Boudreau, J.E.; McLaughlin, T.; Palmer, R.G.; Starkovich, V.; Stein, W.E.; Stevenson, M.G.; Yarnell, Y.L.

    1975-05-01

    Included are sections dealing with the following topics: (1) perspective and philosophy of fast reactor safety analysis; (2) status of accident analysis and experimental needs; (3) experiment and facility definitions; (4) existing in-pile facilities; (5) new facility options; and (6) data acquisition methods. (DG)

  17. ERDA test facilities, East Mesa Test Site. Geothermal resource investigations, Imperial Valley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Detailed specifications which must be complied with in the construction of the ERDA Test Facilities at the East Mesa Site for geothermal resource investigations in Imperial Valley, California are presented for use by prospective bidders for the construction contract. The principle construction work includes a 700 gpm cooling tower with its associated supports and equipment, pipelines from wells, electrical equipment, and all earthwork. (LCL)

  18. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-09-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC09 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC09 in air- and oxygen-blown modes. Test Run TC09 was started on September 3, 2002, and completed on September 26, 2002. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run, with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen was smooth. The gasifier temperature varied between 1,725 and 1,825 F at pressures from 125 to 270 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC09, 414 hours of solid circulation and over 300 hours of coal feed were attained with almost 80 hours of pure oxygen feed.

  19. Review of Transient Testing of Fast Reactor Fuels in the Transient REActor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, C.; Wachs, D.; Carmack, J.; Woolstenhulme, N.

    2017-01-01

    The restart of the Transient REActor Test (TREAT) facility provides a unique opportunity to engage the fast reactor fuels community to reinitiate in-pile experimental safety studies. Historically, the TREAT facility played a critical role in characterizing the behavior of both metal and oxide fast reactor fuels under off-normal conditions, irradiating hundreds of fuel pins to support fast reactor fuel development programs. The resulting test data has provided validation for a multitude of fuel performance and severe accident analysis computer codes. This paper will provide a review of the historical database of TREAT experiments including experiment design, instrumentation, test objectives, and salient findings. Additionally, the paper will provide an introduction to the current and future experiment plans of the U.S. transient testing program at TREAT.

  20. Defense Waste Processing Facility Canister Closure Weld Current Validation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korinko, P. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Maxwell, D. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2018-01-29

    Two closure welds on filled Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters failed to be within the acceptance criteria in the DWPF operating procedure SW4-15.80-2.3 (1). In one case, the weld heat setting was inadvertently provided to the canister at the value used for test welds (i.e., 72%) and this oversight produced a weld at a current of nominally 210 kA compared to the operating procedure range (i.e., 82%) of 240 kA to 263 kA. The second weld appeared to experience an instrumentation and data acquisition upset. The current for this weld was reported as 191 kA. Review of the data from the Data Acquisition System (DAS) indicated that three of the four current legs were reading the expected values, approximately 62 kA each, and the fourth leg read zero current. Since there is no feasible way by further examination of the process data to ascertain if this weld was actually welded at either the target current or the lower current, a test plan was executed to provide assurance that these Nonconforming Welds (NCWs) meet the requirements for strength and leak tightness. Acceptance of the welds is based on evaluation of Test Nozzle Welds (TNW) made specifically for comparison. The TNW were nondestructively and destructively evaluated for plug height, heat tint, ultrasonic testing (UT) for bond length and ultrasonic volumetric examination for weld defects, burst pressure, fractography, and metallography. The testing was conducted in agreement with a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) (2) and applicable procedures.

  1. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-12-01

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC25, the second test campaign using a high moisture lignite coal from the Red Hills mine in Mississippi as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC25 was conducted from July 4, 2008, through August 12, 2008. During TC25, the PSDF gasification process operated for 742 hours in air-blown gasification mode. Operation with the Mississippi lignite was significantly improved in TC25 compared to the previous test (TC22) with this fuel due to the addition of a fluid bed coal dryer. The new dryer was installed to dry coals with very high moisture contents for reliable coal feeding. The TC25 test campaign demonstrated steady operation with high carbon conversion and optimized performance of the coal handling and gasifier systems. Operation during TC25 provided the opportunity for further testing of instrumentation enhancements, hot gas filter materials, and advanced syngas cleanup technologies. The PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane with syngas from the Transport Gasifier.

  2. Heater test planning for the near surface test facility at the Hanford reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuBois, A.; Binnall, E.; Chan, T.; McEvoy, M.; Nelson, P.; Remer, J.

    1979-03-01

    The underground test facility NSTF being constructed at Gable Mountain, is the site for a group of experiments designed to evaluate the thermo-mechanical suitability of a deep basalt stratum as a permanent repository for nuclear waste. Thermo-mechanical modeling was performed to help design the instrumentation arrays for the three proposed heater tests (two full scale tests and one time scale test) and predict the thermal environment of the heaters and instruments. The modeling does not reflect recent RHO revisions to the in situ heater experiment plan. Heaters, instrumentation, and data acquisition system designs and recommendations were adapted from those used in Sweden. (DLC)

  3. Small-Scale Testing of Laterally Loaded Bucket Foundations in Dense Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Foglia, Aligi

    Monopod bucket foundations promise to become a reliable and cost-effective concept for offshore wind turbine. Physical models are essential to understand the behavior of soil-structure systems. When conducting small-scale experiments on soil, scale effects can considerably affect the tests outcome....... In a bid for overcoming this issue, a novel testing system based on the application of suction between the soil surface and a membrane is employed. The comparison between the tests conducted at stress levels of 0 kPa, and the tests with increased stress level, shows remarkable differences. In particular...

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Results from COPV Accelerated Stress Rupture Testing, NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry Regor

    2010-01-01

    Develop and demonstrate NDE techniques for real-time characterization of CPVs and, where possible, identification of NDE capable of assessing stress rupture related strength degradation and/or making vessel life predictions (structural health monitoring or periodic inspection modes). Secondary: Provide the COPV user and materials community with quality carbon/epoxy (C/Ep) COPV stress rupture progression rate data. Aid in modeling, manufacturing, and application of COPVs for NASA spacecraft.

  5. Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility (ARMSEF). User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the ARMSEF. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  6. Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Briefing Book 1 Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WJ Apley

    1997-12-01

    This report documents the results of evaluations preformed during 1997 to determine what, if an, future role the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) might have in support of the Department of Energy’s tritium productions strategy. An evaluation was also conducted to assess the potential for the FFTF to produce medical isotopes. No safety, environmental, or technical issues associated with producing 1.5 kilograms of tritium per year in the FFTF have been identified that would change the previous evaluations by the Department of Energy, the JASON panel, or Putnam, Hayes & Bartlett. The FFTF can be refitted and restated by July 2002 for a total expenditure of $371 million, with an additional $64 million of startup expense necessary to incorporate the production of medical isotopes. Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of reactor-generated medical isotopes will increase dramatically over the next decade. Essential medical isotopes can be produced in the FFTF simultaneously with tritium production, and while a stand-alone medical isotope mission for the facility cannot be economically justified given current marker conditions, conservative estimates based on a report by Frost &Sullivan indicate that 60% of the annual operational costs (reactor and fuel supply) could be offset by revenues from medical isotope production within 10 yeas of restart. The recommendation of the report is for the Department of Energy to continue to maintain the FFTF in standby and proceed with preparation of appropriate Nations Environmental Policy Act documentation in full consultation with the public to consider the FFTF as an interim tritium production option (1.5 kilograms/year) with a secondary mission of producing medical isotopes.

  7. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2008-03-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a KBR Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of TC24, the first test campaign using a bituminous coal as the feedstock in the modified Transport Gasifier configuration. TC24 was conducted from February 16, 2008, through March 19, 2008. The PSDF gasification process operated for about 230 hours in air-blown gasification mode with about 225 tons of Utah bituminous coal feed. Operational challenges in gasifier operation were related to particle agglomeration, a large percentage of oversize coal particles, low overall gasifier solids collection efficiency, and refractory degradation in the gasifier solids collection unit. The carbon conversion and syngas heating values varied widely, with low values obtained during periods of low gasifier operating temperature. Despite the operating difficulties, several periods of steady state operation were achieved, which provided useful data for future testing. TC24 operation afforded the opportunity for testing of various types of technologies, including dry coal feeding with a developmental feeder, the Pressure Decoupled Advanced Coal (PDAC) feeder; evaluating a new hot gas filter element media configuration; and enhancing syngas cleanup with water-gas shift catalysts. During TC24, the PSDF site was also made available for testing of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's fuel cell module and Media Process Technology's hydrogen selective membrane.

  8. Cyclic Triaxial Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand with Three Different Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    This report contains the results of numerous cyclic triaxial tests performed within the framework of the project "Probabilistic Design Tools for Vertical Breakwaters (PROVERBS), MAST III". The performed tests constitute a part of an established data base to be used to estimate the undrained cycli...

  9. Research on Core Design for ACME Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Fang Fang; Qin, Ben Ke [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Chang, Hua Jian; Chen, Lian [State Nuclear Power Technology R and D Center, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    The Advanced Core-Cooling Mechanism Experiment (ACME) is designed and will be built to assess the performance of the passive safety system of CAP1400. In the reactor core of ACME, the electrical heater rods simulating the fuel rods provide the energy that drives the natural circulation in the primary loop, and single phase and two phase natural circulation are the main physical processes transporting core decay heat during small break loss of coolant accident (SBLOCA), which is the key part of the ACME test program. Natural circulation scaling which determines the integral scaling parameters of the test facility was presented in this paper, and the criteria in the core design were also investigated, which leads to a procedure that could be applied to the core design. According to the results from calculation, the maximum heat flux of heater rods, the maximum power for a single rod would increase while the number of rods would decrease with the increasing of pitch to diameter ratio (P/D) and the rod diameter fixed. Therefore a reasonable pitch value can be obtained by considering the maximum heat flux, the maximum single-rod power and other engineering factors. On this basis, the number of rods could be selected according to the similarity principle of flow area. Finally, a reasonable core arrangement could be designed by requiring the core to be symmetrical and approximately circular.

  10. Cooled Ceramic Composite Panel Tested Successfully in Rocket Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.

    2003-01-01

    Regeneratively cooled ceramic matrix composite (CMC) structures are being considered for use along the walls of the hot-flow paths of rocket-based or turbine-based combined-cycle propulsion systems. They offer the combined benefits of substantial weight savings, higher operating temperatures, and reduced coolant requirements in comparison to components designed with traditional metals. These cooled structures, which use the fuel as the coolant, require materials that can survive aggressive thermal, mechanical, acoustic, and aerodynamic loads while acting as heat exchangers, which can improve the efficiency of the engine. A team effort between the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and various industrial partners has led to the design, development, and fabrication of several types of regeneratively cooled panels. The concepts for these panels range from ultra-lightweight designs that rely only on CMC tubes for coolant containment to more maintainable designs that incorporate metal coolant containment tubes to allow for the rapid assembly or disassembly of the heat exchanger. One of the cooled panels based on an all-CMC design was successfully tested in the rocket combustion facility at Glenn. Testing of the remaining four panels is underway.

  11. Arc Jet Facility Test Condition Predictions Using the ADSI Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Grant; Prabhu, Dinesh; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda

    2015-01-01

    The Aerothermal Design Space Interpolation (ADSI) tool is used to interpolate databases of previously computed computational fluid dynamic solutions for test articles in a NASA Ames arc jet facility. The arc jet databases are generated using an Navier-Stokes flow solver using previously determined best practices. The arc jet mass flow rates and arc currents used to discretize the database are chosen to span the operating conditions possible in the arc jet, and are based on previous arc jet experimental conditions where possible. The ADSI code is a database interpolation, manipulation, and examination tool that can be used to estimate the stagnation point pressure and heating rate for user-specified values of arc jet mass flow rate and arc current. The interpolation is performed in the other direction (predicting mass flow and current to achieve a desired stagnation point pressure and heating rate). ADSI is also used to generate 2-D response surfaces of stagnation point pressure and heating rate as a function of mass flow rate and arc current (or vice versa). Arc jet test data is used to assess the predictive capability of the ADSI code.

  12. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  13. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Campaign TC21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2007-01-30

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, routinely demonstrates gasification technologies using various types of coal. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device (PCD), advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This report summarizes the results of the first demonstration of gasification operation with lignite coal following the 2006 gasifier configuration modifications. This demonstration took place during test campaign TC21, occurring from November 7, 2006, through January 26, 2007. The test campaign began with low sodium lignite fuel, and after 304 hours of operation, the fuel was changed to high sodium lignite, for 34 additional hours of operation. Both fuels were from the North Dakota Freedom mine. Stable operation with low sodium lignite was maintained for extended periods, although operation with high sodium lignite was problematic due to agglomeration formation in the gasifier restricting solids circulation.

  14. Testing of ceramic filter materials at the PCFB test facility; Keraamisten suodinmateriaalien testaus PCFB-koelaitoksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuivalainen, R.; Eriksson, T.; Lehtonen, P.; Tiensuu, J. [Foster Wheeler Energia Oy, Karhula (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) combustion technology has been developed in Karhula, Finland since 1986. In 1989, a 10 MW PCFB test facility was constructed. The test facility has been used for performance testing with different coal types through the years 1990-1994 for obtaining data for design and commercialization of the high-efficiency low-emission PCFB combustion technology. The main objective of the project Y53 was to evaluate advanced candle filter materials for the Hot Gas Clean-up Unit (HGCU) to be used in a commercial PCFB Demonstration Project. To achieve this goal, the selected candle materials were exposed to actual high temperature, high pressure coal combustion flue gases for a period of 1000-1500 h during the PCFB test runs. The test runs were carried out in three test segments in Foster Wheeler`s PCFB test facility at the Karhula R and D Center. An extensive inspection and sampling program was carried out after the second test segment. Selected sample candles were analyzed by the filter supplier and the preliminary results were encouraging. The material strength had decreased only within expected range. Slight elongation of the silicon carbide candles was observed, but at this phase the elongation can not be addressed to creep, unlike in the candles tested in 1993-94. The third and last test segment was completed successfully in October 1996. The filter system was inspected and several sample candles were selected for material characterization. The results will be available in February - March 1997. (orig.)

  15. Joint ACE ground penetrating radar antenna test facility at the Technical University of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter; Sarri, A.

    2005-01-01

    A ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna test facility, established within the ACE network at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), is described. Examples of results from the facility obtained from measurements of eight different GPR antennas are presented.......A ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna test facility, established within the ACE network at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), is described. Examples of results from the facility obtained from measurements of eight different GPR antennas are presented....

  16. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-06-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC08 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier in air- and oxygen-blown modes during TC08. Test Run TC08 was started on June 9, 2002 and completed on June 29. Both gasifier and PCD operations were stable during the test run with a stable baseline pressure drop. The oxygen feed supply system worked well and the transition from air to oxygen blown was smooth. The gasifier temperature was varied between 1,710 and 1,770 F at pressures from 125 to 240 psig. The gasifier operates at lower pressure during oxygen-blown mode due to the supply pressure of the oxygen system. In TC08, 476 hours of solid circulation and 364 hours of coal feed were attained with 153 hours of pure oxygen feed. The gasifier and PCD operations were stable in both enriched air and 100 percent oxygen blown modes. The oxygen concentration was slowly increased during the first transition to full oxygen-blown operations. Subsequent transitions from air to oxygen blown could be completed in less than 15 minutes. Oxygen-blown operations produced the highest synthesis gas heating value to date, with a projected synthesis gas heating value averaging 175 Btu/scf. Carbon conversions averaged 93 percent, slightly lower than carbon conversions achieved during air-blown gasification.

  17. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air conditioning environmental test... conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. The goal of an air conditioning test facility is... elements that are discussed are ambient air temperature and humidity, minimum test cell size, solar heating...

  18. Experiment Needs and Facilities Study Appendix A Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-09-01

    The TREAT Upgrade effort is designed to provide significant new capabilities to satisfy experiment requirements associated with key LMFBR Safety Issues. The upgrade consists of reactor-core modifications to supply the physics performance needed for the new experiments, an Advanced TREAT loop with size and thermal-hydraulics capabilities needed for the experiments, associated interface equipment for loop operations and handling, and facility modifications necessary to accommodate operations with the Loop. The costs and schedules of the tasks to be accomplished under the TREAT Upgrade project are summarized. Cost, including contingency, is about 10 million dollars (1976 dollars). A schedule for execution of 36 months has been established to provide the new capabilities in order to provide timely support of the LMFBR national effort. A key requirement for the facility modifications is that the reactor availability will not be interrupted for more than 12 weeks during the upgrade. The Advanced TREAT loop is the prototype for the STF small-bundle package loop. Modified TREAT fuel elements contain segments of graphite-matrix fuel with graded uranium loadings similar to those of STF. In addition, the TREAT upgrade provides for use of STF-like stainless steel-UO{sub 2} TREAT fuel for tests of fully enriched fuel bundles. This report will introduce the Upgrade study by presenting a brief description of the scope, performance capability, safety considerations, cost schedule, and development requirements. This work is followed by a "Design Description". Because greatly upgraded loop performance is central to the upgrade, a description is given of Advanced TREAT loop requirements prior to description of the loop concept. Performance requirements of the upgraded reactor system are given. An extensive discussion of the reactor physics calculations performed for the Upgrade concept study is provided. Adequate physics performance is essential for performance of experiments with

  19. New Medium-Scale Laboratory Testing of Bucket Foundation Capacity in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkunaite, Evelina; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a new testing rig for axially loaded bucket foundations. The medium-scale physical model gives the ability to examine the influence of axial tensile, compressive as well as cyclic loading on bucket foundations subjected to various levels of overburden stress. The properties...

  20. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  1. An Injector for the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Roger H.

    2001-01-23

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) is an intermediate step to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the key concepts of the new RF power source for CLIC. CTF3 will use electron beams with an energy range adjustable from 170 MeV (3.5 A) to 380 MeV (with low current). The injector is based on a thermionic gun followed by a classical bunching system embedded in a long solenoidal field. As an alternative, an RF photo-injector is also being studied. The beam dynamics studies on how to reach the stringent beam parameters at the exit of the injector are presented. Simulations performed with the EGUN code showed that a current of 7 A can be obtained with an emittance less than 10 mm.mrad at the gun exit. PARMELA results are presented and compared to the requested beam performance at the injector exit. Sub-Harmonic Bunchers (SHB) are foreseen, to switch the phase of the bunch trains by 180 degrees from even to odd RF buckets. Specific issues of the thermionic gun and of the SHB with fast phase switch are discussed.

  2. Development of a test facility for analyzing supercritical fluid blowdown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, Thiago D.; Alvim, Antonio C.M., E-mail: thiagodbtr@gmail.com [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, Mario A.B. da, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (CTG/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lapa, Celso M.F., E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The generation IV nuclear reactors under development mostly use supercritical fluids as the working fluid because higher temperatures improve the thermal efficiency. Supercritical fluids are used by modern nuclear power plants to achieve thermal efficiencies of around 45%. With water as the supercritical working fluid, these plants operate at a high temperature and pressure. However, experiments on supercritical water are limited by technical and financial difficulties. These difficulties can be overcome by using model fluids, which have more feasible supercritical conditions and exhibit a lower critical pressure and temperature. Experimental research is normally used to determine the conditions under which model fluids represent supercritical fluids under steady-state conditions. A fluid-to-fluid scaling approach has been proposed to determine model fluids that can represent supercritical fluids in a transient state. This paper presents an application of fractional scale analysis to determine the simulation parameters for a depressurization test facility. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and R134a gas were considered as the model fluids because their critical point conditions are more feasible than those of water. The similarities of water (prototype), CO{sub 2} (model) and R134a (model) for depressurization in a pressure vessel were analyzed. (author)

  3. Laserwire at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 with submicrometer resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Nevay

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A laserwire transverse electron beam size measurement system has been developed and operated at the Accelerator Test Facility 2 at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Japan (KEK. Special electron beam optics were developed to create an approximately 1×100  μm (vertical×horizontal electron beam at the laserwire location, which was profiled using 150 mJ, 71 ps laser pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm. The precise characterization of the laser propagation allows the non-Gaussian laserwire scan profiles caused by the laser divergence to be deconvolved. A minimum vertical electron beam size of 1.07±0.06(stat±0.05(sys  μm was measured. A vertically focusing quadrupole just before the laserwire was varied while making laserwire measurements and the projected vertical emittance was measured to be 82.56±3.04  pm rad.

  4. Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

    1991-07-01

    The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, P. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy)]. E-mail: pierluigi.zaccaria@igi.cnr.it; Dal Bello, S. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Marcuzzi, D. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Masiello, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Cordier, J.J. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Hemsworth, R. [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/Departement Recherche Fusion Controlee, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Antipenkov, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Day, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dremel, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mack, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Technische Physik, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Jones, T. [UKAEA Culham EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coniglio, A. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Pillon, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Sandri, S. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Speth, E. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Tanga, A. [IPP CSU-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX, Association EURATOM-ENEA, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Pietro, E. Di [EFDA CSU, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mondino, P.L. [EFDA CSU, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER international team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D{sup -} ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimise the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring.

  6. Maintenance schemes for the ITER neutral beam test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaccaria, P.; Dal Bello, S.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Coniglio, A.; Antoni, V. [Consorzio RFX Association Euratom-ENEA, Padova (Italy); Cordier, J.J.; Hemsworth, R. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache (DSM/DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Antipenkov, A.; Day, C.; Dremel, M.; Mack, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Physik; Pillon, M.; Sandri, S. [ENEA, Frascati (Italy). Centro Ricerche Energia; Speth, E.; Tanga, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, IPP CSU, Garching (Germany); Jones, T. [UKAEA Culham Euratom/Ukaea Fusion Association Culham Science Centre, Abingdom OX (United Kingdom); Di Pietro, E.; Mondino, P.L. [EFDA CSU, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The ITER neutral beam test facility (NBTF) is planned to be built, after the approval of the ITER construction and the choice of the ITER site, with the agreement of the ITER International Team and of the JA and RF participant teams. The key purpose is to progressively increase the performance of the first ITER injector and to demonstrate its reliability at the maximum operation parameters: power delivered to the plasma 16.5 MW, beam energy 1 MeV, accelerated D{sup -} ion current 40 A, pulse length 3600 s. Several interventions for possible modifications and for maintenance are expected during the early operation of the ITER injector in order to optimize the beam generation, aiming and steering. The maintenance scheme and the related design solutions are therefore a very important aspect to be considered for the NBTF design. The paper describes consistently the many interrelated aspects of the design, such as the optimisation of the vessel and cryopump geometry, in order to get a better maintenance flexibility, an easier man access and a larger access for diagnostic and monitoring. (authors)

  7. Assessment Of Polishing Behaviour Of Sand Using The Test Device According To Wehner/Schulze

    OpenAIRE

    Hofko, B.; Kirchmaier, L.; Blabl, R.; Mader, M.

    2012-01-01

    To ensure the safety of road users during driving maneuvers an adequate skid resistance level of the wearing courses is required. Skid resistance of dense road surface layers besides the texture profile also depends on the polishing resistance of both coarse and fine aggregates. In the European standards so far requirements concerning the polishing behaviour of mineral aggregates are given merely with regard to the PSV (Polished Stone Value), tested on stone chippings 8/11 mm. No specific spe...

  8. Fast Flux Test Facility, Sodium Storage Facility project-specific project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, D.R.

    1994-12-29

    This Project-Specific Project Management Plan describes the project management methods and controls used by the WHC Projects Department to manage Project 03-F-031. The Sodium Storage Facility provides for storage of the 260,000 gallons of sodium presently in the FFTF Plant. The facility will accept the molten sodium transferred from the FFTF sodium systems, and store the sodium in a solid state under an inert cover gas until such time as a Sodium Reaction Facility is available for final disposal of the sodium.

  9. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [ed.] [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  10. IR-RF dating of sand-sized K-feldspar extracts: A test of accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Jain, Mayank; Murray, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    performance and to test the reproducibility of IR-RF measurements. These experiments illustrate the high sensitivity and dose rate of our RL system, the negligible influence of the turntable movement on IR-RF signals and the effectiveness of the built in 395 nm LED at bleaching IR-RF signals. We measure IR......-RF ages on a set of samples with independent age control using a robust analytical method, which is able to detect any possible sensitivity change. Our IR-RF ages do not agree well with the independent age control; the ages of the younger samples (20–45 ka) are significantly over-estimated while the ages...

  11. Design and production of a novel sand materials strength testing machine for foundry applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Hansen, K. S.; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2012-01-01

    In the foundry, existing strength testing machines are used to measure only the maximum fracture strength of mould and core materials. With traditionally used methods, the loading history to ascertain deformation of the material is not available. In this paper, a novel moulding material strength....... The force was calibrated using an Amsler Hydraulic Press while the displacements were calibrated with and without loading using a displacement calibrator (Heidenhain Digitaler). The calibration results showed that the data obtained are stable and reliable and the machine can be used for the measurement...

  12. Thermal Testing of Ablators in the NASA Johnson Space Center Radiant Heat Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Papa, Steven; Milhoan, Jim; Remark, Brian; Suess, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    A spacecraft's thermal protection system (TPS) is required to survive the harsh environment experienced during reentry. Accurate thermal modeling of the TPS is required to since uncertainties in the thermal response result in higher design margins and an increase in mass. The Radiant Heat Test Facility (RHTF) located at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) replicates the reentry temperatures and pressures on system level full scale TPS test models for the validation of thermal math models. Reusable TPS, i.e. tile or reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC), have been the primary materials tested in the past. However, current capsule designs for MPCV and commercial programs have required the use of an ablator TPS. The RHTF has successfully completed a pathfinder program on avcoat ablator material to demonstrate the feasibility of ablator testing. The test results and corresponding ablation analysis results are presented in this paper.

  13. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  14. Zero-Gravity Research Facility Drop Test (2/4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration pit at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physcis, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to 1 meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No. 2 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  15. Zero-Gravity Research Facility Drop Test (3/4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physics, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to one-meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No. 3 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  16. Zero-Gravity Research Facility Drop Test (1/4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration pit at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physics, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to 1 meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No.1 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  17. Zero-Gravity Research Facility Drop Test (4/4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    An experiment vehicle plunges into the deceleration pit at the end of a 5.18-second drop in the Zero-Gravity Research Facility at NASA's Glenn Research Center. The Zero-Gravity Research Facility was developed to support microgravity research and development programs that investigate various physical sciences, materials, fluid physics, and combustion and processing systems. Payloads up to one meter in diameter and 455 kg in weight can be accommodated. The facility has a 145-meter evacuated shaft to ensure a disturbance-free drop. This is No. 4 of a sequence of 4 images. (Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center)

  18. Construction, testing and development of large wind energy facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windheim, R. (Editor); Cuntze, R. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Building large rotor blades and control of oscillations in large facilities are discussed. It is concluded that the technical problems in the design of large rotor blades and control of oscillations can be solved.

  19. Long pulse, high power operation of the ELISE test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünderlich, D.; Kraus, W.; Fröschle, M.; Riedl, R.; Fantz, U.; Heinemann, B.

    2017-08-01

    The ion source of the ELISE test facility (0.9×1.0 m2 with an extraction area of 0.1 m2) has half the size of the ion source foreseen for the ITER NBI beam lines. Aim of ELISE is to demonstrate that such large RF driven negative ion sources can achieve the following parameters at a filling pressure of 0.3 Pa and for pulse lengths of up to one hour: extracted current densities of 28.5 mA/cm2 in deuterium and 33.0 mA/cm2 in hydrogen, a ratio of co-extracted electrons to extracted ions below one and deviations in the uniformity of the extracted beam of less than 10 %. From the results obtained at ELISE so far it can be deduced that for demonstrating the ITER parameters, an RF power of 80 kW/driver will be necessary, i.e. final aim is to demonstrate long pulses (up to one hour) at this power level and a stable source performance. The most crucial factor limiting the source performance during such pulses - in particular in deuterium - is a steady increase in the co-extracted electron current. This paper reports measures that counteract this steady increase, namely applying a dedicated long pulse caesium conditioning technique and modifying the filter field topology by adding strengthening external permanent magnets. Additionally, RF issues are discussed that prevented increasing the RF power towards the target value. Although it was not possible up to now to perform long pulses at 80 kW/driver, a significant improvement of the source performance and its stability are demonstrated. The latter allowed performing the very first 1 h deuterium pulse in ELISE.

  20. Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  2. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

  3. Power Systems Development Facility Gasification Test Run TC10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2002-12-30

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC10 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed gasifier designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier in air- or oxygen-blown mode of operation using a particulate control device (PCD). The Transport Gasifier was operated as a pressurized gasifier during TC10 in air- (mainly for transitions and problematic operations) and oxygen-blown mode. Test Run TC10 was started on November 16, 2002, and completed on December 18, 2002. During oxygen-blown operations, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures from 150 to 180 psig. After initial adjustments were made to reduce the feed rate, operations with the new fluidized coal feeder were stable with about half of the total coalfeed rate through the new feeder. However, the new fluidized-bed coal feeder proved to be difficult to control at low feed rates. Later the coal mills and original coal feeder experienced difficulties due to a high moisture content in the coal from heavy rains. Additional operational difficulties were experienced when several of the pressure sensing taps in the gasifier plugged. As the run progressed, modifications to the mills (to address processing the wet coal) resulted in a much larger feed size. This eventually resulted in the accumulation of large particles in the circulating solids causing operational instabilities in the standpipe and loop seal. Despite problems with the coal mills, coal feeder, pressure tap nozzles and the standpipe, the gasifier did experience short periods of stability during oxygenblown operations. During these periods, the syngas quality was high. During TC10, the gasifier gasified over 609 tons of Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and

  4. Statistical processing the results of interlaboratory testing the grain-size distribution of sand and gravel from the western part of the Kostolac basin

    OpenAIRE

    Urošević, Daniela; Vukićević, Mirjana; Davidović, Nebojša

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of interlaboratory testing the grain-size distribution of sand and gravel on representative samples from the site of the western part of the Kostolac Basin. The results were statistically processed by two ways: Numerical method: the Cochran test of accuracy and Graphic interpretation: the MANDEL technique of consistency in accordance with the Standard SRPS ISO 5725-2 [1,2]. The followings were calculated: repeatability variance Sr2; interlaboratory variance SL ...

  5. Pre and post test analyses for the core scenarios tested in the ATLAS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Goo; Kim, H. J.; Cho, Y. J.; Yang, C. Y.; Yoo, S. O.; Choi, Y. S.; Bang, Y. S.; Shin, A. D.; Huh, B. G.; Kim, S. J. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    The scope of present study is to establish an environment to operate ATLAS Standard Problem for the core scenarios. Following has been performed in this study : evaluation of the characteristics of ATLAS facility by using RELAP5 code, development of steady input data deck for ATLAS TRACE assessment, evaluation of QA requirements for the important thermal-hydraulic tests, organization of ATLAS standard problem. In this study, the characteristics of ATLAS, which is the first large IET facility, has been analyzed and it was confirmed that ATLAS program will provide meaningful date for the assurance of APR1400 safety. A comparing work on the characteristics of APR1400 and ATLAS confirmed general similarities between two installations. Also, some specific characteristics of each ones were founded in this study. It was recommended that special care should be given to them in developing a test scenario and code assessment. In this study, QA requirements for thermal hydraulic experiments used for proof test and/or code assessment were identified. Finally, an infrastructure for ATLAS Standard Problem (ASP) was successfully established. ASP will play important role of an systematic connection between ATLAS test and code assessment programs, and be actively operated for the next period of ATLAS program. QA requirements proposed in this study would be applied for the quality improvement of experimental programs in Korea. Also, an infrastructure for ATLAS Standard Problem will be directly applied for the next ATLAS program.

  6. Development and Commissioning of a Small/Mid-Size Wind Turbine Test Facility: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valyou, D.; Arsenault, T.; Janoyan, K.; Marzocca, P.; Post, N.; Grappasonni, G.; Arras, M.; Coppotelli, G.; Cardenas, D.; Elizalde, H.; Probst, O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and commissioning tests of the new Clarkson University/Center for Evaluation of Clean Energy Technology Blade Test Facility. The facility is a result of the collaboration between the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Intertek, and is supported by national and international partners. This paper discusses important aspects associated with blade testing and includes results associated with modal, static, and fatigue testing performed on the Sandia National Laboratories' Blade Systems Design Studies blade. An overview of the test capabilities of the Blade Test Facility are also provided.

  7. Engineering study: Fast Flux Test Facility fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beary, M.M.; Raab, G.J.; Reynolds, W.R. Jr.; Yoder, R.A.

    1974-01-07

    Several alternatives were studied for reprocessing FFTF fuels at Hanford. Alternative I would be to decontaminate and trim the fuel at T Plant and electrolytically dissolve the fuel at Purex. Alternative II would be to decontaminate and shear leach the fuels in a new facility near Purex. Alternative III would be to decontaminate and store fuel elements indefinitely at T Plant for subsequent offsite shipment. Alternative I, 8 to 10 M$ and 13 quarter-years; for Alternative II, 24 to 28 M$ and 20 quarter-years; for Alternative III, 3 to 4 M$ and 8 quarter-years. Unless there is considerable slippage in the FFTF shipping schedule, it would not be possible to build a new facility as described in Alternative II in time without building temporary storage facilities at T Plant, as described in Alternative III. (auth)

  8. Test facility requirements for the thermal vacuum thermal balance test of the Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Laura J.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory (COBE) underwant a thermal vacuum thermal balance test in the Space Environment Simulator (SES). This was the largest and most complex test ever conducted at this facility. The 4 x 4 m (13 x 13 ft) spacecraft weighed approx. 2223 kg (4900 lbs) for the test. The test set up included simulator panels for the inboard solar array panels, simulator panels for the flight cowlings, Sun and Earth Sensor stimuli, Thermal Radio Frequency Shield heater stimuli and a cryopanel for thermal control in the Attitude Control System Shunt Dissipator area. The fixturing also included a unique 4.3 m (14 ft) diameter Gaseous Helium Cryopanel which provided a 20 K environment for the calibration of one of the spacecraft's instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer. This cryogenic panel caused extra contamination concerns and a special method was developed and written into the test procedure to prevent the high buildup of condensibles on the panel which could have led to backstreaming of the thermal vacuum chamber. The test was completed with a high quality simulated space environment provided to the spacecraft. The test requirements, test set up, and special fixturing are described.

  9. Passive BWR integral LOCA testing at the Karlstein test facility INKA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, Robert [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Wagner, Thomas [AREVA GmbH, Karlstein am Main (Germany); Leyer, Stephan [TH Univ. of Applied Sciences, Deggendorf (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    KERENA is an innovative AREVA GmbH boiling water reactor (BWR) with passive safety systems (Generation III+). In order to verify the functionality of the reactor design an experimental validation programme was executed. Therefore the INKA (Integral Teststand Karlstein) test facility was designed and erected. It is a mockup of the BWR containment with integrated pressure suppression system. In March 2013 the first integral test - Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) - was executed. The main target was to demonstrate the ability of the passive systems to ensure core coverage, decay heat removal and to maintain the containment within defined limits. The results of the test showed that the passive safety systems are capable to bring the plant to stable conditions meeting all required safety targets with sufficient margins. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of the Netherlands' International Test Facility for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmintier, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pratt, Annabelle [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Netherlands Enterprise Agency (Rijksdienst voor Ondernemend Nederland, or RVO) engaged the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for two primary purposes: to evaluate the International Test Facility for Smart Grids (ITF) sponsored by RVO and to learn best practices for integrated test facilities from NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF). This report covers the ITF evaluation and is largely based on a one-week visit to the Netherlands in November 2014.

  11. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  12. Vehicle Test Facilities at Aberdeen Test Center and Yuma Test Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    dynamometers rated at 350 hp and 600 hp NA NA Wheeled Vehicle Roller Brake Dynamometer 70 Brake forces up to 45 kN (10,000 lb) at axle weights up to 2000...2.11.9 Wheeled Vehicle Roller Brake Dynamometer. The roller brake dynamometer is capable of dynamically testing brakes and anti-lock brake systems...used for closely controlled engineering tests such as drawbar pull (Figure 12), tractive resistance measurements, coast-down, braking , and fuel

  13. The possibility of using non-qualified clay-rich sand by overview the standard (methylene blue test), mineralogy of aggregates, and engineering behavior

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, Chi-Wei; Duc, Myriam; Descantes, Yannick

    2014-01-01

    The natural aggregates from quarry are getting exhausting due to the demanding from bloomed construction. We are able to save the natural resource if we do count both the accuracy of standard and the performance of engineering behavior. The study aims to overview the limitation and the uncertain parameters of European standard, methylene blue test (EN 933-9), for qualifying the fine in sand fraction. Besides, the interaction between bitumen and clay, and the engineering behaviors of clay-rich...

  14. Test results of the FER/ITER conductors in the FENIX test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, M.; Isono, T.; Koizumi, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Nishi, M.; Okuno, K.; Yoshida, K.; Nakajima, H.; Ando, T.; Hosono, F.

    1994-07-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed the Advanced Disk and the Hollow Monolithic conductors for the FER/ITER Toroidal Field coils. The Advanced Disk conductor is a Cable-in-Conduit conductor which consists of 324 Nb3Sn strands. The Hollow monolithic conductor has hollow cooling channels and 23 Nb3Sn strands. The JA-FENIX sample consists of a pair of straight legs: one leg is the Advanced disk conductor and another is the Hollow Monolithic one. The FENIX facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) can provide a magnetic field up to 13T on a sample conductor of over 40cm-length. The performance test of the JA-sample was carried out in Autumn 1992. The critical current, the current sharing temperature, and the stability margin of each conductor were measured in this test. These results are presented and discussed.

  15. Aerospace Technology: Technical Data and Information on Foreign Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-22

    Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries IMF Institut de Mecanique des Fluides (Institute of Fluid Mechanics) IMFL Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Lille (Lille...Cell 11 High-Pressure Turbine Facility Country: Japan Performance Maximum Flow Rate: 40 lb/s Location: Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries , Chiyoda...6,000 hp Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries Comments: None Aero-Engines and Space Operations Shin Ohtemachi Building. 2-chome Cost

  16. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  17. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Veith, D.J.; Giorgis, G.C.; Walker, D.E.; Seim, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF) is the latest in a series of special EBR-II instrumented in-core test facilities. A flow control valve in the facility is programmed to vary the coolant flow, and thus the temperature, in an experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it and coupled to it. In this way, thermal transients can be simulated in that subassembly without changing the temperatures in surrounding subassemblies. The FPTF also monitors sodium flow and temperature, and detects delayed neutrons in the sodium effluent from the experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it. This facility also has an acoustical detector (high-temperature microphone) for detecting sodium boiling.

  18. Efficacy of Structured Organizational Change Intervention on HIV Testing in Correctional Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenko, Steven; Visher, Christy; Pearson, Frank; Swan, Holly; Pich, Michele; O'Connell, Daniel; Dembo, Richard; Frisman, Linda; Hamilton, Leah; Willett, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    This article presents findings from a multisite cluster randomized trial of a structured organizational change intervention for improving HIV testing services in jails and prisons. Matched pairs of prison and jail facilities were randomized to experimental and control conditions; all facilities received baseline training about best practices in HIV testing and other HIV services and selected an area of HIV services on which to focus improvement efforts. The experimental facilities formed local change teams and were provided external coaching based on the Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment (NIATx) process improvement model. Difference-indifference analyses indicate a significant relative increase in HIV testing in the experimental compared to the control condition. Meta-analyses across the matched pairs indicated a small to medium effect of increased testing overall. The results indicate that the local change team model can achieve significant increases in HIV testing in correctional facilities. Implications for HIV testing policies and challenges for expanding testing are discussed.

  19. Evaluation of Durability Parameters of Concrete with Manufacture Sand and River Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangoju, Bhaskar; Ramesh, G.; Bharatkumar, B. H.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.

    2017-09-01

    Most of the states in our country have banned sand quarrying from the river beds, causing a scarcity of natural river sand for the construction sector. Manufacture sand (M-sand) is one of the alternate solutions to replace the river sand (R-sand) in concrete. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the durability parameters of concrete with M-sand when compared to that of concrete with R-sand. Corrosion of reinforcement is one of the main deteriorating mechanisms of reinforced concrete due to the ingress of chloride ions or carbon-di-oxide. For comparative evaluation of durability parameters, accelerated tests such as Rapid Chloride Permeability Test, Rapid Chloride Migration Test and accelerated carbonation test were carried out on specimens of R-sand and M-sand. All tests were carried out after 90 days of casting. Test results reveal that the durability parameters of the concrete with M-sand in chloride induced environment is relatively better than that of concrete with R-sand and hence is recommended to use M-sand as a replacement to R-sand.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF APPROPRIATE QUALIFICATION TESTING AND END-OF-LIFE WASTE STORAGE CONSIDERATIONS FOR DEEP BED SAND FILTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, K.

    2010-06-02

    Deep bed sand (DBS) filters have filtered radioactive particulates at two United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites since 1948. Some early DBS filters experienced issues with chemical attack on support tiles, requiring significant repairs. Designs of DBS filters constructed since 1970 paid greater attention to chemical compatibility, resulting in decades of reliable performance since 1975.

  1. Optics At White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczek, Ron C.; Hayslett, Charles R.

    1985-11-01

    We present an overview of the optics and optical data gathering programs conducted at White Sands Missile Range. Activities at White Sands Missile Range have always been diverse - the first test conducted there was the world's first nuclear explosion. In the forty years since that event the range has hosted a large assortment of vehicles including V2, Nike, Aerobee, Space Shuttle, Cruise, and the Copperhead. The last three of these devices illustrate the difficulty of the White Sands optical data gathering task. One is acquired in orbit, one as it crosses through a mountain pass, and one as it issues from the muzzle of a cannon. A combination of optical, radar, video, computer, and communications technology has produced a versatile system that can satisfy the data gathering requirements of most range users. Another example of the diverse optics programs at the range is the development of the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF). Because of the nature of the systems being tested, the HELSTF is full of optics and optical systems including the TRW MIRACL laser and the Hughes SEA LITE Beam Director.

  2. Spectroscopic characterization of a Nigerian standard sand: Igbokoda sand

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojuri, OO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the Middle Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone near Ottawa, Illinois, had been picked by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as the reference sand to employ in testing cement and strength of concrete [9]. To the best of our knowledge... and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques due to its importance in cement, geotechnical/geo-environmental research in Nigeria. This should halt importation of standard silica sand for mortar and concrete testing...

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-17

    Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

  4. Rocket nozzle thermal shock tests in an arc heater facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, James H.; Williamson, Ronald A.

    1986-01-01

    A rocket motor nozzle thermal structural test technique that utilizes arc heated nitrogen to simulate a motor burn was developed. The technique was used to test four heavily instrumented full-scale Star 48 rocket motor 2D carbon/carbon segments at conditions simulating the predicted thermal-structural environment. All four nozzles survived the tests without catastrophic or other structural failures. The test technique demonstrated promise as a low cost, controllable alternative to rocket motor firing. The technique includes the capability of rapid termination in the event of failure, allowing post-test analysis.

  5. Chemical characterization of sanding dust and methylene chloride usage in automotive refinishing: implications for occupational and environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Richard T; Gute, David M; Cohen, Howard J; Brown, Linfield C; Desmaris, Anne Marie C; Missaghian, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Surface preparation activities conducted during automotive refinishing present several potential human health and environmental risks. This study examines the chemical composition of vehicle sanding dust and the prevalence of methylene chloride use as a basis for evaluating potential chemical exposures in the work environment, fugitive environmental releases, and take-home toxics. This article reports on the findings of (1) a statewide technology and work practices survey of 353 licensed auto body shops and (2) laboratory analyses of sanding dust representing more than 200 vehicles, 10 commercial body filler compounds, and work shirts worn during vehicle sanding while using nonventilated equipment. Survey data revealed that the majority of shops (78%) do not use ventilated sanding equipment, that most workers (55%) take their work clothes and shoes home at the end of the workday, and that 17% of the respondents used a methylene chloride-based paint stripper as an adjunct to mechanical sanding. Laboratory results showed that Pb, As, Cr, Mn, and Ni were present in the sanding dust at every facility tested. Lead concentrations in sanding dust were found to be highest at facilities that performed complete vehicle refinishing (range 770 to 7300 ppm) and at a collision repair shop that used a high-lead content body filler compound (1800 ppm). Hexavalent chromium also was found in two vocational high school paint dust samples at concentrations of 54 and 710 ppm. When total lead and chromium concentrations reached 7300 and 2300 ppm, respectively, facility sanding dust samples failed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure for hazardous waste. Metals found in the sanding dust also were present on the work shirts of technicians-ranging from 0.06 (Cd) to 81 (Mg) microg/inch2 of cloth-who sanded on paint without ventilated equipment. Results suggest that sanding dust and methylene chloride paint strippers used in vehicle

  6. Development and Testing of an ISRU Soil Mechanics Vacuum Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2014-01-01

    For extraterrestrial missions, earth based testing in relevant environments is key to successful hardware development. This is true for both early component level development and system level integration. For In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the moon, hardware must interface with the surface material, or regolith, in a vacuum environment. A relevant test environment will therefore involve a vacuum chamber with a controlled, properly conditioned bed of lunar regolith simulant. However, in earth-based granular media, such as lunar regolith simulant, gases trapped within the material pore structures and water adsorbed to all particle surfaces will release when exposed to vacuum. Early vacuum testing has shown that this gas release can occur violently, which loosens and weakens the simulant, altering the consolidation state. A mid-size chamber (3.66 m tall, 1.5 m inner diameter) at the NASA Glenn Research Center has been modified to create a soil mechanics test facility. A 0.64 m deep by 0.914 m square metric ton bed of lunar simulant was placed under vacuum using a variety of pumping techniques. Both GRC-3 and LHT-3M simulant types were used. Data obtained from an electric cone penetrometer can be used to determine strength properties at vacuum including: cohesion, friction angle, bulk density and shear modulus. Simulant disruptions, caused by off-gassing, affected the strength properties, but could be mitigated by reducing pump rate. No disruptions were observed at pressures below 2.5 Torr, regardless of the pump rate. The slow off-gassing of the soil at low pressure lead to long test times; a full week to reach 10(exp -5) Torr. Robotic soil manipulation would enable multiple ISRU hardware test within the same vacuum cycle. The feasibility of a robotically controlled auger and tamper was explored at vacuum conditions.

  7. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  8. Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

  9. The accomplishments of lithium target and test facility validation activities in the IFMIF/EVEDA phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeiter, Frederik; Baluc, Nadine; Favuzza, Paolo; Gröschel, Friedrich; Heidinger, Roland; Ibarra, Angel; Knaster, Juan; Kanemura, Takuji; Kondo, Hiroo; Massaut, Vincent; Saverio Nitti, Francesco; Miccichè, Gioacchino; O’hira, Shigeru; Rapisarda, David; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Wakai, Eiichi; Yokomine, Takehiko

    2018-01-01

    As part of the engineering validation and engineering design activities (EVEDA) phase for the international fusion materials irradiation facility IFMIF, major elements of a lithium target facility and the test facility were designed, prototyped and validated. For the lithium target facility, the EVEDA lithium test loop was built at JAEA and used to test the stability (waves and long term) of the lithium flow in the target, work out the startup procedures, and test lithium purification and analysis. It was confirmed by experiments in the Lifus 6 plant at ENEA that lithium corrosion on ferritic martensitic steels is acceptably low. Furthermore, complex remote handling procedures for the remote maintenance of the target in the test cell environment were successfully practiced. For the test facility, two variants of a high flux test module were prototyped and tested in helium loops, demonstrating their good capabilities of maintaining the material specimens at the desired temperature with a low temperature spread. Irradiation tests were performed for heated specimen capsules and irradiation instrumentation in the BR2 reactor at SCK-CEN. The small specimen test technique, essential for obtaining material test results with limited irradiation volume, was advanced by evaluating specimen shape and test technique influences.

  10. Irradiation test of the HCAL Forward and Endcap upgrade electronics at the CHARM facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068434; Costanza, Francesco; Karakaya, Tugba; Sahin, Mehmet Ozgur; Lincoln, Don; Strobbe, Nadja; Kaminskiy, Alexander; Tlisov, Danila; Wang, Yanchu; Hirschauer, James Francis

    2016-01-01

    In the period October 21 – 28, 2015, the CMS HCAL group did a radiation tolerance study for the Phase I Upgrade HF, HE and HB front end electronics. The test was conducted at the CERN CHARM facility, which is a mixed field radiation facility. No permanent damages were observed. Effects observed during the irradiation are presented.

  11. The photomultiplier tube testing facility for the Borexino experiment at LNGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigatti, A. [INFN sez. di Milano, Via Celoria, 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Ianni, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, S.S. 17bis Km 18-910, I-67010 Assergi, Aquila (Italy); Lombardi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita and INFN. sez. di Milano, Via Celoria, 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Ranucci, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita and INFN. sez. di Milano, Via Celoria, 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Smirnov, O.Ju. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: smirnov@lngs.infn.it

    2005-02-01

    A facility to test the photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for the solar neutrino detector Borexino was built at the Gran Sasso laboratory. Using the facility 2200 PMTs with optimal characteristics were selected from the 2350 delivered from the manufacturer. The details of the hardware used are presented.

  12. Design and Testing of Subsystems for Mo-99 Production Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Bailey, James; Virgo, Mathew; Gromov, R.; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Micklich, Bradley

    2014-10-01

    Three beamline configurations have been proposed for the SHINE Medical Technologies facility for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator (Figure 1). One configuration, proposed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), includes a three-bend magnet system with a total 20° bending angle. This configuration also includes a set of octuplet magnets to generate a non-Gaussian beam profile. Argonne has proposed two beamlines based on a (1) 10° bending magnet (Appendix A and Ref. 1) and (2) alpha magnets (Appendix B) that use a pair of raster doublets to redistribute the beam over the face of the target. This report gives an overview of the various designs.

  13. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D T [comp.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ingersoll, J K [comp.; Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  14. Testing of actively cooled mock-ups in several high heat flux facilities-An International Round Robin Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.roedig@fz-juelich.de; Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, Porte Magenta, BP181, 71205 Le Creusot Cedex (France); Cox, S. [JET, UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Escourbiac, F. [CEA-DRFC, Cadarache, 13115 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Gervash, A. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Kapoustina, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuehnlein, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuznetsov, V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nygren, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States); Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States)

    2005-11-15

    Several electron beam and ion beam facilities are involved in high heat flux testing of plasma-facing components for next step fusion devices. Up to a certain degree, these machines are comparable, but differences concern, e.g. beam generation, beam sweeping, calibration techniques and diagnostics. In order to get an information if tests in the different facilities are really comparable, a set of actively cooled CFC monoblocks has been heated in four electron beam and one ion beam facility at comparable power densities. The temperature response during these loadings has been registered and used as a criteria for assessment.

  15. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  16. Ames T-3 fire test facility - Aircraft crash fire simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    There is a need to characterize the thermal response of materials exposed to aircraft fuel fires. Large scale open fire tests are costly and pollute the local environment. This paper describes the construction and operation of a subscale fire test that simulates the heat flux levels and thermochemistry of typical open pool fires. It has been termed the Ames T-3 Test and has been used extensively by NASA since 1969 to observe the behavior of materials exposed to JP-4 fuel fires.

  17. Intercomparison of U.S. Ballast Water Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    GBF) and the Great Ships Initiative (GSI). Due to scheduling factors, the first TF to conduct testing was GBF, located in Vallejo , California... VALLEJO , CA ......................................................................................... A-1  APPENDIX B.  CONTENTS OF THE VERIFICATION...defined as a full-scale ballast water test using water taken up from the Carquinez Strait at the vessel’s mooring point in Vallejo , CA. All testing

  18. Design, construction, and testing of the vacuum vessel for the tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerich, J. W.

    1985-11-01

    In 1980, the US Department of Energy gave the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory approval to design and build a tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) to support the goals of the National Mirror Program. We designed the MFTF-B vacuum vessel both to maintain the required ultrahigh vacuum environment and to structurally support the 42 superconducting magnets plus auxiliary internal and external equipment. During our design work, we made extensive use of both simple and complex computer models to arrive at a cost-effective final configuration. As part of this work, we conducted a unique dynamic analysis to study the interaction of the 32,000-ton concrete-shielding vault with the 2850-ton vacuum vessel system. To maintain a vacuum of 2 x 10 to the -8 Torr during the physics experiments inside the vessel, we designed a vacuum pumping system of enormous capacity. The vacuum vessel (4200 cu m) has been fabricated, erected, and acceptance tests have been completed at the Livermore site. The rest of the machine has been assembled, and individual systems have been successfully checked. On October 1, 1985, we began a series of integrated engineering tests to verify the operation of all components as a complete system.

  19. Testing portable luminescence reader signals against late Pleistocene to modern OSL ages of coastal and desert dunefield sand in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Bookman, Revital; Porat, Naomi; López, Gloria I.

    2017-04-01

    Rapid assessment of luminescence signals of poly-mineral samples by a pulsed-photon portable OSL reader (PPSL) is useful for interpreting sedimentary sections during fieldwork, and can assist with targeted field sampling for later full OSL dating and prioritize laboratory work. This study investigates PPSL signal intensities in order to assess its usefulness in obtaining relative OSL ages from linear regressions created by interpolating newly generated PPSL values of samples with existing OSL ages from two extensive Nilotic-sourced dunefields. Eighteen OSL-dated sand samples from two quartz-dominated sand systems in Israel were studied:(1) the Mediterranean littoral-sourced coastal dunefields that formed since the middle Holocene; and (2) the inland north-western Negev desert dunefield that rapidly formed between the Last Glacial Maximum and the Holocene. Samples from three coastal dune profiles were also measured. Results show that the PPSL signals differ by several orders of magnitude between modern and late Pleistocene sediments. The coastal and desert sand have different OSL age - PPSL signal ratios. Coastal sand show better correlations between PPSL values and OSL ages. However, using regression curves for each dunefield to interpolate ages is less useful than expected as samples with different ages exhibit similar PPSL signals. The coastal dune profiles yielded low luminescence signal values depicting a modern profile chronology. This study demonstrates that a rapid assessment of the relative OSL ages across different and extensive dunefields is useful and may be achieved. However, the OSL ages obtained by linear regression are only a very rough age estimate. The reasons for not obtaining more reliable ages need to be better understood, as several variables can affect the PPSL signal such as mineral provenance, intrinsic grain properties, micro-dosimetry and moisture content.

  20. Power Burst Facility (PBF) severe fuel damage test 1-4 test results report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, D.A.; Martinson, Z.R.; Hobbins, R.R.; Allison, C.M.; Carlson, E.R.; Hagrman, D.L.; Cheng, T.C.; Hartwell, J.K.; Vinjamuri, K.; Seifken, L.J.

    1989-04-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of the Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) Test 1-4 performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is presented. Test SFD 1-4 was the fourth and final test in an internationally sponsored light water reactor severe accident research program, initiated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The overall technical objective of the test was to contribute to the understanding of fuel and control rod behavior, aerosol and hydrogen generation, and fission product release and transport during a high-temperature, severe fuel damage transient. A test bundle, comprised of 26 previously irradiated (36,000 MWd/MtU) pressurized water-reactor-type fuel rods, 2 fresh instrumented fuel rods, and 4 silver-indium-cadmium control rods, was surrounded by an insulating shroud and contained in a pressurized in-pile tube. The experiment consisted of a 1.3-h transient at a coolant pressure of 6.95 MPa in which the inlet coolant flow to the bundle was reduced to 0.6 g/s while the bundle fission power was gradually increased until dryout, heatup, cladding rupture, and oxidation occurred. With sustained fission power and heat from oxidation, temperatures continued to rise rapidly, resulting in zircaloy and control rod absorber alloy melting, fuel liquefaction, material relocation, and the release of hydrogen, aerosols, and fission products. The transient was terminated over a 2100-s time span by slowly reducing the reactor power and cooling the damaged bundle with argon gas. A description and evaluation of the major phenomena, based upon the response of on-line instrumentation, analysis of fission product and aerosol data, postirradiation examination of the fuel bundle, and calculations using the SCDAP/RELAP5 computer code, are presented. 40 refs., 160 figs., 31 tabs.

  1. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  2. sand mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Lazar; Terek, Pal; Miletić, Aleksandar; Kakaš, Damir

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the metal-mold interface (IHTC) was estimated by an iterative algorithm based on the function specification method. An Al-9 wt% Si alloy plate casting was made in a sand mold prepared by CO2 process. Thermal history obtained from the experiment was used to solve an inverse heat conduction problem. Acquired transient IHTC values are then given in function of the casting surface temperature at the interface. By comparing the obtained results with previous findings, the influence of grain fineness number and consequently of mold roughness on maximum IHTC values is revealed.

  3. 40 CFR 792.43 - Test system care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other test systems. (1) In tests with plants or aquatic animals, proper separation of species can be... the protocol. (g) For freshwater organisms, an adequate supply of clean water of the appropriate... shall be available as specified in the protocol. (h) For plants, an adequate supply of soil of the...

  4. DITCM roadside facilities for cooperative systems testing and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier, I.; Netten, B.D.; Wedemeijer, H.; Maas, S.M.P.; Leeuwen, C.J. van; Schackmann, P.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative systems are being developed for large scale deployment in the near future. Validation of the performance of cooperative systems, and evaluation of the impact of cooperative applications is crucial before large scale deployment can proceed. The DITCM test site facilitates testing,

  5. Validity and Utilization of the Out-Pile Testing Facilities at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, Kee-Nam; Cho, Man-Soon; Yang, Sung-Woo; Shin, Yoon-Taek; Park, Seng-Jae; Jun, Byung-Hyuk; Kim, Myong-Seop [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Various neutron irradiation facilities such as rabbit irradiation facilities, loop facilities and the capsule irradiation facilities for irradiation tests of nuclear materials, fuels and radioisotope products have been developed at HANARO. Among these irradiation facilities, the capsule is the most useful device for coping with the various test requirements at HANARO. To support the national research and development programs on nuclear reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle technology in Korea, new irradiation capsules have been developed and actively utilized for the irradiation tests requested by numerous users. The environmental conditions for these reactors are generally beyond present day reactor technology, especially regarding the higher neutron fluence and higher operating temperature. To effectively support the national R and Ds relevant to the future nuclear systems, the development of advanced irradiation technologies concerning higher neutron fluence and irradiation temperature are being preferentially developed at HANARO. The utilization of the out-pile testing facilities to satisfy the criteria of safety evaluation for a new device installed in the core of HANARO was summarized. In addition, the validity of the out-pile testing facilities was evaluated and proved to be effective for verifying the integrity of irradiation capsule.

  6. Test Facilities in Support of High Power Electric Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyke, Melissa; Houts, Mike; Godfroy, Thomas; Dickens, Ricky; Martin, James J.; Salvail, Patrick; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Successful development of space fission systems requires an extensive program of affordable and realistic testing. In addition to tests related to design/development of the fission system, realistic testing of the actual flight unit must also be performed. If the system is designed to operate within established radiation damage and fuel burn up limits while simultaneously being designed to allow close simulation of heat from fission using resistance heaters, high confidence in fission system performance and lifetime can be attained through non-nuclear testing. Through demonstration of systems concepts (designed by DOE National Laboratories) in relevant environments, this philosophy has been demonstrated through hardware testing in the High Power Propulsion Thermal Simulator (HPPTS). The HPPTS is designed to enable very realistic non-nuclear testing of space fission systems. Ongoing research at the HPPTS is geared towards facilitating research, development, system integration, and system utilization via cooperative efforts with DOE labs, industry, universities, and other NASA centers. Through hardware based design and testing, the HPPTS investigates High Power Electric Propulsion (HPEP) component, subsystem, and integrated system design and performance.

  7. TASKA, a fusion engineering test facility for the 1990's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulcinski, G. L.; Emmert, G. A.; Maynard, C. W.; Santarius, J. F.; Sawan, M. E.; Heinz, W.; Komarek, P.; Maurer, W.; Suppan, A.; Opperman, E. K.

    The preliminary performance of a new Engineering Testing Reactor based on the tandem mirror confinement principle is described. This device, called TASKA, is based on near term (mid 1980's) technology and is designed to test reactor relevant technologies (superconducting magnets, blankets, materials, etc.) for the Demonstration Power Reactor envisioned for the turn of the century. The key operating parameters are a DT power level of 86 MW, a neutron wall loading of 1.5 MW/m 2, and an overall tritium breeding ratio of 1.0. Details of the materials testing program reveal that damage levels approaching 100 dpa can be achieved in less than 15 years of irradiation time. TASKA appears to be an attractive, cost effective way of achieving the near term technology testing goals for the world fusion program.

  8. Development of CFD Approaches for Modeling Advanced Concepts of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will be developing a CFD approach that can handle the additional complexities needed in a NTP testing facility when modeling the combustion processes in...

  9. JOINT INTELLIGENCE, SURVEILLANCE, & RECONNAISSANCE (ISR) TEST & EVALUATION (JISR-TE) FACILITY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — To meet the needs of the Warfighter, the JISR-TE facility provides the US, NATO, and Coalition members standards conformance testing of imagery capabilities across...

  10. Beam profile monitoring at the test beam line at the Compact Linear Collider test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olvegård

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC is a study for a future linear electron-positron collider based on a two-beam acceleration scheme in which a high-intensity drive beam is decelerated in order to provide the power to accelerate the main beam for collision in the TeV range. The power extracted from the drive beam deteriorates the beam quality and increases the energy spread significantly. Monitoring of the beam properties is therefore challenging but essential. These challenges are being addressed experimentally at the CLIC test facility where up to 55% of the power is extracted from the beam in the test beam line, a small-scale version of the CLIC drive-beam decelerator, leaving the beam with a very wide energy profile. For monitoring of the transverse beam profile and Twiss parameters we use optical transition radiation screens and quadrupole scans. The intra-pulse-train energy spectrum before and after deceleration is measured with segmented beam dumps. In this paper we discuss the performance of these diagnostic devices with a particular emphasis on the large energy spread and its effect on the beam imaging techniques, and with a final outlook to the CLIC drive-beam diagnostics.

  11. Design, construction and performance of the current lead test facility CuLTKa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, T.; Bobien, S.; Fietz, W. H.; Heiduk, M.; Heller, R.; Hollik, M.; Lange, C.; Lietzow, R.; Rohr, P.

    2017-09-01

    The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has a longtime experience in the development of High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) Current Leads (CLs) for high currents leading to several contracts with national and international partners. Within these contracts series production and cold acceptance tests of such CLs were required. The cold test of a large number of CLs requires the availability of a flexible facility which allows fast and reproducible testing. With the Current Lead Test Facility Karlsruhe (CuLTKa) a versatile and flexible test bed for CLs was designed and constructed. The facility consists of five cryostats including two test boxes and is directly connected by a transfer line to a refrigerator with a capacity of 2 kW at 4.4 K. The refrigerator supplies supercritical helium at two different temperature levels simultaneously. Each of the two test cryostats can be equipped with a pair of CLs which is short-circuited at the low temperature level via a superconducting bus bar. For current tests a power supply can provide DC currents up to 30 kA. If required, the facility design offers the potential of withstanding high voltages of up to 50 kV on the test objects. The commissioning of the facility started in July 2014. In total a series of acceptance tests of the CLs for the Japanese JT-60SA will be carried out until second half of 2017 to qualify six CLs with a current of 26 kA and 20 CLs with a current of 20 kA. In the meantime, six CLs@26 kA and 16 CLs@20 kA have been tested in CuLTKa which demonstrates the very effective operation of the facility. This paper describes the setup of the facility from cryogenic, electrical and process control point of view and will highlight the design of particular technical aspects. Furthermore, an overview of the performance during the commissioning phase will be given.

  12. The Test Facility for the Short Prototypes of the LHC Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Arn, A; Giloux, C; Mompo, R; Siemko, A; Venturini-Delsolaro, W; Walckiers, L

    2002-01-01

    The LHC development program relies on cryogenic tests of prototype and model magnets. This vigorous program is pursued in a dedicated test facility based on several vertical cryostats working at superfluid helium temperatures. The performance of the facility is detailed. Goals and test equipment for currently performed studies are reviewed: quench analysis and magnet protection studies, measurement of the field quality, test of ancillary electrical equipment like diodes and busbars. The paper covers the equipment available for tests of prototypes and some special series of LHC magnets to come.

  13. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  14. Report on the symposium and workshop on the 5 MWt solar thermal test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Design concepts and applications for the 5 MWt Solar Thermal Test Facility at Albuquerque are discussed in 43 papers. Session topics include central receivers, solar collectors, solar energy storage, high temperature materials and chemistry. A program overview and individual contractor reports for the test facility project are included, along with reports on conference workshop sessions and users group recommendations. A list of conference attendees is appended. Separate abstracts are prepared for 39 papers.

  15. Design of 500kW grate fired test facility using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Jørgensen, K.

    2005-01-01

    A 500kW vibrating grate fired test facility for solid biomass fuels has been designed using numerical models including CFD. The CFD modelling has focussed on the nozzle layout and flowpatterns in the lower part of the furnace, and the results have established confidence in the chosen design......, indicating that the test facility will adequately provide conditions resembling those found in full-scale industrial plants....

  16. Helium mass flow measurement in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylor, L.R.

    1986-08-01

    The measurement of helium mass flow in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) is an important aspect in the operation of the facility's cryogenic system. Data interpretation methods that lead to inaccurate results can cause severe difficulty in controlling the experimental superconducting coils being tested in the facility. This technical memorandum documents the methods of helium mass flow measurement used in the IFSMTF for all participants of the Large Coil Program and for other cryogenic experimentalists needing information on mass flow measurements. Examples of experimental data taken and calculations made are included to illustrate the applicability of the methods used.

  17. A numerical optimization of high altitude testing facility for wind tunnel experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Ralphin Rose J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High altitude test facilities are required to test the high area ratio nozzles operating at the upper stages of rocket in the nozzle full flow conditions. It is typically achieved by creating the ambient pressure equal or less than the nozzle exit pressure. On average, air/GN2 is used as active gas for ejector system that is stored in the high pressure cylinders. The wind tunnel facilities are used for conducting aerodynamic simulation experiments at/under various flow velocities and operating conditions. However, constructing both of these facilities require more laboratory space and expensive instruments. Because of this demerit, a novel scheme is implemented for conducting wind tunnel experiments by using the existing infrastructure available in the high altitude testing (HAT facility. This article presents the details about the methods implemented for suitably modifying the sub-scale HAT facility to conduct wind tunnel experiments. Hence, the design of nozzle for required area ratio A/A∗, realization of test section and the optimized configuration are focused in the present analysis. Specific insights into various rocket models including high thrust cryogenic engines and their holding mechanisms to conduct wind tunnel experiments in the HAT facility are analyzed. A detailed CFD analysis is done to propose this conversion without affecting the existing functional requirements of the HAT facility.

  18. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  19. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-17

    A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

  20. 40 CFR 160.43 - Test system care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) In tests with plants or aquatic animals, proper separation of species can be accomplished within...) shall be available. The ranges of composition shall be as specified in the protocol. (g) For freshwater... protocol. (h) For plants, an adequate supply of soil of the appropriate composition, as specified in the...

  1. 21 CFR 58.15 - Inspection of a testing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... case of records also to copy) all records and specimens required to be maintained regarding studies... laboratory study will not be considered in support of an application for a research or marketing permit does... LABORATORY PRACTICE FOR NONCLINICAL LABORATORY STUDIES General Provisions § 58.15 Inspection of a testing...

  2. Testing for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems: Identification of Technologies for Effluent Treatment in Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop a comprehensive understanding of requirements for a facility that could safely conduct effluent treatment for a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) rocket...

  3. Fermilab Test Beam Facility Annual Report FY17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rominsky, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmidt, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rivera, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Uplegger, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Asaadi, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Freeman, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Price, J. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); Casey, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ehrlich, R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Belmont, R. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Boose, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Conners, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Haggerty, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, K. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hodges, A. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Huang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kistenev, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lajoie, J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Mannel, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Osborn, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Pontieri, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sarsour, M. [Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Sen, A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Skoby, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Stoll, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Toldo, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ujvari, B. [Debrecen Univ., Debrecen (Hungary); Woody, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ronzhin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Hanagaki, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Apresyan, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bose, T. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Canepa, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Demina, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Gershtein, Y. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Halkiadakis, E. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haytmyradov, M. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Hazen, E. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Hindrichs, O. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Korjenevski, S. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Nachtman, J. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Narain, M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Nash, K. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Onel, Y. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Osherson, M. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Rankin, D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Schneider, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stone, B. [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Metcalfe, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benoit, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Vicente, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); di Bello, F. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Cavallaro, E. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Chakanov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frizzell, D. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Kiehn, M. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Meng, L. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Miucci, A. [Univ. of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Nodulman, L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Terzo, S. [Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Wang, Rui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Weston, T. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Xie, Junqie [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Xu, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zaffaroni, E. [Univ. of Geneva (Switzerland); Zhang, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Argelles, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Axani, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Katori, T. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Noulai, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Mandalia, S. [Queen Mary Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Sandstrom, P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Kryemadhi, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Barner, L. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Grove, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Mohler, J. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Roth, A. [Messiah College, Mechanicsburg, PA (United States); Beuzekom, M. van [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dall' Occo, E. [Nikhef National Inst. for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schindler, H. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Paley, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Badgett, W. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Denisov, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lukic, S. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Ujic, P. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia); Lebrun, P. L.G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Fields, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Christian, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zaki, R. [Radboud Univ., Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2018-01-23

    This Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes the Fermilab Test Beam operations for FY2017. It is one of a series of annual publications intended to gather information in one place. In this case, the information concerns the individual experiments that ran at FTBF and are listed in Table 1. Each experiment section was prepared by the relevant authors, and was edited for inclusion in this summary.

  4. Data Validation in the AEDC Engine Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    processing systems in the ETF in the 1960 time frame. The first engine tests at AEDC (Ref 1.) used manometer banks to measure steady-state pressure...validation environment. An ETF Analysis Capability Upgrade Project replaced the Central Computer as a data source for data validation and analysis with...to change in the data validation culture, and the lack of a champion for the DVM among the ETF analysts. In addition, ETF analysts began to rely on

  5. Sand Diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alan J.

    2005-01-01

    A few years ago, I was preparing to teach a summer enrichment program for middle school students at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. With swimming on the minds of most kids during the summer, I thought buoyancy would be a fun topic to discuss. An interesting way to introduce this concept is by discussing the beer-drinking balloonist who, in a lawn chair, floated to 11,000 feet above Los Angeles in 1997. However, I needed a hands-on project and was not about to go purchase some lawn chairs to duplicate this experiment. A simple submersible called the "Sand Diver" was designed and is now used as a hands-on activity for my introductory physics course.

  6. Development and performances of a high statistics PMT test facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mollo Carlos Maximiliano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since almost a century photomultipliers have been the main sensors for photon detection in nuclear and astro-particle physics experiments. In recent years the search for cosmic neutrinos gave birth to enormous size experiments (Antares, Kamiokande, Super-Kamiokande, etc. and even kilometric scale experiments as ICECUBE and the future KM3NeT. A very large volume neutrino telescope like KM3NeT requires several hundreds of thousands photomultipliers. The performance of the telescope strictly depends on the performance of each PMT. For this reason, it is mandatory to measure the characteristics of each single sensor. The characterization of a PMT normally requires more than 8 hours mostly due to the darkening step. This means that it is not feasible to measure the parameters of each PMT of a neutrino telescope without a system able to test more than one PMT simultaneously. For this application, we have designed, developed and realized a system able to measure the main characteristics of 62 3-inch photomultipliers simultaneously. Two measurement sessions per day are possible. In this work, we describe the design constraints and how they have been satisfied. Finally, we show the performance of the system and the first results coming from the test of few thousand tested PMTs.

  7. Space Station Freedom solar array panels plasma interaction test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donald F.; Mellott, Kenneth D.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Station Freedom Power System will make extensive use of photovoltaic (PV) power generation. The phase 1 power system consists of two PV power modules each capable of delivering 37.5 KW of conditioned power to the user. Each PV module consists of two solar arrays. Each solar array is made up of two solar blankets. Each solar blanket contains 82 PV panels. The PV power modules provide a 160 V nominal operating voltage. Previous research has shown that there are electrical interactions between a plasma environment and a photovoltaic power source. The interactions take two forms: parasitic current loss (occurs when the currect produced by the PV panel leaves at a high potential point and travels through the plasma to a lower potential point, effectively shorting that portion of the PV panel); and arcing (occurs when the PV panel electrically discharges into the plasma). The PV solar array panel plasma interaction test was conceived to evaluate the effects of these interactions on the Space Station Freedom type PV panels as well as to conduct further research. The test article consists of two active solar array panels in series. Each panel consists of two hundred 8 cm x 8 cm silicon solar cells. The test requirements dictated specifications in the following areas: plasma environment/plasma sheath; outgassing; thermal requirements; solar simulation; and data collection requirements.

  8. CARS temperature measurements in a hypersonic propulsion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, O., Jr.; Smith, M. W.; Antcliff, R. R.; Northam, G. B.; Cutler, A. D.

    1990-01-01

    Static-temperature measurements performed in a reacting vitiated air-hydrogen Mach-2 flow in a duct in Test Cell 2 at NASA LaRC by using a coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) system are discussed. The hypersonic propulsion Test Cell 2 hardware is outlined with emphasis on optical access ports and safety features in the design of the Test Cell. Such design considerations as vibration, noise, contamination from flow field or atmospheric-borne dust, unwanted laser- and electrically-induced combustion, and movement of the sampling volume in the flow are presented. The CARS system is described, and focus is placed on the principle and components of system-to-monochromator signal coupling. Contour plots of scramjet combustor static temperature in a reacting-flow region are presented for three stations, and it is noted that the measurements reveal such features in the flow as maximum temperature near the model wall in the region of the injector footprint.

  9. Role of Sand Grains in Sorption Processes by Surface Layers of Components of Sand Moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaźnica N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of researches of sorption processes of surface layers of components of sand moulds covered by protective coatings are presented in the hereby paper. Investigations comprised various types of sand grains of moulding sands with furan resin: silica sand, reclaimed sand and calcined in temperature of 700°C silica sand. Two kinds of alcoholic protective coatings were used - zirconium and zirconium - graphite. Tests were performed under condition of a constant temperature within the range 30 - 35°C and high relative air humidity 75 - 80%. To analyze the role of sand grains in sorption processes quantitavie moisture sorption with use of gravimetric method and ultrasonic method were used in measurements. The tendency to moisture sorption of surface layers of sand moulds according to the different kinds of sand grains was specified. The effectiveness of protective action of coatings from moisture sorption was analyzed as well.

  10. Test simulation of neutron damage to electronic components using accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, D.B., E-mail: dbking@sandia.gov; Fleming, R.M.; Bielejec, E.S.; McDonald, J.K.; Vizkelethy, G.

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate equivalent bipolar transistor damage response to neutrons and silicon ions. We report on irradiation tests performed at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor, the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Annular Core Research Reactor, the SNL SPHINX accelerator, and the SNL Ion Beam Laboratory using commercial silicon npn bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and III–V Npn heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs). Late time and early time gain metrics as well as defect spectra measurements are reported.

  11. One year update - Chevron's horizontal steam injection test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, J.C.; Fram, J.H. [Chevron Energy Technology Company (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In the heavy oil industry, control of the steam injection profile constitutes an important challenge when using a thermal recovery system in horizontal wells. In general, the measurement of two flow mixtures is complex and to date there is no reliable method for controlling two-phase steam distribution. The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on the results of testing flow splitting and liner isolation devices. These tests have been conducted by Chevron over the last year in a horizontal steam injection test facility built at the Kern River Field close to Bakersfield. This facility also allows Chevron to develop their own equipment for improving steam injection profile. Results show that none of the commercially available devices tested are able to provide consistent steam control. This paper highlighted the results of Chevron's horizontal steam injection test facility and the need for improvement of steam control equipment.

  12. Particles fluidized bed receiver/reactor tests with quartz sand particles using a 100-kWth beam-down solar concentrating system at Miyazaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Cho, Hyun Seok; Matsubara, Koji; Kaneko, Hiroshi; Senuma, Kazuya; Itoh, Sumie; Yokota, Shin-nosuke

    2017-06-01

    A window-type, solar fluidized bed receiver with quartz sand particles was tested by a 100-kWth novel beam-down solar concentrating system at Miyazaki, Japan. A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) was placed above the quartz window of the receiver to increase the concentration of the solar fluxes from the beam-down solar concentrating system. The solar tests were performed in the middle of December, 2015. The central bed temperature of the receiver was reached around 960-1100° C. It was found that only 20 Ndm3/min of air flow rate was enough to create the uniform fluidization of the particles at the given temperature range. It was predicted that if the central bed temperature could have been higher than 1100°C if solar receiver test had conducted in other seasons than winter. The next solar campaign of the receiver test will be carried out in October, 2016.

  13. The Development of the Acoustic Design of NASA Glenn Research Center's New Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is leading the design and build of the new world-class vibroacoustic test capabilities at the NASA GRC s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. Benham Companies, LLC is currently constructing modal, base-shake sine and reverberant acoustic test facilities to support the future testing needs of NASA s space exploration program. The large Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) will be approximately 101,000 ft3 in volume and capable of achieving an empty chamber acoustic overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of 163 dB. This combination of size and acoustic power is unprecedented amongst the world s known active reverberant acoustic test facilities. The key to achieving the expected acoustic test spectra for a range of many NASA space flight environments in the RATF is the knowledge gained from a series of ground acoustic tests. Data was obtained from several NASA-sponsored test programs, including testing performed at the National Research Council of Canada s acoustic test facility in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and at the Redstone Technical Test Center acoustic test facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The majority of these tests were performed to characterize the acoustic performance of the modulators (noise generators) and representative horns that would be required to meet the desired spectra, as well as to evaluate possible supplemental gas jet noise sources. The knowledge obtained in each of these test programs enabled the design of the RATF sound generation system to confidently advance to its final acoustic design and subsequent on-going construction.

  14. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  15. Life-Cycle Assessments of Selected NASA Ground-Based Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, George Honeycutt

    2012-01-01

    In the past two years, two separate facility-specific life cycle assessments (LCAs) have been performed as summer student projects. The first project focused on 13 facilities managed by NASA s Aeronautics Test Program (ATP), an organization responsible for large, high-energy ground test facilities that accomplish the nation s most advanced aerospace research. A facility inventory was created for each facility, and the operational-phase carbon footprint and environmental impact were calculated. The largest impacts stemmed from electricity and natural gas used directly at the facility and to generate support processes such as compressed air and steam. However, in specialized facilities that use unique inputs like R-134a, R-14, jet fuels, or nitrogen gas, these sometimes had a considerable effect on the facility s overall environmental impact. The second LCA project was conducted on the NASA Ames Arc Jet Complex and also involved creating a facility inventory and calculating the carbon footprint and environmental impact. In addition, operational alternatives were analyzed for their effectiveness at reducing impact. Overall, the Arc Jet Complex impact is dominated by the natural-gas fired boiler producing steam on-site, but alternatives were provided that could reduce the impact of the boiler operation, some of which are already being implemented. The data and results provided by these LCA projects are beneficial to both the individual facilities and NASA as a whole; the results have already been used in a proposal to reduce carbon footprint at Ames Research Center. To help future life cycle projects, several lessons learned have been recommended as simple and effective infrastructure improvements to NASA, including better utility metering and data recording and standardization of modeling choices and methods. These studies also increased sensitivity to and appreciation for quantifying the impact of NASA s activities.

  16. Testing of a Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Methane Reaction Control Thruster in a New Altitude Rocket Engine Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Marshall, William M.

    2012-01-01

    A relocated rocket engine test facility, the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS), was activated in 2009 at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This facility has the capability to test with a variety of propellants and up to a thrust level of 2000 lbf (8.9 kN) with precise measurement of propellant conditions, propellant flow rates, thrust and altitude conditions. These measurements enable accurate determination of a thruster and/or nozzle s altitude performance for both technology development and flight qualification purposes. In addition the facility was designed to enable efficient test operations to control costs for technology and advanced development projects. A liquid oxygen-liquid methane technology development test program was conducted in the ACS from the fall of 2009 to the fall of 2010. Three test phases were conducted investigating different operational modes and in addition, the project required the complexity of controlling propellant inlet temperatures over an extremely wide range. Despite the challenges of a unique propellant (liquid methane) and wide operating conditions, the facility performed well and delivered up to 24 hot fire tests in a single test day. The resulting data validated the feasibility of utilizing this propellant combination for future deep space applications.

  17. Design of Test Facility to Evaluate Boric Acid Precipitation Following a LOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jeong-Kwan; Song, Yong-Jae [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The U.S.NRC has identified a concern that debris associated with generic safety issue (GSI) - 191 may affect the potential precipitation of boric acid due to one or more of the following phenomena: - Reducing mass transport (i.e. mixing) between the core and the lower plenum (should debris accumulate at the core inlet) - Reduced lower plenum volume (should debris settle in the lower plenum), and, - Increased potential for boric acid precipitation (BAP) in the core (should debris accumulate in suspension in the core) To address these BAP issues, KHNP is planning to conduct validation tests by constructing a BAP test facility. This paper describes the design of test facility to evaluate BAP following a LOCA. The design of BAP test facility has been developed by KHNP. To design the test facility, test requirements and success criteria were established, and scaling analysis of power-to-volume method, Ishii-Kataoka method, and hierarchical two-tiered method were investigated. The test section is composed of two fuel assemblies with half of full of prototypic FA height. All the fuel rods are heated by the electric power supplier. The BAP tests in the presence of debris, buffering agents, and boron will be performed following the test matrix.

  18. A unique high heat flux facility for testing hypersonic engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.; Gladden, Herbert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the Hot Gas Facility, a unique, reliable, and cost-effective high-heat-flux facility for testing hypersonic engine components developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Hot Gas Facility is capable of providing heat fluxes ranging from 200 Btu/sq ft per sec on flat surfaces up to 8000 Btu/sq ft per sec at a leading edge stagnation point. The usefulness of the Hot Gas Facility for the NASP community was demonstrated by testing hydrogen-cooled structures over a range of temperatures and pressures. Ranges of the Reynolds numbers, Prandtl numbers, enthalpy, and heat fluxes similar to those expected during hypersonic flights were achieved.

  19. A free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator controls and load interaction test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Jeffrey S.; Kankam, M. David; Santiago, Walter; Madi, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    A test facility at LeRC was assembled for evaluating free-piston Stirling engine/linear alternator control options, and interaction with various electrical loads. This facility is based on a 'SPIKE' engine/alternator. The engine/alternator, a multi-purpose load system, a digital computer based load and facility control, and a data acquisition system with both steady-periodic and transient capability are described. Preliminary steady-periodic results are included for several operating modes of a digital AC parasitic load control. Preliminary results on the transient response to switching a resistive AC user load are discussed.

  20. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant Conceptual Design Engineering Report (CDER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The reference conceptual design of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF), a prototype 200 MWe coal-fired electric generating plant designed to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of open cycle MHD, is summarized. Main elements of the design, systems, and plant facilities are illustrated. System design descriptions are included for closed cycle cooling water, industrial gas systems, fuel oil, boiler flue gas, coal management, seed management, slag management, plant industrial waste, fire service water, oxidant supply, MHD power ventilating

  1. Characterization of Vacuum Facility Background Gas Through Simulation and Considerations for Electric Propulsion Ground Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, John T.; Burt, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    The background gas in a vacuum facility for electric propulsion ground testing is examined in detail through a series of cold flow simulations using a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code. The focus here is on the background gas itself, its structure and characteristics, rather than assessing its interaction and impact on thruster operation. The background gas, which is often incorrectly characterized as uniform, is found to have a notable velocity within a test facility. The gas velocity has an impact on the proper measurement of pressure and the calculation of ingestion flux to a thruster. There are also considerations for best practices for tests that involve the introduction of supplemental gas flows to artificially increase the background pressure. All of these effects need to be accounted for to properly characterize the operation of electric propulsion thrusters across different ground test vacuum facilities.

  2. Development of boron concentration analysis system and techniques for testing performance of BNCT facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Dong; Kim, Chang Shuk; Byun, Soo Hyun; Lee, Jae Yun; Sun, Gwang Min; Kim, Suk Kwon [Seoul National University, (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    I. Objectives and Necessity of the Project. Development of a boron concentration analysis system used for BNCT. Development of test techniques for BNCT facility. II. Contents and Scopes of the Project. (1) Design of a boron concentration analysis system at HANARO. (2) Component machining and instruments purchase, performance test. (3) Calculation and measurement of diffracted polychromatic beam quality. (4) Test procedures for boron concentration analysis system and BNCT facility. III. Result of the Project (1) Diffracted neutron beam quality for boron concentration analysis. (neutron flux: 1.2 * 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}s, Cd-ratio : 1,600) (2) Components and instruments of the boron concentration analysis system. (3) Diffracted neutron spectrum and flux. (4) Test procedures for boron concentration analysis system and BNCT facility. 69 refs., 44 figs., 14 tabs. (Author)

  3. Crushed rock sand – An economical and ecological alternative to natural sand to optimize concrete mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mundra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the use of crushed rock sand as viable alternative to Natural River sand that is being conventionally used as fine aggregate in cement concrete. Various mix designs were developed for different grades of concrete based on IS, ACI and British codes using Natural River sand and crushed rock sand. In each case, the cube compressive strength test, and beam flexure tests were conducted. The results of the study show that, the strength properties of concrete using crushed rock sand are nearly similar to the conventional concrete. The study has shown that crushed stone sand can be used as economic and readily available alternative to river sand and can therefore help to arrest the detrimental effects on the environment caused due to excessive mining of river sand.

  4. Thermal shock tests with beryllium coupons in the electron beam facility JUDITH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Schuster, J.L.A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Several grades of American and Russian beryllium have been tested in high heat flux tests by means of an electron beam facility. For safety reasons, major modifications of the facility had to be fulfilled in advance to the tests. The influence of energy densities has been investigated in the range between 1 and 7 MJ/m{sup 2}. In addition the influence of an increasing number of shots at constant energy density has been studied. For all samples, surface profiles have been measured before and after the experiments. Additional information has been gained from scanning electron microscopy, and from metallography.

  5. Barriers and facilitators associated with HIV testing uptake in South African health facilities offering HIV Counselling and Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neo Mohlabane

    2016-10-01

    Objective: An HCT survey was carried out to ascertain barriers and facilitators for HIV testing in South Africa. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 67 HCT-offering health facilities in 8 South African provinces was undertaken. Individuals (n = 489 who had not tested for HIV on the day of the site visit were interviewed on awareness of HCT services, HIV testing history and barriers to HIV testing. Frequencies were run to describe the sample characteristics, barriers and facilitators to HIV testing. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was usedt o identify the association between never tested for HIV with socio-demographics, awareness of HCT services and type of HCT facilities. Results: In all 18.1% participants never had an HIV test. Major barriers to HCT uptake comprise being scared of finding out one's HIV test result or what people may say, shyness or embarrassment, avoidance of divulging personal information to health workers and fear of death. In multivariate analysis the age group 55 years and older, and not being recommended to have an HIV test were associated with never had an HIV test. Potential facilitators for HIV testing include community or household HIV testing, providing incentives for those who test for HIV, mandatory HIV testing and disclosure of HIV status by those who test HIV positive. Conclusion: The benefits of HCT which include the reduction of HIV transmission, the availability of HIV care and treatment needs to be emphasized to enhance HCT uptake.

  6. Brayton-Cycle Heat Recovery System Characterization Program. Glass-furnace facility test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-29

    The test plan for development of a system to recover waste heat and produce electricity and preheated combustion air from the exhaust gases of an industrial glass furnace is described. The approach is to use a subatmospheric turbocompressor in a Brayton-cycle system. The operational furnace test requirements, the operational furnace environment, and the facility design approach are discussed. (MCW)

  7. Model Injection System Induced Accelerations in the Rent Test Leg of the 50 Megawatt Facility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walchli, Lawrence

    1973-01-01

    The Re-Entry Nose Tip (RENT) test leg of the 50 Megawatt Facility is used for hyperthermal testing of nose tips under simultaneous conditions as high as 100 atmospheres impact pressure and 18,000 BTU/ft2 sec heat flux...

  8. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  9. The Inter Facility Testing of a Standard Oscillating Water Column (OWC) Type Wave Energy Converter (WEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg

    This report describes the behavior and preliminary performance of a simplified standard oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter (WEC). The same tests will be conducted at different scales at 6 different test facilities and the results obtained will be used for comparison. This project...

  10. A new cryogenic test facility for large superconducting devices at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Serio, L; Stewart, L; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Pirotte, O

    2015-01-01

    To expand CERN testing capability to superconducting devices that cannot be installed in existing test facilities because of their size and/or mass, CERN is building a new cryogenic test facility for large and heavy devices. The first devices to be tested in the facility will be the S-FRS superconducting magnets for the FAIR project that is currently under construction at the GSI Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany. The facility will include a renovated cold box with 1.2 kW at 4.5 K equivalent power with its compression system, two independent 15 kW liquid nitrogen precooling and warm-up units, as well as a dedicated cryogenic distribution system providing cooling power to three independent test benches. The article presents the main input parameters and constraints used to define the cryogenic system and its infrastructure. The chosen layout and configuration of the facility is presented and the characteristics of the main components are described.

  11. A New Large Vibration Test Facility Concept for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Brian P.; Johnson, Eric L.; Hoksbergen, Joel; Lund, Doug

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope consists of three main components, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) Element, the Optical Telescope Element (OTE), and the Spacecraft Element. The ISIM and OTE are being assembled at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC). The combined OTE and ISIM Elements, called OTIS, will undergo sine vibration testing before leaving Goddard. OTIS is the largest payload ever tested at Goddard and the existing GSFC vibration facilities are incapable of performing a sine vibration test of the OTIS payload. As a result, a new large vibration test facility is being designed. The new facility will consist of a vertical system with a guided head expander and a horizontal system with a hydrostatic slip table. The project is currently in the final design phase with installation to begin in early 2015 and the facility is expected to be operational by late 2015. This paper will describe the unique requirements for a new large vibration test facility and present the selected final design concepts.

  12. A new test facility for the E-ELT infrared detector program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizon, Jean Louis; Amico, Paola; Brinkmann, Martin; Delabre, Bernard; Finger, Gert; Guidolin, Ivan Maria; Guzman, Ronald; Hinterschuster, Renate; Ives, Derek; Klein, Barbara; Quattri, Marco

    2016-08-01

    During the development of the VLT instrumentation program, ESO acquired considerable expertise in the area of infrared detectors, their testing and optimizing their performance. This can mainly be attributed to a very competent team and most importantly to the availability of a very well suited test facility, namely, IRATEC. This test facility was designed more than 15 years ago, specifically for 1K × 1K detectors such as the Aladdin device, with a maximum field of only 30 mm square. Unfortunately, this facility is no longer suited for the testing of the new larger format detectors that are going to be used to equip the future E-ELT instruments. It is projected that over the next 20 years, there will be of the order of 50-100 very large format detectors to be procured and tested for use with E-ELT first and second generation instruments and VLT third generation instruments. For this reason ESO has initiated the in-house design and construction of a dedicated new IR detector arrays test facility: the Facility for Infrared Array Testing (FIAT). It will be possible to mount up to four 60 mm square detectors in the facility, as well as mosaics of smaller detectors. It is being designed to have a very low thermal background such that detectors with 5.3 μm cut-off material can routinely be tested. The paper introduces the most important use cases for which FIAT is designed: they range from performing routine performance measurements on acquired devices, optimization setups for custom applications (like spot scan intra-pixel response, persistence and surface reflectivity measurements), test of new complex operation modes (e.g. high speed subwindowing mode for low order sensing, flexure control, etc.) and the development of new tests and calibration procedures to support the scientific requirements of the E-ELT and to allow troubleshooting the unexpected challenges that arise when a new detector system is brought online. The facility is also being designed to minimize

  13. Development of a facility using robotics for testing automation of inertial instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, Joy Y.; Lamont, Gary B.; Biezad, Daniel J.; Lewantowicz, Zdsislaw H.; Greig, Joy Y.

    1987-01-01

    The Integrated Robotics System Simulation (ROBSIM) was used to evaluate the performance of the PUMA 560 arm as applied to testing of inertial sensors. Results of this effort were used in the design and development of a feasibility test environment using a PUMA 560 arm. The implemented facility demonstrated the ability to perform conventional static inertial instrument tests (rotation and tumble). The facility included an efficient data acquisitions capability along with a precision test servomechanism function resulting in various data presentations which are included in the paper. Analysis of inertial instrument testing accuracy, repeatability and noise characteristics are provided for the PUMA 560 as well as for other possible commercial arm configurations. Another integral aspect of the effort was an in-depth economic analysis and comparison of robot arm testing versus use of contemporary precision test equipment.

  14. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S.; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F.; Ganter, R.; Hauri, C. P.; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.; Kaiser, M.; Keil, B.; Löhl, F.; Orlandi, G. L.; Ozkan Loch, C.; Peier, P.; Prat, E.; Raguin, J.-Y.; Reiche, S.; Schilcher, T.; Wiegand, P.; Zimoch, E.; Anicic, D.; Armstrong, D.; Baldinger, M.; Baldinger, R.; Bertrand, A.; Bitterli, K.; Bopp, M.; Brands, H.; Braun, H. H.; Brönnimann, M.; Brunnenkant, I.; Chevtsov, P.; Chrin, J.; Citterio, A.; Csatari Divall, M.; Dach, M.; Dax, A.; Ditter, R.; Divall, E.; Falone, A.; Fitze, H.; Geiselhart, C.; Guetg, M. W.; Hämmerli, F.; Hauff, A.; Heiniger, M.; Higgs, C.; Hugentobler, W.; Hunziker, S.; Janser, G.; Kalantari, B.; Kalt, R.; Kim, Y.; Koprek, W.; Korhonen, T.; Krempaska, R.; Laznovsky, M.; Lehner, S.; Le Pimpec, F.; Lippuner, T.; Lutz, H.; Mair, S.; Marcellini, F.; Marinkovic, G.; Menzel, R.; Milas, N.; Pal, T.; Pollet, P.; Portmann, W.; Rezaeizadeh, A.; Ritt, S.; Rohrer, M.; Schär, M.; Schebacher, L.; Scherrer, St.; Schlott, V.; Schmidt, T.; Schulz, L.; Smit, B.; Stadler, M.; Steffen, Bernd; Stingelin, L.; Sturzenegger, W.; Treyer, D. M.; Trisorio, A.; Tron, W.; Vicario, C.; Zennaro, R.; Zimoch, D.

    2016-10-26

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including atransverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunchesof up to200 pC chargeand up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of a FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measureme...

  15. Effluent Containment System for space thermal nuclear propulsion ground test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the research and development study work performed for the Space Reactor Power System Division of the U.S. Department of Energy on an innovative ECS that would be used during ground testing of a space nuclear thermal rocket engine. A significant portion of the ground test facilities for a space nuclear thermal propulsion engine are the effluent treatment and containment systems. The proposed ECS configuration developed recycles all engine coolant media and does not impact the environment by venting radioactive material. All coolant media, hydrogen and water, are collected, treated for removal of radioactive particulates, and recycled for use in subsequent tests until the end of the facility life. Radioactive materials removed by the treatment systems are recovered, stored for decay of short-lived isotopes, or packaged for disposal as waste. At the end of the useful life, the facility will be decontaminated and dismantled for disposal.

  16. Future aerospace ground test facility requirements for the Arnold Engineering Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Mark E.; Baron, Judson R.; Bogdonoff, Seymour M.; Carter, Donald I.; Couch, Lana M.; Fanning, Arthur E.; Heiser, William H.; Koff, Bernard L.; Melnik, Robert E.; Mercer, Stephen C.

    1992-01-01

    Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was conceived at the close of World War II, when major new developments in flight technology were presaged by new aerodynamic and propulsion concepts. During the past 40 years, AEDC has played a significant part in the development of many aerospace systems. The original plans were extended through the years by some additional facilities, particularly in the area of propulsion testing. AEDC now has undertaken development of a master plan in an attempt to project requirements and to plan for ground test and computational facilities over the coming 20 to 30 years. This report was prepared in response to an AEDC request that the National Research Council (NRC) assemble a committee to prepare guidance for planning and modernizing AEDC facilities for the development and testing of future classes of aerospace systems as envisaged by the U.S. Air Force.

  17. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  18. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  19. SNS Cryogenic Test Facility Kinney Vacuum Pump Commissioning and Operation at 2 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraff, B.; Howell, M.; Kim, S.; Neustadt, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has built and commissioned an independent Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) in support of testing in the Radio-frequency Test Facility (RFTF). Superconducting Radio-frequency Cavity (SRF) testing was initially conducted with the CTF cold box at 4.5 K. A Kinney vacuum pump skid consisting of a roots blower with a liquid ring backing pump was recently added to the CTF system to provide testing capabilities at 2 K. System design, pump refurbishment and installation of the Kinney pump will be presented. During the commissioning and initial testing period with the Kinney pump, several barriers to achieve reliable operation were experienced. Details of these lessons learned and improvements to skid operations will be presented. Pump capacity data will also be presented.

  20. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  1. An Update of the Nation's Long-Term Strategic Needs for NASA's Aeronautics Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Philip S.; Raman, Raj; Osburg, Jan; Kallimani, James G.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) major wind tunnel (WT), propulsion test (PT), and simulation facilities exist to serve NASA's and the nation's aeronautics needs. RAND Corporation researchers conducted a prior study of these facilities from 2002 to 2003, identifying (1) NASA's continuing ability to serve national needs, (2) which facilities appear strategically important from an engineering perspective given the vehicle classes the nation investigates and produces, and (3) management challenges and issues. This documented briefing (DB) is the final report from a new, one-year study (conducted from September 2006 through January 2008), partially updating the prior assessment. The study focuses on updating the list of facilities in the prior study that were deemed to be strategically important (again, from an engineering perspective) in serving those needs. This update also adds a new assessment of national needs for six major aeronautics simulators at NASA and lists those deemed strategically important.

  2. Biannular Airbreathing Nozzle Rig (BANR) facility checkout and plug nozzle performance test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Chase B.

    2010-09-01

    The motivation for development of a supersonic business jet (SSBJ) platform lies in its ability to create a paradigm shift in the speed and reach of commercial, private, and government travel. A full understanding of the performance capabilities of exhaust nozzle configurations intended for use in potential SSBJ propulsion systems is critical to the design of an aircraft of this type. Purdue University's newly operational Biannular Airbreathing Nozzle Rig (BANR) is a highly capable facility devoted to the testing of subscale nozzles of this type. The high accuracy, six-axis force measurement system and complementary mass flowrate measurement capabilities of the BANR facility make it rather ideally suited for exhaust nozzle performance appraisal. Detailed accounts pertaining to methods utilized in the proper checkout of these diagnostic capabilities are contained herein. Efforts to quantify uncertainties associated with critical BANR test measurements are recounted, as well. Results of a second hot-fire test campaign of a subscale Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation (GAC) axisymmetric, shrouded plug nozzle are presented. Determined test article performance parameters (nozzle thrust efficiencies and discharge coefficients) are compared to those of a previous test campaign and numerical simulations of the experimental set-up. Recently acquired data is compared to published findings pertaining to plug nozzle experiments of similar scale and operating range. Suggestions relating to the future advancement and improvement of the BANR facility are provided. Lessons learned with regards to test operations and calibration procedures are divulged in an attempt to aid future facility users, as well.

  3. The Effect of Sand on Strength of Mixtures of Bentonite-Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaz, Mohammad C.; Khayat, Navid

    The main purpose of this research is to evaluate the effect of sand on strength of compacted samples of bentonite sand mixtures. Samples of bentonite with 10,30,50,70, and 80 percent by weight of sand at standard proctor optimum water content were compacted and tested to measure confined and unconfined strength. Unconfined strength of mixtures increased with percentage of sand until 50 percent and then it decreased thereafter. On the other hand, the confined strength of mixtures tested in triaxial UU increased with percentage of sand.

  4. The 88-Inch Cyclotron: A One-Stop Facility for Electronics Radiation and Detector Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kireeff Covo, M.; Albright, R. A.; Ninemire, B. F.; Johnson, M. B.; Hodgkinson, A.; Loew, T.; Benitez, J. Y.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z.; Perry, T.; Phair, L.; Bernsteiny, L. A.; Bevins, J.; Brown, J. A.; Goldblum, B. L.; Harasty, M.; Harrig, K. P.; Laplace, T. A.; Matthews, E. F.; Bushmaker, A.; Walker, D.; Oklejas, V.; Hopkins, A. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Chen, J.; Cronin, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    In outer space down to the altitudes routinely flown by larger aircrafts, radiation can pose serious issues for microelectronics circuits. The 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a sector-focused cyclotron and home of the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects Facility, where the effects of energetic particles on sensitive microelectronics are studied with the goal of designing electronic systems for the space community. This paper describes the flexibility of the facility and its capabilities for testing the bombardment of electronics by heavy ions, light ions, and neutrons. Experimental capabilities for the generation of neutron beams from deuteron breakups and radiation testing of carbon nanotube field effect transistor will be discussed.

  5. Summary of Testing of SuperLig 639 at the TFL Ion Exchange Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.L.

    2000-12-19

    A pilot scale facility was designed and built in the Thermal Fluids Laboratory at the Savannah River Technology Center to test ion exchange resins for removing technetium and cesium from simulated Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW). The facility supports the design of the Hanford River Protection Project for BNFL, Inc. The pilot scale system mimics the full-length of the columns and the operational scenario of the planned ion exchange system. Purposes of the testing include confirmation of the design, evaluation of methods for process optimization and developing methods for waste volume minimization. This report documents the performance of the technetium removal resin.

  6. Strategic avionics technology definition studies. Subtask 3-1A3: Electrical Actuation (ELA) Systems Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, J. P.; Cureton, K. L.; Olsen, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Future aerospace vehicles will require use of the Electrical Actuator systems for flight control elements. This report presents a proposed ELA Test Facility for dynamic evaluation of high power linear Electrical Actuators with primary emphasis on Thrust Vector Control actuators. Details of the mechanical design, power and control systems, and data acquisition capability of the test facility are presented. A test procedure for evaluating the performance of the ELA Test Facility is also included.

  7. Fixed Base Modal Testing Using the NASA GRC Mechanical Vibration Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Lucas D.; Winkel, James P.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Jones, Trevor M.; Napolitano, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Power Facility at NASA's Plum Brook Station houses the world's largest and most powerful space environment simulation facilities, including the Mechanical Vibration Facility (MVF), which offers the world's highest-capacity multi-axis spacecraft shaker system. The MVF was designed to perform sine vibration testing of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV)-class spacecraft with a total mass of 75,000 pounds, center of gravity (cg) height above the table of 284 inches, diameter of 18 feet, and capability of 1.25 gravity units peak acceleration in the vertical and 1.0 gravity units peak acceleration in the lateral directions. The MVF is a six-degree-of-freedom, servo-hydraulic, sinusoidal base-shake vibration system that has the advantage of being able to perform single-axis sine vibration testing of large structures in the vertical and two lateral axes without the need to reconfigure the test article for each axis. This paper discusses efforts to extend the MVF's capabilities so that it can also be used to determine fixed base modes of its test article without the need for an expensive test-correlated facility simulation.

  8. 2-MW plasmajet facility thermal tests of concrete. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goin, K.L.

    1977-07-01

    A test was made in the 2-Megawatt Plasmajet Facility to obtain experimental data relative to the thermal response of concrete to incident heat flux. 14.6 cm diameter by 8.0 cm long concrete cylinders were positioned in a supersonic flow of heated nitrogen from an arc heater. The end of the concrete cylinders impacted by the flow were subjected to heat fluxes in the range of 0.13 to 0.35 kW/cm/sup 2/. Measurements included cold wall surface heat flux and pressure distributions, surface and indepth temperatures, ablation rates, and surface emission spectrographs. The test was part of the Sandia light water reactor safety research program and complements similar tests made in the Radiant Heat Facility at heat fluxes from 0.03 to 0.12 kW/cm/sup 2/. A description of the tests and a tabulation of test data are included.

  9. Results From a Pressure Sensitive Paint Test Conducted at the National Transonic Facility on Test 197: The Common Research Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, A. Neal; Lipford, William E.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Goodman, Kyle Z.; Goad, William K.; Goad, Linda R.

    2011-01-01

    This report will serve to present results of a test of the pressure sensitive paint (PSP) technique on the Common Research Model (CRM). This test was conducted at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center. PSP data was collected on several surfaces with the tunnel operating in both cryogenic mode and standard air mode. This report will also outline lessons learned from the test as well as possible approaches to challenges faced in the test that can be applied to later entries.

  10. Activity of the European high heat flux test facility: FE200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, FE200, Porte Magenta BP181, 71200 Le Creusot Cedex (France) and EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: isabelle.bobinvastra@framatome-anp.com; Escourbiac, F. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA/Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)]. E-mail: escourbi@drfc.cad.cea.fr; Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: mario.merola@tech.efda.org; Lorenzetto, P. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)]. E-mail: lorenzp@tech.efda.org

    2005-11-15

    FE200 is an electron beam (EB) 200 kW test facility resulting since 1991 from partnership between Framatome Technical Centre in Le Creusot (France) and Tore Supra team in CEA Cadarache (France). It is dedicated to high heat flux testing of small and medium-sized plasma facing components. The performed tests are thermal fatigue tests (100,000 since 1992), critical heat fluxes, disruptions, glancing incidence tests on materials such as Cu-Al25 and CuCrZr alloys, carbon fibre composite (CFC) or tungsten (W). The thermal fatigue behaviour of some primary first wall (PFW), hypervapotron and divertor components is described.

  11. NASA GRC's High Pressure Burner Rig Facility and Materials Test Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. Craig

    1999-01-01

    The High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) at NASA Glenn Research Center is a high-velocity. pressurized combustion test rig used for high-temperature environmental durability studies of advanced materials and components. The facility burns jet fuel and air in controlled ratios, simulating combustion gas chemistries and temperatures that are realistic to those in gas turbine engines. In addition, the test section is capable of simulating the pressures and gas velocities representative of today's aircraft. The HPBR provides a relatively inexpensive. yet sophisticated means for researchers to study the high-temperature oxidation of advanced materials. The facility has the unique capability of operating under both fuel-lean and fuel-rich gas mixtures. using a fume incinerator to eliminate any harmful byproduct emissions (CO, H2S) of rich-burn operation. Test samples are easily accessible for ongoing inspection and documentation of weight change, thickness, cracking, and other metrics. Temperature measurement is available in the form of both thermocouples and optical pyrometery. and the facility is equipped with quartz windows for observation and video taping. Operating conditions include: (1) 1.0 kg/sec (2.0 lbm/sec) combustion and secondary cooling airflow capability: (2) Equivalence ratios of 0.5- 1.0 (lean) to 1.5-2.0 (rich), with typically 10% H2O vapor pressure: (3) Gas temperatures ranging 700-1650 C (1300-3000 F): (4) Test pressures ranging 4-12 atmospheres: (5) Gas flow velocities ranging 10-30 m/s (50-100) ft/sec.: and (6) Cyclic and steady-state exposure capabilities. The facility has historically been used to test coupon-size materials. including metals and ceramics. However complex-shaped components have also been tested including cylinders, airfoils, and film-cooled end walls. The facility has also been used to develop thin-film temperature measurement sensors.

  12. Performance of a Low-Noise Test Facility for the SAFARI TES Bolometer Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audley, M. D.; de Lange, G.; Ferrari, L.; Gao, J-R.; Hijmering, R. A.; Khosropanah, P.; Lindeman, M.; de Ridder, M.

    We have constructed a test facility for characterizing the focal plane arrays of SAFARI, the far-infrared imaging spectrometer for the SPICA satellite. SAFARI's three bolometer arrays are populated with extremely sensitive (NEP similar to 2 x 10(-19) W/root Hz) transition edge sensors with a

  13. Performance of a low-noise test facility for the SAFARI TES bolometer arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audley, M.D.; De Lange, G.; Ferrari, L.; Gao, J.R.; Hijmering, R.A.; Khosropanah, P.; Lindeman, M.; Ridder, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed a test facility for characterizing the focal plane arrays of SAFARI, the far-infrared imaging spectrometer for the SPICA satellite. SAFARI’s three bolometer arrays are populated with extremely sensitive (NEP ? 2 × 10?19 W/? Hz) transition edge sensors with a transition

  14. Detailed measurements and modelling of thermo active components using a room size test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    measurements in an office sized test facility with thermo active ceiling and floor as well as modelling of similar conditions in a computer program designed for analysis of building integrated heating and cooling systems. A method for characterizing the cooling capacity of thermo active components is described...

  15. Scoping assessment on medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, S.W.

    1997-08-29

    The Scoping Assessment addresses the need for medical isotope production and the capability of the Fast Flux Test Facility to provide such isotopes. Included in the discussion are types of isotopes used in radiopharmaceuticals, which types of cancers are targets, and in what way isotopes provide treatment and/or pain relief for patients.

  16. The ACE-DTU Planar Near-Field Ground Penetrating Radar Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The ACE-DTU planar near-field ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna test facility is used to measure the plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a GPR loop antenna close to the air-soil interface by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented using knowledge about the complex...

  17. Background-Oriented Schlieren Applications in NASA Glenn Research Center's Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    This is a presentation for an invited session at the 2015 SciTech Conference 53rd AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. The presentation covers the recent applications of Background-Oriented Schlieren in NASA Glenn Research Center's ground test facilities, such as the 8x6 SWT, open jet rig, and AAPL.

  18. Acoustic Performance of an Advanced Model Turbofan in Three Aeroacoustic Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Richard P.; Hughes, Christopher E.

    2012-01-01

    A model advanced turbofan was acoustically tested in the NASA Glenn 9- by 15-Foot-Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT), and in two other aeroacoustic facilities. The Universal Propulsion Simulator (UPS) fan was designed and manufactured by the General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE) Company, and featured active core, as well as bypass, flow paths. The reference test configurations were with the metal, M4, rotor with hardwall and treated bypass flow ducts. The UPS fan was tested within an airflow at a Mach number of 0.20 (limited flow data were also acquired at a Mach number of 0.25) which is representative of aircraft takeoff and approach conditions. Comparisons were made between data acquired within the airflow (9x15 LSWT and German-Dutch Wind Tunnel (DNW)) and outside of a free jet (Boeing Low Speed Aero acoustic Facility (LSAF) and DNW). Sideline data were acquired on an 89-in. (nominal 4 fan diameters) sideline using the same microphone assembly and holder in the 9x15 LSWT and DNW facilities. These data showed good agreement for similar UPS operating conditions and configurations. Distortion of fan spectra tonal content through a free jet shear layer was documented, suggesting that in-flow acoustic measurements are required for comprehensive fan noise diagnostics. However, there was good agreement for overall sound power level (PWL) fan noise measurements made both within and outside of the test facility airflow.

  19. High Temperature Test Facility Preliminary RELAP5-3D Input Model Description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-01

    A RELAP5-3D input model is being developed for the High Temperature Test Facility at Oregon State University. The current model is described in detail. Further refinements will be made to the model as final as-built drawings are released and when system characterization data are available for benchmarking the input model.

  20. Facility for the testing of the TFTR prototype neutral beam injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haughian, J.M.

    1977-07-01

    The design of the prototype neutral beam injection system for TFTR is nearing completion at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This paper describes some of the features of the facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory where this prototype will be assembled and tested.

  1. The installation and performance test of the surveillance system for DUPIC facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Ho Dong; Cha, Hong Ryul

    2000-07-01

    We have developed the real time surveillance system, named by DSSS, for DUPIC test facility. The system acquires data from He-3 neutron monitors(DSNM) and CCD cameras to automatically diagnose the transportation status of nuclear material. This technical report shortly illustrates important features of hardware and software of the system.

  2. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT: MARCH 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.

    1969-04-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(4S-l)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during March 1969.

  3. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT MAY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-06-06

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during May 1969 .

  4. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT SEPTEMBER 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astely, E. R.; Cabell, C. P.

    1969-10-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT(45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during September 1969.

  5. FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY MONTHLY INFORMAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FEBRUARY 1969

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astley, E. R.

    1969-03-07

    This report was prepared by Battelle-Northwest under Contract No. AT (45-1)-1830 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, to summarize technical progress made in the Fast Flux Test Facility Program during February 1969.

  6. Space Nuclear Facility test capability at the Baikal-1 and IGR sites Semipalatinsk-21, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. J.; Stanley, M. L.; Martinell, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The International Space Technology Assessment Program was established 1/19/92 to take advantage of the availability of Russian space technology and hardware. DOE had two delegations visit CIS and assess its space nuclear power and propulsion technologies. The visit coincided with the Conference on Nuclear Power Engineering in Space Nuclear Rocket Engines at Semipalatinsk-21 (Kurchatov, Kazakhstan) on Sept. 22-25, 1992. Reactor facilities assessed in Semipalatinski-21 included the IVG-1 reactor (a nuclear furnace, which has been modified and now called IVG-1M), the RA reactor, and the Impulse Graphite Reactor (IGR), the CIS version of TREAT. Although the reactor facilities are being maintained satisfactorily, the support infrastructure appears to be degrading. The group assessment is based on two half-day tours of the Baikals-1 test facility and a brief (2 hr) tour of IGR; because of limited time and the large size of the tour group, it was impossible to obtain answers to all prepared questions. Potential benefit is that CIS fuels and facilities may permit USA to conduct a lower priced space nuclear propulsion program while achieving higher performance capability faster, and immediate access to test facilities that cannot be available in this country for 5 years. Information needs to be obtained about available data acquisition capability, accuracy, frequency response, and number of channels. Potential areas of interest with broad application in the U.S. nuclear industry are listed.

  7. Operational Phase Life Cycle Assessment of Select NASA Ground Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, George H.; Marshall, Timothy J.; McGinnis, Sean

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) is responsible for many large, high-energy ground test facilities that accomplish the nation s most advanced aerospace research. In order to accomplish these national objectives, significant energy and resources are consumed. A select group of facilities was analyzed using life-cycle assessment (LCA) to determine carbon footprint and environmental impacts. Most of these impacts stem from electricity and natural gas consumption, used directly at the facility and to generate support processes such as compressed air and steam. Other activities were analyzed but determined to be smaller in scale and frequency with relatively negligible environmental impacts. More specialized facilities use R-134a, R-14, jet fuels, or nitrogen gas, and these unique inputs can have a considerable effect on a facility s overall environmental impact. The results of this LCA will be useful to ATP and NASA as the nation looks to identify its top energy consumers and NASA looks to maximize research output and minimize environmental impact. Keywords: NASA, Aeronautics, Wind tunnel, Keyword 4, Keyword 5

  8. Testing of ITER prototype cable-in-conduit conductors in the FENIX facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, S. S.; Chaplin, M. R.; Felker, B.; Hassenzahl, W. V.; Kishiyama, K. I.; Parker, J. M.

    1994-07-01

    The Fusion Engineering International Experiment (FENIX) Test Facility has been operational since 1991 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for testing the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) prototype conductors. These conductors are designed to operate stably with transport current of more than 40 kA at a magnetic field of 13 T. The FENIX facility consists of four magnet sets that are configured to allow easy access to the 40-cm high-field region with a test cross-section area of 10-15 cm(exp 2). FENIX provides test conditions that closely simulate many of the ITER magnet operation modes. Performed experiments include measurements of critical current, current-sharing temperature, forced-flow properties, stability, joint performance and cyclic fatigue effects. This paper describes the design and performance of these experiments.

  9. Survey of active and inactive mines for possible use as in situ test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    A survey of active and inactive mines which might be useful for radioactive waste storage in situ test experiments was conducted. It was performed for Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Office of Waste Isolation. The report covers available information gathered from literature, U.S. Bureau of Mines, the Mining Enforcement and Safety Agency, and a limited number of personal contacts with constructors or operators of facilities. This survey is preliminary in nature and the objective is to develop potential candidate facilities for in situ experiments which warrant further investigation. Included are descriptions of 244 facilities, with all the data about each one which was available within the time restraint of the study. These facility descriptions are additionally indexed by depth of mine, nature of the country rock, mineral mined, and type of entry. A total of 14 inactive mines and 34 active mines has been selected as those most worthy of further investigation for possible service as nuclear waste isolation test facilities. This investigation, being preliminary and having been performed in a very short time period, must be qualified, and the description of the qualification is presented in the body of this report. Qualifications deal primarily with the hazard of having omitted facilities and having incomplete data in some instances. Results indicate sedimentary rock mines of minerals of evaporite origin as a first ranking of preference for in situ testing, followed by other sedimentary rocks and then by mines producing minerals from any type rock where the mine is above the local water table. These are general rules and of course there can be exceptions to them.

  10. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The first terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser will be brought to operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility in 1998. System consists of a single-mode TEA oscillator, picosecond semiconductor optical switch, multi-atmosphere. The authors report on design, simulation, and performance tests of the 10 atm final amplifier that allows for direct multi-joule energy extraction in a picosecond laser pulse.

  11. Test of a MWPC for the LHCb Muon System at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Anelli, M; Felici, G; Forti, C; Lanfranchi, G; Rosellini, R; Santoni, M; Saputi, A; Sarti, A; Sciascia, B; Bocci, V; Chiodi, G; Dané, E; Iacoangeli, F; Martellotti, G; Nobrega, R; Pinci, D; Rinaldi, W; Gatta, M

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of a test on a MWPC, of the region M3R3 of the LHCb Muon System, at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN. This was the first test of a chamber equipped with the final front end electronics. The performance of the chamber was studied with an about 100 GeV muon beam varying, by means of filters, the intensity of the photon flux reaching the detector.

  12. Operation and Performance Measurement on Engines in Sea Level Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    ENGINE TESTING LABORATORIES / FLUOROSCOPY / *GAS TURBINE ,. ENGINES / ’ IMAGE ENHACEMENT / IMAGING TECHNIQUES / ’RADIOGRAPHY / TEST FACILITIES /X-RAY... image enhancement techniques on either film or video pictures we can improve the accuracy to 0.05 mm. This makes the techniques particularly useful for...whilst the aircraft is a mirror image port to starboard, the engine rotational sense is constant and particularly on a supersonic intake this gives rise

  13. Single Event Effects Test Facility Options at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Dominik, Laura J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of microelectronics of ever diminishing feature size in avionics systems has led to a growing Single Event Effects (SEE) susceptibility arising from the highly ionizing interactions of cosmic rays and solar particles. Single event effects caused by atmospheric radiation have been recognized in recent years as a design issue for avionics equipment and systems. To ensure a system meets all its safety and reliability requirements, SEE induced upsets and potential system failures need to be considered, including testing of the components and systems in a neutron beam. Testing of integrated circuits (ICs) and systems for use in radiation environments requires the utilization of highly advanced laboratory facilities that can run evaluations on microcircuits for the effects of radiation. This paper provides a background of the atmospheric radiation phenomenon and the resulting single event effects, including single event upset (SEU) and latch up conditions. A study investigating requirements for future single event effect irradiation test facilities and developing options at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is summarized. The relatively new SNS with its 1.0 GeV proton beam, typical operation of 5000 h per year, expertise in spallation neutron sources, user program infrastructure, and decades of useful life ahead is well suited for hosting a world-class SEE test facility in North America. Emphasis was put on testing of large avionics systems while still providing tunable high flux irradiation conditions for component tests. Makers of ground-based systems would also be served well by these facilities. Three options are described; the most capable, flexible, and highest-test-capacity option is a new stand-alone target station using about one kW of proton beam power on a gas-cooled tungsten target, with dual test enclosures. Less expensive options are also described.

  14. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 665 - Tests To Be Performed at the Bus Testing Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... should be reported in the reliability test. 6. Fuel Economy The fuel economy test should be conducted using duty cycles that simulate transit service. This test should measure the fuel economy of the bus in miles per gallon or other energy-equivalent units. The fuel economy test should be designed only to...

  15. Laboratory and field tests on photo-electric probes and ultrasonic Doppler flow switch for remote control of turbidity and flowrate of a water-sand mixture flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, M.; Saccani, C.

    2017-08-01

    The paper describes the experimental apparatus and field tests carried on to remotely control through non-invasive and non-intrusive instruments turbidity and flowrate of a water-sand mixture flow conveyed by a pipeline. The mixture flow was produced by an innovative plant for seabed management. The turbidity was monitored by thru-beam infra-red photo-electric sensors, while flowrate was monitored by an ultrasonic Doppler flow switch. In a first phase, a couple of photo-electric sensors and a mechanical flow switch were preliminary tested in laboratory to verify installations concerns and measurement repeatability and precision. After preliminary test completion, photo-electric sensors and mechanical flow switch were installed in the real scale plant. Since the mechanical flow switch did not reach high reliability, an ultrasonic Doppler flow switch was identified and tested as alternative. Then, two couple of photo-electric sensors and ultrasonic Doppler flow switch were installed and tested on two pipelines of the plant. Turbidity and minimum flow signals produced by the instruments were integrated in the PLC logic for the automatic management of the plant. The paper also shows how ultrasonic Doppler flow switch measurement repeatability was negatively affected by the presence of the other ultrasonic Doppler flow switch working in a close pipeline and installed inside a steel casing.

  16. Modelling and operation strategies of DLR's large scale thermocline test facility (TESIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenthal, Christian; Breidenbach, Nils; Bauer, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In this work an overview of the TESIS:store thermocline test facility and its current construction status will be given. Based on this, the TESIS:store facility using sensible solid filler material is modelled with a fully transient model, implemented in MATLAB®. Results in terms of the impact of filler site and operation strategies will be presented. While low porosity and small particle diameters for the filler material are beneficial, operation strategy is one key element with potential for optimization. It is shown that plant operators have to ponder between utilization and exergetic efficiency. Different durations of the charging and discharging period enable further potential for optimizations.

  17. Investigation of hypersonic ramjet propulsion cycles using a ram accelerator test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, A. P.; Chew, G.; De Turenne, J. A.; Dunmire, B.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental research on hypersonic propulsion using a ram accelerator test facility is presented. The gasdynamics of the ram accelerator has been studied experimentally in a 38-mm bore facility over the Mach number range of 2.5 to 8.5, using methane- and ethylene-based propellant mixtures. Three different propulsive modes, centered on the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation speed of the combustible gas, have been experimentally observed. Projectiles have been accelerated smoothly from velocities below to above the C-J speed within a single propellant mixture.

  18. HiRadMat: A New Irradiation Facility for Material Testing at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, I; Gaillard, H; Grenier, D; Meddahi, M; Trilhe, P; Pardons, A; Theis, C; Charitonidis, N; Evrard, S; Vincke, H; Lazzaroni, M

    2011-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a new facility under construction at CERN designed to provide high intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies can be tested. The facility uses a 440 GeV proton beam extracted from the CERN SPS with a pulse length of 7.2μs, to a maximum pulse energy of 3.4 MJ. In addition to protons, ion beams with an energy of 173.5 GeV/nucleon and a total pulse energy of 21 kJ can be used. The facility is expected to become operational in autumn 2011. The first tests will include candidate materials and prototype assemblies of LHC collimators foreseen to operate at the ultimate LHC beam powers. Experiments on beam windows and high-power target material options, such as tungsten powder, are also planned. The paper will describe the layout and design parameters for the facility and the way experiments can be operated. Ideas on online and post-irradiation tests and instrumentation will be outlined.

  19. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Final progress report, March 1980--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-80ET-15601, Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities, developed diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, were refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics were developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems were interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support was provided for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort. DIAL personnel also cooperated with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs. The initial contract, Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery, established a data base on heat transfer, slagging effects on heat transfer surfaces, metal durability, secondary combustor performance, secondary combustor design requirements, and other information pertinent to the design of HR/SR components at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF). To accomplish these objectives, a combustion test stand was constructed that simulated MHD environments, and mathematical models were developed and evaluated for the heat transfer in hot-wall test sections. Two transitions occurred during the span of this contract. In May 1983, the objectives and title of the contract changed from Testing and Evaluation of Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery to Diagnostic Development and Support of MHD Test Facilities. In July 1988, the research laboratory`s name changed from the MHD Energy Center to the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory.

  20. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    CERN Document Server

    Samec, K; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Romanets, Y; Behzad, M; Aleksan, R; Bousson, S

    2014-01-01

    The EU’s FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the DEMO fusion reactor for ITER, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550°C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum. The entire “TMIF” facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico existing environmental analyses bounding environmental test facilities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Rodney A.; Bailey-White, Brenda E. (Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Cantwell, Amber (Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-06-01

    This report identifies current environmental operating parameters for the various test and support facilities at SNL/NM. The intent of this report is solely to provide the limits which bound the facilities' operations. Understanding environmental limits is important to maximizing the capabilities and working within the existing constraints of each facility, and supports the decision-making process in meeting customer requests, cost and schedule planning, modifications to processes, future commitments, and use of resources. Working within environmental limits ensures that mission objectives will be met in a manner that protects human health and the environment. It should be noted that, in addition to adhering to the established limits, other approvals and permits may be required for specific projects.

  2. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  3. Prospects for a Muon Spin Resonance Facility in the MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, John A. [Fermilab

    2017-04-12

    This paper investigates the feasibility of re-purposing the MuCool Test Area beamline and experimental hall to support a Muon Spin Resonance facility, which would make it the only such facility in the US. This report reviews the basic muon production concepts studied and operationally implemented at TRIUMF, PSI, and RAL and their application to the MTA facility. Two scenarios were determined feasible. One represents an initial minimal-shielding and capital-cost investment stage with a single secondary muon beamline that transports the primary beam to an existing high-intensity beam absorber located outside of the hall. Another, upgraded stage, involves an optimized production target pile and high-intensity absorber installed inside the experimental hall and potentially multiple secondary muon lines. In either scenario, with attention to target design, the MTA can host enabling and competitive Muon Spin Resonance experiments

  4. Botany Facility: Test report on breadboard tests for the determination of the heat transfer at the glass disk and of the temperature distribution in the fluorescent tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, W.

    1986-11-01

    Botany Facility tests were performed in an environmental laboratory in order to determine the heat transfer at the glass disk of the breadboard model and the temperature distribution in the fluorescent tube under different environmental conditions. The test objects, test facility, instrumentation, environmental conditions, and test procedures are described. The tests were successful since all data needed were obtained with the required accuracy. The extent of the data was substantially increased during the tests, allowing safe predictions.

  5. Facilities and procedures used for the performance testing of DOE personnel dosimetry systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, P.L.; Fox, R.A.; Hogan, R.T.; Holbrook, K.L.; Hooker, C.D.; Yoder, R.C.

    1983-04-01

    Radiological calibration facilities for personnel dosimeter testing were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide a capability for evaluating the performance of DOE personnel dosimetry systems. This report includes the testing methodology used. The informational presented here meets requirements specified in draft ANSI N13.11 for the testing laboratory. The capabilities of these facilities include sealed source irradiations for /sup 137/Cs, several beta-particle emitters, /sup 252/Cf, and machine-generated x-ray beams. The x-ray beam capabilities include filtered techniques maintained by the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and K-fluorescent techniques. The calibration techniques, dosimeter irradiation procedures, and dose-equivalent calculation methods follow techniques specified by draft ANSI N13.11 where appropriate.

  6. Status Update on the Seal/bearing Rotordynamics Test Facility at Case Western Reserve University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael L.

    1991-01-01

    The CWRU Seal/Bearing test facility is shown along with the revised force measuring system. This facility has recently been retrofitted with a high pressure, high flow oil system. The high pressure high flow water system remains in place to test seals. Also, a new high flow air system is now installed. Thus, testing to determine static and dynamic properties can now be performed using oil, water, or air on this single facility. The oil system is currently being used to determine rotordynamic properties of a NASA four pocket hydrostatic journal bearing. The revised dual system force measuring configuration is performing with excellent accuracy. That is, the dynamic force measurements are made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. The difference is less than 2 pct. between these two sets of load cell measurements on recent tests with a static eccentricity set close to zero and an orbit radius of 0.0004 inch. The extracted stiffness, damping and inertia coefficients is given for the test conditions shown, as extracted from the two independent dynamic force measurements.

  7. Tests and studies of USSR materials at the US coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Telegin, G P; Romanov, A I; Rekov, A I; Spiridonov, E G; Barodina, T I; Vysotsky, D A

    1978-10-01

    In accordance with the overall program of the US--USSR cooperation in the field of MHD power generation tests of Soviet electrode materials were conducted at the coal burning MHD facility UTSI-2 of the University of Tennessee Space Institute. The main purposes of the tests are evaluation of electrode materials behavior in the channel of the MHD generator operating with combustion products of coal containing ionizing alkali seed, study of thermal and physical stability of materials in the presence of corrosive slag, study of electrophysical characteristics of electrode materials when they are subjected to the passage of current through the plasma-slag-electrode system. Tests were conducted on electrodes made of silicon carbide doped with titanium and LaCrO/sub 3/--Cr cermet. Results are reported on the phase and chemical composition and structure of these two materials, their thermophysical and electrophysical properties, and the electrode fabrication methods. The MHD facility UTSI-2, where the tests were conducted is one of few utilizing actual coal as the fuel. A description of this facility is given, and its main operating parameters and the methods used to conduct electrode tests with and without an applied current are described.

  8. Evaluation of Liquefaction Susceptibility of Clean Sands after Blast Densification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Posada, Carlos Alberto

    The effect of earthquakes on infrastructure facilities is an important topic of interest in geotechnical research. A key design issue for such facilities is whether or not liquefaction will occur during an earthquake. The consequences of this type of ground failure are usually severe, resulting in severe damage to a facility and in some cases the loss of human life. One approach to minimize the effect of liquefaction is to improve the ground condition by controlled blasting. The main limitations of the blast densification technique are that the design is mostly empirical and verification studies of densification have resulted in contradictory results in some case studies. In such cases, even though the ground surface settles almost immediately after blasting, common verification tests such as the cone penetration test (CPT), standard penetration test (SPT), and shear wave velocity test (Vs) suggest that the soil mass has not been improved at all. This raises concerns regarding the future performance of the soil and casts doubts on whether or not the improved deposit is still susceptible to liquefaction. In this work, a blast densification program was implemented at the Oakridge Landfill located in Dorchester County, SC, to gain information regarding the condition of a loose sand deposit during and after each blast event. In addition, an extensive laboratory testing program was conducted on reconstituted sand specimens to evaluate the mechanical behavior of saturated and gassy, medium dense sands during monotonic and cyclic loading. The results from the field and laboratory program indicate that gas released during blasting can remain trapped in the soil mass for several years, and this gas greatly affects the mechanical behavior of the sand. Gas greatly increases the liquefaction resistance of the soil. If the gas remains in the sand over the life of a project, then it will maintain this increased resistance to liquefaction, whether or not the penetration

  9. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW's Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  10. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW`s Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  11. DEKRA: New indoor crash test facility; DEKRA: Neue Indoor-Crashtestbahn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandel, J [ATZ Entwicklungszentrum, Sulzbach-Rosenberg (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    So far, the Dekra crash test centre specialized in outdoor crash tests with heavy and light industrial vehicles, passenger cars, and motorcycles. The test facility is used by public and private users from Europe, America, and Asia. The new indoor crash test facility provides further test options, especially in the so-called standard range of passenger carsa nd light industrial vehicles. With a rotary impact block for fast crash test sequences, generous space for optimal underfloor crash documentations, and processor-controlled impact speed, Dekra presents itself as a modern service institution for scientists and as a development partner of the international motor car industry. (orig.) [German] Bisher war das Dekra-Crash-Test-Center vor allem auf Outdoor-Crashtests mit schweren und leichten Nutzfahrzeugen, Personenkraftwagen und Motorraedern spezialisiert. Dieses Angebot wird von oeffentlichen und privaten Auftraggebern aus Europa, Amerika und Asien genutzt. 'Die neue Indoor-Crash-Test-Bahn eroeffnet zusaetzliche Testmoeglichkeiten, vor allem im so genannten Standardbereich der Personenkraftwagen und leichten Nutzfahrzeuge'. Mit einem drehbaren Aufprallblock fuer schnelle Crashtestfolgen, einer besonders geraeumigen XXL-Filmgrube fuer optimale Unterflur-Crashdokumentationen und prozessorgesteuertem Antrieb fuer noch praezisiere Aufprallgeschwindigkeiten erweitert Dekra im Bereich Unfallforschung and Crash Test Center ihr Angebot als moderner Forschungsdienstleister und Entwicklungspartner der internationalen Automobilindustrie. (orig.)

  12. Test facility for investigation of heat transfer of promising coolants for the nuclear power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, I. A.; Sviridov, V. G.; Batenin, V. M.; Biryukov, D. A.; Nikitina, I. S.; Manchkha, S. P.; Pyatnitskaya, N. Yu.; Razuvanov, N. G.; Sviridov, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The results are presented of experimental investigations into liquid metal heat transfer performed by the joint research group consisting of specialist in heat transfer and hydrodynamics from NIU MPEI and JIHT RAS. The program of experiments has been prepared considering the concept of development of the nuclear power industry in Russia. This concept calls for, in addition to extensive application of water-cooled, water-moderated (VVER-type) power reactors and BN-type sodium cooled fast reactors, development of the new generation of BREST-type reactors, fusion power reactors, and thermonuclear neutron sources. The basic coolants for these nuclear power installations will be heavy liquid metals, such as lead and lithium-lead alloy. The team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS commissioned a new RK-3 mercury MHD-test facility. The major components of this test facility are a unique electrical magnet constructed at Budker Nuclear Physics Institute and a pressurized liquid metal circuit. The test facility is designed for investigating upward and downward liquid metal flows in channels of various cross-sections in a transverse magnetic field. A probe procedure will be used for experimental investigation into heat transfer and hydrodynamics as well as for measuring temperature, velocity, and flow parameter fluctuations. It is generally adopted that liquid metals are the best coolants for the Tokamak reactors. However, alternative coolants should be sought for. As an alternative to liquid metal coolants, molten salts, such as fluorides of lithium and beryllium (so-called FLiBes) or fluorides of alkali metals (so-called FLiNaK) doped with uranium fluoride, can be used. That is why the team of specialists from NRU MPEI and JIHT RAS, in parallel with development of a mercury MHD test facility, is designing a test facility for simulating molten salt heat transfer and hydrodynamics. Since development of this test facility requires numerical predictions and verification

  13. A Pressuremeter Method for Single Piles Subjected to Cyclic Lateral Loads in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    M University -" Laborator es. " ". .,’ 249 5S . . - 0 Fiue 9 Shmai o odlPleLadTstApaausfo One-ayLoadconrol Cyc ic ests 1.Tes Figureoa H9 ce aic r of...Tests at the University of Houston Foundation Test Facility Sand Site. Is-p 103 -k % Figure 66. Come of Depresion Around Driven ,:.. Co ne Pr e s u r

  14. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility and integrating the particulate control devices (PCDs) into structural and process designs. Substantial progress in underground construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. Delivery and construction of coal handling and process structural steel began during the quarter. MWK equipment at the grade level and the first tier are being set in the structure.

  15. Calculation and comparisons with measurement of fast neutron fluxes in the material testing facilities of the NRU research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The NRU reactor at Chalk River provides three irradiation facilities to study the effects of fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) on reactor materials for assessing material damage and deformation. The facilities comprise two types of fast neutron rods (Mark 4 and Mark 7), and a Material Test Bundle (MTB) irradiated in a loop site. This paper describes the neutronic simulation of these testing facilities using the WIMS-AECL and TRIAD codes, and comparisons with the fast neutron flux measurements using iron-wire activation techniques. It also provides comparisons of flux levels, neutron spectra, and size limitations of the experimental cavities between these test facilities. (author)

  16. Tests and analyses on the laboratory equipment in fuel-fabrication mockup test facility (Technical Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, T.; Gunji, Y.; Kikumo, H.; Okamoto, N.; Murakami, T.; Sato, S. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-11-01

    A rotary press has been manufactured for trial use of fabricating nuclear-fuel pellets, which is compact and superior in processing capacity compared to conventional reciprocating presses, and its performance tests were done. Tests include (1) finding out of problems in the equipment maintenance, (2) a comparative test of rotary and reciprocating presses in pellet fabrication, (3) an injection test of dry-recovered fuel powders, and (4) a confirmation test for process holdup of the fuel powders in the equipment. To evaluate the applicability to MOX (uranium and plutonium mixed oxide) fuel fabrication, 0 - 40 weight % of dry-recovered powders obtained from sintered uranium pellets was added to the raw materials of uranium powders to make the pellets. Some recommendations based on the present testing results in designing large scale MOX fuel fabricating machines are given. (S. Ohno)

  17. Upgrading UNLV's ASTM E477 test facility to meet the current requirements of ASTM E477

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojas, Ronn Reinier

    A by-product of Heating, Ventilation, and Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems is noise that is produced by fans, compressors, and other related equipments and the noises from the turbulence that is created by moving air. Sometimes, it is impractical to modify the sources of the noise, which requires designers to modify the path of the noise, the duct system. These modifications might include installing an in-duct silencer or acoustical lining on the inside walls of the ducts. The testing and the precise quantification of the performance of these silencers and duct linings are necessary for any designer to be able to make the correct modifications to the ventilation system. The ASTM E477 code calls for strict standardization of the testing of such noise attenuation devices. The ASTM E477 test facility used by the Center for Mechanical & Environmental Systems Technology (CMEST) at UNLV was first constructed in 1991 and required upgrades to meet the newer revisions of the ASTM code. This study includes making modifications to the facility (1) to increase sound input, (2) reduce sound leakage, and (3) to integrate the measurement systems. These upgrades will bring the facility into compliance with the current version of the ASTM E477 test standard.

  18. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  19. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  20. HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOCKREM, L L

    2005-07-13

    Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

  1. Pre-operational environmental monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferate, F.D.

    1995-01-01

    Nuclear explosives operations have been and may continue to be an important component of the DOE mission at the NTS. This mission has been to conduct the nation`s nuclear testing program in a safe, secure, and efficient manner while assuring full compliance with state and federal regulations, and DOE order`s and directives. These operations have generally included assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, and tesbng of nuclear explosive devices. They may also include maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. The Device Assembly Facility (DAF) was constructed to provide a dedicated facility in which to prepare nuclear explosives assemblies for their intended disposition. This facility will provide for combined operations (replacing two separate facilities) and incorporates state-of-the-art safety and security features while minimizing the risks of environmental impacts. The facility has been completed but not yet operated, so the impacts to be considered will b e based on normal operations and not on the impacts of construction activities. The impacts will arise from nuclear explosives operations that require the handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials. Wastes from operation of the earlier device assembly facilities have included grams of epoxies, pints of solvents, and small quantities of waste explosives. These are hazardous (includes radioactive) wastes and are disposed of in accordance with state and federal regulations. Assuming similar operations at the DAF, non-hazardous (includes non-radioactive) solid waste would be transported to a permitted landfill. Waste explosives would be sent to the Area 11 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Unit. Other hazardous waste would be sent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste.Management Site for shipment or burial.

  2. Steady state RF facility for testing ITER ICRH RF contact component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argouarch, A., E-mail: arnaud.argouarch@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bamber, R. [Euratom/CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX143DB (United Kingdom); Bernard, J.M.; Delaplanche, J.M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Durodié, F. [Laboratory for Plasmas Physics, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Larroque, S.; Lecomte, P.; Lombard, G.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Mollard, P.; Mouyon, D.; Pagano, M.; Patterlini, J.C.; Rasio, S.; Soler, B.; Toulouse, L.; Thouvenin, D.; Verger, J.M.; Vigne, T.; Volpe, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-10-15

    After the installation and commissioning of the TITAN [1,2], test facility, a key element – the T resonator – was assembled in order to facilitate testing components at high RF voltages and currents. This work is within the CEA roadmap for testing ITER ICRH components in a relevant environment. Several components of the future ITER ICRH antenna have been targeted. The embedded RF contact within the ITER ICRH antenna appeared as a critical component for antenna performance, requiring extensive R and D. Therefore, CEA has proposed and subsequently prepared a platform to test and validate the anticipated RF contact. A steady state resonator with active water cooling has been manufactured and assembled within the TITAN facility, including a hot pressurized water loop. The program consists of testing the contact at 2.25 kA and 62 MHz in steady state conditions. Sliding tests are also performed at high temperature and vacuum to understand component aging, including wear. The equipment installed is consistent with that required to test an ITER ICRH extensively.

  3. A unique integrated flight testing facility for advanced control/display research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, V. M.; Hatfield, J. J.; Novack, N. E.

    1981-01-01

    NASA is engaged in programs aimed at developing avionic concepts and systems technology for air transportation systems of the 1980's and beyond. A part of these programs is related to the development of advanced concepts and avionics technology for integrated displays and controls. In support of these efforts an interactive Flight Display Research System (FDRS) has been developed as an integral part of integrated flight test facilities which have been used in evaluation studies of integrated display and control concepts in support of a VTOL Approach and Landing Technology (VALT) program and current Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) program. A description is provided of several of the advanced integrated display and control concepts that have evolved within the VALT, TCV, and general aviation programs, as well as the integrated flight test facilities.

  4. Numerical Evaluation of a Light-Gas Gun Facility for Impact Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rahner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests which match the application conditions might be used to properly evaluate materials for specific applications. High velocity impacts can be simulated using light-gas gun facilities, which come in different types and complexities. In this work different setups for a one-stage light-gas gun facility have been numerically analyzed in order to evaluate their suitability for testing materials and composites used as armor protection. A maximal barrel length of 6 m and a maximal reservoir pressure of a standard industrial gas bottle (20 MPa were chosen as limitations. The numerical predictions show that it is not possible to accelerate the projectile directly to the desired velocity with nitrogen, helium, or hydrogen as propellant gas. When using a sabot corresponding to a higher bore diameter, the necessary velocity is achievable with helium and hydrogen gases.

  5. 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kauai Test Facility Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy Rene [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Agogino, Karen [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Li, Jun [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Nancy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Minitrez, Alexandra [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Avery, Penny [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bailey-White, Brenda [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bonaguidi, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); duMond, Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckstein, Joanna [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, William [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, III, Allen [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lantow, Tiffany [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Reuben [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mauser, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Amy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Payne, Jennifer [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, Dennis [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reiser, Anita [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ricketson, Sherry [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roma, Charles [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salinas, Stephanie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ullrich, Rebecca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities managed and operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Field Office (SFO), in Albuquerque, New Mexico, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineering subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes data and the compliance status of the sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year 2013. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities, and the National Environmental Policy Act. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of TTR ER sites. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2012).

  6. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  7. Calendar year 2003 : annual site enviromental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2004-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2003. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2003) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg 2., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  8. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  9. Operational Performance of the Horizontal Fast Rise EMP Pulser at the Patuxent River EMP Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    program. The facility utilized the hybrid elliptical horizontally polarized dipole antenna that was driven by the Maxwell Labs 5 MV (ML-5) dual...new pulser was delivered to Patuxent River October 1st, 2010, where it was re-assembled, installed, and tested in the HPD antenna by December 1st...Electromagnetic Pulse which radiates from its 150 Ohm biconical launch antenna1. A simplistic equivalent circuit model is shown in Figure 2. Each

  10. Low power microwave tests on RF gun prototype of the Iranian Light Source Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sadeghipanah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce RF electron gun of Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF pre-injection system. Design, fabrication and low-power microwave tests results of the prototype RF electron gun have been described in detail. This paper also explains the tuning procedure of the prototype RF electron gun to the desired resonant frequency. The outcomes of this project brighten the path to the fabrication of the RF electron gun by the local industries  

  11. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Design Requirements Document (DRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, H. S.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Bents, D. J.; Hatch, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    A description and the design requirements for the 200 MWe (nominal) net output MHD Engineering Test Facility (ETF) Conceptual Design, are presented. Performance requirements for the plant are identified and process conditions are indicated at interface stations between the major systems comprising the plant. Also included are the description, functions, interfaces and requirements for each of these major systems. The lastest information (1980-1981) from the MHD technology program are integrated with elements of a conventional steam electric power generating plant.

  12. Preliminary design of safety and interlock system for indian test facility of diagnostic neutral beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Himanshu, E-mail: htyagi@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Soni, Jignesh [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Yadav, Ratnakar; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Rotti, Chandramouli [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Gahlaut, Agrajit [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Parmar, Deepak [ITER-India, Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Bansal, Gourab; Pandya, Kaushal; Chakraborty, Arun [Institute For Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Indian Test Facility being built to characterize DNB for ITER delivery. • Interlock system required to safeguard the investment incurred in building the facility and protecting ITER deliverable components. • Interlock levels upto 3IL-3 identified. • Safety instrumented system for occupational safety being designed. Safety I&C functions of SIL-2 identified. • The systems are based on ITER PIS and PSS design guidelines. - Abstract: Indian Test Facility (INTF) is being built in Institute For Plasma Research to characterize Diagnostic Neutral Beam in co-operation with ITER Organization. INTF is a complex system which consists of several plant systems like beam source, gas feed, vacuum, cryogenics, high voltage power supplies, high power RF generators, mechanical systems and diagnostics systems. Out of these, several INTF components are ITER deliverable, that is, beam source, beam line components and power supplies. To ensure successful operation of INTF involving integrated operation of all the constituent plant systems a matured Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) is required. The INTF DACS is based on CODAC platform following on PCDH (Plant Control Design Handbook) guidelines. The experimental phases involve application of HV power supplies (100 KV) and High RF power (∼800 KW) which will produce energetic beam of maximum power 6MW within the facility for longer durations. Hence the entire facility will be exposed tohigh heat fluxes and RF radiations. To ensure investment protection and to provide occupational safety for working personnel a matured Safety and Interlock system is required for INTF. The Safety and Interlock systems are high-reliability I&C systems devoted completely to the specific functions. These systems will be separate from the conventional DACS of INTF which will handle the conventional control and acquisition functions. Both, the Safety and Interlock systems are based on IEC 61511 and IEC 61508 standards as

  13. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos [CERN; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias [CERN; Fabich, Adrian [CERN; Meddahi, Malika [CERN; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana [Fermilab

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  14. Progress in the realization of the PRIMA neutral beam test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, V.; Boilson, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Piovan, R.; Hanada, M.; Chakraborty, A.; Agarici, G.; Antoni, V.; Baruah, U.; Bigi, M.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; Decamps, H.; Graceffa, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Hemsworth, R.; Luchetta, A.; Marcuzzi, D.; Masiello, A.; Paolucci, F.; Pasqualotto, R.; Patel, H.; Pomaro, N.; Rotti, C.; Serianni, G.; Simon, M.; Singh, M.; Singh, N. P.; Svensson, L.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Zaccaria, P.; Agostinetti, P.; Agostini, M.; Andreani, R.; Aprile, D.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Barbisan, M.; Battistella, M.; Bettini, P.; Blatchford, P.; Boldrin, M.; Bonomo, F.; Bragulat, E.; Brombin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Chuilon, B.; Coniglio, A.; Croci, G.; Dalla Palma, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Dave, R.; De Esch, H. P. L.; De Lorenzi, A.; De Muri, M.; Delogu, R.; Dhola, H.; Fantz, U.; Fellin, F.; Fellin, L.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Fonnesu, N.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Gaio, E.; Gambetta, G.; Gomez, G.; Gnesotto, F.; Gorini, G.; Grando, L.; Gupta, V.; Gutierrez, D.; Hanke, S.; Hardie, C.; Heinemann, B.; Kojima, A.; Kraus, W.; Maeshima, T.; Maistrello, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marconato, N.; Mico, G.; Moreno, J. F.; Moresco, M.; Muraro, A.; Muvvala, V.; Nocentini, R.; Ocello, E.; Ochoa, S.; Parmar, D.; Patel, A.; Pavei, M.; Peruzzo, S.; Pilan, N.; Pilard, V.; Recchia, M.; Riedl, R.; Rizzolo, A.; Roopesh, G.; Rostagni, G.; Sandri, S.; Sartori, E.; Sonato, P.; Sottocornola, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Thakkar, A.; Umeda, N.; Valente, M.; Veltri, P.; Yadav, A.; Yamanaka, H.; Zamengo, A.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zaupa, M.

    2015-08-01

    The ITER project requires additional heating by two neutral beam injectors, each accelerating to 1 MV a 40 A beam of negative deuterium ions, to deliver to the plasma a power of about 17 MW for one hour. As these requirements have never been experimentally met, it was recognized as necessary to setup a test facility, PRIMA (Padova Research on ITER Megavolt Accelerator), in Italy, including a full-size negative ion source, SPIDER, and a prototype of the whole ITER injector, MITICA, aiming to develop the heating injectors to be installed in ITER. This realization is made with the main contribution of the European Union, through the Joint Undertaking for ITER (F4E), the ITER Organization and Consorzio RFX which hosts the Test Facility. The Japanese and the Indian ITER Domestic Agencies (JADA and INDA) participate in the PRIMA enterprise; European laboratories, such as IPP-Garching, KIT-Karlsruhe, CCFE-Culham, CEA-Cadarache and others are also cooperating. Presently, the assembly of SPIDER is on-going and the MITICA design is being completed. The paper gives a general overview of the test facility and of the status of development of the MITICA and SPIDER main components at this important stage of the overall development; then it focuses on the latest and most critical issues, regarding both physics and technology, describing the identified solutions.

  15. Oxy-Combustion Burner and Integrated Pollutant Removal Research and Development Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Schoenfield; Manny Menendez; Thomas Ochs; Rigel Woodside; Danylo Oryshchyn

    2012-09-30

    A high flame temperature oxy-combustion test facility consisting of a 5 MWe equivalent test boiler facility and 20 KWe equivalent IPR® was constructed at the Hammond, Indiana manufacturing site. The test facility was operated natural gas and coal fuels and parametric studies were performed to determine the optimal performance conditions and generated the necessary technical data required to demonstrate the technologies are viable for technical and economic scale-up. Flame temperatures between 4930-6120F were achieved with high flame temperature oxy-natural gas combustion depending on whether additional recirculated flue gases are added to balance the heat transfer. For high flame temperature oxy-coal combustion, flame temperatures in excess of 4500F were achieved and demonstrated to be consistent with computational fluid dynamic modeling of the burner system. The project demonstrated feasibility and effectiveness of the Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process with Integrated Pollutant Removal process for CCS and CCUS. With these technologies total parasitic power requirements for both oxygen production and carbon capture currently are in the range of 20% of the gross power output. The Jupiter Oxygen high flame temperature oxy-combustion process has been demonstrated at a Technology Readiness Level of 6 and is ready for commencement of a demonstration project.

  16. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-01-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/201...

  17. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  18. The 400W at 1.8K Test Facility at CEA-Grenoble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, P.; Girard, A.; Jager, B.; Rousset, B.; Bonnay, P.; Millet, F.; Gully, P.

    2006-04-01

    A new test facility with a cooling capacity respectively of 400W at 1.8K or 800W at 4.5K, is now under nominal operation in SBT (Low Temperature Department) at CEA Grenoble. It has been recently used for thermohydraulic studies of two phase superfluid helium in autumn 2004. In the near future, this test bench will allow: - to test industrial components at 1.8K (magnets, cavities of accelerators) - to continue the present studies on thermohydraulics of two phase superfluid helium - to develop and simulate new cooling loops for ITER Cryogenics, and other applications such as high Reynolds number flows This new facility consists of a cold box connected to a warm compressor station (one subatmospheric oil ring pump in series with two screw compressors). The cold box, designed by AIR LIQUIDE, comprises two centrifugal cold compressors, a cold turbine, a wet piston expander, counter flow heat exchangers and two phase separators at 4.5K and 1.8K. The new facility uses a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) connected to a bus for the measurements. The design is modular and will allow the use of saturated fluid flow (two phase flow at 1.8K or 4.5K) or single phase fluid forced flow. Experimental results and cooling capacity in different operation modes are detailed.

  19. The measurements of 2200 ETL9351 type photomultipliers for the Borexino experiment with the photomultiplier testing facility at LNGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianni, A. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, S.S. 17bis Km 18-910, I-67010 Assergi (Aquila) (Italy); Lombardi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universit and INFN. sez. di Milano, Via Celoria, 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Ranucci, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universit and INFN. sez. di Milano, Via Celoria, 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Smirnov, O.Ju. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie, 6, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: smirnov@lngs.infn.it

    2005-02-01

    The results of tests of more than 2200 ETL9351 type PMTs for the Borexino detector with the PMT test facility are presented. The PMTs characteristics relevant for the proper detector operation and modeling are discussed in detail.

  20. Design and Testing of Scaled Ejector-Diffusers for Jet Engine Test Facility Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    for 3/4 inch steel drive shaft. The shaft was coupled to an electrically operated 24 drive mechanism, Figure 13, which was remotely activated , allowing...NATiONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS 1963-A ,.7 -’ -’~~~~-777 . -7.17- -- - are large sea level test cells, one all purpose test tunnel and a helicopter transmission ...by TPL personnel. Twenty minutes of prelubrication is required on the compressor prior to start followed by approximately twenty minutes of warmup