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Sample records for sands development contributes

  1. Development tendencies of moulding and core sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw M. Dobosz1

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Further development of the technology for making moulding and core sands will be strictly limited by tough requirements due to protection of the natural environment. These tendencies are becoming more and more tense, so that we will reach a point when even processes, that from technological point of view fulfill high requirements of the foundry industry, must be replaced by more ecologically-friendly solutions. Hence, technologies using synthetic resins as binding materials will be limited. This paper presents some predictable development tendencies of moulding and core sands. The increasing role of inorganic substances will be noticed, including silicate binders with significantly improved properties, such as improved knock-out property or higher reclamation strength. Other interesting solutions might also be moulding sands bonded by geo-polymers and phosphate binders or salts and also binders based on degradable biopolymers. These tendencies and the usefulness of these binders are put forward in this paper.

  2. Soil and humus development in drift sands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevink, J.; de Waal, R.W.; Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    In drift sand, incipient mineral soils with a very thin endorganic horizon develop towards highly acid soils with a thick, differentiated, mor to moder type ectorganic horizon and incipient podzolisation, within a period of about 100 years. This is due slow litter decomposition and associated soil

  3. Microwave processing of oil sands and contribution of clay minerals

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, John; Binner, Eleanor; Saeid, Abdul; Al-Harahsheh, Mohammed; Kingman, Sam

    2014-01-01

    This study establishes the feasibility of microwave heating for extracting oil from Oil Sands in ex-situ processes. Previous studies in this area have shown some potential, but have not characterised the dielectric properties of the Oil Sands used, nor related them to the mineral composition, both of which are vital if successful scale up is to be achieved. In this work the fundamental interactions of microwave energy with Oil Sands are investigated and understood for the first time, and the ...

  4. Development and validation of model for sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Church P.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing requirement within QinetiQ to develop models for assessments when there is very little experimental data. A theoretical approach to developing equations of state for geological materials has been developed using Quantitative Structure Property Modelling based on the Porter-Gould model approach. This has been applied to well-controlled sand with different moisture contents and particle shapes. The Porter-Gould model describes an elastic response and gives good agreement at high impact pressures with experiment indicating that the response under these conditions is dominated by the molecular response. However at lower pressures the compaction behaviour is dominated by a micro-mechanical response which drives the need for additional theoretical tools and experiments to separate the volumetric and shear compaction behaviour. The constitutive response is fitted to existing triaxial cell data and Quasi-Static (QS compaction data. This data is then used to construct a model in the hydrocode. The model shows great promise in predicting plate impact, Hopkinson bar, fragment penetration and residual velocity of fragments through a finite thickness of sand.

  5. New international developments in oil sands projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vercoe, J. [Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    Governments and oil companies from a variety of different countries are now working to create alternative oil and gas operations and the policies required to enable their financial success. The Africa Energy Commission was developed to coordinate policy and act as a framework for the African energy sector. Several large oil and gas operators have become involved in the creation of new contracts to develop training and human resources policies for the petroleum industry in Congo. Issues related to national oil companies and value creation in African countries are currently being studied by the World Bank. A biofuel alliance was recently signed between Congo and Brazil, and a Congo Forest Fund has also been created to help the inhabitants of the Congolese rainforest protect their environment. Congo is also offering opportunities for international companies to implement greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction programs to trade emission credits when requirements are satisfied. It was concluded that several African countries are suitable candidates for oil sands development. 1 fig.

  6. Developing a Sand Management Plan for Galveston Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-16

    US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Developing a Sand Management Plan for Galveston Island Ashley E. Frey, P. E. Research Civil...BUILDING STRONG® Problem Statement/Approach Recommend a long-term plan of actions to better manage sands on Galveston Island Initial Tasks...Formalize and document Galveston Island Sand Management Plan 3 Innovative solutions for a safer, better world BUILDING STRONG® Sediment

  7. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice-age deposits were reactivated as drift sand

  8. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand

  9. The contribution of Corynephorus canescens to the geodiversity of inland drift sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Riksen, Michel; van den Ancker, Hanneke; Kooistra, Maja

    2016-04-01

    Most dunes in the Netherlands are phytogenic, which means that plants are essential in their formation. This applies also to the dunes of the inland drift sand areas, which are nicknamed Atlantic deserts on account of their extreme climatic conditions. Daily temperatures on the bare sand surfaces may run up to 60° C on sunny summer days, dropping as low as below freezing point at night. Apart from blue and green algae, Corynephorus canescens, Grey hair-grass, it is the first conqueror of these active sands and plays an important role in the geomorphological development of the inland drift sands. C. canescens is a rapid colonizer and flourishes when it receives a regular supply of fresh sand, but is soon succeeded by competitor species. Like Ammophila arenaria (Marram grass), its vigour declines after some time, because its roots are affected. Therefore the plant requires a regular supply of fresh sand to outgrow the affected root zone. The growth of C. canescens is stimulated by two different geomorphological processes: aeolian and pluvial processes. Aboveground, the tussock architecture of the plant helps to trap sand and form small initial dunes. When formed by wind, these are called nabkahs; when formed by splash bush mounds. In a micro-morphological thin section both processes can often be recognized in one dune. The decline of C. canescens is caused by two soil-forming processes: reduction of permeability and accumulation of organic matter. Poor aeration and compaction restrict the growth of its roots. Increase in organic matter hampers the rate of root respiration and promotes conditions for the establishment of competitor species. In the nabkahs, thin slides show on the positive side for C. canescens there is little blown-in organic matter, but on the negative side that the grains upon aging develop a colourless organic coating formed by cyanobacteria (algae. For splashed sands on the positive side for Grey hairgrass there are few organic coatings, but on

  10. Geophysics comes of age in oil sands development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, P. [WorleyParsons Komex, Calgary, AB (Canada); Birch, R.; Parker, D.; Andrews, B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed geophysical techniques developed for oil sands exploration and production applications in Alberta's oil sands region. Geophysical methods are playing an important role in mine planning, tailings containment, water supply, and land reclamation activities. Geophysics techniques are used to estimate the volume of muskeg that needs to be stripped and stored for future reclamation activities as well as to site muskeg piles and delineate the thickness of clay Clearwater formations overlying Cretaceous oil-bearing sands. 2-D electrical resistivity mapping is used to map river-connected deep bedrock Pleistocene paleovalleys in the region. Geophysical studies are also used to investigate the interiors of dikes and berms as well as to monitor salt migration within tailings piles. Sonic and density logs are used to create synthetic seismograms for mapping the Devonian surface in the region. The new applications included the calculation of bitumen saturation from surface sands and shales; muskeg thickness mapping; and non-intrusive monitoring of leachate plumes. Geophysical techniques included 2-D electrical resistivity imaging; transient electromagnetic (EM) technologies; ground penetrating radar; and high-resolution seismic reflections. Polarization, surface nuclear magnetic resonance and push-probe sensing techniques were also discussed. Techniques were discussed in relation to Alberta's Athabasca oil sands deposits. 4 refs.

  11. Analysis of the environmental control technology for tar sand development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Nevers, N.; Glenne, B.; Bryner, C.

    1979-06-01

    The environmental technology for control of air pollution, water pollution, and for the disposal, stabilization, and vegetation of the waste tar sand were thoroughly investigated. Although some difficulties may be encountered in any of these undertakings, it seems clear that the air and water pollution problems can be solved to meet any applicable standard. Currently there are two large-scale plants producing liquid fuels from tar sands in Alberta, Canada which use similar technology involving surface mining, hot water extraction, and surface disposal of waste sand. These projects all meet the Canadian environmental control regulations in force at the time they began. The largest US deposits of tar sands are much smaller than the Canadian; 95 percent are located in the state of Utah. Their economics do not appear as attractive as the Canadian deposits. The environmental control costs are not large enough to make an otherwise economic project uneconomic. The most serious environmental conflict likely to occur over the recovery of liquid fuels from the US deposits of tar sands is that caused by the proximity of the deposits to national parks, national monuments, and a national recreation area in Utah. These areas have very stringent air pollution requirements; and even if the air pollution control requirements can be met, there may still be adequate opposition to large-scale mining ventures in these areas to prevent their commercial exploitation. Another environmental constraint may be water rights availability.Essentially all of the water running in the Colorado river basin is now legally allocated. Barring new interpretations of the legality of water rights purchase, Utah tar sands developments should be able to obtain water by purchasing existing irrigation water rights.

  12. Dataset of tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand

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    Shunbo Zhao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents 755 groups splitting tensile strength tests data of concrete with manufactured sand (MSC in different curing age ranged from 1 day to 388 days related to the research article “Experimental study on tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand” (Zhao et al., 2017 [1]. These data were used to evaluate the precision of the prediction formulas of tensile strength of MSC, and can be applied as dataset for further studies.

  13. Element geochemical analysis of the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment in desert stream flash floods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaopeng; Wang, Haibing

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream.

  14. Element Geochemical Analysis of the Contribution of Aeolian Sand to Suspended Sediment in Desert Stream Flash Floods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Jia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of wind and water in semiarid and arid areas usually leads to low-frequency flash flood events in desert rivers, which have adverse effects on river systems and ecology. In arid zones, many aeolian dune-fields terminate in stream channels and deliver aeolian sand to the channels. Although aeolian processes are common to many desert rivers, whether the aeolian processes contribute to fluvial sediment loss is still unknown. Here, we identified the aeolian-fluvial cycling process responsible for the high rate of suspended sediment transport in the Sudalaer desert stream in the Ordos plateau of China. On the basis of element geochemistry data analysis, we found that aeolian sand was similar to suspended sediment in element composition, which suggests that aeolian sand contributes to suspended sediment in flash floods. Scatter plots of some elements further confirm that aeolian sand is the major source of the suspended sediment. Factor analysis and the relation between some elements and suspended sediment concentration prove that the greater the aeolian process, the higher the suspended sediment concentration and the greater the contribution of aeolian sand to suspended sediment yield. We conclude that aeolian sand is the greatest contributor to flash floods in the Sudalaer desert stream.

  15. Contribution to the physical-mechanical study of cement CRS basis of dune-sand powder and other minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmani, Saci; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2016-07-01

    The Portland cements are increasingly used for the manufacture of cement materials (mortar or concrete). Sighting the increasing demand of the cement in the field of construction, and the wealth of our country of minerals. It is time to value these local materials in construction materials and in the manufacture of cement for the manufacture of a new type of cement or for the improvement of the cement of characteristics for several reasons either technical, or ecological or economic or to improve certain properties to the State fees or hardened. The uses of mineral additions remain associated to disadvantages on the time of solidification and the development of the mechanical resistance at the young age [8]. The objective of our work is to study the effects of the incorporation of additions minerals such the pozzolan (active addition) [3], slag of blast furnace (active addition) [4] and the sand dune powder (inert addition) on the physico-mechanical properties of compositions of mortar collaborated compositions according to different binary combinations basis of these additions. This will allow selecting of optimal dosages of these combinations the more efficient, from the point of view of mechanical resistanceas well. The results of this research work confirm that the rate of 10% of pozzolan, slag or powder of dune sand contributes positively on the development of resistance in the long term, at of this proportion time,there is a decrease in the latter except for the slag (20 - 40%) [4]Seems the more effective resistors and physical properties.

  16. Alberta's economic development of the Athabasca oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Michael

    This dissertation examines the 61-year evolution of public policies pertaining to development of Alberta's non-conventional source of crude oil. The Athabasca oil sands contain an estimated 1.5 trillion barrels and provide for a safe continental supply. The Provincial Government first sponsored this undertaking in 1943. The period from then to 1971 was one of a transition from a wheat economy to a natural-resource economic base. A stable government emerged and was able to negotiate viable development policies. A second period, 1971 to 1986, was marked by unstable world conditions that afforded the Alberta government the ability to set terms of development with multi-national oil firms. A 50% profit-sharing plan was implemented, and basic 1973 terms lasted until 1996. However, 1986 was a critical year because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) reduced prices, causing the Alberta economy to lapse into recession. During a third period, 1986 to 1996, the Alberta Government was unable to adapt quickly to world conditions. A new leadership structure in 1996 made major changes to create ongoing fiscal and development policies. That history provides answers to two primary research questions: How do public policies affect the behaviors of the modern corporation and visa versa? What are the implications for development theory? Two sources of information were used for this study. First, it was possible to review the Premier's files located in the Provincial Archives. Materials from various government libraries were also examined. Some 7,000 documents were used to show the evolution of government policymaking. Second, interviews with leaders of oil companies and federal research facilities were important. Findings support the thesis that, to facilitate oil sands development, government and the private sector have closely collaborated. In particular, revenue policies have allowed for effective R&D organization. Relying on intensive technological

  17. Developing Large Scale Explosively Driven Flyer Experiments on Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehagen, Thomas; Kraus, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of the dynamic behavior of granular materials are of great importance to a variety of scientific and engineering applications, including planetary science, seismology, and construction and destruction. In addition, high quality data are needed to enhance our understanding of granular physics and improve the computational models used to simulate related physical processes. However, since there is a non-negligible grain size associated with these materials, experiments must be of a relatively large scale in order to capture the continuum response of the material and reduce errors associated with the finite grain size. We will present designs for explosively driven flyer experiments to make high accuracy measurements of the Hugoniot of sand (with a grain size of hundreds of microns). To achieve an accuracy of better than a few percent in density, we are developing a platform to measure the Hugoniot of samples several centimeters in thickness. We will present the target designs as well as coupled designs for the explosively launched flyer system. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Sand in the salt marsh : Contribution of high-energy conditions to salt-marsh accretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Alma V.; Veeneklaas, Roos M.; Bakker, Jan P.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental dynamics at barrier-island salt marshes are reflected in lateral and vertical textural patterns of the marsh sediment. During normal conditions, fine-grained sediment is deposited, whereas during high-energy conditions also sand accretion can occur. This paper describes the

  19. Sand in the salt marsh: Contribution of high-energy conditions to salt-marsh accretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de A.V.; Veeneklaas, R.M.; Bakker, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental dynamics at barrier-island salt marshes are reflected in lateral and vertical textural patterns of the marsh sediment. During normal conditions, fine-grained sediment is deposited, whereas during high-energy conditions also sand accretion can occur. This paper describes the

  20. Intermontane eolian sand sheet development, Upper Tulum Valley, central-western Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Francisco Fuhr Dal' Bó

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe intermontane Upper Tulum eolian sand sheet covers an area of ca. 125 km² at north of the San Juan Province, central-western Argentina. The sand sheet is currently an aggrading system where vegetation cover, surface cementation and periodic flooding withhold the development of dunes with slipfaces. The sand sheet surface is divided into three parts according to the distribution of sedimentary features, which reflects the variation in sediment budget, water table level and periodic flooding. The central sand sheet part is the main area of eolian deposition and is largely stabilized by vegetation. The sedimentary succession is 4 m thick and records the vertical interbedding of eolian and subaqueous deposits, which have been deposited for at least 3.6 ky with sedimentation rates of 86.1 cm/ky. The construction of the sand sheet is associated with deflation of the sand-graded debris sourced by San Juan alluvial fan, which is available mainly in drier fall-winter months where water table is lower and wind speeds are periodically above the threshold velocity for sand transport. The accumulation of sedimentary bodies occurs in a stabilized eolian system where vegetation cover, thin mud veneers and surface cementation are the main agents in promoting accumulation. The preservation of the sand sheet accumulations is enabled by the progressive creation of the accommodation space in a tectonically active basin and the continuous burial of geological bodies favored by high rates of sedimentation.

  1. Characterization and determination of naphthenic acids species in oil sands process-affected water and groundwater from oil sands development area of Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongfu; Chen, Yuan; Meshref, Mohamed N A; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Dong, Shimiao; Ibrahim, Mohamed D; Wang, Chengjin; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Hughes, Sarah A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Brown, Christine; Mahaffey, Ashley; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2018-01-01

    This work reports the monitoring and assessment of naphthenic acids (NAs) in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), Pleistocene channel aquifer groundwater (PLCA), and oil sands basal aquifer groundwater (OSBA) from an active oil sands development in Alberta, Canada, using ultra performance liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF-MS) analysis with internal standard (ISTD) and external standard (ESTD) calibration methods and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for compositional analysis. PLCA was collected at 45-51 m depth and OSBA was collected at 67-144 m depth. Results of Ox-NA concentrations follow an order as OSPW > OSBA > PLCA, indicating that occurrences of NAs in OSBA were likely related to natural bitumen deposits instead of OSPW. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) was applied to avoid the matrix effect for the ESTD method. Reduced LLE efficiency accounted for the divergence of the ISTD and ESTD calibrated results for oxidized NAs. Principle component analysis results of O2 and O4 species could be employed for differentiation of water types, while classical NAs with C13-15 and Z (-4)-(-6) and aromatic O2-NAs with C16-18 and Z (-14)-(-16) could be measured as marker compounds to characterize water sources and potential temporal variations of samples, respectively. FTICR-MS results revealed that compositions of NA species varied greatly among OSPW, PLCA, and OSBA, because of NA transfer and transformation processes. This work contributed to the understanding of the concentration and composition of NAs in various types of water, and provided a useful combination of analytical and statistical tools for monitoring studies, in support of future safe discharge of treated OSPW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ethnographic Contributions to Method Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leander, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to common assumptions, there is much to be learned about methods from constructivist/post-structuralist approaches to International Relations (IR) broadly speaking. This article develops this point by unpacking the contributions of one specific method—ethnography—as used in one subfield...... assumptions and instructions pertaining to “sound methods.” Both in the context of observation and in that of justification, working with “strong objectivity” requires a flexibility and willingness to shift research strategies that is at odds with the usual emphasis on stringency, consistency, and carefully...... of research in the ethnographic tradition. However, it would also require rethinking standard methods instructions and the judgments they inform....

  3. The Contribution of Endozoochory to the Colonization and Vegetation Composition of Recently Formed Sand Coastal Dunes

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    C. M. Dellafiore

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether endozoochory contributes to the dispersal and colonization of plant species in recently formed coastal dunes. At least 5.7% of species present in the study area are being dispersed by wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.. Most dispersed species are perennial herbs with small seeds size. The continuous input of seeds through rabbit feces into newly created areas would ensure the constant arrival of seeds and would facilitate colonization. Therefore, endozoochorous dispersal may play a relevant role for the structure and composition of dune plant communities.

  4. Water availability for development of major tar sands areas in Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefer, T.N.; McQuivey, R.S.

    1979-05-01

    The Sutron Corporation, under contract with Colorado State University, has conducted a study for the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) to determine the availability of water for future extraction of viscous petroleum (bitumen) from the six major tar sands deposits in Utah. Specifically, the areas are: Asphalt Ridge and Whiterocks, which lie immediately west of Vernal, Utah; P.R. Spring, a large area extending from the Colorado River to the White River along Utah's eastern border; Hill Creek, adjacent to P.R. Spring to the west; Sunnyside, immediately across the Green River from Hill Creek between the Price and Green Rivers; and Tar Sand Triangle, near the confluence of the Colorado and Dirty Devil Rivers. The study, conducted between September and December of 1978, was a fact-finding effort involving the compilation of information from publications of the US Geological Survey (USGS), Utah State Engineer, Utah Department of Natural Resources, and other federal and state agencies. The information covers the general physiographic and geologic features of the total area, the estimated water requirements for tar sands development, the availability of water in each of the six areas, and the legal and sociological restraints and impacts. The conclusions regarding water availability for tar sands development in each of the six areas and specific recommendations related to the development of each area are presented also.

  5. Development of digestive enzyme activity in larvae of spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus. 1. Biochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-González, C A; Moyano-López, F J; Civera-Cerecedo, R; Carrasco-Chávez, V; Ortiz-Galindo, J L; Dumas, S

    2008-12-01

    Spotted sand bass Paralabrax maculatofasciatus is a potential aquaculture species in Northwest Mexico. In the last few years it has been possible to close its life cycle and to develop larviculture technology at on pilot scale using live food, however survival values are low (11%) and improvements in growth and survival requires the study of the morpho-physiological development during the initial ontogeny. In this research digestive activity of several enzymes were evaluated in larvae, from hatching to 30 days after hatching (dah), and in live prey (rotifers and Artemia), by use of biochemical and electrophoretic techniques. This paper, is the first of two parts, and covers only the biochemical analysis. All digestive enzyme activities were detected from mouth opening; however the, maximum activities varied among different digestive enzymes. For alkaline protease and trypsin the maximum activities were detected from 12 to 18 dah. Acid protease activity was observed from day 12 onwards. The other digestive enzymes appear between days 4 and 18 after hatching, with marked fluctuations. These activities indicate the beginning of the juvenile stage and the maturation of the digestive system, in agreement with changes that occur during morpho-physiological development and food changes from rotifers to Artemia. All enzymatic activities were detected in rotifers and Artemia, and their contribution to enhancement the digestion capacity of the larvae appears to be low, but cannot be minimised. We concluded that the enzymatic equipment of P. maculatofasciatus larvae is similar to that of other marine fish species, that it becomes complete between days 12 and 18 after hatching, and that it is totally efficient up to 25 dah.

  6. Legacy of a half century of Athabasca oil sands development recorded by lake ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Joshua; Kirk, Jane L; Muir, Derek C G; Wang, Xiaowa; Evans, Marlene S; Smol, John P

    2013-01-29

    The absence of well-executed environmental monitoring in the Athabasca oil sands (Alberta, Canada) has necessitated the use of indirect approaches to determine background conditions of freshwater ecosystems before development of one of the Earth's largest energy deposits. Here, we use highly resolved lake sediment records to provide ecological context to ∼50 y of oil sands development and other environmental changes affecting lake ecosystems in the region. We show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) within lake sediments, particularly C1-C4-alkylated PAHs, increased significantly after development of the bitumen resource began, followed by significant increases in dibenzothiophenes. Total PAH fluxes in the modern sediments of our six study lakes, including one site ∼90 km northwest of the major development area, are now ∼2.5-23 times greater than ∼1960 levels. PAH ratios indicate temporal shifts from primarily wood combustion to petrogenic sources that coincide with greater oil sands development. Canadian interim sediment quality guidelines for PAHs have been exceeded since the mid-1980s at the most impacted site. A paleoecological assessment of Daphnia shows that this sentinel zooplankter has not yet been negatively impacted by decades of high atmospheric PAH deposition. Rather, coincident with increases in PAHs, climate-induced shifts in aquatic primary production related to warmer and drier conditions are the primary environmental drivers producing marked daphniid shifts after ∼1960 to 1970. Because of the striking increase in PAHs, elevated primary production, and zooplankton changes, these oil sands lake ecosystems have entered new ecological states completely distinct from those of previous centuries.

  7. Atlas of Dutch drift sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger

  8. Unusual coelom formation in the direct-type developing sand dollar Peronella japonica

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuchimoto, Jun; Yamada, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2011-01-01

    Peronella japonica is a sand dollar with a zygote that develops into an abbreviated pluteus but then metamorphoses on day three. The adult rudiment formation is unique; it uses a median position of the hydrocoel and a stomodeum-like invagination of vestibule that covers the dorsal side of the hydrocoel. However, the developmental processes underlying coelom formation remain unclear. In this study, we examined this process by reconstructing three-dimensional images from serial sections of larv...

  9. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  10. Assessing uncertainties in GHG emission estimates from Canada's oil sands developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. G.; Lin, J. C.; Huang, L.; Edwards, T. W.; Worthy, D.; Wang, D. K.; Sweeney, C.; White, J. W.; Andrews, A. E.; Bruhwiler, L.; Oda, T.; Deng, F.

    2013-12-01

    Reducing uncertainties in projections of surface emissions of CO2 and CH4 relies on continuously improving our scientific understanding of the exchange processes between the atmosphere and land at regional scales. In order to enhance our understanding in emission processes and atmospheric transports, an integrated framework that addresses individual natural and anthropogenic factors in a complementary way proves to be invaluable. This study presents an example of top-down inverse modeling that utilizes high precision measurement data collected at a Canadian greenhouse gas monitoring site. The measurements include multiple tracers encompassing standard greenhouse gas species, stable isotopes of CO2, and combustion-related species. The potential for the proposed analysis framework is demonstrated using Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model runs to yield a unique regional-scale constraint that can be used to relate the observed changes of tracer concentrations to the processes in their upwind source regions. The uncertainties in emission estimates are assessed using different transport fields and background concentrations coupled with the STILT model. Also, methods to further reduce uncertainties in the retrieved emissions by incorporating additional constraints including tracer-to-tracer correlations and satellite measurements are briefly discussed. The inversion approach both reproduces source areas in a spatially explicit way through sophisticated Lagrangian transport modeling and infers emission processes that leave imprints on atmospheric tracers. The results indicate that the changes in greenhouse gas concentration are strongly influenced by regional sources, including significant contributions from fossil fuel emissions, and that the integrated approach can be used for regulatory regimes to verify reported emissions of the greenhouse gas from oil sands developments.

  11. Development of a bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments to pike (Esox lucius)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Pike (Esox lucius) are a commercially sought fish species that inhabit the Athabasca River, which flows through the Athabasca oil sands. The fish are exposed to natural sources of bitumen from the McMurray formation. This study was conducted to design and implement a daily-renewal bioassay to assess the toxicity of oil sands to this fish species and to obtain information regarding the development of pike exposed to bitumen. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild pike captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish, approximately 15 days post-hatch. For the rest of the experiment, brine shrimp were fed to the walleye embryos every day after hatching. The developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length. The research findings indicated that pike is less sensitive than walleye and fathead minnow to the toxicity of oil sands sediments.

  12. Electrical conductivity of lab-formed methane hydrate + sand mixtures; technical developments and new results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.; Du Frane, W. L.; Weitemeyer, K. A.; Constable, S.; Roberts, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    frequency associated with the highest phase angle (typically 100 kHz) could be used to effectively isolate the electrical response of the sample from system contributions, enabling determination of σ. Surprisingly, the addition of sand, a nominal insulator, served to increase the overall σ of mixtures with sand fractions up through ~50 vol. % (i.e. those samples with well-connected methane hydrate), while Ea significantly decreased relative to single-phase methane hydrate. The reduced Ea suggests that a separate conduction mechanism operates when sand is present. One possible explanation is that ionic impurities from sand surfaces chemically diffuse into the hydrate grains, increasing their concentration of mobile charge-carrying defects. The fact that the addition of glass beads did not produce the same results supports this hypothesis. Geometrical mixing laws alone may therefore not sufficiently describe complicated mixing relationships between gas hydrate and sediment. Further tests are needed to resolve the competing effects, particularly if results are to be applied to systems that are not dominated by the presence of seawater. Work was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE contracts DE-NT0005668 and DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DOE/USGS Interagency Agreement DE-NT0006147.

  13. Gender Differences among Contributing Leadership Development Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences among contributing student leadership development resources were examined within the context of theory-based perspectives of leadership-related attributes. The findings suggest that students' increased engagement with institutional constituencies cultivates an environment conducive to students' cognitive development toward…

  14. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  15. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development of the theory of building up pore pressure in sand....

  16. Development of a new instrument for measurement of high temperature mechanical properties of resin-bonded sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of resin-bonded sand mixtures at high temperatures significantly affect the quality of casting. However, the existing instruments for high-temperature performances testing mainly focus on inorganic binder-bonded sands no matter the test items or the atmospheric protection, while the instrumentss specially designed for resin-bonded sand are not yet available. A new instrument for testing the high-temperature performance of resin sand was designed including the confirmation of the testing parameters, loading, measurement and control systems, and the design of the frame shape and heating furnace. This instrument can test the compressive strength, heat tolerance time and restraining load of phenol-formaldehyde resin coated sand, self-hardened furan resin sand, and trimethylamine (TEA-based resin bonded sand at high temperatures. The developed instrument has a high accuracy offering smaller than 0.3% deviation at a full scale in the measurement of the high temperature compressive strength and the restraining load over the range of 0–6.8 MPa and 0–2,000 N, respectively. The high temperature heat tolerance time range is 0–300 s and its measurement accuracy is ±1 s.

  17. Developing the Guidelines for Reclamation to Forest Vegetation in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straker, J. [Integral Ecology Group Ltd., Victoria, BC (Canada); Cumulative Environmental Management Association, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada). Reclamation Working Group, Terrestrial Subgroup; Donald, G. [Donald Functional and Applied Ecology Inc., Victoria, BC (Canada); Cumulative Environmental Management Association, Fort McMurray, AB (Canada). Reclamation Working Group, Terrestrial Subgroup

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the development process behind and the structure of the Guidelines for Reclamation to Forest Vegetation in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region. The advances present in the second edition, published in 2010, were described relative to the first edition, which was published in 1998. Oils sands mining companies are mandated to use the manual under the Alberta Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act. The paper provided an overview of the structure of the second edition and presented the process used to develop the second edition. It also described the planning approaches for revegetative treatments and the planning guidance of overstory and understory species selection. The methods for evaluating revegetative success were also described with particular reference to plant community composition and soil salinity indicators as examples of indicator development. The goal of the manual is to provide guidance on re-establishing the vegetation component of upland ecosystems on reclaimed landscapes and on evaluating the success of the re-establishment, assuming that the reclaimed plant communities should have species characteristic of native plant communities in the region, that the trends of vegetation community and structure development on reclaimed land should be similar to native plant communities in the region, and that the reclaimed ecosystems should have development trajectories that satisfy land-use objectives and provide resilience against natural disturbances. 15 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  18. Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruple, John [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Keiter, Robert [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Oil shale and oil sands resources located within the intermountain west represent a vast, and as of yet, commercially untapped source of energy. Development will require water, and demand for scarce water resources stands at the front of a long list of barriers to commercialization. Water requirements and the consequences of commercial development will depend on the number, size, and location of facilities, as well as the technologies employed to develop these unconventional fuels. While the details remain unclear, the implication is not – unconventional fuel development will increase demand for water in an arid region where demand for water often exceeds supply. Water demands in excess of supplies have long been the norm in the west, and for more than a century water has been apportioned on a first-come, first-served basis. Unconventional fuel developers who have not already secured water rights stand at the back of a long line and will need to obtain water from willing water purveyors. However, uncertainty regarding the nature and extent of some senior water claims combine with indeterminate interstate river management to cast a cloud over water resource allocation and management. Quantitative and qualitative water requirements associated with Endangered Species protection also stand as barriers to significant water development, and complex water quality regulations will apply to unconventional fuel development. Legal and political decisions can give shape to an indeterminate landscape. Settlement of Northern Ute reserved rights claims would help clarify the worth of existing water rights and viability of alternative sources of supply. Interstate apportionment of the White River would go a long way towards resolving water availability in downstream Utah. And energy policy clarification will help determine the role oil shale and oil sands will play in our nation’s future.

  19. EU CONTRIBUTION TO SUPPORT DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Popa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the EU aid concerning to improved the economic situation from developing countries. Therefore, the aim of this research is to identify how EU states contribute to helping poor countries, members of the World Trade Organization. For the beginning, we define the EU’position before, during and after the Doha Round – a round of WTO multilateral trade negotiations. Moreover, we analyse the development dimension, focusing on countries „marginalized” until early of XXI century in terms of international trade, because this represents the idea-axis of the Doha Round. In this context, the EU – one of the leading global commercial players and a key member of the institution mentioned above – has set several objectives to achieve the basic goal of negotiations and several ways to support developing countries. To conclude, we propose to define the key points of the European aid for least developed and developing countries.

  20. Development of EOS data for granular material like sand by using micromodels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebbeken N.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Detonations in soil can occur due to several reasons: e.g. land mines or bombs from the Second World War. Soil is also often used as a protective barrier. In all cases the behaviour of soil loaded by shock waves is important. The simulation of shock wave loaded soil using hydro-codes like AUTODYN needs a failure model as well as an equation of state (EOS. The parameters for these models are often not known. The popular material law for sand from Laine and Sandvik [1], e.g., is a first approximation, but it can only be used for dry sand with a certain grain grading. The parameters porosity, grain grading, and humidity have a big influence on the material behaviour of cohesive soils. Micro-mechanic models can be used to develop the material behaviour of granular materials. EOS data can be obtained by numerically loading micro-mechanically modelled grains and measuring the density under a certain pressure in the finite element model. The influence of porosity, grain grading, and humidity can be easily investigated. EOS data are determined in this work for cohesive soils depending on these parameters.

  1. Unusual coelom formation in the direct-type developing sand dollar Peronella japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Jun; Yamada, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2011-11-01

    Peronella japonica is a sand dollar with a zygote that develops into an abbreviated pluteus but then metamorphoses on day three. The adult rudiment formation is unique; it uses a median position of the hydrocoel and a stomodeum-like invagination of vestibule that covers the dorsal side of the hydrocoel. However, the developmental processes underlying coelom formation remain unclear. In this study, we examined this process by reconstructing three-dimensional images from serial sections of larvae. We show that the left coelom developed by both schizocoely and enterocoely from the archenteron tip, whereas the hydrocoel and right coelom formed by enterocoely from the archenteron. This coelom formation arranged the coelomic compartments directly along the adult oral-aboral axis by skipping the initial bilateral phases. Furthermore, our data indicate P. japonica retains ancestral asymmetry along the left-right axis in the location of the adult rudiment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Glial cell contributions to auditory brainstem development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina S Cramer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glial cells, previously thought to have generally supporting roles in the central nervous system, are emerging as essential contributors to multiple aspects of neuronal circuit function and development. This review focuses on the contributions of glial cells to the development of specialized auditory pathways in the brainstem. These pathways display specialized synapses and an unusually high degree of precision in circuitry that enables sound source localization. The development of these pathways thus requires highly coordinated molecular and cellular mechanisms. Several classes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia, have now been explored in these circuits in both avian and mammalian brainstems. Distinct populations of astrocytes are found over the course of auditory brainstem maturation. Early appearing astrocytes are associated with spatial compartments in the avian auditory brainstem. Factors from late appearing astrocytes promote synaptogenesis and dendritic maturation, and astrocytes remain integral parts of specialized auditory synapses. Oligodendrocytes play a unique role in both birds and mammals in highly regulated myelination essential for proper timing to decipher interaural cues. Microglia arise early in brainstem development and may contribute to maturation of auditory pathways. Together these studies demonstrate the importance of non-neuronal cells in the assembly of specialized auditory brainstem circuits.

  3. Development of a certified reference material for specific surface area of quartz sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egor P Sobina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of conducting research on the development of a certified reference material (CRM for specific surface area of quartz sand, which is practically non-porous and therefore has low specific surface area value ~ 0.8 m2/g. The standard uncertainty due to RM inhomogeneity, the standard uncertainty due to RM instability, as well as the standard uncertainty due to characterization were estimated using the State Primary Standard GET 210‑2014 for Units of Specific Absorption of Gases, Specific Surface Area, Specific Volume, and Pore Size of Solid Substances and Materials. The metrological characteristics of the CRM were determined using a low-temperature gas adsorption method. Krypton was used as an adsorbate to increase measurement accuracy.

  4. Steponas Kolupaila's contribution to hydrological science development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiuškevičius, Gintaras

    2017-08-01

    Steponas Kolupaila (1892-1964) was an important figure in 20th century hydrology and one of the pioneers of scientific water gauging in Europe. His research on the reliability of hydrological data and measurement methods was particularly important and contributed to the development of empirical hydrological calculation methods. Kolupaila was one of the first who standardised water-gauging methods internationally. He created several original hydrological and hydraulic calculation methods (his discharge assessment method for winter period was particularly significant). His innate abilities and frequent travel made Kolupaila a universal specialist in various fields and an active public figure. He revealed his multilayered scientific and cultural experiences in his most famous book, Bibliography of Hydrometry. This book introduced the unique European hydrological-measurement and computation methods to the community of world hydrologists at that time and allowed the development and adaptation of these methods across the world.

  5. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  6. Development of a bioassay using walleye (Sander vitreus) to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, D.; Yuan, H.; Tumber, V.; Parrott, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Raine, J. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the effects of sediments from the Athabasca oil sands area on fish development and survival. Walleye (Sander vitreus) which inhabit the Athabasca River are exposed to natural sources of bitumen eroding from the McMurray formation. This study described the design and implementation of a daily-renewal bioassay to evaluate the potential effects of toxicants on walleye development. Eggs were collected and fertilized with milt from spawning wild walleye captured from Lake Diefenbaker in Saskatchewan. The fertilized eggs were exposed to different concentrations of sediments or culture water only (negative controls) until complete yolk absorption of control fish. The walleye embryos were fed brine shrimp daily after hatching and the developing fish were examined for morphological deformities, survival, hatching success, and changes in weight and length between treatments. Organics concentrations in fish tissues and water were measured when possible. Fathead minnows and northern pikes will also be exposed to the same sediments in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the three species.

  7. Reclamation of peat-based wetlands affected by Alberta, Canada's oil sands development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Lee; Ciborowski, Jan; Dixon, D. George; Liber, Karsten; Smits, Judit

    2013-04-01

    The ability to construct or reclaim functional peat-based wetlands as a replacement for those lost to development activity is uncertain. Oil sands development in northern Alberta, Canada will ultimately result in the removal of over 85 km2 of peat-based wetlands. To examine potential replacement of these lost peatlands we compared four treatments assigned to 16 known-age wetlands where we followed plant community, carbon dynamics, water quality, invertebrates and top predators for 5 years. Key questions followed by a synopsis of findings include: (1) Will wetland communities become more natural with age? - Yes, however industrial effluents of salinity and napthenates will slow succession and may truncate development compared to natural systems; (2) Can community succession be accelerated? - Yes, the addition of carbon-rich soils can facilitate development in some zones but cautions are raised about a "green desert" of vigorous plant stands with low insect and vertebrate diversity; (3) Is productivity sustainable? - Maybe, limitations of water chemistry (salinity and napthenates) and hydrologic regime appear to play large roles; (4) Will production support top predators? Sometimes; insectivorous birds, some small fish and a few amphibians persisted under all except the most saline and napthenate-enriched sites; (5) What is the role of the compromised water quality in reclamation? - Reduced diversity of plants, insects and vertebrates, reduced plant physiological efficiency and thus slower rates of reclamation. It is axiomatic and well demonstrated throughout Europe that it is easier and more cost effective to protect peatlands than it is to reclaim or create them. This is complicated, though, where mineral or property values soar to over 1 million per hectare. Industrial planners, governments and the public need to understand the options, possibilities, time frames and costs of peatland replacement to make the best land use decisions possible. Our research provides

  8. Rapid development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in Psammomys obesus (Israeli sand rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briana Spolding

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: A major impediment to establishing new treatments for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is the lack of suitable animal models that accurately mimic the biochemical and metabolic characteristics of the disease. The aim of this study was to explore a unique polygenic animal model of metabolic disease as a model of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis by determining the effects of 2% dietary cholesterol supplementation on metabolic and liver endpoints in Psammomys obesus (Israeli sand rat. METHODS: P. obesus were provided ad libitum access to either a standard rodent diet (20% kcal/fat or a standard rodent diet supplemented with 2% cholesterol (w/w for 4 weeks. Histological sections of liver from animals on both diets were examined for key features of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. The expression levels of key genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism were measured by real-time PCR. RESULTS: P. obesus fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet exhibited profound hepatomegaly and steatosis, and higher plasma transaminase levels. Histological analysis identified extensive steatosis, inflammation, hepatocyte injury and fibrosis. Hepatic gene expression profiling revealed decreased expression of genes involved in delivery and uptake of lipids, and fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis, and increased expression of genes involved in very low density lipoprotein cholesterol synthesis, triglyceride and cholesterol export. CONCLUSIONS: P. obesus rapidly develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis when fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet that appears to be histologically and mechanistically similar to patients.

  9. How confident is Fort McKay that industry can reclaim oil sand development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzpatrick, C. [Fort McKay First Nations, AB (Canada)

    2004-02-05

    This presentation described how traditional environmental knowledge (TEK) can provide valuable information for both the reclamation design and assessment of oil sand development in Fort McKay. Conservation is valued by the Fort McKay First Nations communities who claim that current reclamation methods are too slow, and that the land is not being brought back to its original use with the uniqueness of the boreal landscape. Elders have noted that each year the water level in the Athabasca River is lower. The blowing tailings and coke dust are causing trees to dye and driving animals away. There is concern that the animals that remain may not be safe to eat. The Fort McKay First Nation community has stated that it will view reclamation as a success only when it functions with proof over many generations. The major concerns include: salt in the water draining from reclaimed areas; salt in the soils of reclaimed area; muskeg cannot be recreated; and, the issue of whether cranberry, blueberry and streambank forest areas can be recreated, along with traditional medicinal plants. Other concerns include the loss of rivers such as the Beaver Creek and Tar River, and that the water in reclaimed areas may not be suitable for animals to live in or to drink. tabs., figs.

  10. Development of CFC-Free Cleaning Processes at the NASA White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeson, Harold; Kirsch, Mike; Hornung, Steven; Biesinger, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) is developing cleaning and verification processes to replace currently used chlorofluorocarbon-113- (CFC-113-) based processes. The processes being evaluated include both aqueous- and solvent-based techniques. The presentation will include the findings of investigations of aqueous cleaning and verification processes that are based on a draft of a proposed NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) cleaning procedure. Verification testing with known contaminants, such as hydraulic fluid and commonly used oils, established correlations between nonvolatile residue and CFC-113. Recoveries ranged from 35 to 60 percent of theoretical. WSTF is also investigating enhancements to aqueous sampling for organics and particulates. Although aqueous alternatives have been identified for several processes, a need still exists for nonaqueous solvent cleaning, such as the cleaning and cleanliness verification of gauges used for oxygen service. The cleaning effectiveness of tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, hydrochlorofluorocarbon-225 (HCFC-225), tert-butylmethylether, and n-Hexane was evaluated using aerospace gauges and precision instruments and then compared to the cleaning effectiveness of CFC-113. Solvents considered for use in oxygen systems were also tested for oxygen compatibility using high-pressure oxygen autoignition and liquid oxygen mechanical impact testing.

  11. Effects of Fetal Exposure to Asian Sand Dust on Development and Reproduction in Male Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Seiichi; Ichinose, Takamichi; Arashidani, Keiichi; He, Miao; Takano, Hirohisa; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-11-23

    In recent experimental studies, we reported the aggravating effects of Asian sand dust (ASD) on male reproduction in mice. However, the effects of fetal ASD exposure on male reproduction have not been investigated. The present study investigated the effects of fetal ASD exposure on reproduction in male offspring. Using pregnant CD-1 mice, ASD was administered intratracheally on days 7 and 14 of gestation, and the reproduction of male offspring was determined at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after birth. The secondary sex ratio was significantly lower in the fetal ASD-exposed mice than in the controls. Histologic examination showed partial vacuolation of seminiferous tubules in immature mice. Moreover, daily sperm production (DSP) was significantly less in the fetal ASD-exposed mice than in the controls. DSP in the fetal ASD-exposed mice was approximately 10% less than the controls at both 5 and 10 weeks. However, both the histologic changes and the DSP decrease were reversed as the mice matured. These findings suggest that ASD exposure affects both the fetal development and the reproduction of male offspring. In the future, it will be necessary to clarify the onset mechanisms of ASD-induced male fetus death and male reproductive disorders.

  12. The efficiency of sand rat metabolism is responsible for development of obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, R; Adler, J H; Lazarovici, G; Bar-On, H; Ziv, E

    1993-01-01

    Two separate lines--diabetic and partially diabetes-resistant--have been isolated from the sand rat (Psammomys obesus), each with different growth characteristics in response to diets of varying digestible caloric densities (high energy, HE, 2.93 kcal/g, or low energy, LE, 2.38 kcal/g). Over a two week period all animals consumed similar quantities (c. 125 g) irrespective of the diet consumed. Weight gains were as follows: diabetic line on HE diet - 59.7 g, on LE - 46.2 g; non-diabetic animals from the diabetes-resistant line on HE - 44 g. Only animals from the diabetic line, fed the HE diet, developed hyperinsulinemia, obesity and diabetes. The energy cost of weight gain for the diabetic line fed either HE or LE diets was 6.0 - 6.3 kcal/g whereas for the diabetes-resistant line on the HE diet, the cost of growth was 50% higher at 9.3 kcal/g. These differences could be due either to alterations in the content of tissue laid down or to differences in energy expenditure. It has already been established that diet-induced obesity and diabetes develop in the diabetic line with features typical of insulin resistance in the metabolism of the pancreas, liver and peripheral tissues. Some of the animals of the diabetes-resistant line may also develop diabetes over a long time period and go through a phase of transient hyperinsulinemia-normoglycemia. This may represent an intermediate stage in the development of the diabetic syndrome and serve as a model of type 2 diabetes in man.

  13. Influence of In-Situ Oil Sands Development on Caribou (Rangifer tarandus Movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Muhly

    Full Text Available In-situ oil sands development (ISD involves a network of facilities, wells, roads and pipelines to extract and transport subsurface bitumen. This technology is rapidly expanding and there is uncertainty whether ISDs restrict animal movement, leading to increased extinction probabilities for some wide-ranging species. Here we test for effects of simulated future (i.e., 50 years from now and current ISDs on simulated movements of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus, a threatened species across North America. In simulations of future scenarios, we varied the spacing and permeability of ISDs and the presence/absence of protected areas. Permeability was measured as the number of times simulated caribou crossed ISDs with different levels of modelled permeability. We estimated the effects of these factors on caribou step length and annual home range size, key metrics of small and large spatiotemporal scales of movement, respectively. Current caribou crossings of above-ground pipeline features of ISDs were measured using camera traps and compared to expected caribou crossing rates based on present-day caribou movement simulations. Current crossing rates were evaluated within the context of predicted future crossing success rates necessary to maintain caribou step lengths and home ranges. With few exceptions, permeability across ISDs was the main factor affecting caribou movement, more so than spacing between developments or the presence of protected areas. However, minimal permeability (crossing rates of c. 15% to 60%, relative to an undisturbed site was needed to maintain existing home range size and step lengths. The effect of permeability on home range size and step length was non-linear, suggesting that small increases in permeability would provide a disproportionately greater benefit to caribou movement. Our predictions demonstrate that maintaining permeability across ISDs is more important than spacing between leases or including protected areas

  14. Plant growth and arbuscular mycorrhizae development in oil sands processing by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Naeth, M Anne; Schneider, Uwe; Schneider, Beate; Hüttl, Reinhard F

    2017-11-22

    Soil pollutants such as hydrocarbons can induce toxic effects in plants and associated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). This study was conducted to evaluate if the legume Lotus corniculatus and the grass Elymus trachycaulus and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could grow in two oil sands processing by-products after bitumen extraction from the oil sands in northern Alberta, Canada. Substrate treatments were coarse tailings sand (CTS), a mix of dry mature fine tailings (MFT) with CTS (1:1) and Pleistocene sandy soil (hydrocarbon free); microbial treatments were without AMF, with AMF and AMF plus soil bacteria isolated from oil sands reclamation sites. Plant biomass, root morphology, leaf water content, shoot tissue phosphorus content and mycorrhizal colonization were evaluated. Both plant species had reduced growth in CTS and tailings mix relative to sandy soil. AMF frequency and intensity in roots of E. trachycaulus was not influenced by soil hydrocarbons; however, it decreased significantly over time in roots of L. corniculatus without bacteria in CTS. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not significantly improve plant growth in CTS and tailings mix; however, inoculation with mycorrhizae plus bacteria led to a significantly positive response of both plant species in CTS. Thus, combined inoculation with selected mycorrhizae and bacteria led to synergistic effects. Such combinations may be used in future to improve plant growth in reclamation of CTS and tailings mix. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Laboratory demonstration of the acquisition and development of leishmania major in the sand fly Phlebotomus kazeruni (Diptera: Psychodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi, Hanafi A; Fryauff, David J; Dykstra, Elizabeth A; Szumlas, Daniel E

    2007-04-01

    Phlebotumus kazeruni, a blood-feeding, xerophilic sand fly species found broadly throughout North Africa and Western Asia, is a suspected vector of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL). Following successful laboratory colonization of this species, we employed the murine (BALB/c) infection model to determine whether our Sinai strain of P. kazeruni was able to successfully acquire, develop, and transmit a Sinai strain of Leishmania major. Groups of female sand flies were fed 1) by membrane, hamster blood containing culture-produced L. major promastigotes, 2) by membrane, hamster blood containing a suspension of L. major tissue amastigotes, and 3) directly upon L. major lesions in BALB/c mice. Samples of blood-fed sand flies from each group were dissected on selected days post-feeding and examined by light microscope for acquired and developing Leishmania infections. Female P. kazeruni acquired viable parasites by the three feeding methods. Development of ingested parasites to infective-stage metacyclic forms was observed and seen to progress from midgut to the mouthparts. Promastigote infection rates were 20% in flies fed directly upon infected mice, 35% in those fed amastigotes via membrane, and 100% in flies fed culture promastigotes via membrane. Direct blood fee-ding upon BALB/c mice was more avid (P kazeruni could serve as a vector for this parasite.

  16. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for rapid mass-screening of sand flies for Leishmania infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzelu, Chukwunonso O; Gomez, Eduardo A; Cáceres, Abraham G; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Martini-Robles, Luiggi; Uezato, Hiroshi; Mimori, Tatsuyuki; Katakura, Ken; Hashiguchi, Yoshihisa; Kato, Hirotomo

    2014-04-01

    Entomological monitoring of Leishmania infection in leishmaniasis endemic areas offers epidemiologic advantages for predicting the risk and expansion of the disease, as well as evaluation of the effectiveness of control programs. In this study, we developed a highly sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the mass screening of sand flies for Leishmania infection based on the 18S rRNA gene. The LAMP technique could detect 0.01 parasites, which was more sensitive than classical PCR. The method was robust and could amplify the target DNA within 1h from a crude sand fly template without DNA purification. Amplicon detection could be accomplished by the newly developed colorimetric malachite green (MG)--mediated naked eye visualization. Pre-addition of MG to the LAMP reaction solution did not inhibit amplification efficiency. The field applicability of the colorimetric MG-based LAMP assay was demonstrated with 397 field-caught samples from the endemic areas of Ecuador and eight positive sand flies were detected. The robustness, superior sensitivity, and ability to produce better visual discriminatory reaction products than existing LAMP fluorescence and turbidity assays indicated the field potential usefulness of this new method for surveillance and epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis in developing countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of ocean acidification on the swimming ability, development and biochemical responses of sand smelt larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cátia S.E. [MARE — Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ISPA − Instituto Universitário (Portugal); MARE — Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ESTM, Instituto Politécnico de Leiria (Portugal); Novais, Sara C.; Lemos, Marco F.L.; Mendes, Susana [MARE — Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ESTM, Instituto Politécnico de Leiria (Portugal); Oliveira, Ana P. [IPMA — Instituto Português do Mar e da Atmosfera, Algés (Portugal); Gonçalves, Emanuel J. [MARE — Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ISPA − Instituto Universitário (Portugal); Faria, Ana M., E-mail: afaria@ispa.pt [MARE — Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, ISPA − Instituto Universitário (Portugal)

    2016-09-01

    Ocean acidification, recognized as a major threat to marine ecosystems, has developed into one of the fastest growing fields of research in marine sciences. Several studies on fish larval stages point to abnormal behaviours, malformations and increased mortality rates as a result of exposure to increased levels of CO{sub 2}. However, other studies fail to recognize any consequence, suggesting species-specific sensitivity to increased levels of CO{sub 2}, highlighting the need of further research. In this study we investigated the effects of exposure to elevated pCO{sub 2} on behaviour, development, oxidative stress and energy metabolism of sand smelt larvae, Atherina presbyter. Larvae were caught at Arrábida Marine Park (Portugal) and exposed to different pCO{sub 2} levels (control: ~ 600 μatm, pH = 8.03; medium: ~ 1000 μatm, pH = 7.85; high: ~ 1800 μatm, pH = 7.64) up to 15 days, after which critical swimming speed (U{sub crit}), morphometric traits and biochemical biomarkers were determined. Measured biomarkers were related with: 1) oxidative stress — superoxide dismutase and catalase enzyme activities, levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, and levels of superoxide anion production; 2) energy metabolism — total carbohydrate levels, electron transport system activity, lactate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase enzyme activities. Swimming speed was not affected by treatment, but exposure to increasing levels of pCO{sub 2} leads to higher energetic costs and morphometric changes, with larger larvae in high pCO{sub 2} treatment and smaller larvae in medium pCO{sub 2} treatment. The efficient antioxidant response capacity and increase in energetic metabolism only registered at the medium pCO{sub 2} treatment may indicate that at higher pCO{sub 2} levels the capacity of larvae to restore their internal balance can be impaired. Our findings illustrate the need of using multiple approaches to explore the consequences of future pCO{sub 2} levels on

  18. Development and Application of a Life Cycle-Based Model to Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Oil Sands Upgrading Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Diana M; Bergerson, Joule A; Alvarez-Majmutov, Anton; Chen, Jinwen; MacLean, Heather L

    2016-12-20

    A life cycle-based model, OSTUM (Oil Sands Technologies for Upgrading Model), which evaluates the energy intensity and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of current oil sands upgrading technologies, is developed. Upgrading converts oil sands bitumen into high quality synthetic crude oil (SCO), a refinery feedstock. OSTUM's novel attributes include the following: the breadth of technologies and upgrading operations options that can be analyzed, energy intensity and GHG emissions being estimated at the process unit level, it not being dependent on a proprietary process simulator, and use of publicly available data. OSTUM is applied to a hypothetical, but realistic, upgrading operation based on delayed coking, the most common upgrading technology, resulting in emissions of 328 kg CO2e/m(3) SCO. The primary contributor to upgrading emissions (45%) is the use of natural gas for hydrogen production through steam methane reforming, followed by the use of natural gas as fuel in the rest of the process units' heaters (39%). OSTUM's results are in agreement with those of a process simulation model developed by CanmetENERGY, other literature, and confidential data of a commercial upgrading operation. For the application of the model, emissions are found to be most sensitive to the amount of natural gas utilized as feedstock by the steam methane reformer. OSTUM is capable of evaluating the impact of different technologies, feedstock qualities, operating conditions, and fuel mixes on upgrading emissions, and its life cycle perspective allows easy incorporation of results into well-to-wheel analyses.

  19. Improving Marketing's Contribution to New Product Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drechsler, Wenzel; Natter, Martin; Leeflang, Peter S. H.

    In many firms, the marketing department plays a minor role in new product development (NPD). However, recent research demonstrates that marketing capabilities more strongly influence firm performance than other areas such as research and development. This finding underscores the importance of

  20. Assessment of strength development in stabilized soil with CBR PLUS and silica sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Esmaeil Mousavi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the potential use of a nano polymer stabilizer, namely CBR PLUS for stabilization of soft clay and formulation of an optimal mix design of stabilized soil with CBR PLUS and silica sand. The highway settlements induced by the soft clay are problematic due to serious damages in the form of cracks and deformation. With respect to this, soil compaction and stabilization is regarded as a viable method to treat shallow soft clayey ground for supporting highway embankment. The objectives of this paper are: i to stabilize the compacted soil with CBR PLUS and silica sand in the laboratory; and ii to evaluate the permeability, strength and California bearing ratio (CBR of the untreated and stabilized soil specimens. The suitability of stabilized soil was examined on the basis of standard Proctor compaction, CBR, unconfined compression, direct shear, and falling head permeability tests. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the materials was determined using X-ray Fluorescence (XRF test. It was found that the optimal mix design of the stabilized soil is 90% clay, 1% CBR PLUS, 9% silica sand. It is further revealed that, stabilization increases the CBR and unconfined compressive strength of the combinations by almost 6-fold and 1.8-fold respectively. In summary, a notable discovery is that the optimum mix design can be sustainably applied to stabilize the shallow clay without failure.

  1. Chicken blood provides a suitable meal for the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis and does not inhibit Leishmania development in the gut

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sant'anna, Mauricio Rv; Nascimento, Alexandre; Alexander, Bruce; Dilger, Erin; Cavalcante, Reginaldo R; Diaz-Albiter, Hector M; Bates, Paul A; Dillon, Rod J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to address the role of chickens as bloodmeal sources for female Lutzomyia longipalpis and to test whether chicken blood is harmful to Leishmania parasite development within the sand flies...

  2. Development of a Sanded Expansive Salt Grout for Repository Sealing Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    would be: cement 16.27 lbs ?A/t7 I?-r Ili flyash + plaster + silica flour to.?~33.19 lbs sand L72.74 lbs salt 7.69 lbs - cz super-plasticizer 0.86...with AS’h Designz:ion: C 806-75, "Standard Test Method for Re- strained Expansion of Expansive Cement Mortar .’’) Two bars were 2 by 2 by 10 in. in...Stren;th of Hydraulic Cement Mortars ."(1) One 6- by 12-in. cyl- inder was made for possible later testing. 5. When observation of the above cylinder

  3. Government's contribution to the development of translation in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African government has contributed tremendously to the development of translation, a contribution which is not always rightfully acknowledged or valued. The development of translation benefited significantly from the country's official bilingualism policy of 1910 which necessitated the translation of a variety of text ...

  4. Development of a data-driven forecasting tool for hydraulically fractured, horizontal wells in tight-gas sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulga, B.; Artun, E.; Ertekin, T.

    2017-06-01

    Tight-gas sand reservoirs are considered to be one of the major unconventional resources. Due to the strong heterogeneity and very low permeability of the formation, and the complexity of well trajectories with multiple hydraulic fractures; there are challenges associated with performance forecasting and optimum exploitation of these resources using conventional modeling approaches. In this study, it is aimed to develop a data-driven forecasting tool for tight-gas sands, which are based on artificial neural networks that can complement the physics-driven modeling approach, namely numerical-simulation models. The tool is designed to predict the horizontal-well performance as a proxy to the numerical model, once the initial conditions, operational parameters, reservoir/hydraulic-fracture characteristics are provided. The data-driven model, that the forecasting tool is based on, is validated with blind cases by estimating the cumulative gas production after 10 years with an average error of 3.2%. A graphical-user-interface application is developed that allows the practicing engineer to use the developed tool in a practical manner by visualizing estimated performance for a given reservoir within a fraction of a second. Practicality of the tool is demonstrated with a case study for the Williams Fork Formation by assessing the performance of various well designs and by incorporating known uncertainties through Monte Carlo simulation. P10, P50 and P90 estimates of the horizontal-well performance are quickly obtained within acceptable accuracy levels.

  5. Contribution of Mining Activities and Development in Africa: Private ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Contribution of Mining Activities and Development in Africa: Private, Public and Multilateral Strategies. This research project aims to contribute to a better understanding of the context in which mining investment in Africa takes place. Based on a holistic analysis framework and case studies (Ghana, Mali and the Democratic ...

  6. Effect of Triiodothyronine and Cortisol on Development, Growth and Survival Rate of Sand Goby (Oxyeleotris marmorata, Blkr. Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R Sri Pudji

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of triiodothyronine and cortisol on the development, growth, and survival rate of sand goby larvae.  The experiment was carried out at Kolan Percobaan Babakan, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Sciences, IPB Bogor.  The larvae were immersed in solution of A (T3 2 mg/1 + C 1 mg/1, B (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mgll, C (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0,0 1 mg/1 dan D (without hormone for one hour.  After treatment, larvae were reared in aquarium (50x50x50 cm.  Larvae were fed by rotifer and phytoplankton, three times a day.  Larval development, growth and survival rate were observed.  Result showed that T3 2 mg/1 +C 1 nig/1 and T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mg/1 could accelerated development of swim bladder and eyespot of larvae.  Treatment did not effect body pigmentation and growth; but effect survival rate of sand goby larvae.Key words :  Triidothyronine, cortisol, larvae, sand goby fish, development, growth, survival rate ABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh pemberian hormon triidotironin dan kortisol terhadap perkembangan, pertumbuhan dan kelangsungan hidup larva ikan betutu.  Penelitian ini dilakukan di Kolam Percobaan Babakan, Fakultas Perikanan dan Ilmu Kelautan, Institut Pertanian Bogor.  Larva direndam selama satu jam dalam larutan A (T3 2 mg/1 + C 1 mg/1, B (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0, 1 mg/1, C (T3 2 mg/1 + C 0,0 1 mg/1 dan D (tanpa hormon.  Setelah perlakuan, larva dipelihara dalam akuariun berukuran 50x50x50 cm.  Selama pemeliharaan larva diberi pakan berupa rotifer dan fitoplankton dengan frekuensi tiga kali sehari.  Perkembangan, petumbuhan, dan kelangsungan hidup larva diamati.  Perendaman larva ikan betutu dalam larutan A dan B dapat mempercepat pembentukan gelembung renang dan bintik mata.  Perlakuan yang diberikan tidak mempengaruhi kecepatan terjadinya pigmentasi tubuh dan pertumbuhan, tetapi mempengaruhi derriat kelangsungan hidup larva.Kata kunci :  Triidotironin, kortisol

  7. Life Insurance Contribution, Insurance Development and Economic Growth in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang Ying, Yin Linsen, Pan Wenjie

    2017-01-01

    ... (including life insurance and non-life insurance) and economic growth, reveals the contribution law of the insurance development in economic growth in the short and long term from both economic scale and quality respectively...

  8. Hox expression in the direct-type developing sand dollar Peronella japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimoto, Jun; Yamaguchi, Masaaki

    2014-08-01

    Echinoderms are a curious group of deuterostomes that forms a clade with hemichordates but has a pentameral body plan. Hox complex plays a pivotal role in axial patterning in bilaterians and often occurs in a cluster on the chromosome. In contrast to hemichordates with an organized Hox cluster, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus has a Hox cluster with an atypical organization. However, the current data on hox expression in sea urchin rudiments are fragmentary. We report a comprehensive examination of hox expression in a sand dollar echinoid. Nine hox genes are expressed in the adult rudiment, which are classified into two groups, but hox11/13b belongs to both: one with linear expression in the coelomic mesoderm and another with radial expression around the adult mouth. The linear genes may endow the coelom/mesentery with axial information to direct postmetamorphic transformation of the digestive tract, whereas the radial genes developmentally correlate with the morphological novelties of echinoderms and/or sea urchins. Recruitment of the radial genes except hox11/13b appears to be accompanied by the loss of ancestral/axial roles. This in toto co-option of the hox genes provides insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of echinoderms from a bilateral ancestor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A multi-isotope approach for assessing industrial contributions to atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the Athabasca oil sands region in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadette C. Proemse; Bernhard Mayer; Mark E. Fenn; Christopher S. Ross

    2013-01-01

    Industrial nitrogen (N) emissions in the Athabasca oil sands region (AOSR), Alberta, Canada, affect nitrate (NO3) and ammonium (NH4) deposition rates in close vicinity of industrial emitters. NO3-N and NH4-N open field and throughfall deposition rates were determined at various...

  10. Rapid formation of large coastal sand bodies after emplacement of Magdalena river jetties, northern Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. O.; Pilkey, O. H.; Neal, W. J.

    1990-11-01

    The Magdalena River is noted for its high discharge of river sediment and its importance as the sediment source for a large delta complex and downdrift coastal sand bodies. The emplacement of jetties, completed in 1935 to stabilize the river mouth, contributed to major changes in the downstream coastal sand bodies. The western delta front retreated an average 65 m/yr. Puerto Colombia spit detached and migrated toward Puerto Colombia at rates of 230 430 m/yr, ultimately running into the town's quay and port facility. Galerazamba spit alternately elongated and shortened over the short term, leading to the destruction or damage of coastal town sites. Isla Cascajo acted as a significant sand trap with nearly 12 km2 of accretion over a 47-year period. Sand is now bypassing the tombolo, and the accretion zone continues migrating southwest. The small Punta Canaos spit also has shown significant accretion since 1974. The changes imply high rates of sediment transport; furthermore their growth is probably dependent on jetty-caused alterations of wave patterns, causing remobilization of shelf sands as well as delta-derived sand. Understanding sand body evolution and behavior is important to future development of the northern Colombia coast. Placement of port facilities, recreational beaches, tourist villages, and related support facilities on these sand bodies, as well as utilizing the sand bodies for aggregate, beach nourishment sands for other areas, or heavy mineral resources will require significant planning.

  11. Contribution of Rural Schools to Socioeconomic Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the contribution of rural schools to economic development in Swaziland. The important linkage between rural schools and their communities is also outlined. The paper shows that successful socioeconomic development should focus on harnessing the resources already in the community to find ...

  12. The contribution of philosophy to Africa's development | Oyedola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This precarious state has made many scholars cynical about the contributions philosophy has made towards the development of the continent. In this study, however, it is argued that such a cynical attitude is due to a myopic conception of “development,” which excludes growth in education, the economy, politics, science, ...

  13. Contributions of womens social clubs to community development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to examine the contributions of women social clubs in the Development of Communities in Akuku-Toru, Asari-Toru and Degema Local Government Areas of Rivers State, Nigeria. The objective was to identify the number of registered women social clubs in the areas, their community development ...

  14. Contribution of the Ciciban magazine to Slovenian youth poetry development

    OpenAIRE

    Eržen, Tomaž

    2015-01-01

    Slovenian children's and youth magazine Ciciban is coming out regularly since 1945 until today, in total 70 years. It had many publishers, many of which had literature for professional occupation. It promoted many non-literary and literary works which contributed to children's knowledge of world of literature and their reading development. This diploma researches contribution of Ciciban magazine to poetry and poets. Many different poets were publishing their works through decades and because ...

  15. How the nursing profession can contribute to sustainable development goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, David; Shaffer, Franklin

    2016-11-01

    As of 1 January 2016, the UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) became the focus of global efforts on a wide range of development agenda. The SDGs have subsumed the work of the UN millennium development goals (MDGs), so it is timely to reflect on the contribution made by nurses and midwives, so that we can optimise the profession's contribution to the 17 SDGs. This article reports the results of a scientometrics analysis of the published literature related to the MDGs and SDGs indexed in CINAHL, which identified the underlying themes addressed by nurses and midwives. It shows how analysis demonstrates that although nursing was slow to engage with the MDG agenda, it has made some progress in contributing to SDG scholarship. So far this contribution has been narrowly focused, but the profession could contribute to all 17 of the SDG goals. Routine updates of the analysis described here could help monitor progress, identify gaps in nursing's contributions to the goals, and provide further impetus to its engagement in this major global policy initiative.

  16. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  17. sand mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovačević, Lazar; Terek, Pal; Miletić, Aleksandar; Kakaš, Damir

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial heat transfer coefficient at the metal-mold interface (IHTC) was estimated by an iterative algorithm based on the function specification method. An Al-9 wt% Si alloy plate casting was made in a sand mold prepared by CO2 process. Thermal history obtained from the experiment was used to solve an inverse heat conduction problem. Acquired transient IHTC values are then given in function of the casting surface temperature at the interface. By comparing the obtained results with previous findings, the influence of grain fineness number and consequently of mold roughness on maximum IHTC values is revealed.

  18. Environmental building policy by the use of microalgae and decreasing of risks for Canadian oil sand sector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagyan, Armen B

    2017-09-01

    Environmental building recommendations aimed towards new environmental policies and management-changing decisions which as example demonstrated in consideration of the problems of Canadian oil sands operators. For the implementation of the circular economic strategy, we use an in-depth analysis of reported environmental after-consequence on all stages of the production process. The study addressed the promotion of innovative solutions for greenhouse gas emission, waste mitigation, and risk of falling in oil prices for operators of oil sands with creating market opportunities. They include the addition of microalgae biomass in tailings ponds for improvement of the microbial balance for the water speedily cleaning, recycling, and reusing with mitigation of GHG emissions. The use of food scraps for the nutrition of microalgae will reduce greenhouse gas emission minimally, on 0.33 MtCO2eq for Alberta and 2.63 MtCO2eq/year for Canada. Microalgae-derived biofuel can reduce this emission for Alberta on 11.9-17.9 MtCO2eq and for Canada on 71-106 MtCO2eq/year, and the manufacturing of other products will adsorb up to 135.6 MtCO2 and produce 99.2 MtO2. The development of the Live Conserve Industry and principal step from non-efficient protection of the environment to its cultivation in a large scale with mitigation of GHG emission and waste as well as generating of O2 and value-added products by the use of microalgae opens an important shift towards a new design and building of a biological system.

  19. Chicken blood provides a suitable meal for the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis and does not inhibit Leishmania development in the gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcante Reginaldo R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to address the role of chickens as bloodmeal sources for female Lutzomyia longipalpis and to test whether chicken blood is harmful to Leishmania parasite development within the sand flies. Bloodmeal ingestion, excretion of urate, reproduction, fecundity, as well as Leishmania infection and development were compared in sand flies fed on blood from chickens and different mammalian sources. Results Large differences in haemoglobin and protein concentrations in whole blood (dog>human>rabbit> chicken did not correlate with differences in bloodmeal protein concentrations (dog = chicken>human>rabbit. This indicated that Lu. longipalpis were able to concentrate bloodmeals taken from different hosts using prediuresis and this was confirmed by direct observation. Sand flies fed on chickens or dogs produced significantly more eggs than those fed on human blood. Female Lu. longipalpis retained significantly more urate inside their bodies when fed on chicken blood compared to those fed on rabbit blood. However, when the amounts of urate excreted after feeding were measured, sand flies fed on rabbit blood excreted significantly more than those fed on chicken blood. There was no difference in female longevity after feeding on avian or mammalian blood. Sand flies infected via chicken blood produced Leishmania mexicana infections with a similar developmental pattern but higher overall parasite populations than sand flies infected via rabbit blood. Conclusions The results of this study help to define the role that chickens play in the epidemiology of leishmaniasis. The present study using a Lu. longipalpis/L. mexicana model indicates that chickens are suitable hosts to support a Lu. longipalpis population and that chicken blood is likely to support the development of transmissible Leishmania infections in Lu. longipalpis.

  20. Contributions of Dynamic Systems Theory to Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John P.; Austin, Andrew; Schutte, Anne R.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the contributions of dynamic systems theory to the field of cognitive development, focusing on modeling using dynamic neural fields. After introducing central concepts of dynamic field theory (DFT), we probe empirical predictions and findings around two examples--the DFT of infant perseverative reaching that explains Piaget's A-not-B…

  1. The Contribution of Complex Dynamic Systems to Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geert, Paul

    2011-01-01

    As development is an example of a complex dynamic system (CDS), the theory of CDS can make important contributions to our understanding of the developmental process. However, mainstream research in developmental psychology uses an empirical paradigm that is at odds with what it is purported to

  2. The contribution of the missionaries to the development of Setswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They therefore set about to achieve this through introduction of formal education among the Batswana people. They started by building mission schools, translating scriptural and non-scriptural books as well as writing readers for elementary classes. The extent of the contribution of these missionaries to the development of ...

  3. Can genetically modified cotton contribute to sustainable development in Africa?

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, S.; Mannion, AM

    2009-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops and sustainable development remain the foci of much media attention, especially given current concerns about a global food crisis. However, whilst the latter is embraced with enthusiasm by almost all groups GM crops generate very mixed views. Some countries have welcomed GM, but others, notably those in Europe, adopt a cautious stance. This paper aims to review the contribution that GM crops can make to agricultural sustainability in the developing world. Follo...

  4. Sand Diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alan J.

    2005-01-01

    A few years ago, I was preparing to teach a summer enrichment program for middle school students at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. With swimming on the minds of most kids during the summer, I thought buoyancy would be a fun topic to discuss. An interesting way to introduce this concept is by discussing the beer-drinking balloonist who, in a lawn chair, floated to 11,000 feet above Los Angeles in 1997. However, I needed a hands-on project and was not about to go purchase some lawn chairs to duplicate this experiment. A simple submersible called the "Sand Diver" was designed and is now used as a hands-on activity for my introductory physics course.

  5. Contribution of Frenkel's theory to the development of materials science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović V.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The original and comprehensive research of Yakov Ilich Frenkel in physics and physical chemistry of condensed states, nuclear physics, electrodynamics, science of sintering has significantly contributed to the development of modern scientific knowledge and his scientific ideas are still an inspiration to many scientists. Having in mind the wealth of scientific ideas he had in the research of electroconductivity in metals, crystal structure imperfections and phase transitions and in founding the science of sintering, the contribution of individual theories of Frenkel of significance to materials science are presented in this paper.

  6. The eolian sand problems arising from desertification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofah, K K; Owusu, Y A

    1986-05-01

    Eolian (wind blown) sand constitutes a very serious problem to development in sandy desert lands and causes equally serious problems in lands that are undergoing desertification. In this paper, eolian sand movement due to bulk movement such as sand dune and ripple movement, sand drift by saltation, and sand storms by strong winds are discussed. Associated problems such as eolian sand encroachment on highways, farms, communities and industrial complexes are also discussed and workable solutions are offered. Solutions include chemical stabilization of the surface grains, fences to trap the blown sand and vegetation to prevent soil deflation. Vegetation is emphasized and recommended as the ultimate viable solution to combat desertification and eolian sand problems.

  7. Northern Sand Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form. This VIS image was taken at 82 degrees North latitude during Northern spring. The image is completely dominated by dunes. In sand seas, it is very common for a single type of dune to occur, and for a single predominate wind to control the alignment of the dunes. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 82.2, Longitude 152.5 East (207.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. The contribution of the Saudi woman in economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Elimam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the study is to analyze the contribution of Saudi woman in economic development of the country. This report develops an understanding of women contributions towards economic development. The method used to analyze the data was Pearson correlation. Through correlation we can determine the relationship between the variables. The study was a quantitative study. The data for five years was taken. Hypotheses development proceeded by focusing on labor work force participation, literacy rate of adult females and GDP rate within Saudi Arabia. Analysis was done on the results and the findings confirmed that there is a significant relationship between the variables. This study was of exploratory nature, it is recommended that this research be expanded to a statistically valid base within Saudi Arabia and then expand the study to additional countries. The findings showed that there was a high significant relationship between women labor work force participation and GDP. Whereas, there was moderate significant relationship between labor work force and literacy rate. Hence, there is a positive relationship between women contribution and economic development. The research is conducted within the context of Saudi Arabia and has certain limitation with further directions of conducting research in related field to get more accurate results.

  9. CONTRIBUTION OF FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT FOR THE REGION DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KATARÍNA ČULKOVÁ

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Foreign direct investments contribute to the important solving of the economical growth and regionaldevelopment and it presents part of the state’s effort to increase living level of the state. Slovakia government ismotivated to support any foreign investment and it competes for such investments with other transforming countries.Goal of the contribution is to provide idea about main factors that influence inflow of the foreign investments to theindividual regions of Slovakia and to evaluate their contribution through characteristics and main determinants of theforeign investments. Only through careful choice can Slovakia obtain successfully investors that would come to thecountry with production, research and development since in modern economy we cannot be competitive without suchactivities, neither in regional, nor in the international level.

  10. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  11. Local economic development and migrant remittances in rural Zimbabwe : Building on sand or solid ground?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ncube (Gracsious); G.M. Gómez (Georgina)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe paper explores the impact of migrant remittances on local economic development in a locality where more than half of the households have been recipients for at least five years. The study has taken place in rural Zimbabwe and uses an ethnographic method devised for this research. The

  12. [Crust development and subsurface soil properties under dominant shrubs in the process of dune restoration, Horqin Sand Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi-rui; Zhao, Ha-lin; Zuo, Xiao-an; Li, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yin-xin; Wang, Shao-kun

    2008-04-01

    Soil crust is a common and widespread phenomenon in desert areas all over the world due to its extraordinary ability to survive desiccation and extreme temperatures, high pH and salinity. Despite its unassuming appearance, biological soil crusts play a significant role in desert ecosystems, including involvement in the process of formation, stability and fertility of soil, preventing soil erosion by water or wind, increasing the possibility of vascular plant colonization, and being responsible for the stabilization of sand dunes. This study taking Horqin Sand Land as research region, by field sampling, crust and topsoil (0-2.5 cm and 2.5-5 cm under crust) samples in different dune habitats and shrub communities were collected, and their physicochemical properties were analyzed, including particle size distribution, bulk density, total nutrients and available nutrients, pH, EC and CaCO3 content. The result revealed that Artemisia halodendron in semi-mobile dune, Caragana microphylla in semi-fix dune, Artemisia frigida in fix dune and Salix microstachya in interdunal lowland were respectively developed physical soil crust, algae crust, lichen crust and moss crust. Crust thickness, hardness, water content, fine fraction, total and available nutrients gradually increased by semi-mobile dune < semi-fix dune < fix dune < interdunal lowland in terms of different dune habitats, and by physical soil crust < algae crust < lichen crust < moss crust in terms of different crust types. There were significant differences among crust types on nutrient content and particle size distribution (p < 0.01). Meanwhile, crust enhanced the < 0.05 mm content and nutrient content of topsoil, following an increasing trend from semi-mobile dune to interdunal lowland. As to each crust, the parameters of 0-2.5 cm subsurface soil layer were higher than that in 2.5-5 cm soil layer. The result also showed that the fine fraction and nutrient content of moss crust under Salix microstachya in

  13. Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah. Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, Robert [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ruple, John [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Tanana, Heather [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Holt, Rebecca [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Unconventional fuel development will require scarce water resources. In an environment characterized by scarcity, and where most water resources are fully allocated, prospective development will require minimizing water use and seeking to use water resources in the most efficient manner. Conjunctive use of surface and groundwater provides just such an opportunity. Conjunctive use includes two main practices: First, integrating surface water diversions and groundwater withdrawals to maximize efficiency and minimize impacts on other resource users and ecological processes. Second, conjunctive use includes capturing surplus or unused surface water and injecting or infiltrating that water into groundwater aquifers in order to increase recharge rates. Conjunctive management holds promise as a means of addressing some of the West's most intractable problems. Conjunctive management can firm up water supplies by more effectively capturing spring runoff and surplus water, and by integrating its use with groundwater withdrawals; surface and groundwater use can be further integrated with managed aquifer recharge projects. Such integration can maximize water storage and availability, while simultaneously minimizing evaporative loss, reservoir sedimentation, and surface use impacts. Any of these impacts, if left unresolved, could derail commercial-scale unconventional fuel development. Unconventional fuel developers could therefore benefit from incorporating conjunctive use into their development plans. Despite its advantages, conjunctive use is not a panacea. Conjunctive use means using resources in harmony to maximize and stabilize long-term supplies it does not mean maximizing the use of two separate but interrelated resources for unsustainable short-term gains and it cannot resolve all problems or provide water where no unappropriated water exists. Moreover, conjunctive use may pose risks to ecological values forgone when water that would otherwise remain in a stream

  14. Development of a low-cost cement free polymer concrete using industrial by-products and dune sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Najif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkali-activated polymer concrete (APC can potentially reduce CO2 emissions associated to concrete production by 84%. The binder in APC herein was synthesized using a combined sodium silicate-sodium hydroxide solution (i.e., alkali activator, alumino-silicate rich precursor (fly ash and slag. Light weight expanded clay and desert dune sand were used as aggregates. An overview of an experimental program was presented, which involved evaluation of fresh and mechanical properties of the produced APC and counterpart mortar (APM. Variables investigated were the fly ash to slag ratio and curing conditions. The curing regimes adopted herein included 24 hours of curing at ambient conditions, 30°C, and 60°C. The experimental program was undertaken in two stages, of these the first stage involved physical and chemical testing of constituent materials and the second stage involved testing or produced APM/APC. Reported were the setting times, workability, compression strength, strength development, flexural strength, tensile splitting strength, and plastic shrinkage strains. Relationship between strength results were investigated and effectiveness of codified predictive equations was evaluated.

  15. SAND: a Screening for Aphasia in NeuroDegeneration. Development and normative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catricalà, Eleonora; Gobbi, Elena; Battista, Petronilla; Miozzo, Antonio; Polito, Cristina; Boschi, Veronica; Esposito, Valentina; Cuoco, Sofia; Barone, Paolo; Sorbi, Sandro; Cappa, Stefano F; Garrard, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Language assessment has a critical role in the clinical diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases, in particular, in the case of Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA). The current diagnostic criteria (Gorno-Tempini et al., 2011) identify three main variants on the basis of clinical features and patterns of brain atrophy. Widely accepted tools to diagnose, clinically classify, and follow up the heterogeneous language profiles of PPA are still lacking. In this study, we develop a screening battery, composed of nine tests (picture naming, word and sentence comprehension, word and sentence repetition, reading, semantic association, writing and picture description), following the recommendations of current diagnostic guidelines and taking into account recent research on the topic. All tasks were developed with consideration of the psycholinguistic factors that can affect performance, with the aim of achieving sensitivity to the language deficit to which each task was relevant, and to allow identification of the selective characteristic impairments of each PPA variant. Normative data on 134 Italian subjects pooled across homogeneous subgroups for age, sex, and education are reported. Although further work is still needed, this battery represents a first step towards a concise multilingual standard language examination, a fast and simple tool to help clinicians and researchers in the diagnosis of PPA.

  16. Darwin's contribution to the development of the Panspermia theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demets, René

    2012-10-01

    The contributions of Svante Arrhenius, William Thomson, Hermann von Helmholtz, Hermann Richter, and Ferdinand Cohn to the development of the Panspermia theory have extensively been reviewed by Arrhenius himself (1908), Oparin ( 1938 ), and Kamminga ( 1982 ). Reading the original publications reveals the pivotal role that Charles Darwin must have played in shaping their ideas-an aspect that has not been highlighted before. It is argued that The Origin of Species not only kick-started the scientific development of the Panspermia theory in the 19(th) century but that biological evolution was an integral building block of it.

  17. Development and Evaluation of Solbrax-Water Nanoemulsions for Removal of Oil from Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila F. Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, surfactants have been used to clean up soils and aquifers contaminated by petroleum and petroleum derivatives. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate nanoemulsions for remediation of soil contaminated by petroleum, by using a commercial solvent Solbrax. The nanoemulsions were prepared by the phase inversion temperature (PIT method, using oil phase Solbrax (a solvent extracted from naphtha with low aromatics content and a nonionic ethoxylated lauryl ether surfactant. The surfactant concentrations were varied from 10 to 12 wt% and the oil phase was varied from 5 to 20 wt%. A 23 factorial experimental design with center point run was used to evaluate the soil washing process, varying time, temperature, and shear rate of the system. The results show that the most efficient system (with 90% efficiency was that using the nanoemulsion containing 5 wt% of Solbrax and 12 wt% of surfactant after four hours of washing, on 240 rotation·min−1 of shear rate and at a temperature of 318 K.

  18. Contributions of Islamic Civilization to The Mathematics Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Khaulah Asy-Syaimaa' Hussain

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of Islamic civilization goes hand in hand with physical and spiritual development. This development can be highlighted since the beginning of the golden age of Islam that witnessed the development of knowledge by Muslims scholars in various disciplines, including mathematics. The discourse in mathematical science only involves numbers, letters, and formulas. Muslims scholars took them as instruments to manifest the greatest of God. This paper investigates the contributions of Muslim scholars in Mathematics. The method of this study is qualitative through literature review. The resulting study found that the Quran became a source of inspiration to Muslim scholars in mathematics that form the branch of knowledge such as number theory, arithmetic, algebra, and geometry. This paper also promotes Islamization of Knowledge and its necessity to solve current Muslim world’s educational problems.

  19. Rates versus Developer Contributions as Revenue Sources for Local Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koutifaris

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Population expansion in many New South Wales (NSW local government areas (LGA has resulted in an increase in demand for local infrastructure and services that has far outstripped sources of local government revenue. This paper looks at two important sources of local government revenue in NSW, municipal rates and Section 94 contributions, as a source of funding increased demand and maintenance of infrastructure. It examines some recent and potentially long-term trends of both these revenues within different economic climates. An analysis and comparison of data over the period from June 2006 through to June 2010 against data collected for the period ending June 1993 forms the basis of this research. The research objective is to compare changes in the relativity of these revenue types and assess their application as a source of local government revenue. Data collected from the Department of Local Government NSW is compared with the findings of an earlier study, conducted by Barnes and Dollery (1996, in determining their relativity. The provision and maintenance of infrastructure by local government is essential for growth in the economy and is a valuable asset to be used by the community. Two types of funding for this infrastructure, among others, is sourced from municipal rates and developer charges levied under Section 94 contributions either by the developer providing the infrastructure, or a contribution towards its funding (Barnes and Dollery 1996.

  20. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  1. Regional Development Contribution of Toursim:Case of Adiyaman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ismail

    2013-06-01

    In this study, the position of the tourism sector in Turkish economy was manifested by means of various indicators. According to this, the number of the tourists visiting Turkey has increased about twenty two times and income of the tourism has increased fifthy-three times. It has been also determined that, the rate of the tourism incomes in GNP has reached 2,9 %; the rate in the export has reached 20,8 %. In addition to these, some analysis and comments have been suggested by determining the status of Adıyaman in this relation and contributions that will support the country and regional development have been mentioned.

  2. Vertical migration of nematodes and soil-borne fungi to developing roots of Ammophila arenaria (L.) link after sand accretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rooij van der Goes, P.C.E.M.; Peters, B.A.M.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Ammophila arenaria benefits from regular burial of windblown beach sand as it allows escape from soilborne pathogens (nematodes and fungi). The present study was done to obtain more insight into the timing and order of migration of the soil organisms towards the newly formed roots. Accordingly,

  3. Public health leadership development: factors contributing to growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Linda G

    2013-01-01

    This study compares pre- and posttest Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI-Self) scores for public health leaders who completed the Regional Institute for Health and Environmental Leadership (RIHEL) training program at least 2 years earlier; it seeks to identify factors contributing to changes in practices and overall leadership development for public health and environment leaders. Sixty-seven alumni who completed the yearlong RIHEL program between 1999 and 2002 participated through mailed surveys and phone interviews. The Leadership Practices Inventory, an alumni leadership development survey, and interviews provided evidence for positive change in leadership practices. Alumni experienced significant increases in pre- to post-LPI scores, collaborative leadership practices, and communication skills consistent with those taught in the RIHEL program. Women presented higher Encourage the Heart scores than men. Years of public health service negatively correlated with Total Change scores of LPI. The RIHEL program as a training intervention was credited significantly with changes in leadership practices for alumni studied. Nine influencing factors were identified for leadership development and are embedded in a Leadership Development Influence Model. These include self-awareness, a leadership development framework, and skills important in multiple leadership situations. Confidence was both an encouraging factor and a resulting factor to the increased exemplary leadership practices. Leadership development in public health must include multiple factors to create consistent increases in exemplary leadership practices. While the study focused on the leadership development process itself, RIHEL training was reported as having a positive, significant impact overall in participant leadership development. This study adds research data as a foundation for training content areas of focus. Studies to further test the Leadership Development Influence Model will allow public health

  4. The importance of TVET and its contribution to sustainable development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paryono

    2017-09-01

    Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) has been gaining its popularity and considered as the driving force for sustainable development. TVET is also considered highly in strategic and operational priorities of the G20, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and of multilateral organizations such as the International Labour Organization (ILO), UNESCO, ASEAN, and SEAMEO. As reflected in Shanghai Consensus, TVET systems need sustained transformation and revitalization if TVET is to realize its enormous potential to impact development. This paper will elaborate relevant policies considered as major drivers for promoting TVET at global, regional, and national levels. The paper also shares TVET initiatives in response the policies, especially in meeting the labour market demands in the 21st century. Lastly, the paper highlights TVET contribution to sustainable development, particularly on the sustainable environmental development, including green jobs. The integration of sustainable development into TVET curriculum, learning contents, and also school policies and practices are important indicators to consider. The paper was based secondary data and documents from the meetings and also reports.

  5. Effect of gritting sand quality on road dust pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Babiuc, Octavian

    2016-01-01

    Pollution of air represents the contamination with matter that can affect both humanhealth and the environment. Road dust has been recognized as a dominant source ofparticulate matter and one of the factors that contributes to its development is the useof gritting sand. Gritting sand is being used during snowy winter conditions as atraction control method. During spring season, when snow and ice melt and surfacesdry out, and the influence of traffic, asphalt surface wear, particle ejection fr...

  6. Urban metabolism: Measuring the city's contribution to sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conke, Leonardo S; Ferreira, Tainá L

    2015-07-01

    Urban metabolism refers to the assessment of the amount of resources produced and consumed by urban ecosystems. It has become an important tool to understand how the development of one city causes impacts to the local and regional environment and to support a more sustainable urban design and planning. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to measure the changes in material and energy use occurred in the city of Curitiba (Brazil) between the years of 2000 and 2010. Results reveal better living conditions and socioeconomic improvements derived from higher resource throughput but without complete disregard to environmental issues. Food intake, water consumption and air emissions remained at similar levels; energy use, construction materials and recycled waste were increased. The paper helps illustrate why it seems more adequate to assess the contribution a city makes to sustainable development than to evaluate if one single city is sustainable or not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Life Insurance Contribution, Insurance Development and Economic Growth in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ying

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Under L-type economy, remodelling the growth power in the medium and long term is essential. The insurance industry during the 13th Five-year Plan period has been given a heavy expectation on promoting economic quality and upgrading economic efficiency, so it will try to accelerate its innovation and development process which serves national needs, market demand and people's requirements. Referring to the previous researches of Solow and Zhang and measuring Capital Stock and Total Factor Productivity independently, the paper analyses the inherent correlation between insurance (including life insurance and non-life insurance and economic growth, reveals the contribution law of the insurance development in economic growth in the short and long term from both economic scale and quality respectively. It also shows enlightenments on policy decision for insurance industry, thus helps economic stability under the downturn periods.

  8. Crushed rock sand – An economical and ecological alternative to natural sand to optimize concrete mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mundra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the use of crushed rock sand as viable alternative to Natural River sand that is being conventionally used as fine aggregate in cement concrete. Various mix designs were developed for different grades of concrete based on IS, ACI and British codes using Natural River sand and crushed rock sand. In each case, the cube compressive strength test, and beam flexure tests were conducted. The results of the study show that, the strength properties of concrete using crushed rock sand are nearly similar to the conventional concrete. The study has shown that crushed stone sand can be used as economic and readily available alternative to river sand and can therefore help to arrest the detrimental effects on the environment caused due to excessive mining of river sand.

  9. Systems biology of facial development: contributions of ectoderm and mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Joan E; Feng, Weiguo; Li, Hong; Leach, Sonia M; Phang, Tzulip; Siska, Charlotte; Jones, Kenneth L; Spritz, Richard A; Hunter, Lawrence E; Williams, Trevor

    2017-06-01

    The rapid increase in gene-centric biological knowledge coupled with analytic approaches for genomewide data integration provides an opportunity to develop systems-level understanding of facial development. Experimental analyses have demonstrated the importance of signaling between the surface ectoderm and the underlying mesenchyme are coordinating facial patterning. However, current transcriptome data from the developing vertebrate face is dominated by the mesenchymal component, and the contributions of the ectoderm are not easily identified. We have generated transcriptome datasets from critical periods of mouse face formation that enable gene expression to be analyzed with respect to time, prominence, and tissue layer. Notably, by separating the ectoderm and mesenchyme we considerably improved the sensitivity compared to data obtained from whole prominences, with more genes detected over a wider dynamic range. From these data we generated a detailed description of ectoderm-specific developmental programs, including pan-ectodermal programs, prominence- specific programs and their temporal dynamics. The genes and pathways represented in these programs provide mechanistic insights into several aspects of ectodermal development. We also used these data to identify co-expression modules specific to facial development. We then used 14 co-expression modules enriched for genes involved in orofacial clefts to make specific mechanistic predictions about genes involved in tongue specification, in nasal process patterning and in jaw development. Our multidimensional gene expression dataset is a unique resource for systems analysis of the developing face; our co-expression modules are a resource for predicting functions of poorly annotated genes, or for predicting roles for genes that have yet to be studied in the context of facial development; and our analytic approaches provide a paradigm for analysis of other complex developmental programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  10. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  11. Hercules project: Contributing to the development of the hydrogen infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arxer, Maria del Mar; Martínez Calleja, Luis E.

    A key factor in developing a hydrogen based transport economy is to ensure the establishment of a strong and reliable hydrogen fuel supply chain, from production and distribution, to storage and finally the technology to dispense the hydrogen into the vehicle. This paper describes how the industrial gas industry and, in particular, Air Products and Carburos Metalicos (Spanish subsidiary of Air Products), is approaching the new market for hydrogen as an energy carrier and vehicle fuel. Through participations in projects aiming to create enough knowledge and an early infrastructure build-up, like The Hercules Project (a project carried out in collaboration with eight partners), we contribute to the hydrogen economy becoming a reality for the next generation.

  12. Has Alberta oil sands development increased far-field delivery of airborne contaminants to the Peace-Athabasca Delta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund, Johan A; Hall, Roland I; Wolfe, Brent B; Edwards, Thomas W D; Farwell, Andrea J; Dixon, D George

    2012-09-01

    Identifying potential regional contamination by Alberta oil sands industrial emissions on sensitive ecosystems like the Peace-Athabasca Delta, ~200 km to the north, requires knowledge of historical contaminant levels and trends. Here we provide some of these critically-needed data, based on analysis of metals in a sediment core from an upland precipitation-fed lake in the delta. The lake is well-situated to record the anthropogenic history of airborne contaminant deposition for this region. Sediment records of metals of concern (Pb, Sb, As, Hg) reflect early to mid-20th century increases in North American industrial emissions, followed by reduced emissions due to improved industrial practices after 1950-70. Notably, Pb, Sb, As and Hg have declined since the onset of Alberta oil sands production, belying concerns that this activity has enhanced far-field atmospheric delivery of these contaminants to the delta. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. AERONET's Development and Contributions through Two Decades of Aerosol Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holben, B. N.

    2016-12-01

    The name Brent Holben has been synonymous with AERONET since it's inception nearly two and a half decades ago. Like most scientific endeavors, progress relies on collaboration, persistence and the occasional good idea at the right time. And so it is with AERONET. I will use this opportunity to trace the history of AERONET's development and the scientific achievements that we, as a community, have developed and profited from in our research and understanding of aerosols, describe measurements from this simple instrument applied on a grand scale that created new research opportunities and most importantly acknowledge those that have been and continue to be key in AERONET contributions to aerosol science. Born from a need to remove atmospheric effects in remotely sensed data in the 1980's, molded at a confluence of ideas and shaped as a public domain database, the program has grown from a prototype instrument in 1992 designed to routinely monitor biomass burning aerosol optical depth to over 600 globally distributed sites providing near real-time aerosol properties for satellite validation, assimilation in models and access for numerous research projects. Although standardization and calibration are fundamental elements for scientific success, development for the scientific needs of the community drive new approaches for reprocessing archival data and making new measurements. I'll discuss these and glimpse into the future for AERONET.

  14. Regional Development Contribution of Toursim:Case of Adiyaman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ismail

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism has an important role in some issues such as exchange input, increasing business opportunities and decreasing blank of the paying balance. That’s why, sector of tourism is seen as a key sector in economical development and vanishing the imbalanced of inter-regions in developing countries. In this scope, Adıyaman (Turkey, located in the region of the GAP (South Eastern Anatolian Project, has a significant status in the aspect of tourism and due to this; Adıyaman is expecting to be evaluated. It is very sufficient to reveal the potential of Adıyaman in the point of tourism sector and to give advices in order to improve the status. In this study, the position of the tourism sector in Turkish economy was manifested by means of various indicators. According to this, the number of the tourists visiting Turkey has increased about twenty two times and income of the tourism has increased fifthy-three times. It has been also determined that, the rate of the tourism incomes in GNP has reached 2,9 %; the rate in the export has reached 20,8 %. In addition to these, some analysis and comments have been suggested by determining the status of Adıyaman in this relation and contributions that will support the country and regional development have been mentioned.

  15. The transition from day-to-night activity is a risk factor for the development of CNS oxygen toxicity in the diurnal fat sand rat (Psammomys obesus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynan, Mirit; Biram, Adi; Mullokandov, Michael; Kronfeld-Schor, Noga; Paz-Cohen, Rotem; Menajem, Dvir; Arieli, Yehuda

    2017-01-01

    Performance and safety are impaired in employees engaged in shift work. Combat divers who use closed-circuit oxygen diving apparatus undergo part of their training during the night hours. The greatest risk involved in diving with such apparatus is the development of central nervous system oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT). We investigated whether the switch from day-to-night activity may be a risk factor for the development of CNS-OT using a diurnal animal model, the fat sand rat (Psammomys obesus). Animals were kept on a 12:12 light-dark schedule (6 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 500 lx). The study included two groups: (1) Control group: animals were kept awake and active during the day, between 09:00 and 15:00. (2) Experimental group: animals were kept awake and active during the night, between 21:00 and 03:00, when they were exposed to dim light in order to simulate the conditions prevalent during combat diver training. This continued for a period of 3 weeks, 5 days a week. On completion of this phase, 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (6-SMT) levels in urine were determined over a period of 24 h. Animals were then exposed to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO). To investigate the effect of acute melatonin administration, melatonin (50 mg/kg) or its vehicle was administered to the animals in both groups 20 min prior to HBO exposure. After the exposure, the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase was measured, as were the levels of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and overall nitrotyrosylation in the cortex and hippocampus. Latency to CNS-OT was significantly reduced after the transition from day-to-night activity. This was associated with alterations in the level of melatonin metabolites secreted in the urine. Acute melatonin administration had no effect on latency to CNS-OT in either of the groups. Nevertheless, the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase, as well as nitrotyrosine and nNOS levels, were altered in the hippocampus following melatonin

  16. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    decreases with height in the reversed direction. The height of 0.5 H is the height of vortex core in the reversed flow region. The vortex core is a critical point in the flow region where few particles are transited. In the reversed region, the reversed mass flux of sand particles is 25% of the mass flux in the flow direction. This research may contribute to scientific understanding of the mechanisms of sand motion and wind flow over leeward of dune and it is likely to be significant in desertification control.

  17. MCPIP1 contributes to clear cell renal cell carcinomas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeza, Janusz; Marona, Paulina; Gach, Natalia; Lipert, Barbara; Miekus, Katarzyna; Wilk, Waclaw; Jaszczynski, Janusz; Stelmach, Andrzej; Loboda, Agnieszka; Dulak, Jozef; Branicki, Wojciech; Rys, Janusz; Jura, Jolanta

    2017-08-01

    Monocyte Chemoattractant protein-induced protein 1 (MCPIP1), also known as Regnase-1, is encoded by the ZC3H12a gene, and it mediates inflammatory processes by regulating the stability of transcripts coding for proinflammatory cytokines and controlling activity of transcription factors, such as NF-κB and AP1. We found that MCPIP1 transcript and protein levels are strongly downregulated in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples, which were derived from patients surgically treated for renal cancer compared to surrounded normal tissues. Using Caki-1 cells as a model, we analyzed the role of MCPIP1 in cancer development. We showed that MCPIP1 expression depends on the proteasome activity; however, hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor 2 alfa (HIF2α) are key factors lowering MCPIP1 expression. Furthermore, we found that MCPIP1 negatively regulates HIF1α and HIF2α levels and in the case of the last one, the mechanism is based on the regulation of the half time of transcript coding for HIF2α. Enhanced expression of MCPIP1 in Caki-1 cells results in a downregulation of transcripts encoding VEGFA, GLUT1, and IL-6. Furthermore, MCPIP1 decreases the activity of mTOR and protein kinase B (Akt) in normoxic conditions. Taken together, MCPIP1 contributes to the ccRCC development.

  18. The contribution of microbially produced nanoparticles to sustainable development goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Miguel E; Horsfall, Louise E

    2017-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs), particles having one or more dimensions below 100 nm, are currently being synthesized through chemical and physical methods on an industrial scale. However, these methods for the synthesis of NPs do not fit with sustainable development goals. NP synthesis, through chemical and physical methods, requires high temperatures and/or pressures resulting in high energy consumption and the generation of large amounts of waste. In recent years, research into the synthesis of NPs has shifted to more green and biological methods, often using microorganisms. A biological approach has many advantages over chemical and physical methods. Reactions are catalysed in aqueous solutions at standard temperature and pressure (cost effective and low energy syntheses). This method does not require solvents or harmful chemicals, making NP biosynthesis a greener and more eco-friendly method. Furthermore, NP synthesis by microbes does not require the use of pure starting materials; thus it can simultaneously be used for the bioremediation of contaminated water, land and waste, and the biosynthesis of NPs. Therefore the biosynthesis of NPs contributes to the sustainable development goals, while the alternative physical and chemical methods exclusively utilize scarce and expensive resources for NP synthesis. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Crest line minimal model for sand dune

    OpenAIRE

    Guignier, Lucie; Valance, Alexandre; Lague, Dimitri

    2013-01-01

    International audience; In desert, complex patterns of dunes form. Under unidirectional wind, transverse rectilinear dunes or crescent shaped dunes called barchan dunes can appear, depending on the amount of sediment available. Most rectilinear transverse sand dunes are observed to fragment, for example at White Sands (New Mexico, United States of America) or Walvis Bay (Namibia). We develop a reduced complexity model to investigate the morphodynamics of sand dunes migrating over a non-erodib...

  20. Contribution of Romanian Secondary Sector to Regional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina ALPOPI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we shows the contribution of the secondary sector (industry and construction on the economic development of the regions, functional areas and the urban system in Romania. The development of economic activities of production is conditioned by certain geophysical, demographical, social and cultural characteristics. Considering that economic restructuring and privatization of industry put their mark on the evolution of the Romanian economy in recent years, it is absolutely necessary to take into account the influence of the secondary sector activities - industry and construction, to establish the development measures of romanian regions. One more reason is that the most industrialized cities prior 1990, dependent on a single branch of industry, losing the markets for these industries, recorded high unemployment, which in terms of social, equates to a high degree of poverty. Territorial development of the secondary sector shows large differences mainly due to natural barriers, level of accessibility to natural resources and public services of general interest. These gaps deep more economic and social problems existing in the territory. In the secondary sector, Romania follows closely the provisions of European Union policy, in order to develop a national competitive market, integrated into the European internal market. An example: in the industrial branch, employment share is approximately equal to the european average level. In terms of productivity, in Romania, in the context of a very low level of this indicator, its value is high in the industrial sector (especially in the manufacturing sector the specific productivity is above the national average. It is estimated that after 2014, the improvement of Romania's macroeconomic stability could generate rapid growth in the secondary sector. In Romania, industrial sector faces with problems such: the high level of resources not identified, poor promotion on domestic and foreign market

  1. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP of cochlear implanted (CI children. Special attention was focused on the influence of the duration and intensity of rehabilitation and hearing age on further development of communication skills. Methods. A group of 30 CI children (13 boys and 17 girls aged 2 to 5 years was enrolled in the study. All of the children had average intelligence and no other developmental disorder. They lived in families and attended rehabilitative seances 3 to 5 times a week. Their parents/ caregivers answered structured questionnaire about functioning after pediatric cochlear implantation (FAPCI and the results were the subject of detailed statistical analysis. Results. Analysis of variance did not show any difference between the boys and the girls regarding FAPCI achievements (F (1, 28 = 2.909; p = 0.099 and age aberration in CP score (F (1, 28 = 0.114, p = 0.738. Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant difference in FAPCI scores related to hearing age and duration of rehabilitation. Regression analysis (enter method showed that model consisting of indipendent variables significantly contributed to prediction of overall FAPCI scores and Adjusted R2 value could explain 32% difference in communication skills of participants in this study. Conclusion. Communication skills of CI children evaluated by FAPCI are falling behind normatives for normal hearing children 18.6 months on the average. Hearing age, duration and intensity of rehabilitation have positive predictive value for communication skills development. Later identification of hearing loss and later cochlear

  2. Factors contributing to communication skills development in cochlear implanted children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojić, Sanja; Djoković, Sanja; Radić-šestić, Marina; Nikolić, Mina; Mikić, Branka; Mirić, Danica

    2015-08-01

    Over the last 10 years more than 300 persons received cochlear implant in Serbia and more than 90% of the recipients were children under 10 years of age. The program of cochlear implantation includes postoperative rehabilitation in which cognitive, integrative and developmental methods are used. The study was conducted to reveal factors affecting communication performance (CP) of cochlear implanted (Cl) children. Special attention was focused on the influence of the duration and intensity of rehabilitation and hearing age on further development of communication skills. A group of 30 CI children (13 boys and 17 girls) aged 2 to 5 years was enrolled in the study. All of the children had average intelligence and no other developmental disorder. They lived in families and attended rehabilitative seances 3 to 5 times a week. Their parents/caregivers answered structured questionnaire about functioning after pediatric cochlear implantation (FAPCI) and the results were the subject of detailed statistical analysis. Analysis of variance did not show any difference between the boys and the girls regarding FAPCI achievements (F(1, 28) = 2.909; p = 0.099) and age aberration in CP score (F(1,28) = 0.114, p = 0.738). Correlation analysis showed a statistically significant difference in FAPCI scores related to hearing age and duration of rehabilitation. Regression analysis (enter method) showed that model consisting of indipendent variables significantly contributed to prediction of overall FAPCI scores and Adjusted R2 value could explain 32% difference in communication skills of participants in this study. Communication skills of CI children evaluated by FAPCI are falling behind normatives for normal hearing children 18.6 months on the average. Hearing age, duration and intensity of rehabilitation have positive predictive value for communication skills development. Later identification of hearing loss and later cochlear implantation lead to delayed development of communication

  3. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  4. CONTRIBUTION OF GLOBAL FIRMS TO TECHNOLOGICAL CAPABILITY IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Bisiaux

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporary company has a dynamic role and it incorporates technological changes at a pace unprecedented in history. In the search for competitiveness, it combines new strategies with technological and organizational innovations, building its own path when including learning starting from its history. The challenges of competitiveness surpass the boundaries of the company and they depend on systemic integration among the several agents. In this challenge context, firms and their ReD centers have incorporated dynamic conception of research and introduced new arrangements to achieve and maintain themselves on the technological frontier, strengthen their key competencies and reduce transition cost. In this dynamic process the integration with developing countries, could, in same cases, permit and encourage the construction of local capability, which contributes to the local innovation systems strength that is basic to the country's competitiveness. This possibility, otherwise, depends on the global strategy of the Group, the nature of technology, the technology trajectory of the sector and the market perspectives.

  5. The Development of an Information System Master Plan for the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Barking Sands, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    1 -0 0- "SANDS KAUAI NOTE (AENA PT.’ . KUALALONO _hIOAHUA P0RT PARK ALLEN CA WEL A IERtCA MT KAALA Are * (MAR61 ICANEOHE~1AAAA MACAS IAAUNA KAPU 0...DOD will be the watchword. The consolidation of functions and the reduction in services will lead the way. PMRF will not be immune to the effects of...meet both of these requirements. It will also provide a channel that is immune to electromagnetic interference. This fiber also will provide

  6. Global sand trade is paving the way for a tragedy of the sand commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A.; Brandt, J.; Lear, K.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the first 40 years of the 21st century, planet Earth is highly likely to experience more urban land expansion than in all of history, an increase in transportation infrastructure by more than a third, and a great variety of land reclamation projects. While scientists are beginning to quantify the deep imprint of human infrastructure on biodiversity at large scales, its off-site impacts and linkages to sand mining and trade have been largely ignored. Sand is the most widely used building material in the world. With an ever-increasing demand for this resource, sand is being extracted at rates that far exceed its replenishment, and is becoming increasingly scarce. This has already led to conflicts around the world and will likely lead to a "tragedy of the sand commons" if sustainable sand mining and trade cannot be achieved. We investigate the environmental and socioeconomic interactions over large distances (telecouplings) of infrastructure development and sand mining and trade across diverse systems through transdisciplinary research and the recently proposed telecoupling framework. Our research is generating a thorough understanding of the telecouplings driven by an increasing demand for sand. In particular, we address three main research questions: 1) Where are the conflicts related to sand mining occurring?; 2) What are the major "sending" and "receiving" systems of sand?; and 3) What are the main components (e.g. causes, effects, agents, etc.) of telecoupled systems involving sand mining and trade? Our results highlight the role of global sand trade as a driver of environmental degradation that threatens the integrity of natural systems and their capacity to deliver key ecosystem services. In addition, infrastructure development and sand mining and trade have important implications for other sustainability challenges such as over-fishing and global warming. This knowledge will help to identify opportunities and tools to better promote a more sustainable use

  7. Gut microbiota dysbiosis contributes to the development of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Fangqing; Wang, Yidan; Chen, Junru; Tao, Jie; Tian, Gang; Wu, Shouling; Liu, Wenbin; Cui, Qinghua; Geng, Bin; Zhang, Weili; Weldon, Ryan; Auguste, Kelda; Yang, Lei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Li; Yang, Xinchun; Zhu, Baoli; Cai, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Recently, the potential role of gut microbiome in metabolic diseases has been revealed, especially in cardiovascular diseases. Hypertension is one of the most prevalent cardiovascular diseases worldwide, yet whether gut microbiota dysbiosis participates in the development of hypertension remains largely unknown. To investigate this issue, we carried out comprehensive metagenomic and metabolomic analyses in a cohort of 41 healthy controls, 56 subjects with pre-hypertension, 99 individuals with primary hypertension, and performed fecal microbiota transplantation from patients to germ-free mice. Compared to the healthy controls, we found dramatically decreased microbial richness and diversity, Prevotella-dominated gut enterotype, distinct metagenomic composition with reduced bacteria associated with healthy status and overgrowth of bacteria such as Prevotella and Klebsiella, and disease-linked microbial function in both pre-hypertensive and hypertensive populations. Unexpectedly, the microbiome characteristic in pre-hypertension group was quite similar to that in hypertension. The metabolism changes of host with pre-hypertension or hypertension were identified to be closely linked to gut microbiome dysbiosis. And a disease classifier based on microbiota and metabolites was constructed to discriminate pre-hypertensive and hypertensive individuals from controls accurately. Furthermore, by fecal transplantation from hypertensive human donors to germ-free mice, elevated blood pressure was observed to be transferrable through microbiota, and the direct influence of gut microbiota on blood pressure of the host was demonstrated. Overall, our results describe a novel causal role of aberrant gut microbiota in contributing to the pathogenesis of hypertension. And the significance of early intervention for pre-hypertension was emphasized.

  8. The Contribution of Humor to Children's Social Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the role of humor in children's social development in the following areas: (1) social interaction; (2) friendship development and popularity; (3) hostility expression; and (4) interpersonal relationships. Argues that early humor development helps to optimize social development. (FMW)

  9. Offshore sand-shoal development and evolution of Petit Bois Pass, Mississippi-Alabama Barrier Islands, Mississippi, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocks, James G.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Twichell, Gregory C.; Buster, Noreen A.; Baehr, John N.; Rosati, Julie D.; Wang, Ping; Roberts, Tiffany M.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of recently collected geophysical and sediment-core data identifies an extensive shoal field located off Dauphin and Petit Bois Islands. The shoals are the product of Pleistocene fluvial deposition and Holocene marine-transgressive processes, and their position and orientation oblique to the modern shoreline has been stable over the past century. The underlying stratigraphy has also influenced the evolution of the barrier platform and inlets. Buried distributary channels bisect the platform, creating erosion hotspots that breach during intense and repeated storms. Inlet growth inhibits littoral transport, and over time, reduces the down-drift sand supply. These relations demonstrate the role of the antecedent geologic framework on morphologic evolution. This study is part of the USGS Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project and the USACE Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program. These projects produced a wealth of information regarding coastal geology, geomorphology, and physical resources; some of the initial results are presented here.

  10. V-2 at White Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1947-01-01

    A V-2 rocket is hoisted into a static test facility at White Sands, New Mexico. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under the direction of the U. S. Army, launching more than sixty V-2s.

  11. Does globalization contribute to economic growth in developing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the empirical results, the following empirical lessons were drawn from Nigeria: globalization does not contribute to economic growth in Nigeria, openness has a negative impact on the Nigerian economy, the Nigerian economy is still very fragile and ill prepared for the challenges of globalization, labour force as one of ...

  12. Contribution towards the development of a DNA barcode reference ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SGeorge

    2013-11-27

    Nov 27, 2013 ... Full Length Research Paper. Contribution towards the ... bridging taxonomical research between other disciplines of science catering for ..... From Science to. Action: Taking DNA Barcoding to Battle Against the Bush meat Crisis. “Speed Presentation” 24th Annual Meeting of the Society for. Conservation ...

  13. Genetic and Environmental Contributions to the Development of Childhood Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubke, Gitta H.; McArtor, Daniel B.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bartels, Meike

    2018-01-01

    Longitudinal data from a large sample of twins participating in the Netherlands Twin Register (n = 42,827, age range 3-16) were analyzed to investigate the genetic and environmental contributions to childhood aggression. Genetic auto-regressive (simplex) models were used to assess whether the same genes are involved or whether new genes come into…

  14. The Development and Testing of a Prototype Mini-Baghouse to Control the Release of Respirable Crystalline Silica from Sand Movers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara M.; Esswein, Eric J.; Gressel, Michael G.; Kratzer, Jerry L.; Feng, H. Amy; King, Bradley; Miller, Arthur L.; Cauda, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) is a significant risk to worker health during well completions operations (which include hydraulic fracturing) at conventional and unconventional oil and gas extraction sites. RCS is generated by pneumatic transfer of quartz-containing sand during hydraulic fracturing operations. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers identified concentrations of RCS at hydraulic fracturing sites that exceed 10 times the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) and up to 50 times the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL). NIOSH research identified at least seven point sources of dust release at contemporary oil and gas extraction sites where RCS aerosols were generated. NIOSH researchers recommend the use of engineering controls wherever they can be implemented to limit the RCS released. A control developed to address one of the largest sources of RCS aerosol generation is the NIOSH mini-baghouse assembly, mounted on the thief hatches on top of the sand mover. This manuscript details the results of a trial of the NIOSH mini-baghouse at a sand mine in Arkansas, November 18 – 21, 2013. During the trial, area air samples were collected at 12 locations on and around a sand mover with and without the mini-baghouse control installed. Analytical results for respirable dust and RCS indicate the use of the mini-baghouse effectively reduced both respirable dust and RCS downwind of the thief hatches. Reduction of airborne respirable dust ranged from 85% to 98%; reductions in airborne RCS ranged from 79% to 99%. A bulk sample of dust collected by the baghouse assembly showed the likely presence of freshly fractured quartz, a particularly hazardous form of RCS. Planned future design enhancements will increase the performance and durability of the mini-baghouse, including an improved bag clamp mechanism and upgraded filter fabric with a modified air-to-cloth ratio

  15. The development and testing of a prototype mini-baghouse to control the release of respirable crystalline silica from sand movers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Barbara M; Esswein, Eric J; Gressel, Michael G; Kratzer, Jerry L; Feng, H Amy; King, Bradley; Miller, Arthur L; Cauda, Emanuele

    2016-08-01

    Inhalation of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) is a significant risk to worker health during well completions operations (which include hydraulic fracturing) at conventional and unconventional oil and gas extraction sites. RCS is generated by pneumatic transfer of quartz-containing sand during hydraulic fracturing operations. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers identified concentrations of RCS at hydraulic fracturing sites that exceed 10 times the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) and up to 50 times the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limit (REL). NIOSH research identified at least seven point sources of dust release at contemporary oil and gas extraction sites where RCS aerosols were generated.  NIOSH researchers recommend the use of engineering controls wherever they can be implemented to limit the RCS released. A control developed to address one of the largest sources of RCS aerosol generation is the NIOSH mini-baghouse assembly, mounted on the thief hatches on top of the sand mover. This article details the results of a trial of the NIOSH mini-baghouse at a sand mine in Arkansas from November 18-21, 2013.  During the trial, area air samples were collected at 12 locations on and around a sand mover with and without the mini-baghouse control installed. Analytical results for respirable dust and RCS indicate the use of the mini-baghouse effectively reduced both respirable dust and RCS downwind of the thief hatches. Reduction of airborne respirable dust ranged from 85-98%; reductions in airborne RCS ranged from 79-99%. A bulk sample of dust collected by the baghouse assembly showed the likely presence of freshly fractured quartz, a particularly hazardous form of RCS.  Planned future design enhancements will increase the performance and durability of the mini-baghouse, including an improved bag clamp mechanism and upgraded filter fabric with a modified air-to-cloth ratio

  16. Preserving inland drift sands in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, M.; Sparrius, L.; Nijssen, M.; Keestra, S.

    2012-04-01

    Inland drift sands in the Netherlands are an important landscape type within the Dutch nature. They represent an important pioneer habitat which has become rare in European nature. Under current climate and environmental conditions (i.e. high N-deposition) these inland drift sands tend to be rapid colonialized by vegetation and therefor lose their aeolian activity. To maintain the area bare sand, managers regularly remove the vegetation. Lack of proper knowledge about the geomorphological processes and even more important on the geomorphological structure of these drift sands, could lead to the loss of characteristic dune structure. In an interdisciplinary research project a new management strategy was developed in which the geomorphological processes and structure form the base for the planning process. To improve the awareness of these aspects among nature managers we developed a management tool "PROMME". Several activities were taken to communicate this with the people involved in the management of drift sands like a brochure and field workshops.

  17. Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigel, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain.

  18. Recent contributions to fusion reactor design and technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    The report contains a collection of 16 recent fusion technology papers on the STARFIRE Project, the study of alternate fusion fuel cycles, a maintainability study, magnet safety, neutral beam power supplies and pulsed superconducting magnets and energy transfer. This collection of papers contains contributions for Argonne National Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, General Atomic Company, The Ralph M. Parsons Company, the University of Illinois, and the University of Wisconsin. Separate abstracts are presented for each paper. (MOW)

  19. Review of Sand Production Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rahmati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand production in oil and gas wells can occur if fluid flow exceeds a certain threshold governed by factors such as consistency of the reservoir rock, stress state and the type of completion used around the well. The amount of solids can be less than a few grams per cubic meter of reservoir fluid, posing only minor problems, or a substantial amount over a short period of time, resulting in erosion and in some cases filling and blocking of the wellbore. This paper provides a review of selected approaches and models that have been developed for sanding prediction. Most of these models are based on the continuum assumption, while a few have recently been developed based on discrete element model. Some models are only capable of assessing the conditions that lead to the onset of sanding, while others are capable of making volumetric predictions. Some models use analytical formulae, particularly those for estimating the onset of sanding while others use numerical models, particularly in calculating sanding rate. Although major improvements have been achieved in the past decade, sanding tools are still unable to predict the sand mass and the rate of sanding for all field problems in a reliable form.

  20. Construction of an Environmentally Sustainable Development on a Modified Coastal Sand Mined and Landfill Site – Part 1. Planning and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneMarie Clements

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Magenta Shores development fronts 2.3 km of Tuggerah Beach on a formerly sand mined and landfill site in an urban growth area on the central coast of New South Wales. To increase the natural defences against storm waves and mass sand movements, the incipient foredune was retained and the parallel beach ridge landform was re-established by mimicking natural processes. Analysis of waste and resources led to a coordinated large-scale onsite re-use, recycling and waste management program that reduced landfill, transportation and natural resource requirements. Bitou bush removed from the Coastal Protection Zone was incorporated into golf course soils to improve grass growth. Leachate in the groundwater from the former landfill was diverted away from Tuggerah Lake and re-used in golf course irrigation. Upgrade of the local sewer treatment plant and installation of a public dual pipeline servicing Magenta and the adjoining township satisfied irrigation demands and provided non-potable water for the existing and expanding urban community. The sustainability challenges of the project were met through clear identification of existing environmental risks, application of scientific research, integrated team management and stakeholders’ cooperation.

  1. Exploring the contributions of vegetation and dune size to early dune development using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Puijenbroek, Marinka E. B.; Nolet, Corjan; de Groot, Alma V.; Suomalainen, Juha M.; Riksen, Michel J. P. M.; Berendse, Frank; Limpens, Juul

    2017-12-01

    Dune development along highly dynamic land-sea boundaries is the result of interaction between vegetation and dune size with sedimentation and erosion processes. Disentangling the contribution of vegetation characteristics from that of dune size would improve predictions of nebkha dune development under a changing climate, but has proven difficult due to the scarcity of spatially continuous monitoring data. This study explored the contributions of vegetation and dune size to dune development for locations differing in shelter from the sea. We monitored a natural nebkha dune field of 8 ha, along the coast of the island Texel, the Netherlands, for 1 year using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with camera. After constructing a digital surface model and orthomosaic we derived for each dune (1) vegetation characteristics (species composition, vegetation density, and maximum vegetation height), (2) dune size (dune volume, area, and maximum height), (3) degree of shelter (proximity to other nebkha dunes and the sheltering by the foredune). Changes in dune volume over summer and winter were related to vegetation, dune size and degree of shelter. We found that a positive change in dune volume (dune growth) was linearly related to initial dune volume over summer but not over winter. Big dunes accumulated more sand than small dunes due to their larger surface area. Exposed dunes increased more in volume (0.81 % per dune per week) than sheltered dunes (0.2 % per dune per week) over summer, while the opposite occurred over winter. Vegetation characteristics did not significantly affect dune growth in summer, but did significantly affect dune growth in winter. Over winter, dunes dominated by Ammophila arenaria, a grass species with high vegetation density throughout the year, increased more in volume than dunes dominated by Elytrigia juncea, a grass species with lower vegetation density (0.43 vs. 0.42 (m3 m-3) week-1). The effect of species was irrespective of dune size or

  2. Sustainable Development: The Contribution from GISc Education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concerns over the negative impact of the deteriorating environment and declining natural resources on economic and social development prompted the drive towards sustainable development, i.e. development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own ...

  3. Tourism in Timor Leste: contributions to a sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Vong, Manuel Florencio da Canossa

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to analyse tourism as a contributor to sustainable development, from a supply and demand perspective, in Timor-Leste, a destination not only “young” but also framed in an early stage of touristic development. From the supply side, studies 1 and 2 present a literature review on the concept of sustainable development, in small islands destinations, its weaknesses and vulnerabilities, and whose attractiveness lies in an integrated set of natural resources (attr...

  4. Alternate approaches for assessing impacts of oil sands development on air quality: A case study using the First Nation Community of Fort McKay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Carla; Spink, David

    2017-09-25

    Previous analyses of continuously measured compounds in Fort McKay, an indigenous community in the Athabasca Oil Sands, have detected increasing concentrations of NO2 and total hydrocarbons (THC), but not of SO2, O3, total reduced sulfur compounds (TRS) or particulate matter (PM2.5). Yet the community frequently experiences odours, dust, and reduced air quality. We used Fort McKay's continuously monitored air quality data (1998-2014) as a case study to assess techniques for air quality analysis that make no assumptions regarding type of change. Linear trends analysis detected increasing concentrations of higher percentiles of NO2, NO and NOx, and THC. However, comparisons of all compounds between an early industrial expansion period (1998-2001) and current-day (2011-2014) show that concentrations of NO2, SO2, THC, TRS and PM2.5 have significantly increased, while concentrations of O3 are significantly lower. An assessment of the frequency and duration of periods when concentrations of each compound were above a variety of thresholds indicates that the frequency of air quality events is increasing for NO2, and THC. Assessment of change over time with odds ratios of the 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile concentrations for each compound compared to an estimate of natural background variability showed that concentrations of TRS, SO2 and THC are dynamic, higher than background, and changes are non-linear and non-monotonic. An assessment of concentrations as a function of wind direction showed a clear and generally increasing influence of industry on air quality. This work shows that evaluating air quality without assumptions of linearity reveals dynamic changes in air quality in Fort McKay, and that it is increasingly being affected by oil sands operations. Implication Statement: Understanding the nature and types of air quality changes occurring in a community or region are essential for the development of appropriate air quality management policies. Time series

  5. Modelling sand wave variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterlini-Van der Meer, Fenneke

    2009-01-01

    The sea floor of shallow seas is rarely flat and often dynamic. A widely occurring bedform type is the sand wave. Sand waves form more or less regular wavelike patterns on the seabed with crests up to one third of the water depth, wave lengths of hundreds of metres and a migration rate of metres up

  6. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  7. Contributing to the Development of Student Leadership through Academic Advising

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major foci of universities in relation to the educational missions is to promote the growth and development of students as leaders. This article discusses the role of academic advising as a strategic partner with classroom and extracurricular leadership development programs. To that end, this article reviews the roles of academic…

  8. New books highlight diverse ways ICTs contribute to development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... The book investigates the impact of ICTs on socio-economic development, going beyond issues of access and use. It also offers a unique look at how research is playing a role in creating an information society in developing countries, through policy formulation, media coverage, and implementation in ...

  9. Argonne's contribution to regional development : successful examples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.

    2000-11-14

    Argonne National Laboratory's mission is basic research and technology development to meet national goals in scientific leadership, energy technology, and environmental quality. In addition to its core missions as a national research and development center, Argonne has exerted a positive impact on its regional economic development, has carried out outstanding educational programs not only for college/graduate students but also for pre-college students and teachers, and has fostered partnerships with universities for research collaboration and with industry for shaping the new technological frontiers.

  10. CVExplorer: identifying candidate developers by mining and exploring their open source contributions.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greene, GJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Open source code contributions contain a large amount of technical skill information about developers, which can help to identify suitable candidates for a particular development job and therefore impact the success of a development team. We develop...

  11. Contributions for larval development optimization of Homarus gammarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Tiago Fonseca Sá

    2014-06-01

    The seawater rising temperature resulted in a decrease of intermoult period in all larval development stages and at all tested temperatures, ranging from 4.77 (Z1 to 16.5 days (Z3 at 16°C, whereas at 23°C, ranged from 3:02 (Z1 and 9.75 days (Z3. The results obtained are an extremely useful guide for future optimization of protocols on larval development of H. gammarus.

  12. Integrated techniques for rapid and highly-efficient development and production of ultra-deep tight sand gas reservoirs of Keshen 8 Block in the Tarim Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongwen Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The unusually ultra-deep and ultra-high-pressure gas reservoirs in the Keshen 8 Block on the Kelasu structural belt of the Tarim Basin are also featured by high temperature, well-developed fault fissures, huge thickness, tight matrix, complex oil–water distribution, etc., which brings about great difficulties to reserves evaluation and further development. In view of this, an overall study was made on the fine description of reservoir fractures and their seepage mechanism, technical problems were being tackled on seismic data processing and interpretation of complex and high & steep structural zones, optimal development design, safe & rapid drilling and completion wells, reservoir stimulation, dynamic monitoring, etc. to promote the development level of such ultra-deep tight gas reservoirs, and 22 complete sets of specific techniques were formulated in the fields of high-efficiency well spacing, safe and fast drilling, recovery enhancement by well completion transformation, efficient development of optimization design, and so on. Through the technical progress and innovative management of integrated exploration & development, reserves evaluation and productivity construction have been completed on the Keshen 8 Block in the last three years of the 12th Five-Year Plan period (2011–2015, as a result, rapid and high-efficiency productivity construction is realized, and a new area is explored in the development of ultra-deep and ultra-high-pressure fractured tight sand gas reservoirs. This study is of great reference to the development of similar gas reservoirs at home and abroad.

  13. Historical Contribution of Pharmaceutics to Botany and Pharmacognosy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Lejla; Skrbo, Armin; Dobraca, Amra

    2017-12-01

    Pharmacy and medicine belong to the oldest human activities, so the development of these sciences is closely related to the socio-economic, cultural and religious opportunities of the nations within which they have been developing. To present the historical influence of pharmacy on the development of the human being from its very beginning; To present the historical link between pharmaceutical and medical activity, as well as early development of independent pharmaceutical activity; To present the historical influence of pharmacists on the development of botany and pharmacognosy and to present the historical influence of the first written herbarium and incunabula on the development of pharmacognosy. The article has a descriptive character, and represents a systematic review of the literature dealing with this topic. The roots of pharmacy started to the very beginning of human civilization, when people collected various medicinal herbs and try to alleviate their health problems, pain and suffering. The scientific foundations of the pharmacy were set up in the antique period by the books of Dioskurides and Galen, and its further development continued in the mid-century, at the beginning by rewriting famous parts of ancient literature, and later by writing new discoveries (the base of this development was represented by South Italy) so that in 1240, for the first time in history, came the separation of doctors and pharmacists, and at the beginning of the 13th century the opening of the first pharmacy. The effort to maintain knowledge of medicinal herbs and its practical application has led to the writing of a large number of recipes books, the forerunners of today's pharmacopeia, while the aspiration to classify medicinal herbs, and the desire to present medicinal herbs to ordinary people, has led to a large number of herbaria, making the knowledge and descriptions of plants available to many, not just the nobility. Descriptions of plants in herbaria and later in

  14. Prothymosin α overexpression contributes to the development of pulmonary emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bing-Hua; Tseng, Yau-Lin; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Shiang, Ya-Chieh; Wu, Pensee; Li, Kuo-Jung; Yen, Te-Hsin; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wu, Chao-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Emphysema is one of the disease conditions that comprise chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prothymosin α transgenic mice exhibit an emphysema phenotype, but the pathophysiological role of prothymosin α in emphysema remains unclear. Here we show that prothymosin α contributes to the pathogenesis of emphysema by increasing acetylation of histones and nuclear factor-kappaB, particularly upon cigarette smoke exposure. We find a positive correlation between prothymosin α levels and the severity of emphysema in prothymosin α transgenic mice and emphysema patients. Prothymosin α overexpression increases susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema, and cigarette smoke exposure further enhances prothymosin α expression. We show that prothymosin α inhibits the association of histone deacetylases with histones and nuclear factor-kappaB, and that prothymosin α overexpression increases expression of nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 9, which are found in the lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These results demonstrate the clinical relevance of prothymosin α in regulating acetylation events during the pathogenesis of emphysema. PMID:23695700

  15. [Community development in Quebec : the contribution of collective intelligence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Réal; Milette, Claire

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces guidelines and certain applications of a national plan and mechanism currently deployed in several regions of Quebec for advancing knowledge on community development. This scheme relies upon the collective intelligence of communities and supports the efforts of various stakeholders in order to improve population living conditions, health and welfare. It primarily distinguishes itself by granting equal importance to quantitative data collected from administrative files and to qualitative data acquired by acknowledging and processing perceptions and observations which arise from actors working in community development. These data are used to support the preparation and planning of interventions implemented according to the socio-economic and socio-health situation of the communities and their potential for development.

  16. Contribution of innovative technologies to new developments in horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pekkeriet, Erik; Henten, Van E.J.; Campen, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews new developments in high-tech greenhouse horticulture. It will focus on sensors, energy solutions, covering materials, production technology and robotics. Driving forces for new technologies are identified and Dutch greenhouse crop production is used as an example. Sensors are

  17. New books highlight diverse ways ICTs contribute to development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    3 juin 2015 ... The book presents research on the impact of publicly shared access to computers and the Internet, such as in cybercafés, libraries, and telecentres, in developing countries. Ten multidisciplinary research teams from around the world examined the impact of public access on users, society, networks, and ...

  18. Biotechnology regulation: limiting or contributing to biotech development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2001-01-01

    Modern biotechnology has been characterized by being surrounded by scientific and public debate and by interest conflicts. An early Danish debate and regulation has been criticized for inhibiting or retarding development and thus growth. Though much regulation and debate have been transferred to ...

  19. Contribution to the development of a simulation software ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work is to develop software to predict the value yield and the distribution coefficient in the process of liquid-liquid extraction of components of a mixture, from mathematical models expressing these entities, based on equations equilibrium between liquid-liquid phases, and predict the conditions under which the ...

  20. Contribution of socio-scientific issues to development of critical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solbes, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we try to justify that socio-scientific issues can help to develop critical thinking of students, based on the science education and history of science. These considerations of the history of science can be transformed into socio-scientific issues (SSI, which can be used in science classes.

  1. Human Resource Management and Human Resource Development: Evolution and Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Research agrees that a high performance organization (HPO) cannot exist without an elevated value placed on human resource management (HRM) and human resource development (HRD). However, a complementary pairing of HRM and HRD has not always existed. The evolution of HRD from its roots in human knowledge transference to HRM and present day HRD…

  2. Government's contribution to the development of translation in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Bureau's failure to cope with its huge load of government work led to outsourcing translation work, and a realisation that the country needed a comprehensive strategy for translation service development. This included the introduction of translation courses or programmes at South African universities. Southern African ...

  3. Macrophages and Their Contribution to the Development of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobryshev, Yuri V; Nikiforov, Nikita G; Elizova, Natalia V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2017-01-01

    Atherosclerosis can be regarded as chronic inflammatory disease driven by lipid accumulation in the arterial wall. Macrophages play a key role in the development of local inflammatory response and atherosclerotic lesion growth. Atherosclerotic plaque is a complex microenvironment, in which different subsets of macrophages coexist executing distinct, although in some cases overlapping functions. According to the classical simplified nomenclature, lesion macrophages can belong to pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory or alternatively activated types. While the former promote the inflammatory response and participate in lipid accumulation, the latter are responsible for the inflammation resolution and plaque stabilisation. Atherosclerotic lesion dynamics depends therefore on the balance between these macrophages populations. The diverse functions of macrophages make them an attractive therapeutic target for the development of novel anti-atherosclerotic treatments. In this chapter, we discuss different types of macrophages and their roles in atherosclerotic lesion dynamics and describe the results of several experiments studying macrophage polarisation in atherosclerosis.

  4. Autonomic nerve development contributes to prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnon, Claire; Hall, Simon J; Lin, Juan; Xue, Xiaonan; Gerber, Leah; Freedland, Stephen J; Frenette, Paul S

    2013-07-12

    Nerves are a common feature of the microenvironment, but their role in tumor growth and progression remains unclear. We found that the formation of autonomic nerve fibers in the prostate gland regulates prostate cancer development and dissemination in mouse models. The early phases of tumor development were prevented by chemical or surgical sympathectomy and by genetic deletion of stromal β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors. Tumors were also infiltrated by parasympathetic cholinergic fibers that promoted cancer dissemination. Cholinergic-induced tumor invasion and metastasis were inhibited by pharmacological blockade or genetic disruption of the stromal type 1 muscarinic receptor, leading to improved survival of the mice. A retrospective blinded analysis of prostate adenocarcinoma specimens from 43 patients revealed that the densities of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers in tumor and surrounding normal tissue, respectively, were associated with poor clinical outcomes. These findings may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for prostate cancer.

  5. Techniques and factors contributing to developing critical thinking skills

    OpenAIRE

    GLUKHOVA IRINA VLADIMIROVNA

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the issue of working out and introduction in educational process of higher educational institutions of the innovative technology for developing skills of critical thinking skills of the future specialists. Research is aimed at revealing of the factors promoting formation of students’ critical thinking in high schools; the search of strategy and the receptions actualizing creative abilities of students and helping to formation of an active, independent person. The author g...

  6. TECHNIQUES AND FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO DEVELOPING CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vladimirovna Glukhova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of working out and introduction in educational process of higher educational institutions of the innovative technology for developing skills of critical thinking skills of the future specialists. Research is aimed at revealing of the factors promoting formation of students’ critical thinking in high schools; the search of strategy and the receptions actualizing creative abilities of students and helping to formation of an active, independent person. The author gives the reasoned proving that it’s necessary to set up the creative educational environment and adjustment of positive dialogue between the teacher and the trainee for education of such person, development of abilities of an objective reflection, interpretation of the phenomena, formulations of adequate conclusions, well-founded evaluating. Methods. The methods involve the analysis of the philosophical, psychology-pedagogical, methodical literature and the scientific periodical publications; generalisation of the Russian and foreign background, classification and arrangement of the considered issues, supervision. Results. Current approaches to the rendering of critical thinking and a problem of its formation in the scientific literature are considered; the concept «the creative educational environment» is specified; the ways of increasing the educational process efficiency are shown. Scientific novelty. The complex of procedures and the conditions promoting effective development of critical thinking skills is theoretically proved on the basis of the analysis of various information sources. Practical significance. The research outcomes and the recommended methods of critical thinking skills formation can be useful for the professors and lecturers of higher education institutions to optimize subject matter selection, techniques and methods of education under the conditions of dynamically updated educational process. 

  7. Contribution to developing the environment radiation protection methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, A. [Institute of Atomic Power Engineering NRNU MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alexakhin, R.; Dubynina, M. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The environment sustainable development and biota protection, including the environment radiation protection are issues of nowadays interest in the society. An activity is ongoing on the development of a system of radiation protection for non-human biota. Anthropocentric and eco-centric principles are widely discussed. ICRP Publications 103, 108, 114 and many other reports and articles refer to the topic of environmental protection, reference animals and plants set, corresponding transfer parameters, dose models and derived consideration reference levels. There is still an open field for discussion of methods and approaches to get well-established procedure to assess environmental risks of radiation impacts to different organisms, populations and ecosystems. A huge work has been done by the ICRP and other organizations and research groups to develop and systematize approaches for this difficult subject. This activity, however, is not everywhere well-known and perceived, and more efforts are needed to bring ideas of eco-centric strategy in the environment radiation protection not only to public but to specialists in many countries as well. One of the main points of interest is an assessment of critical doses and doses rates for flora and fauna species. Some aspects of a possible procedure to find their estimates are studied in this work, including criteria for datasets of good quality, models of dose dependence, sensitivity of different umbrella endpoints and methods of original massive datasets treatment. Estimates are done based on information gathered in a database on radiation-induced effects in plants. Data on biological effects in plants (umbrella endpoints of reproductive potential, survival, morbidity, morphological, biochemical, and genetic effects) in dependence on dose and dose rates of ionizing radiation have been collected from reviewed publications and maintained in MS Access format. The database now contains about 7000 datasets and 25000 records

  8. Involving Corporate Functions: Who Contributes to Sustainable Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schaltegger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A large body of literature claims that corporate sustainable development is a cross-functional challenge, which requires all functional units to be involved. However, it remains uncertain to what extent and in which way different corporate functions are actually involved in corporate sustainability management. To bridge this research gap, our paper draws on a concept of involvement introduced in the field of consumer behavior. Based on this previous research, our paper distinguishes two components of involvement: first, a cognitive-affective component, incorporating being affected by sustainability issues and being supportive of corporate sustainability; and second, a behavioral component, represented by the application of sustainability management tools. We use this concept to empirically analyze the involvement of corporate functions in sustainability management and find considerable differences in large German companies. Whereas public relations and strategic management are heavily involved, finance, accounting and management control appear not to be involved. A multinomial logistic regression shows that the cognitive-affective component significantly influences the behavioral component, with a functional unit being affected influencing the application of tools the most. Building on the model proposed, the paper provides implications on how to increase a functional unit’s involvement in sustainability management.

  9. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  10. Student Association Activities Contribute to Leadership Development of Students in Nonprofit Management and Leadership

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julianne Gassman; Dakotah Reed; Angela Widner

    2014-01-01

    .... This study was designed to answer the following question: Do the activities in the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance Student Associations contribute to the learning and leadership development of students...

  11. Vestled - Hvide Sande

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten; Hesselbjerg, Marianne; Schønherr, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side......Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side...

  12. Entrepreneurial developments and small scale industry contribution to Nigerian national development- A marketing interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayozie Daniel Ogechukwu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available : In both developed and developing countries, the government is turning to small and medium scale industries and entrepreneurs, as a means of economic development and a veritable means of solving problems. It is a seedbed of innovations, inventions and employment. Entrepreneurship is as old as Nigeria and had contributed to the growth of the economy. Presently in Nigeria, SMEs assist in promoting the growth of the country’s economy, hence all the levels of government at different times havepolicies which promote the growth and sustenance of SMEs. This paper identifies the orientation of SME’s and entrepreneurial trends in Nigeria, tackles the operational definition and scopes, and describes the role of the Nigerian government as a participant, regulator and facilitator, both legally and politically in the growth of SMEs and entrepreneurship. It identifies the marketing problems of SMEs and entrepreneurships in Nigeria, the provision and enactment of beneficial and supportive laws, the provision of infrastructural facilities, constant man-power and development, direct financial assistance to SMEs and the establishment of finance institutions to support SMEs. It identifies the roles of SMEs in Nigeria’s development and growth. It discusses the entrepreneurial thoughts, problems and advance practical marketing solution. It concludes by clearly specifying the role of marketing to the survival of SMEsand entrepreneurship in Nigeria, and relevant recommendations. For SMEs to survive marketing practice and principles must be given prominence.

  13. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  14. Measurement of elastic modulus and evaluation of viscoelasticity of foundry green sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingchun XIANG

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Elastic modulus is an important physical parameter of molding sand; it is closely connected with molding sand's properties. Based on theories of rheology and molding sand microdeformation, elastic modulus of molding sand was measured and investigated using the intelligent molding sand multi-property tester developed by ourselves. The measuring principle was introduced. Effects of bentonite percentage and compactibility of the molding sand were experimentally studied. Furthermore, the essential viscoelastic nature of green sand was analyzed. It is considered that viscoelastic deformation of molding sand consists mainly of that of Kelvin Body of clay membrane, and elastic modulus of molding sand depends mainly on that of Kelvin Body which is the elastic component of clay membrane between sands. Elastic modulus can be adopted as one of the property parameters, and can be employed to evaluate viscoelastic properties of molding sand.

  15. Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-09-01

    For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

  16. Properties of dune sand concrete containing coffee waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Guendouz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, an increase of coffee beverages consumption has been observed all over the world; and its consumption increases the waste coffee grounds which will become an environmental problems. Recycling of this waste to produce new materials like sand concrete appears as one of the best solutions for reduces the problem of pollution. This work aims to study the possibility of recycling waste coffee grounds (Spent Coffee Grounds (SCG as a fine aggregate by replacing the sand in the manufacturing of dune sand concrete. For this; sand concrete mixes were prepared with substitution of sand with the spent coffee grounds waste at different percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% by volume of the sand in order to study the influence of this wastes on physical (Workability, bulk density and porosity, mechanical (compressive and flexural strength and Thermal (Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity properties of dune sand concrete. The results showed that the use of spent coffee grounds waste as partial replacement of natural sand contributes to reduce workability, bulk density and mechanical strength of sand concrete mixes with an increase on its porosity. However, the thermal characteristics are improved and especially for a level of 15% and 20% of substitution. So, it is possible to obtain an insulating material which can be used in the various types of structural components. This study ensures that reusing of waste coffee grounds in dune sand concrete gives a positive approach to reduce the cost of materials and solve some environmental problems.

  17. MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SAND FRACTION IN A SAND GRAIN IMAGE CAPTURE SYSTEM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Arruda Viana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Morphology studies assume significant importance in analysis of phenomena of granular systems packaging, in particular with a view to the use of the technique of soil stabilization named particle size correction in forest roads. In this context, this study aimed to develop and operationalize a Sand Grain Image Capture System and, hereby, determine the morphological indices of the sand fractions of two sandy soils called João Pinheiro (JP and Cachoeira da Prata (CP. Soil samples, air-dried, were sieved (2.0 mm nominal mesh size for removal of gravels. The materials that passed through the sieve were subjected to dispersion, washing in 0.053 mm nominal mesh size sieve, removal of organic matter and iron oxides to obtain the clean sand fractions. Subsequently, each soil sample was sieved for separation into twelve classes, between the diameters of 0.149 mm and 1.190 mm, using a Rotap shaker. Next, tests were carried out to characterize the morphometric attributes of the twelve classes of sand fractions of the soils studied. For validation of the performance of the Sand Grain Image Capture System, the results were compared to those obtained using a standard procedure for image analysis. The analysis of the results led to the following conclusions: (i the sand fraction of the JP soil presented higher values for the morphometric indices roundness, elongation and compactness compared to sand fraction of the CP soil; and (ii the Sand Grain Image Capture System worked properly, with practicality.

  18. Booker T. Washington's Educational Contributions to Contemporary Practices of Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Brett G.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses Booker T. Washington's educational contributions to contemporary practices of sustainable development. In particular, the article looks at Washington's contributions in the areas of economic sustainability and entrepreneurship, character development, and aesthetics. As states continue to contemplate and evaluate the value of…

  19. Influence of silicate on the transport of bacteria in quartz sand and iron mineral-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe; Yang, Haiyan; Wu, Dan; Ni, Jinren; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping

    2014-11-01

    The influence of silicate on the transport and deposition of bacteria (Escherichia coli) in packed porous media were examined at a constant 20 mM ionic strength with different silicate concentrations (from 0 to 1 mM) at pH 7. Transport experiments were performed in two types of representative porous media, both bare quartz sand and iron mineral-coated quartz sand. In bare quartz sand, the breakthrough plateaus in the presence of silicate in suspensions were lower and the corresponding retained profiles were higher than those without silicate ions, indicating that the presence of silicate in suspensions decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand. Moreover, the decrease of bacteria transport in quartz sand induced by silicate was more pronounced with increasing silicate concentrations from 0 to 1 mM. However, when EPS was removed from cell surfaces, the presence of silicate in cell suspensions (with different concentrations) did not affect the transport behavior of bacteria in quartz sand. The interaction of silicate with EPS on cell surfaces negatively decreased the zeta potentials of bacteria, resulting in the decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand when silicate was copresent in bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the presence of silicate in suspensions increased cell transport in iron mineral-coated sand. Silicate ions competed with bacteria for the adsorption sites on mineral-coated sand, contributing to the increased cell transport in mineral-coated sand with silicate present in cell suspensions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Postovipositional development of the sand snake Psammophis sibilans (Serpentes:Lamprophiidae) in comparison with other snake species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khannoon, E. R.; Zahradníček, Oldřich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 2 (2017), s. 144-153 ISSN 0001-7272 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37368G Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : embryonic development * Psammophis * snake Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2016

  1. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corjan Nolet

    Full Text Available Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1 to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength (λ and surface moisture (θ over the optical domain of 350-2500 nm, and (2 to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content θ 0.97, but underestimated reflectance for θ between 24-30% (R2 > 0.92, most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well (R2 > 0.99 but is limited to 4% > θ < 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner (λ = 1550 nm can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%, demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach.

  2. Measuring and Modeling the Effect of Surface Moisture on the Spectral Reflectance of Coastal Beach Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolet, Corjan; Poortinga, Ate; Roosjen, Peter; Bartholomeus, Harm; Ruessink, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure surface moisture at a high spatio-temporal resolution. It is based on the principle that wet sand appears darker than dry sand: it is less reflective. The goals of this study are (1) to measure and model reflectance under controlled laboratory conditions as function of wavelength () and surface moisture () over the optical domain of 350–2500 nm, and (2) to explore the implications of our laboratory findings for accurately mapping the distribution of surface moisture under natural conditions. A laboratory spectroscopy experiment was conducted to measure spectral reflectance (1 nm interval) under different surface moisture conditions using beach sand. A non-linear increase of reflectance upon drying was observed over the full range of wavelengths. Two models were developed and tested. The first model is grounded in optics and describes the proportional contribution of scattering and absorption of light by pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix. The second model is grounded in soil physics and links the hydraulic behaviour of pore water in an unsaturated sand matrix to its optical properties. The optical model performed well for volumetric moisture content 24% ( 0.97), but underestimated reflectance for between 24–30% ( 0.92), most notable around the 1940 nm water absorption peak. The soil-physical model performed very well ( 0.99) but is limited to 4% 24%. Results from a field experiment show that a short-wave infrared terrestrial laser scanner ( = 1550 nm) can accurately relate surface moisture to reflectance (standard error 2.6%), demonstrating its potential to derive spatially extensive surface moisture maps of a natural coastal beach. PMID:25383709

  3. The contribution of several Nobel Laureates in the development of the Theory of general economic equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Florentina Xhelili Krasniqi; Rahmie Topxhiu; Donat Rexha

    2016-01-01

    Nobel Laureates with their contributions to the development of the theory of general equilibrium have enabled this theory to be one of the most important for theoretical and practical analysis of the overall economy and the efficient use of economic resources. Results of the research showing that contributions of Nobel Laureates in the economy belong to two main frameworks of development of the general equilibrium theory: one was the mathematical model of general equilibrium developed by J...

  4. Natural headland sand bypassing; towards identifying and modelling the mechanisms and processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin Ab Razak, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural headland sand bypassing: Towards identifying and modelling the mechanisms and processes contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms and processes of sand bypassing in artificial and non-artificial coastal environments through a numerical modelling study. Sand bypassing processes in

  5. Detection of residual oil-sand-derived organic material in developing soils of reclamation sites by ultra-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noah, Mareike; Poetz, Stefanie; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilkes, Heinz

    2015-06-02

    The reconstruction of disturbed landscapes back to working ecosystems is an issue of increasing importance for the oil sand areas in Alberta, Canada. In this context, the fate of oil-sand-derived organic material in the tailings sands used for reclamation is of utmost environmental importance. Here we use electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of maltene fractions to identify compositional variations over a complete oil sand mining and recultivation process chain. On the basis of bulk compound class distributions and percentages of unique elemental compositions, we identify specific compositional features that are related to the different steps of the process chain. The double bond equivalent and carbon number distributions of the N1 and S1O2 classes are almost invariant along the process chain, despite a significant decrease in overall abundance. We thus suggest that these oil-sand-derived components can be used as sensitive tracers of residual bitumen, even in soils from relatively old reclamation sites. The patterns of the O2, O3, and O4 classes may be applied to assess process-chain-related changes in organic matter composition, including the formation of plant-derived soil organic matter on the reclamation sites. The N1O2 species appear to be related to unidentified processes in the tailings ponds but do not represent products of aerobic biodegradation of pyrrolic nitrogen compounds.

  6. Development and Application of the Single-Spiral Inductive-Capacitive Resonant Circuit Sensor for Wireless, Real-Time Characterization of Moisture in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. DeRouin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A wireless, passive embedded sensor was designed and fabricated for monitoring moisture in sand. The sensor, consisted of an inductive-capacitive (LC resonant circuit, was made of a printed spiral inductor embedded inside sand. When exposed to an electromagnetic field, the sensor resonated at a specific frequency dependent on the inductance of the inductor and its parasitic capacitance. Since the permittivity of water was much higher than dry sand, moisture in sample increased the parasitic capacitance, thus decreasing the sensor’s resonant frequency. Therefore, the internal moisture level of the sample could be easily measured through tracking the resonant frequency using a detection coil. The fabrication process of this sensor is much simpler compared to LC sensors that contain both capacitive and inductive elements, giving it an economical advantage. A study was conducted to investigate the drying rate of sand samples of different grain sizes. The experimental data showed a strong correlation with the actual moisture content in the samples. The described sensor technology can be applied for long term monitoring of localized water content inside soils and sands to understand the environmental health in these media, or monitoring moisture levels within concrete supports and road pavement.

  7. "Design makes you understand"-Mapping the contributions of designing to regional planning and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempenaar, Annet; Westerink, Judith; Lierop, van Marjo; Brinkhuijsen, Marlies; Brink, van den Adri

    2016-01-01

    Designing has assumed a prominent position in current regional planning and development. There is, however, no coherent body of knowledge on how designing contributes to, alters or influences planning processes. Our essay explores a leading example: the contributions of designing to Dutch

  8. Oil sands operations as a large source of secondary organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Hayden, Katherine; Taha, Youssef M.; Stroud, Craig; Darlington, Andrea; Drollette, Brian D.; Gordon, Mark; Lee, Patrick; Liu, Peter; Leithead, Amy; Moussa, Samar G.; Wang, Danny; O'Brien, Jason; Mittermeier, Richard L.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Lu, Gang; Staebler, Ralf M.; Han, Yuemei; Tokarek, Travis W.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Makar, Paul A.; Zhang, Junhua; L. Plata, Desiree; Gentner, Drew R.

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide heavy oil and bitumen deposits amount to 9 trillion barrels of oil distributed in over 280 basins around the world, with Canada home to oil sands deposits of 1.7 trillion barrels. The global development of this resource and the increase in oil production from oil sands has caused environmental concerns over the presence of toxic compounds in nearby ecosystems and acid deposition. The contribution of oil sands exploration to secondary organic aerosol formation, an important component of atmospheric particulate matter that affects air quality and climate, remains poorly understood. Here we use data from airborne measurements over the Canadian oil sands, laboratory experiments and a box-model study to provide a quantitative assessment of the magnitude of secondary organic aerosol production from oil sands emissions. We find that the evaporation and atmospheric oxidation of low-volatility organic vapours from the mined oil sands material is directly responsible for the majority of the observed secondary organic aerosol mass. The resultant production rates of 45-84 tonnes per day make the oil sands one of the largest sources of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols in North America. Heavy oil and bitumen account for over ten per cent of global oil production today, and this figure continues to grow. Our findings suggest that the production of the more viscous crude oils could be a large source of secondary organic aerosols in many production and refining regions worldwide, and that such production should be considered when assessing the environmental impacts of current and planned bitumen and heavy oil extraction projects globally.

  9. Sand (CSW4)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  10. Virksomhedens sande ansigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholt, Marianne Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Er modhistorier en byrde eller en styrke i forandringsprocesser? Hvad stiller vi op, når adgangen til organisationens sande identitet går gennem medarbejdernes modhistorier? Når vi sammenholder denne erkendelse med vores viden om, at medarbejdere helt naturligt afholder sig fra at videregive disse...

  11. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  12. Sand Filter Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    EXWC) performed the evaluation at the Naval Air Station Lemoore, CA . The two year evaluation period began with one year of sand filter operation...appear dirty? If you answered “ yes ” to the first question and “ yes ” to either of the other questions, investigate this technology for your

  13. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  14. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...

  15. On the contribution of Knowledge for Climate to the development of JPI Climate in 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, R.J.; Bessembinder, J.; Driessen, P.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008 to 2012, Knowledge for Climate contributed to the development of the Joint Programming Initiative “Connecting Climate Knowledge for Europe” (JPI Climate). In 2010, a proposal was developed and accepted, followed in 2011 by the development and adoption of a governance structure and a

  16. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  17. Nuclear energy in the oils sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, J.E.

    2014-09-15

    The major Canadian oil sands are located in Alberta and Saskatchewan, with most production from the strata along the Athabasca River in Alberta. The economically recoverable oil sands reserves are estimated to be 168 billion barrels which at a current production rate of 1.8 million barrels per day (2012), are projected to last a very long time. Canada has been blessed with vast energy resources which make it potentially energy-independent and able to provide significant exports but there are concerns that their development cannot be managed in a wholly acceptable manner. Comparable concerns have been applied to nuclear energy in the past and in recent times to the oil sands. The technologies associated with these energy sources have always been controversial because they are at the confluence of economics and politics where finding a balance between risk and reward is difficult. So it should be no surprise that when these technologies get linked together in certain proposals their prospect for success is doubly difficult. The possible use of nuclear energy for production of oil from the oil sands dates back to the late 1950s, when an experiment to mine the oil by detonating an underground nuclear device was proposed. It was predicted that the heat and pressure released from such a device would create a large cavern into which oil would flow, and from where it would be pumped to the surface. Almost at the same time, oil sands research using conventional sources of energy had culminated with the development of practical refining processes, essentially those still in use today. These methods require large amounts of heat energy in the form of hot water and steam. In this century nuclear energy was proposed as the source for the heat required by the oil sands production processes. To date neither of these nuclear proposals for oil sands projects have been successful, because the economic and political balance could not be struck. (author)

  18. Environmental Impacts of Sand Exploitation. Analysis of Sand Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Dan Gavriletea

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sand is an indispensable natural resource for any society. Despite society’s increasing dependence on sand, there are major challenges that this industry needs to deal with: limited sand resources, illegal mining, and environmental impact of sand mining. The purpose of this paper is twofold: to present an overview of the sand market, highlighting the main trends and actors for production, export and import, and to review the main environmental impacts associated with sand exploitation process. Based on these findings, we recommend different measures to be followed to reduce negative impacts. Sand mining should be done in a way that limits environmental damage during exploitation and restores the land after mining operations are completed.

  19. [Influence of perlite sand on the skin in experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracheva, E E; Iatsyna, I V; Lapina, N E; Ianin, V A; Antoshina, L I; Zhadan, I Iu; Krasavina, E K

    2012-01-01

    In the present work influence of perlite sand has been studied on a skin of Sprague-Dawley male rat (300-350 g). The biopsy of intact rat skin has been used as control. Contact of the perlite sand with animals' skin causes the reaction of an inflammation amplifying with increase of duration of the influence of substance. Therefore, despite an inert chemical compound, long contact with perlite sand in conditions of production can promote development of skin diseases. From the result of this investigation it is concluded that perlite sand causes irritating action on the skin and it is necessary to apply additional protective means to workers contacting to this substance.

  20. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  1. The contribution of farmer field schools to rural development in Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westendorp, A.M.B.

    2012-01-01

     This thesis argues that Farmer Field Schools in Nepal contributed to agriculture and rural development and to gendered empowerment. The Nepalese government, but also NGOs involved in FFS applied a rather technocratic approach towards development (Li, 1999) and assumed that will well-defined

  2. Factors Contributing to the Fear of Success in Women's Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree-Wyly, Jeanie; And Others

    Fear of success in women is a pervasive phenomenon affecting women's career development. Women affected by this phenomenon are often unaware that they are afraid of succeeding. Identification of the factors that contribute to the fear of success in women's career development is important for educators and counselors wanting to assist women in…

  3. The Challenge of the "Second Economy" in South Africa: The Contribution of Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, Andre

    2005-01-01

    This article investigates the contribution skills development can make in promoting South Africa's wider socio-economic development. It provides a broad overview of the emerging gap between those who are benefiting from South Africa's transition to democracy and those who are not. Overcoming these worsening social conditions has become a major…

  4. The Contributions of Human Resource Development Research across Disciplines: A Citation and Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeung, Chang-Wook; Yoon, Hea Jun; Park, Sunyoung; Jo, Sung Jun

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of the current study is to identify how human resource development (HRD) research has contributed to the knowledge base across social science disciplines during the past two decades. We identified the top 20 Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) journal articles that have been most frequently cited in research articles…

  5. Jamali lauds PAEC contribution to scientific development defence needs of country

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The Prime Minister Mir Zafarullah Khan Jamali has appreciated role of Pakistan Atomic Energy Council (PAEC) for its contribution to the scientific development and defence needs of the country. He directed that all resources and energy be devoted to the development of human resource and infrastructure for socio-economic uplift of the nation" (1 page).

  6. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  7. Construction of an Environmentally Sustainable Development on a Modified Coastal Sand Mined and Landfill Site—Part 2. Re-Establishing the Natural Ecosystems on the Reconstructed Beach Dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Markovina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Mimicking natural processes lead to progressive colonization and stabilization of the reconstructed beach dune ecosystem, as part of the ecologically sustainable development of Magenta Shores, on the central coast of New South Wales, Australia. The retained and enhanced incipient dune formed the first line of storm defence. Placement of fibrous Leptospermum windrows allowed wind blown sand to form crests and swales parallel to the beach. Burial of Spinifex seed head in the moist sand layer achieved primary colonization of the reconstructed dune and development of a soil fungal hyphae network prior to introduction of secondary colonizing species. Monitoring stakes were used as roosts by birds, promoting re-introduction of native plant species requiring germination by digestive tract stimulation. Bush regeneration reduced competition from weeds, allowing native vegetation cover to succeed. On-going weeding and monitoring are essential at Magenta Shores until bitou bush is controlled for the entire length of beach. The reconstructed dunes provide enhanced protection from sand movement and storm bite, for built assets, remnant significant vegetation and sensitive estuarine ecosystems.

  8. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2017-06-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  9. The Areal Extent of Continuous Type Gas Accumulations in Lower Silurian Clinton Sands and Medina Group Sandstones of the Appalachian Basin and the Environments Affected by Their Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandrey, C.J.; Ryder, Robert T.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Aggen, Kerry L.

    1997-01-01

    In order to best preserve and manage our energy and natural resources we must understand the relationships between these resources and the impacts of their development. To further this understanding the U.S. Geological Survey is studying unconventional continuous-type and, to a lesser extent, conventional oil and gas accumulations and the environmental impacts associated with their development. Continuous-type gas accumulations are generally characterized by low matrix permeabilities, large areal extents, and no distinct water contacts. This basin scale map shows the overall extent of these accumulations and the general land use types that may be impacted by their development. The Appalachian Basin has the longest history of oil and gas exploration and production in the United States. Since Drake's Titusville discovery well was drilled in 1859, oil and gas has been continuously produced in the basin. While there is still a great deal of oil and gas production, new field discoveries are rare and relatively small. For most of the second half of the 20th century the Appalachian basin has been considered a mature petroleum province because most of the large plays have already been discovered and developed. One exception to this trend is the Lower Silurian Clinton Sands and Medina Group Gas play which is being developed in New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. This continuous-type gas play has been expanding since the early 1970's (see inset maps). In the 1980's economic incentives such as large increases in wellhead prices further stimulated continuous-type gas resource development. Continuous-type gas plays can be large in areal extent and in thickness. 'Sweetspots' (areas of greater prodcution) are hard to predict and generally associated with better than average permeabilities, and enhanced by natural fracture systems. With an overall success rate often approaching 90%, drilling most of the play with closely spaced wells is often the best way to maximize gas recovery

  10. Evaluating the oil sands reclamation process: Assessing policy capacity and stakeholder access for government and non-governmental organizations operating in Alberta's oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tyler

    By employing interpretive policy analysis this thesis aims to assess, measure, and explain policy capacity for government and non-government organizations involved in reclaiming Alberta's oil sands. Using this type of analysis to assess policy capacity is a novel approach for understanding reclamation policy; and therefore, this research will provide a unique contribution to the literature surrounding reclamation policy. The oil sands region in northeast Alberta, Canada is an area of interest for a few reasons; primarily because of the vast reserves of bitumen and the environmental cost associated with developing this resource. An increase in global oil demand has established incentive for industry to seek out and develop new reserves. Alberta's oil sands are one of the largest remaining reserves in the world, and there is significant interest in increasing production in this region. Furthermore, tensions in several oil exporting nations in the Middle East remain unresolved, and this has garnered additional support for a supply side solution to North American oil demands. This solution relies upon the development of reserves in both the United States and Canada. These compounding factors have contributed to the increased development in the oil sands of northeastern Alberta. Essentially, a rapid expansion of oil sands operations is ongoing, and is the source of significant disturbance across the region. This disturbance, and the promises of reclamation, is a source of contentious debates amongst stakeholders and continues to be highly visible in the media. If oil sands operations are to retain their social license to operate, it is critical that reclamation efforts be effective. One concern non-governmental organizations (NGOs) expressed criticizes the current monitoring and enforcement of regulatory programs in the oil sands. Alberta's NGOs have suggested the data made available to them originates from industrial sources, and is generally unchecked by government

  11. On the Role of Glutamate in Presynaptic Development: Possible Contributions of Presynaptic NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlie N. Fedder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proper formation and maturation of synapses during development is a crucial step in building the functional neural circuits that underlie perception and behavior. It is well established that experience modifies circuit development. Therefore, understanding how synapse formation is controlled by synaptic activity is a key question in neuroscience. In this review, we focus on the regulation of excitatory presynaptic terminal development by glutamate, the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. We discuss the evidence that NMDA receptor activation mediates these effects of glutamate and present the hypothesis that local activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (preNMDARs contributes to glutamate-dependent control of presynaptic development. Abnormal glutamate signaling and aberrant synapse development are both thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. Therefore, understanding how glutamate signaling and synapse development are linked is important for understanding the etiology of these diseases.

  12. Effective Laboratory Method of Chromite Content Estimation in Reclaimed Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignaszak Z.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an original method of measuring the actual chromite content in the circulating moulding sand of foundry. This type of material is applied for production of moulds. This is the case of foundry which most frequently perform heavy casting in which for the construction of chemical hardening mould is used, both the quartz sand and chromite sand. After the dry reclamation of used moulding sand, both types of sands are mixed in various ratios resulting that in reclaimed sand silos, the layers of varying content of chromite in mixture are observed. For chromite recuperation from the circulating moulding sand there are applied the appropriate installations equipped with separate elements generating locally strong magnetic field. The knowledge of the current ratio of chromite and quartz sand allows to optimize the settings of installation and control of the separation efficiency. The arduous and time-consuming method of determining the content of chromite using bromoform liquid requires operational powers and precautions during using this toxic liquid. It was developed and tested the new, uncomplicated gravimetric laboratory method using powerful permanent magnets (neodymium. The method is used in the production conditions of casting for current inspection of chromite quantity in used sand in reclamation plant.

  13. Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu's contribution to the development of science and culture in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotaru, Alexandru; Petrovai, Ion; Rotaru, Horatiu

    2016-01-01

    When speaking about Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu (1863-1926) and his major contribution to the establishment of Romanian medical education in Cluj, he should be considered not only in terms of scientist and creator of the Dental School, but also through his commitment to the development of science and culture in Romania. A wealthy dentist in Budapest where he graduated from the Dental School, he supported a lot of Romanian students to attend schools and universities in the Budapest, thus contributing to the development of culture in his own country. Finally, he left his private practice in the Capital of Hungary to come to Cluj to support the efforts of building the Dental School and profession in Romania. This paper illustrates the contribution that Professor Gheorghe Bilaşcu made to the development of higher education in Romania, as well as his support of the local culture.

  14. Nutritional contribution of street foods to the diet of people in developing countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, Nelia Patricia; McHiza, Zandile; Hill, Jillian; Davids, Yul Derek; Venter, Irma; Hinrichsen, Enid; Opperman, Maretha; Rumbelow, Julien; Jacobs, Peter

    2014-06-01

    To review studies examining the nutritional value of street foods and their contribution to the diet of consumers in developing countries. The electronic databases PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Proquest Health and Science Direct were searched for articles on street foods in developing countries that included findings on nutritional value. From a total of 639 articles, twenty-three studies were retained since they met the inclusion criteria. In summary, daily energy intake from street foods in adults ranged from 13 % to 50 % of energy and in children from 13 % to 40 % of energy. Although the amounts differed from place to place, even at the lowest values of the percentage of energy intake range, energy from street foods made a significant contribution to the diet. Furthermore, the majority of studies suggest that street foods contributed significantly to the daily intake of protein, often at 50 % of the RDA. The data on fat and carbohydrate intakes are of some concern because of the assumed high contribution of street foods to the total intakes of fat, trans-fat, salt and sugar in numerous studies and their possible role in the development of obesity and non-communicable diseases. Few studies have provided data on the intake of micronutrients, but these tended to be high for Fe and vitamin A while low for Ca and thiamin. Street foods make a significant contribution to energy and protein intakes of people in developing countries and their use should be encouraged if they are healthy traditional foods.

  15. How the development of handedness could contribute to the development of language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, George F; Babik, Iryna; Nelson, Eliza L; Campbell, Julie M; Marcinowski, Emily C

    2013-09-01

    We propose a developmental process which may link the development of handedness with the development of hemispheric specialization for speech processing. Using Arbib's proposed sequence of sensorimotor development of manual skills and gestures (that he considers to be the basis of speech gestures and proto-language), we show how the development of hand-use preferences in proto-reaching skills concatenate into object acquisition skills and eventually into role-differentiated bimanual manipulation skills (that reflect interhemispheric communication and coordination). These latter sensorimotor skills might facilitate the development of speech processing via their influence on the development of tool-using and object management abilities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Distribution and relative sensitivity to acidfication of soils Sand River area, Alberta

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holowaychuk, N; Lindsay, J.D

    1982-01-01

    .... The Sand River area was selected for testing the criteria and procedures. This report discusses the defines the criteria that were developed and how they were applied in the sensitivity classificatioin of the soils of the Sand River area...

  17. On the Size Distribution of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    by Bagnold and confirmed in numerous empirical studies. The model implies that the size distribution of a sand deposit is a logarithmic normal-inverse Gaussian (NIG) distribution, which is one of the generalized hyperbolic distributions. The model modifies a previous model, which implied a log-normal size-distribution......, variance and skewness of the log-size distribution to the physical parameters of the model. The results might be useful when comparing empirical size-distributions from different deposits. It is argued that size-distributions with the same general shape as the NIG-distributions can be obtained also when......A model is presented of the development of the size distribution of sand while it is transported from a source to a deposit. The model provides a possible explanation of the log-hyperbolic shape that is frequently found in unimodal grain size distributions in natural sand deposits, as pointed out...

  18. The Contribution of the Human Development Index Literacy Theory to the Debate on Literacy and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biao, Idowu; Mogotsi, Kebadire; Maruatona, Tonic; Raditloaneng, Wapula; Tladi, Flora; Chawawa, Morgan; Kheru, Obakeng

    2014-01-01

    The Human Development Index Literacy (HDIL) theory was developed in 2011 to eliminate or minimise the negative impact of issues underlying the failure of previous literacy programmes in promoting socio-economic development. This theory was tested for the first time between July 2013 and February 2014 in two rural communities of Botswana. A…

  19. The Development and Testing of a Prototype Mini-Baghouse to Control the Release of Respirable Crystalline Silica from Sand Movers

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Barbara M.; Esswein, Eric J.; Gressel, Michael G.; Kratzer, Jerry L.; Feng, H. Amy; King, Bradley; Miller, Arthur L.; Cauda, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of respirable crystalline silica (RCS) is a significant risk to worker health during well completions operations (which include hydraulic fracturing) at conventional and unconventional oil and gas extraction sites. RCS is generated by pneumatic transfer of quartz-containing sand during hydraulic fracturing operations. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers identified concentrations of RCS at hydraulic fracturing sites that exceed 10 times the Occu...

  20. Pathological study of chronic pulmonary toxicity induced by intratracheally instilled Asian sand dust (Kosa): possible association of fibrosis with the development of granulomatous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akinori; Kohara, Yukari; Naota, Misaki; Kobayashi, Yoshimi; Morita, Takehito; Inoue, Kenichiro; Takano, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to Asian sand dust (ASD) is associated with enhanced pulmonary morbidity and mortality, and the reporting of such cases has rapidly increased in East Asia since 2000. The purpose of the study was to assess chronic lung toxicity induced by ASD. A total of 174 ICR mice were randomly divided into 5 control and 17 exposure groups. Suspensions of low dose (0.2, 0.4 mg) and high dose (3.0 mg) of ASD particles in saline were intratracheally instilled into ICR mice, followed by sacrifice at 24 hours, 1 week, and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months after instillation. Paraffin sections of lung tissues were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and by immunohistochemistry to detect α-smooth muscle actin, collagen III, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1), CD3, CD20, immunoglobulin G, interleukin-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase. A lung histological examination revealed similar patterns in the lesions of the groups treated with high (3.0 mg) or low dose (0.4 mg) of ASD. Acute inflammation was observed 24 h after treatment and subsided after 1 week; persistent granulomatous changes were observed at 2 months, focal lymphocytic infiltration at 3 months, and granuloma formation at 4 months. An increase in the size of granulomatous lesions was observed over time and was accompanied by collagen deposition in the lesions. The cytoplasm of macrophages in inflammatory lesions showed positive immunolabeling for MMP-9 at 24 h, 1 and 2 months after instillation of 3.0 mg of ASD. Positive immunolabeling for TIMP-1 was demonstrated in the cytoplasm of macrophages at 2 and 4 months after instillation of 3.0 mg of ASD. These findings suggest association between the expression of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 with the development of lung granulomatous lesions. These findings suggest that collagen deposition resulting from the altered regulation of extracellular matrix is associated with granuloma formation in the lungs of mice treated with ASD.

  1. The clean development mechanism's contribution to sustainable development: A review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Holm

    2007-01-01

    The challenges of how to respond to climate change and ensure sustainable development are currently high on the political agenda among the world's leading nations. The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is part of the global carbon market developing rapidly as part of the Kyoto response towards...... the mitigation of global warming. One of the aims of the CDM is to achieve sustainable development in developing countries, but uncertainty prevails as to whether the CDM is doing what it promises to do. Close to 200 studies on the CDM have been carried out since its birth in 1997 including peer...

  2. The contribution of a particular 'kids in parks' programme to the professional development of teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J G Ferreira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the possible contribution of the 'kids in parks' programme offered at Golden Gate Highlands National Park to the professional development of teachers. Focus group interviews were held with teachers who participated in the programme, and an interview with open-ended questions was held with a learning facilitator from the provincial education department. Although the programme has not primarily been developed to focus on professional development, the setting creates an ideal opportunity for the professional development of teachers away from the formal school situation. This research suggests that the programme, and consequently similar programmes offered at other national parks in South Africa, could make a contribution to the professional development of teachers.

  3. The contribution of several Nobel Laureates in the development of the Theory of general economic equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Xhelili Krasniqi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nobel Laureates with their contributions to the development of the theory of general equilibrium have enabled this theory to be one of the most important for theoretical and practical analysis of the overall economy and the efficient use of economic resources. Results of the research showing that contributions of Nobel Laureates in the economy belong to two main frameworks of development of the general equilibrium theory: one was the mathematical model of general equilibrium developed by John R. Hicks (1939, Kenneth J.Arrow (1951 and Gerard Debreu (1954 and second frames of general equilibrium belongs to Paul A. Samuelson (1958. To highlight the contributions of these Nobel laureates in the development of the theory of general equilibrium have been selected and are presented in the paper some views, estimates and assumptions that have contributed not only in solving concrete problems, but also to the development of economic science in general. Their works represent a synthesis of theoretical and practical aspects of treatment of general equilibrium which are the starting point for further research in this field.

  4. Laboratory singing sand avalanches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagois-Bohy, Simon; Ngo, Sandrine; du Pont, Sylvain Courrech; Douady, Stéphane

    2010-02-01

    Some desert sand dunes have the peculiar ability to emit a loud sound up to 110 dB, with a well-defined frequency: this phenomenon, known since early travelers (Darwin, Marco Polo, etc.), has been called the song of dunes. But only in late 19th century scientific observations were made, showing three important characteristics of singing dunes: first, not all dunes sing, but all the singing dunes are composed of dry and well-sorted sand; second, this sound occurs spontaneously during avalanches on a slip face; third this is not the only way to produce sound with this sand. More recent field observations have shown that during avalanches, the sound frequency does not depend on the dune size or shape, but on the grain diameter only, and scales as the square root of g/d--with g the gravity and d the diameter of the grains--explaining why all the singing dunes in the same vicinity sing at the same frequency. We have been able to reproduce these singing avalanches in laboratory on a hard plate, which made possible to study them more accurately than on the field. Signals of accelerometers at the flowing surface of the avalanche are compared to signals of microphones placed above, and it evidences a very strong vibration of the flowing layer at the same frequency as on the field, responsible for the emission of sound. Moreover, other characteristics of the booming dunes are reproduced and analyzed, such as a threshold under which no sound is produced, or beats in the sound that appears when the flow is too large. Finally, the size of the coherence zones emitting sound has been measured and discussed.

  5. V-2 Rocket at White Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    1946-01-01

    A V-2 rocket takes flight at White Sands, New Mexico, in 1946. The German engineers and scientists who developed the V-2 came to the United States at the end of World War II and continued rocket testing under the direction of the U. S. Army, launching more than sixty V-2s.

  6. A new sand-wedge-forming mechanism in an extra-arid area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongshou; Wang, Wanfu; Wu, Fasi; Zhan, Hongtao; Zhang, Guobing; Qiu, Fei

    2014-04-01

    A survey found that sand wedges are widely distributed in the extremely extra-arid Gobi region of Dunhuang, China. The sand wedges are still developing. Well-developed sand wedges are surrounded by polygonal areas showing fractal structures. The depth of a well-developed sand wedge is 50-60 cm and its maximum width is 50-60 cm, so the depth/width ratio is 1.0. The interface between the wedge and matrix is arc-shaped. The mechanical composition of the sand wedges compared to the matrix is such that 76.72% of the particles have diameters ≤ 0.25 mm and show vertical sand laminations in the sand wedge, while 55.19% of the particles in the matrix are ≥ 2.00 mm in diameter. The particle diameters are consistent with the width of the sand-wedge fractures. The salt content in the sand wedges is 3.13 g/kg, while that of the matrix is 40.86 g/kg. The large salinity difference shows that the sand in the wedges comes from drift sand or cladding layers where salinity is lower, and that the sand wedge was formed in an arid climate. Displacement and pressure are closely associated with the daily temperature variation; they fluctuate significantly following the temperature. Measurements reveal the movement of thermal-contraction fissures. Pressure monitoring identified that wet expansions occurred after rainfall, which made the sand wedges become tightly joined to the matrix. Following this, as the soil became desiccated and shrank, a crack opened in the middle of the sand wedge. This was then filled with drift sand. With the next rainfall, the system moved into another development cycle. The current article reveals a new mechanism for forming sand wedges in extra-arid conditions. Arid sand wedges are a unique drought-induced surface landmark resulting from long-term, natural, dry-climate processes.

  7. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  8. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  9. Production of Natural Gas and Fluid Flow in Tight Sand Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Cecilia Bravo

    2006-06-30

    This document reports progress of this research effort in identifying relationships and defining dependencies between macroscopic reservoir parameters strongly affected by microscopic flow dynamics and production well performance in tight gas sand reservoirs. These dependencies are investigated by identifying the main transport mechanisms at the pore scale that should affect fluids flow at the reservoir scale. A critical review of commercial reservoir simulators, used to predict tight sand gas reservoir, revealed that many are poor when used to model fluid flow through tight reservoirs. Conventional simulators ignore altogether or model incorrectly certain phenomena such as, Knudsen diffusion, electro-kinetic effects, ordinary diffusion mechanisms and water vaporization. We studied the effect of Knudsen's number in Klinkenberg's equation and evaluated the effect of different flow regimes on Klinkenberg's parameter b. We developed a model capable of explaining the pressure dependence of this parameter that has been experimentally observed, but not explained in the conventional formalisms. We demonstrated the relevance of this, so far ignored effect, in tight sands reservoir modeling. A 2-D numerical simulator based on equations that capture the above mentioned phenomena was developed. Dynamic implications of new equations are comprehensively discussed in our work and their relative contribution to the flow rate is evaluated. We performed several simulation sensitivity studies that evidenced that, in general terms, our formalism should be implemented in order to get more reliable tight sands gas reservoirs' predictions.

  10. Microbes in Beach Sands: Integrating Environment, Ecology and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Richard; Harwood, Valerie J.; Edge, Thomas A.; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Vijayavel, Kannappan; Brandão, João; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Crowe, Allan; Ferguson, Donna; Ge, Zhongfu; Halliday, Elizabeth; Kinzelman, Julie; Kleinheinz, Greg; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Staley, Christopher; Staley, Zachery; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Beach sand is a habitat that supports many microbes, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa (micropsammon). The apparently inhospitable conditions of beach sand environments belie the thriving communities found there. Physical factors, such as water availability and protection from insolation; biological factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all contribute to the characteristics of the micropsammon. Sand microbial communities include autochthonous species/phylotypes indigenous to the environment. Allochthonous microbes, including fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate of these microbes ranges from death, to transient persistence and/or replication, to establishment of thriving populations (naturalization) and integration in the autochthonous community. Transport of the micropsammon within the habitat occurs both horizontally across the beach, and vertically from the sand surface and ground water table, as well as at various scales including interstitial flow within sand pores, sediment transport for particle-associated microbes, and the large-scale processes of wave action and terrestrial runoff. The concept of beach sand as a microbial habitat and reservoir of FIB and pathogens has begun to influence our thinking about human health effects associated with sand exposure and recreational water use. A variety of pathogens have been reported from beach sands, and recent epidemiology studies have found some evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB and enteric pathogens have consequences for watershed/beach management strategies and regulatory standards for safe beaches. This review summarizes our understanding of the community structure, ecology, fate, transport, and public health implications of microbes in beach sand. It concludes with recommendations for future

  11. Microbes in Beach Sands: Integrating Environment, Ecology and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Richard; Harwood, Valerie J; Edge, Thomas A; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Vijayavel, Kannappan; Brandão, João; Sadowsky, Michael J; Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Crowe, Allan; Ferguson, Donna; Ge, Zhongfu; Halliday, Elizabeth; Kinzelman, Julie; Kleinheinz, Greg; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Staley, Christopher; Staley, Zachery; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2014-09-01

    Beach sand is a habitat that supports many microbes, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa (micropsammon). The apparently inhospitable conditions of beach sand environments belie the thriving communities found there. Physical factors, such as water availability and protection from insolation; biological factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all contribute to the characteristics of the micropsammon. Sand microbial communities include autochthonous species/phylotypes indigenous to the environment. Allochthonous microbes, including fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate of these microbes ranges from death, to transient persistence and/or replication, to establishment of thriving populations (naturalization) and integration in the autochthonous community. Transport of the micropsammon within the habitat occurs both horizontally across the beach, and vertically from the sand surface and ground water table, as well as at various scales including interstitial flow within sand pores, sediment transport for particle-associated microbes, and the large-scale processes of wave action and terrestrial runoff. The concept of beach sand as a microbial habitat and reservoir of FIB and pathogens has begun to influence our thinking about human health effects associated with sand exposure and recreational water use. A variety of pathogens have been reported from beach sands, and recent epidemiology studies have found some evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB and enteric pathogens have consequences for watershed/beach management strategies and regulatory standards for safe beaches. This review summarizes our understanding of the community structure, ecology, fate, transport, and public health implications of microbes in beach sand. It concludes with recommendations for future work in

  12. A Phenomenological Approach to Development: The Contributions of Maurice Merleau-Ponty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardello, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    A discussion of the importance of the relation between psychology and philosophy for the understanding of child development. The positive contribution of Merleau-Ponty's phenomenological approach to developmental psychology are examined in the areas of perception, language acquisition, and the child's relations with others. (JMB)

  13. Development of risk-taking: contributions from adolescent testosterone and the orbito-frontal cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peper, J.S.; Koolschijn, P.C.M.P.; Crone, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of puberty in the development of risk taking remains poorly understood. Here, in a normative sample of 268 participants between 8 and 25 years old, we applied a psycho-endocrine neuroimaging approach to investigate the contribution of testosterone levels and OFC morphology to individual

  14. Contributions of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) to Quality Education: A Synthesis of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Robert; Nonoyama-Tarumi, Yuko; Mckeown, Rosalyn; Hopkins, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This research is a synthesis of studies carried out in 18 countries to identify contributions of education for sustainable development (ESD) to quality education. Five common questions were used for the interviews in each country to solicit education leaders and practitioners' views on the outcome and implementation of ESD. The analysis revealed…

  15. Contributions of Youth Engagement to the Development of Social Capital through Community Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaniel, Keith C.; Kinsey, Sharon B.

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-State North Central Extension Research Activity (NCERA), Contributions of 4-H Participation to the Development of Social Capital, identified a strategy to pilot a research method that incorporates an inquiry-based approach to understanding community level impact of youth programs. This article focuses on how youth engagement educators…

  16. The Best of Two Worlds. Article 6 mechanisms shall contribute to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Karen Holm; Soezer, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    The Paris Agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were two milestone achievements in 2015. The Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) put forward by Parties before the Climate Conference in Paris will have to be fully embedded in the 2030 agenda to achieve truly...

  17. Using PeerWise to Develop a Contributing Student Pedagogy for Postgraduate Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Wendy; Roodenburg, John

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the role of peer and self-assessment in developing formative and sustainable assessment practice in higher education is increasingly becoming evident. PeerWise is an online software tool that engages students in contributing to their own and others' learning by authoring, answering and providing feedback on multiple choice…

  18. Developmental stimulation in child care centers contributes to young infants’ cognitive development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, E.M.; Riksen-Walraven, J.M.A.; Weerth, C. de

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether the quality of caregiver behavior in child care centers contributes to infant cognitive development at 9 months of age. Sixty-four infants (34 boys) were observed with their primary caregivers in child care centers at 3, 6, and 9 months of age. Caregiver behavior was

  19. Enhancing maya women's development through cooperative associations : what factors support or restrict the contribution of cooperatives?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osorio Vazquez, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of contributing to the development of Mayan women living in the Yucatan Peninsula, this research focused on determine the factors that support or inhibit the sustainability of micro-businesses cooperatives, which are organizations with innovative elements that allow Mayan women to work

  20. Understanding Writing Problems in Young Children: Contributions of Cognitive Skills to the Development of Written Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Amy

    2011-01-01

    While several models of adult writing have been proposed and studied, the development of writing skills in young children has only recently garnered attention. Using measures of fine-motor, language, working memory, and attention/executive functions, the current study explored motor and cognitive skills that may contribute to writing skill in…

  1. The Contribution of a Particular "Kids in Parks" Programme to the Professional Development of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J. G.

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the possible contribution of the "kids in parks" programme offered at Golden Gate Highlands National Park to the professional development of teachers. Focus group interviews were held with teachers who participated in the programme, and an interview with open-ended questions was held with a learning facilitator…

  2. Domestic Courts' Contribution to the Development of International Criminal Law: Some Reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wilt, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    This essay seeks to give an impression of the way in which domestic courts are contributing to the development of international criminal law. Have they predominantly followed the case law of international tribunals and, by doing so, have they corroborated those standards? Or have they rather

  3. Domestic courts' contribution to the development of international criminal law: some reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wilt, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to give an impression of the way in which domestic courts are contributing to the development of international criminal law. Have they predominantly followed the case law of international tribunals and, by doing so, have they corroborated those standards? Or have they rather

  4. CONTRIBUTIONS FOR DEVELOPING OF A COMPUTER AIDED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT OF DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonescu Ion

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the authors’ contributions for developing a computer code for teaching of descriptive geometry using the computer aided learning techniques. The program was implemented using the programming interface and the 3D modeling capabilities of the AutoCAD system.

  5. Wait Not, Want Not: Factors Contributing to the Development of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Trish

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine prevalence and incident rates of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. In addition, this article will review the psychological and sociological factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of an eating disorder. Finally, different treatment approaches will be discussed in…

  6. Five basic rules contributing to the development of children’s technical creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varaksin Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the forms and methods of work of the children’s technical creativity in Russia in the comparative analysis with the direction of this activity in the countries of the western world. Five basic rules contributing to the development of children's technical creativity have been derived in the result of analysis of the activities of children’s technical creativity on the modern stage of development

  7. Positive psychology and its contribution to the development of positive victimology

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiljević-Prodanović Danica

    2015-01-01

    The development of positive psychology, a new direction in psychology, marked the beginning of a positive movement in the social sciences, having an impact on the development of criminology and victimology thought. This article presents basic principles of positive psychology, the study of positive emotions, positive character and institutions that make this possible. Additionally, the aim is to analyse the contribution of positive psychology to positive vi...

  8. Children with specific language impairment and their contribution to the study of language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Laurence B

    2014-07-01

    Children with specific language impairment (SLI) are distinguishable from typically developing children primarily in the pace and course of their language development. For this reason, they are appropriate candidates for inclusion in any theory of language acquisition. In this paper, the areas of overlap between children with SLI and those developing in typical fashion are discussed, along with how the joint study of these two populations can enhance our understanding of the language development process. In particular, evidence from children with SLI can provide important information concerning the role of language typology in language development, the optimal ages for acquiring particular linguistic details, the robustness of the bilingual advantage for children, the role of input in children's acquisition of grammatical details, the unintended influence of processing demands during language assessment, the contributions of treatment designs to the study of typically developing children, and the study of individual differences in language development.

  9. Engineering Education for Sustainable Development. The Contribution of University Curricula to Engineering Education for Sustainable Development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastenhofer, Karen; Lansu, Angelique; Van Dam-Mieras, Rietje; Sotoudeh, Mahshid

    2010-01-01

    Global failures to reach a sustainable development within present-day societies as well as recent breakthroughs within technoscience pose new challenges to engineering education. The list of competencies which engineers should have to rise to these challenges is long and diverse, and often

  10. TET1 contributes to neurogenesis onset time during fetal brain development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyerim; Jang, Woo Young; Kang, Min-Cheol; Jeong, Jain; Choi, Minjee; Sung, Yonghun; Park, Song; Kwon, Wookbong; Jang, Soyoung; Kim, Myoung Ok; Kim, Sung Hyun; Ryoo, Zae Young

    2016-03-18

    Epigenetic mechanisms are relevant to development and contribute to fetal neurogenesis. DNA methylation and demethylation contribute to neural gene expression during mouse brain development. Ten-eleven translocation 1 (TET1) regulates DNA demethylation by converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). TET1 specifically regulates 5hmC in the central nervous system (CNS), including during neurogenesis in the adult brain. However little is known about its function in fetal neurogenesis. In order to evaluate the role of TET1 in fetal brain development, we generated TET1-overexpressing transgenic (TG) mice. TET1 overexpression was confirmed in the brains of fetal mice, and we detected 5hmC overexpression in the TG brains compared to that in the wild type (WT) brains, using a dot-blot assay. In order to observe the role of TET1 in fetal brain development, we examined fetal brain samples at varied time points by using real-time PCR, Western blotting, and Immunofluorescence (IF). We confirmed that TET1 contributes to neurogenesis by upregulating the protein expressions of neuronal markers in the TG mouse brains, as determined by Western blotting. However the cortex structure or brain mass between WT and TG mice showed no significant difference by IF. In conclusion, TET1 makes the start time of neurogenesis earlier in the TG brains compared to that in the WT brains during fetal brain development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Operating sand and environment: can harmonising?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriton Geraldo Vieira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mining is considered one of the basic sectors of Brazil's economy. The mining activity provides basic raw material for industry, and several products from the simplest to the most complex have mineral origin. Most products mined in Brazil, by volume, are sand and crushed stone. The sand extraction activities are of great importance for social development, but equally responsible for negative environmental impacts, sometimes irreversible. Due to the location’s rigidity, the sand miner is forced to mine where there is mineral occurrence, which constantly is near the bottom of valleys and rivers, often coinciding with the riparian forests, which are considered to be permanently protected areas (APP. In this context, objective is to demonstrate through a dialectical approach, procedurally developed through literature the possibility of conciliating the exploration of ore sand in permanently protected areas. Thus, will be analyzed the rules established in the Law 12.651/12 (New forest law, as well as will be demonstrated the socioeconomic and environmental impacts of mining activities which have to be observed to achieve the environmental function of property. The research was supported by the qualitative method and its construction we used the technique of bibliographical and documentary review.

  12. CONTRIBUTIONS OF SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION TO THE PSYCHIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE HUMAN BEING: FIRST NOTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Bernardo Silva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article, of theoretical character, aims to submit bibliographic elements to the pedagogical practice in the context of school physical education, with theoretical historical-cultural psychology and historical-critical pedagogy. Thus, emphasis: understanding the contribution of school education and, thus, of the physical education in the process of physical development of the individual; and the presentation of didactic-methodological elements for the pedagogical practice of the physical education to contribute to the integral formation of the individual, through the assimilation of knowledge historically systematized this knowledge area. It is concluded that the aforementioned theoretical mediation it becomes possible to contribute and clarify elements for pedagogical practice in the field of school physical education having as main scope the formation omnilateral of the individual.

  13. Hematite Outlier and Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 4 December 2003This image shows a crater just south of the edge of the famous hematite-bearing surface, which is visible in the context image as a smooth area to the north. The crater has two features of immediate note. The first is a layered mound in the north part of the crater floor. This mound contains hematite, and it is an outlying remnant of the greater deposits to the north that have otherwise completely disappeared in this crater. The second feature is a dune field in the center of the crater floor, with dark dunes indicating winds from the northwest. The dunes grade into a dark sand sheet with no coherent structure, indicating that the sand layer thins out to the south and east.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 357.3 East (2.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

  15. User roles and contributions during the new product development process in collaborative innovation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Qing; An, Weijin; Peng, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Collaborative innovation (co-innovation) community emerges as a new product design platform where companies involve users in the new product development (NPD) process. Large numbers of users participate and contribute to the process voluntarily. This exploratory study investigates the heterogeneous roles of users based on a global co-innovation project in online community. Content analysis, social network analysis and cluster method are employed to measure user behaviors, distinguish user roles, and analyze user contributions. The study identifies six user roles that emerge during the NPD process in co-innovation community: project leader, active designer, generalist, communicator, passive designer, and observer. The six user roles differ in their contribution forms and quality. This paper contributes to research on co-innovation in online communities, including design team structure, user roles and their contribution to design task and solution, as well as user value along the process. In addition, the study provides practices guidance on implementing project, attracting users, and designing platform for co-innovation community practitioners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Traceability of optical length measurements on sand surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohaghegh, Kamran; Yazdanbakhsh, Seyed Alireza; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns traceable measurements on moulds used in automatic casting lines made of green sand, which has a very low strength against the force of a contact probe. A metrological set-up was made based on the use of calibrated workpieces following ISO 15530-3 to determine the uncertainty...... of optical measurements on a sand surface. A new customised sand sample was developed using a hard binder to withstand the contact force of a touch probe, while keeping optical cooperativeness similar to that of green sand. The length of the sample was calibrated using a dial gauge set-up. An optical 3D...... scanner with fringe pattern projection was used to measure the length of a green sand sample (soft sample) with traceability transfer through the hard sample. Results confirm that the uncertainty of the optical scanner on the substituted hard sample is similar to that of the soft sample, so the hard...

  17. Rural Development and the Contribution of Psychology: A Review of the State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Roberti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Seventy per cent of the world poor population lives in rural areas. Despite efforts to eradicate poverty, results are limited. Rural development is a process to transform production and change institutions; but psychosocial obstacles exist. Our aim was to explore and describe the synergy of rural development and Psychology as presented in 111 papers published between 1985 and 2012. Selected papers on rural issues used psychological concepts such as perception, beliefs, decision, attitudes, and empowerment. Psychology may make useful contributions to territorial rural development

  18. Additive surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) adsorption onto quartz-sand dominated sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenming; Wan, Jiamin

    2014-06-17

    Many aquifers contaminated by U(VI)-containing acidic plumes are composed predominantly of quartz-sand sediments. The F-Area of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina (USA) is an example. To predict U(VI) mobility and natural attenuation, we conducted U(VI) adsorption experiments using the F-Area plume sediments and reference quartz, goethite, and kaolinite. The sediments are composed of ∼96% quartz-sand and 3-4% fine fractions of kaolinite and goethite. We developed a new humic acid adsorption method for determining the relative surface area abundances of goethite and kaolinite in the fine fractions. This method is expected to be applicable to many other binary mineral pairs, and allows successful application of the component additivity (CA) approach based surface complexation modeling (SCM) at the SRS F-Area and other similar aquifers. Our experimental results indicate that quartz has stronger U(VI) adsorption ability per unit surface area than goethite and kaolinite at pH ≤ 4.0. Our modeling results indicate that the binary (goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM under-predicts U(VI) adsorption to the quartz-sand dominated sediments at pH ≤ 4.0. The new ternary (quartz/goethite/kaolinite) CA-SCM provides excellent predictions. The contributions of quartz-sand, kaolinite, and goethite to U(VI) adsorption and the potential influences of dissolved Al, Si, and Fe are also discussed.

  19. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  20. Experimental effect of feeding on Ricinus communis and Bougainvillea glabra on the development of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae) from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldas, Rania M; El Shafey, Azza S; Shehata, Magdi G; Samy, Abdallah M; Villinski, Jeffrey T

    2014-04-01

    Plants are promising sources of agents useful for the control of vectors of human diseases including leishmaniasis. The effect of Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae) and Bougainvillea glabra (Nyctaginaceae), on transmission of leishmaniasis was investigated using them as diets for Phlebotomus papatasi to monitor their effect on life-history traits. P. papatasi were allowed to feed separately on both plants then offered a blood-meal. Fed-females were observed daily for egg-laying and subsequent developmental stages. P. papatasi was able to feed on B. glabra (29.41% females and 46.30% males) and R. communis (5.80% females and 10.43% males). 34.28% of females died within 24-48 hours post-feeding on R. communis, whereas, it was 16.5% in females fed on B. glabra. Overall fecundity of surviving females was reduced compared to controls, reared on standard laboratory diet; however there was no effect on the sex ratio of progeny. Female P. papatasi in the control group had significantly longer life span compared to plant-fed group. Feeding on these plants not only decreased sand fly survival rates but incurred negative effects on fecundity. Findings indicate that planting high densities of R. communis and B. glabra in sand flies-endemic areas will reduce population sizes and reduce the risk of Leishmania major infections.

  1. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  2. Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

    2005-08-30

    In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

  3. Coastal eolian sand-ramp development related to paleo-sea-level changes during the Latest Pleistocene and Holocene (21–0 ka) in San Miguel Island, California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Curt D.; Erlandson, Jon M.; Stock, Errol; Hostetler, Steven W.; Price, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Coastal eolian sand ramps (5–130 m elevation) on the northern slope (windward) side of the small San Miguel Island (13 km in W-E length) range in age from late Pleistocene to modern time, though a major hiatus in sand-ramp growth occurred during the early Holocene marine transgression (16–9 ka). The Holocene sand ramps (1–5 m measured thicknesses) currently lack large dune forms, thereby representing deflated erosional remnants, locally covering thicker late Pleistocene sand-ramp deposits. The ramp sand was initially supplied from the adjacent island-shelf platform, extending about 20 km north of the present coastline. The sand-ramp deposits and interbedded loess soils were 14C dated using 112 samples from 32 archaeological sites and other geologic sections. Latest Pleistocene sand ramps (66–18 ka) were derived from across-shelf eolian sand transport during marine low stands. Shoreward wave transport supplied remobilized late Pleistocene sand from the inner shelf to Holocene beaches, where dominant NW winds supplied sand to the sand ramps. The onset dates of the sand-ramp deposition in San Miguel are 7.2 ± 1.5 ka (sample n = 14). The internal strata dates in the vertically accreting sand ramps are 3.4 ± 1.7 ka (n = 34). The sand ramps in San Miguel show wide-scale termination of sand supply in the latest Holocene time. The sand-ramp top dates or burial dates are 1.7 ± 0.9 ka (n = 28). The latest Holocene sand ramps are truncated along most of the island's northern coastline, indicating recent losses of nearshore sand reserves to onshore, alongshore, and, possibly, offshore sand sinks. The truncated sand ramps in San Miguel Island and in other sand-depleted marine coastlines provide warnings about future beach erosion and/or shoreline retreat from accelerated sea-level rise accompanying predicted global warming.

  4. DETERMINANTS OF SYARI'AH BASED FINANCING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION FOR SMEs DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Sakhowi, Akhmad; Chalimah, Chalimah

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the factors that affect the volume of Shariah-based financing for results and its contribution to the SMEs development in Indonesia. The determinant of sharia-based financing covers, third party funds, financing problems (non-performing Finance), inflation rates, interest rates on working capital loans, investment credit interest rate, and the gross domestic product.  This study uses secondary data sourced from Indonesian Banking statistics published by Bank Indonesia with...

  5. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL OF ECO TECHNOLOGIC ORGANIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Dan DOBROTĂ; Amza, Gheorghe

    2012-01-01

    The paper present a series of contributions to the development of a model of eco technologic organization. Managers of various organizations generally recognized the need for change, as a way to cope with competitive pressures, but many do not understand how the change should be implemented. The key to success is to integrate employees, their roles and responsibilities within the organization in a structure of processes. A process-based approach and starting with the declaration of vision and...

  6. All But Forgotten: Thomas Jefferson's Contribution to the Development of Public Administration in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Newbold, Stephanie P

    2006-01-01

    Thomas Jefferson's contribution to the development of public administration in the United States has been largely neglected. When we think of Jefferson our minds naturally reflect back to his authorship of the Declaration of American Independence, his commitment to religious freedom, his unwavering support for universal education at all levels of instruction, his establishment of the University of Virginia, and his public service as Foreign Minister to France, Secretary of State, Vice Presid...

  7. Contributions to the Development of a General Methodology for Innovation and Forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela IONESCU; Ion IONITA

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents authors’ contributions to the achievement of a first variant of the innovation and forecasting methodology. The various tools of TRIZ methodology (laws of systems development set for technical systems, the matrix of contradictions, the 40 inventive principles, the 39 parameters, Su-Field analysis, the method of the 9 screens etc) are already available, or can be customised to the specific type of the organization system. The TRIZ methodology for economics was embedded in a ...

  8. Contribution of Neuroimaging Studies to Understanding Development of Human Cognitive Brain Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, Tomoyo; Asada, Minoru; Naito, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Humans experience significant physical and mental changes from birth to adulthood, and a variety of perceptual, cognitive and motor functions mature over the course of approximately 20 years following birth. To deeply understand such developmental processes, merely studying behavioral changes is not sufficient; simultaneous investigation of the development of the brain may lead us to a more comprehensive understanding. Recent advances in noninvasive neuroimaging technologies largely contribut...

  9. Contribution to the development of the French electronuclear power; Contribution au developpement de l'electronucleaire francais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doizi, D

    2008-01-15

    In this work are described the research and development studies carried out by Denis Doizi on electronuclear power topics. It is composed into two parts: 1)the first part (1984-2001) deals with the research project on Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (Silva in French). In the second part (2001-2007) is particularly developed the plan of massive hydrogen production from nuclear heat. (O.M.)

  10. Clinicians' contributions to the development of coronary artery stents: a qualitative study of transformative device innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Xu, Shuai; Avorn, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Medical device innovation remains poorly understood, and policymakers disagree over how to incentivize early development. We sought to elucidate the components of transformative health care innovation by conducting an in-depth case study of development of a key medical device: coronary artery stents. We conducted semi-structured interviews with the innovators whose work contributed to the development of coronary artery stents who we identified based on a review of the regulatory, patent, and medical literature. Semi-structured interviews with each participant covered the interviewee's personal involvement in coronary artery stent development, the roles of institutions and other individuals in the development process, the interplay of funding and intellectual property in the interviewee's contribution, and finally reflections on lessons arising from the experience. Transcripts were analyzed using standard coding techniques and the constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis. We found that the first coronary artery stents emerged from three teams: Julio Palmaz and Richard Schatz, Cesare Gianturco and Gary Roubin, and Ulrich Sigwart. First, these individual physician-inventors saw the need for coronary artery stents in their clinical practice. In response, they developed prototypes with the support of academic medical centers leading to early validation studies. Larger companies entered afterwards with engineering support. Patents became paramount once the technology diffused. The case of coronary stents suggests that innovation policy should focus on supporting early physician-inventors at academic centers.

  11. Clinicians' contributions to the development of coronary artery stents: a qualitative study of transformative device innovation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron S Kesselheim

    Full Text Available Medical device innovation remains poorly understood, and policymakers disagree over how to incentivize early development. We sought to elucidate the components of transformative health care innovation by conducting an in-depth case study of development of a key medical device: coronary artery stents.We conducted semi-structured interviews with the innovators whose work contributed to the development of coronary artery stents who we identified based on a review of the regulatory, patent, and medical literature. Semi-structured interviews with each participant covered the interviewee's personal involvement in coronary artery stent development, the roles of institutions and other individuals in the development process, the interplay of funding and intellectual property in the interviewee's contribution, and finally reflections on lessons arising from the experience. Transcripts were analyzed using standard coding techniques and the constant comparative method of qualitative data analysis.We found that the first coronary artery stents emerged from three teams: Julio Palmaz and Richard Schatz, Cesare Gianturco and Gary Roubin, and Ulrich Sigwart. First, these individual physician-inventors saw the need for coronary artery stents in their clinical practice. In response, they developed prototypes with the support of academic medical centers leading to early validation studies. Larger companies entered afterwards with engineering support. Patents became paramount once the technology diffused. The case of coronary stents suggests that innovation policy should focus on supporting early physician-inventors at academic centers.

  12. Corporate Initiatives and Strategies to Meet the Environmental Challenges – Contributions Towards a Green Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ogrean

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to emphasize, based on an interdisciplinary and multi-level approach, on the actual and potential contributions of businesses towards a green economic development - through the positive integration of the environmental challenges within their initiatives and strategies. The main objectives that the paper will target in order to accomplish this mission are: (1. to outline the general framework of the green economic development; (2. to identify the specific environmental challenges businesses could and have to address in order to support the green economic development; (3. to analyze particular initiatives and strategies which have been successfully developed by companies aiming at internalizing the environmental imperative - and to argue in favor of a new business model, able to end, through the green economic development, a virtuous circle of co-evolution between businesses and the environment.

  13. Underestimated contribution of skeletal muscle in ornithine metabolism during mouse postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeuix, Benjamin; Duchamp, Claude; Levillain, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine aminotransferase (L-ornithine 2-oxoacid aminotransferase, OAT) is widely expressed in organs, but studies in mice have focused primarily on the intestine, kidney and liver because of the high OAT-specific activity in these tissues. This study aimed to investigate OAT activity in adult mouse tissues to assess the potential contribution to ornithine metabolism and to determine OAT control during postnatal development. OAT activity was widely distributed in mouse tissues. Sexual dimorphism was observed for most tissues in adults, with greater activity in females than in males. The contribution of skeletal muscles to total OAT activity (34% in males and 27% in females) was the greatest (50%) of the investigated tissues in pre-weaned mice and was similar to that of the liver in adults. OAT activity was found to be regulated in a tissue-specific manner during postnatal development in parallel with large changes in the plasma testosterone and corticosterone levels. After weaning, OAT activity markedly increased in the liver but dropped in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Anticipating weaning for 3 days led to an earlier reduction of OAT activity in skeletal muscles. Orchidectomy in adults decreased OAT activity in the liver but increased it in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. We concluded that the contribution of skeletal muscle to mouse ornithine metabolism may have been underestimated. The regulation of OAT in skeletal muscles differs from that in the liver. The present findings suggest important and tissue-specific metabolic roles for OAT during postnatal development in mice.

  14. Suitability of a South African silica sand for three-dimensional printing of foundry moulds and cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyembwe, Kasongo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Applications of three-dimensional printing (3DP to metal casting include, among other things, the direct manufacturing of foundry moulds and cores in refractory materials such as silica sand. The main properties of silica sand that are essentially related to the traditional moulding and core-making processes are: size distribution, clay content, pH, acid demand, and refractoriness. The silica sand used for 3DP must also be appropriately selected for the layer-based manufacturing process involved in 3DP. Properties such as grain size distribution, grain surface morphology, angularity, flowability, and recoating abilities have a particular importance when determining sand suitability. Because of these extra requirements, only a limited range of available foundry silica sands can be used for 3DP processes. The latter situation explains the scarcity and high cost of suitable silica sands, thus contributing to the relatively high operational costs of the 3DP processes for the production of sand moulds and cores. This research paper investigates the suitability of a locally-available silica sand for use in a Voxeljet VX1000 3DP machine. The local silica sand was assessed and compared with an imported silica sand recommended by the manufacturer of 3DP equipment in terms of foundry characteristics and recoating behaviour. The study shows that, despite the differences between the characteristics of the two silica sands, the local sand could be considered a suitable alternative to imported sand for rapid sand casting applications.

  15. Cerebellar Contributions to Language in Typical and Atypical Development: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vias, Carolina; Dick, Anthony Steven

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we present the growing literature suggesting, from a variety of angles, that the cerebellum contributes to higher-order cognitive functions, rather than simply sensorimotor functions, and more specifically to language and its development. The cerebellum's association with language function is determined by the specific cortico-cerebellar connectivity to the right cerebellum from the left cortical hemisphere. The findings we review suggest that the cerebellum plays an important role as part of a broader language network, and also implies that the cerebellum may be a potential new therapeutic target to treat speech and language deficits, especially during development.

  16. Colombian public policies contributing to the achievement of Millennium Development Goals in the health sector, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina M. Grisales

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available During the General Assembly of the United Nations, in September 2000,189 countries (including Colombia committed to eight objectives leading to a more human and fairer world. Such objectives are called the Millennium Development Goals (mdg and to achieve them it is crucial to incorporate them in the action agendas of each country. The purpose of this monograph is to recognize current public policies in Colombia and Antioquia leading the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals, specifically those related to the reduction of mortality among children less than 5 years of age, improvement of maternal health and fighting against hiv/aids, malaria and dengue.In Colombia, Conpes 91 of 2005 is the only guideline given by the Government establishing goals and strategies to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in 2015. Nevertheless, other policies, programs and projects before and even after the Millennium Statement (but without explicit purpose contribute to achieving such goals. Revision of those policies is an effort for the research project “Degree of contribution of public policies to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals related to the health sector, Antioquia, 2006”, which will evaluate the impact these guidelines have had in the achievement of the development goals in that particular sector.

  17. The contribution of behavioural science to primary care research: development and evaluation of behaviour change interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Behavioural science is concerned with predicting, explaining and changing behaviour. Taking a personal perspective, this article aims to show how behavioural science can contribute to primary care research, specifically in relation to the development and evaluation of interventions to change behaviour. After discussing the definition and measurement of behaviour, the principle of compatibility and theories of behaviour change, the article outlines two examples of behaviour change trials (one on medication adherence and the other on physical activity), which were part of a research programme on prevention of chronic disease and its consequences. The examples demonstrate how, in a multidisciplinary context, behavioural science can contribute to primary care research in several important ways, including posing relevant research questions, defining the target behaviour, understanding the psychological determinants of behaviour, developing behaviour change interventions and selection or development of measures. The article concludes with a number of recommendations: (i) whether the aim is prediction, explanation or change, defining the target behaviour is a crucial first step; (ii) interventions should be explicitly based on theories that specify the factors that need to be changed in order to produce the desired change in behaviour; (iii) intervention developers need to be aware of the differences between different theories and select a theory only after careful consideration of the alternatives assessed against relevant criteria; and (iv) developers need to be aware that interventions can never be entirely theory based.

  18. Contribution of Social entrepreneurship to the Development of Cabo Verde: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Bernardino

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Social entrepreneurship has been recognized as a valuable tool for promoting sustainable economic development. The aim of the study is to explore the extent to which Portuguese Non-Governmental Organizations for the Development (ONGDP contribute to the development of Cape Verde (CV. Thus, we indend to identify and assess the projects developed by ONGDP in CV, to understand the difficulties faced and the underlying motivations. To this end a qualitative methodology was used through the collection and analysis of secondary data (desk research and interviews with the responsible of six ONGDP working in CV. The study concluded that the ONGDP do not focus on one area of activity, but several, such as health, rural development, education and training, among others. We found that ONGPs act in partnership with local organizations, which are crucial for understanding the concrete reality. CV has been benefited from the projects because of te common languege shared. To obtain resources, most ONGDP rely on in-kind contributions and volunteering. The generation of social value was achieved mainly through economic generating activities, seen as the most effective to ensure a sustained social response. The main difficulties arise from the specific characteristics of the territory and its orography which have implications for accessibility and communication.

  19. Contribution of Neuroimaging Studies to Understanding Development of Human Cognitive Brain Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyo Morita

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Humans experience significant physical and mental changes from birth to adulthood, and a variety of perceptual, cognitive, and motor functions mature over the course of approximately 20 years following birth. To deeply understand such developmental processes, merely studying behavioral changes is not sufficient; simultaneous investigation of the development of the brain may lead us to more comprehensive understanding. Recent advances in noninvasive neuroimaging technologies largely contribute to this understanding. Here, it is very important to consider the development of the brain from the perspectives of structure and function because both structure and function of the human brain mature slowly. In this review, we first discuss the process of structural brain development, i.e., how the structure of the brain, which is crucial when discussing functional brain development, changes with age. Second, we introduce some representative studies and the latest studies related to the functional development of the brain, particularly for visual, facial recognition, and social cognition functions, all of which are important for humans. Finally, we summarize how brain science can contribute to developmental study and discuss the challenges that neuroimaging should address in the future.

  20. Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge : Annual report : 1943-1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes activities on Sand Lake NWR from 1943 to 1944. Wildlife, water levels, Refuge development, economic uses, and easement refuges are discussed....

  1. The Geodiversity in Drift Sand Landscapes of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Riksen, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The authors carried out detailed field studies of more than twelve drift sand landscapes in The Netherlands. The objective of these studies was to restore Natura-2000 values by restoring the wind activity. Active drift sands occur almost exclusively in The Netherlands, Natura 2000 habitat 2330 'Inland dunes with open Corynephorus and Agrostis grasslands', for which reason our country is largely responsible for this European landscape. Active drift sands had almost disappeared for two reasons: first, the stabilization of the drift sands by air pollution, mainly nitrogen, which stimulates the growth of algae and grasses that initiate soil formation, and second, by the growth of forests surrounding the sands, which decreases the wind force. The restoration studies revealed differences in the geodiversity between and within the drift sand areas. Whereas the drift sands on geological and soil maps show as almost homogenous areas, they have in fact highly variable geo-conditions of which examples will be given. These geodiversity aspects concern differences in geomorphological structure, origin, sediments and age of the drift sands. Differences in wind and water erosion, trampling and soil formation add to the geodiversity within the drift sand areas. Especially in the primary stages of succession the differences in geodiversity are relevant for the Natura-2000 values. We discerned three main types of active sands. Firstly, the impressive drift sands with large parabolic dune structures, often consisting of series of interlocking parabolic dunes. They developed from the northeast towards the southwest, against the direction of the dominant wind, and must have taken centuries to develop. Small parts of these systems are still active, other parts show different degrees of soil formation. Their origin is still unclear but probably dates from medieval times (Heidinga, 1985, Jungerius & Riksen, 2008). Second are the drift sand areas with irregular hills from 0.5 to about 2

  2. Contributions of national and global health estimates to monitoring health-related sustainable development goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundhamcharoen, Kanitta; Limwattananon, Supon; Kusreesakul, Khanitta; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2016-01-01

    The millennium development goals triggered an increased demand for data on child and maternal mortalities for monitoring progress. With the advent of the sustainable development goals and growing evidence of an epidemiological transition toward non-communicable diseases, policymakers need data on mortality and disease trends and distribution to inform effective policies and support monitoring progress. Where there are limited capacities to produce national health estimates (NHEs), global health estimates (GHEs) can fill gaps for global monitoring and comparisons. This paper discusses lessons learned from Thailand's burden of disease (BOD) study on capacity development on NHEs and discusses the contributions and limitations of GHEs in informing policies at the country level. Through training and technical support by external partners, capacities are gradually strengthened and institutionalized to enable regular updates of BOD at national and subnational levels. Initially, the quality of cause-of-death reporting in death certificates was inadequate, especially for deaths occurring in the community. Verbal autopsies were conducted, using domestic resources, to determine probable causes of deaths occurring in the community. This method helped to improve the estimation of years of life lost. Since the achievement of universal health coverage in 2002, the quality of clinical data on morbidities has also considerably improved. There are significant discrepancies between the Global Burden of Disease 2010 study estimates for Thailand and the 1999 nationally generated BOD, especially for years of life lost due to HIV/AIDS, and the ranking of priority diseases. National ownership of NHEs and an effective interface between researchers and decision-makers contribute to enhanced country policy responses, whereas subnational data are intended to be used by various subnational partners. Although GHEs contribute to benchmarking country achievement compared with global health

  3. The microbiology of oil sands tailings: past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foght, Julia M; Gieg, Lisa M; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-05-01

    Surface mining of enormous oil sands deposits in northeastern Alberta, Canada since 1967 has contributed greatly to Canada's economy but has also received negative international attention due largely to environmental concerns and challenges. Not only have microbes profoundly affected the composition and behavior of this petroleum resource over geological time, they currently influence the management of semi-solid tailings in oil sands tailings ponds (OSTPs) and tailings reclamation. Historically, microbial impacts on OSTPs were generally discounted, but next-generation sequencing and biogeochemical studies have revealed unexpectedly diverse indigenous communities and expanded our fundamental understanding of anaerobic microbial functions. OSTPs that experienced different processing and management histories have developed distinct microbial communities that influence the behavior and reclamation of the tailings stored therein. In particular, the interactions of Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes with methanogenic archaea impact greenhouse gas emissions, sulfur cycling, pore water toxicity, sediment biogeochemistry and densification, water usage and the trajectory of long-term mine waste reclamation. This review summarizes historical data; synthesizes current understanding of microbial diversity and activities in situ and in vitro; predicts microbial effects on tailings remediation and reclamation; and highlights knowledge gaps for future research. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Fathers' Early Contributions to Children's Language Development in Families from Low-income Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancsofar, Nadya; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne

    2010-10-01

    This study utilized a large sample of two-parent families from low-income rural communities to examine the contributions of father education and vocabulary, during picture book interactions with their infants at 6 months of age, to children's subsequent communication development at 15 months and expressive language development at 36 months. After controlling for family demographics, child characteristics, as well as mother education and vocabulary, father education and father vocabulary during the picture-book task were related to more advanced language development at both 15 and 36 months of age. Only mother education, but not vocabulary during book-reading was related to children's later language. These findings support the growing evidence on the importance of fathers in understanding children's early communication and language development.

  5. [Nursing contributions to the development of the Brazilian Telehealth Lactation Support Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Cláudia; Silva, Isília Aparecida; Soares, Alda Valéria Neves; Aragaki, Ilva Marico Mizumoto; Shimoda, Gilcéria Tochika; Zaniboni, Vanessa Forte; Padula, Camila Brolezzi; Muller, Fabiana Swain; Salve, Jeanine Maria; Daré, Sergio Junior; Wen, Chao Lung; Peres, Heloísa Helena Ciqueto; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2013-08-01

    The National Telehealth Program was founded by the Ministry of Health, in partnership with the Ministry of Education (Ministério da Educação - MEC) and the Ministry of Science and Technology (Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia - MCT), to support the development of family healthcare teams throughout the country. The São Paulo Telehealth Center has developed the Telehealth Lactation Support program, which provides primary healthcare professionals with information on diverse aspects of breastfeeding. This paper reports the development of the Lactation Support program and the nursing contributions. Project methodology included the formation of a multidisciplinary group of pediatricians, nurses, speech and language therapists, nutritionists, and dentists. Multimedia teaching resources were prepared for inclusion in the Cybertutor platform. Telehealth Lactation Support is an innovative and promising addition to continuing education for healthcare professionals and provides a framework for the development of other programs.

  6. ANALYSIS AND CHALLENGES REGARDING WOMEN CONTRIBUTION TO THE SME DEVELOPMENT IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana LUPASC

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, entrepreneurship is promoting and in SMEs are over 99%. SMEs are viewed like the “economics engine”, they are the one that are generating work places. The researches in the entrepreneurial field proved that there is a good relation between the level of the entrepreneurial activity (the frequency of which in an economy it is creating new enterprises and the economic growth. More intense the entrepreneurial activity is, the more it will have positive effects on the economy in generally. In the past years, Europe has increased interest in female entrepreneurship. This support has resulted in the creation and implementation of public policies to encourage women to engage into business, and thereby stimulate economic growth. The contribution of women in the labor market is becoming more relevant. We present analysis, challenges and characteristics of women's contribution to the development of SMEs in Romania.

  7. Attractive action of FGF-signaling contributes to the postnatal developing hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccioli, V; Bueno, C; Belvindrah, R; Lledo, P-M; Martinez, S

    2015-04-01

    During brain development neural cell migration is a crucial, well-orchestrated, process, which leads to the proper whole brain structural organization. As development proceeds, new neurons are continuously produced, and this protracted neurogenesis is maintained throughout life in specialized germinative areas inside the telencephalon: the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. In the anterior SVZ, newly generated neurons migrate through long distances, along the rostral migratory stream (RMS), before reaching their final destinations in the olfactory bulb (OB). Intriguingly, recent observations pointed out the existence of other postnatal tangential routes of migration alternative to the RMS but still starting from the SVZ. The presence of such dynamic and heterogeneous cell movements contributes to important features in the postnatal brain such as neural cell replacement and plasticity in cortical regions. In this work, we asked whether a caudal migratory pathway starting from the caudal SVZ continues through life. Strikingly, in vivo analysis of this caudal migration revealed the presence of a postnatal contribution of SVZ to the hippocampus. In vitro studies of the caudal migratory stream revealed the role of FGF signaling in attracting caudally the migrating neuroblasts during postnatal stages. Our findings demonstrate a postnatal neuronal contribution from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) CGE-SVZ to the hippocampus through an FGF-dependent migrating mechanism. All together our data emphasizes the emerging idea that a developmental program is still operating in discrete domains of the postnatal brain and may contribute to the regulation of neural cell replacement processes in physiological plasticity and/or pathological circumstances. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Inflammasome genetics contributes to the development and control of active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza de Lima, D; Ogusku, M M; Sadahiro, A; Pontillo, A

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a major public health problem. An estimated one-third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) but remains asymptomatic (latent TB) and only 5% to 10% of these latent individuals will develop active pulmonary TB. Factors affecting the balance between latent and active TB are mostly unknown, even if host genome has been shown to contribute to the outcome of Mtb response. Acute inflammation and Th1 response are important in the early clearance of the bacteria as it was emphasized by the association between immune genes (i.e.: HLA, IFNG, TNF, NRPAM1, IL10) variants and the development of active pulmonary TB. Recently, the role of the inflammasome in experimental TB has been demonstrated, however, to our knowledge, no data still exist about the contribution of inflammasome genetics to Mtb susceptibility and/or to the development of active TB. For this reason, selected polymorphisms in inflammasome genes were analysed in a case/control cohort of individuals with active pulmonary TB from an endemic area of Brazil Amazon. Our data evidence the novel association between polymorphisms in NLRP3-inflammasome encoding genes and active pulmonary TB, and replicated the association between P2X7 and TB observed in other populations. These results emphasize the role of NLRP3-inflammasome also in human TB, and contribute to our knowledge about pathways involved in the development of active TB, even if deeper investigation are needed to fully elucidate the role of the complex in Mtb infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of a Nigerian standard sand: Igbokoda sand

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojuri, OO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the Middle Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone near Ottawa, Illinois, had been picked by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as the reference sand to employ in testing cement and strength of concrete [9]. To the best of our knowledge... and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques due to its importance in cement, geotechnical/geo-environmental research in Nigeria. This should halt importation of standard silica sand for mortar and concrete testing...

  10. Characterization of sand lenses embedded in tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, K.E.S.; Nilsson, B.

    2012-01-01

    Tills dominate large parts of the superficial sediments on the Northern hemisphere. These glacial diamictons are extremely heterogeneous and riddled with fractures and lenses of sand or gravel. The frequency and geometry of sand lenses within tills are strongly linked to glaciodynamic processes...... occurring in various glacial environments. This study specifically focuses on the appearance and spatial distribution of sand lenses in tills. It introduces a methodology on how to measure and characterize sand lenses in the field with regard to size, shape and degree of deformation. A set of geometric...... parameters is defined to allow characterization of sand lenses. The proposed classification scheme uses a stringent terminology to distinguish several types of sand lenses based on the geometry. It includes sand layers, sand sheets, sand bodies, sand pockets and sand stringers. The methodology has been...

  11. "It shall contribute to ... the strict observance and development of international law...": The role of the Court of Justice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, P.J.; Rosas, A.; Levits, E.; Bot, Y.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution seeks to analyse the contribution of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) to the European Union’s duty to contribute to the strict observation and development of international law (Article 3.5 TEU). The introduction shows that the ECJ’s hands were largely tied by some basic

  12. Development of a group contribution method to predict aqueous phase hydroxyl radical (HO*) reaction rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Li, Ke; Westerhoff, Paul; Crittenden, John

    2009-08-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO*) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites of organic compounds and initiates complex chain mechanisms. In order to help understand the reaction mechanisms, a rule-based model was previously developed to predict the reaction pathways. For a kinetic model, there is a need to develop a rate constant estimator that predicts the rate constants for a variety of organic compounds. In this study, a group contribution method (GCM) is developed to predict the aqueous phase HO* rate constants for the following reaction mechanisms: (1) H-atom abstraction, (2) HO* addition to alkenes, (3) HO* addition to aromatic compounds, and (4) HO* interaction with sulfur (S)-, nitrogen (N)-, or phosphorus (P)-atom-containing compounds. The GCM hypothesizes that an observed experimental rate constant for a given organic compound is the combined rate of all elementary reactions involving HO*, which can be estimated using the Arrhenius activation energy, E(a), and temperature. Each E(a) for those elementary reactions can be comprised of two parts: (1) a base part that includes a reactive bond in each reaction mechanism and (2) contributions from its neighboring functional groups. The GCM includes 66 group rate constants and 80 group contribution factors, which characterize each HO* reaction mechanism with steric effects of the chemical structure groups and impacts of the neighboring functional groups, respectively. Literature-reported experimental HO* rate constants for 310 and 124 compounds were used for calibration and prediction, respectively. The genetic algorithms were used to determine the group rate constants and group contribution factors. The group contribution factors for H-atom abstraction and HO* addition to the aromatic compounds were found to linearly correlate with the Taft constants, sigma*, and electrophilic substituent parameters, sigma+, respectively. The best calibrations for 83% (257 rate constants) and predictions for 62% (77

  13. Improved Probe for Evaluating Compaction of Mold Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overfelt, Ruel A.; Bakhtiyarov, Sayavur I.

    2008-01-01

    A nominally stationary tubular probe denoted a telescopic probe has been developed as an improved alternative to a prior movable probe used to evaluate the local degree of compaction of mold sand. The probe is inserted vertically to a desired depth in a sand-filled molding flask and the back pressure at the given rate of flow of air is recorded as a measure of the degree of partial impermeability and, hence, of the degree of compaction of sand in the vicinity of the probe tip.

  14. Used Furan Sand Reclamation in REGMAS Vibratory Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper, especially dealt with problems of reclamation of used furan sand, carried out in new, vibratory sand reclamation unit REGMAS developed by researches from AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Foundry Engineering in Cracow (Poland. Functional characteristics of reclamation unit as well as the results of reclamation of used sand with furfuryl resin are discussed in the paper. The quality of reclaim was tested by means of the LOI and pH value, dust content in the reclaim and at least by the the quality of the castings produced in moulds prepared with the use of reclaimed matrix.

  15. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  16. Initial and continuing education: contributions to the profesional development of mathematics teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Manrique

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article seeks to analyze the relations between the Initial and Continuing Education of Mathematics Teachers in the perspective a process of continuum, based on the assumption of the development and professional outreach of the teaching profession. This study was performed under the qualitative approach and for its development, accumulated theoretical knowledge based on bibliographical research was taken into account, as well as meaningful testimonies of participants in these two educational spaces. The discussions and reflections presented here are based on studies developed on teacher education, the initial education of mathematics teachers, the continuing education of mathematics teacher, and professional outreach. We offer excerpts from two on-going Masters research projects, providing evidence of factors that may contribute to the comprehension of professional outreach, during the initial education process or even the continuing education process of mathematics teachers.

  17. The Development of White-Asian Categorization: Contributions from Skin Color and Other Physiognomic Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Yarrow; Dotsch, Ron; Clark, Amelia R; Stepanova, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    We examined the development of racial categorizations of faces spanning the European-East Asian ("White-Asian") categorical continuum in children between the ages of four and nine as well as adults. We employed a stimulus set that independently varied skin color and other aspects of facial physiognomy, allowing the contribution of each to be assessed independently and in interaction with each other. Results demonstrated substantial development across this age range in children's ability to draw on both sorts of cue, with over twice as much variance explained by stimulus variation in adults than children. Nonetheless, children were clearly sensitive to both skin color and other aspects of facial physiognomy, suggesting that understanding of the White-Asian category boundary develops in a somewhat different way than understanding of the White-Black category boundary, in which attention to features other than skin color appear only somewhat later. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for theories of social categorization.

  18. Histone H3 variants and their chaperones during development and disease: contributing to epigenetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipescu, Dan; Müller, Sebastian; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    Within the nucleus, the interplay between lineage-specific transcription factors and chromatin dynamics defines cellular identity. Control of this interplay is necessary to properly balance stability and plasticity during the development and entire life span of multicellular organisms. Here, we present our current knowledge of the contribution of histone H3 variants to chromatin dynamics during development. We review the network of histone chaperones that governs their deposition timing and sites of incorporation and highlight how their distinct distribution impacts genome organization and function. We integrate the importance of H3 variants in the context of nuclear reprogramming and cell differentiation, and, using the centromere as a paradigm, we describe a case in which the identity of a given genomic locus is propagated across different cell types. Finally, we compare development to changes in stress and disease. Both physiological and pathological settings underline the importance of H3 dynamics for genome and chromatin integrity.

  19. Metasynthesis of Factors Contributing to Children’s Communication Development: Influence on Reading and Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber J. Godwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine what previous studies have found to be factors that contribute to a child’s initial communication development and previously identified effects of reading mathematics storybooks to toddlers or preschoolers. Therefore, it follows that the earlier a preschooler is exposed to mathematics vocabulary, the easier mathematics vocabulary acquisition and understanding can be for that child, which can result in an increase in future academic achievement. This metasynthesis was conducted to gather information on the effects that interactive relationships with caregivers have on a child’s ability to communicate and then how symbiotic reading and mathematics interventions can affect a child’s ability to think and communicate mathematically. According to the data analyzed for this metasynthesis, caregivers’ language relationships help facilitate a child’s early communication development and reading and mathematics symbiotic instruction can lead to developing a child’s ability to think and communicate mathematically.

  20. An added dimension: GC atmospheric pressure chemical ionization FTICR MS and the Athabasca oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Mark P; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V

    2014-08-19

    The Athabasca oil sands industry, an alternative source of petroleum, uses large quantities of water during processing of the oil sands. In keeping with Canadian environmental policy, the processed water cannot be released to natural waters and is thus retained on-site in large tailings ponds. There is an increasing need for further development of analytical methods for environmental monitoring. The following details the first example of the application of gas chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FTICR MS) for the study of environmental samples from the Athabasca region of Canada. APCI offers the advantages of reduced fragmentation compared to other ionization methods and is also more amenable to compounds that are inaccessible by electrospray ionization. The combination of GC with ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry can improve the characterization of complex mixtures where components cannot be resolved by GC alone. This, in turn, affords the ability to monitor extracted ion chromatograms for components of the same nominal mass and isomers in the complex mixtures. The proof of concept work described here is based upon the characterization of one oil sands process water sample and two groundwater samples in the area of oil sands activity. Using the new method, the Ox and OxS compound classes predominated, with OxS classes being particularly relevant to the oil sands industry. The potential to resolve retention times for individual components within the complex mixture, highlighting contributions from isomers, and to characterize retention time profiles for homologous series is shown, in addition to the ability to follow profiles of double bond equivalents and carbon number for a compound class as a function of retention time. The method is shown to be well-suited for environmental forensics.

  1. Enhanced SMAD1 Signaling Contributes to Impairments of Early Development in CFC-iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu-Min; Kim, Seung-Kyoon; Kim, Dongkyu; Choi, Jung-Yun; Im, Ilkyun; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Beom Hee; Yoo, Han-Wook; Han, Yong-Mahn

    2015-05-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a developmental disorder caused by constitutively active ERK signaling manifesting mainly from BRAF mutations. Little is known about the role of elevated ERK signaling in CFC syndrome during early development. Here, we show that both SMAD1 and ERK signaling pathways may contribute to the developmental defects in CFC syndrome. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from dermal fibroblasts of a CFC syndrome patient (CFC-iPSCs) revealed early developmental defects in embryoid body (EB) development, β-catenin localization, and neuronal differentiation. Both SMAD1 and ERK signalings were significantly activated in CFC-iPSCs during EB formation. Most of the β-catenin was dissociated from the membrane and preferentially localized into the nucleus in CFC-EBs. Furthermore, activation of SMAD1 signaling recapitulated early developmental defects in wild-type iPSCs. Intriguingly, inhibition of SMAD1 signaling in CFC-iPSCs rescued aberrant EB morphology, impaired neuronal differentiation, and altered β-catenin localization. These results suggest that SMAD1 signaling may be a key pathway contributing the pathogenesis of CFC syndrome during early development. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  2. Analysis of anther transcriptomes to identify genes contributing to meiosis and male gametophyte development in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rita

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In flowering plants, the anther is the site of male gametophyte development. Two major events in the development of the male germline are meiosis and the asymmetric division in the male gametophyte that gives rise to the vegetative and generative cells, and the following mitotic division in the generative cell that produces two sperm cells. Anther transcriptomes have been analyzed in many plant species at progressive stages of development by using microarray and sequence-by synthesis-technologies to identify genes that regulate anther development. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of rice anther transcriptomes at four distinct stages, focusing on identifying regulatory components that contribute to male meiosis and germline development. Further, these transcriptomes have been compared with the transcriptomes of 10 stages of rice vegetative and seed development to identify genes that express specifically during anther development. Results Transcriptome profiling of four stages of anther development in rice including pre-meiotic (PMA, meiotic (MA, anthers at single-celled (SCP and tri-nucleate pollen (TPA revealed about 22,000 genes expressing in at least one of the anther developmental stages, with the highest number in MA (18,090 and the lowest (15,465 in TPA. Comparison of these transcriptome profiles to an in-house generated microarray-based transcriptomics database comprising of 10 stages/tissues of vegetative as well as reproductive development in rice resulted in the identification of 1,000 genes specifically expressed in anther stages. From this sub-set, 453 genes were specific to TPA, while 78 and 184 genes were expressed specifically in MA and SCP, respectively. The expression pattern of selected genes has been validated using real time PCR and in situ hybridizations. Gene ontology and pathway analysis of stage-specific genes revealed that those encoding transcription factors and components of protein folding

  3. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  4. Drained Triaxial Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praastrup, U.; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    In the process of understanding and developing models for geomaterials, the stress-strain behaviour is commonly studied by performing triaxial tests. In the present study static triaxial tests have been performed to gain knowledge of the stress-strain behaviour of frictional materials during mono...... monotonic loading. The tests reported herein are all drained tests, starting from different initial states of stress and following various stress paths. AIl the tests are performed on reconstituted medium dense specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand....

  5. Breda Filo and her contribution to the development of the Slovenian librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Sapač

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the contribution of Breda Filo to the development of Slovenian librarianship. She researched and published articles concerning library systems, typology of libraries and library organization. She was interested in library legislation and standardization. At first, she was interested in public libraries, later she devoted to the university libraries, particulary to the evidence of research work, information resources, data bases and user education. She cooperated actively in the Slovenian Library association and associations abroad. She prepared study programs at the Librarianship Department and lectured the students of librarianship.

  6. The contribution of religious priests to the development of liturgical worship of Sacred Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Włodzimierz Mocydlarz

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Contribution by many religious priests (Benedictines, Cistercians, Dominicans, Franciscans and Jesuits to the devotion of Sacred Heart has improved its theological roots. The article lists priests who conducted the study of Biblical and patristic sources of the cult of Sacred Heart. Their prayer, meditation and contemplation deepened the truth of the Gospel and Tradition. The worship of Sacred Heart is rooted in the Word of God and in it’s Patristic interpretation, but it’s theological development and the intervention of God through Marguerite Marie Alacoque brought to the approval of the cult by the Church.

  7. Traceability of Height Measurements on Green Sand Molds using Optical 3D Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohaghegh, Kamran; Yazdanbakhsh, S.A.; Tiedje, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a reliable measurement procedure for dimensional measurements on green sand molds is a prerequisite for analysis of geometric deviations in mass production of quality castings. Surface of the green sand mold is not suitable for measurements using a tactile coordinate measuring machine....... This paper presents a metrological approach for height measurement on green sand molds using an optical 3D scanner with fringe projection. A new sand sample was developed with a hard binder to withstand the contact force of a touch probe, while keeping optical cooperativeness similar to green sand...

  8. Improved Sand-Compaction Method for Lost-Foam Metal Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiyarov, Sayavur I.; Overfelt, Ruel A.

    2008-01-01

    An improved method of filling a molding flask with sand and compacting the sand around a refractory-coated foam mold pattern has been developed for incorporation into the lost-foam metal-casting process. In comparison with the conventional method of sand filling and compaction, this method affords more nearly complete filling of the space around the refractory-coated foam mold pattern and more thorough compaction of the sand. In so doing, this method enables the sand to better support the refractory coat under metallostatic pressure during filling of the mold with molten metal.

  9. Sensuous Communism: Sand with Marx

    OpenAIRE

    White, Claire

    2015-01-01

    This article reads George Sand's Le Compagnon du Tour de France (1840) alongside Karl Marx's “Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844.” It considers how these contemporaries bring to bear on their accounts of labor, estrangement, and the structures of property an attention to the fate of the senses under capitalism. Both elaborate a critique of political economy—Sand's voiced by her worker-hero—that demonstrates how the individual's sensuous life is circumscribed by the pressures of mate...

  10. Casting Ductile Iron in Layer Moulds Made from Ecological Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rączka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of tests performed under the target project in Hardtop Foundry Charsznica.The objective of the tests and studies was to develop a technology of making high-quality ductile iron castings, combined witheffective means of environmental protection. The studies presented in this article related to castings weighing from 1 to 300 kg made from ductile iron of grades 400-15 and 500-7, using two-layer moulds, where the facing and core sand was the sand with an alkaline organic binder, while backing sand was the sand with an inorganic geopolymer binder.A simplified method of sand reclamation was applied with possible reuse of the reclaim as an addition to the backing sand. The castiron spheroidising treatment and inoculation were selected taking into account the specific conditions of Hardtop Foundry. A pilot batch of castings was made, testing the gating and feeding systems and using exothermic sleeves on risers. The study confirmed the validity of the adopted concept of making ductile iron castings in layer moulds, while maintaining the content of sand with an organic binder at a level of maximum 15%.

  11. Genome Stability by DNA Polymerase β in Neural Progenitors Contributes to Neuronal Differentiation in Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Kohei; Uyeda, Akiko; Shida, Mitsuhiro; Hirayama, Teruyoshi; Yagi, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko; Sugo, Noriyuki

    2017-08-30

    DNA repair is crucial for genome stability in the developing cortex, as somatic de novo mutations cause neurological disorders. However, how DNA repair contributes to neuronal development is largely unknown. To address this issue, we studied the spatiotemporal roles of DNA polymerase β (Polβ), a key enzyme in DNA base excision repair pathway, in the developing cortex using distinct forebrain-specific conditional knock-out mice, Emx1-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) and Nex-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. Polβ expression was absent in both neural progenitors and postmitotic neurons in Emx1-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice, whereas only postmitotic neurons lacked Polβ expression in Nex-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. We found that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were frequently detected during replication in cortical progenitors of Emx1-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. Increased DSBs remained in postmitotic cells, which resulted in p53-mediated neuronal apoptosis. This neuronal apoptosis caused thinning of the cortical plate, although laminar structure was normal. In addition, accumulated DSBs also affected growth of corticofugal axons but not commissural axons. These phenotypes were not observed in Nex-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. Moreover, cultured Polβ-deficient neural progenitors exhibited higher sensitivity to the base-damaging agent methylmethanesulfonate, resulting in enhanced DSB formation. Similar damage was found by vitamin C treatment, which induces TET1-mediated DNA demethylation via 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. Together, genome stability mediated by Polβ-dependent base excision repair is crucial for the competence of neural progenitors, thereby contributing to neuronal differentiation in cortical development.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT DNA repair is crucial for development of the nervous system. However, how DNA polymerase β (Polβ)-dependent DNA base excision repair pathway contributes to the process is still unknown. We found that loss of Polβ in cortical progenitors rather than postmitotic neurons led to

  12. The Human Resource function contribution to human development in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Abbott

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: This article discusses the extent to which human under-development in South Africa and the consequent societal problems of poverty and inequality are addressed by the work of HR practitioners. Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to provide empirical evidence of the appropriateness of current HR practice in South African socio-economic conditions and to make suggestions for improvement. Motivation for the study: Societal problems caused by human under-development are impacting more and more on organisations in South Africa. It is currently not known to what extent and in what way HR work contributes to the improvement of this situation. Research design and method: An interpretive approach was adopted. Qualitative methods within a basic qualitative study strategy were used, including interviewing and a focus group. A sample of 50 individual HR practitioners at various organisational levels was interviewed. Data were analysed by means of thematic analysis. Main findings: Societal problems caused by human under-development impact tremendously on the daily work of HR practitioners. Many HR practitioners do play an Employee Advocate role within the workplace but do not see this role as extending further to any degree. Some role models of more strategic responses were found. Practical/managerial implications: HR practitioners would better fulfil their mandate to work for the success of their organisation if they took pro-active steps to accelerate human development outside their organisations. Contribution/value-add: Empirical evidence is presented to support efforts to broaden the focus of HR work to human development. This linkage has not previously been researched.

  13. Characterization of Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater on Mars by Application of a Mesoscale Model (the Mars MM5) and by Development of a Graphical Information System (GIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, L. K.; Richardson, M. I.; Bandfield, J. L.; Ward, A. W.; Albee, A. L.; Toigo, A. D.

    2001-12-01

    Aeolian action is most likely the dominant geologic process currently acting on the surface of Mars. Data recently acquired by the Mars Global Surveyor have provided an unprecedented opportunity to study in detail the surface features produced by aeolian activity in the area of the southern highlands west of the Hellas Basin. All available data sets have been incorporated into a Graphical Information System (GIS) in order to correlate aeolian features with data products from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (e.g., albedo, thermal inertia, and composition) and from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (e.g., surface roughness, and elevation). In addition, a mesoscale model (the Mars MM5) has been applied over the study area to determine sand transport capacity and dominant wind directions. We present results from Proctor Crater, a large ( ~150~km diameter), prominent, and well-studied crater of the southern highlands of Mars. In the eastern portion of Proctor Crater is a dunefield that spans 60~x~35~km. It consists of what has been traditionally thought of as large ( ~1~km spacing), dark transverse dune ridges. Analysis of the GIS has led to numerous conclusions regarding the dunes of Proctor Crater. Surficial mapping of dune crests has led to the hypothesis that the dunes are not transverse (i.e., perpendicular to the dominant dune-forming wind) but that instead they are longitudinal (i.e., parallel to the resultant of multiple dune-forming winds). Mesoscale modeling supports the existence of a complex wind regime that affects the shape of the dunes and determines the state of activity of sand saltation. Close inspection of high resolution images (from the Narrow Angle camera on the Mars Orbiter Camera) reveals that the large dark dunes are surrounded by smaller ( ~30~m spacing), higher albedo duneforms with which they share a complex interaction. Compositional analysis of Proctor Crater has determined that the dark dunes are largely basaltic, more so than the

  14. Cambodian peasant's contribution to rural development: a perspective from Kampong Thom Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diepart, JC.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to identify the rationality of peasant communities and their contribution to rural development in Kampong Thom province. To do so, an interdisciplinary analytical framework addresses the dynamics of land use and land tenure, the strategies of labor force allocation as well as the determinants of land and labor agricultural productivities amongst peasant communities. It rests on details field surveys in two communes located in very distinct agro-ecological settings of Kampong Thom province. A land use change analysis based on time-series aerial photos is conducted with participatory inventories of natural resources. It shows that endogenous management of forest and fisheries resources generate significant incomes and, at the same time, contribute to maintaining biodiversity. The paper analyses how this contribution is challenged by the non-peasant actors involved in massive State land privatization. Aiming to full employment, peasant households enjoy a great flexibility in the way they allocate labor force, especially in line with the age of active labor and the fluctuation of labor opportunity costs. Principally due to an unequal land holding distribution, agricultural income is unfairly distributed but this inequality is actually balanced by the access to common-pool resources of crucial importance for the poorest and by the recourse to non farming activities, which is an important factor of socio-economic differentiation amongst households. The main economic indicators of rice production confirm that peasant households always try to maximize their income in step with the production factor they have in relatively less amount. A land market simulation stresses that, contrarily to theoretical assumptions, land access through sale (and purchase does not result in a fairer land distribution. Nevertheless, land leases amongst peasant households seem more promising to ensure equitable access to land as they are embedded in collective

  15. The sinus venosus myocardium contributes to the atrioventricular canal: potential role during atrioventricular node development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelder, Tim P; Vicente-Steijn, Rebecca; Harryvan, Tom J; Kosmidis, Georgios; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Poelmann, Rob E; Schalij, Martin J; DeRuiter, Marco C; Jongbloed, Monique R M

    2015-06-01

    The presence of distinct electrophysiological pathways within the atrioventricular node (AVN) is a prerequisite for atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia to occur. In this study, the different cell contributions that may account for the anatomical and functional heterogeneity of the AVN were investigated. To study the temporal development of the AVN, the expression pattern of ISL1, expressed in cardiac progenitor cells, was studied in sequential stages performing co-staining with myocardial markers (TNNI2 and NKX2-5) and HCN4 (cardiac conduction system marker). An ISL1+/TNNI2+/HCN4+ continuity between the myocardium of the sinus venosus and atrioventricular canal was identified in the region of the putative AVN, which showed a pacemaker-like phenotype based on single cell patch-clamp experiments. Furthermore, qPCR analysis showed that even during early development, different cell populations can be identified in the region of the putative AVN. Fate mapping was performed by in ovo vital dye microinjection. Embryos were harvested and analysed 24 and 48 hrs post-injection. These experiments showed incorporation of sinus venosus myocardium in the posterior region of the atrioventricular canal. The myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to the atrioventricular canal. It is postulated that the myocardium of the sinus venosus contributes to nodal extensions or transitional cells of the AVN since these cells are located in the posterior region of the AVN. This finding may help to understand the origin of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  16. Prostate Cancer Stem-like Cells Contribute to the Development of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Ojo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT has been the standard care for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PC since the 1940s. Although ADT shows clear benefits for many patients, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC inevitably occurs. In fact, with the two recent FDA-approved second-generation anti-androgens abiraterone and enzalutamide, resistance develops rapidly in patients with CRPC, despite their initial effectiveness. The lack of effective therapeutic solutions towards CRPC largely reflects our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for CRPC development. While persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling under castration levels of serum testosterone (<50 ng/mL contributes to resistance to ADT, it is also clear that CRPC evolves via complex mechanisms. Nevertheless, the physiological impact of individual mechanisms and whether these mechanisms function in a cohesive manner in promoting CRPC are elusive. In spite of these uncertainties, emerging evidence supports a critical role of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSLCs in stimulating CRPC evolution and resistance to abiraterone and enzalutamide. In this review, we will discuss the recent evidence supporting the involvement of PCSLC in CRPC acquisition as well as the pathways and factors contributing to PCSLC expansion in response to ADT.

  17. A Historical Overview of Aeroelasticity Branch and Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Contributions to Rotorcraft Technology and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, William T., Jr.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    2001-01-01

    A historical account of the contributions of the Aeroelasticity Branch (AB) and the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) to rotorcraft technology and development since the tunnel's inception in 1960 is presented. The paper begins with a summary of the major characteristics of the TDT and a description of the unique capability offered by the TDT for testing aeroelastic models by virtue of its heavy gas test medium. This is followed by some remarks on the role played by scale models in the design and development of rotorcraft vehicles and a review of the basic scaling relationships important for designing and building dynamic aeroelastic models of rotorcraft vehicles for testing in the TDT. Chronological accounts of helicopter and tiltrotor research conducted in AB/TDT are then described in separate sections. Both experimental and analytical studies are reported and include a description of the various physical and mathematical models employed, the specific objectives of the investigations, and illustrative experimental and analytical results.

  18. Contributions of Neuroscience to Develop Teaching Strategies and Learning of Mathematics

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    Eddy Mogollón

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present work is to develop some strategies based on research in neurosciences that contribute to the teaching and learning of mathematics. The interrelationship of education with the brain, as well as the relationship of cerebral structures with mathematical thinking was discussed. Strategies were developed taking into consideration levels that include cognitive, semiotic, language, affect and the overcoming of phobias to the subject. The fundamental conclusion was the imperative educational requirement in the near future of a new teacher, whose pedagogic formation must include the knowledge on the cerebral function, its structures and its implications to education, as well as a change in pedagogy and curricular structure in the teaching of mathematics.

  19. THE CONTRIBUTION OF PLAY FIGHTING TO THE EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN

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    Ioan TRIFA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Play fighting is a form of behavior in which partners compete with each other to gain an advantage. Behavior during play fighting largely resembles the behavior in a real fight, where partners encounter, push and pull down onto the ground, trying to get into a position whereby to control or to dominate the opponent. In the play, unlike the fight, movements are exaggerated and performed at a lower intensity, muscles being somewhat less tensed, and certain actions that can cause injury to the partner are inhibited or modified, while offensive-defensive roles will be reversed quite frequently. Play fighting can be considered a type of evolutionary adaptation designed to facilitate those experiences that will shape the cognitive and emotional development necessary for living in social communities. Research undertaken on different mammal species shows that play fighting offers many opportunities for expression and decoding emotions, improves emotional regulation and contributes to the development of coping mechanisms.

  20. THE CONTRIBUTION OF ACCOUNTING DISCIPLINES TO DEVELOPING PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan BUNEA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Expectations of teachers and employers are not always confirmed by student response and performance. The objective of our research is to find out the perception of final-year undergraduate students towards the contribution of accounting disciplines to shaping and developing skills and competencies, but also to developing student personality. We have found that students prefer courses based on detailed rules rather than courses based on general principles and concepts which require ongoing recourse to professional judgment, scenarios, assumptions, tests, simulations, etc. Concerning professional judgment, students prefer judgments made in financial accounting rather than judgments made for management purposes, which are heavily based on the use of certain competencies such as communication skills, persuasion skills, critical thinking skills, interdisciplinary thinking skills, and decision-making skills.

  1. The development of a rugged, field portable membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometer and its use as an on-line monitor for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in the Alberta Oil Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Davey [Applied Environmental Research Laboratories (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In Alberta, steam assisted gravity drainage is a process often used to enhance oil recovery from open pit mining or heavy oil reservoirs. This process releases volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC/SVOC) into the atmosphere or process waters. Thus a field portable analytical instrument is needed to monitor VOC/SVOC. The aim of this paper is to present the development of such a tool and its results. A field portable membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometer was developed through a multiyear collaboration between Statoil, NTNU and Griffin. This technology can analyze both atmospheric and aqueous environmental samples. Calibrations of the system were carried out in a laboratory and the system was then tested in two field trials in the Alberta oil sands. This work gives results of these different tests and explores the use of thermally assisted membrane interfaces and in-membrane trap and release strategies.

  2. Research and practice of the impulse sand fracturing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the deep development of tight sand gas reservoirs, problems such as short stable production period and quick production decline of gas wells after fracturing have become increasingly prominent. Consequently, there is an increasing demand for the effective penetration and conductivity of artificial fractures. Impulse sand fracturing technology introduces a concept of discrete multilayer sanding inside fractures; joint application of pulse blender which can be switched at high frequency, intensive multi-cluster perforation and special fibrous material made it possible to ensure the flow stability of proppant slug, and placement of nonuniformly-laid sand pinnacles and grooves, which markedly upgraded the capacity of the fracture conductivity to several orders of magnitude more than the conventional method. Laboratory engineering simulation evaluation and field test show that pre-fracturing reservoir evaluation, pulse time design and the optimization of degradable fiber and support equipment are the keys to the success of impulse sand fracturing. Compared with the conventional fracturing, this technique can effectively increase well production, decrease the volume of fracturing proppant, and lower sand plugging risks. An independent sand fracturing pilot test has been conducted in 6 layers of 3 wells for the first time in Block Tao 7 of the Sulige Gasfield, Ordos Basin, as a result, the average volume of fracturing proppant dropped by 28.3%, the average sand intensity dropped by 21.88%, and the post-fracturing average daily gas output increased by 26.8%. This technology provides an efficient and environmentally friendly reservoir stimulation option for tight sand gas reservoirs in China.

  3. Dysbiosis Contributes to Arthritis Development via Activation of Autoreactive T Cells in the Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuichi; Kurakawa, Takashi; Umemoto, Eiji; Motooka, Daisuke; Ito, Yoshinaga; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Hirota, Keiji; Matsushita, Masato; Furuta, Yoki; Narazaki, Masashi; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Kayama, Hisako; Nakamura, Shota; Iida, Tetsuya; Saeki, Yukihiko; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    The intestinal microbiota is involved in the pathogenesis of arthritis. Altered microbiota composition has been demonstrated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it remains unclear how dysbiosis contributes to the development of arthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether altered composition of human intestinal microbiota in RA patients contributes to the development of arthritis. We analyzed the fecal microbiota of patients with early RA and healthy controls, using 16S ribosomal RNA-based deep sequencing. We inoculated fecal samples from RA patients and healthy controls into germ-free arthritis-prone SKG mice and evaluated the immune responses. We also analyzed whether the lymphocytes of SKG mice harboring microbiota from RA patients react with the arthritis-related autoantigen 60S ribosomal protein L23a (RPL23A). A subpopulation of patients with early RA harbored intestinal microbiota dominated by Prevotella copri; SKG mice harboring microbiota from RA patients had an increased number of intestinal Th17 cells and developed severe arthritis when treated with zymosan. Lymphocytes in regional lymph nodes and the colon, but not the spleen, of these mice showed enhanced interleukin-17 (IL-17) responses to RPL23A. Naive SKG mouse T cells cocultured with P copri-stimulated dendritic cells produced IL-17 in response to RPL23A and rapidly induced arthritis. We demonstrated that dysbiosis increases sensitivity to arthritis via activation of autoreactive T cells in the intestine. Autoreactive SKG mouse T cells are activated by dysbiotic microbiota in the intestine, causing joint inflammation. Dysbiosis is an environmental factor that triggers arthritis development in genetically susceptible mice. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Towards a developmental ethology: exploring Deleuze's contribution to the study of health and human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Cameron

    2010-11-01

    This article explores the work of French thinker Gilles Deleuze and argues for the application of his central ideas to the study of health and human development. Deleuze's work furnishes a host of ontological and epistemological resources for such analysis, ushering in new methods and establishing new objects of inquiry. Of principal interest are the inventive conceptualizations of affect, multiplicity and relationality that Deleuze proposes, and the novel reading of subjectivity that these concepts support. This article introduces a developmental ethology in exploring Deleuze's contributions to the study of human development and its varied courses and processes. Taken from a Deleuzean perspective, human development will be characterized as a discontinuous process of affective and relational encounters. It will be argued further that human development is advanced in the provision of new affective sensitivities and new relational capacities. This course is broadly consistent with existing approaches to human development--particularly those associated with Amartya Sen's capabilities model--with the considerable advantage of offering a more viable working theory of the ways in which developmental capacities are acquired, cultivated and maintained. A provisional research agenda consistent with this developmental ethology is offered by way of conclusion.

  5. Post-liquefaction reconsolidation of sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamidis, O; Madabhushi, G S P

    2016-02-01

    Loosely packed sand that is saturated with water can liquefy during an earthquake, potentially causing significant damage. Once the shaking is over, the excess pore water pressures that developed during the earthquake gradually dissipate, while the surface of the soil settles, in a process called post-liquefaction reconsolidation. When examining reconsolidation, the soil is typically divided in liquefied and solidified parts, which are modelled separately. The aim of this paper is to show that this fragmentation is not necessary. By assuming that the hydraulic conductivity and the one-dimensional stiffness of liquefied sand have real, positive values, the equation of consolidation can be numerically solved throughout a reconsolidating layer. Predictions made in this manner show good agreement with geotechnical centrifuge experiments. It is shown that the variation of one-dimensional stiffness with effective stress and void ratio is the most crucial parameter in accurately capturing reconsolidation.

  6. New Financial Development Indicators: With a Critical Contribution to Inequality Empirics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simplice A. Asongu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The employment of financial development indicators without due consideration to country/regional specific financial development realities remains an issue of substantial policy relevance. Financial depth in the perspective of money supply is not equal to liquid liabilities in every development context. This paper introduces complementary indicators to the existing Financial Development and Structure Database (FDSD. Dynamic panel system GMM estimations are applied. Different specifications, non-overlapping intervals and control variables are used to check the consistency of estimated coefficients. Our results suggest that from an absolute standpoint (GDP base measures, all financial sectors are pro-poor. However, three interesting findings are drawn from measures of sector importance. (1 The expansion of the formal financial sector to the detriment of other financial sectors has a disequalizing income effect. (2 Growth of informal and semi-formal financial sectors at the expense of the formal financial sector has an income equalizing effect. (3 The positive income redistributive effect of semi-formal finance in financial sector competition is higher than the corresponding impact of informal finance. It unites two streams of research by contributing at the same time to the macroeconomic literature on measuring financial development and responding to the growing field of economic development by means of informal financial sector promotion and microfinance. The paper suggests a practicable way to disentangle the effects of the various financial sectors on economic development. The equation of financial depth in the perspective of money supply to liquid liabilities has put on the margin the burgeoning informal financial sector in developing countries. The phenomenon of mobile banking is such an example

  7. Molecular Diversity between Salivary Proteins from New World and Old World Sand Flies with Emphasis on Bichromomyia olmeca, the Sand Fly Vector of Leishmania mexicana in Mesoamerica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeladhim, Maha; V Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano; Townsend, Shannon; Pasos-Pinto, Silvia; Sanchez, Laura; Rasouli, Manoochehr; B Guimaraes-Costa, Anderson; Aslan, Hamide; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Oliveira, Fabiano; Becker, Ingeborg; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Jochim, Ryan C; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-07-01

    Sand fly saliva has been shown to have proteins with potent biological activities, salivary proteins that can be used as biomarkers of vector exposure, and salivary proteins that are candidate vaccines against different forms of leishmaniasis. Sand fly salivary gland transcriptomic approach has contributed significantly to the identification and characterization of many of these salivary proteins from important Leishmania vectors; however, sand fly vectors in some regions of the world are still neglected, as Bichromomyia olmeca (formerly known as Lutzomyia olmeca olmeca), a proven vector of Leishmania mexicana in Mexico and Central America. Despite the importance of this vector in transmitting Leishmania parasite in Mesoamerica there is no information on the repertoire of B. olmeca salivary proteins and their relationship to salivary proteins from other sand fly species. A cDNA library of the salivary glands of wild-caught B. olmeca was constructed, sequenced, and analyzed. We identified transcripts encoding for novel salivary proteins from this sand fly species and performed a comparative analysis between B. olmeca salivary proteins and those from other sand fly species. With this new information we present an updated catalog of the salivary proteins specific to New World sand flies and salivary proteins common to all sand fly species. We also report in this work the anti-Factor Xa activity of Lofaxin, a salivary anticoagulant protein present in this sand fly species. This study provides information on the first transcriptome of a sand fly from Mesoamerica and adds information to the limited repertoire of salivary transcriptomes from the Americas. This comparative analysis also shows a fast degree of evolution in salivary proteins from New World sand flies as compared with Old World sand flies.

  8. New production techniques for alberta oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigy, M A

    1986-12-19

    Low world oil prices represent a serious threat to expanded commercial development of the Canadian oil sands in the near term, as they do to all of the higher cost alternatives to crude oil such as oil shales and coal liquefaction. Nonetheless, research and field testing of new technology for production of oil from oil sands are being pursued by industry and government in Alberta. New production technology is being developed in Canada to produce synthetic oil from the vast resources of bitumen trapped in the oil sands and bituminous carbonates of northern Alberta. This technology includes improved methods of mining, extraction, and upgrading of bitumen from near-surface deposits as well as new drilling and production techniques for thermal production of bitumen from the more deeply buried reservoirs. Of particular interest are the cluster drilling methods designed to reduce surface disturbance and the techniques for horizontal drilling of wells from underground tunnels to increase the contact of injection fluids with the reservoir.

  9. Opportunities to assess factors contributing to the development of the intestinal microbiota in infants living in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Lang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that establishment of a healthy gut microbiota shortly after birth is important to achieve optimal growth and development of children. Being born into a resource-poor environment presents challenges to the establishment of a healthy gut microbial flora in the newborn. Among these challenges are births that occur at home, traditional pre-lacteal feeding of newborns leading to failure to initiate lactation, poor sanitation and water quality, early environmental exposure to, and infection with, enteric or other pathogens, suboptimal breast feeding duration and intensity, deficiencies in weaning and childhood diets contributing to micro- and macro-nutrient deficiencies, and the frequent use of antibiotics. These factors should be considered in the design and implementation of preventive and therapeutic interventions aimed at improving the health and development of these children.

  10. Sorption of Arsenite onto Mackinawite Coated Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, T. J.; Hayes, K. F.; Abriola, L. M.

    2004-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem affecting aquifers in the United States as well as abroad. Recent strengthening of the US EPA MCL for arsenic has prompted the need for technology capable of removing both arsenite and arsenate from solution. Arsenite, the more toxic form of arsenic, is more difficult to remove from anoxic zones in the subsurface. Studies by others have demonstrated the affinity of some types of iron sulfides for arsenite, such as troilite, pyrite, amorphous iron sulfide and mackinawite. However, these studies have not provided a comprehensive investigation of the macroscopic behavior of arsenite in the presence of crystalline mackinawite in a form that can be readily applied to real-world treatment technologies. This study examines the behavior of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sand. PH edge results demonstrate that arsenite sorption onto mackinawite coated sand increases with increasing pH, reaching maximum removal at pH 10. Arsenite removal, albeit slight, occurring below pH 5 is independent of pH indicative of a different removal mechanism. Isotherm studies show that at low concentrations, removal is Langmuirian in nature. Arsenite sorption abruptly converts to linear behavior at high concentrations, possibly attributed to the saturation of the monolayer. Ionic strength effects were assessed by comparing pH edge data developed for three different concentrations of NaCl background electrolyte solution. Increases in ionic strength enhance the removal of arsenite from solution, suggesting possible inner-sphere surface complexation removal mechanisms. Information gathered in this study can be used to further develop surface complexation models to describe and predict reactivity of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sands in anoxic regions. Mackinawite coated sands investigated here may provide a feasible reactive medium for implementation in above-ground sorption reactors or subsurface

  11. GIVING WOMEN VOICE: THE ETHIOPIAN FEMALE SKILLED DIASPORA’S POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION TO DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Amazan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Migration research, which tends to focus on the low paying and exploitative nature of female migrants’ work, often neglects female skilled migration. Under-representation of the gender dimension is not only common in international migration research, but is also present in policies, development strategies and initiatives. This lack of acknowledgement also impedes, and continues to marginalise, the role of women in development, and further perpetuates disparities between the sexes. Overall, the focus on gender within the study of international migration and diaspora mobility studies remains inadequate. The methodology behind this article involved questionnaires and semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted with Ethiopian skilled and highly-skilled professionals residing in North America. Some temporary and permanent returnees were interviewed, including government officials, local NGOs and members of international organizations. The research sheds new light on the gender dimensions of the role of the diaspora in contributing to the re-shaping of Ethiopian society. The article explores aspects of ambiguity among gender roles in both North America and in Ethiopia. This article will explore these themes and also discuss the gender dimension of skilled migration and female diaspora mobility in the context of African development, specifically relating to Ethiopia. It will analyse the role of women in the realm of international skilled migration, in order to recognize and empower migrant women as agents of development and change.

  12. Comparison of Volunteered Geographic Information Data Contributions and Community Development for Selected World Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zipf

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI projects and their crowdsourced data have been the focus of a number of scientific analyses and investigations in recent years. Oftentimes the results show that the collaboratively collected geodata of one of the most popular VGI projects, OpenStreetMap (OSM, provides good coverage in urban areas when considering particular completeness factors. However, results can potentially vary significantly for different world regions. In this article, we conduct an analysis to determine similarities and differences in data contributions and community development in OSM between 12 selected urban areas of the world. Our findings showed significantly different results in data collection efforts and local OSM community sizes. European cities provide quantitatively larger amounts of geodata and number of contributors in OSM, resulting in a better representation of the real world in the dataset. Although the number of volunteers does not necessarily correlate with the general population density of the urban areas, similarities could be detected while comparing the percentage of different contributor groups and the number of changes they made to the OSM project. Further analyses show that socio-economic factors, such as income, can have an impact on the number of active contributors and the data provided in the analyzed areas. Furthermore, the results showed significant data contributions by members whose main territory of interest lies more than one thousand kilometers from the tested areas.

  13. The contribution of veterinary medicine to public health and poverty reduction in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muma, John B; Mwacalimba, Kennedy K; Munang'andu, Hetron M; Matope, Gift; Jenkins, Akinbowale; Siamudaala, Victor; Mweene, Aaron S; Marcotty, Tanguy

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have explicitly examined the linkages between human health, animal disease control and poverty alleviation. This paper reviews the contribution that veterinary medicine can make to poverty alleviation in sub-Saharan Africa. Our analysis attempts to explore aspects of this contribution under five themes: food production; food safety; impact and control of zoonotic infections; promotion of ecotourism; and environmental protection. While these areas of human activity have, more or less, fallen under the influence of the veterinary profession to varying degrees, we attempt to unify this mandate using a 'One Health' narrative, for the purpose of providing clarity on the linkages between the veterinary and other professions, livestock production and poverty alleviation. Future opportunities for improving health and reducing poverty in the context of developing African countries are also discussed. We conclude that veterinary science is uniquely positioned to play a key role in both poverty reduction and the promotion of health, a role that can be enhanced through the reorientation of the profession's goals and the creation of synergies with allied and related professions.

  14. [Development of neurology in Japan and its contribution to elucidate and resolve the sociomedical problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2009-11-01

    Japanese Society of Neurology (JSN) was established in 1960 with 643 members, and in 2009 it has grown up to a big society having more than 8,000 members including 3,600 neurology board specialists. JSN has greatly contributed in elucidating and resolving many socio-medical problems. I will take three topics including SMON (subacute myelo-optico-neuropathy), infectious Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Minamata disease. SMON was a new epidemic disease characterized by subacute optic neuritis and myeloneuropathy associated with diarrhea and abdominal symptoms. The research committee clarified that it was a neurological complication of chinoform, a drug for gastroenteritis. CJD surveillance started in 1996 for variant CJD, and uncovered many patients who developed CJD after human dura draft. The government prohibited to use non-inactivated human dura. Minamata disease is an organic mercury poisoning of people who took fish contaminated by mercury in Minamata bay in Kumamoto or in Aganogawa river in Niigata. The factories discharged water contaminated with mercury which was accumulated in fish and shellfish. Still many victims claim for compensation to the companies and government. Neurologists in Kumamoto and Niigata greatly contributed to diagnose and treat the victims and to clarify the cause of the disease.

  15. Potential contribution of progesterone receptors to the development of sexual behavior in male and female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroziers, Elodie; Brock, Olivier; Bakker, Julie

    2017-04-01

    We previously showed that estradiol can have both defeminizing and feminizing effects on the developing mouse brain. Pre- and early postnatal estradiol defeminized the ability to show lordosis in adulthood, whereas prepubertal estradiol feminized this ability. Furthermore, we found that estradiol upregulates progesterone receptors (PR) during development, inducing both a male-and female-typical pattern of PR expression in the mouse hypothalamus. In the present study, we took advantage of a newly developed PR antagonist (ZK 137316) to determine whether PR contributes to either male- or female-typical sexual differentiation. Thus groups of male and female C57Bl/6j mice were treated with ZK 137316 or OIL as control: males were treated neonatally (P0-P10), during the critical period for male sexual differentiation, and females were treated prepubertally (P15-P25), during the critical period for female sexual differentiation. In adulthood, mice were tested for sexual behavior. In males, some minor effects of neonatal ZK treatment on sexual behavior were observed: latencies to the first mount, intromission and ejaculation were decreased in neonatally ZK treated males; however, this effect disappeared by the second mating test. By contrast, female mice treated with ZK during the prepubertal period showed significantly less lordosis than OIL-treated females. Mate preferences were not affected in either males or females treated with ZK during development. Taken together, these results suggest a role for PR and thus perhaps progesterone in the development of lordosis behavior in female mice. By contrast, no obvious role for PR can be discerned in the development of male sexual behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How can the Serbian diaspora contribute much more to the development at home country?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grečić Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the existing contribution of the Serbian diaspora to the development at home country, and features of its major effects as a partner in the process of economic development. No doubt, the spiritus movens of the contemporary and future economic and social progress is and will be the economy of ideas and creativity. The key factors of this new economy are education, research and innovation. To achieve competitiveness in an increasingly global economic environment it is necessary: the adequate supply and quality of the workforce in the field of research and development. In the last two and a half decades, Serbia's brain drain was quite massive. Thus in the Serbian diaspora there are reputable scientists and successful managers in all fields. Diaspora, the people link between countries, can be the source of cooperation. Consequently, the most important is the question of whether and under what conditions Serbia’s brain drain can be reversed to brain gain. The author argue that the diasporas and migrants could play a crucial role in the development of home country, by presentation of their different experiences. Engaging the Diaspora in the development of home country largely depends on the home country. Talents remain an important component of countries’ and businesses’ long-term competitiveness. In support of this thesis, the author presents the most significant and most successful examples of good practice, arguing that this experience can be used in Serbia, of course, taking into account some of its specificities. The question: how they develop, retain and attract talent should therefore remain high on the agenda of policymakers and business leaders for the foreseeable future of Serbia.

  17. The Contributions of Onchocerciasis Control and Elimination Programs toward the Achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Caitlin; Callahan, Kelly; Katabarwa, Moses; Richards, Frank; Hopkins, Donald; Withers, P Craig; Buyon, Lucas E; McFarland, Deborah

    2015-05-01

    In 2000, 189 member states of the United Nations (UN) developed a plan for peace and development, which resulted in eight actionable goals known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Since their inception, the MDGs have been considered the international standard for measuring development progress and have provided a blueprint for global health policy and programming. However, emphasis upon the achievement of priority benchmarks around the "big three" diseases--namely HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and malaria--has influenced global health entities to disproportionately allocate resources. Meanwhile, several tropical diseases that almost exclusively impact the poorest of the poor continue to be neglected, despite the existence of cost-effective and feasible methods of control or elimination. One such Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD), onchocerciasis, more commonly known as river blindness, is a debilitating and stigmatizing disease primarily affecting individuals living in remote and impoverished areas. Onchocerciasis control is considered to be one of the most successful and cost-effective public health campaigns ever launched. In addition to improving the health and well-being of millions of individuals, these programs also lead to improvements in education, agricultural production, and economic development in affected communities. Perhaps most pertinent to the global health community, though, is the demonstrated effectiveness of facilitating community engagement by allowing communities considerable ownership with regard to drug delivery. This paper reviews the contributions that such concentrated efforts to control and eliminate onchocerciasis make to achieving select MDGs. The authors hope to draw the attention of public policymakers and global health funders to the importance of the struggle against onchocerciasis as a model for community-directed interventions to advance health and development, and to advocate for NTDs inclusion in the post 2015 agenda.

  18. The Contributions of Onchocerciasis Control and Elimination Programs toward the Achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Dunn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2000, 189 member states of the United Nations (UN developed a plan for peace and development, which resulted in eight actionable goals known as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs. Since their inception, the MDGs have been considered the international standard for measuring development progress and have provided a blueprint for global health policy and programming. However, emphasis upon the achievement of priority benchmarks around the "big three" diseases--namely HIV, tuberculosis (TB, and malaria--has influenced global health entities to disproportionately allocate resources. Meanwhile, several tropical diseases that almost exclusively impact the poorest of the poor continue to be neglected, despite the existence of cost-effective and feasible methods of control or elimination. One such Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD, onchocerciasis, more commonly known as river blindness, is a debilitating and stigmatizing disease primarily affecting individuals living in remote and impoverished areas. Onchocerciasis control is considered to be one of the most successful and cost-effective public health campaigns ever launched. In addition to improving the health and well-being of millions of individuals, these programs also lead to improvements in education, agricultural production, and economic development in affected communities. Perhaps most pertinent to the global health community, though, is the demonstrated effectiveness of facilitating community engagement by allowing communities considerable ownership with regard to drug delivery. This paper reviews the contributions that such concentrated efforts to control and eliminate onchocerciasis make to achieving select MDGs. The authors hope to draw the attention of public policymakers and global health funders to the importance of the struggle against onchocerciasis as a model for community-directed interventions to advance health and development, and to advocate for NTDs inclusion in the post 2015

  19. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  20. Development of a group contribution method for determination of viscosity of ionic liquids at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Ilani-Kashkouli, Poorandokht; Mohammadi, Amir H.

    2012-01-01

    contribution method has been developed. The method employs a total of 46 sub-structures in addition to the temperature to predict the viscosity of ILs. In order to differentiate the effects of the anion and cation on the viscosity of ILs, 24 sub-structures related to the chemical structure of anions, and 22......In this study, a wide literature survey has been carried out to collect an extensive set of liquid viscosity data for ionic liquids (ILs). A data set consisting of 1672 viscosity values and comprising 443 ILs was collated from 204 different literature sources. Using this data set, a reliable group...... sub-structures related to the chemical structure of cations were implemented. The proposed model produces a low average relative deviation (AARD) of less than 6.4% taking into consideration all 1672 experimental data values....

  1. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL OF ECO TECHNOLOGIC ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan DOBROTĂ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper present a series of contributions to the development of a model of eco technologic organization. Managers of various organizations generally recognized the need for change, as a way to cope with competitive pressures, but many do not understand how the change should be implemented. The key to success is to integrate employees, their roles and responsibilities within the organization in a structure of processes. A process-based approach and starting with the declaration of vision and mission, analyzing critical success factors and identifying the basic processes, it is the most effective way of employment of staff in the process of change In these conditions paper addresses notions of implementation of the change in the industrial organizations: organizational change process, consequences of ignoring the change, internal and external factors of change, actions needing change

  2. The contribution of renewable energy resources on the electrification and development at the Guantanamo Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, S.; Angel, J. [CUBASOLAR, Guantanamo (Cuba); Moreno Figueredo, C. [Centro de Estudio de Tecnologias Energeticas Renovables (Cuba); Montesinos Larrosa, A. [Sociedad Cubana para la Promocion de las Energias Renovables (Cuba)

    2008-07-01

    Cuba's Guantanamo province is a leader in the application of renewable energy technologies. This paper discussed the socio-economic impact of renewable energy projects that are underway in the Guantanamo province to improve the standard of living in rural areas. More than 400 rural schools and 70 rural medical offices get their electricity from photovoltaic systems. Hydropower provides the energy needs to 3000 rural houses with 11,000 inhabitants. Other applications include remote community solar systems, improved woodstoves for community kitchens, solar cookers and solar dryers. This paper demonstrated how the high penetration of these renewable energy technologies has contributed to the sustainable development of the province. The lessons learned in energy management by the local governments and research institutions were also outlined. 1 tab.

  3. Contributions to the Development of a General Methodology for Innovation and Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela IONESCU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents authors’ contributions to the achievement of a first variant of the innovation and forecasting methodology. The various tools of TRIZ methodology (laws of systems development set for technical systems, the matrix of contradictions, the 40 inventive principles, the 39 parameters, Su-Field analysis, the method of the 9 screens etc are already available, or can be customised to the specific type of the organization system. The TRIZ methodology for economics was embedded in a more general methodology for innovation and forecasting. The eight laws of evolution systems were customised to economics. The authors also make a comparative analysis of the technical TRIZ matrix to the company management matrix. Based on the analysis performed, it can be concluded that a general methodology can be prepared for innovation and forecasting, making use of TRIZ methodology, by customising some classical instruments of the technical field, and bringing in other specific economic tools.

  4. The field treatment of the nuclear spectrum. Historical foundation and two contributions to its ensuing development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bes, Daniel R.

    2016-06-01

    The highlights of the model which was developed during the 1950s at the Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, under the leadership of Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson, are described in this contribution. Subsequently, it is shown that the field concept—the fundamental tool of the unified model—is not only an intelligent guess to describe the difficult many-body nuclear system. By means of a systematic expansion of field-coupling effects, the nuclear field theory (NFT) accounts for the overcompleteness of the initial product basis and the overlooking of the Pauli principle acting between constituents of the basis. Eventually it leads to the exact solution of the nuclear many-body problem. The description in terms of fields involves another problem if the field violates a symmetry inherent to the initial problem. The solution is borrowed from the BRST treatments of gauge systems, in which the lost symmetry is replaced by a more powerful one.

  5. Optimal array of sand fences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A.; Araújo, Ascânio D.; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Andrade, José S.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2017-03-01

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth’s climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  6. Simultaneous obtention of multicomponent ferroalloy and slag from black sands for the development of electrical arc welding consumables; Obtencion simultanea de ferroaleacion multicomponents y escoria a partir de areas negras, para el desarrollo de consumibles de doldadura por arco electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Crespo, A.; Gomez-Rodriguez, L.; Garcia-Sanchez, L. L.; Quintana-Puchol, R.; Cerpa-Naranjo, A.; Cores-Sanchez, A.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, chemical and mineralogical characterizations of the black sands of the Mejias placer of Sagua de Tanamo (the most important beach littoral placer of the northwest of oriental Cuba) are exposed. Starting from these characterizations a calculation strategy is developed for the making of the metallurgical load that allows to obtain simultaneously, when processed by carbothermic reduction in an electrical arc furnace, a multicomponent ferroalloy and a useful slag for the making of electric arch welding consumables. The powder of the obtained slag is agglomerated with liquid glass. The resulting pellets, due to their behavior on the submerged arc welding (SAW) present technological and metallurgical properties that correspond with the requirements of an agglomerated flux matrix. The chemical composition of the multicomponent ferroalloy is constituted by metallic elements of high metallurgical and alloyed values (V, Cr, Mo, Ti, Nb). It is appropriate for the formulation of consumables for manual welding (SMAW) and SAW, as well. (Author) 15 refs.

  7. Contributions of Japanese patients to development of antisense therapy for DMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Masafumi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Hisahide

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal progressive muscle wasting disease considered untreatable since its first description in 1868. In 1987, the dystrophin gene responsible for DMD was cloned. This paved the way for the development of therapies. Antisense oligonucleotide (AO)-mediated exon skipping therapy is now reaching the stage of marketing authorization. On the 20th anniversary of the proposal of AO-mediated exon skipping therapy for DMD, this review explores the contributions of Japanese patients. In 1990, a Japanese DMD patient was reported as having a small deletion within dystrophin exon 19 and complicating exon 19 skipping in the absence of any mutation at the consensus splice sites. This led to identification of a splicing enhancer sequence within exon 19. Remarkably, AOs against this sequence were shown to induce exon skipping. This encouraged us to propose AO-mediated exon skipping therapy for DMD in 1995. The therapy's effectiveness was verified in a Japanese patient with a nonsense dystrophin mutation manifesting as Becker muscular dystrophy. The patient showed skipping of the nonsense mutation-encoding exon. Finally, a DMD patient carrying a deletion of exon 20 volunteered to undergo intravenous AO infusion, enabling us to obtain proof of concept. The findings from these three patients greatly facilitated studies on exon skipping therapy. As a result, more than 300 reports on AO-mediated exon skipping therapy for DMD have been published, including at least two a month during the last few years. We greatly appreciate the important contributions of Japanese patients to development of the exon skipping therapy for DMD. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Optics At White Sands Missile Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczek, Ron C.; Hayslett, Charles R.

    1985-11-01

    We present an overview of the optics and optical data gathering programs conducted at White Sands Missile Range. Activities at White Sands Missile Range have always been diverse - the first test conducted there was the world's first nuclear explosion. In the forty years since that event the range has hosted a large assortment of vehicles including V2, Nike, Aerobee, Space Shuttle, Cruise, and the Copperhead. The last three of these devices illustrate the difficulty of the White Sands optical data gathering task. One is acquired in orbit, one as it crosses through a mountain pass, and one as it issues from the muzzle of a cannon. A combination of optical, radar, video, computer, and communications technology has produced a versatile system that can satisfy the data gathering requirements of most range users. Another example of the diverse optics programs at the range is the development of the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility (HELSTF). Because of the nature of the systems being tested, the HELSTF is full of optics and optical systems including the TRW MIRACL laser and the Hughes SEA LITE Beam Director.

  9. Lgr5+ve Stem/Progenitor Cells Contribute to Nephron Formation during Kidney Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Barker

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent stem cells and their lineage-restricted progeny drive nephron formation within the developing kidney. Here, we document expression of the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 in the developing kidney and assess the stem/progenitor identity of Lgr5+ve cells via in vivo lineage tracing. The appearance and localization of Lgr5+ve cells coincided with that of the S-shaped body around embryonic day 14. Lgr5 expression remained restricted to cell clusters within developing nephrons in the cortex until postnatal day 7, when expression was permanently silenced. In vivo lineage tracing identified Lgr5 as a marker of a stem/progenitor population within nascent nephrons dedicated to generating the thick ascending limb of Henle’s loop and distal convoluted tubule. The Lgr5 surface marker and experimental models described here will be invaluable for deciphering the contribution of early nephron stem cells to developmental defects and for isolating human nephron progenitors as a prerequisite to evaluating their therapeutic potential.

  10. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R.; Griffith, A.

    2009-04-01

    For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of beach (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of beach sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of beach have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by beach sand mining include: destruction of natural beaches and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a

  12. Sustainable water management in Alberta's oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Bill; Usher, Robyn; Roach, Andrea [CH2M HILL, Englewood, CO (United States); Lambert, Gord; Kotecha, Prit [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers forecast published in 2011 predicts that oil production from oil sands will increase by 50% in the next 3 years and double by 2020. This rate of growth will result in significant pressure on water resources; water use per barrel of oil sands production is comparable to other energy resources - about 2.5 barrels of fresh water per barrel of oil produced are used by mining operations and 0.5 barrels by in-situ operations. Suncor Energy Inc. (Suncor) was the first company to develop the oil sands in northern Alberta and holds one of the largest oil sands positions in Canada. In 2010, Suncor announced plans to increase production to more than 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day by 2020, which it plans to achieve through oil sands production growth of approximately 10% per year. Because water supply and potential impacts to water quality are critical to its future growth, in 2010-2011 Suncor conducted a risk assessment to identify water-related business risks related to its northern Alberta operations. The assessment identified more than 20 high level business risks in strategic water risk areas including water supply, water reuse, storm water management, groundwater, waste management and river water return. The risk assessment results prompted development of a strategic roadmap to guide water stewardship across Suncor's regional operations. The roadmap describes goals, objectives, and specific activities for each of six key water risk areas, and informs prioritization and selection of prospective water management activities. Suncor is not only exploring water within its own boundaries, but is also collaborating with other oil sands producers to explore ways of integrating its water systems through industry consortia; Suncor is a member of the Oil Sands Leadership Initiative and of the recently formed Canadian Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, among others. (author)

  13. Hot and Cool Executive Functions in Adolescence: Development and Contributions to Important Developmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Kean

    2018-01-01

    Despite significant theoretical advancement in the area of child neuropsychology, limited attention has been paid to the developmental features of adolescence. The present study intends to address this issue in relation to executive function (EF). EF refers to the psychological processes that underlie goal-directed behavior; recent studies separate cool EF (psychological process involves pure logic and critical analysis) and hot EF (psychological process driven by emotion). Although neurological findings suggest that adolescence is a sensitive period for EF development, data on comparing the developmental progression in hot or cool EFs is highly missing. Moreover, while evidence has confirmed the relationships between EF and day-to-day functioning, whether and how hot and cool EFs contribute to core developmental outcomes in adolescence is still remained unknown. The current study aims to enhance our understanding of the development and impacts of hot and cool EFs in adolescence. A total of 136 typically developing adolescents from age 12 to 17 completed four cool EF tasks including Backward digit span, Contingency naming test, Stockings of Cambridge, and Stroop Color and Word test, and one hot task on Cambridge gambling task. Data on academic performance and psychological adjustment was also collected. Results showed that cool and hot EF exhibited different patterns of age-related growth in adolescence. Specifically, cool EF ascended with age while hot EF showed a bell-shaped development. Moreover, there were correlations among cool EF measures but no association between cool and hot EFs. Further, cool EF was a better predictor of academic performance, while hot EF uniquely related to emotional problems. The results provide evidence for the association among cool EF tests and the differentiation of hot and cool EFs. The bell-shaped development of hot EF might suggest a period of heightened risk-taking propensity in middle adolescence. Given the plastic nature of

  14. Hot and Cool Executive Functions in Adolescence: Development and Contributions to Important Developmental Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kean Poon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant theoretical advancement in the area of child neuropsychology, limited attention has been paid to the developmental features of adolescence. The present study intends to address this issue in relation to executive function (EF. EF refers to the psychological processes that underlie goal-directed behavior; recent studies separate cool EF (psychological process involves pure logic and critical analysis and hot EF (psychological process driven by emotion. Although neurological findings suggest that adolescence is a sensitive period for EF development, data on comparing the developmental progression in hot or cool EFs is highly missing. Moreover, while evidence has confirmed the relationships between EF and day-to-day functioning, whether and how hot and cool EFs contribute to core developmental outcomes in adolescence is still remained unknown. The current study aims to enhance our understanding of the development and impacts of hot and cool EFs in adolescence. A total of 136 typically developing adolescents from age 12 to 17 completed four cool EF tasks including Backward digit span, Contingency naming test, Stockings of Cambridge, and Stroop Color and Word test, and one hot task on Cambridge gambling task. Data on academic performance and psychological adjustment was also collected. Results showed that cool and hot EF exhibited different patterns of age-related growth in adolescence. Specifically, cool EF ascended with age while hot EF showed a bell-shaped development. Moreover, there were correlations among cool EF measures but no association between cool and hot EFs. Further, cool EF was a better predictor of academic performance, while hot EF uniquely related to emotional problems. The results provide evidence for the association among cool EF tests and the differentiation of hot and cool EFs. The bell-shaped development of hot EF might suggest a period of heightened risk-taking propensity in middle adolescence. Given the

  15. Activated wnt signaling in stroma contributes to development of pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Makoto; Driscoll, David R; De Jesus-Monge, Wilfredo E; Klimstra, David S; Lewis, Brian C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), a cystic tumor of the pancreas that develops most frequently in women, is a potential precursor to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. MCNs develop primarily in the body and tail of the pancreas and are characterized by the presence of a mucinous epithelium and ovarian-like subepithelial stroma. We investigated the involvement of Wnt signaling in KRAS-mediated pancreatic tumorigenesis and development of MCN in mice, and Wnt activation in human MCN samples. LSL-Kras(G12D), Ptf1a-cre mice were crossed with elastase-tva mice to allow for introduction of genes encoded by the replication-competent avian sarcoma-leukosis virus long-terminal repeat with splice acceptor viruses to pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors, postnatally and sporadically. Repeat with splice acceptor viruses that expressed Wnt1 were delivered to the pancreatic epithelium of these mice; pancreatic lesions were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical analyses. We analyzed levels of factors in Wnt signaling pathways in 19 MCN samples from patients. Expression of Wnt1 in the pancreatic acinar cells and acinar cell progenitors of female mice led to development of unilocular or multilocular epithelial cysts in the pancreas body and tail, similar to MCN. The cystic lesions resembled the estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive ovarian-like stroma of MCN, but lacked the typical mucinous epithelium. Activated Wnt signaling, based on nuclear localization of β-catenin, was detected in the stroma but not cyst epithelium. Wnt signaling to β-catenin was found to be activated in MCN samples from patients, within the ovarian-like stroma, consistent with the findings in mice. Based on studies of mice and pancreatic MCN samples from patients, the canonical Wnt signaling pathway becomes activated and promotes development of the ovarian-like stroma to contribute to formation of MCNs. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  16. Layers, Landslides, and Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 27 October 2003This image shows the northern rim of one of the Valles Marineris canyons. Careful inspection shows many interesting features here. Note that the spurs and gullies in the canyon wall disappear some distance below the top of the canyon wall, indicating the presence of some smooth material here that weathers differently from the underlying rocks. On the floor of the canyon, there are remains from a landslide that came hurtling down the canyon wall between two spurs. Riding over the topography of the canyon floor are many large sand dunes, migrating generally from the lower right to upper left.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14.1, Longitude 306.7 East (53.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  18. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack; Arvidson, Raymond; Grin, Edmond; Li, Ronxing; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, Barbara; Bell, James F.; Aileen Yingst, R.

    2014-05-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  19. Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS) Contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, T.

    2014-12-01

    It has been said that scientists and experts usually use 80% of their research time for data management (DOE, 2002). Only 20% of research time is used for purely scientific activities. This ratio should be reversed by introducing computer science technology. To realize this goal, the Japanese government supported the development of a data system called "Data Integration and Analysis System (DIAS)," as one of the national key projects promoted by the Council for Science and Technology Policy (CSTP) from 2006 to 2010. A follow-up 5-year project is also ongoing. The essential aim for the DIAS was to create knowledge that would enable solutions to problems and generate socioeconomic benefits. DIAS mainly consists of four data components including data injection, management, integration, and interoperability. DIAS is now tackling a large increase in the diversity and volume of data from observing the Earth. Dictionaries have been developing an ontology system for technical and geographical terms, and a metadata design has been completed according to international standards. The volume of data stored has exponentially increased. Previously, almost all of the large-volume data came from satellites, but model outputs occupy the largest volume of our data storage nowadays. In collaboration with scientific and technological groups, DIAS can accelerate data archiving by including data loading, quality checking, metadata registration, and our system data-searching capability is being enriched. DIAS also enables us to perform integrated research and realize interdisciplinarity. Essentially, we are now working in the fields of climate, water resources, food, fisheries, and biodiversity by collaborating between different disciplines and trying to develop bases of contribution to Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

  20. Porcine Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from IVF Embryos Contribute to Chimeric Development In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binghua Xue

    Full Text Available Although the pig is considered an important model of human disease and an ideal animal for the preclinical testing of cell transplantation, the utility of this model has been hampered by a lack of genuine porcine embryonic stem cells. Here, we derived a porcine pluripotent stem cell (pPSC line from day 5.5 blastocysts in a newly developed culture system based on MXV medium and a 5% oxygen atmosphere. The pPSCs had been passaged more than 75 times over two years, and the morphology of the colony was similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Characterization and assessment showed that the pPSCs were alkaline phosphatase (AKP positive, possessed normal karyotypes and expressed classic pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG. In vitro differentiation through embryonic body formation and in vivo differentiation via teratoma formation in nude mice demonstrated that the pPSCs could differentiate into cells of the three germ layers. The pPSCs transfected with fuw-DsRed (pPSC-FDs could be passaged with a stable expression of both DsRed and pluripotent markers. Notably, when pPSC-FDs were used as donor cells for somatic nuclear transfer, 11.52% of the reconstructed embryos developed into blastocysts, which was not significantly different from that of the reconstructed embryos derived from porcine embryonic fibroblasts. When pPSC-FDs were injected into day 4.5 blastocysts, they became involved in the in vitro embryonic development and contributed to the viscera of foetuses at day 50 of pregnancy as well as the developed placenta after the chimeric blastocysts were transferred into recipients. These findings indicated that the pPSCs were porcine pluripotent cells; that this would be a useful cell line for porcine genetic engineering and a valuable cell line for clarifying the molecular mechanism of pluripotency regulation in pigs.

  1. Porcine Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from IVF Embryos Contribute to Chimeric Development In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Binghua; Li, Yan; He, Yilong; Wei, Renyue; Sun, Ruizhen; Yin, Zhi; Bou, Gerelchimeg; Liu, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Although the pig is considered an important model of human disease and an ideal animal for the preclinical testing of cell transplantation, the utility of this model has been hampered by a lack of genuine porcine embryonic stem cells. Here, we derived a porcine pluripotent stem cell (pPSC) line from day 5.5 blastocysts in a newly developed culture system based on MXV medium and a 5% oxygen atmosphere. The pPSCs had been passaged more than 75 times over two years, and the morphology of the colony was similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Characterization and assessment showed that the pPSCs were alkaline phosphatase (AKP) positive, possessed normal karyotypes and expressed classic pluripotent markers, including OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG. In vitro differentiation through embryonic body formation and in vivo differentiation via teratoma formation in nude mice demonstrated that the pPSCs could differentiate into cells of the three germ layers. The pPSCs transfected with fuw-DsRed (pPSC-FDs) could be passaged with a stable expression of both DsRed and pluripotent markers. Notably, when pPSC-FDs were used as donor cells for somatic nuclear transfer, 11.52% of the reconstructed embryos developed into blastocysts, which was not significantly different from that of the reconstructed embryos derived from porcine embryonic fibroblasts. When pPSC-FDs were injected into day 4.5 blastocysts, they became involved in the in vitro embryonic development and contributed to the viscera of foetuses at day 50 of pregnancy as well as the developed placenta after the chimeric blastocysts were transferred into recipients. These findings indicated that the pPSCs were porcine pluripotent cells; that this would be a useful cell line for porcine genetic engineering and a valuable cell line for clarifying the molecular mechanism of pluripotency regulation in pigs.

  2. Blastocystis hominis as a contributing risk factor for development of iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Deeb, Hala K; Salah-Eldin, Hesham; Khodeer, Seham

    2012-06-01

    Intestinal parasitic infection increases the risk of developing iron deficiency anemia (IDA) during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to assess Blastocystis hominis as a contributing risk factor for development of IDA in pregnant women. A total of 200 fecal specimens from 120 pregnant women with IDA (mean Hb = 9.6 g/dl), and 80 non-anemic controls were examined for Blastocystis. Fecal specimens were examined by the formalin/ethyl-acetate concentration technique, iron hematoxylin staining, modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast staining, and by the in vitro cultivation technique for Blastocystis. Frequency of Blastocystis infection, detected microscopically and by the in vitro culture technique, was significantly higher in IDA study group (n = 48; 40%) compared to non-anemic controls (n = 5; 6.3%; P Blastocystis without other intestinal parasitic infections was detected in 41 cases (34.2%), while seven cases (5.8%) with Blastocystis were coinfected with other intestinal parasites which included Giardia and Cryptosporidium (1.7% each), and Entamoeba sp., Ascaris, and Trichuris (0.8% each). The mean Hb level of the 48 Blastocystis-infected cases was 9.2 g/dl (mild anemia). While the other 72 IDA cases with no infection had mean Hb of 10.0 g/dl (mild anemia), with a significant difference in mean Hb level between Blastocystis-infected and the non-infected IDA cases (P Blastocystis-infected IDA cases, the mean Hb of the 41 Blastocystis-infected cases without other intestinal parasitic co-infection was 9.1 g/dl (mild anemia), while the mean Hb level of the 7 Blastocystis-infected cases with other intestinal parasitic co-infection was 8.7 g/dl (moderate anemia). Findings of the current study showed that B. hominis infection contributes to the development of IDA in pregnant women. Hence, parasitological diagnostic tests are recommended in routine examination at all antenatal clinics.

  3. Does Cell Lineage in the Developing Cerebral Cortex Contribute to its Columnar Organization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marcos R.; Hedin-Pereira, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Since the pioneer work of Lorente de Nó, Ramón y Cajal, Brodmann, Mountcastle, Hubel and Wiesel and others, the cerebral cortex has been seen as a jigsaw of anatomic and functional modules involved in the processing of different sets of information. In fact, a columnar distribution of neurons displaying similar functional properties throughout the cerebral cortex has been observed by many researchers. Although it has been suggested that much of the anatomical substrate for such organization would be already specified at early developmental stages, before activity-dependent mechanisms could take place, it is still unclear whether gene expression in the ventricular zone (VZ) could play a role in the development of discrete functional units, such as minicolumns or columns. Cell lineage experiments using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have shown that the progeny of a single neuroepithelial/radial glial cell in the dorsal telencephalon is organized into discrete radial clusters of sibling excitatory neurons, which have a higher propensity for developing chemical synapses with each other rather than with neighboring non-siblings. Here, we will discuss the possibility that the cell lineage of single neuroepithelial/radial glia cells could contribute for the columnar organization of the neocortex by generating radial columns of sibling, interconnected neurons. Borrowing some concepts from the studies on cell–cell recognition and transcription factor networks, we will also touch upon the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment of sibling-neuron circuits. PMID:20676384

  4. Contribution of autolysin and Sortase a during Enterococcus faecalis DNA-dependent biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiton, Pascale S; Hung, Chia S; Kline, Kimberly A; Roth, Robyn; Kau, Andrew L; Hayes, Ericka; Heuser, John; Dodson, Karen W; Caparon, Michael G; Hultgren, Scott J

    2009-09-01

    Biofilm production is a major attribute of Enterococcus faecalis clinical isolates. Although some factors, such as sortases, autolysin, and extracellular DNA (eDNA), have been associated with E. faecalis biofilm production, the mechanisms underlying the contributions of these factors to this process have not been completely elucidated yet. In this study we define important roles for the major E. faecalis autolysin (Atn), eDNA, and sortase A (SrtA) during the developmental stages of biofilm formation under static and hydrodynamic conditions. Deletion of srtA affects the attachment stage and results in a deficiency in biofilm production. Atn-deficient mutants are delayed in biofilm development due to defects in primary adherence and DNA release, which we show to be particularly important during the accumulative phase for maturation and architectural stability of biofilms. Confocal laser scanning and freeze-dry electron microscopy of biofilms grown under hydrodynamic conditions revealed that E. faecalis produces a DNase I-sensitive fibrous network, which is important for biofilm stability and is absent in atn-deficient mutant biofilms. This study establishes the stage-specific requirements for SrtA and Atn and demonstrates a role for Atn in the pathway leading to DNA release during biofilm development in E. faecalis.

  5. Contribution of RENAM to informational services development for higher education and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru BOGATENCOV

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transition of the traditional science and higher education to e-Science and e-Education is fueled by the ever increasing needs to have access, process and visualize of exceedingly large amounts of data that can’t be managed without modern communication and computing instruments. In the past years the European Commission has funded, through a number of targeted initiatives, creation of specialized eInfrastructures for providing IT services to research and educational communities to support collaborative research and education. In Eastern Europe, including in Moldova the existing resources of eIfrastructures are less developed than in Western Europe (ANTUN BALAZ, et. al., 2011. Advancing the Information Society, strengthening of the local eInfrastructures, activating new user communities, enabling access to modern educational content and technologies, to new instruments for collaborative research, would strongly contribute to closing the existing gap, and thus bridging the digital divide, stimulating research and consequently alleviating the brain drain in the region. At present the main facilities like Research and Educational networking infrastructure for effective data exchange, access to large-scale computing and other e-Infrastructures services is rapidly increasing in Moldova. eInfrastructure designates a new generation of integrated ICT based infrastructures and is widely considered as a key enabler of research and education development.

  6. Independent Contributions of Early Positive Parenting and Mother-Son Coercion on Emerging Social Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcinar, Berna; Shaw, Daniel S

    2017-09-21

    In the current study, we explored associations between parent-child coercion and positive parenting in the toddler period in relation to children's social-behavioral development during the school-age period. The data were drawn from the Pitt Mother & Child Project, a sample of 310 low-income, ethnically diverse boys. Drawing on tenets of both attachment and social learning theory, it was hypothesized that coercive mother-son interaction would lead to reductions in positive maternal parenting in the toddler period, and that both positive parenting and mother-son coercion in the toddler period would contribute to children's conduct problems at school entry and lower social skills and peer rejection in middle childhood. The results were largely confirmed, such that mother-son coercive interaction at 18 months was related to decreases in positive parenting at 24 months. Additionally, mother-son coercive interaction and positive parenting at 24 months were linked to child conduct problems at age 5, which in turn predicted child social skills and peer rejection during middle childhood. In addition to indirect effects through child conduct problems, mother-son coercion continued to be independently related to school-age peer rejection. The findings are discussed with respect to the importance of early coercive interactions in the growth of child social-behavioral development from early to middle childhood.

  7. Contribution of α- and β-Adrenergic Mechanisms to the Development of Pulmonary Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassler, Beate

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous or exogenous catecholamines can induce pulmonary edema (PE). This may occur in human pathologic conditions such as in pheochromocytoma or in neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) but can also be provoked after experimental administration of adrenergic agonists. PE can result from stimulation with different types of adrenergic stimulation. With α-adrenergic treatment, it develops more rapidly, is more severe with abundant protein-rich fluid in the alveolar space, and is accompanied by strong generalized inflammation in the lung. Similar detrimental effects of α-adrenergic stimulation have repeatedly been described and are considered to play a pivotal role in NPE or in PE in patients with pheochromocytoma. Although β-adrenergic agonists have often been reported to prevent or attenuate PE by enhancing alveolar fluid clearance, PE may also be induced by β-adrenergic treatment as can be observed in tocolysis. In experimental models, infusion of β-adrenergic agonists induces less severe PE than α-adrenergic stimulation. The present paper addresses the current understanding of the possible contribution of α- and β-adrenergic pathways to the development of PE. PMID:24278744

  8. Does cell lineage in the developing cerebral cortex contribute to its columnar organization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos R Costa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the pioneer work of Lorente de Nó, Ramón y Cajal, Brodmann, Mountcastle, Hubel and Wiesel and others, the cerebral cortex has been seen as a jigsaw of anatomic and functional modules involved in the processing of different sets of information. In fact, a columnar distribution of neurons displaying similar functional properties throughout the cerebral cortex has been observed by many researchers. Although it has been suggested that much of the anatomical substrate for such organization would be already specified at early developmental stages, before activity-dependent mechanisms could take place, it is still unclear whether gene expression in the ventricular zone could play a role in the development of discrete functional units, such as minicolumns or columns. Cell lineage experiments using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have shown that the progeny of a single neuroepithelial/radial glial cell in the dorsal telencephalon is organized into discrete radial clusters of sibling excitatory neurons, which have a higher propensity for developing chemical synapses with each other rather than with neighbouring non-siblings. Here, we will discuss the possibility that the cell lineage of single neuroepithelial/radial glia cells could contribute for the columnar organization of the neocortex by generating radial columns of sibling, interconnected neurons. Borrowing some concepts from the studies on cell-cell recognition and transcription factor networks, we will also touch upon the potential molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment of sibling-neuron circuits.

  9. Contribution of α- and β-Adrenergic Mechanisms to the Development of Pulmonary Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Rassler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous or exogenous catecholamines can induce pulmonary edema (PE. This may occur in human pathologic conditions such as in pheochromocytoma or in neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE but can also be provoked after experimental administration of adrenergic agonists. PE can result from stimulation with different types of adrenergic stimulation. With -adrenergic treatment, it develops more rapidly, is more severe with abundant protein-rich fluid in the alveolar space, and is accompanied by strong generalized inflammation in the lung. Similar detrimental effects of -adrenergic stimulation have repeatedly been described and are considered to play a pivotal role in NPE or in PE in patients with pheochromocytoma. Although -adrenergic agonists have often been reported to prevent or attenuate PE by enhancing alveolar fluid clearance, PE may also be induced by -adrenergic treatment as can be observed in tocolysis. In experimental models, infusion of -adrenergic agonists induces less severe PE than -adrenergic stimulation. The present paper addresses the current understanding of the possible contribution of - and -adrenergic pathways to the development of PE.

  10. Italian Contributions to the Development of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Sensors for Diabetes Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Cobelli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring glucose concentration in the blood is essential in the therapy of diabetes, a pathology which affects about 350 million people around the World (three million in Italy, causes more than four million deaths per year and consumes a significant portion of the budget of national health systems (10% in Italy. In the last 15 years, several sensors with different degree of invasiveness have been proposed to monitor glycemia in a quasi-continuous way (up to 1 sample/min rate for relatively long intervals (up to 7 consecutive days. These continuous glucose monitoring (CGM sensors have opened new scenarios to assess, off-line, the effectiveness of individual patient therapeutic plans from the retrospective analysis of glucose time-series, but have also stimulated the development of innovative on-line applications, such as hypo/hyper-glycemia alert systems and artificial pancreas closed-loop control algorithms. In this review, we illustrate some significant Italian contributions, both from industry and academia, to the growth of the CGM sensors research area. In particular, technological, algorithmic and clinical developments performed in Italy will be discussed and put in relation with the advances obtained in the field in the wider international research community.

  11. Contributions of Tourism to the Development of Regions in Russia and Germany. Bashkortostan and Saxony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Wiesmeth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the growth of the tourism industry in Russia has slowed down, and its lack of competitiveness has been the topic of various publications. Similarly, the touristic potential of the Republic of Bashkortostan is not exhausted with tourism still making an unsatisfactory contribution to the GRP of the region. Bashkortostan and Saxony are of the same size — in terms of population. Population density, however, is much higher in Saxony. In addition, differing historic roots affect any efforts to develop the touristic potential of Bashkortostan. It is then the goal of this paper to provide recommendations for sustainable tourism with a long-term perspective by analyzing consequences of these facts on the touristic infrastructure, on competitive forces, on the tasks of a tourism-marketing bureau, among others — always in comparison to the situation in Saxony (the case study method. Thus, this comparative analysis helps to restructure tourism in Bashkortostan in a situation with insufficient reliable touristic data. In the conditions of deceleration of global economic growth, depletion of natural resources, it is highly important to secure proper functioning of economic systems by means of using the available potential possibilities and searching for new reserves of economic growth. Tourism has a huge potential of development and can be an additional source of economic growth in Bashkortostan.

  12. EU Contribution to Strengthening Regional Development and Cooperation in the Black Sea Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voicu-Dorobanțu Roxana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available EU's agenda had for some time a topic (at least at an idea level about the “strengthening ofcooperation in the Black Sea Region.” It faced an interesting paradox: the lack of (or, in the caseof existence, sub-optimal economic relations between countries in this area, regardless of theirgeographical proximity. The paradoxical situation considered to be mostly due to their differenthistorical and political backgrounds. Therefore, a form of support of regional development in thearea was necessary, as it has been considered in EU's Black Sea Synergy, which encouragescooperation between countries in the Basin while offering a forum for solving common issues andpromoting political and economic reform. Regional cooperation in various areas stems from a highpolitical involvement as the main initiator but requires a strong involvement and participation ofboth civil society and private sector as main drivers of cross-border cooperation. Our paperfocuses, apart from its conceptual research background, on mapping the effective outcomes of theEU initiatives in the area and on providing future perspectives for EU contribution tostrengthening regional development and cooperation in the Black Sea Basin.

  13. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining-the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes during a period of

  14. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Locke

    Full Text Available Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining-the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes

  15. Holocene beach buildup and coastal aeolian sand incursions off the Nile littoral cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Shtienberg, Gilad; Porat, Naomi; Bookman, Revital

    2017-04-01

    Israel's coastal plain is abundant with sand originating from the Nile littoral cell. The inland windblown loose sand has formed 3-6 km wide lobe-like sand and dune fields currently comprised of foredunes, linear and northeasterly facing transverse and parabolic dunes that are currently stabilized by vegetation. This study reviews the architecture and history of the these dune fields aiming to: (a) Date the timings of beach accretion, and sand and dune incursions. (b) Discriminate between natural and human-induced forcing factors of sand mobilization and stabilization in time and space. (c) Present a model of the dunescape development. (d) Assess scenarios of sand transport in the future charcaterized by intense human impact and climate change. Luminescence ages, radiocarbon dates and relative ages from previously published geological and archaeological reports, historical texts, together with new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages and stratigraphic and sedimentological data are analyzed. The deposition, mobilizations and preservation of the sand bodies, initially induced by the decline in sea level rise at 6-4 ka, were later controlled by historic land-use intensity and modern land-use/negligence practices. At 6 ka, beach sand buildup rapidly started. Where aeolianite ridges bordered the coast, pulses of sand with biogenic carbonate grains unconformably draped the ridges and rapidly consolidated into a distinct sandy calcarenite unit. Further east, sand sheets and low dunes partly pedogenized following their incursion, but did not cement. The water retention capacities of the sand sheets enabled the establishment of a sand-stabilizing vegetation cover that probably became an attractive environment for fuel and grazing. The growing Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine ( 2.4-1.3 ka) populations probably led to increased consumption and massive destruction of sand stabilizing vegetation, enabling sand erodibility and mobilization during winter storms. The sand

  16. Fetal development of ligaments around the tarsal bones with special reference to contribution of muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Eiichi; Kim, Ji Hyun; Abe, Hiroshi; Cho, Baik Hwan; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Murakami, Gen

    2014-04-01

    Through a histological examination of eight mid-term human fetuses (10-15 weeks) and seven late-stage fetuses (30-34 weeks), we attempted to determine how and when fetal ligaments around the tarsal bones form the regular arrangement seen in adults. Ligaments along the dorsal aspect of the tarsal bones developed early as an elongation of the perichondrium, in contrast to the late development of the plantar-sided ligaments. In contrast, a distal elongation of the tibialis posterior tendon was a limited plantar ligament in the early stage; finally, it extended from the navicular, ran obliquely to cross the dorsal side of the fibularis longus tendon, and inserted to the lateral cuneiform and fourth metatarsal. In the late stage, the adductor hallucis muscle origin provided multiple ligamentous structures along the cuneiforms and metatarsals. The tarsal sinus contained multiple fibrous bundles (possibly, the putative interosseous talocalcanean ligaments) that were derived from (1) insertion tendons of the extensor digitorus brevis muscle and (2) the fibrous sheath of the extensor digitorus longus tendon. The aponeurotic origin of the quadratus plantae muscle seemed to contribute to formation of the long plantar ligament. Therefore, tarsal ligaments appeared likely to develop from the long tendons, their fibrous sheaths and aponeuroses and intramuscular tendons of the proper foot muscles. Under in utero conditions with little or no stress from the plantar side of the foot, the muscle-associated connective tissue seems to play a crucial role in providing a regular arrangement of the ligaments in accordance with tensile stress from muscle contraction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Novel mouse model reveals distinct activity-dependent and -independent contributions to synapse development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Giorgio Pacifici

    Full Text Available The balanced action of both pre- and postsynaptic organizers regulates the formation of neuromuscular junctions (NMJ. The precise mechanisms that control the regional specialization of acetylcholine receptor (AChR aggregation, guide ingrowing axons and contribute to correct synaptic patterning are unknown. Synaptic activity is of central importance and to understand synaptogenesis, it is necessary to distinguish between activity-dependent and activity-independent processes. By engineering a mutated fetal AChR subunit, we used homologous recombination to develop a mouse line that expresses AChR with massively reduced open probability during embryonic development. Through histological and immunochemical methods as well as electrophysiological techniques, we observed that endplate anatomy and distribution are severely aberrant and innervation patterns are completely disrupted. Nonetheless, in the absence of activity AChRs form postsynaptic specializations attracting motor axons and permitting generation of multiple nerve/muscle contacts on individual fibers. This process is not restricted to a specialized central zone of the diaphragm and proceeds throughout embryonic development. Phenotypes can be attributed to separate activity-dependent and -independent pathways. The correct patterning of synaptic connections, prevention of multiple contacts and control of nerve growth require AChR-mediated activity. In contrast, myotube survival and acetylcholine-mediated dispersal of AChRs are maintained even in the absence of AChR-mediated activity. Because mouse models in which acetylcholine is entirely absent do not display similar effects, we conclude that acetylcholine binding to the AChR initiates activity-dependent and activity-independent pathways whereby the AChR modulates formation of the NMJ.

  18. Optimization the composition of sand-lime products modified of diabase aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisarczyk, K.; Stępień, A.

    2017-10-01

    The problem of optimizing the composition of building materials is currently of great importance due to the increasing competitiveness and technological development in the construction industry. This phenomenon also applies to catalog sand-lime. The respective arrangement of individual components or their equivalents, and linking them with the main parameters of the composition of the mixture, i.e. The lime/sand/water should lead to the intended purpose. The introduction of sand-lime diabase aggregate is concluded with a positive effect of final products. The paper presents the results of optimization with the addition of diabase aggregate. The constant value was the amount of water, variable - the mass of the dry ingredients. The program of experimental studies was taken for 6 series of silicates made in industrial conditions. Final samples were tested for mechanical and physico-chemical expanding the analysis of the mercury intrusion porosimetry, SEM and XRD. The results show that, depending on the aggregate’s contribution, exhibit differences. The sample in an amount of 10% diabase aggregate the compressive strength was higher than in the case of reference sample, while modified samples absorbed less water.

  19. Transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis by sand flies is enhanced by regurgitation of fPPG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Matthew E.; Ilg, Thomas; Nikolaev, Andrei V.; Ferguson, Michael A. J.; Bates, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Sand flies are the exclusive vectors of the protozoan parasite Leishmania1, but the mechanism of transmission by fly bite has not been determined nor incorporated into experimental models of infection. In sand flies with mature Leishmania infections the anterior midgut is blocked by a gel of parasite origin, the promastigote secretory gel (PSG)2,3. Here, we analyse for the first time the inocula from Leishmania mexicana infected Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies. This revealed the size of the infectious dose, the underlying mechanism of parasite delivery by regurgitation, and the novel contribution made to infection by filamentous proteophosphoglycan (fPPG), a component of PSG found to accompany the parasites during transmission. Collectively, these results have important implications for understanding the relationship between parasite and its vector, the pathology of cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans and also the development of effective vaccines and drugs. These findings emphasise that to fully understand transmission of vector-borne diseases the interaction between all three participants must be considered. PMID:15269771

  20. Remotely sensed dune sand flux measurements in the dustiest place on Earth (Bodélé, Chad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Bodélé Depression of northern Chad is the dustiest place on Earth, thanks to a unique combination of two factors. First, the Bodélé is located downwind of a narrow gap between the Tibesti and Ennedi mountain ranges, which act as a funnel creating the strong winds of the Bodélé Low Level Jet. Second, the depression forms the deepest part of palaeo-lake Megachad, which once rivaled the Caspian Sea in size. When the lake dried out during the Holocene, it left behind thick deposits of diatomite, which currently provide an abundant and readily available source of dust. Previous work has shown that dust is primarily produced by eddies near the horns of barchan dunes. Using a new remote sensing technique called COSI-Corr, these barchans were shown to be not only the largest, but also the fastest on Earth, featuring the highest sand fluxes. Quantifying sand flux with field measurements is an expensive and time-consuming process. COSI-Corr -which stands for 'Co-registration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation' and was originally developed for the purpose of detecting surface deformation caused by earthquakes- offers an alternative approach to measuring sand flux, using remote sensing. From pairs of ASTER imagery, dune migration in the Bodélé depression was successfully measured over time intervals of one month to 6.5 years. The displacement maps produced by COSI-Corr can be used to automatically distinguish dunes from interdunes, which is a crucial step towards calculating sand flux. Dune heights and volumes were obtained by interpolating a surface between the interdune areas and subtracting it from a digital elevation model. Multiplying height with celerity yields a pixel-by-pixel estimate of the sand flux. Applying this method to large diatomite dunes in the Bodélé confirms that these are some of the world’s fastest moving barchans. Plotting dune height against inverse celerity reveals sand flux at the dune crest of >200 m3/m/yr. Average dune sand

  1. Settling Tube Analysis of Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geldof, H.J.; Slot, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    For various reasons particle-size analysis of sediment is used in many fields of science and technology, a.o. earth sciences, agricultural and civil engineering. Relatively coarse-grained sediment like sand, with dimensions ranging from 0.06 till 2 mm, is analyzed almost exclusively by sieving. The

  2. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  3. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  4. A bright intra-dune feature on Titan and its implications for sand formation and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason W.; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Cornet, Thomas; Brossier, Jeremy; Soderblom, Jason M.; Le Mouélic, Stephane; Sotin, Christophe; Brown, Robert H.; Buratti, Bonnie J.; Clark, Roger Nelson; Nicholson, Philip D.; Baines, Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Organic sands cover much of Titan’s equatorial belt, gathered into longitudinal dunes about a kilometer wide and hundreds of kilometers long. At the end of the Cassini era, questions of how such a vast volume of saltable material is or was created on Titan remain unanswered. At least two possible mechanisms suggested for forming sand-sized particles involve liquids: (1) evaporite deposition and erosion and (2) flocculation of material within a lake. Transporting sand from the lakes and seas of Titan’s poles to the equatorial belt is not strongly supported by Cassini observations: the equatorial belt sits higher than the poles and no sheets or corridors of travelling sand have been identified. Thus, previous sites of equatorial surface liquids may be of interest for understanding sand formation, such as the suggested paleoseas Tui and Hotei Regio. A newly identified feature in the VIMS data sits within the Fensal dune field but is distinct from the surrounding sand. We investigate this Bright Fensal Feature (BFF) using data from Cassini VIMS and RADAR. Specifically, we find spectral similarities between the BFF and both sand and Hotei Regio. The RADAR cross sectional backscatter is similar to neighboring dark areas, perhaps sand covered interdunes. We use this evidence to constrain the BFF’s formation history and discuss how this intra-dune feature may contribute to the processes of sand transport and supply.

  5. The Intersection of Identity Development and Peer Relationship Processes in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: Contributions of the Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliher, Renee V.; Kerpelman, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    This analysis of the papers in the special section on the intersection of identity development and peer relationship processes calls attention to conceptual contribution this collection of papers makes to the literature on identity development. Together these ten papers build on strong theoretical foundations in identity development, which posit…

  6. Implications of sustainable development considerations for comparability across nationally determined contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Gokul; Calvin, Katherine; Clarke, Leon; Edmonds, James; Hultman, Nathan; Hartin, Corinne; McJeon, Haewon; Aldy, Joseph; Pizer, William

    2018-01-29

    An important component of analyses of the Paris Agreement has been the assessment of comparability of countries’ nationally determined contributions (NDCs). These assessments have typically focused on a set of emissions or cost-based indicators1-8. At the same time, an increasing body of literature is articulating many possible linkages between mitigation and other national priorities, with a major focus on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)9-13. The importance of the SDGs raises a question about how their linkages to mitigation activities might influence comparability assessments. We explore this question using a global integrated assessment model14 and provide illustrations of the geographical distributions of the influence of the NDCs on broader sustainability goals. We demonstrate that the extent to which these distributions differ from the distribution of mitigation effort obtained using standard comparability metrics depends on the degree to which domestic mitigation actions affect broader sustainability goals domestically and/or internationally and whether these effects are synergistic or antagonistic. Our analysis provides a foundation for considering how comparability across the NDCs could be better understood in the larger context of sustainability.

  7. Contribution of Mexico's Universal Immunization Program to the Fourth Millennium Development Goal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesta Richardson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify and describe 1 progress achieved thus far in meeting the commitments of the Fourth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 4 in Mexico, mainly the contribution of the Universal Immunization Program (UIP over the last 20 years, and 2 new opportunities for further reducing mortality among children under 5 years old. METHODS: An observational, descriptive, retrospective study was carried out to examine registered causes of death in children under 5 between 1990 and 2010. Indicators were built according to the recommendations of the United Nations. RESULTS: In 2010, deaths among children under 5 decreased 64.3% compared to the baseline (1990 figure. Of the total deaths of the children under 5, the neonatal period was the most affected (52.8%, followed by the 1 to 11 months (30.9%, and the 12 to 59 months (16.2% groups. A 34% overall mortality reduction was observed after the universalization of immunization against influenza, rotavirus, and pneumococcus in children under 5. CONCLUSIONS: Despite a significant reduction in under-5 mortality in Mexico over the last 20 years, largely due to the successes of the UIP, several challenges remain, particularly in improving preventive and curative services during pre- and postnatal care.

  8. Sociodemographic factors that contribute to the development of extrapulmonary tuberculosis were identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailhol, Johann; Decludt, Bénédicte; Che, Didier

    2005-10-01

    The majority of cases of tuberculosis occur among males, but the majority of cases with extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) occur among females. The aim of this study was to identify independent risk factors associated with EPTB. A multivariable logistic regression model was used. Eighteen thousand, six hundred seventeen cases of tuberculosis, notified through the French national mandatory network between 1 January 1997 through 31 December 2001, were included in the analysis. Because of multiple interactions, different multivariable models were built for each area of birth (Europe, North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Asia). Risk factors for EPTB vary according to area of birth. Women born in Asia or North Africa were at a higher risk of developing an EPTB than men. In Sub-Saharan Africa, age was associated with EPTB. Human immunodeficiency virus infection was an independent risk factor for EPTB in the European groups only with an OR of 2.48 (CI 99% 1.84-3.34). This analysis contributes to a better understanding of host-related factors associated with EPTB. As clinical presentation of EPTB is extremely variable, the identification of groups at higher risk may help in the early detection of cases.

  9. Function Self-Efficacy Scale-FSES: Development, Evaluation, and Contribution to Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovel, Hava; Carmel, Sara

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Function Self-Efficacy Scale (FSES) for assessing the degree of confidence in self-functioning while facing decline in health and function (DHF). The FSES was evaluated in two studies of older Israelis, aged 75+ years. Data were collected by structured home interviews. Exploratory factor analyses conducted in both studies clearly revealed two underlying factors: emotion self-efficacy and action self-efficacy. Confirmatory factor analyses resulted in acceptable model fit criteria. The shortened final 13-item FSES had good internal consistency and satisfactory criterion and convergent validity. Multiple regression analyses, conducted to predict subjective well-being in each of the studies, showed that function self-efficacy had a positive and significant contribution to the explanation of well-being, while controlling for general self-efficacy, self-rated health, and sociodemographic variables. We propose that appropriate interventions can strengthen function self-efficacy, thus improving the well-being of elderly persons and their ability to cope with DHF. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Practices to Develop Spatial Data Infrastructures: Exploring the Contribution to E-Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompvoets, Joep; Vancauwenberghe, Glenn; Bouckaert, Geert; Vandenbroucke, Danny

    The main objectives of this chapter are to introduce Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs), and to explore their potential contribution to good e-government. In order to understand the possible strengths of SDIs for good e-government, the concept, components, governance, and the cost-benefit analyses regarding the implementation of these infrastructures are first explained and presented followed by a short presentation of four existing SDIs in practice (Europe, Catalonia, Flanders, and Leiedal). These practices clearly show the dynamic, integrated, and multiple natures of SDIs. The main reason to invest in SDIs is that they facilitate the sharing of spatial data in a way that the management and use of these spatial resources happens more efficiently and effectively. This concept of sharing resources from multiple sources is not common practice in e-government research and implementation. However, it is very likely that ICTs will play a key role in improving the sharing of public resources in order to have a more efficient and effective management and use of these resources. Therefore, the lessons learnt from the existing SDI-practices and understanding of the nature of SDIs could be useful support in developing good e-governments.

  11. Education in Sustainable Development: How Can Science Education Contribute to the Vulnerability Perception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Education for human development within the constraints of sustainability is problematic for schools. On one hand, it is a political idea that continues to evolve with successive compromises between social groups with differing or even conflicting interests. ESD is therefore inherently `non-disciplinary' and cannot be the basis of a single school subject if we wish to keep the creativity that results from the dynamics at work. On the other hand, SD leads us to think collectively about solutions that ensure a future of our choosing that preserves the biological capacity of the planet and to reduce our vulnerability. The sciences thus have a key role: their ability to question the world and to model the consequences of collective and individual choices. But there is a risk of technocratic drift and SD leads us to think about society's values and aims. A new link is established between sciences and humanities with a democratic model in sight. This paper presents what is possible out of the prospective scenarios method within general and compulsory education by seeking, through an empirical approach, to determine its feasibility, its contributions, its limits, and to locate the place of science education in the elaboration of the perception of "vulnerability". Both primary and secondary schools are concerned.

  12. Apolipoprotein A-V level may contribute to the development of obesity-associated dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yayoi; Okada, Tomoo; Abe, Yuriko; Odaka, Minako; Kuromori, Yuki; Yonezawa, Ryuta; Iwata, Fujihiko; Mugishima, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    In a mice study, insulin suppressed apolipoprotein A-V (apoA-V) gene expression in a dose dependent manner. Thus, we investigated the association between apoA-V levels and dyslipidemias in obese children with hyperinsulinemia. The subjects were 17 obese children (15 male, 2 female) aged 11.8 ± 2.4 years. Total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), triglyceride (TG), apoA-V and insulin levels were determined. Obese children with hyperinsulinemia had greater percent overweight, higher TG level, lower HDLC level and lower apoA-V level than those without hyperinsulinemia. In simple regression analysis, apoA-V level correlated negatively with TG (r = -0.613, p = 0.0152) and insulin levels (r = -0.566, p = 0.0279), and positively correlated with HDLC (r = 0.811, p = 0.0002). In stepwise regression analysis, insulin level emerged as the independent determinant of TG level after apoA-V level was taken into account, whereas apoA-V emerged as the independent determinant of HDLC level after adjusting for insulin level. Insulin may be a potent regulator of serum apoA-V level in obesity, and apoA-V level may partly contribute to the development of obesity-associated dyslipidemia. © 2013 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity . Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Equipping students to contribute to development through a geohazards education and research programme (Ladakh, India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Joel; Tostevin, Rosalie

    2014-05-01

    Here we present a geohazards education and engagement project in the Indian region of Ladakh, used as an opportunity to train geoscience students in a number of important ethical, cultural and professional considerations. Located in the Indian Himalaya, Ladakh is home to historically-disadvantaged and endangered indigenous groups. It is also an area of extreme topography, climate and vulnerability, with a growing tourist industry. This combination of factors makes it an important region to improve geohazards understanding and observe the complex interactions between nature, society, and culture. Specific aims of this project are to (i) support community education through an interactive natural hazards programme (delivered in conjunction with a range of partners), training school-aged students from multiple socio-economic backgrounds; and (ii) increase the effectiveness of disaster risk reduction programmes, through research into the perception of natural hazards and environmental change. At all stages of this work, we are seeking to engage young geoscientists, helping them to better understand the skills and knowledge-base required to make a long-term, effective contribution to interdisciplinary research and professional practice. Through presenting an overview of this project and associated opportunities, we seek to emphasise the importance of developing practical opportunities for students to consider aspects of geoethics, social responsibility and cross-cultural understanding.

  14. The untold story: how the health care systems in developing countries contribute to maternal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundari, T K

    1992-01-01

    This article attempts to put together evidence from maternal mortality studies in developing countries of how an inadequate health care system characterized by misplaced priorities contributes to high maternal mortality rates. Inaccessibility of essential health information to the women most affected, and the physical as well as economic and sociocultural distance separating health services from the vast majority of women, are only part of the problem. Even when the woman reaches a health facility, there are a number of obstacles to her receiving adequate and appropriate care. These are a result of failures in the health services delivery system: the lack of minimal life-saving equipment at the first referral level; the lack of equipment, personnel, and know-how even in referral hospitals; and worst of all, faulty patient management. Prevention of maternal deaths requires fundamental changes not only in resource allocation, but in the very structures of health services delivery. These will have to be fought for as part of a wider struggle for equity and social justice.

  15. The somatic marker theory in the context of addiction: contributions to understanding development and maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen VV

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegard V Olsen,1 Ricardo G Lugo,1 Stefan Sütterlin1,2 1Section of Psychology, Lillehammer University College, Lillehammer, 2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Division of Surgery and Clinical Neuroscience, Oslo University Hospital – Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway Abstract: Recent theoretical accounts of addiction have acknowledged that addiction to substances and behaviors share inherent similarities (eg, insensitivity to future consequences and self-regulatory deficits. This recognition is corroborated by inquiries into the neurobiological correlates of addiction, which has indicated that different manifestations of addictive pathology share common neural mechanisms. This review of the literature will explore the feasibility of the somatic marker hypothesis as a unifying explanatory framework of the decision-making deficits that are believed to be involved in addiction development and maintenance. The somatic marker hypothesis provides a neuroanatomical and cognitive framework of decision making, which posits that decisional processes are biased toward long-term prospects by emotional marker signals engendered by a neuronal architecture comprising both cortical and subcortical circuits. Addicts display markedly impulsive and compulsive behavioral patterns that might be understood as manifestations of decision-making processes that fail to take into account the long-term consequences of actions. Evidence demonstrates that substance dependence, pathological gambling, and Internet addiction are characterized by structural and functional abnormalities in neural regions, as outlined by the somatic marker hypothesis. Furthermore, both substance dependents and behavioral addicts show similar impairments on a measure of decision making that is sensitive to somatic marker functioning. The decision-making deficits that characterize addiction might exist a priori to addiction development; however, they may be worsened by ingestion of substances with

  16. Contribution of Blastocystishominis subtypes and associated inflammatory factors in development of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizian, Marzieh; Basati, Gholam; Abangah, Ghobad; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Mirzaei, Asad

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis hominis with worldwide distribution is a human intestinal protozoa found in all countries. There have been differences in the severity of the pathogenesis of various Blastocystis spp. and a concomitant variation in the plasma concentration of the cytokines in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the contribution of B. hominis subtypes in the development of irritable bowel syndrome. Stool samples were collected from patients with gastrointestinal disorders. All samples were evaluated through native-lugol method. Total DNA was extracted. A PCR protocol was developed to amplify a specific region of the SSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. Serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were determined by immunoassay methods. The ClustalW algorithm was applied to align and blast the nucleotide sequences of the amplified region of the SSU rDNA gene. To evaluate the phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary of the nucleotide sequences, we used the MEGA software. In this study, we found 26 haplotypes of B. hominis in the studied samples which were collectively belong to five subtypes (ST1, ST2 in patients without irritable bowel syndrome vs. ST3 and two unknown subtypes in patients with irritable bowel syndrome). Result of ELISA showed a high level of IL-6 and TNF-α in the serum of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The genetic heterogeneity of B. hominis and the existence of different subtypes of the protozoan in patients with IBS may shed light to the fact that some subtypes of parasites may involve in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  17. Beyond dreams: do sleep-related movements contribute to brain development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S Blumberg

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional wisdom has long held that the twitches of sleeping infants and adults are by-products of a dreaming brain. With the discovery of active (or REM sleep in the 1950s and the recognition soon thereafter that active sleep is characterized by inhibition of motor outflow, researchers elaborated on conventional wisdom and concluded that sleep-related twitches are epiphenomena that result from incomplete blockade of dream-related cortical activity. This view persists despite the fact that twitching is unaffected in infant and adults when the cortex is disconnected from the brainstem. In 1966, Roffwarg and colleagues introduced the ontogenetic hypothesis, which addressed the preponderance of active sleep in early infancy. This hypothesis posited that the brainstem mechanisms that produce active sleep provide direct ascending stimulation to the forebrain and descending stimulation to the musculature, thereby promoting brain and neuromuscular development. However, this hypothesis and the subsequent work that tested it did not directly address the developmental significance of twitching or sensory feedback as a contributor to activity-dependent development. Here I review recent findings that have inspired an elaboration of the ontogenetic hypothesis. Specifically, in addition to direct brainstem activation of cortex during active sleep, sensory feedback arising from limb twitches produces discrete and substantial activation of somatosensory cortex and, beyond that, of hippocampus. Delineating how twitching during active sleep contributes to the establishment, refinement, and maintenance of neural circuits may aid our understanding of the early developmental events that make sensorimotor integration possible. In addition, twitches may prove to be sensitive and powerful tools for assessing somatosensory function in humans across the lifespan as well as functional recovery in individuals with injuries or conditions that affect sensorimotor function.

  18. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  19. Mites and spiders act as biological control agent to sand flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diwakar Singh Dinesh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To find out natural biological control agents of sand flies vector of kala azar in Bihar, India. Methods: Sand flies collected from the field using CDC light trap installing overnight to the collection site scrutitinized for Phlebotomus argentipes, the established vector of visceral leishmaniasis. Blood fed adult females were confined in the insectary for its development of life cycle. During developmental stages 2nd to 4th instars larvae were examined closely by using compound microscope for mite infestation. Adult spider residing along with sand flies collected in trap were kept in cage along with sand flies and their activities were watched closely and recorded by video and picture. Results: Mites were found predating 2nd to 4th instars larvae only under the laboratory conditions and lowering down the population of sand flies up to basal level within 15 d after infestation. One specific spider was found eating blood fed female sand flies kept inside the cage (n=50 attacking on lower part of thoracic region to kill the sand fly and ate desired soft part. Conclusions: Both predators, mites and spiders are acting as biological control agents to larvae and adults of sand flies respectively resulting variable density of vectors due to variable association with these predators and also cause lowering the transmission of the disease as hidden natural controlling agent of sand flies. The extensive study will be of immense help in controlling sand flies without use of environmental pollutant i.e. chemical insecticide.

  20. Research on testing method of resin sand high temperature compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High temperature compressive strength is one of the most important performances of resin sand; its value directly concerns the quality of castings. In order to seek the best testing method of resin sand high temperature compressive strength, a self-developed instrument was used to carry out experiments, and the sample shape and size were designed and studied. The results show that a hollow cylinder sample can reflect the strength difference of different resin sands better than a solid cylinder sample, and its data is stable. The experiments selected フ20/5】30 mm as the size of the hollow cylinder samples. The high temperature compressive strengths of phenol-formaldehyde resin coated sand, furan resin self-setting sand, and TEA resin sand were each tested. For the resin sand used for cast steel and cast iron, 1,000 ìC was selected as the test temperature; for the resin sand used for cast non-ferrous alloy, 800 ìC was selected as the test temperature; and for all the resin sand samples, 1 min was selected as the holding time. This testing method can truthfully reflect the high temperature performance of three kinds of resin sand; it is reproducible, and the variation coefficients of test values are under 10%.

  1. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  2. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauul J. Tikalsky

    2004-10-31

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  3. Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikalsky, Paul J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Bahia, Hussain U. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Deng, An [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Snyder, Thomas [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2004-10-15

    This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

  4. COASTALT Project's contribution to the development and dissemination of coastal altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, P.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    Satellite altimeters have been monitoring the global ocean for 20 years, with an excellent degree of accuracy; but in the coastal strip data are normally flagged as bad because of a number of technical problems, and therefore rejected. However this situation is rapidly changing: prompted by the tantalizing prospect of recovering 20 years of data over the coastal ocean, and encouraged by the improved suitability for coastal applications of new and future altimeters (like those on Cryosat-2, AltiKa and Sentinel-3), a lively community of researchers in coastal altimetry has coalesced in the last few years, and is developing techniques to recover useful measurements of sea level and significant wave height in the coastal strip, as well as implementing and promoting new applications. The major space agencies are strongly supporting R&D in this new field with initiatives like ESA's COASTALT (for Envisat) and CNES' PISTACH (for Jason-2). The coastal altimetry community holds regular workshops (see http://www.coastalt.eu/community) where the science and techniques of coastal altimetry are reviewed and various applications are showcased and discussed. The present contribution revisits briefly the many recent technical improvements that are contributing to the steady progress of this new field and in particular focuses on the results of the COASTALT project, which has recently concluded. COASTALT has been an excellent incubator of ideas and new techniques for the improvement of coastal altimetry: first of all it has contributed to establish user requirements for this new field, and it has defined detailed product specifications for the new coastal altimetry products and produced the relevant documentation. At the same time COASTALT has tackled the two main areas of improvement for coastal altimetry. These are: 1) retracking, i.e. fitting a waveform model to the waveforms to obtain an estimate of the geophysical parameters: and 2) designing and validating improved coastal

  5. experimental studies of sand production from unconsolidated

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    consolidated samples has been used to simulate the effect of flow rates, confining pressure, pressure drawdown and fluid viscosity on sand production in the Niger. Delta. The model was also used to determine the ability of using the flow rate to control the production of sand. Sand sample from an unconsolidated reser-.

  6. Food web structure in oil sands reclaimed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, K E; Ciborowski, J J H; Daly, C; Dixon, D G; Farwell, A J; Foote, A L; Frederick, K R; Costa, J M Gardner; Kennedy, K; Liber, K; Roy, M C; Slama, C A; Smits, J E G

    2013-07-01

    Boreal wetlands play an important role in global carbon balance. However, their ecosystem function is threatened by direct anthropogenic disturbance and climate change. Oil sands surface mining in the boreal regions of Western Canada denudes tracts of land of organic materials, leaves large areas in need of reclamation, and generates considerable quantities of extraction process-affected materials. Knowledge and validation of reclamation techniques that lead to self-sustaining wetlands has lagged behind development of protocols for reclaiming terrestrial systems. It is important to know whether wetlands reclaimed with oil sands process materials can be restored to levels equivalent to their original ecosystem function. We approached this question by assessing carbon flows and food web structure in naturally formed and oil sands-affected wetlands constructed in 1970-2004 in the postmining landscape. We evaluated whether a prescribed reclamation strategy, involving organic matter amendment, accelerated reclaimed wetland development, leading to wetlands that were more similar to their natural marsh counterparts than wetlands that were not supplemented with organic matter. We measured compartment standing stocks for bacterioplankton, microbial biofilm, macrophytes, detritus, and zoobenthos; concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and residual naphthenic acids; and microbial production, gas fluxes, and aquatic-terrestrial exports (i.e., aquatic insect emergence). The total biomass of several biotic compartments differed significantly between oil sands and reference wetlands. Submerged macrophyte biomass, macroinvertebrate trophic diversity, and predator biomass and richness were lower in oil sands-affected wetlands than in reference wetlands. There was insufficient evidence to conclude that wetland age and wetland amendment with peat-mineral mix mitigate effects of oil sands waste materials on the fully aquatic biota. Although high variability was observed within

  7. Diagnostics in biological rapid sand filters treating groundwater – governing factors for nitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Gülay, Arda; Smets, Barth F.

    To improve the insight in the processes in biological rapid sand filters a range of methods were developed to diagnose the microbial mediated processes – particularly nitrification.......To improve the insight in the processes in biological rapid sand filters a range of methods were developed to diagnose the microbial mediated processes – particularly nitrification....

  8. Potassium Channel Subfamily K Member 3 (KCNK3) Contributes to the Development of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antigny, Fabrice; Hautefort, Aurélie; Meloche, Jolyane; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Manoury, Boris; Rucker-Martin, Catherine; Péchoux, Christine; Potus, François; Nadeau, Valérie; Tremblay, Eve; Ruffenach, Grégoire; Bourgeois, Alice; Dorfmüller, Peter; Breuils-Bonnet, Sandra; Fadel, Elie; Ranchoux, Benoît; Jourdon, Philippe; Girerd, Barbara; Montani, David; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2016-04-05

    Mutations in the KCNK3 gene have been identified in some patients suffering from heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). KCNK3 encodes an outward rectifier K(+) channel, and each identified mutation leads to a loss of function. However, the pathophysiological role of potassium channel subfamily K member 3 (KCNK3) in PAH is unclear. We hypothesized that loss of function of KCNK3 is a hallmark of idiopathic and heritable PAH and contributes to dysfunction of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells, leading to pulmonary artery remodeling: consequently, restoring KCNK3 function could alleviate experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH). We demonstrated that KCNK3 expression and function were reduced in human PAH and in monocrotaline-induced PH in rats. Using a patch-clamp technique in freshly isolated (not cultured) pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells, we found that KCNK3 current decreased progressively during the development of monocrotaline-induced PH and correlated with plasma-membrane depolarization. We demonstrated that KCNK3 modulated pulmonary arterial tone. Long-term inhibition of KCNK3 in rats induced distal neomuscularization and early hemodynamic signs of PH, which were related to exaggerated proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell, adventitial fibroblasts, and pulmonary and systemic inflammation. Lastly, in vivo pharmacological activation of KCNK3 significantly reversed monocrotaline-induced PH in rats. In PAH and experimental PH, KCNK3 expression and activity are strongly reduced in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. KCNK3 inhibition promoted increased proliferation, vasoconstriction, and inflammation. In vivo pharmacological activation of KCNK3 alleviated monocrotaline-induced PH, thus demonstrating that loss of KCNK3 is a key event in PAH pathogenesis and thus could be therapeutically targeted.

  9. Does Impaired Gallbladder Function Contribute to the Development of Barrett's Esophagus and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nassr, Ayman O

    2011-06-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma is aetiologically associated with gastro-esophageal reflux, but the mechanisms responsible for the metaplasia-dysplasia sequence are unknown. Bile components are implicated. Impaired gallbladder function may contribute to duodenogastric reflux (DGR) and harmful GERD.

  10. Proceedings of the 7. annual Athabasca oil sands conference : oil sands trade show and conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The Athabasca Oil Sands Projects are considered a major source energy supply for North America, which means increased commitments from producing companies to improve environmental impact and enhance the technology used for extraction and refining. This annual conference, which was hosted by the world's leading group of experts in the unconventional oil industry, provided a venue to network, do business and discover new strategies and innovations for the industry. The presentations highlighted thermal recovery methods, transportation infrastructure, and government policies designed to ensure project success. The four sessions of the conference were entitled: the oil sands landscape, technology advances; project updates; and, research and development. The conference featured 12 presentations, of which 4 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. tabs., figs.

  11. The relative labour productivity contribution of different age-skill categories for a developing economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhardus van Zyl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The article dealt with the estimation, computation and interpretation of the relative productivity contributions of different age-skill categories.Research purpose: The aim of the article was to estimate and compute, (1 relative productivity contributions and (2 relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost levels for different age-skill categories.Motivation for the study: The research was deemed necessary given the current debate on relative productivity levels and possible changes to the retirement age in the South African labour market. No real research in this regard has been published regarding the South African labour market situation.Research design, approach and method: A less restrictive production function was used, allowing for the simultaneous estimation and final computation of relative labour contribution levels of different age-skill categories.Main findings: The lower-skilled segment produced significantly smaller productivity contributions and the relative productivity contribution–employee remuneration cost ratios of the 55 years and older age group were superior in the higher-skilled segment but, at the same time, the lowest in the lower-skilled segment.Practical/managerial implications: It is recommended that human resource practitioners (given the perceived rigidity of labour legislation implement and maintain structures that promote higher productivity levels for all age-skill categories in the workplace.Contribution/value-add: An estimation procedure, which can be applied to the measurement of the relative productivity contribution of different age-skill categories, has been established.

  12. Bacterial diversity of the American sand fly Lutzomyia intermedia using high-throughput metagenomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Carolina Cunha; Villegas, Luis Eduardo Martinez; Campolina, Thais Bonifácio; Pires, Ana Clara Machado Araújo; Miranda, Jose Carlos; Pimenta, Paulo Filemon Paolucci; Secundino, Nagila Francinete Costa

    2016-08-31

    the constituents of Lu. intermedia native microbiota contribute to the knowledge regarding the bacterial community in an important sand fly vector and allow for further studies to better understand how the microbiota interacts with vectors of human parasites and to develop tools for biological control.

  13. Reframing the Canadian Oil Sands

    OpenAIRE

    Patchett, Merle M; Lozowy, A

    2012-01-01

    Reframing the Canadian Oil Sands” is a collaborative exchange between photographer Andriko Lozowy and cultural geographer Merle Patchett that engages photography and photographic theory to evoke a more critical and politically meaningful visual engagement with the world’s largest capital oil project. Since the appearance of Edward Burtynsky’s aerial and abstracted photographic-mappings of the region, capturing the scale of the Oil Sands from ‘on high’ has become the dominant visual imaginary....

  14. Simulating Sand Behavior through Terrain Subdivision and Particle Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, M.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in computer graphics, GPUs, and parallel processing hardware have provided researchers with new methods to visualize scientific data. In fact, these advances have spurred new research opportunities between computer graphics and other disciplines, such as Earth sciences. Through collaboration, Earth and planetary scientists have benefited by using these advances in hardware technology to process large amounts of data for visualization and analysis. At Oregon State University, we are collaborating with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs to investigate techniques for simulating the behavior of sand. In addition, we have also been collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's DARTS Lab to exchange ideas on our research. The DARTS Lab specializes in the simulation of planetary vehicles, such as the Mars rovers. One aspect of their work is testing these vehicles in a virtual "sand box" to test their performance in different environments. Our research builds upon this idea to create a sand simulation framework to allow for more complex and diverse environments. As a basis for our framework, we have focused on planetary environments, such as the harsh, sandy regions on Mars. To evaluate our framework, we have used simulated planetary vehicles, such as a rover, to gain insight into the performance and interaction between the surface sand and the vehicle. Unfortunately, simulating the vast number of individual sand particles and their interaction with each other has been a computationally complex problem in the past. However, through the use of high-performance computing, we have developed a technique to subdivide physically active terrain regions across a large landscape. To achieve this, we only subdivide terrain regions where sand particles are actively participating with another object or force, such as a rover wheel. This is similar to a Level of Detail (LOD) technique, except that the density of subdivisions are determined by

  15. Rheological Characterization of Green Sand Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hovad, Emil

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to characterize experimentally the flow behaviour of the green sand that is used for casting of sand moulds. After the sand casting process is performed, the sand moulds are used for metal castings. The rheological properties of the green sand is important to quantify...... module for characterizing granular materials. The new module enables viscosity measurements of the green sand as function of the shear rate at different flow rates, i.e. 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 15 L/min. The results show generally that the viscosity decreases with both the shear- and flow rate....... In addition, the measurements show that the green sand flow follows a shear-thinning behaviour even after the full fluidization point....

  16. The development of pragmatic skills in children after hemispherotomy: Contribution from left and right hemispheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Save-Pédebos, Jessica; Pinabiaux, Charlotte; Dorfmuller, Georg; Sorbets, Sarah Ferrand; Delalande, Olivier; Jambaqué, Isabelle; Bulteau, Christine

    2016-02-01

    Hemispherotomy (H) is the standard treatment used to cure hemispheric epileptic syndromes in childhood. The postoperative linguistic profile involves hemispheric specialization processes and developmental cognitive plasticity. This research concerns pragmatic aspects of language as a tool for communication which involves both linguistic and extralinguistic communication in context. Our aim was to analyze whether any correlation exists with age at surgery and side of surgery on pragmatic skills following H. Forty children who underwent H (23 females, 16 right H) were evaluated at a mean age of 12.8 years (±2.6) with two receptive tasks (oral comprehension and syntactic judgment), the Children's Communication Checklist (CCC) rating scale, and the Behavioral Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) questionnaire in order to evaluate the role of executive functions on pragmatic skills. Children operated on before the age of 18 months were considered the "early" group (5 right H and 9 left H), while those operated on later were called the "late" group (11 right H and 15 left H). The whole group had significant deficits in all three measures. We demonstrated a statistically significant crossed interaction between the side of H and the age at H with pragmatic language impairments (F(1,36)=17.48; p=.0002) and disorders in executive function (F(1,36)=5.80; p=.021) in left early H and in right late H patients. These findings are consistent with the previous studies of pragmatic language impairments concerning adolescents and adults with right hemisphere damage and emphasize the contribution of structural language in the early stage of verbal communication. These results emphasize for the first time that hemispherotomized children have pragmatic language impairments that are independent of receptive language. Our findings are congruent with the recent theory on pragmatic language development in childhood with evidence of a participation of the left hemisphere at the

  17. OSL age and stratigraphy of the Strauss sand sheet in New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stephen A.; Goble, Ronald J.

    2015-07-01

    The Strauss sand sheet occurs in south-central New Mexico, USA, and northern Chihuahua, Mexico, covering an area of about 4740 km2. Its chronology is determined by 19 OSL ages. The sand sheet formed primarily during three phases of eolian deflation and deposition, each phase with a separate sand source and under different climatic and environmental circumstances. The first phase of eolian sedimentation occurred 45 to 15 ka with the deposition of unit 1. The sand source for the first phase was beach-related features along the eastern shoreline of pluvial Lake Palomas in Mexico. The glacial-age climate was cool, wet, and windy because of the southern path of the jet stream at that time. After 15 ka, with the onset of warmer conditions of the Bølling-Allerød, the shutting down of the Palomas sand source, and wet conditions of the Younger Dryas, the sand sheet stabilized with weak soil development in unit 1. By 11 ka, the climate shifted to Holocene drying conditions and the second phase of sand accumulation began, forming unit 2; the sand source was the local deflation of the previously deposited unit 1 sand. The sand sheet stabilized again by 1.9 ka with slightly wetter late Holocene climate; a weak soil formed in unit 2 sand. About A.D. 1500 and extending to about A.D. 1850 or later, an A horizon formed on the sand sheet, probably in response to a desert grassland vegetation during the period of wet climate of the Little Ice Age. In an anthropogenic third phase of eolian activity, after A.D. 1850, the vegetation was likely disturbed by overgrazing; and the unit 2 and A horizon (unit 3) sands were deflated, resulting in the deposition of a thin layer of massive eolian sand (unit 4) across the sand sheet. By about A.D. 1900 mesquite shrubs had increased in abundance; and deflated sand, largely from unit 2, began to accumulate around the shrubs, forming coppice dunes (unit 5). Mesquite coppice dunes continued to increase in number and volume during the twentieth

  18. Sandstone to frac sand: an innovative approach to sourcing high-value sand in NE British Columbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broughton, Scott; Chambers, Bob [Stikine Energy Corp (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of conventional energy resources and the rising energy demand, the shale gas industry is growing. In British Columbia, the Horn River Basin, Liard Basin and Montney Basin are large shale plays which are attracting billions of investment dollars. Important volumes of frac sand are required for the development of those plays and the aim of this paper is to present the study carried out by Strikine to find local sources of raw materials which could be transformed in frac sands. The company has located significant quantities of quartz pure sandstones in northeast British Columbia, a pilot trial showed good performance and two projects are under development in the heart of British Columbia's major gas plays. With these projects Strikine will gain a cost advantage over the other frac sand producers due to the proximity of its quartz pure sandstone projects to growing markets.

  19. Mechanical and Hydraulic Properties of Wax-coated Sands for Sport Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, J. P.; Benazza, C.; Bruchon, J. F.; Mishra, M.

    2009-06-01

    Natural soils such as sandy loams are being replaced by synthetic soils for various types of sport and recreational surfaces, including horseracing tracks. These synthetic soils are made of a mixture of sand, microcrystalline wax, synthetic fibers and rubber chips which optimize the mechanical and hydraulic properties of natural soils so that they drain faster after rainstorms and decrease risks of sport injuries while retaining appropriate sport performances. Silica sand, which makes up the largest fraction of synthetic soils, is hydrophyllic by nature, i.e., tends to retain water on sand grain surfaces. After rainstorms, hydrophilic surfaces retain a large amount of water, are difficult to compact, and yield uncontrollable mechanical and hydraulic properties when too moist. The addition of wax contributes to improving both mechanical and hydraulic properties of sands. Wax coats the sand grains with a thin layer, and enhances adherence between sand particles. It repels water from sand grains and influences both compaction and hydraulic properties. This study reports experimental results that help to understand the properties of wax-coated sands used in synthetic surfaces, especially the degradation of synthetic surfaces that have insufficient wax-coatings.

  20. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  1. Estimation of Sand Production Rate Using Geomechanical and Hydromechanical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Tung Pham

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to develop a numerical model that can be used in sand control during production phase of an oil and gas well. The model is able to predict not only the onset of sand production using critical bottom hole pressure inferred from geomechanical modelling, but also the mass of sand produced versus time as well as the change of porosity versus space and time using hydromechanical modelling. A detailed workflow of the modelling was presented with each step of calculations. The empirical parameters were calibrated using laboratory data. Then the modelling was applied in a case study of an oilfield in Cuu Long basin. In addition, a sensitivity study of the effect of drawdown pressure was presented in this paper. Moreover, a comparison between results of different hydromechanical models was also addressed. The outcome of this paper demonstrated the possibility of modelling the sand production mass in real cases, opening a new approach in sand control in petroleum industry.

  2. Gouging abrasion resistance of materials for oil sands service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llewellyn, R.J. [National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Tolfree, D.J.; Hall, R.A. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering; Liang, P. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Hydraulic ore transportation in the oil sands industry has brought about a need for effective and reliable crusher and classifying systems to pulverize, screen and handle mined frozen oil sands lumps and large solids before they get slurried and pipelined to bitumen extraction plants. Improved product development, assessment methods for materials for oil sands applications have generally focused on low and high stress abrasion and slurry erosion resistance because these wear mechanisms are considered to predominate in oil sands mining, transportation and bitumen recovery. With the increased use of crusher and slurry handling systems, materials of construction are required to have good toughness and gouging abrasion properties to withstand impact and ploughing forces. Tests of gouging abrasion were conducted using a modified ASTM G81 procedure on a range of materials associated with oil sands processing. The objective was to assess material property requirements for mitigating these conditions. The wear losses that occurred for reference wear plates were compared to feed rock that was pulverized in a laboratory jaw crusher. The classes of evaluated materials were abrasion resistant (AR) steel plates, austenitic manganese steel castings, chromium and chromium molybdenum white irons (as plain castings and in laminated forms), and chromium carbide and tungsten carbide overlaid wear plates. 8 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  3. Modeling and Optimization of Phenol Formaldehyde Resin Sand Mould System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chate G. R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical bonded resin sand mould system has high dimensional accuracy, surface finish and sand mould properties compared to green sand mould system. The mould cavity prepared under chemical bonded sand mould system must produce sufficient permeability and hardness to withstand sand drop while pouring molten metal through ladle. The demand for improved values of permeability and mould hardness depends on systematic study and analysis of influencing variables namely grain fineness number, setting time, percent of resin and hardener. Try-error experiment methods and analysis were considered impractical in actual foundry practice due to the associated cost. Experimental matrices of central composite design allow conducting minimum experiments that provide complete insight of the process. Statistical significance of influencing variables and their interaction were determined to control the process. Analysis of variance (ANOVA test was conducted to validate the model statistically. Mathematical equation was derived separately for mould hardness and permeability, which are expressed as a non-linear function of input variables based on the collected experimental input-output data. The developed model prediction accuracy for practical usefulness was tested with 10 random experimental conditions. The decision variables for higher mould hardness and permeability were determined using desirability function approach. The prediction results were found to be consistent with experimental values.

  4. Music Artistes and their Contribution to the Idea of Development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The works of three artistes - Sonny Okosun, Fela Anikulapo-Kuti and Bob Marley - are selected for detailed examination, although references are made to other artistes. The study depended on primary and secondary source material. The paper is a contribution to knowledge in the field of African Political Thought.

  5. The Contribution of Sustainability Assessment to Policy Development in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Wim

    2015-01-01

    This article builds upon the experiences and results of the application of sustainability assessment instruments in higher education. First, a short overview of existing sustainability assessment tools will be provided, as well as their contribution towards the integration of sustainability in higher education. Second, a reflective case focuses on…

  6. Developing a University Contribution to Teacher Education: Creating an Analytical Space for Learning Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Chris; Brown, Tony

    2017-01-01

    What might a distinct university contribution to teacher education look like? This paper tracks a group of prospective teachers making the transition from undergraduate to teacher on a one-year school-based postgraduate course. The study employs a practitioner research methodological framework where teacher learning is understood as a process of…

  7. Contributions of plant scientists to the development of the germ theory of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Arthur; Peterson, Paul D

    2002-02-01

    Investigations demonstrating the causal role of microbes in diseases of plants were completed decades before Pasteur and Koch presented conclusive evidence in support of the germ theory of disease in man and animals. The limited recognition of these and other contributions in understanding the nature of plant diseases has delayed recognition of the commonality that exists among pathogens in general and mechanisms of pathogenesis.

  8. Assessing the built environment’s contribution to sustainable development: the sustainable building assessment tool

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses how the built environment can support sustainable development. It identifies the key characteristics of built environment that can be used to support sustainable development and shows how this can be developed into a set...

  9. Role of Sand Grains in Sorption Processes by Surface Layers of Components of Sand Moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaźnica N.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of researches of sorption processes of surface layers of components of sand moulds covered by protective coatings are presented in the hereby paper. Investigations comprised various types of sand grains of moulding sands with furan resin: silica sand, reclaimed sand and calcined in temperature of 700°C silica sand. Two kinds of alcoholic protective coatings were used - zirconium and zirconium - graphite. Tests were performed under condition of a constant temperature within the range 30 - 35°C and high relative air humidity 75 - 80%. To analyze the role of sand grains in sorption processes quantitavie moisture sorption with use of gravimetric method and ultrasonic method were used in measurements. The tendency to moisture sorption of surface layers of sand moulds according to the different kinds of sand grains was specified. The effectiveness of protective action of coatings from moisture sorption was analyzed as well.

  10. Evaluation of Durability Parameters of Concrete with Manufacture Sand and River Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangoju, Bhaskar; Ramesh, G.; Bharatkumar, B. H.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.

    2017-09-01

    Most of the states in our country have banned sand quarrying from the river beds, causing a scarcity of natural river sand for the construction sector. Manufacture sand (M-sand) is one of the alternate solutions to replace the river sand (R-sand) in concrete. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the durability parameters of concrete with M-sand when compared to that of concrete with R-sand. Corrosion of reinforcement is one of the main deteriorating mechanisms of reinforced concrete due to the ingress of chloride ions or carbon-di-oxide. For comparative evaluation of durability parameters, accelerated tests such as Rapid Chloride Permeability Test, Rapid Chloride Migration Test and accelerated carbonation test were carried out on specimens of R-sand and M-sand. All tests were carried out after 90 days of casting. Test results reveal that the durability parameters of the concrete with M-sand in chloride induced environment is relatively better than that of concrete with R-sand and hence is recommended to use M-sand as a replacement to R-sand.

  11. Effects of oil sands sediments on fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrott, J.; Colavecchia, M.; Hewitt, L.; Sherry, J.; Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Turcotte, D.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a collaborative project organized by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Panel of Energy Research and Development (PERD) with researchers from Environment Canada and the University of Saskatchewan. The 4-year study was conducted to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments and river waters, and reclamation ponds and sediments on laboratory-raised fish. Three sediments from rivers were evaluated for their potential to cause adverse impacts on fathead minnow eggs and larvae for a period of 18 days. The study monitored hatching, larval survival, development, and growth. Naphthenic acids (NA), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were measured in the sediments to determine if the compounds can be correlated with observed toxicity. The study will also assess walleye eggs exposed to sediments, and in situ fish exposures. Toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) studies will be conducted to isolate the fractions that may affect fish development and growth.

  12. Effects of root dips of benomyl and captan on seedling response and mycorrhizal development of outplanted longleaf, sand, and loblolly pines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatchell, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    Longleaf pine seedlings inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius (Pt) on naturally inoculated (NI) were grown at densities of 7-1/2 or 15 per square feet. Seedlings were graded by size and ectomycorrhizal development. The Pt group at 7-1/2 per square feet had 50% ectomycorrhiza with 70% formed by Pt. In the Pt-15 per square foot group, 65% had ectomycorrhiza, 90% of which were Pt. The NI-7-1/2 per square foot group had 20% feeder root with ectomycorrhiza and the NI-15 per square foot had ectomycorrhiza in 30% of the feeder roots. A split-plot design was used to isolate Pt and NI treatments on major plots and 12 minor plots within each were represented by 25 seedlings. One experiment will determine the effect of removal of ectomycorrhiza (stripping) on seedling performance in the field. Preliminary observations indicate that stripping 50% or more of the mycorrhizae substantially reduces survival. Another experiment will test the effects of benomyl and captan as dips of fungicide/clay slurries on mycorrhizal development and seedling response. 2 tables. (MF)

  13. Growth, development and incidence of deformities in amphibian larvae exposed as embryos to naphthenic acid concentrations detected in the Canadian oil sands region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Steven D; Trudeau, Vance L

    2012-08-01

    Naphthenic acids (NA) have been identified as harmful environmental contaminants that influence survival, growth and development of wildlife. Amphibian larvae are particularly susceptible to waterborne contaminants, but little information exists regarding exposure of amphibian embryos or tadpoles to NA. Our results demonstrate that embryos of Lithobates pipiens and Silurana tropicalis exposed to 2-4 mg/l of a commercial NA blend suffer significant reductions (32% and 25%, respectively) in growth and development upon hatching. Increased incidences of deformities were observed in exposed individuals of both species, but were only significant in L. pipiens. Embryos suffered 100% mortality following exposure to 6 mg/l NAs, and narcosis at lower concentrations. LC50 estimates were 4.10 mg/l for 72-h exposure in L. pipiens and 4.13, 3.51, and 2.95 mg/l for 24-, 48-, and 72-h exposure in S. tropicalis. These data suggest that exposure to NAs at environmentally realized concentrations may negatively affect tadpole populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. PROSPECTS FOR APPLICATION OF COMPLEX-MODIFIED SAND ASPHALT CONCRETE IN ROAD CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Alexandrov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a possibility to use sand asphalt concrete as a material for protection of asphalt concrete and cement concrete road pavements against affection of external destructive factors. Advantages and disadvantages of sand asphalt concrete road pavements have been determined in the paper. The paper provides recommendations on improvement of sand asphalt concrete properties and contains an analysis of possible variants for usage of complex-modified sand asphalt concrete in the road construction. It has been noted that according to its potentially possible physical and mechanical properties activated quartz sand being micro-reinforced by dispersive industrial wastes is considered as an efficient component for creation of constructive layers in road asphalt concrete pavements. The paper reveals only specific aspects of the efficient application of quartz sand in road asphalt concrete. The subject of the paper loоks rather interesting for regions where there are no rock deposits for obtaining broken-stone ballast but there is rather significant spreading of local quarts sand. Its successful application is connected with the necessity to develop special equipment for physical and chemical activation of sand grain surface that permits strongly to increase an adhesive strength in the area of phase separation within the “bitumen–SiO2” system. The considered problem is a topical one and its solution will make it possible to local sand in a maximum way and partially to exclude application of broken stone in road construction.

  15. The intersection of identity development and peer relationship processes in adolescence and young adulthood: contributions of the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliher, Renee V; Kerpelman, Jennifer L

    2012-12-01

    This analysis of the papers in the special section on the intersection of identity development and peer relationship processes calls attention to conceptual contribution this collection of papers makes to the literature on identity development. Together these ten papers build on strong theoretical foundations in identity development, which posit close relationship contexts as central to the development of self-awareness and self-representation. The complex and innovative methodologies employed across these studies allow for the analysis of intersecting and interacting influence of multiple relationship types, and facilitate the analysis of culture and gender as they relate to identity development and peer processes. Together, these papers make a powerful contribution to the current literature and provide a foundation for future research. Copyright © 2012 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preterm birth enhances the contribution of mothers' mind-mindedness to infants' expressive language development: A longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Alessandro; Coppola, Gabrielle; Fasolo, Mirco; Cassibba, Rosalinda

    2017-11-01

    Maternal mind-mindedness has been shown to be a powerful predictor of many developmental outcomes and to buffer the impact of psychosocial risk conditions, but no study has investigated whether this parental feature might support child development in the presence of biological risk, such as preterm birth. The present study addresses this gap, by investigating whether early maternal mind-mindedness contributes to the growth of a child's linguistic abilities in the following two years of life, and if the contribution of this maternal feature might be stronger in the presence of preterm birth. Forty mother-child dyads (twenty with a preterm infant) were followed longitudinally, with maternal mind-mindedness assessed at 14 months of age and child's expressive linguistic abilities at 24 and 36 months through observational measures. Multilevel models showed that linguistic abilities increased from 24 to 36 months of age, but that this increase was stronger in full-term infants. Maternal mind-mindedness also contributed to this growth, playing a stronger role in preterm infants than in full-term infants. Altogether, these findings contribute more deeply to the understanding of language development in preterm infants and of the joint contribution made by biological risk and environmental factors; from a practical standpoint, they suggest the importance of addressing mother's mind-mindedness in order to support child's language development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced microbubbles assisted cleaning of diesel contaminated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2017-11-15

    In this article, we investigated the effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (US), temperature and salinity on cleaning efficacy of fine bubbles with diameter diesel contaminated sands. About 47% and 76% diesel removal was achieved from 10% (w/w) diesel contaminated fine and medium sands respectively, after 30min treatment with 40kHz low intensity intermittent pulsed US together with MBs in contrast to 41% and 68% diesel removal while treatment with MBs alone. The effect of high temperature was found to be prominent during the initial stages of cleaning. In addition, MBs generated in 599mM saline water efficiently removed 85% diesel from fine sand within 30min in contrast to only 41% diesel removal with MBs in fresh water. This study provides evidence for developing highly efficient MBs based chemical free technology for diesel contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of sand production onset in petroleum reservoirs using a reliable classification approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Gharagheizi

    2017-06-01

    It is shown that the developed model can accurately predict the sand production in a real field. The results of this study indicates that implementation of LSSVM modeling can effectively help completion designers to make an on time sand control plan with least deterioration of production.

  19. Mathematical modelling of sand wave migration and the interaction with pipelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morelissen, Robin; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Knaapen, Michiel; Nemeth, Attila; Bijker, Romke

    2003-01-01

    A new method is presented for identifying potential pipeline problems, such as hazardous exposures. This method comprises a newly developed sand wave amplitude and migration model, and an existing pipeline–seabed interaction model. The sand wave migration model is based on physical principles and

  20. Measuring and modeling the effect of surface moisture on the spectral reflectance of coastal beach sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, C.; Poortinga, A.; Roosjen, P.P.J.; Bartholomeus, H.; Ruessink, G.

    2014-01-01

    Surface moisture is an important supply limiting factor for aeolian sand transport, which is the primary driver of coastal dune development. As such, it is critical to account for the control of surface moisture on available sand for dune building. Optical remote sensing has the potential to measure

  1. Study on sand particles creep model and open pit mine landslide mechanism caused by sand fatigue liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dong-Ning; Wang, Lai-Gui; Zhang, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Kun

    2017-06-01

    The sand particles in the sand - rock composite slope of the open pit mine occurs creep deformation and fatigue liquefaction under the action of vehicle load vibration and hydraulic gradient, which causes landslide geological disasters and it destroys the surface environment. To reveal the mechanism, a mechanics model based on the model considering the soil structural change with a new “plastic hinge” element is developed, to improve its constitutive and creep curve equations. Data from sand creep experiments are used to identify the parameters in the model and to validate the model. The results show that the mechanical model can describe the rotation progress between the sand particles, disclose the negative acceleration creep deformation stage during the third phase, and require fewer parameters while maintaining accuracy. It provides a new creep model considering rotation to analyze sand creep mechanism, which provides a theoretical basis for revealing the open pit mine landslide mechanism induced by creep deformation and fatigue liquefaction of sandy soil.

  2. Wind regime and sand transport in the corridor between the Badain Jaran and Tengger deserts, central Alxa Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, YanYan; Qu, ZhiQiang; Shi, PeiJun; Liu, LianYou; Zhang, GuoMing; Tang, Yan; Hu, Xia; Lv, YanLi; Xiong, YiYing; Wang, JingPu; Shen, LingLing; Lv, LiLi; Sun, Shao

    2014-03-01

    The Alxa Plateau in north China is characterized by frequent sand dust storm activity, desertification, various blown sand hazards and extensive sand dunes. Three of China's major sand deserts, the Badain Jaran (BJ), Tengger and Ulan Buh (UB), are distributed in this region. The BJ desert lies to the northwest and is separated from the other two deserts by mountains Yabrai and Alateng. However, the dominant northwest wind could transport sand from the BJ to the other two deserts through several corridors. Locating the sand source for these deserts is fundamental in understanding the formation and evolution of the aeolian landforms. It has been proposed that the sand in the Tengger desert is from the BJ desert. However, evidence supporting the hypothesis is still limited. To estimate the sand contribution of the BJ to the Tengger desert, we measured wind speeds at a 2 m height above the ground for the period from November 2010 to December 2011. We then calculated the amount of sand transport and observed the speed of dune migration in the junction part of the two deserts. Sand-transporting winds (⩾6.0 m s-1) occurred mostly in spring and winter, and accounted for 16.4% of the total of the year. The prevailing wind directions were NW, WNW and NNW, and were occupied 61.9% of the total frequency of sand-transporting winds. The frequencies of winds decreased with increasing wind speed, and strong wind frequencies (⩾17.0 m s-1) were 5.3% of the sand-transporting winds. In comparison to adjacent areas, the drift potential in the corridor was several times higher, indicating an obvious effect of narrowing. During the period of observation, 752 sand-transporting events occurred with durations from 10 to 1940 min (32 h). In the corridor, the sand transport flux was 372 tons m-1 yr-1, an order of magnitude larger than previous estimation, and the annual total amount of sand transported through the corridor was over 5 million tons, indicating a substantial sand supply from

  3. SAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Grete

    Der er udført et konsolideringsforsøg med bakkesand fra Lunds grusgrav, Lund no. O. forsøget er udført i samme konsolideringsapparat, som er anvendt til måling af deformationsegenskaberne af mange forskellige danske jordarter. Forsøgsresultaterne er søgt tolket som ved forsøg med andre jordarter....

  4. Performance of sand-lime products made with plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowek Milena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the studies on the sand-lime (silicate masonry units modified with recycled plastics in various forms: regranulate, regrind and powder. The following materials were examined: high impact polystyrene (HIPS and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS. The results of the functional properties tests, such as compressive strength, softening behavior, bulk density and water absorption are presented in the article. The microstructure of the products was analyzed using SEM and XRD methods.Obtained results show that the properties of modified product largely depend on the type, form and amount of used polymer. The highest compressive strength was achieved with 15% of HIPS regranulate in the product (by weight. ABS does not improve the strength of the sample, however, it does block the capillary action in the sand-lime product. The lowest softening coefficient was obtained in the sample modified with HIPS regranulate. The examined polymers contributed to decrease in bulk density of the samples as well as lowered their water absorption. The samples with pulverized polymer have the worst properties. All the results are compared with those of the traditional sand-lime bricks and sand-lime product modified with other additives. The analysis indicate that silicate masonry units with post-production and post-consumption plastic waste can possess interesting functional properties what brings a new potential possibility to dispose of still growing number of plastic waste.

  5. [Contribution of fertilization development to yield production and its geographic differentiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wantai; Zhang, Lu; Ma, Qiang; Yin, Xiuyan; Shen, Shanmin

    2003-11-01

    The results of long-term field experiments at three stations in different areas of China indicated that the contribution of fertilization to crop yield was significantly affected by the thermal condition of climate and the fertilization system. In the case of optimum fertilization, the largest contribution rate was 0.31 (average of fourteen years) at Hailun Station (in temperate zone), 0.39 (average of twelve years) at Shenyang Station (in warmer-temperate zone), and 0.42 (average of eleven years) at Taoyuan Station (in subtropical zone), which showed that the existence of geographic differentiation was caused by the thermal condition of local climate. Therefore, keeping the optimum fertilization systems, the largest contribution rate to crop yield could be estimated from 30% to 50%, depending on the local climate condition. The interaction of fertilization and thermal factor between Shenyang and Taoyuan was much bigger than that between Shenyang and Hailun. The interaction between organic manure and thermal condition of local climate was bigger than that between chemical fertilizer and thermal condition of local climate.

  6. Development and Assessment of the Sand Dust Prediction Model by Utilizing Microwave-Based Satellite Soil Moisture and Reanalysis Datasets in East Asian Desert Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunglok Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, satellite-based microwave sensors have provided valuable soil moisture monitoring in various surface conditions. We have first developed a modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD dataset by utilizing Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2, and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS soil moisture datasets in order to estimate dust outbreaks over desert areas of East Asia. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer- (MODIS- based AOD products were used as reference datasets to validate the modeled AOD (MA. The SMOS-based MA (SMOS-MA dataset showed good correspondence with observed AOD (R-value: 0.56 compared to AMSR2- and GLDAS-based MA datasets, and it overestimated AOD compared to observed AOD. The AMSR2-based MA dataset was found to underestimate AOD, and it showed a relatively low R-value (0.35 with respect to observed AOD. Furthermore, SMOS-MA products were able to simulate the short-term AOD trends, having a high R-value (0.65. The results of this study may allow us to acknowledge the utilization of microwave-based soil moisture datasets for investigation of near-real time dust outbreak predictions and short-term dust outbreak trend analysis.

  7. COASTALT Project's Contribution to the Development and Dissemination of Coastal Altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Paolo; Barbosa, Susana; Benveniste, Jérôme; Bos, Machiel; Caparrini, Marco; Challenor, Peter; Coelho, Henrique; Dinardo, Salvatore; Fernandes, Joana; Gleason, Scott; Gómez-Enri, Jesus; Gommenginger, Christine; Lázaro, Clara; Lucas, Bruno M.; Martin-Puig, Cristina; Moreno, Laura; Nunes, Alexandra; Pires, Nelson; Quartly, Graham; Scozzari, Andrea; Snaith, Helen; Tsimplis, Mikis; Vignudelli, Stefano; West, Luke; Wolf, Judith; Woodworth, Phil

    2013-09-01

    The present contribution revisits briefly the many recent technical improvements that are contributing to the steady progress of the new field of Coastal Altimetry, and in particular focuses on the results of the ESA-funded COASTALT project (2008- 2011), which has recently concluded.COASTALT has been an excellent incubator of ideas and new techniques for the improvement of coastal altimetry: first of all it has contributed to establish user requirements for this new field, and it has defined detailed product specifications for the new coastal altimetry products and produced the relevant documentation. At the same time COASTALT has tackled the two main areas of improvement for coastal altimetry, i.e. 1) retracking, i.e. fitting a waveform model to the waveforms to obtain an estimate of the geophysical parameters: and 2) designing and validating improved coastal corrections for the effects of the atmosphere and/or other geophysical phenomena, like tides.The main results of COASTALT, as far as retracking is concerned, are the innovative techniques to deal with the waveforms in proximity of the coast, where there are often quasi-specular returns due to stretches of calm water which prevent a successful use of the standard (open-ocean) Brown-model retracker. This issue has been investigated in a number of cases around islands, and we present a hyperbolic pre-tracker that has been suggested as a way to precondition the waveform stack prior to conventional retracking. In terms of coastal-specific corrections, the main contribution by COASTALT has been the implementation of an innovative scheme for the Wet Tropospheric Correction (i.e. the path delay due to water vapour in the troposphere) based on GPSobservations and following pioneering research by the University of Porto.An important part of the COASTALT mission has been to facilitate the coming together of the international coastal altimetry community of researchers. This has been achieved via the moderation of the

  8. Scenario Analysis on Global Hydropower Development Paths and Their Contribution to GHG Mitigation Utilizing a Dynamic CGE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Z.; Hanasaki, N.; Fujimori, S.; Masaki, Y.; Hijioka, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, hydropower accounts for 16% of the worldwide electricity power supply and 86% of the total renewable electricity energy source due to its low cost, low greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, and relatively high reliability. It is well known that the global hydropower has not yet been fully developed, but the future paths of development and corresponding contribution to GHG mitigation in each region combined with socioeconomic activities are less known. Here we investigated following three questions. How much will hydropower generation increase in the future? Will hydropower generation reach the economically exploitable capability (EEC)? If this will be the case, when and where will it occur? How much GHG emission will be reduced by adding new hydropower? In order to address these questions, we used the AIM/CGE model, a dynamic computable general equilibrium model to quantify the global hydropower development paths and corresponding GHG mitigation contribution for 17 regions in the world associated with a socio-economic scenario termed SSP2. We compared two scenarios with different assumptions on EEC. One is BAU which takes EEC from the report of "World Energy Resources", the other is FIX_BAU which fix EEC at the current hydropower generation amount throughout the research period (2005-2100) or no additional installation of hydropower plants. The comparison between two scenarios indicated that promoting hydropower development contributed to GHG emission reduction globally but the magnitude varied by region. For example we found that in North Africa, hydropower development grew fast because of the rapid economic development, but it reached EEC as soon as in 2040 because of limitation in EEC due to its climatic and geographical conditions. Conversely, in Brazil, it grew steadily and did not reach its abundant EEC. Consequently, GHG mitigation contribution of North Africa is far less than Brazil. This research provides important information for policy makers to

  9. Investigation of Thermal Conductivity and Heat Characteristics of Oil Sands Using Ultrasound Irradiation for Shortening the Preheating Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamagata, Shingo; Kawamura, Youhei; Okawa, Hirokazu; Mizutani, Koichi

    2012-07-01

    Oil sands are attractive as an energy resource. Bitumen, which is found in oil sands, has high viscosity, so that it does not flow. Most oil sands are underground and are developed with a method called steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD). Hot steam is injected underground to fluidize bitumen and promote its recovery. However, the preheating time is too long. One way of reducing running costs is by shortening the preheating time. Previous studies have found that bitumen can be extracted from oil sands efficiently by applying ultrasonic irradiation, but SAGD was not applied directly in these cases. Thus, the purpose of this study is to apply ultrasonic irradiation to SAGD, thereby shortening the preheating time of oil sands. As a model experiment for SAGD, heat transfer experiments in a sand layer made with Toyoura sand and silicone oil were conducted and the thermal effect with ultrasound was investigated.

  10. Relative contributions of human types 1 and 2 T-helper cell-derived eosinophilotrophic cytokines to development of eosinophilia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, E. A.; Backx, B.; Snoek, M.; Koenderman, L.; Kapsenberg, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    The relative contributions of type 1 and 2 T-helper (Th1 and Th2) cell-derived interleukin (IL-5), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and IL-3 were studied in the regulation of sequential events in the development of eosinophilia. Using eosinophils from normal donors and

  11. Contribution of a Professional Development Programme to the Quality and Retention of Teachers in an Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikhorst, Lisa; Beishuizen, Jos J.; Zijlstra, Bonne J. H.; Volman, Monique L. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a professional development programme aimed at equipping teachers for the challenges of teaching in urban schools. The contribution of the programme to teacher quality and teacher retention was evaluated using a mixed research design in which both quantitative (N?=?133) and qualitative (N?=?42) approaches were…

  12. The development of a market for sustainable coffee in the Netherlands: Rethinking the contribution of fair trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Reinders, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have observed the process of mainstreaming Fair Trade and the emergence of alternative sustainability standards in the coffee industry. The underlying market dynamics that have contributed to these developments are, however, under-researched. Insight into these dynamics

  13. Contribution of a professional development programme to the quality and retention of teachers in an urban environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaikhorst, L.; Beishuizen, J.J.; Zijlstra, B.J.H.; Volman, M.L.L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a professional development programme aimed at equipping teachers for the challenges of teaching in urban schools. The contribution of the programme to teacher quality and teacher retention was evaluated using a mixed research design in which both quantitative (N =

  14. The Development of Graphophonological-Semantic Cognitive Flexibility and Its Contribution to Reading Comprehension in Beginning Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Kelly B.; Marshall, Timothy R.; Dandy, Kristina L.; Isaac, Marisa C.

    2010-01-01

    Reading-specific and general color-shape cognitive flexibility were assessed in 68 first and second graders to examine: 1) the development of graphophonological-semantic cognitive flexibility (the ability to process concurrently phonological and semantic aspects of print) in comparison to color-shape cognitive flexibility, 2) the contribution of…

  15. Individual Differences in the Development of Early Writing Skills: Testing the Unique Contribution of Visuo-Spatial Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Lorna; Davies, Simon J.; Sumner, Emma; Green, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Visually mediated processes including, exposure to print (e.g. reading) as well as orthographic transcription and coding skills, have been found to contribute to individual differences in literacy development. The current study examined the role of visuospatial working memory (WM) in underpinning this relationship and emergent writing. One hundred…

  16. Contribution of a professional development programme to the quality and retention of teachers in an urban environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaikhorst, L.; Beishuizen, J.J.; Zijlstra, B.J.H.; Volman, M.L.L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a professional development programme aimed at equipping teachers for the challenges of teaching in urban schools. The contribution of the programme to teacher quality and teacher retention was evaluated using a mixed research design in which both quantitative

  17. Exploring the contributions of vegetation and dune size to early dune development using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijenbroek, van Marinka E.B.; Nolet, Corjan; Groot, de Alma V.; Suomalainen, Juha M.; Riksen, Michel J.P.M.; Berendse, Frank; Limpens, Juul

    2017-01-01

    Dune development along highly dynamic land-sea boundaries is the result of interaction between vegetation and dune size with sedimentation and erosion processes. Disentangling the contribution of vegetation characteristics from that of dune size would improve predictions of nebkha dune

  18. Universities' Contributions to Sustainable Development's Social Challenge : A Case Study of a Social Innovation Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juliani, Douglas; Silva, Ania; Cunha, Jorge; Benneworth, Paul Stephen

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing recognition that dealing with sustainable development need to address the social structures that encourage unsustainable economic and environmental practices. Universities represent important sources of knowledge for addressing sustainable development, but there has been

  19. Contribution Of Human Development Index On Per Capita Income Growth And Poverty Alleviation In Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Sudarlan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The development of a country usually determined by the human development index HDI. Per capita income education and health are the three most important components of human development index. The purpose of this research is to understand the relationship among human development index to income per capita growth and poverty alleviation in Indonesia with cross-section data from 30 provinces period 2002 2011 year. The result of this research were a income per capita growth was not sign...

  20. Characterizing volumetric deformation behavior of naturally occuring bituminous sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available on the test results, bulk modulus properties were characterized as a function of the applied hydrostatic stress for individual oil sand samples. When the entire test data were combined, nonlinear bulk modulus models were successfully developed to account...

  1. Sand and Water Play: Simple, Creative Activities for Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Sherrie; Cox, Amy

    Based on the view that creative play and hands-on experiences are essential to the development of well-balanced children and that their teachers have the responsibility to create an environment that can stimulate children's senses and curiosity, this book provides activities incorporating the use of sand and water tables into the classroom on a…

  2. A New Sand-Culture Apparatus for Tree Nutrition Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. G. Blackmon; N. E. Linnartz

    1970-01-01

    Research in tree nutrition often necessitates the use of rather large-scale installations of sand-culture equipment. The apparatus described below was developed during the course of experiments at Louisiana State University and provided daily irrigation to 102 culture units of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) for a period of 10 months. This apparatus is a modification of...

  3. Evaluation of an Intergrated / Biocoagulant-sand filter Drum for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2015-03-18

    Mar 18, 2015 ... An integrated low-tech biocoagulant-sand filter drum for disinfection of oocysts of Toxoplasma gondii targeted for developing countries was evaluated. Dirty and turbid water (130.3 NTU) from Mezam River and leachates from dump sites and stagnant water in Bamenda, Cameroon, was analyzed ...

  4. Monitoring of rapid sand filters using an acoustic imaging technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allouche, N.; Simons, D.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2012-01-01

    A novel instrument is developed to acoustically image sand filters used for water treatment and monitor their performance. The instrument consists of an omnidirectional transmitter that generates a chirp with a frequency range between 10 and 110 kHz, and an array of hydrophones. The instrument was

  5. Static Tension Tests on Axially Loaded Pile Segments in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    This paper provides laboratory test results of static axially loaded piles in sand. With a newly developed test setup, the pile-soil interface friction was investigated by using an open-ended steel pile segment with a diameter of 0.5 m. Use of a pile length of 1 m enabled the pile-soil interface...

  6. The HMG box transcription factor Sox4 contributes to the development of the endocrine pancreas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, M.E.; Yang, K.Y.; Kalousova, A.; Janet, L.; Kosaka, Y.; Lynn, F.C.; Wang, J.; Mrejen, C.; Episkopou, V.; Clevers, J.C.; German, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the role of the Sry/hydroxymethylglutaryl box (Sox) transcription factors in the development of the pancreas, we determined the expression pattern of Sox factors in the developing mouse pancreas. By RT-PCR, we detected the presence of multiple Sox family members in both the developing

  7. Understanding the Contributions of Prosodic Phonology to Morphological Development: Implications for Children with Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuth, Katherine; Tomas, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of research with typically developing children has begun to show that the acquisition of grammatical morphemes interacts not only with a developing knowledge of syntax, but also with developing abilities at the interface with prosodic phonology. In particular, a Prosodic Licensing approach to these issues provides a framework for…

  8. Determining the Motor Skills Development of Mentally Retarded Children through the Contribution of Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erim, Gonca; Caferoglu, Müge

    2017-01-01

    Visual arts education is a process that helps the reflection of inner worlds, socialization via group works and healthier motor skills development of normally developing or handicapped children like the mentally retarded. This study aims to determine the influence of visual art studies on the motor skills development of primary school first grade…

  9. Making mental health an integral part of sustainable development: the contribution of a social determinants framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, M J

    2015-04-01

    There have been repeated calls to include mental health in the sustainable development goals (SDGs), arguing that progress in development will not be made without improvements in mental health. Although these calls are starting to gain political traction, currently only a tiny fraction of international development work includes mental health. A social determinants framework may be useful in incorporating mental health into sustainable development because it promotes a multi-sectorial and multi-disciplinary approach which is the corner stone of good development practice. Two approaches are suggested to make mental health a part of sustainable development: (1) integrate mental health into existing development programmes to promote social and economic environments that prevent mental health problems developing; (2) ensure that mental health programmes are better at promoting sustainable development by preventing the negative social and economic consequences of mental illness. Real-world examples of these approaches are provided. To achieve this, the mental health impact of wider development programmes, and the social and economic consequences of mental health interventions, must be evaluated. Development agencies should ensure that they have equity for mental health in all their policies, and investment must be increased for those mental health prevention, promotion and treatment programmes which have the greatest impact on sustainable development. The SDGs bring the promise of a more holistic approach to development. It is now the task of global mental health to demonstrate not just that mental health is an integral part of sustainable development, but that affordable and effective solutions exist which can improve mental health and development more broadly.

  10. Motility, Chemotaxis and Aerotaxis Contribute to Competitiveness during Bacterial Pellicle Biofilm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Theresa; Bartels, Benjamin; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Gallegos-Monterrosa, Ramses; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Kolter, Roberto; Dietrich, Lars E P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2015-11-20

    Biofilm formation is a complex process involving various signaling pathways and changes in gene expression. Many of the sensory mechanisms and regulatory cascades involved have been defined for biofilms formed by diverse organisms attached to solid surfaces. By comparison, our knowledge on the basic mechanisms underlying the formation of biofilms at air-liquid interfaces, that is, pellicles, is much less complete. In particular, the roles of flagella have been studied in multiple solid-surface biofilm models but remain largely undefined for pellicles. In this work, we characterize the contributions of flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis and oxygen sensing to pellicle formation in the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. We confirm that flagellum-based motility is involved in, but is not absolutely essential for, B. subtilis pellicle formation. Further, we show that flagellum-based motility, chemotaxis and oxygen sensing are important for successful competition during B. subtilis pellicle formation. We report that flagellum-based motility similarly contributes to pellicle formation and fitness in competition assays in the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Time-lapse imaging of static liquid cultures demonstrates that, in both B. subtilis and P. aeruginosa, a turbulent flow forms in the tube and a zone of clearing appears below the air-liquid interface just before the formation of the pellicle but only in strains that have flagella. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The contribution of active body movement to visual development in evolutionary robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Mototaka; Floreano, Dario; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by the pioneering work by Held and Hein (1963) on the development of kitten visuo-motor systems, we explore the role of active body movement in the developmental process of the visual system by using robots. The receptive fields in an evolved mobile robot are developed during active or passive movement with a Hebbian learning rule. In accordance to experimental observations in kittens, we show that the receptive fields and behavior of the robot developed under active condition significantly differ from those developed under passive condition. A possible explanation of this difference is derived by correlating receptive field formation and behavioral performance in the two conditions.

  12. Connecting Brabant's cover sand landscapes through landscape history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskes, Erik; van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Harthoorn, Jaap; Maes, Bert; Leenders, Karel; de Jongh, Piet; Kluiving, Sjoerd; van den Oetelaar, Ger

    2015-04-01

    Noord-Brabant has the largest variety of cover sand landscapes in The Netherlands, and probably in Western Europe. During the Last Ice Age the area was not covered by land ice and a polar desert developed in which sand dunes buried the existing river landscapes. Some of these polar dune landscapes experienced a geomorphological and soil development that remained virtually untouched up to the present day, such as the low parabolic dunes of the Strabrechtse Heide or the later and higher dunes of the Oisterwijkse Vennen. As Noord-Brabant lies on the fringe of a tectonic basin, the thickness of cover sand deposits in the Centrale Slenk, part of a rift through Europe, amounts up to 20 metres. Cover sand deposits along the fault lines cause the special phenomenon of 'wijst' to develop, in which the higher grounds are wetter than the boarding lower grounds. Since 4000 BC humans settled in these cover sand landscapes and made use of its small-scale variety. An example are the prehistoric finds on the flanks and the historic towns on top of the 'donken' in northwest Noord-Brabant, where the cover sand landscapes are buried by river and marine deposits and only the peaks of the dunes protrude as donken. Or the church of Handel that is built beside a 'wijst' source and a site of pilgrimage since living memory. Or the 'essen' and plaggen agriculture that developed along the stream valleys of Noord-Brabant from 1300 AD onwards, giving rise to geomorphological features as 'randwallen' and plaggen soils of more than a metre thickness. Each region of Brabant each has its own approach in attracting tourists and has not yet used this common landscape history to connect, manage and promote their territories. We propose a landscape-historical approach to develop a national or European Geopark Brabants' cover sand landscapes, in which each region focuses on a specific part of the landscape history of Brabant, that stretches from the Late Weichselian polar desert when the dune

  13. Tar sands : dirty oil and the future of a continent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforuk, A.

    2008-07-01

    This book exposes the environmental, social and political costs of oil sands development in Alberta's Athabasca Deposit. It argues that the earth-destroying production methods of bitumen cost nearly 20 times more than conventional crude to produce and upgrade. Most of the tar sands lie in such deep formations that bitumen must be steamed out of the ground using an array of pumps, pipes and horizontal wells. Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), which is the most popular in situ technology used to recover oil sands can have detrimental effects on the boreal forests, wildlife and their habitat. The book emphasized the high greenhouse gas emissions, high energy consumption and suspected health problems associated with oil sands development. It also highlighted the industry's poor record on reclamation. Although some industry players have taken measures to reduce water consumption, more will have to be done to treat and reuse water. The author advocates that changes must be made in order to ensure sustainable development. refs., figs.

  14. A New Global Partnership for Development: Factoring in the Contribution of Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGregor, Elaine; Siegel, Melissa; Ragab, Nora; Juzwiak, Teressa

    2014-01-01

    Part A of this report provides a systematic update of the evidence base regarding migration’s relevance to and impact on the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In doing so, it considers the role of migration as an enabler of development through a number of different channels –

  15. Lgr5(+ve) stem/progenitor cells contribute to nephron formation during kidney development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, N.; Rookmaaker, M.B.; Kujala, P.; Ng, A.; Leushacke, M.; Snippert, H.; van de Wetering, M.; Tan, S.; van Es, J.H.; Huch, M.; Poulsom, R.; Verhaar, M.C.; Peters, P.J.; Clevers, H.

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent stem cells and their lineage-restricted progeny drive nephron formation within the developing kidney. Here, we document expression of the adult stem cell marker Lgr5 in the developing kidney and assess the stem/progenitor identity of Lgr5(+ve) cells via in vivo lineage tracing. The

  16. Contributions of Prior Knowledge, Motivation, and Strategies to Korean College Students' L2 Writing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Soo Eun

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined Korean college students' L2 writing development and performance, motivation, and strategies while taking ESL writing classes. The present study expands the literature by examining the effects of various learner characteristics on L2 writing development. The selection and the expected effects of learner variables were…

  17. About the Role of Universities and Their Contribution to Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Walter Leal

    2011-01-01

    The debate on sustainable development is not new and the search for new approaches, methods and means to further the case of sustainability in a higher education context is needed today more than ever. This paper reviews the status of sustainable development at universities and presents issues which need to be considered in ensuring sustainable…

  18. John Pendry: His Contributions to the Development of LEED Surface Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Rous, P.J.

    2007-10-15

    In this paper we discuss the pivotal role played by Sir John Pendry in the development of Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) during the past three decades; the earliest understanding on the physics of LEED to the development of sophisticated methods for the structural solution of complex surfaces.

  19. Contribution of microreactor technology and flow chemistry to the development of green and sustainable synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Flavio; Parisi, Giovanna; Degennaro, Leonardo; Luisi, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    Microreactor technology and flow chemistry could play an important role in the development of green and sustainable synthetic processes. In this review, some recent relevant examples in the field of flash chemistry, catalysis, hazardous chemistry and continuous flow processing are described. Selected examples highlight the role that flow chemistry could play in the near future for a sustainable development.

  20. Contribution of microreactor technology and flow chemistry to the development of green and sustainable synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Fanelli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microreactor technology and flow chemistry could play an important role in the development of green and sustainable synthetic processes. In this review, some recent relevant examples in the field of flash chemistry, catalysis, hazardous chemistry and continuous flow processing are described. Selected examples highlight the role that flow chemistry could play in the near future for a sustainable development.

  1. Parenting Behaviours and Children's Development from Infancy to Early Childhood: Changes, Continuities and Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Leslie Morrison; Feinstein, Leon

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated trajectories of parenting behaviours and children's development from infancy to early childhood, associations between parenting behaviours and children's development and how these associations vary according to socioeconomic indicators. Mothers and children were examined from an ongoing longitudinal study of families…

  2. Moving Education into the Digital Age: The Contribution of Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, P.; Raffaghelli, J.; Albion, P.; Knezek, D.

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the main outcomes of discussions at EDUsummIT 2011 by the specific Technical Working Group on Teacher Professional Development (TWG3). The focus was to explore how professional development of teachers may ensure that teachers are better prepared to use information and communication technology (ICT) to promote 21st century…

  3. Building the blocks of executive functioning: differentiating early developing processes contributing to executive functioning skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandell, D.J.; Ward, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    The neural processes that underlie executive function begin to develop in infancy. However, it is unclear how the behavior manifested by these processes are related or if they can be differentiated early in development. This study seeks to examine early emerging executive functioning skills in

  4. Duane Webster's Contributions to Leadership Development in Research Libraries, 1970-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branin, Joseph J.

    2009-01-01

    For over 30 years, Duane Webster worked tirelessly and effectively in developing leaders in the research library community. Through his own efforts and example and through a group of colleagues he trained and mentored, the Association of Research Libraries was able to create a series of programs in leadership development that has had an impact on…

  5. How Do Maternal Reasoning and Physical Punishment Contribute to Development of Verbal Competence and Behavior Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, Jennifer M.; Muzik, Maria; Berube, Renee; Narang, Sonia; Tuttle, Brenda; Jacobson, Joseph

    As part of a longitudinal investigation of the effect of prenatal alcohol exposure on children's cognitive and socioemotional development, this study examined the role of physical punishment on the development of children's externalizing behavior. Participating in this phase were 296 inner-city African-American families with 7-year-olds who had…

  6. Assessing Cardiff University's Curricula Contribution to Sustainable Development Using the STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Peattie, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of the sustainable development curricula assessment undertaken at 19 of the 28 schools of Cardiff University using the Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversity's Curricula Holistically (STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)]. STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] was developed with two objectives: (1) to systematically assess how…

  7. Development and Analysis of Group Contribution Plus Models for Property Prediction of Organic Chemical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustaffa, Azizul Azri

    of pharmaceutical systems where new group have been created and their interaction parameters are predicted/fine tuned generating a master parameter table specifically for those case studies. Also, the applicability of the Original UNIFACCI model is shown for predicting phase equilibria of lipid systems, filling...... the molecular fragmentation that relates properties which is the molecular interactions with the molecular structures. One well known and established group-contribution method is the UNIFAC model, used to predict liquid phase activity coefficients for mixtures. The needed values of the group interaction...... parameters (GIPs) are obtained by fitting phase equilibrium data. There are, however many gaps in the UNIFAC parameter table due to lack of data. Alternative to performing measurements, which may not be feasible, values of the missing GIPs, can be predicted through the GCPlus approach. The predicted values...

  8. Cytokeratin 18 Is Not Required for Morphogenesis of Developing Prostates but Contributes to Adult Prostate Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenlu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokeratin 18 (CK18 is a key component of keratin-containing intermediate filaments and has long been used as a classic luminal cell marker in prostatic tissue. However, the in vivo function of CK18 in prostate is not known so far. We reported in this study, unexpectedly, that deletion of CK18 in a mouse model did not affect the morphological or the histological structures of adult prostate, as the CK18 knockout prostate displayed a normal glandular ductal structure, branching pattern, and composition of both luminal and basal cells. However, CK18 loss compromised the regenerative tubular branching in dorsolateral prostate after castration and androgen replacement. Therefore, in contrast to its importance as luminal cell marker, CK18 is dispensable for the prostate morphogenesis but contributes to adult prostate regeneration.

  9. Simulating and understanding sand wave variation: a case study of the Golden Gate sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterlini-Van der Meer, Fenneke; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Hanes, D.M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed comparison between measured features of the Golden Gate sand wave field and the results of a nonlinear sand wave model. Because the Golden Gate sand waves exhibit large variation in their characteristics and in their environmental physics, this area gives us the

  10. Contributions of Participatory Modeling to Development and Support of Coastal and Marine Management Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of participatory modeling- at various scales- to assist in developing shared visions, understanding the decision landscape, identifying and selecting management options, and monitoring outcomes will be explored in the context of coastal and marine planning, ecosystem ser...

  11. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  12. Children's Stereotypes of Older Adults: Evaluating Contributions of Cognitive Development and Social Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, Tara T.; Roy, Ashley; Horth, Madison

    2017-01-01

    Past research has investigated the development of stereotypes surrounding race and gender in children; however, there is a lack of literature examining the development of children's stereotypes of older adults. In this study, 163 children from four grades: first (n = 44), fourth (n = 49), fifth (n = 35), and eighth (n = 35) completed a new…

  13. Local Authorities’ contribution on Gastronomy Tourism Development: the case of Ontario, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Karagiannis, Dimitris; Metaxas, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    The role of Local Government (LG) in achieving tourism development is extremely important. A characteristic example is the province of Ontario in Canada, which managed with the assistance of the Ministries of Tourism and Culture and with the cooperation of the private sector, to create an effective tourism development tool promote the region through its gastronomy - Ontario Culinary Tourism Alliance (OCTA), a non-profit, industry driven organization which leads the implementation of the provi...

  14. Developing a holistic framework to understand the contribution of sustainable public procurement to the development of more sustainable business models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, S.; Lozano, R.

    2015-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development has encouraged companies to re-asses the 9 way they do business. The integration of sustainability requirements into the 10 procurement process, leading to sustainable procurement, can motivate companies to 11 develop more sustainable business models. 12

  15. Both cell-autonomous mechanisms and hormones contribute to sexual development in vertebrates and insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, Ashley; Monteiro, Antónia

    2013-08-01

    The differentiation of male and female characteristics in vertebrates and insects has long been thought to proceed via different mechanisms. Traditionally, vertebrate sexual development was thought to occur in two phases: a primary and a secondary phase, the primary phase involving the differentiation of the gonads, and the secondary phase involving the differentiation of other sexual traits via the influence of sex hormones secreted by the gonads. In contrast, insect sexual development was thought to depend exclusively on cell-autonomous expression of sex-specific genes. Recently, however, new evidence indicates that both vertebrates and insects rely on sex hormones as well as cell-autonomous mechanisms to develop sexual traits. Collectively, these new data challenge the traditional vertebrate definitions of primary and secondary sexual development, call for a redefinition of these terms, and indicate the need for research aimed at explaining the relative dependence on cell-autonomous versus hormonally guided sexual development in animals. © 2013 The Authors. BioEssays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Western Gas Sands Project status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, C.H.

    1978-10-31

    This edition of the WGSP status report summarizes September 1978 progress of the government-sponsored projects directed towards increasing gas production from the low-permeability gas sands of the western United States. Background information is provided in the September 1977 Status Report, NVO/0655-100. The Williston Basin Symposium was held in Billings, Montana, the 24th through the 27th of September 1978. The USGS continued work on characterization and assessment of the resource in the four primary study areas and completed the 1978 field work in the Sand Wash and Green River Basins. CER Corporation is evaluating a Twin Arrow drill site, located on the Douglas Creek Arch for the possibility of obtaining core, and preparations are being made for the Logging Program meeting to be held at the CER offices the latter part of October, 1978. The design phase for the pressure coring system has been completed and work is progressing on the fabrication and testing of the improved system. The National Laboratories and Energy Technology Centers continued work on mathematical model development, new tools and instrumentation systems, data analysis techniques and rock mechanics. Work continued on the field tests and demonstrations aspect of the WGSP. Bids sent to several service companies by Mitchell Energy Corporation, for a massive fracture treatment, are due back in October and the treatment is expected to be performed in mid-November. Mobil Research and Development fractured Zone 8 of their PCU 31-13 well, then shut it in due to anticipated winter weather and work was started on Zone 9. Sandia's mineback program involved evaluation of the Hole No. 6 Formation Interface Fracture Experiment.

  17. The contribution of the Catholic Church to the development of Cameroon, and why they are engaged in development works

    OpenAIRE

    Kahnyuy, Rachel Leinyuy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to answer the research questions and to find out why the Catholic Church is involved in development work. According to the Catholic Church, its mission is to impact faith to its people and to bring peace, unity, love and do charity works to the world at large. However, they are as well engaged in development works and practices. The Catholic church is involved in development issues such as, health care services, education and the provision of clean portable water, pov...

  18. Dystroglycan does not contribute significantly to kidney development or function, in health or after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarad, George; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Shankland, Stuart J; Kreidberg, Jordan A; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2011-03-01

    Dystroglycan (DG or DAG1) is considered a critical link between the basement membrane and the cytoskeleton in multiple tissues. DG consists of two subunits, an extracellular α-subunit that binds laminin and other basement membrane components, and a transmembrane β-subunit. DG-null mouse embryos die during early embryogenesis because DG is required for Reichert's membrane formation. DG also forms an integral part of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in muscle. Although no human DG mutations have been reported, multiple forms of muscular dystrophy have been linked to DG glycosylation defects, and targeted deletion of muscle DG causes muscular dystrophy in mice. Moreover, DG is widely distributed in endothelial and epithelial cells, including those in the kidney. There has therefore been significant interest in DG's role in the kidney, especially in podocytes. Previous reports suggested that DG's disturbance in podocytes might cause glomerular filtration barrier abnormalities. To fully understand DG's contribution to nephrogenesis and kidney function, we used a conditional DG allele and a variety of Cre mice to systematically delete DG from podocytes, ureteric bud, metanephric mesenchyme, and then from the whole kidney. Surprisingly, none of these conditional deletions resulted in significant morphological or functional abnormalities in the kidney. Furthermore, DG-deficient podocytes did not show increased susceptibility to injury, and DG-deficient kidneys did not show delayed recovery. Integrins are therefore likely the primary extracellular matrix receptors in renal epithelia.

  19. Contribution of Academician Momir Polenakovic to the Development of Nephrology in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafimoski, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Academician Momir H. Polenakovic, MD, Ph.D. is an outstanding researcher, educator and scientist, one of the founders of the nephrology in the Republic of Macedonia. With more than 500 published papers in national and international journals, of which more than 189 are on the PubMed, he is one of the most fruitful medical worker in our country. With his participation in national and international congresses he has contributed to the transfer of the world nephrology in Macedonia, as well as, to the dissemination of the reputation of the Macedonian nephrology and science in the world. He has educated a number of specialists in internal medicine and subspecialists in nephrology. He has introduced new tests and methods in diagnosis and treatment of renal disease, which was a basis for his research and publication. Analyzing the life opus of Academician Momir Polenakovic we can say that he has dedicated his life and work to the research, diagnosis and treatment of kidney patients.

  20. ECO-INNOVATION AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta RUSU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the context of global economy a dominant role of knowledge is the importance of human resources in the process of innovation and value creation. This paper aims to address Romania’s competitiveness in the context of global change mitigation by analyzing the counties competitiveness and eco-innovation. The efficiency-driven stage of development, which Romania is part of require specific regulatory measure in order to achieve sustainable development and competitive advantage. Analyzing the eco-innovation local needs by focusing on the SME can be seen as a solution, as they are creative in order to compensate for the lack of funding in research, development and innovation (like cluster research which is beneficial for sharing the risk and cost involved in research activities.