WorldWideScience

Sample records for sand wind erosion

  1. Soil erosion rates caused by wind and saltating sand stresses in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1993-02-01

    Wind erosion tests were performed in a wind tunnel in support of the development of long-term protective barriers to cap stabilized waste sites at the Hanford Site. Controlled wind and saltating sand erosive stresses were applied to physical models of barrier surface layers to simulate worst-case eolian erosive stresses. The goal of these tests was to provide information useful to the design and evaluation of the surface layer composition of an arid-region waste site barrier concept that incorporates a deep fine-soil reservoir. A surface layer composition is needed that will form an armor resistant to eolian erosion during periods of extreme dry climatic conditions, especially when such conditions result in the elimination or reduction of vegetation by water deprivation or wildfire. Because of the life span required of Hanford waste barriers, it is important that additional work follow these wind tunnel studies. A modeling effort is planned to aid the interpretation of test results with respect to the suitability of pea gravel to protect the finite-soil reservoir during long periods of climatic stress. It is additionally recommended that wind tunnel tests be continued and field data be obtained at prototype or actual barrier sites. Results wig contribute to barrier design efforts and provide confidence in the design of long-term waste site caps for and regions.

  2. Emergency wind erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    February through May is the critical time for wind erosion in Kansas, but wind erosion can happen any time when high winds occur on smooth, wide fields with low vegetation and poor soil structure. The most effective wind erosion control is to ensure a protective cover of residue or growing crop thro...

  3. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  4. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate and impac......The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  5. 搭设障蔽控制樟子松风蚀沙埋危害的效果%Control Effect on Wind Erosion and Sand Cover by Building Sand-Barrier for Pinus sylvestris var.mongolica Plantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈升银; 叶竹林

    2011-01-01

    The control effect on wind erosion and sand cover by building sand-barrier was studied by taking Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica as planting tree species. The results showed that building sand-barrier could promote the survival rate of the plantation up to 100% , which was significantly higher than that of the control. There were also significant differences in the growth rate of the Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica plantation between building the sand-barrier and the control. The experiment showed that building the sand-barrier could promote the average sapling height, basal diameter and crown growth by 55.4% , 66. 6% and 60.1% respectively compared to the control. Sand-barrier building provided the morphology construction of the Pinus sylvestris var. Mongolica saplings with much better environment that significantly reduced the phenomena such as trunk bending, wind throw and drying up of the brnaches and turning yellow of the leaves due to the wind damage.%以樟子松为对象探讨搭设沙障控制风蚀沙埋危害的效果.结果表明:搭设与未搭设沙障的造林保存率存在显著差异,搭设沙障可使造林保存率高达100%;搭设与未搭设沙障的生长量也存在显著差异,搭设沙障可使树高、地径、树冠生长量分别提高55.4%、66.6%和60.7%;搭设沙障为樟子松的形态建成创造了良好的环境条件,树干弯曲、风倒及枯黄现象明显减少.

  6. Vertical distribution of soil moisture and surface sandy soil wind erosion for different types of sand dune on the southeastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChaoFeng Fu; JingBo Zhao; FanMin Mei; TianJie Shao; Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Soil moisture is a critical state affecting a variety of land surface and subsurface processes. We report investigation results of the factors controlling vertical variation of soil moisture and sand transport rate of three types of dunes on the south-eastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land. Samples were taken from holes drilled to a depth of 4 m at different topographic sites on the dunes, and were analyzed for soil moisture, grain-size distribution and surface sediment discharge. The results show that: (1) The average soil moisture varies in different types of dunes, with the following sequences ordered from highest to lowest: in the shrubs-covered dunes and the trees-covered dunes the sequence is from inter-dunes lowland to windward slope to leeward slope. The average moisture in the bare-migratory sand dunes is sequenced from inter-dunes lowland to leeward slope to windward slope. (2) Vegetation form and surface coverage affect the range of soil moisture of different types of dunes in the same topographic position. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture for shrubs-covered dunes is higher than that of other types of dune. (3) The effect of shrubs on dune soil moisture is explained in terms of the greater ability of shrubs to trap fine-grained atmospheric dust and hold moisture. (4) The estimated sand transport rates over sand dunes with sparse shrubs are less than those over bare-migratory dunes or sand dunes with sparse trees, indi-cating that shrubs are more effective in inhibiting wind erosion in the sandy land area.

  7. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  8. A Multiphase First Order Model for Non-Equilibrium Sand Erosion, Transport and Sedimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Preziosi, Luigi; Bruno, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Three phenomena are involved in sand movement: erosion, wind transport, and sedimentation. This paper presents a comprehensive easy-to-use multiphase model that include all three aspects with a particular attention to situations in which erosion due to wind shear and sedimentation due to gravity are not in equilibrium. The interest is related to the fact that these are the situations leading to a change of profile of the sand bed.

  9. Integrated spatial assessment of wind erosion risk in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, László; Négyesi, Gábor; Laborczi, Annamária; Kovács, Tamás; László, Elemér; Bihari, Zita

    2016-11-01

    Wind erosion susceptibility of Hungarian soils was mapped on the national level integrating three factors of the complex phenomenon of deflation (physical soil features, wind characteristics, and land use and land cover). Results of wind tunnel experiments on erodibility of representative soil samples were used for the parametrization of a countrywide map of soil texture compiled for the upper 5 cm layer of soil, which resulted in a map representing threshold wind velocity exceedance. Average wind velocity was spatially estimated with 0.5' resolution using the Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenised Data Basis (MISH) method elaborated for the spatial interpolation of surface meteorological elements. The probability of threshold wind velocity exceedance was determined based on values predicted by the soil texture map at the grid locations. Ratio values were further interpolated to a finer 1 ha resolution using sand and silt content of the uppermost (0-5 cm) layer of soil as spatial co-variables. Land cover was also taken into account, excluding areas that are not relevant to wind erosion (forests, water bodies, settlements, etc.), to spatially assess the risk of wind erosion. According to the resulting map of wind erosion susceptibility, about 10 % of the total area of Hungary can be identified as susceptible to wind erosion. The map gives more detailed insight into the spatial distribution of wind-affected areas in Hungary compared to previous studies.

  10. Wind Erosion and Dune Formation on High Frozen Bluffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, W. M.; Marsh, B. D.

    1984-01-01

    Frost penetration increases upslope on barren, windswept bluffs in cold environments. Along the south shore of Lake Superior, near the brow of 100 m high bluffs it typically exceeds 5 m. Frost increases the shear strength of damp sand to a level comparable to that of concrete, making winter slopes highly stable despite undercutting by waves and ground-water sapping along the footslope. Sublimation of interparticle ice in the slope face increases with wind speed and lower vapor pressures. The cold and dry winter winds of Lake Superior ablate these slopes through loss of binding ice. Wind erosion rates, based on measurements of sand accumulation on the forest floor downwind of the brow, show most airborne sand falls out within several meters of the brow, forming a berm 1 to 3 m high after many years. The spatial pattern of sand deposition, however, varies considerably over distances of several hundred meters along the top bluffs in response to frost conditions and the build-up of gravel lag on the slope face, sand exposure from mass movements, and local aerodynamics of the crest slope. The formation of perched sand dunes in the Great Lakes region is clearly related to wind erosion of sand from high bluffs in winter. Broadly similar processes may operate on Mars.

  11. Cropping system effects on wind erosion potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion of soil is a destructive process impacting crop productivity and human health and safety. The mechanics of wind erosion and soil properties that influence erosion are well understood. Less well-studied are the effects that cropping intensity has upon those soil properties. We collected ...

  12. Wind born(e) landscapes: the role of wind erosion in agricultural land management and nature development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Wind has played an important role in the geological development of the north-western Europe. Various aeolian deposits such as inland dunes, river dunes, cover sands, drift sands and coastal dunes, form the base of large areas in our present landscape. The role of wind erosion in today's north-west E

  13. CFD evaluation of erosion rate around a bridge near a sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Huang, Ning; Dun, Hongchao; Wang, Wenbo

    2017-04-01

    This study performs a series of simulations through solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the RNG k-ε turbulence model to investigate the wind erosion rates around a bridge in a desert area with sand dunes. The digital elevation model of sand dunes and the bridge model are obtained respectively from hypsographic map and construction drawings. Through combining them into the CFD software of Fluent the simulation zone was formed. The data of wind speed obtained from field observation is fitted into a logarithm format, which was imported into Fluent model as a inlet wind speed condition. Then, the effect of Dun-Go railway on wind-blown sand movement of the neighbouring environment is simulated. The results exhibit that affected by both the sand dune and bridge, the flow field is in a complex condition. It is also shown that the bridge in upstream of the sand dune will not increase the sand transport rate intensively, but change both wind velocity gradient and turbulence kinetic energy over surface of sand dune. On the other hand, when the bridge is built downstream the sand dune, simulation results show that sand deposition rate would be decreased in reference region downstream the pier.

  14. Wind erosion potential following application of biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The application of biosolids to agricultural land has the potential to improve soil health and crop production. These benefits could also possibly reduce the threat of wind erosion in arid and semiarid regions. Therefore, we assessed the impact of biosolids on wind erosion of agricultural land at Li...

  15. Stellar Wind Erosion of Protoplanetary Discs

    CERN Document Server

    Schnepf, Neesha R; Romanova, Marina

    2014-01-01

    An analytic model is developed for the erosion of protoplanetary gas discs by high velocity magnetized stellar winds. The winds are centrifugally driven from the surface of rapidly rotating, strongly magnetized young stars. The presence of the magnetic field in the wind leads to Reynolds numbers sufficiently large to cause a strongly turbulent wind/disk boundary layer which entrains and carries away the disc gas. The model uses the conservation of mass and momentum in the turbulent boundary layer. The time-scale for significant erosion depends on the disc accretion speed, accretion rate and on the wind mass loss rate. The time-scale is estimated to be ~2E6 yr. The stellar wind erosion may act in conjunction with photo-evaporation of the discs.

  16. The effect of wind erosion on toxic element content of soils based on wind tunnel trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatárvári, Károly; Négyesi, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion causes enormous problems in many parts of the world. It damages the fertile layer of soils, and eventually wind erosion can transport materials, pathogens and these may cause medical problems in the respiratory system. Numerous international and Hungarian surveys have proved, that wind erosion not only affects loose textured soils. During droughts wind erosion may cause great damage in bound soils of clay in case these are over-cultivated and dusty. As an effect of climate change the duration and frequency of drought periods shall grow. In our investigation samples were taken from the upper 10 cms of soils of 5 various types of mechanical compounds (according to physical characteristics sand, clay, clay loam, loam, sandy loam) in Györ-Moson-Sopron County Hungary. According to the map of Hungary of the areas potentially affected by wind erosion the sand physical soil type is strongly endangered by wind erosion, other areas are moderatly endangered. According to most recent international classification areas belonging to the sand physical soil type are categorized as "endangered by wind erosion", and others belong to the category "not endangered by wind erosion", but these data were not based on local trials. When selecting the sampling areas it was taken to account that opencast sand and gravel mines are in operation in the area. Because of these recently significant wind erosion related phenomena were observed. The area is the most windy in the country. The mechanical composition, CaCO3 content, pH value (H2O,Kcl), humus content of the samples were defined. The wind erosion experiments were conducted in the wind tunnel of the University of Debrecen. The threshold velocities of the soils were measured, and the quantity of the soil transported by the wind was analyzed at four wind velocity value ranges. The transported material intercepted at different wind velocities at the height of 0-10 cm and 10-35 cm. The As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn

  17. Regularities of wind-erosion of different land-use types in Yongding River sandy land,Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Depeng; Liu Yongbing; Zang Runguo; Wang Xian

    2006-01-01

    The threshold wind velocity of a number of variables was studied in four different land-use types:farmland,forestland,wild grassland and a flood plain in the Yongding River sandy land in Beijing.The variables studied were transport of sand, underlying surface roughness,windblown sediment,wind-sand flow structure,soil mechanical composition and amount of wind erosion.The following conclusions were drawn: 1) The order of decreasing threshold of wind speed for sand displacement and surface roughness were forestland,wild grassland,farmland,sparse wild grassland and flood plain.2) There were significant differences in sand flux among different ground covers.At a height of 0-20 cm,the height increased while the sediment discharge percent of sand flux decreased;there were significant differences in the sand flow formation under different land-use types.3) The mechanical composition of sand particles consisted mainly of silver sand in the flood plain and sparse wild grassland,and of silver sand,particle silver sand and floury sand in other land-use types.4) The amounts of wind erosion and sand sediment were different among different land-use types.Increased vegetation cover and change in farming techniques were suggested to prevent and control wind erosion of sand and soil.

  18. The prevention of wind erosion in agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaslavsky, D.

    1977-01-01

    The wind erosion is a problem over more than 80 000 hectares in the Netherlands. The damage in wind erodible areas is on the average at least 150 Dfl. per hectare per year. A lot of damages very probably pass unobserved or unreported.

  19. Recent Developments in Understanding Wind Driven Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrison, J. P.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Holstein-Rathlou, C.; Knak Jensen, S.; Nørnberg, P.; Rasmussen, K. R.

    2011-10-01

    The wind driven transport of granular material is an important environmental/climatic factor on Earth and even more so on Mars. Several related aspects of Aeolian activity are presently being studied in the laboratory. These include simulating wind driven erosion in the laboratory and the study of mineral change due to mechanical activation as well as quantifying erosion rates. The generation of electric fields and the effects of these electric fields on grain transport is also being investigated using environmental wind tunnel simulators.

  20. The influence of rainfall on transport of beach sand by wind.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van P.M.; Stroosnijder, L.; Lima, de J.L.M.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of rainfall on the process of wind erosion of beach sands and presents results from both field and wind tunnel experiments. Although sediment transport by splash is of secondary importance on coastal dunes, splash-saltation processes can move sediments in conditions

  1. Particulate Loads Caused by Wind Erosion in the Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Lawrence J.; Woodruff, Neil P.

    1975-01-01

    In this paper the annual flux of suspended particulates caused by wind erosion in the Great Plains is estimated. This study demonstrated that climate causes wide variations in air pollution from wind erosion. (BT)

  2. Erosion/corrosion testing of materials for oil sands applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.; Wolodko, J.; Alemaskin, K.; Been, J.; Danysh, M. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Erosion and corrosion are common wear mechanisms for components used in oil sands processing facilities. This paper described a slurry jet test apparatus designed to evaluate and assess materials for oil sands service conditions. The jet testing apparatus was designed to mimic the wet erosion phenomena typically found in oil sands applications. Wear- and corrosion-resistant materials tested by the apparatus included carbon steel, tungsten carbide metal matrix composite (WC-MMC) overlays, and a range of polymer and rubber liner materials. Polymeric materials included hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR); polyurethane elastomer; and high density polyethylene (HDPE). Material losses were determined by measuring the mass of the samples before and after testing. Normalized rates of abrasion were calculated by dividing total mass lost in the specimens by the total mass of sand impinged on the sample surface. Samples were also visually assessed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to determine failure modes. Tests were conducted for a 2-hour period at an impingement angle of 90 degrees. Results of the study showed that the average abrasion rates of the polymeric samples are lower than rates seen with the carbon steel and overlay materials. Future work on the apparatus will include testing the materials under varying slurry jet parameters. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. A transport-rate model of wind-blown sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Sand transport by wind plays an important role in environmental problems.Formulating the sand-transport rate model has been of continuing significance,because the majority of the existing models relate sand-transport rate to the wind-shear velocity.However,the wind-shear velocity readapted to blown sand is difficult to determine from the measured wind profiles when sand movement occurs,especially at high wind velocity.Detailed wind tunnel tests were carried out to reformulate the sand-transport rate model,followed by attempts to relate sand-transport rate to parameters of wind velocity,threshold shear-velocity,and grain size.Finally,we validated the model based on the data from field observations.

  4. On the geoethical implications of wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Károly, Tatárvári

    2016-04-01

    Human activities exerts an ever growing impact on our environment, and this is undeniably the responsibility of mankind. In spite of this fact there is almost no process in our environment that can be described exactly with complete exactness, and the working of which is known in full extent. Wind erosion is such a process. Although water erosion is mentioned ever more often in scientific circles as a from of erosion, its effect is restrained to a certain region, although it may cause perceptibly damage of a greater extent in short time. Wind erosion, apart from the fact that it may have global impact, may play an important role in the warming of our climate according to recent studies. First of all, wind erosion may cause damage far from its origin in human health, nutrition, or in the environment in general. Today several surveys have proved, that erosion caused by wind significantly contributes to the air pollution of cities, the fine dust carried as drift by the wind may cause severe environmental damage in accumulation zones. Microbes, toxic material may attach themselves to the dust carried this way and carried on and by the wings of the wind they may cause health issues in humans animals and plants as well. In spite of these facts there are almost no measures against wind erosion employed in arable land, although our ever doughtier climate and changes would make these necessary. Reduction of organic matter content presents a great problem in a large part of cultivated land, so the risk of the production of high quality food raises questions of more and more ethical nature. Who is responsible? The fact, that the chemicals used in a growing extent by agriculture may reach many people causing considerable damage to the environment also raises serious ethical questions. More and more periods with extreme weather conditions are experienced in Hungary and Europe as the effect of climate change. Drought periods are longer and more frequent as the intensity of

  5. PM10 Emission, Sandblasting Efficiency and Vertical Entrainment During Successive Wind-Erosion Events: A Wind-Tunnel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, J. E.; Mendez, M. J.; Buschiazzo, D. E.

    2016-11-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment was carried out to measure saltation and PM10 (particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm) emission during three successive wind-erosion events on three different surfaces: an unpaved road and two different textured agricultural soils: a sandy loam and a loamy sand. The total horizontal mass transport ( Q) and the PM10 emissions ( E), were measured at two friction velocities: 0.2 and 0.3 m s^{-1}. Results indicated that Q decreased rapidly in time over all surfaces, as the Q values were only 13-17 % of the amount registered during the first event. Similar trends were detected at both wind speeds. However, E values showed a lower relative decrease in the second wind-erosion event at the lower wind speed (25-51 % of the initial amounts) than at the higher wind speed (19-28 % of the initial amounts) over all surfaces. After the second wind-erosion event, both Q and E values remained constant except for the unpaved road, where both values decreased by 50 % in relation to the second event. Emission from the agricultural soils was sustained over successive wind-erosion events even when saltation was low. The sandblasting efficiency for PM10 emission was found to be higher for agricultural soils than for the unpaved road, and increased over wind-erosion events particularly in agricultural soils, and this was also reflected in the PM10 vertical entrainment. Results suggest that sandblasting efficiency and PM10 vertical distribution can change among wind-erosion events even for the same surface. The saltation fraction to PM10 content ratio can be a simple indicator of the general behaviour of an emitting surface during successive wind-erosion events.

  6. PM10 Emission, Sandblasting Efficiency and Vertical Entrainment During Successive Wind-Erosion Events: A Wind-Tunnel Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, J. E.; Mendez, M. J.; Buschiazzo, D. E.

    2016-06-01

    A wind-tunnel experiment was carried out to measure saltation and PM10 (particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μ m) emission during three successive wind-erosion events on three different surfaces: an unpaved road and two different textured agricultural soils: a sandy loam and a loamy sand. The total horizontal mass transport (Q) and the PM10 emissions (E), were measured at two friction velocities: 0.2 and 0.3 m {s}^{-1} . Results indicated that Q decreased rapidly in time over all surfaces, as the Q values were only 13-17 % of the amount registered during the first event. Similar trends were detected at both wind speeds. However, E values showed a lower relative decrease in the second wind-erosion event at the lower wind speed (25-51 % of the initial amounts) than at the higher wind speed (19-28 % of the initial amounts) over all surfaces. After the second wind-erosion event, both Q and E values remained constant except for the unpaved road, where both values decreased by 50 % in relation to the second event. Emission from the agricultural soils was sustained over successive wind-erosion events even when saltation was low. The sandblasting efficiency for PM10 emission was found to be higher for agricultural soils than for the unpaved road, and increased over wind-erosion events particularly in agricultural soils, and this was also reflected in the PM10 vertical entrainment. Results suggest that sandblasting efficiency and PM10 vertical distribution can change among wind-erosion events even for the same surface. The saltation fraction to PM10 content ratio can be a simple indicator of the general behaviour of an emitting surface during successive wind-erosion events.

  7. Analysis of Wind-blown Sand Movement over Transverse Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

    2014-12-01

    Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification.

  8. Electronmicroscopic Study of Sand Erosion Processes in Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    AO—A073 k97 ISRAEL INST OF MEtALS HAIFA - ~ - - — Ffl 11/6 ELECTROI~~ICROSCOPIC STUDY OF SAND EROSION PROCESSES IN METALS, IU) UNCLASSIFIED 79...General Appearance 8 4.2.2 Local Erosion Processes and Hard Phase Par t icles 9 5. Further Discussion 10 S S-_ S _~S _~~SS ~~~ S ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ __SS...research was to ga in addit iona l unders tan di ng of the mechanism of loca l mater ia l removal from eroded compos ite meta l l i c surface

  9. 水蚀对风蚀影响的室内模拟试验%Effects of Water Erosion on Wind Erosion in Wind Tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张庆印; 樊军; 张晓萍

    2012-01-01

    为了揭示黄土高原水蚀风蚀交错区风水复合侵蚀机制,利用室内风洞,在一定的风速(9.3m/s)、坡度(20°)下,人工模拟不同沟宽、沟深、沟密度对风蚀过程的影响。结果表明,在一定的水蚀沟宽度与密度范围内,风蚀量随着宽度与密度的增加而增加,并且两者与风蚀量都呈线性关系;侵蚀沟深度在4~8cm范围内,风蚀量随着沟深度增加而增加,当沟深大于8cm时,随着沟深度增加,风蚀量有所减少;水蚀沟发生风蚀的部位主要在沟壁和沟头,风沙流的磨蚀作用可能是主要作用力,水蚀沟形成会显著影响风蚀量。%Effect of water erosion on wind erosion was studied by wind tunnel under the different width,depth and density of rill under the condition of wind speed(9.3 m/s) and steep slope(20°) in order to reveal the mechanism of aeolian-fluvial interaction in the water-wind erosion crisscross region on the Loess Plateau.The results show that the sediment yields of wind erosion increased with the rill width and density during the certain range,and the sediment yields of wind erosion presented a positive relation with the rill width and density;in the 4~8 cm range,the sediment yields of wind erosion increased with the depth,while decreased when the depth was over 8 cm.Wall and foreside of rill were eroded easily by wind and the abrasive action of sand-driving wind may be the main force.The width,density and depth of rill were the key factors to influence the sediment yields of wind erosion,therefore,wind erosion was affected significantly by water erosion.

  10. Using the RBFN model and GIS technique to assess wind erosion hazards of Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huading; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhuang, Dafang; Hu, Yunfeng

    2006-08-01

    Soil wind erosion is the primary process and the main driving force for land desertification and sand-dust storms in arid and semi-arid areas of Northern China. Many researchers have paid more attention to this issue. This paper select Inner Mongolia autonomous region as the research area, quantify the various indicators affecting the soil wind erosion, using the GIS technology to extract the spatial data, and construct the RBFN (Radial Basis Function Network) model for assessment of wind erosion hazard. After training the sample data of the different levels of wind erosion hazard, we get the parameters of the model, and then assess the wind erosion hazard. The result shows that in the Southern parts of Inner Mongolia wind erosion hazard are very severe, counties in the middle regions of Inner Mongolia vary from moderate to severe, and in eastern are slight. The comparison of the result with other researches shows that the result is in conformity with actual conditions, proving the reasonability and applicability of the RBFN model.

  11. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  12. Soil nutrients losses by wind erosion in a citrus crop at southeast Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, C.; Gómez, J. D.; Gallardo, P.; Lozano, F. J.; Asensio, C.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of wind erosion on the productivity of citric crops over gypsiric Fluvisols in Gador area (Almeria, SE Spain) by blowing air through a wind tunnel. Wind erosion varies considerably depending on time since the last tillage. This is because a physical crust forms after tilling which protects the soil from wind. Crust formation in the study area is strongly favored by dew, which causes them to form in around a week. The repeated measurements ANOVA, as a nonparametric alternative to the ANOVA, using the Geiiser method and the Friedman test shows significant differences ( P ≤ 0.05) in the fractions of very fine sand and coarse silt, which confirmed that very fine sand and coarse silt are the fractions most susceptible to loss from wind. The same statistical analysis for fertility showed smaller differences in organic carbon and K2O content, while N and P2O5 increased. Nutrients lost from wind imply an additional fertilization cost for a crop to be economically feasible. The cost of this restoration of nutrients lost from the soil because of wind erosion was based on experimental data taken in crusted soil and immediately after tilling. Losses in organic matter (O.M.), N, P2O5 and K2O were estimated based on the cost of fertilizers most commonly used in the area.

  13. Testing compost as an anti wind erosion agent in a wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential of compost as an anti wind erosion agent was studied in a wind tunnel on a sandy soil susceptible to wind erosion. Soil treated with a compost-water mixture, which forms a crust on the soil surface after drying, was exposed to a series of increasing wind speeds. Two composts were

  14. Numerical modelling of the erosion and deposition of sand inside a filter layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; van Gent, Marcel R. A.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    prediction method to assure that the amount of erosion remains within acceptable limits. This work presents a numerical model that is capable of describing the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter of rock on top of sand. The hydraulic loading is that of incident irregular waves...... additional data sets on the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter. A few cases are defined to study the effect of the sinking of the filter into the erosion hole. The numerical model is also applied to several application cases. The response of the core material (sand) to changes......This paper treats the numerical modelling of the behaviour of a sand core covered by rocks and exposed to waves. The associated displacement of the rock is also studied. A design that allows for erosion and deposition of the sand core beneath a rock layer in a coastal structure requires an accurate...

  15. Numerical modeling of wind-blown sand on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, HaoJie; Bo, TianLi; Zheng, XiaoJing

    2014-09-01

    Recent observation results show that sand ripples and dunes are movable like those on Earth under current Martian climate. And the aeolian process on Mars therefore is re-attracting the eyes of scientific researchers in different fields. In this paper, the spatial and temporal evolution of wind-blown sand on Mars is simulated by the large-eddy simulation method. The simulations are conducted under the conditions of both friction wind speed higher and lower than the "fluid threshold", respectively. The fluid entrainment of the sand particles, the processes among saltation sand particles and sand bed, and the negative feedback of sand movement to flow field are considered. Our results show that the "overshoot" phenomenon also exists in the evolution of wind-blown sand on Mars both temporally and spatially; impact entrainment affects the sand transport rate on Mars when the wind speed is smaller or larger than the fluid threshold; and both the average saltation length and height are one order of magnitudes larger than those on Earth. Eventually, the formulas describing the sand transport rate, average saltation length and height on Mars are given, respectively.

  16. Dust and nutrient enrichment by wind erosion from Danish soils in dependence of tillage direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian Behbahani, Ali; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion is a selective process, which promotes erosion of fine particles. Therefore, it can be assumed that increasing erosion rates are generally associated with increasing loss of dust sized particles and nutrients. However, this selective process is strongly affected by the orientation and respective trapping efficiency of tillage ridges and furrows. Since tillage ridges are often the only protection measure available on poorly aggregated soils in absence of a protective vegetation cover, it is very important to know which orientation respective to the dominant wind direction provides best protection. This knowledge could be very helpful for planning erosion protection measures on fields with high wind erosion susceptibility. The main objective of this study, therefore, was to determine the effect of tillage direction on dust and nutrient mobilization by wind, using wind tunnel simulations. In order to assess the relationship between the enrichment ratio of specific particle sizes and the amount of eroded nutrients, three soils with loamy sand texture, but varying amounts of sand-sized particles, were selected. In addition, a soil with slightly less sand, but much higher organic matter content was chosen. The soils were tested with three different soil surface scenarios - flat surface, parallel tillage, perpendicular tillage. The parallel tillage operation experienced the greatest erosion rates, independent of soil type. Particles with D50 between 100-155 μm showed the greatest risk of erosion. However, due to a greater loss of dust sized particles from perpendicularly tilled surfaces, this wind-surface arrangement showed a significant increase in nutrient enrichment ratio compared to parallel tillage and flat surfaces. The main reason for this phenomenon is most probably the trapping of larger particles in the perpendicular furrows. This indicates that the highest rate of soil protection does not necessarily coincide with lowest soil nutrient losses and

  17. Wind characteristics and the associated risk of erosion in Seribu Islands patch reef complexes, Java Sea, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poerbandono

    2016-05-01

    This paper explores design event and entrainment of cay beach sands due to wave shear stresses from winds. Univariate frequency analysis is used to predict recurrence intervals of extreme winds from 30-year (1984-2013) global assimilated data set. Two primary clusters of wind directions representing East and West monsoons are examined. This identifies the equivalence of characteristics of regime among the two clusters. Taking into account the threshold of bottom shear stress of cay beach sands, conceptual relationship between height of wind-generated waves (forecasted from predefined fetch length and wind speed) and erosion of cay beach sand is prescribed. The results indicate that East monsoon is the predominant occurrence of wind and facilitates persistent north-westward shift of cay beach sands, while West monsoon provides extreme events in shorter time span. It is suspiciously thought that due to these, net north-westward drift of sand is indicated. These imply that many of cays in the domain being investigated is at risk of erosion due to unequal balance forcing of winds.

  18. A Multidirectional Wind Erosion Model for Western Saxony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Simon; Meusburger, Katrin; de Figueiredo, Tomás; Alewell, Christine

    2016-04-01

    Wind erosion can trigger a non-visible loss of fine soil up to 40 t ha-1 per single event and is as such a major soil threat and environmental concern in areas susceptible to wind erosion. Western Saxony was assessed to be among the most susceptible landscapes not only within Germany but even within Europe (Borelli et al., 2015; Borelli et al., 2014). Moreover, wind erosion events in eastern Germany cause very severe off-site effects with impacts on road traffic. So far the wind erosion model that is normally applied in Germany is based on the norm DIN standard 19706. The DIN standard 19706 was revised by new controlling factors and fuzzy logic to consider the multi-directionality of wind and make it more realistic to wind erosion processes. The new factors are based on different datasets like (i) wind and temperature data (1hr resolution) for 9 gauging stations and interpolated long-term wind speed (1981-2000, 200m resolution) provided by the German Weather Service, (ii) soil erodibility extracted from the digital soil map 1:50,000, (iii) landscape components from different data sources (ATKIS, OpenStreetMap and others), and (iv) a DEM (20m resolution) for local orographic modeling. For a risky sub-region, local wind speeds and directions were modelled based on the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Programs (WAsP) orography-model to assess road bodies for priority actions. Major improvements of the proposed model are the consideration of changing wind directions and the implementation of factors on soil cover and field length. An estimation of the long-term spatiotemporal variability under changing climate is possible with the model conception. The revised model assesses 3.6% of western Saxonies agricultural fields under very high risk to wind erosion. Larger fields (greater than 116 ha) are connected to a higher frequency (51.7%) of very high risk. Only a small proportion (5.2%) of the high risk class was found in small fields (smaller than 21 ha). Fields under

  19. Wind Erosion Induced Soil Degradation in Northern China: Status, Measures and Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongling Guo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil degradation is one of the most serious ecological problems in the world. In arid and semi-arid northern China, soil degradation predominantly arises from wind erosion. Trends in soil degradation caused by wind erosion in northern China frequently change with human activities and climatic change. To decrease soil loss by wind erosion and enhance local ecosystems, the Chinese government has been encouraging residents to reduce wind-induced soil degradation through a series of national policies and several ecological projects, such as the Natural Forest Protection Program, the National Action Program to Combat Desertification, the “Three Norths” Shelter Forest System, the Beijing-Tianjin Sand Source Control Engineering Project, and the Grain for Green Project. All these were implemented a number of decades ago, and have thus created many land management practices and control techniques across different landscapes. These measures include conservation tillage, windbreak networks, checkerboard barriers, the Non-Watering and Tube-Protecting Planting Technique, afforestation, grassland enclosures, etc. As a result, the aeolian degradation of land has been controlled in many regions of arid and semiarid northern China. However, the challenge of mitigating and further reversing soil degradation caused by wind erosion still remains.

  20. 7 CFR 610.13 - Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion... Erosion Prediction Equations § 610.13 Equations for predicting soil loss due to wind erosion. (a) The equation for predicting soil loss due to wind in the Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ) is E = f(IKCLV). (For...

  1. Numerical Simulation of Sand Erosion Phenomena in Rotor/Stator Interaction of Compressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaya Suzuki; Kazuaki Inaba; Makoto Yamamoto

    2008-01-01

    Sand erosion is a phenomenon where solid particles impinging to a wall cause serious mechanical damages to the wall surface. This phenomenon is a typical gas-particle two-phase turbulent flow and a multi-physics problem where the flow field, particle trajectory and wall deformation interact with each other. On the other hand, aircraft engines operating in a particulate environment are subjected to the performance and lifetime deterioration due to sand erosion. Especially, the compressor of the aircraft engines is severely damaged. The flow fields of the compressor have strongly three dimensional and unsteady natures. In order to estimate the deterioration due to sand erosion, the sand erosion simulation for a compressor is required under the consideration of the rotor-stator interaction. In the present study, we apply our three dimensional sand erosion prediction code to a single stage axial flow compressor. We numerically investigate the change of the flow field, the particle trajectories, and the eroded wall shape in the compressor, to clarify the effects of sand erosion in the compressor.

  2. Sand erosion at the toe of a gabion-protected dune face

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, A.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to study the manner in which erosion takes place the the toe of a dune slope protected by gabions, and to examine the response of the gabions to this erosion. A sand slope overlaid by model gabions was subjected to wave attack in a hydraulic flume, and period

  3. Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Li Bo; Xiao-Jing Zheng; Shao-Zhen Duan; Yi-Rui Liang

    2013-01-01

    In the research of windblown sand movement,the lift-off and incident velocities of saltating sand particles play a significant role in bridging the spatial and temporal scales from single sand particle's motion to windblown sand flux.In this paper,we achieved wind tunnel measurements of the movement of sand particles near sand bed through improving the wind tunnel experimental scheme of paticle image velocimetry (PIV) and data processing method.And then the influence of observation height on the probability distributions of lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles was analyzed.The results demonstrate that the observation height has no obvious influence on the distribution pattern of the lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles,i.e.,the probability distribution of horizontal and vertical velocities of lift-off and incident sand particles follow a Gaussian distribution and a negative exponential distribution,respectively.However,it influences the center of the Gaussian distribution,the decay constant and the amplitude of the negative exponential distribution.

  4. Mechanics of Interrill Erosion with Wind-Driven Rain (WDR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article provides an evaluation analysis for the performance of the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model for Wind-Driven Rain (WDR) events. The interrill delivery rates (Di) were collected in the wind tunnel rainfall simulator facility of the International Cen...

  5. Mechanics of interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    The vector physics of wind-driven rain (WDR) differs from that of wind-free rain, and the interrill soil detachment equations in the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model were not originally developed to deal with this phenomenon. This article provides an evaluation of the performance of the...

  6. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C.; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern `wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  7. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W T; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A G

    2015-11-05

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern 'wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  8. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface–atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern ‘wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today. PMID:26537669

  9. Spatial distribution of wind erosion and its driving factors in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Based on remote sensing and geographic information system, the spatial distribution of nation-wide wind erosion is studied, and the 1:100 000 national map of soil erosion by wind in China is made. Wind speed, soil dryness, NDVI, soil texture and the slope of land surface are the key factors to wind erosion. The relations between wind erosion and each factor are discussed. The method of principal component is used to pick up the information included in the five factors, and the wind erosion dynamic index (WEDI) is established. Its comparison with the RS/GIS derived data shows that WEDI can reflect the potential capacity of soil erosion by wind. The dynamic process of the wind erosion is studied to reveal the distribution of the most intense wind erosion regions and the dominant factors in these regions. All these studies may greatly help the mitigation of wind erosion of soil.

  10. Experimental wind-driven rain erosion study on agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Miriam; Iserloh, Thomas; Brings, Christine; Fister, Wolfgang; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2014-05-01

    Wind is potentially capable to considerably increase soil erosion by rain drops. In contrast to laboratory experiments, in-situ experiments enable the measurement of soil erosion by wind and rain including the reactions of relatively intact soil surfaces and a complete body of soil. The Portable Wind and Rainfall Simulator of Trier University was applied on winter cereal fields to measure rain erosion on agricultural areas with and without the influence of wind. The test areas are situated near Pamplona, Navarre and recognized to be representative for large parts of northern Spain concerning soil, land use and climate. The soil surfaces on the fields were ploughed and sparsely covered by recently sowed winter cereals. The soil water content was close to saturation due to long lasting rainfall. Runoff was medium to high with runoff-coefficients ranging from 26 to 100%. The eroded material from rainfall simulations ranged from 14.5 to 42.5 g m² / 30min. The eroded material from wind-driven rain ranged from 28.1 to 47.3 g m² / 30 min. Compared to windless rainfall, the wind-driven rain increased erosion of soil material up to 82.2%. In one case, the eroded material decreased by 18.3%. The results indicate a strong influence of wind on rain erosion on recently seeded agricultural soils. Wind influence can be an important aspect for the general assessment of sheet erosion and supports the finding that a neglect of this factor might lead to severe underestimation of soil loss.

  11. Optimization design of performance test of cyclone separator sand sampler based on numerical simulation and wind erosion tunnel experiment%基于数值模拟与风洞试验的旋风分离式集沙仪优化设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄炎; 赵满全

    2015-01-01

    为了解风蚀风沙运动规律,提高旋风分离式集沙仪集沙效率。该文在Fluent 平台中建立了旋风分离式集沙仪有限元模型,基于RNG k-ε模型和雷诺应力模型对旋风分离式集沙仪进行数值分析,并对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行风洞试验。通过有限元分析,得到了其内部气相运动规律,观察到集沙仪升气管附近气流强度较大,其内部有“短路流”存在。同时,通过对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行数值模拟,得到结构参数为:筒体直径50 mm;锥体段高度125 mm 的旋风分离式集沙仪集沙盒底部具有较小的湍动能和向上轴向速度,其大小分别为0.99 m2/s2和1.48 m/s。另外,分别对3种不同结构参数旋风分离式集沙仪进行风洞试验,得到了改变筒体直径与锥体段高度引起集沙盒底部湍流强度的改变,从而对集沙效率有一定影响,相比较筒体直径而言,锥体段高度对集沙效率影响更明显;集沙盒底部湍动能和向上轴向速度较小的集沙仪,集沙效率较高,具有良好的分离性能。结合数值模拟和风洞试验确定了集沙盒底部湍动能、向上轴向速度为目标函数,根据目标函数,优化设计了集沙盒直管的长度,确定了集沙盒直管长16 mm的旋风分离式集沙仪可以降低集沙盒底部湍动能和向上轴向速度,理论上可以提高旋风分离式集沙仪集沙效率。该文研究结果可为进一步提高旋风分离式集沙仪性能提供依据。%For the purpose of knowing the motion law of sand erosion and improving the efficiency of cyclone separation sand sampler, the finite element model of cyclone separation sand sampler is built by using the software of Fluent. There is a two-phase movement inside the cyclone separation sand sampler, including air and soil particles. The cyclone separation sand sampler mainly separates the soil

  12. Probability of rebound and eject of sand particles in wind-blown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xie; Xiaojing Zheng

    2007-01-01

    When incident particles impact into a sand bed in wind-blown sand movement, rebound of the incident particles and eject of the sand particles by the incident particles affect directly the development of wind sand flux. In order to obtain rebound and eject lift-off probability of the sand particles, we apply the particle-bed stochastic collision model presented in our pervious works to derive analytic solutions of velocities of the incident and impacted particles in the postcollision bed. In order to describe randomness inherent in the real particle-bed collision, we take the incident angle, theimpact position and the direction of resultant action of sand particles in sand bed on the impacted sand particle as random variables, and calculate the rebound and eject velocities,angles and coefficients (ratio of rebound and eject velocity to incident velocity). Numerical results are found in accordance with current experimental results. The rebound and eject lift-off probabilities versus the incident and creeping velocities are predicted.

  13. Beryllium-7 measurements of wind erosion on sloping fields in the wind-water erosion crisscross region on the Chinese Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaqiong; Yang, Mingyi; Deng, Xinxin; Liu, Zhang; Zhang, Fengbao; Zhou, Weiying

    2017-09-29

    Soil erosion is complex in the wind-water erosion crisscross region of the Chinese Loess Plateau, as interleaving of wind and water erosion occurs on both temporal and spatial scales. It is difficult to distinguish wind erosion from the total erosion in previous studies due to the untraceable of aeolian particles and the limitation of feasible methods and techniques. This study used beryllium-7 measurements to study wind erosion in the wind-water erosion crisscross region on the Chinese Loess Plateau arms to delineate wind erosion distribution, to analyze its implication to erosive winds and surface microrelief, and to determine correlations between erosion rates and slope gradients. Results obtained using beryllium-7 measurements based on observation plots were verified with saltating particle collection method, and were also verified on a field scale. Results indicated that the effective resultant erosion wind was from northward, which was proved by the eight-directional distributed saltating particles. The microrelief of the ground surface contributed to the formation of high or low erosion centers. Wind erosion rates increased with a linear (R(2)≥0.95) or exponential (R(2)≥0.83) fitting increase in the slope gradients as reported in previous studies. Compared to wind erosion on field scale, both the plots and fields exhibited similar distribution patterns in wind erosion isolines. We also determined that the wind erosion rate for two fields estimated, based on equations developed from plot scale was acceptable. This study validates the feasibility of beryllium-7 measurements for soil-wind erosion field experiments and the potential to expand this approach to real field conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Wind erosion and vegetation interactions in a desert ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, L.; Epstein, H.; Li, J.; Okin, G.

    2006-12-01

    Desert grassland degradation is common in many arid environments and is related to increasing shrub coverage, declines in grass species and loss of soil nutrients. Wind erosion may contribute to this degradation by eroding surface soil and depleting soil nutrients. Areas downwind of wind eroded areas may also be affected because wind eroded soils can be trapped beneath shrub canopies, creating "islands of fertility," while grass species are likely abraded or buried by deposition. We have established a manipulative experiment on the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico in a predominantly grassland habitat (interspersed with some shrub cover) to examine interactions between wind erosion and vegetation structure and function in the Chihuahuan Desert. Each of three experimental blocks includes five 25x50m treatment plots with different levels of vegetation removed (100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 0% - control) to stimulate wind erosion. Dust flux and vegetation composition, coverage (lateral and fractional), and spatial distribution are being monitored on and immediately downwind of treated areas. Additionally, individual grasses and shrubs have been selected for monitoring of leaf-level photosynthesis rates on treated and downwind areas to determine impacts of erosion on plant physiology. Results indicate an exponential increase in dust flux with decreasing lateral coverage of vegetation. The spatial distribution of vegetation also appears to be an important factor influencing wind erosion rates. Specifically, there is a positive correlation between the average gap size (space between plants) and dust flux. Leaf level photosynthesis rates were higher for shrubs than grasses, and were lower for grasses downwind of the 100% removal areas compared to the controls. Additionally, a decrease in grass coverage downwind of treated areas suggests that community composition changes are occurring downwind from eroding areas. These results suggest a significant role for

  15. Wind erosion in the alpine zone - a case study at Latschuelfurgga (Davos, Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, F.; Gromke, Ch.

    2012-04-01

    Protection against wind erosive processes ranks among the most important challenges in natural hazard mitigation, worldwide. Today, it is generally accepted that the (re-)establishment of a protective vegetation cover is the most promising and efficient measure in restoring degraded land in the long term. Sustainable protection against wind erosion requires adequate information about suitable plant species regarding ecological aspects as well as with respect to their proper contribution to wind erosion control. The latter, however, is widely lacking. Within a broader conceptual framework, wind tunnel studies have been performed using naturally grown vegetation covers. The use of live plants aimed at simulating the behaviour of natural canopies as accurately as possible compared to previous studies using artificial objects. The goals of the presented field study are to record reliable data on windblown erosion rates under natural alpine conditions on the one hand and, on the other hand, to interrelate the findings with the results of the wind tunnel experiments with live plants. The wind erosion test field was established at 2409 m a.s.l. on a small saddle like pass in an alpine meadow and includes two east-west orientated test tracks of the dimension 2x10 m2. One track is left as is, representing the naturally alpine vegetated soil (15-20% plant cover). The other track is equipped with a plastic covering sheet, mimicking desertified soil (0% plant cover) and serving as control plot as well as providing a direct link to the wind tunnel experiments. Blue and red quartz sand (grain size: 0.2-0.6 mm) was spread on the vegetated and sheet-covered track, respectively, to visualise and measure the effect of vegetation on wind erosion control. During summer and fall 2010 field experiments were performed of which experiment no. 4 is presented here as a case study as well as compared with and discussed in relation to a wind tunnel run with medium-density configuration (16

  16. [Impact of wind-water alternate erosion on the characteristics of sediment particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuo, Deng-Feng; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Ma, Xin-Xin; Zheng, Shi-Qing

    2014-02-01

    Wind and water are the two dominant erosion agents that caused soil and water losses in the wind-water alternate erosion region on the Loess Plateau. It is meaningful to study the impact of wind-water alternate erosion on the characteristics of soil particles for understanding the response of soil quality and environment to erosion. Through wind tunnel combined rainfall simulation, this paper studied the characteristics of the erosive sediment particles under the effect of wind-water alternate erosion. The results showed that the particles of 0-1 cm soil were coarsened by wind erosion at the wind speeds of 11 and 14 m x s(-1) compared with no wind erosion. Soil fine particles ( 0.05 mm) increased by 16.8%-20.8%. The physical property of surface soil was changed by the wind erosion, which, in turn, caused an increase in finer particles content in the sediment. Compared with no wind erosion, fine particles (wind alternate erosion increased by 2.7%-18.9% , and coarse particles (> 0.05 mm) decreased by 3.7%-9.3%. However, the changing trend of erosive sediment particles after the wind erosion at wind speeds of 11 and 14 m x s(-1) was different along with the rainfall intensity and duration. The erosive sediment particles at the rainfall intensities of 60, 80, 100 mm x h(-1) changed to greater extents than at the 150 mm x h(-1) rainfall intensity with longer than 15 min runoff flowing.

  17. A comprehensive numerical model of wind-blown sand

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F

    2009-01-01

    Wind-blown sand, or "saltation", ejects dust aerosols into the atmosphere, creates sand dunes, and erodes geological features. We present a comprehensive numerical model of steady-state saltation that, in contrast to most previous studies, can simulate saltation over mixed soils. Our model simulates the motion of saltating particles due to gravity, fluid drag, particle spin, fluid shear, and turbulence. Moreover, the model explicitly accounts for the retardation of the wind due to drag from saltating particles. We also developed a physically-based parameterization of the ejection of surface particles by impacting saltating particles which matches experimental results. Our numerical model is the first to reproduce measurements of the wind shear velocity at the impact threshold (i.e., the lowest shear velocity for which saltation is possible) and of the aerodynamic roughness length in saltation. It also correctly predicts a wide range of other saltation processes, including profiles of the wind speed and partic...

  18. Using albedo to reform wind erosion modelling, mapping and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are used to assess the impacts of dust on radiative forcing in the atmosphere, cloud formation, nutrient fertilisation and human health. The models are underpinned by a two-dimensional geometric property (lateral cover; L) used to characterise the three-dimensional aerodynamic roughness (sheltered area or wakes) of the Earth's surface and calibrate the momentum it extracts from the wind. We reveal a fundamental weakness in L and demonstrate that values are an order of magnitude too small and significant aerodynamic interactions between roughness elements and their sheltered areas have been omitted, particularly under sparse surface roughness. We describe a solution which develops published work to establish a relation between sheltered area and the proportion of shadow over a given area; the inverse of direct beam directional hemispherical reflectance (black sky albedo; BSA). We show direct relations between shadow and wind tunnel measurements and thereby provide direct calibrations of key aerodynamic properties. Estimation of the aerodynamic parameters from albedo enables wind erosion assessments over areas, across platforms from the field to airborne and readily available satellite data. Our new approach demonstrated redundancy in existing wind erosion models and thereby reduced model complexity and improved fidelity. We found that the use of albedo enabled an adequate description of aerodynamic sheltering to characterise fluid dynamics and predict sediment transport without the use of a drag partition scheme (Rt) or threshold friction velocity (u∗t). We applied the calibrations to produce global maps of aerodynamic properties which showed very similar spatial patterns to each other and confirmed the redundancy in the traditional parameters of wind erosion modelling. We evaluated temporal patterns of predicted horizontal mass flux at locations across Australia which revealed variation between land cover types that would not

  19. Wind tunnel experimental study on the effect of PAM on soil wind erosion control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ji-Jun; Cai, Qiang-Guo; Tang, Ze-Jun

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, high-molecular-weight anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) have been widely tested on a variety of soils, primarily in water erosion control. However, little information is available regarding the effectiveness of PAM on preventing soil loss from wind erosion. The research adopted room wind tunnel experiment, two kinds of soils were used which were from the agro-pastoral area of Inner Mongolia, the northwest of China, the clay content of soils were 22.0 and 13.7%, respectively. For these tests, all the treatments were performed under the condition of wind velocity of 14 m s(-1) and a blown angle of 8.75%, according to the actual situation of experimented area. The study results indicated that using PAM on the soil surface could enhance the capability of avoiding the wind erosion, at the same time, the effect of controlling wind soil erosion with 4 g m(-2) PAM was better than 2 g m(-2) PAM's. Economically, the 2 g m(-2) PAM used in soil surface can control wind erosion effectively in this region. The prophase PAM accumulated in soil could not improve the capability of avoiding the wind erosion, owing to the degradation of PAM in the soil and the continual tillage year after year. The texture of soil is a main factor influencing the capability of soil avoiding wind erosion. Soil with higher clay content has the higher capability of preventing soil from wind erosion than one with the opposite one under the together action of PAM and water.

  20. The wind-water two-phase erosion and sediment-producing processes in the middle Yellow River basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许炯心

    2000-01-01

    Based on data from the middle Yellow River basin, a wind-water two-phase mechanism for erosion and sediment-producing processes has been found. By using this mechanism, the extremely strong erosion and sediment yield in the study area can be better explained. The operation of wind and water forces is different in different seasons within a year. During winter and spring, strong wind blows large quantities of eolian sand to gullies and river channels, which are temporally stored there. During the next summer, rainstorms cause runoff that contains much fine loessic material and acts as a powerful force to carry the previously prepared coarse material. As a result, hyperconcentrated flows occur, resulting in high-intensity erosion and sediment yield.

  1. Numerical Analysis of Flow Erosion on Sand Discharge Pipe in Nitrogen Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In nitrogen drilling, entrained sand particles in the gas flow may cause erosive wear on metal surfaces and have a significant effect on the operational life of discharge pipelines, especially for elbows. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations based code FLUENT is carried out to investigate the flow erosion on a sand discharge pipe in conjunction with an erosion model. The motion of the continuum phase is captured based on solving the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations, while the kinematics and trajectory of the sand particles are evaluated by the discrete phase model (DPM. The flow field has been examined in terms of pressure, velocity, and erosion rate profiles along the flow path in the bend of the simulated discharge pipe. Effects of flow parameters such as inlet velocity, sandy volume fraction, and particle diameter and structure parameters such as pipe diameter and bend curvature are analyzed based on a series of numerical simulations. The results show that small pipe diameter or small bend curvature leads to serious erosion, while slow flow, little sandy volume fraction, and small particle diameter can weaken erosion. The results obtained from the present work provide useful guidance to practical operation and discharge pipe design.

  2. An index guiding temporal planting policies for wind erosion reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, C.X.; Zheng, D.W.; Stigter, C.J.; He, W.Q.; Tuo, D.B.; Zhao, P.

    2006-01-01

    Vegetation cover has spatial as well as temporal characteristics, but the latter are often neglected. Temporal cover characteristics were explored to recommend planting policies for returning arable land into land better protected from serious wind erosion during late autumn, winter, and particularl

  3. Accelerated rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong

    During operation, the fast-moving blades of wind turbines are exposed to continuous impacts with rain droplets, hail, insects, or solid particles. This can lead to erosion of the blades, whereby the electrical efficiency is compromised and expensive repairs may be required. One possible solution...

  4. Enhancing wind erosion monitoring and assessment for US rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion is a major resource concern for rangeland managers because it can impact soil health, ecosystem structure and function, hydrologic processes, agricultural production and air quality. Despite its significance, little is known about which landscapes are eroding, by how much, and when. T...

  5. Field Measurements of Influence of Sand Transport Rate on Structure of Wind-sand Flow over Coastal Transverse Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yuxiang; S L NAMIKAS; P A HESP; MA Jun

    2008-01-01

    The structure of wind-sand flow under different total sand transport rates was measured with field vertical anemometer and sand trap on the crest of typical coastal transverse ridge in Changli Gold Coast of Hebei Province,which is one of the most typical coastal aeolian distribution regions in China and famous for the tall and typical coastal transverse ridges.The measurement results show that,on the conditions of approximate wind velocities and same surface materials and environments,some changes happen to the structure of wind-sand flow with the increase of total sand transport rate on the crest of coastal transverse ridge.First,the sand transport rates of layers at different heights in the wind-sand flow increase,with the maximum increase at the height layer of 4-8cm.Second,the ratios of sand transport rates of layers at different heights to total sand transport rate decrease at the low height layer (0-4cm),but increase at the high height layer (4-60cm).Third,the distribution of the sand transport rate in the wind-sand flow can be expressed by an exponential function at the height layer of 0-40cm,but it changes fi'om power function model to exponential function model in the whole height layer (0-60cm) and changes into polynomial function model at the height layer of 40-60cm with the increase of total sand transport rate.Those changes have a close relationship with the limit of sand grain size of wind flow transporting and composition of sand grain size in the wind-sand flow.

  6. Sand-mud erosion from a soil mechanical perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.

    2011-01-01

    ‘Wetlands’ in tidal lagoons and estuaries are among the most valuable ecosystems in the world. Managing these systems requires both a thorough knowledge and validated tools to predict their behavior and development. An important morpho-dynamic process herein is the erosion (‘pick-up’) of the bed, wh

  7. Spatial changes of wind erosion-caused landscapes and their relation with wind field in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the results of remote sensing investigations of the landscapes of 1995 and 2000,the national distribution of sandy desertified land and its interaction with other landscapes are classified, and five zonal types are distinguished. The data of nationally distributed 400 meteorological stations of 1999 are processed. With the GIS method, the data are spatially interpolated, and the national database of wind field concerned with wind erosion is established. In arid and semi-arid areas of China, the intensity of wind field is one of the key factors that controls the development of landscape especially in desert and its adjacent area. Different indexes are set up to describe the intensity of wind field, the method suggested by the wind erosion prediction models of RWEQ is also adopted to express the intensity of wind. The Weibull distribution is used to describe the wind field in China. Based on the analysis of the process of the wind erosion-driven landscape changes, this article proposes and discusses the control measures of wind erosion.

  8. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  9. AN ALTERNATE METHOD TO PREVENT SAND ABRASIVE EROSION IN PIPELINES FOR TRANSPORTING HIGH-SPEED NATURAL GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an alternate method to re-move the sand carried by natural gas in the upstream pipelinestherefore preventing sand abrasive erosion in pipelines used intransporting high-speed natural gas. Conventionally, most ex-perts pay much attention to improving the anti-erosion charac-teristics of the pipeline materials to solve the problem of seri-ous abrasive erosion, but without significant success. Basedon the theory of multiphase flow and analysis of the character-istics of sandy jets, a new equipment named "Sand Catcher" isintroduced in this article. Experimental results show that theSand Catcher effectively removes most of the sand in the natu-ral gas and significantly reduces the abrasive erosion of thepipelines. The Sand Catcher can be widely applied in practicein the near future.

  10. Simultaneous PIV and PTV measurements of wind and sand particle velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Lee, Sang Joon

    2008-08-01

    Wind-blown sand is a typical example of two-phase particle-laden flows. Owing to lack of simultaneous measured data of the wind and wind-blown sand, interactions between them have not yet been fully understood. In this study, natural sand of 100-125 μm taken from Taklimakan Desert was tested at the freestream wind speed of 8.3 m/s in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. The captured flow images containing both saltating sand and small wind tracer particles, were separated by using a digital phase mask technique. The 2-D PIV (particle imaging velocimetry) and PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) techniques were employed to extract simultaneously the wind velocity field and the velocity field of dispersed sand particles, respectively. Comparison of the mean streamwise wind velocity profile and the turbulence statistics with and without sand transportation reveal a significant influence of sand movement on the wind field, especially in the dense saltating sand layer ( y/ δ < 0.1). The ensemble-averaged streamwise velocity profile of sand particles was also evaluated to investigate the velocity lag between the sand and the wind. This study would be helpful in improving the understanding of interactions between the wind and the wind-blown sand.

  11. WIND EROSION INTENSITY DETERMINATION USING SOIL PARTICLE CATCHER DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Lackóová

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To analyze wind erosion events in the real terrain conditions, we proposed to construct a prototype of soil particle catcher devices to trap soil particles. With these devices we are able to measure the intensity of wind erosion at six different heights above the soil surface in one location or at three different heights in two places. It is possible to use them for six different places at the same time as well. We performed field measurements to determine the amount of soil particles transported by the wind between 26th – 31st March 2012. Each measuring took 60 minutes. After this time the soil particle catchers were emptied and further measurements carried out. At the beginning we selected two places for measurement (soil HPJ 16 and 37 at two heights, one above the other. Then we used two measuring systems 40 m apart at two sites (D2 and D4 and the soil captured at two heights (0, 1. The maximum weight of soil particles trapped in measuring system D2 at height (0 was 1242.7 g at a wind speed of 9.6 ms-1. At measurement height (1 the maximum weight was 72.7 g trapped at the same average hourly rate, but during different measurement events. The measuring system at D4 trapped the highest amount of soil at a wind speed of 8.9 ms-1 (1141.7 g at height (0 and at a speed of 9.3 ms-1 (22.3 g at height (1. During the measurements with the two basic measuring systems D4 and D2, we measured the wind erosion intensity together with soil particle catchers D1 and D3. D3 was placed between devices D4 and D2, D1 was 20 m ahead D2. Soil particle catchers were placed on the soil surface at height position (0. We measured increasing soil erosion downwind on four locations spaced at 20 m. The results show that with there is an increasing quantity of particles collected as the erosive surface length increases, due to the so-called snowball effect. We analyzed selected trapped soil samples in order to determine the size of the soil particles and their proportion

  12. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion -- lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-01-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar–Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m−2 d−1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2–555.3 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0–44,010.7 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar–Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  13. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-12-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar-Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m-2 d-1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2-555.3 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0-44,010.7 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar-Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  14. Unloading Characteristics of Sand-drift in Wind-shallow Areas along Railway and the Effect of Sand Removal by Force of Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Xin, Guo-Wei; Zhi, Ling-yan; Jiang, Fu-qiang

    2017-01-01

    Wind-shield walls decrease the velocity of wind-drift sand flow in transit. This results in sand accumulating in the wind-shadow zone of both windshield wall and track line, causing severe sand sediment hazard. This study reveals the characteristics of sand accumulation and the laws of wind-blown sand removal in the wind-shadow areas of three different types of windshield walls, utilizing three-dimensional numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments and on-site sand sediment tests. The results revealed the formation of apparent vortex and acceleration zones on the leeward side of solid windshield walls. For uniform openings, the vortex area moved back and narrowed. When bottom-opening windshield walls were adopted, the track-supporting layer at the step became a conflux acceleration zone, forming a low velocity vortex zone near the track line. At high wind speeds, windshield walls with bottom-openings achieved improved sand dredging. Considering hydrodynamic mechanisms, the flow field structure on the leeward side of different types of windshield structures is a result of convergence and diffusion of fluids caused by an obstacle. This convergence and diffusion effect of air fluid is more apparent at high wind velocities, but not obvious at low wind velocities. PMID:28120915

  15. Unloading Characteristics of Sand-drift in Wind-shallow Areas along Railway and the Effect of Sand Removal by Force of Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-Jun; Xin, Guo-Wei; Zhi, Ling-Yan; Jiang, Fu-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Wind-shield walls decrease the velocity of wind-drift sand flow in transit. This results in sand accumulating in the wind-shadow zone of both windshield wall and track line, causing severe sand sediment hazard. This study reveals the characteristics of sand accumulation and the laws of wind-blown sand removal in the wind-shadow areas of three different types of windshield walls, utilizing three-dimensional numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments and on-site sand sediment tests. The results revealed the formation of apparent vortex and acceleration zones on the leeward side of solid windshield walls. For uniform openings, the vortex area moved back and narrowed. When bottom-opening windshield walls were adopted, the track-supporting layer at the step became a conflux acceleration zone, forming a low velocity vortex zone near the track line. At high wind speeds, windshield walls with bottom-openings achieved improved sand dredging. Considering hydrodynamic mechanisms, the flow field structure on the leeward side of different types of windshield structures is a result of convergence and diffusion of fluids caused by an obstacle. This convergence and diffusion effect of air fluid is more apparent at high wind velocities, but not obvious at low wind velocities.

  16. Experimental analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xie; Zhibao Dong; Xiaojing Zheng

    2005-01-01

    The probability distributions of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in a wind-blown sand flux play very important roles in the simulation of the wind-blown sand movement. In this paper, the vertical and the horizontal speeds of sand particles located at 1.0 mm above a sand-bed in a wind-blown sand flux are observed with the aid of Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) in a wind tunnel. Based on the experimental data, the probability distributions of not only the vertical lift-off speed but also the lift-off velocity as well as its horizontal component and the incident velocity as well as its vertical and horizontal components can be obtained by the equal distance histogram method. It is found, according to the results of the χ2-test for these probability distributions, that the probability density functions (pdf's) of the sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities as well as their vertical components are described by the Gamma density function with different peak values and shapes and the downwind incident and lift-off horizontal speeds, respectively, can be described by the lognormal and the Gamma density functions. These pdf's depend on not only the sand particle diameter but also the wind speed.

  17. Experimental assessment of wind erosion after soil stabilization treatments at Eneabba, Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D T; Carter, D J; Hetherington, R E

    1986-12-01

    Wind tunnel experiments on rehabilitation surfaces at Eneabba, Western Australia evaluated the techniques used by Associated Minerals Consolidated Ltd. (AMC) and Allied Eneabba Ltd. (AEL) to stabilize regions being revegetated following heavy mineral sand mining.Newly landscaped areas proved to be the most erodible, beginning to erode at 9 m sec(-1) and producing a soil flux of 10 kg m(-1) min(-1) at 18 m sec(-1) wind speeds. Sandier, more organically-rich, surfaces in the rehabilitation areas were somewhat less erodible with losses of only 2 kg m(-1) min(-1) at wind speeds of 18 m sec(-1).The mining companies use various nurse crops and top dressing mulch for surface stabilization. Rows of oats, sparse plantings of the grass cultivar "SUDAX" (Dekalb ST6) supplied by Westfarmers Ltd. and applications of Terolas, a cold, bituminous surface binding material supplied by Shell Co. of Australia Ltd., all proved successful in reducing wind erosion in this semi-arid region where more than 25% of summer days experience winds greater than 8 m sec(-1).

  18. Experimental Evaluation of Erosion of Gunmetal under Asymmetrical Shaped Sand Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asaduzzaman Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The erosion characteristics of gunmetal have been evaluated practically at different operating conditions. Asymmetrical silica sand (SiO2 is taken into account as erodent within range of 300–600 μm. The impact velocity within 30–50 m/sec, impact angle 15–900, and stand off distance 15–25 mm are inspected as other relevant operating test conditions. The maximum level of erosion is obtained at impact angle 15° which indicates the ductile manner of the tested gunmetal. The higher the impact velocity, the higher the erosion rate as almost linear fashion is observed. Mass loss of gunmetal reduces with the increase of stand-off distance. A dimensional analysis, erosion efficiency (η, and relationship between friction and erosion indicate the prominent correlation. The test results are designated using Taguchi’s and ANOVA concept. S/N ratio indicates that there are 1.72% deviations that are estimated between predicted and experimental results. To elaborately analyze the results, ANN and GMDH methods are mentioned. After erosion process of tested composite, the damage propagation on surfaces is examined using SEM for the confirmation of possible nature of wear behavior. The elemental composition of eroded test samples at varying percentage of gunmetal is analyzed by EDX analysis.

  19. Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over typical underlying surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pulsatory characteristics of wind velocity in sand flow over Gobi and mobile sand surface have been investigated experimentally in the wind tunnel. The primary goal of this paper is to reveal the relation- ship between pulsatory characteristics of instantaneous wind speed in sand flow and the motion state of sand grains. For a given underlying surface, pulsation of wind velocities in sand flow on different heights has a good correlation. As the space distance among different heights increases, fluctuation of instantaneous wind speed presents a decreasing trend and its amplitude is closely related to the mo- tion state of sand grains and their transport. Pulsatory intensity increases with the indicated wind speed, but its relative value does not depend on it, only agrees with height.

  20. Estimation of wind erosion from construction of a railway in arid northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-art wind erosion simulation model, the Wind Erosion Prediction System and the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s AP-42 emission factors formula, were combined together to evaluate wind-blown dust emissions from various construction units from a railway construction projec...

  1. Variability of Some soil physical and chemical properties along a transect under wind erosion processes in Segzi district, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ghiesari

    2016-10-01

    reduced significantly In eroded sites compared to reference site. Similarly, clay content was reduced in the eroded sites compared to depositional sites. But,the amount of gypsum and calcium carbonate equivalent increased in eroded sites. Bulk density significantly declined in eroded (23.95% and depositional (33.33% sites comparing to reference site. Silt and sand content significantly were increased and decreased in depositional sites respectively compared to reference site. High speed winds caused to translocate the fine and coarser particles to farther and closer distances from detachment locations. Therefore, soil texture was mainly affected by soil erosion and changed to coarser classes. Compare means between physical and chemical properties in the eroded and deposited sites and reference site showed that physical and chemical properties were affected by erosion and deposition processes significantly. Conclusion: Overall results indicated that Cs-137 is powerful technique for differentiation between erosional and depositional sites in the regions under wind erosion. Moreover, the this study confirmed that eroded and depositional sites wrer significantly affected by wind erosion process and soil attributes were changed compared to reference site. and proper management, especially in gypsum mines of Segzi district should be considered .

  2. Investigation of wind erosion process for estimation, prevention, and control of DSS in Yazd-Ardakan plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekhtesasi, M R; Sepehr, A

    2009-12-01

    Wind erosion is a phenomenon that is reasonably common in regions where dry winds blow. For the most part, these regions correspond to the dry lands; areas where the soil, generally, is dry and shifting and lacks vegetation for most of the year. The winds are sufficiently strong to lift and move sands and soil particles. The repeated removal of superficial layers by the action of winds can modify the texture of the topsoil, by removing the fine particles and leaving the larger particles. Dust and sandstorm (DSS) is the generic term for a serious environmental phenomenon that involves strong winds that blow a large quantity of dust and fine sand particles away from the ground and carry them over a long distance with significant environmental impacts along the way. In the realm of DSS in Iran country, the people who live in Yazd and Sistan-Baluchestan provinces form a single ecological community due to their geographic proximity and climatic contiguity. The major sources of DSS in the region are believed to be the desert and semidesert areas of the Yazd-Ardakan plain in Yazd province. Both Sistan and Baluchestan are the recipients of this dust. To address the long-range transboundary environmental problem of DSS, a regional cooperation mechanism must be established among the provinces in the region. Yazd-Ardakan plain, with area of about 650,000 ha, is located in the center of Iran, between Yazd and Ardakan cities. The mean annual rainfall is less than 65 mm. Rainfall distribution is a simple modal and more than 70% of it occurs in winter. Plant density varies from 0% to 25%, and Artemisia sieberi is the dominant plant species. The major part of Yazd-Ardakan plain is bare land. According to the recent investigation, more than 20,000-m(3) dust with less than 100-microm diameter falls down annually on Yazd city with an area of 7,000 ha. Horizontal visibility is reduced to less than 6 m in stormy days in some parts of Yazd-Ardakan plain. This phenomenon causes car

  3. A Wind Tunnel Investigation of the Shear Stress with A Blowing Sand Cloud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In a blowing sand system,the wind provides the driving forces for the particle movement while the moving particles exert the opposite forces to the wind by extracting its momentum.The wind-sand interaction that can be characterized by shear stress and force exerted on the wind by moving particles results in the modification of wind profiles.Detailed wind pro-files re-adapted to blown sand movement are measured in a wind tunnel for different grain size populations and at differ-ent free-stream wind velocities.The shear stress with a blowing sand cloud and force exerted on the wind by moving par-ticles are calculated from the measured wind velocity profiles.The results suggest that the wind profiles with presence of blowing sand cloud assume convex-upward curves on the u(z)-ln(z) plot compared with the straight lines characterizing the velocity profiles of clean wind,and they can be better fitted by power function than log-linear function.The exponent of the power function ranging from 0.1 to 0.17 tends to increase with an increase in wind velocity but decrease with an increase in particle size.The force per unit volume exerted on the wind by blown sand drift that is calculated based on the empirical power functions for the wind velocity profiles is found to decrease with height.The particle-induced force makes the total shear stress with blowing sand cloud partitioned into air-borne stress that results from the wind velocity gradient and grain-borne stress that results from the upward or downward movement of particles.The air-borne stress in-creases with an increase in height,while the grain-borne stress decreases with an increase in height.The air-borne shear stress at the top of sand cloud layer increases with both wind velocity and grain size,implying that it increases with sand transport rate for a given grain size.The shear stress with a blowing sand cloud is also closely related to the sand transport rate.Both the total shear stress and grain-borne stress on

  4. Soil tillage and windbreak effects on millet and cowpea: I. Wind speed, evaporation, and wind erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzhaf, J.; Leihner, D.E.; Buerkert, A. (Univ. of Hohenheim, Stuttgart (Germany)); Serafini, P.G. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville (United States))

    Deforestation, overgrazing, and declining soil regeneration periods have resulted in increased wind erosion problems in dry areas of the West African Sahel, but little is known about the bio-physical factors involved. This research was conducted to determine the effects of ridging and four different windbreak spacings on wind erosion, potential evaporation, and soil water reserves. A field trial was conducted from 1985 to 1987 on 12 ha of a Psammentic Paleustalf in Southern Niger. Millet, Pennisetum glaucum (L.), and cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp., were seeded in strips on flat and ridged soil. Windbreaks of savannah vegetation were spaced at 6, 20, 40, and 90 m. The effects of ridging on wind speed, evaporation, and wind erosion were small and mostly non-significant. However, average wind speed at 0.3 m above ground in the center of cowpea and millet strips was significantly reduced from 2.8 to 2.1 m s[sup [minus]1] as windbreak distances narrowed from 90 to 6 m. As a consequence, potential evaporation declined by 15% and the amount of windblown soil particles by 50% in ridged and by 70% in flat treatments. Despite reduced potential evaporation, average subsoil water reserves were 14 mm smaller in the 6- than in the 20-m windbreak spacing indicating excessive water extraction by the windbreak vegetation. Thus, establishing windbreaks with natural savannah vegetation may require a careful consideration of the agronomic benefits and costs to competing crops. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Soil Loss by Wind Erosion for Three Different Textured Soils Treated with Polyacrylamide and Crude Oil, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The study is conducted to estimate the resistance of three soils (EL-Hartha clay loam, Barjisiya sandy loam and the soil near the sand dunes in Sheikh sa'ad area sandy soil) to wind erosion, it is also aimed at getting full acquaintance of the relationship between the soil loss and the physical and chemical features of soil. In addition to the experiment of some soil stabilizers, polyacrylamide (PAM) concentration of 0.2 % and crude oil in concentration of 1 % in order to reduce or prevent wind erosion. The study shows that the amendment increased the dry soil aggregate >1 mm, mean weight diameter and soil moisture. It is clear that polyacrylamide had greater effect than that of crude oil, besides the great effectiveness of these amendments in decreasing bulk density and relations of soil loss.

  6. Processes of coastal bluff erosion in weakly lithified sands, Pacifica, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, B.D.; Sitar, N.

    2008-01-01

    Coastal bluff erosion and landsliding are currently the major geomorphic processes sculpting much of the marine terrace dominated coastline of northern California. In this study, we identify the spatial and temporal processes responsible for erosion and landsliding in an area of weakly lithified sand coastal bluffs located south of San Francisco, California. Using the results of a five year observational study consisting of site visits, terrestrial lidar scanning, and development of empirical failure indices, we identify the lithologic and process controls that determine the failure mechanism and mode for coastal bluff retreat in this region and present concise descriptions of each process. Bluffs composed of weakly cemented sands (unconfined compressive strength - UCS between 5 and 30??kPa) fail principally due to oversteepening by wave action with maximum slope inclinations on the order of 65 at incipient failure. Periods of significant wave action were identified on the basis of an empirical wave run-up equation, predicting failure when wave run-up exceeds the seasonal average value and the bluff toe elevation. The empirical relationship was verified through recorded observations of failures. Bluffs composed of moderately cemented sands (UCS up to 400??kPa) fail due to precipitation-induced groundwater seepage, which leads to tensile strength reduction and fracture. An empirical rainfall threshold was also developed to predict failure on the basis of a 48-hour cumulative precipitation index but was found to be dependent on a time delay in groundwater seepage in some cases.

  7. Soil coverage evolution and wind erosion risk on summer crops under contrasting tillage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Mariano J.; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2015-03-01

    The effectiveness of wind erosion control by soil surface conditions and crop and weed canopy has been well studied in wind tunnel experiments. The aim of this study is to assess the combined effects of these variables under field conditions. Soil surface conditions, crop and weed coverage, plant residue, and non-erodible aggregates (NEA) were measured in the field between the fallow start and the growth period of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and corn (Zea mays). Both crops were planted on a sandy-loam Entic Haplustoll with conventional-(CT), vertical-(VT) and no-till (NT) tillage systems. Wind erosion was estimated by means of the spreadsheet version the Revised Wind Erosion Equation and the soil coverage was measured each 15 days. Results indicated that wind erosion was mostly negligible in NT, exceeding the tolerable levels (estimated between 300 and 1400 kg ha-1 year-1 by Verheijen et al. (2009)) only in an year with high climatic erosivity. Wind erosion exceeded the tolerable levels in most cases in CT and VT, reaching values of 17,400 kg ha-1. Wind erosion was 2-10 times higher after planting of both crops than during fallows. During the fallows, the soil was mostly well covered with plant residues and NEA in CT and VT and with residues and weeds in NT. High wind erosion amounts occurring 30 days after planting in all tillage systems were produced by the destruction of coarse aggregates and the burying of plant residues during planting operations and rains. Differences in soil protection after planting were given by residues of previous crops and growing weeds. The growth of weeds 2-4 weeks after crop planting contributed to reduce wind erosion without impacting in crops yields. An accurate weeds management in semiarid lands can contribute significantly to control wind erosion. More field studies are needed in order to develop management strategies to reduce wind erosion.

  8. Soil wind erosion in ecological olive trees in the Tabernas desert (southeastern Spain): a wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Carlos; Lozano, Francisco Javier; Gallardo, Pedro; Giménez, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Wind erosion is a key component of the soil degradation processes. The purpose of this study is to find out the influence of material loss from wind on soil properties for different soil types and changes in soil properties in olive groves when they are tilled. The study area is located in the north of the Tabernas Desert, in the province of Almería, southeastern Spain. It is one of the driest areas in Europe, with a semiarid thermo-Mediterranean type of climate. We used a new wind tunnel model over three different soil types (olive-cropped Calcisol, Cambisol and Luvisol) and studied micro-plot losses and deposits detected by an integrated laser scanner. We also studied the image processing possibilities for examining the particles attached to collector plates located at the end of the tunnel to determine their characteristics and whether they were applicable to the setup. Samples collected in the traps at the end of the tunnel were analyzed. We paid special attention to the influence of organic carbon, carbonate and clay contents because of their special impact on soil crusting and the wind-erodible fraction. A principal components analysis (PCA) was carried out to find any relations on generated dust properties and the intensity and behavior of those relationships. Component 1 separated data with high N and OC contents from samples high in fine silt, CO3= and available K content. Component 2 separated data with high coarse silt and clay contents from data with high fine sand content. Component 3 was an indicator of available P2O5 content. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to analyze the effect of soil type and sampling height on different properties of trapped dust. Calculations based on tunnel data showed overestimation of erosion in soil types and calculation of the fraction of soil erodible by wind done by other authors for Spanish soils. As the highest loss was found in Cambisols, mainly due to the effect on soil crusting and the wind

  9. Sand petrology and focused erosion in collision orogens: the Brahmaputra case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Andò, Sergio; France-Lanord, Christian; Singh, Sunil K.; Foster, Gavin

    2004-03-01

    The high-relief and tectonically active Himalayan range, characterized by markedly varying climate but relatively homogeneous geology along strike, is a unique natural laboratory in which to investigate several of the factors controlling the composition of orogenic sediments. Coupling of surface and tectonic processes is most evident in the eastern Namche Barwa syntaxis, where the Tsangpo-Siang-Brahmaputra River, draining a large elevated area in south Tibet, plunges down the deepest gorge on Earth. Here composition of river sands changes drastically from lithic to quartzofeldspathic. After confluence with the Lohit River, draining the Transhimalayan-equivalent Mishmi arc batholiths, sediment composition remains remarkably constant across Assam, indicating subordinate contributions from Himalayan tributaries. Independent calculations based on petrographical, mineralogical, and geochemical data indicate that the syntaxis, representing only ∼4% of total basin area, contributes 35±6% to the total Brahmaputra sediment flux, and ∼20% of total detritus reaching the Bay of Bengal. Such huge anomalies in erosion patterns have major effects on composition of orogenic sediments, which are recorded as far as the Bengal Fan. In the Brahmaputra basin, in spite of very fast erosion and detrital evacuation, chemical weathering is not negligible. Sand-sized carbonate grains are dissolved partially in mountain reaches and completely in monsoon-drenched Assam plains, where clinopyroxenes are selectively altered. Plagioclase, instead, is preferentially weathered only in detritus from the Shillong Plateau, which is markedly enriched in microcline. Most difficult to assess is the effect of hydraulic sorting in Bangladesh, where quartz, garnet and epidote tend to be sequestered in the bedload and trapped on the coastal plain, whereas cleavable feldspars and amphiboles are concentrated in the suspended load and eventually deposited in the deep sea. High-resolution petrographic and

  10. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars: Wind, Dust Sand, and Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Mars: Wind, Dust Sand, and Debris" included: Mars Exploration Rovers: Laboratory Simulations of Aeolian Interactions; Thermal and Spectral Analysis of an Intracrater Dune Field in Amazonis Planitia; How High is that Dune? A Comparison of Methods Used to Constrain the Morphometry of Aeolian Bedforms on Mars; Dust Devils on Mars: Scaling of Dust Flux Based on Laboratory Simulations; A Close Encounter with a Terrestrial Dust Devil; Interpretation of Wind Direction from Eolian Features: Herschel Crater, Mars Erosion Rates at the Viking 2 Landing Site; Mars Dust: Characterization of Particle Size and Electrostatic Charge Distributions; Simple Non-fluvial Models of Planetary Surface Modification, with Application to Mars; Comparison of Geomorphically Determined Winds with a General Circulation Model: Herschel Crater, Mars; Analysis of Martian Debris Aprons in Eastern Hellas Using THEMIS; Origin of Martian Northern Hemisphere Mid-Latitude Lobate Debris Aprons; Debris Aprons in the Tempe/Mareotis Region of Mars;and Constraining Flow Dynamics of Mass Movements on Earth and Mars.

  11. Evaluating the effectiveness of agricultural mulches for reducing post-wildfire wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-wildfire soil erosion can be caused by water or aeolian processes yet most erosion research has focused on predominantly water-driven erosion. This study investigates the effectiveness of three agricultural mulches, with and without a tackifier, on aeolian sediment transport processes. A wind t...

  12. Wind erosion in semiarid landscapes: Predictive models and remote sensing methods for the influence of vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, H. Brad

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: to develop and test predictive relations for the quantitative influence of vegetation canopy structure on wind erosion of semiarid rangeland soils, and to develop remote sensing methods for measuring the canopy structural parameters that determine sheltering against wind erosion. The influence of canopy structure on wind erosion will be investigated by means of wind-tunnel and field experiments using structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments using model roughness elements to simulate plant canopies. The canopy structural variables identified by the wind-tunnel and field experiments as important in determining vegetative sheltering against wind erosion will then be measured at a number of naturally vegetated field sites and compared with estimates of these variables derived from analysis of remotely sensed data.

  13. Soil conservation policy measures to control wind erosion in northwestern Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Brouwer, F.M.; Graaff, de J.

    2003-01-01

    Wind erosion is not as significant or a widespread problem in Europe as in dryer parts of the world, but it can cause major damage in small areas. The hazard is greatest in the lowlands of northwestern Europe with more than 3 million ha at high-potential wind erosion risk. Crop damage and off-site d

  14. Effect of vegetation cover and transitions on regional wind erosion in drylands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, I.F.

    2012-01-01

    Wind erosion is a critical environmental problem that threatens mainly the arid and semi-arid regions of our planet. Usually this problem is associated with desertification, poverty and other environmental and socioeconomic problems. Wind erosion causes the loss of fertile topsoil, and has a

  15. Wind erosion in a semiarid agricultural area of Spain: the WELSONS project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, L.; Arrue, J.L.; Lopez, M.V.; Sterk, G.; Richard, D.; Gracia, R.; Sabre, M.; Gaudichet, A.; Frangi, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    The co-ordinated European research project Wind Erosion and Loss of SOil Nutrients in semiarid Spain (WELSONS) was carried out from 1996 to 1999 to understand and predict the potential impacts of land-use change and management on soil degradation by wind erosion on agricultural land in Central Arago

  16. Using state-and-transition models to evaluate impacts of land cover change on wind erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion of rangeland soils is a global problem exacerbated by land cover change. Despite efforts to quantify the impacts of land cover change on wind erosion, assessment uncertainty remains large. We address this uncertainty by evaluating the application of ecological sites and state-and-transi...

  17. Effect of vegetation cover and transitions on regional wind erosion in drylands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, I.F.

    2012-01-01

    Wind erosion is a critical environmental problem that threatens mainly the arid and semi-arid regions of our planet. Usually this problem is associated with desertification, poverty and other environmental and socioeconomic problems. Wind erosion causes the loss of fertile topsoil, and has a negativ

  18. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  19. Ecological site-based assessments of wind and water erosion: informing accelerated soil erosion management in rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Duniway, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated soil erosion occurs when anthropogenic processes modify soil, vegetation or climatic conditions causing erosion rates at a location to exceed their natural variability. Identifying where and when accelerated erosion occurs is a critical first step toward its effective management. Here we explore how erosion assessments structured in the context of ecological sites (a land classification based on soils, landscape setting and ecological potential) and their vegetation states (plant assemblages that may change due to management) can inform systems for reducing accelerated soil erosion in rangelands. We evaluated aeolian horizontal sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion rates for five ecological sites in southern New Mexico, USA, using monitoring data and rangeland-specific wind and water erosion models. Across the ecological sites, plots in shrub-encroached and shrub-dominated vegetation states were consistently susceptible to aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion. Both processes were found to be highly variable for grassland and grass-succulent states across the ecological sites at the plot scale (0.25 Ha). We identify vegetation thresholds that define cover levels below which rapid (exponential) increases in aeolian sediment flux and fluvial sediment erosion occur across the ecological sites and vegetation states. Aeolian sediment flux and fluvial erosion in the study area can be effectively controlled when bare ground cover is 100 cm in length is less than ~35%. Land use and management activities that alter cover levels such that they cross thresholds, and/or drive vegetation state changes, may increase the susceptibility of areas to erosion. Land use impacts that are constrained within the range of natural variability should not result in accelerated soil erosion. Evaluating land condition against the erosion thresholds identified here will enable identification of areas susceptible to accelerated soil erosion and the development of

  20. The wind-water two-phase erosion and sediment-producing processes in the middle Yellow River basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on data from the middle Yellow River basin,a wind-water two-phase mechanism for erosion and sediment-producing processes has been found.By using this mechanism,the extremely strong erosion and sediment yield in the study area can be better explained.The operation of wind and water forces is different in different seasons within a year.During winter and spring,strong wind blows large quantities of eolian sand to gullies and river channels,which are temporally stored there.During the next summer,rainstorms cause runoff that contains much fine loessic material and acts as a powerful force to carry the previously prepared coarse material.As a result,hyperconcentrated flows occur,resulting in high-intensity erosion and sediment yield.

  1. Experimental Measurement and CFD Model Development of Thick Wind Turbine Airfoils with Leading Edge Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniaci, David C.; White, Edward B.; Wilcox, Benjamin; Langel, Christopher M.; van Dam, C. P.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2016-09-01

    Leading edge erosion and roughness accumulation is an issue observed with great variability by wind plant operators, but with little understanding of the effect on wind turbine performance. In wind tunnels, airfoil models are typically tested with standard grit roughness and trip tape to simulate the effects of roughness and erosion observed in field operation, but there is a lack of established relation between field measurements and wind tunnel test conditions. A research collaboration between lab, academic, and industry partners has sought to establish a method to estimate the effect of erosion in wind turbine blades that correlates to roughness and erosion measured in the field. Measurements of roughness and erosion were taken off of operational utility wind turbine blades using a profilometer. The field measurements were statistically reproduced in the wind tunnel on representative tip and midspan airfoils. Simultaneously, a computational model was developed and calibrated to capture the effect of roughness and erosion on airfoil transition and performance characteristics. The results indicate that the effects of field roughness fall between clean airfoil performance and the effects of transition tape. Severe leading edge erosion can cause detrimental performance effects beyond standard roughness. The results also indicate that a heavily eroded wind turbine blade can reduce annual energy production by over 5% for a utility scale wind turbine.

  2. Parrotfish erosion underpins reef growth, sand talus development and island building in the Maldives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kyle M.; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-07-01

    Parrotfish play a key functional role on coral reefs as external bioerosion agents and produce large quantities of carbonate sediment as a by-product of grazing on reef surfaces. Parrotfish are therefore an important potential source of sediment for island construction and maintenance within atoll reef environments, particularly under future scenarios of sea level rise and island morphological change. Here, we present the first field-based estimates of excavating parrotfish erosion (Chlorurus sordidus and Chlorurus strongylocephalus) within the Indian Ocean and quantify the contribution of parrotfish to the carbonate and sediment budgets of an atoll interior reef platform in the Maldives. We note that parrotfish erosion rates are high (6.3 kg m- 2 y- 1), generating large amounts of new coral-based sediment (2.6 kg m- 2 y- 1) that has a comparable grain size distribution to island deposits. Mean erosion rates by individual C. strongylocephalus (405 kg individual y- 1) were higher than C. sordidus (55 kg individual y- 1), but their contribution to erosion per unit area of reef was less due to a lower relative biomass (C. strongylocephalus: 1.3 kg m- 2 y- 1; C. sordidus: 5.0 kg m- 2 y- 1). Parrotfish also facilitate sediment export from reefs (0.7 kg m- 2 y- 1), which contributes extensively to the development of the sand talus on the fore-reef slope and to the evolution of the wider atoll basin. Our results provide strong evidence that parrotfish erosion (and sediment generation) underpins island morphology on Maldivian reefs and highlight the importance of larger parrotfish as producers of island-grade sediment. Ecological processes must therefore be considered within future coastal management strategies for enhancing island stability.

  3. Determination of Soil Endangerment by Wind Erosion with Consideration of Legislative Changes in Acceptable Soil Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Streďanský Jozef

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Value tightening of acceptable soil loss by wind erosion in amendment to the Act No. 220/2004 on Protection and Use of Agricultural Land in the Slovak Republic from 1st of April 2013 is necessary to reconsider wind erosion intensity in agricultural territories. The paper presents results of wind erosion intensity calculation by using Wind Erosion Equation (WEQ that is recommended by Act No. 220/2004. As observed we choose cadastral area Moèenok territory and had determined and compared changes in levels of soil endangerment of arable land by wind and spatial delamination of wind erosion in specific territory of Moèenok. According to WEQ calculation, we determined that soil loss from 3778.85 ha arable land is 1220.52 ha, which is highly endangerment by wind erosion. By defining levels of soil erosion endangerment (LSEE, we found out that area in 3rd class of endangerment rose from 1.48% to 43.37% after changing acceptable soil from 40 to 15 t ha-1 year-1. Results enable us to specify priority areas where to implement erosion control measures in according to sustainable use and protection of arable land in model area.

  4. The effect of wind and precipitation on vegetation and biogenic crust covers in the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Raz; Kinast, Shai; Tsoar, Haim; Yizhaq, Hezi; Zaady, Eli; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2014-03-01

    Vegetation and biogenic crust covers play an important role in sand dune stabilization, yet there is a lack of high temporal and spatial resolution data on sand dune cover. A field experiment, aimed at measuring the dynamics of biogenic crust and vegetation in sand dunes, was conducted at the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes in the northwestern Negev Desert, Israel, from July 2008 to August 2010. The climate of the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes is arid (the mean annual precipitation over the past 13 years is 61 mm), and the dunes are linear and partially stable, mainly due to the presence of biogenic crust and partially due to the presence of vegetation. In July 2008, 10×10 m plots on the four dune habitats (crest, interdune, north slope, and south slope) were treated as follows: (i) removal of vegetation and biogenic crust, (ii) removal of biogenic crust only, (iii) removal of vegetation only, (iv) partial removal of biogenic crust and vegetation, and (v) control plot. The surface coverage of sand, biogenic crust, and vegetation was monitored on a monthly basis, using a remote-sensing technique especially developed for the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes. It was found that strong wind events, with durations of several days, accounted for the coverage changes in biogenic crust and vegetation. The response to precipitation was much slower. In addition, no rehabilitation of biogenic crust and vegetation was observed within the experiment time period. The changes in biogenic crust cover were not necessarily related to changes in dune dynamics, since often an increase in biogenic crust cover is a result of wind erosion that exposes old crust that was buried under the sand; wind hardly erodes biogenic crust at all due to its high durability to wind action. The Sde-Hallamish dunes seem to have become more active as a result of a prolonged drought during the past several years. The field experiment reported here indicates that biogenic crust cover exhibits large seasonal variations that are

  5. Measuring splash erosion potential under vegetation using sand-filled splash cups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, C.; Scholten, T.; Kühn, P.

    2009-04-01

    In soil erosion research it is widely accepted that vegetation is not only protecting the soil from the erosive power of rainfall. Under specific circumstances (like they occur e.g. in forests) vegetation can enhance the erosive power of rainfall by modifying its properties (esp. drop size distribution, kinetic energy). The adjacent processes are very complex and variable in time and space and depend on numerous variables (e.g. rainfall intensity, drop size distribution, drop fall velocity, height of the canopy, density of the canopy, crown and leaf traits, LAI). In the last decades a large number of studies focused this process-system using different methods and came to often different results (Brandt 1989; Calder 2001; Foot & Morgan 2005; Hall & Calder 1993; Mosley 1982; Nanko et al. 2006; Park & Cameron 2008; Vis 1986). The main objective of our field experiments in subtropical China is to quantify the modification of precipitation by its pass through the canopy layer for six different tree species, three different successional stages and three different biodiversity classes. For this, new splash cups were developed based on the archetype of Ellison (1947). In contrast to previous studies with splash cups (Vis 1986) or other forms of splash cups (Kinnell 1974; Morgan 1981) we measured the unit sand remaining inside the cup after single natural rainfall events. The new splash cups contain of a PE-flask to which a carrier system has been attached. In this carrier system a cup filled with unit sand of 125-200 µm particle size is inserted. At the bottom of the cup a silk cover is attached to avoid the loss of sand and to guarantee free drainage of water from the cup to the carrier and vice versa. Cup and PE-flask are hydraulically connected by a cotton wick to assure constant moisture content throughout the time of measuring. Additionally, vents in the carrier system ensure that the pressure arising from the insertion of the cup doesn't lead to a loss of sand. The

  6. Regional modeling of wind erosion in the North West and South West of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmousavi, S. H.

    2016-08-01

    About two-thirds of the Iran's area is located in the arid and semiarid region. Lack of soil moisture and vegetation is poor in most areas can lead to soil erosion caused by wind. So that the annual suffered severe damage to large areas of rich soils. Modeling studies of wind erosion in Iran is very low and incomplete. Therefore, this study aimed to wind erosion modeling, taking into three factors: wind speed, vegetation and soil types have been done. Wind erosion sensitivity was modeled using the key factors of soil sensitivity, vegetation cover and wind erodibility as proxies. These factors were first estimated separately by factor sensitivity maps and later combined by fuzzy logic into a regional-scale wind erosion sensitivity map. Large areas were evaluated by using publicly available datasets of remotely sensed vegetation information, soil maps and meteorological data on wind speed. The resulting estimates were verified by field studies and examining the economic losses from wind erosion as compensated by the state insurance company. The spatial resolution of the resulting sensitivity map is suitable for regional applications, as identifying sensitive areas is the foundation for diverse land development control measures and implementing management activities.

  7. A laboratory test of the elec-trification phenomenon in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The measured data in the wind-tunnel tests show that the wind-blown sand particles acquired a negative charge when their diameters are smaller than 250 mm and positive charge when their diameters are larger than 500 mm, which confirms Latham's assumption that the large particles in wind-blown sand flux acquired positive charge while nega-tive charge developed on small ones. In the meanwhile, the measured data also show that the average charge-to-mass ratio for wind-blown sand particles decreases with the in-crease of the particle diameter and the wind velocity, and increases with the rise of height. The electric field in wind-blown sand flux is mainly formed by the moving charged sand particles. Its direction is vertical to the Earth's surface and upward, which is opposite to that of the fair-weather field. The electric field increases with wind velocity and height increasing. These experimental results will lay the foundation for developing the theoretical analysis of the electrification phenomenon in wind-blown sand flux.

  8. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Klopfer, D.C.

    1990-08-01

    Protective barriers have been identified as integral components of plans to isolate defense waste on the Hanford Site. The use of natural materials to construct protective barriers over waste site is being considered. Design requirements for protective barriers include preventing exposure of buried waste, and restricting penetration or percolation of surface waters through the waste zone. Studies were initiated to evaluate the effects of wind erosion on candidate protective barrier surfaces. A wind tunnel was used to provide controlled erosive stresses and to investigate the erosive effects of wind forces on proposed surface layers for protective barriers. Mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared and tested for resistance to wind erosion at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Aerosol Wind Tunnel Research Facility. These tests were performed to investigate surface deflation caused by suspension of soil from various surface layer configurations and to provide a comparison of the relative resistance of the different surfaces to wind erosion. Planning, testing, and analyzing phases of this wind erosion project were coordinated with other tasks supporting the development of protective barriers. These tasks include climate-change predictions, field studies and modeling efforts. This report provides results of measurements of deflation caused by wind forces over level surfaces. Section 2.0 reviews surface layer characteristics and previous relevant studies on wind erosion, describes effects of erosion, and discusses wind tunnel modeling. Materials and methods of the wind tunnel tests are discussed in Section 3.0. Results and discussion are presented in Section 4.0, and conclusions and recommendations Section 5.0. 53 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. A continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap: Wind tunnel and field evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, XingHua; Huo, Wen; Ali, Mamtimin; Zheng, XinQian; Zhou, ChengLong; He, Qing

    2017-09-01

    A new continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap (CWHF) has been designed. Its sampling efficiency is evaluated in a wind tunnel and the potential of the new trap has been demonstrated in field trials. The newly designed sand trap allows fully automated and high frequency measurement of sediment fluxes over extensive periods. We show that it can capture the variations and structures of wind-driven sand transport processes and horizontal sediment flux, and reveal the relationships between sand transport and meteorological parameters. Its maximum sampling frequency can reach 10 Hz. Wind tunnel tests indicated that the sampling efficiency of the CWHF sand trap varies between 39.2 to 64.3%, with an average of 52.5%. It achieved a maximum sampling efficiency of 64.3% at a wind speed of 10 m s- 1. This is largely achieved by the inclusion of a vent hole which leads to a higher sampling efficiency than that of a step-like sand trap at high wind speeds. In field experiments, we show a good agreement between the mass of sediment from the CWHF sand trap, the wind speed at 2 m and the number of saltating particles at 5 cm above the ground surface. According to analysis of the horizontal sediment flux at four heights from the CWHF sand trap (25, 35, 50, and 100 cm), the vertical distribution of the horizontal sediment flux up to a height of 100 cm above the sand surface follows an exponential function. Our field experiments show that the new instrument can capture more detailed information on sediment transport with much reduced labor requirement. Therefore, it has great potential for application in wind-blown sand monitoring and process studies.

  10. Raindrop and flow interactions for interrill erosion with wind-driven rain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erpul, G.; Gabriels, D.; Darell Norton, L.; Dennis, C.; Huang, C.H.; Visser, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Wind-driven rain (WDR) experiments were conducted to evaluate the interrill component of the Water Erosion Prediction Project model with a two-dimensional experimental set-up in a wind tunnel. Synchronized wind and rain simulations were applied to soil surfaces on windward and leeward slopes of 7, 1

  11. Wind as the primary driver of erosion in the Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, Alexander; Heermance, Richard; Kapp, Paul; Cai, Fulong

    2013-07-01

    Deserts are a major source of loess and may undergo substantial wind-erosion as evidenced by yardang fields, deflation pans, and wind-scoured bedrock landscapes. However, there are few quantitative estimates of bedrock removal by wind abrasion and deflation. Here, we report wind-erosion rates in the western Qaidam Basin in central China based on measurements of cosmogenic 10Be in exhumed Miocene sedimentary bedrock. Sedimentary bedrock erosion rates range from 0.05 to 0.4 mm/yr, although the majority of measurements cluster at 0.125±0.05 mm/yr. These results, combined with previous work, indicate that strong winds, hyper-aridity, exposure of friable Neogene strata, and ongoing rock deformation and uplift in the western Qaidam Basin have created an environment where wind, instead of water, is the dominant agent of erosion and sediment transport. Its geographic location (upwind) combined with volumetric estimates suggest that the Qaidam Basin is a major source (up to 50%) of dust to the Chinese Loess Plateau to the east. The cosmogenically derived wind erosion rates are within the range of erosion rates determined from glacial and fluvial dominated landscapes worldwide, exemplifying the effectiveness of wind to erode and transport significant quantities of bedrock.

  12. Changes in wind erosion over a 25-year restoration chronosequence on the south edge of the Tengger Desert, China: implications for preventing desertification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quanlin; Fehmi, Jeffrey S; Zhang, Dekui; Fan, Baoli; Chen, Fang

    2017-08-23

    Wind erosion is a primary cause of desertification as well as being a serious ecological problem in arid and semi-arid areas across the world. To determine mechanisms for restoring desertified lands, an unrestored shifting sand dune and three formerly shifting sand dunes (desertified lands) that had been enclosed and afforested for 5, 15, and 25 years were selected for evaluation on the south edge of the Tengger Desert, China. Based on sampling heights between 0.2 and 3 m, the critical threshold average wind speed was 6.5 m s(-1) at 2 m where the sand transport rate was reduced from 285.9 kg m(-2) h(-1) on the unrestored dunes to 9.1 and 1.8 kg m(-2) h(-1) on the sites afforested and enclosed for 5 and 15 years, respectively. The percentage of wind eroded area was reduced from 99.9% on the unrestored dune to 94.5, 9.0, and 0.5% on the sites afforested and enclosed for 5, 15, and 25 years, respectively. Wind erosion was effectively reduced after 15 years. Although there were different driving factors for wind erosion mitigation on the different restoration stages, an increase in the vegetation cover, surface roughness, soil shear strength, soil clay content, organic matter, and reduction in the near-surface wind speed were the primary variables associated with the restoration chronosequence. We conclude that reducing the wind speed and developing a biological crust through vegetation restoration were the critical components for restoration of desertified land.

  13. Model based optimization of wind erosion control by tree shelterbelt for suitable land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartus, M.; Farsang, A.; Szatmári, J.; Barta, K.

    2012-04-01

    The degradation of soil by wind erosion causes huge problem in many parts of the world. The wind erodes the upper, nutrition rich part of the soil, therefore erosion causes soil productivity loss. The length of tree shelterbelts was significantly reduced by the collectivisation (1960-1989) and the wind erosion affected areas expanded in Hungary. The tree shelterbelt is more than just a tool of wind erosion control; by good planning it can increase the yield. The tree shelterbelt reduces the wind speed and changes the microclimate providing better condition to plant growth. The aim of our work is to estimate wind erosion risk and to find the way to reduce it by tree shelterbelts. A GIS based model was created to calculate the risk and the optimal windbreak position was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk to the minimum. The model is based on the DIN 19706 (Ermitlung der Erosiongefährdung von Böden durch Wind, Estimation of Wind Erosion Risk) German standard. The model uses five input data: structure and carbon content of soil, average yearly wind speed at 10 meters height, the cultivated plants and the height and position of windbreak. The study field (16km2) was chosen near Szeged (SE Hungary). In our investigation, the cultivated plant species and the position and height of windbreaks were modified. Different scenarios were made using the data of the land management in the last few years. The best case scenario (zero wind erosion) and the worst case scenario (with no tree shelter belt and the worst land use) were made to find the optimal windbreak position. Finally, the research proved that the tree shelterbelts can provide proper protection against wind erosion, but for optimal land management the cultivated plant types should also controlled. As a result of the research, a land management plan was defined to reduce the wind erosion risk on the study field, which contains the positions of new tree shelterbelts planting and the optimal cultivation.

  14. Enhancing wind erosion monitoring and assessment for U.S. rangelands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Van Zee, Justin W.; Karl, Jason W.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Courtright, Ericha M.; Billings, Benjamin J.; Boyd, Robert C.; Chappell, Adrian; Duniway, Michael C.; Derner, Justin D.; Hand, Jenny L.; Kachergis, Emily; McCord, Sarah E.; Newingham, Beth A.; Pierson, Frederick B.; Steiner, Jean L.; Tatarko, John; Tedela, Negussie H.; Toledo, David; Van Pelt, R. Scott

    2017-01-01

    On the GroundWind erosion is a major resource concern for rangeland managers because it can impact soil health, ecosystem structure and function, hydrologic processes, agricultural production, and air quality.Despite its significance, little is known about which landscapes are eroding, by how much, and when.The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 to develop tools for monitoring and assessing wind erosion and dust emissions across the United States.The Network, currently consisting of 13 sites, creates opportunities to enhance existing rangeland soil, vegetation, and air quality monitoring programs.Decision-support tools developed by the Network will improve the prediction and management of wind erosion across rangeland ecosystems.

  15. Wind Erosion of Layered Sediments on Mars, and the Role of Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, L. J.; Kite, E. S.; Michaels, T. I.

    2017-10-01

    Most sedimentary rocks on Mars exist as mounds in craters and canyons. To investigate the role of terrain in wind erosion, and the formation and evolution of these mounds, we combine mesoscale model output with a landscape evolution model.

  16. Petrology of Indus River sands: a key to interpret erosion history of the Western Himalayan Syntaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Andò, Sergio; Paparella, Paolo; Clift, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    The Indus River has been progressively transformed in the last decades into a tightly regulated system of dams and channels, to produce food and energy for the rapidly growing population of Pakistan. Nevertheless, Indus River sands as far as the delta largely retain their distinct feldspar- and amphibole-rich composition, which is unique with respect to all other major rivers draining the Alpine-Himalayan belt except for the Brahmaputra. Both the Indus and Brahmaputra Rivers flow for half of their course along the India-Asia suture zone, and receive major contributions from both Asian active-margin batholiths and upper-amphibolite-facies domes rapidly exhumed at the Western and Eastern Himalayan syntaxes. Composition of Indus sands changes repeatedly and markedly in Ladakh and Baltistan, indicating overwhelming sediment flux from each successive tributary as the syntaxis is approached. Provenance estimates based on our integrated petrographic-mineralogical data set indicate that active-margin units (Karakorum and Transhimalayan arcs) provide ˜81% of the 250±50 10 6 t of sediments reaching the Tarbela reservoir each year. Partitioning of such flux among tributaries and among source units allows us to tentatively assess sediment yields from major subcatchments. Extreme yields and erosion rates are calculated for both the Karakorum Belt (up to 12,500±4700 t/km 2 year and 4.5±1.7 mm/year for the Braldu catchment) and Nanga Parbat Massif (8100±3500 t/km 2 year and 3.0±1.3 mm/year). These values approach denudation rates currently estimated for South Karakorum and Nanga Parbat crustal-scale antiforms, and highlight the major influence that rapid tectonic uplift and focused glacial and fluvial erosion of young metamorphic massifs around the Western Himalayan Syntaxis have on sediment budgets of the Indus system. Detailed information on bulk petrography and heavy minerals of modern Indus sands not only represents an effective independent method to constrain

  17. Leading edge erosion of coated wind turbine blades: Review of coating life models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, H.M.; Gelinck, E.R.M.; Rentrop, C.; Heider, E. van der

    2015-01-01

    Erosion of the leading edge of wind turbine blades by droplet impingement wear, reduces blade aerodynamic efficiency and power output. Eventually, it compromises the integrity of blade surfaces. Elastomeric coatings are currently used for erosion resistance, yet the life of such coatings cannot be p

  18. Field-based observations confirm linear scaling of sand flux with wind stress

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L

    2016-01-01

    Wind-driven sand transport generates atmospheric dust, forms dunes, and sculpts landscapes. However, it remains unclear how the sand flux scales with wind speed, largely because models do not agree on how particle speed changes with wind shear velocity. Here, we present comprehensive measurements from three new field sites and three published studies, showing that characteristic saltation layer heights, and thus particle speeds, remain approximately constant with shear velocity. This result implies a linear dependence of saltation flux on wind shear stress, which contrasts with the nonlinear 3/2 scaling used in most aeolian process predictions. We confirm the linear flux law with direct measurements of the stress-flux relationship occurring at each site. Models for dust generation, dune migration, and other processes driven by wind-blown sand on Earth, Mars, and several other planetary surfaces should be modified to account for linear stress-flux scaling.

  19. Experimental measurement of wind and water erosion in Aragón and Andalusia, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Iserloh, Thomas; Marzen, Miriam; Ries, Johannes B.; Schmidt, Reinhard-G.

    2010-05-01

    For more than 50 years rainfall simulators and wind tunnels are important tools for soil erosion studies in the field. Laboratory investigations in wind tunnels with the ability of simultaneous rainfall production showed that wind significantly alters drop sizes, drop fall velocities and impact angles of falling raindrops. Leading to higher kinetic energies and increased soil detachment in comparison to falling drops with no wind influence. In most simulators this combined effect of wind and water is either not taken into account or deliberately excluded from the system, because of increasing complexity of processes involved. Within the project Ri 835/3-1, founded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, a portable combined wind an rainfall simulator for in-situ soil erosion studies was developed and used in Spain (Aragón, Andalusia), Morocco (Souss valley), and Germany (Eifel). The main objective of these field experiments was to quantify the susceptibility of different soil surface conditions and soil surface treatments to soil erosion by wind, water, and the combined effect of wind and water. Here, an overview of the results of the experimental measurements in Spain is given. The results show that wind erosion in Aragón is more or less negligible on undisturbed, crusted soil surfaces, but it can reach high amounts of up to 50 g m-² on rolled and grazed fields. Measurements in Andalusia show mean erosion rates of 24 g m-² on crusted soil surfaces. The expected increase of soil detachment, due to the combined force of wind and water in comparison to solely rainfall simulations, is apparent in most of the simulated runs. In total, the results proof that this combined wind and rainfall simulator is a valuable tool for soil erosion studies in the field and that it can be used to investigate various research questions.

  20. [Physiological response of corn seedlings to changes of wind-sand flow strength].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ha-lin; Li, Jin; Zhou, Rui-lian; Qu, Hao; Yun, Jian-ying; Pan, Cheng-chen

    2015-01-01

    Corn seedlings are often harmed by strong wind-sand in the spring in semi-arid wind-sand area of west of Northeast China. In order to understand physiological response mechanisms of the corn seedlings to wind-sand damage, the changes in MDA content, membrane permeability, protective enzymes activities and osmotic regulation substances at 0 (CK) , 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 m . s-1 wind speed (wind-sand flow strength: 0, 1.00, 28.30, 63.28, 111.82 and 172.93 g . cm-1 . min-1, respectively) for 10 min duration were studied during the spring, 2013 in the Horqin Sand Land of Inner Mongolia. The results showed that effects of wind-sand flow blowing on the RWC of the corn seedling were lighter in the 6-12 m . s-1 treatments, but the RWC decreased by 19.0% and 18.7% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively. The MDA content tended to decline with increasing the wind-sand flow strength, and decreased by 35.0% and 39.0% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively. The membrane permeability increased significantly with increasing the wind-sand flow strength, and increased by 191.3% and 187.8% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively. With the increase of wind-sand flow strength, SOD activities decreased and changes of CAT activities were not significant, only POD activities increased significantly, which played an important role in the process of scavenging reactive oxygen species and protecting cell membrane against damage. For lighter water stress caused, by wind-sand flow blowing, proline and soluble sugar did not play any role in osmotic adjustment, but the proline content increased by 11.4% and 24.5% in the 15 m . s-1 and 18 m . s-1 treatments compared to the CK, respectively, which played an important role in osmotic adjustment.

  1. Estimation of wind erosion from construction of a railway in arid Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benli Liu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A state-of-the-art wind erosion simulation model, the Wind Erosion Prediction System and the United States Environmental Protection Agency's AP 42 emission factors formula, were combined together to evaluate wind-blown dust emissions from various construction units from a railway construction project in the dry Gobi land in Northwest China. The influence of the climatic factors: temperature, precipitation, wind speed and direction, soil condition, protective measures, and construction disturbance were taken into account. Driven by daily and sub-daily climate data and using specific detailed management files, the process-based WEPS model was able to express the beginning, active, and ending phases of construction, as well as the degree of disturbance for the entire scope of a construction project. The Lanzhou-Xinjiang High-speed Railway was selected as a representative study because of the diversities of different climates, soil, and working schedule conditions that could be analyzed. Wind erosion from different working units included the building of roadbeds, bridges, plants, temporary houses, earth spoil and barrow pit areas, and vehicle transportation were calculated. The total wind erosion emissions, 7406 t, for the first construction area of section LXS-15 with a 14.877 km length was obtained for quantitative analysis. The method used is applicable for evaluating wind erosion from other complex surface disturbance projects.

  2. Soil erosion rates from mixed soil and gravel surfaces in a wind tunnel: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.

    1988-12-01

    Tests of wind erosion were performed in a controlled-environment wind tunnel to support the development of natural-material protective barriers for long-term isolation of radioactive waste. Barrier performance standards currently being developed for internal and external barrier performance are expected to mandate a surface layer that is resistant to wind erosion. The purpose of this study was to initiate a series of tests to determine suitable soil and gravel mixtures for such a barrier and to test worst-case surface layer conditions under the influence of high wind speeds. Six mixed soil and gravel surfaces were prepared, weathered to represent natural wind-blown desert areas, and subjected to controlled wind erosion forces in a wind tunnel. The applied erosive forces, including surface shear forces, were characterized to provide a means of relating wind tunnel results with actual field conditions. Soil particle losses from the surfaces caused by suspension, saltation, and surface creep were monitored by aerosol sample probes and mass balance measurements. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Interactive effects of moss-dominated crusts and Artemisia ordosica on wind erosion and soil moisture in Mu Us sandland, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongsheng; Bu, Chongfeng; Mu, Xingmin; Shao, Hongbo; Zhang, Kankan

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the effects of biological soil crusts (BSCs) on soil moisture and wind erosion and study the necessity and feasibility of disturbance of BSCs in the Mu Us sandland, the effects of four treatments, including moss-dominated crusts alone, Artemisia ordosica alone, bare sand, and Artemisia ordosica combined with moss-dominated crusts, on rainwater infiltration, soil moisture, and annual wind erosion were observed. The major results are as follows. (1) The development of moss-dominated crusts exacerbated soil moisture consumption and had negative effects on soil moisture in the Mu Us sandland. (2) Moss-dominated crusts significantly increased soil resistance to wind erosion, and when combined with Artemisia ordosica, this effect became more significant. The contribution of moss-dominated crusts under Artemisia ordosica was significantly lower than that of moss-dominated crusts alone in sites where vegetative coverage > 50%. (3) Finally, an appropriate disturbance of moss-dominated crusts in the rainy season in sites with high vegetative coverage improved soil water environment and vegetation succession, but disturbance in sites with little or no vegetative cover should be prohibited to avoid the exacerbation of wind erosion.

  4. Wind and water erosion on abandoned land in High Andalusia - First results of a portable combined wind and rainfall simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserloh, T.; Fister, W.; Marzen, M.; Ries, J. B.; Schmidt, R.-G.

    2009-04-01

    On abandoned land in semi-arid environments wind and water erosion are the main driving factors causing soil degradation. Recent research has proven the existence of very complex interactions between both processes. For in situ assessment of these interactions on soil erosion rates a portable combined wind and rainfall simulator was constructed and used in a field study in Andalusia. The main objective is to get first results for comparison of erosion rates with and without the influence of wind on plot scale on abandoned land in a semi-arid environment. The simulator is 4 m long, 0.7 m high, 0.7 m wide and rectangular in shape. A bounded plot of 2.2 m² can be irrigated by four downward spraying pressure nozzles (Lechler 460.608) in the roof of the tunnel producing a rainfall intensity of about 90 mm h-1. Approximate wind speed is 8 m s-1 free stream. For sediment collection a gutter system has been combined with two wedge-shaped sediment traps and a beam with four Modified Wilson & Cook Samplers. Runoff was collected with 0.5 l plastic bottles. Test duration is 30 min with measurement intervals of 2.5 min for surface runoff. The test runs were carried out with three variations in the following order on each plot: (1) single wind test run, (2) single rainfall test run and (3) simultaneous wind and rainfall test run. Runoff results show no distinctive differences between test runs without (2) and in combination with wind (3). The sediment loss seems to be higher with wind (3). This might indicate the influence of wind on the kinetic energy and impact angle of raindrops and consequently on the detachment and provision of soil particles. It could be argued that in addition to conventional rainfall simulations the inclusion of wind could assist a better understanding of soil erosion processes in the future.

  5. Aerolian erosion, transport, and deposition of volcaniclastic sands among the shifting sand dunes, Christmas Lake Valley, Oregon: TIMS image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ramsey, Michael S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing is a tool that, in the context of aeolian studies, offers a synoptic view of a dune field, sand sea, or entire desert region. Blount et al. (1990) presented one of the first studies demonstrating the power of multispectral images for interpreting the dynamic history of an aeolian sand sea. Blount's work on the Gran Desierto of Mexico used a Landsat TM scene and a linear spectral mixing model to show where different sand populations occur and along what paths these sands may have traveled before becoming incorporated into dunes. Interpretation of sand transport paths and sources in the Gran Desierto led to an improved understanding of the origin and Holocene history of the dunes. With the anticipated advent of the EOS-A platform and ASTER thermal infrared capability in 1998, it will become possible to look at continental sand seas and map sand transport paths using 8-12 mu m bands that are well-suited to tracking silicate sediments. A logical extension of Blount's work is to attempt a similar study using thermal infrared images. One such study has already begun by looking at feldspar, quartz, magnetite, and clay distributions in the Kelso Dunes of southern California. This paper describes the geology and application of TIMS image analysis of a less-well known Holocene dune field in south central Oregon using TIMS data obtained in 1991.

  6. Analytical calculation of the minimum wind speed required to sustain wind-blown sand on Earth and Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F

    2010-01-01

    The wind-driven hopping motion of sand grains, known as saltation, forms dunes and ripples and ejects fine dust particles into the atmosphere on both Earth and Mars. While the wind speed at which saltation is initiated, the fluid threshold, has been studied extensively, the wind speed at which it is halted, the impact threshold, has been poorly quantified for Mars conditions. We present an analytical model of the impact threshold, which we show to be in agreement with measurements and recent numerical simulations for Earth conditions. For Mars conditions, we find that the impact threshold is approximately an order of magnitude below the fluid threshold, in agreement with previous studies. Saltation on Mars can thus be sustained at wind speeds an order of magnitude less than required to initiate it, leading to the occurrence of hysteresis. These results confirm earlier simulations with a detailed numerical saltation model, and have important implications for the formation of sand dunes, ripples, and dust storm...

  7. The Dust Storm Index (DSI): A method for monitoring broadscale wind erosion using meteorological records

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loingsigh, T.; McTainsh, G. H.; Tews, E. K.; Strong, C. L.; Leys, J. F.; Shinkfield, P.; Tapper, N. J.

    2014-03-01

    Wind erosion of soils is a natural process that has shaped the semi-arid and arid landscapes for millennia. This paper describes the Dust Storm Index (DSI); a methodology for monitoring wind erosion using Australian Bureau of Meteorology (ABM) meteorological observational data since the mid-1960s (long-term), at continental scale. While the 46 year length of the DSI record is its greatest strength from a wind erosion monitoring perspective, there are a number of technical challenges to its use because when the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) recording protocols were established the use of the data for wind erosion monitoring was never intended. Data recording and storage protocols are examined, including the effects of changes to the definition of how observers should interpret and record dust events. A method is described for selecting the 180 long-term ABM stations used in this study and the limitations of variable observation frequencies between stations are in part resolved. The rationale behind the DSI equation is explained and the examples of temporal and spatial data visualisation products presented include; a long term national wind erosion record (1965-2011), continental DSI maps, and maps of the erosion event types that are factored into the DSI equation. The DSI is tested against dust concentration data and found to provide an accurate representation of wind erosion activity. As the ABM observational records used here were collected according to WMO protocols, the DSI methodology could be used in all countries with WMO-compatible meteorological observation and recording systems.

  8. Effect of Annealing Treatment on Erosion-Corrosion of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass in Saline-Sand Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiulin; Shan, Yiping; Chen, Yueyue; Wang, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Bulk metallic glass (BMG) may be a good candidate to solve the erosion-corrosion (E-C) problems of marine pumps in sand-containing seawater. Since annealing treatment is an effective way to improve plasticity of BMGs, the effect of annealing treatment on E-C wear of Zr-based BMG in saline-sand slurry was investigated. All of the annealed BMG samples were crystallized and the quantity of (Zr, Cu) phase increased but that of Al4Cu9 phase decreased with the increase of annealing temperature from 360 to 480 °C. Accordingly, annealing treatment enhances plasticity of the as-cast BMG at the cost of hardness and corrosion resistance. Moreover, 480 °C annealed BMG sample possesses the highest hardness and the lowest corrosion current density in all of the annealed BMG samples. Using a slurry pot erosion tester, the E-C wear of the as-cast and annealed BMG samples was studied under different impingement angles, impact velocities, and concentrations in saline-sand slurry. With the improvement of plasticity, 480 °C annealed BMG sample exhibits the best E-C wear resistance under high impingement angle, high impact velocity, and high sand concentration.

  9. Effects of stubble and mulching on soil erosion by wind in semi-arid China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peifei; Yin, Guanghua; Gu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Soil erosion is a growing challenge for agricultural production in Northern China. To explore the effect of variation in stubble height and mulching biomass on soil erosion caused by wind, we conducted a field experiment using a quadratic rotation combination design. Results showed that the quantity of straw mulch was the dominant factor affecting soil erosion, and stubble height was of secondary importance. The soil water content in stubble and straw mulching treatments was higher than in a control treatment at 0–20 cm soil, and the tendency in the amount of soil water content was opposite to the amount of wind erosion (r = ‑0.882, n = 10, p corn yield to 11900 kg·ha‑1. We determined that those were the most appropriate levels of stubble height and straw mulch for crop fields in the semi-arid regions of Northern China.

  10. Wind reduction patterns around isolated biomass for wind erosion control in a desertified area of Central Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasr Al-amin, N.K.; Stigter, C.J.; El-Tayeb Mohammed, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sparse vegetation, feature common in arid zone, to reduce wind force (velocity) and hence protect the surface and regions downwind from drifting sand and their consequences. Respectively 4 (with heights h of 4, 3.2, 2 and 1.66 m), 2 (with h of

  11. Damage by wind-blown sand and its control along Qinghai-Tibet Railway in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke-cun; Qu, Jian-jun; Liao, Kong-tai; Niu, Qing-he; Han, Qing-jie

    2010-01-01

    Qinghai-Tibet Railway, with an average altitude of 4500 m above sea level, is the longest railway in a high altitude region. It passes through 550 km-long permafrost belt and crosses the Kunlun and Tanggulha Mountain on Tibetan Plateau. Since it opened in 2006, damage by wind-blown sand began to and rapidly spread along the railway. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the climatic conditions, the damage by wind-blown sand and its control along Qinghai-Tibet Railway.

  12. Soil erosion rates by wind-driven rain from a sandy soil in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, W.; Kuhn, N. J.; Itin, N.; Tesch, S.; Heckrath, G.; Ries, J. B.

    2012-04-01

    Soil erosion by wind and water is able to cause severe soil loss from agricultural fields. Laboratory studies in recent years have shown that wind most probably has an increasing effect on soil erosion rates by water. However, field studies have so far not been able to quantify and proof this assumption explicitly. Especially the differentiation between the influence of windless and wind-driven erosion seems to be the major issue. The objectives of this study were, therefore, to explicitly investigate the importance of wind-driven rain in relation to erosion rates without the effect of wind by applying a newly developed Portable Wind and Rainfall Simulator (PWRS) that is able to simulate the processes both separately and simultaneously. The PWRS was used on bare sandy soil near Viborg, Denmark. Prior to simulation the soil was ploughed and after consolidation harrowed to create surface structures and roughness representing typical conditions after seed bed preparation. To facilitate the separation of specific influences by wind-driven rain and to avoid systematic errors a defined order of four consecutive test runs was established: 0) single wind test run for 10 min, 1) single rainfall test run on dry soil, 2) single rainfall test run on moist soil, 3) simultaneous wind and rainfall test run (wind-driven rainfall). Each rainfall simulation lasted for 30 minutes with a 30 min break in between to allow for initial drainage of the soil and for remounting sediment catchers. By utilizing a gutter in combination with wedge-shaped sediment traps it was possible to separate between splash and runoff erosion from the 2.2 m2 plot. The results show a wide range of soil detachment raging from zero up to more than 500 g m-2 in 30 minutes. Five out of nine test sequences support the theory that wind-driven rain causes more erosion than windless rain. The relation between the two processes is therefore not as clear as expected and seems to be dominated by the natural variability

  13. Distribution characteristics of 137Cs in wind-eroded soil profile and its use in estimating wind erosion modulus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yunfeng; LIU Jiyuan; ZHUANG Dafang; CAO Hongxia; YAN Huimin; YANG Fengting

    2005-01-01

    Due to its inert reaction in soil system and distinctive vertical distribution in soil profile, caesium-137 (137Cs) has been used as a tracer to assess wind erosion. In this study, 62 soil samples were collected from 4 sampling sites in Taipusi County, Inner Mongolia; Caesium-137 activities for those soil samples were measured using a gamma-ray spectrometry in Sichuan University, Chengdu. Distribution pattern of 137Cs in vertical soil profile was different for different land use and land cover types. Caesium-137 was distributed homogeneously in plow layer of cropland, and negatively exponential in low to medium cover grassland. Distribution pattern in high covered grassland was represented by a peak at 2-4 cm soil depth followed by a negative exponential curve. Based on those findings, simplified mass balance model was chosen to estimate the rate of wind erosion for cropland, while profile distribution model was used for grassland. Estimated wind erosion rates were 7990, 4270 and dium cover grassland, respectively. Wind erosion intensity correlated negatively with plant cover.

  14. Use of the mass exchange theory for describing soil erosion by water and wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendugov, V. M.; Glazunov, G. P.; Larionov, G. A.; Nazarov, N. F.

    2012-02-01

    It was shown that the soil loss equation for different types of erosion should and can be theoretically derived in a general form. An analogy was drawn between the detachment of soil particles by water or air flows, on the one hand, and the heat and mass exchange in the boundary layer on a plate flowed around by a flow, on the other hand, which allowed finding the thermodynamic parameters of the circumfluent flow analogous to the mechanical parameters of a flow eroding the soil. On this basis, the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for equilibrium sublimation was transformed into an equation describing the removal of soil by both water and wind. The validity of the obtained equation for the description of the soil loss rate as a function of the eroding flow parameters was confirmed using the data on the physical simulation of wind erosion in wind tunnels and water erosion in hydraulic flumes. The confirmed adequacy of the derived equation to the phenomena of soil erosion by water and wind provides the theoretical substantiation of the equations previously derived for soil loss by washing [6] and blowing [3] and forms the basis for the further development of the theory of soil erosion.

  15. Dust emission and soil loss due to anthropogenic activities by wind erosion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katra, Itzhak; Swet, Nitzan; Tanner, Smadar

    2017-04-01

    Wind erosion is major process of soil loss and air pollution by dust emission of clays, nutrients, and microorganisms. Many soils throughout the world are currently or potentially associated with dust emissions, especially in dryland zones. The research focuses on wind erosion in semi-arid soils (Northern Negev, Israel) that are subjected to increased human activities of urban development and agriculture. A boundary-layer wind tunnel has been used to study dust emission and soil loss by simulation and quantification of high-resolution wind processes. Field experiments were conducted in various surface types of dry loess soils. The experimental plots represent soils with long-term and short term influences of land uses such as agriculture (conventional and organic practices), grazing, and natural preserves. The wind tunnel was operated under various wind velocities that are above the threshold velocity of aeolian erosion. Total soil sediment and particulate matter (PM) fluxes were calculated. Topsoil samples from the experimental plots were analysed in the laboratory for physical and chemical characteristics including aggregation, organic matter, and high-resolution particle size distribution. The results showed variations in dust emission in response to surface types and winds to provide quantitative estimates of soil loss over time. Substantial loss of particulate matter that is resources and management strategies as well as for PM loading to the atmosphere and air pollution.

  16. Erosion-corrosion in carbon dioxide saturated systems in presence of sand, inhibitor, oil, and high concentration of salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Shokrollah

    Oil and gas production is usually accompanied by formation water which typically contains high levels of chloride. Some effects of chloride concentration on corrosion are not widely known in the literature, and this can result in misleading conclusions. One goal of this research was to contribute to a better understanding of the effects of chloride concentration in CO2 corrosion. Experimental and theoretical studies conducted in the present work have shown that increasing the NaCl concentration in solution has three important effects on corrosion results. First, standard pH meter readings in high NaCl concentration solutions require corrections. Second, increasing the NaCl concentration decreases the CO2 concentration in solution and therefore contributes to a decrease in the corrosion rate. Third, increasing the NaCl concentration increases the solubility of FeCO3 and therefore reduces the likelihood of forming an iron carbonate scale. High NaCl concentration also decreases the sand erosion rate of the metal slightly by increasing the density and viscosity of the liquid. There are two main contributions of this research. The first contribution is the experimental characterization of inhibited erosion-corrosion behavior of mild steel under CO2-saturated conditions with a high salt concentration. Chemical inhibition is one the most important techniques for controlling erosion-corrosion in offshore mild steel pipelines, tubing and pipe fittings in oil and gas industry. The second contribution is the introduction of a new approach for predicting inhibited erosion-corrosion in mild steel pipes including the effects of flow and environmental conditions, sand production, and an oil phase. Sand erosion can decrease the efficiency of corrosion protection systems including iron-carbonate scale formation and chemical inhibition. The need to be able to predict inhibitor performance under sand production conditions is particularly acute when the wells are deep or off

  17. Quantifying wind blown landscapes using time-series airborne LiDAR at White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Wind blown landscapes are a default geomorphic and sedimentary environment in our solar system. Wind sand dunes are ubiquitous features on the surfaces of Earth, Mars and Titan and prevalent within the aeolian rock records of Earth and Mars. Dunes are sensitive to environmental and climatic changes and a complete understanding of this system promises a unique, robust and quantitative record of paleoclimate extending to the early histories of these worlds. However, our understanding of how aeolian dune landscapes evolve and how the details of the wind are recorded in cross-strata is limited by our lack of understanding of three-dimensional dune morphodynamics related to changing boundary conditions such as wind direction and magnitude and sediment source area. We use airborne LiDAR datasets over 40 km2 of White Sands Dune Field collected from June 2007, June 2008, January 2009, September 2009 and June 2010 to quantify 1) three-dimensional dune geometries, 2) annual and seasonal patterns of erosion and deposition across dune topography, 3) spatial changes in sediment flux related to position within the field, 4) spatial changes in sediment flux across sinuous crestlines and 5) morphologic changes through dune-dune interactions. In addition to measurements, we use the LiDAR data along with wind data from two near-by weather stations to develop a simple model that predicts depositional and stratigraphic patterns on dune lee slopes. Several challenges emerged using time series LiDAR data sets at White Sands Dune Field. The topography upon which the dunes sit is variable and rises by 16 meters over the length of the dune field. In order to compare individual dune geometries across the field and between data sets a base surface was interpolated from local minima and subtracted from the dune topography. Co-registration and error calculation between datasets was done manually using permanent vegetated features within the active dune field and structures built by the

  18. Effect of thermal diffusion and electrostatic force on evolution of wind-blown sand flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Gao-wei; ZHENG Xiao-jing

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical model is suggested to mathematically describe the effect of thermal diffusion from a sand-bed on evolution of a wind-blown sand flow. An upward wind field is engendered by the thermal diffusion and the coupling interaction among the horizontal and upward wind flow, saltating grains, and a kind of electrostatic force exerted on the grains are considered in this theoretical model. The numerical results show that the effect of the thermal diffusion on the evolution process of wind-blown grain flow is quite obvious and very similar to the effect of the electrostatic force on the evolution. Not only the time for the entire system to reach a steady state (called the duration time), the transport rate of grains, the mass-flux profiles and the trajectory of saltating grains are affected by the thermal diffusion and the electrostatic force exerted on saltating grains,but also the wind profiles and the temperature profiles at the steady state are affected by the wind-blown sand flow.

  19. A probability density function of liftoff velocities in mixed-size wind sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the discrete element method(DEM) ,employing the diameter distribution of natural sands sampled from the Tengger Desert,a mixed-size sand bed was produced and the particle-bed collision was simulated in the mixed-size wind sand movement. In the simulation,the shear wind velocity,particle diameter,incident velocity and incident angle of the impact sand particle were given the same values as the experimental results. After the particle-bed collision,we collected all the initial velocities of rising sand particles,including the liftoff angular velocities,liftoff linear velocities and their horizontal and vertical components. By the statistical analysis on the velocity sample for each velocity component,its probability density functions were obtained,and they are the functions of the shear wind velocity. The liftoff velocities and their horizontal and vertical components are distributed as an exponential density function,while the angular velocities are distributed as a normal density function.

  20. Implications of climate change on wind erosion of agricultural lands in the Columbia plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Sharratt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Climate change may impact soil health and productivity as a result of accelerated or decelerated rates of erosion. Previous studies suggest a greater risk of wind erosion on arid and semi-arid lands due to loss of biomass under a future warmer climate. There have been no studies conducted to assess the impact of climate change on wind erosion in the Columbia Plateau of the Pacific Northwest United States where wind erosion of agricultural lands can cause exceedance of national air quality standards. The Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS was used to assess wind erosion and PM10 (particulate matter ≤10 µm in aerodynamic diameter emissions under a future climate projected by downscaling 18 Global Climate Models (GCM for a conservative emissions pathway. Wind erosion simulations were conducted at Lacrosse and Lind, WA and Moro, OR on a winter wheat-summer fallow (WW-SF rotation and at Lind on an additional winter wheat-camelina-summer fallow (WW-Cam-SF rotation. Each rotation was subject to conservation or conventional tillage practices for a baseline (1970–1999 and mid-21st century climate (2035–2064. A significant increase in temperature and nominal increases in precipitation were projected by an ensemble of climate models for the Columbia Plateau by the mid-21st century. Soil and PM10 losses were 25–84% lower for a mid-21st century climate, due in part to greater biomass production associated with CO2 fertilization and warmer temperatures. The reduction in soil and PM10 loss is projected to be more apparent for conservation tillage practices in the future. Soil and PM10 losses were greater from a WW-Cam-SF rotation than WW-SF rotation when conservation tillage practices were employed during the fallow phase of the rotations. Despite accounting for differences in the length of each rotation, annual soil and PM10 losses remained higher for the WW-Cam-SF rotation than the WW-SF rotation. Soil and PM10 losses were more variable across

  1. Remote sensing of land use/cover changes and its effect on wind erosion potential in southern Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei, Mahrooz; Sameni, Abdolmajid; Fallah Shamsi, Seyed Rashid; Bartholomeus, Harm

    2016-01-01

    Wind erosion is a complex process influenced by different factors. Most of these factors are stable over time, but land use/cover and land management practices are changing gradually. Therefore, this research investigates the impact of changing land use/cover and land management on wind erosion pote

  2. The dust emission law in the wind erosion process on soil surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Mao; GUO LieJin

    2009-01-01

    The dust emission models to date cannot describe the relation between the transport rate of different sized grains and their grain size composition in soil surface, so Aeolian grain transport on a soil-like bed composed of fine sand and silt powder was measured in a wind tunnel. Six types of soil-like beds with different silt fractions have been tested in this experiment. The mass flux profiles of silt dust and sand grains are much different due to their different motion modes. Analysis of the vertical distribution of the powder and sand grains reveals that for a given soil bed, the ratio of the horizontal dust flux to the horizontal sand flux is directly proportional to their mass ratio in the bed. The dust flux is closely linked to the sand flux by the bombardment mechanism. For a given wind velocity and grain size of the bed, the slopes of the vertical mass flux profiles of sand grains larger than 100 μm are nearly equal in a log-linear plot and the ratio between the fraction of transport rate of each size group to the whole transport rate and the mass fraction of each size group in the bed is a constant only dependent on grain size. With this law, the transport rate of dust and different sized grains can be related with the grain size composition in the soil surface.

  3. Crop production and economic loss due to wind erosion in hot arid ecosystem of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Priyabrata; Moharana, P. C.; Kumar, Mahesh; Soni, M. L.; Pandey, C. B.; Chaudhari, S. K.; Sikka, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    Wind erosion is a severe land degradation process in hot arid western India and affects the agricultural production system. It affects crop yield directly by damaging the crops through abrasion, burial, dust deposition etc. and indirectly by reducing soil fertility. In this study, an attempt was made to quantify the indirect impact of wind erosion process on crop production loss and associated economic loss in hot arid ecosystem of India. It has been observed that soil loss due to wind erosion varies from minimum 1.3 t ha-1 to maximum 83.3 t ha-1 as per the severity. Yield loss due to wind erosion was found maximum for groundnut (Arachis hypogea) (5-331 kg ha-1 yr-1), whereas minimum for moth bean (Vigna aconitifolia) (1-93 kg ha-1 yr-1). For pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), which covers a major portion of arable lands in western Rajasthan, the yield loss was found 3-195 kg ha-1 yr-1. Economic loss was found higher for groundnut and clusterbean (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba) than rest crops, which are about

  4. winderosionnetwork.org - Portal to the National Wind Erosion Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, N.; Herrick, J. E.; Clingan, S.; Cooper, B.; Courtright, E.; LaPlante, V.; Van Zee, J.

    2015-12-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDI Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for standardized measurements of wind erosion and its controlling factors. Data will be used to support model development and identification of improved land management strategies that have global applications. By applying standard methods, the Network will overcome the common challenge of synthesizing independent studies to assess local-to-national scale wind erosion and dust emission. Twelve intensively instrumented Network sites will be operational by spring 2016, providing high-resolution measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions and soil and vegetation properties. These initial sites are located across rangelands and croplands in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, California, Nevada, Colorado, Utah, North Dakota, Idaho and Washington. A primary objective of the Network is to facilitate collaboration among Network sites and the wider research community to address basic research questions about aeolian processes, model development, and evaluate practical management options. In support of Network activities, winderosionnetwork.org was developed to serve as a Network data portal, and provide online information about the National Wind Erosion Research Network including protocols and results. The website provides a comprehensive resource for scientists and managers interested in engaging with the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides exciting opportunities to engage in a national long-term wind erosion research program that promises significant impact for our understanding and ability to predict and evaluate aeolian processes across land cover types and land use systems.

  5. Quantitative estimation of farmland soil loss by wind-erosion using improved particle-size distribution comparison method (IPSDC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Wang; Zhongling, Guo; Chunping, Chang; Dengpan, Xiao; Hongjun, Jiang

    2015-12-01

    The rapid and accurate estimation of soil loss by wind erosion still remains challenge. This study presents an improved scheme for estimating the soil loss by wind erosion of farmland. The method estimates the soil loss by wind erosion based on a comparison of the relative contents of erodible and non-erodible particles between the surface and sub-surface layers of the farmland ploughed layer after wind erosion. It is based on the features that the soil particle-size distribution of the sampling soil layer (approximately 2 cm) is relatively uniform, and that on the surface layer, wind erosion causes the relative numbers of erodible and non-erodible particles to decrease and increase, respectively. Estimations were performed using this method for the wind erosion periods (WEP) from Oct. of 2012 to May of 2013 and from Oct. of 2013 to April of 2014 and a large wind-erosion event (WEE) on May 3, 2014 in the Bashang area of Hebei Province. The results showed that the average soil loss of farmland by wind erosion from Oct. of 2012 to May of 2013 was 2852.14 g/m2 with an average depth of 0.21 cm, while soil loss by wind from Oct. of 2013 to April of 2014 was 1199.17 g/m2 with a mean depth of 0.08 cm. During the severe WEE on May 3, 2014, the average soil loss of farmland by wind erosion was 1299.19 g/m2 with an average depth of 0.10 cm. The soil loss by wind erosion of ploughed and raked fields (PRF) was approximately twice as large as that of oat-stubble fields (OSF). The improved method of particle-size distribution comparison (IPSDC) has several advantages. It can not only calculate the wind erosion amount, but also the wind deposition amount. Slight changes in the sampling thickness and in the particle diameter range of the non-erodible particles will not obviously influence the results. Furthermore, the method is convenient, rapid, simple to implement. It is suitable for estimating the soil loss or deposition by wind erosion of farmland with flat surfaces and high

  6. Effects of stubble and mulching on soil erosion by wind in semi-arid China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Peifei; Yin, Guanghua; Gu, Jian

    2016-07-18

    Soil erosion is a growing challenge for agricultural production in Northern China. To explore the effect of variation in stubble height and mulching biomass on soil erosion caused by wind, we conducted a field experiment using a quadratic rotation combination design. Results showed that the quantity of straw mulch was the dominant factor affecting soil erosion, and stubble height was of secondary importance. The soil water content in stubble and straw mulching treatments was higher than in a control treatment at 0-20 cm soil, and the tendency in the amount of soil water content was opposite to the amount of wind erosion (r = -0.882, n = 10, p soil water content observed in the stubble and mulch treatments at the 15-20 cm depth was higher than the change from 0-5 cm to 5-10 cm. Combined, the influence of a stubble height of 34 cm and mulch quantity of 4260 kg·ha(-1) lowered the amount of erosion to 0.42 t·ha(-1), and increased the corn yield to 11900 kg·ha(-1). We determined that those were the most appropriate levels of stubble height and straw mulch for crop fields in the semi-arid regions of Northern China.

  7. Environmental risks associated to wind erosion in a metal mining area from SE Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Fernandez, G.; Romero Diaz, A.

    2009-07-01

    Soils and mining wastes from the Mediterranean mining area placed in the Sierra Minera Mountains are highly enriched in heavy metals such as lead and zinc, but also other metals such as cadmium and arsenic. Wind erosion in this area could be considered extremely high and hazards associated to this eroded sediments seems to be high because the huge amount of metals present in this wastes. Therefore, combination of high erosion rates and high metal concentration in this mining waste, make those environmental risks can be considered high for the surrounding ecosystems, but also for public health of the nearby villages and towns. In order, to study these wind erosion processes over these mining materials, some experiments for the evaluation of the transportation of soil particles were carried out. Erosion rates in this realm is particularly important during spring months, when increased activity of the eastern winds brings intense soil dragging, with strong effects on the metals dispersion, including the massive removal of sediments. (Author) 16 refs.

  8. Responses of wind erosion to climate-induced vegetation changes on the Colorado Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Seth M; Belnap, Jayne; Okin, Gregory S

    2011-03-08

    Projected increases in aridity throughout the southwestern United States due to anthropogenic climate change will likely cause reductions in perennial vegetation cover, which leaves soil surfaces exposed to erosion. Accelerated rates of dust emission from wind erosion have large implications for ecosystems and human well-being, yet there is poor understanding of the sources and magnitude of dust emission in a hotter and drier climate. Here we use a two-stage approach to compare the susceptibility of grasslands and three different shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how climate can indirectly moderate the magnitude of aeolian sediment flux through different responses of dominant plants in these communities. First, using results from 20 y of vegetation monitoring, we found perennial grass cover in grasslands declined with increasing mean annual temperature in the previous year, whereas shrub cover in shrublands either showed no change or declined as temperature increased, depending on the species. Second, we used these vegetation monitoring results and measurements of soil stability as inputs into a field-validated wind erosion model and found that declines in perennial vegetation cover coupled with disturbance to biological soil crust resulted in an exponential increase in modeled aeolian sediment flux. Thus the effects of increased temperature on perennial plant cover and the correlation of declining plant cover with increased aeolian flux strongly suggest that sustained drought conditions across the southwest will accelerate the likelihood of dust production in the future on disturbed soil surfaces.

  9. A review of soil erodibility in water and wind erosion research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGYang; LIULianyou; YANPing; CAOTong

    2005-01-01

    Soil erodibility is an important index to evaluate the soil sensitivity to erosion. The research on soil erodibility is a crucial tache in understanding the mechanism of soil erosion. Soil erodibility can be evaluated by measuring soil physiochemical properties, scouring experiment, simulated rainfall experiment, plot experiment and wind tunnel experiment. We can use soil erosion model and nomogram to calculate soil erodibility. Many soil erodibility indices and formulae have been put forward. Soil erodibility is a complex concept, it is influenced by many factors, such as soil properties and human activities. Several obstacles restrict the research of soil erodibility. Firstly, the research on soil erodibility is mainly focused on farmland; Secondly, soil erodibility in different areas cannot be compared sufficiently; and thirdly, the research on soil erodibility in water-wind erosion is very scarce.In the prospective research, we should improve method to measure and calculate soil erodibility.strengthen the research on the mechanism of soil erodibility, and conduct research on soil erodibility by both water and wind agents.

  10. Wind erosion reduces soil organic carbon sequestration falsely indicating ineffective management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Baldock, Jeffrey A.

    2016-09-01

    Improved management of agricultural land has the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to reduce atmospheric CO2 via soil carbon sequestration. However, SOC stocks are reduced by soil erosion which is commonly omitted from calculations of crop production, C cycling, C sequestration and C accounting. We used fields from the wind eroded dryland cropping region of Western Australia to demonstrate the global implications for C sequestration and C accounting of omitting soil erosion. For the fields we previously estimated mean net (1950s-1990) soil erosion of 1.2 ± 1.0 t ha-1 y-1. The mean net (1990-2013) soil erosion increased by nearly four times to 4.4 ± 2.1 t ha-1 y-1. Conservation agriculture has evidently not reduced wind erosion in this region. The mean net (1990-2013) SOC erosion was up to 0.2 t C ha-1 y-1 across all sampled fields and similar to measured sequestration rates in the region (up to 0.5 t C ha-1 y-1; 10 years) for many management practices recommended for building SOC stocks. The minimum detectable change (MDC; 10 years) of SOC without erosion was up to 0.2 t C ha-1 y-1 whilst the MDC of SOC with erosion was up to 0.4 t C ha-1 y-1. These results illustrate the generally applicable outcome: (i) if SOC erosion is equal to (or greater than) the increase in SOC due to management practices, the change will not be detectable (or a loss will be evident); (ii) without including soil erosion in SOC sequestration calculations, the monitoring of SOC stocks will lead to, at best the inability to detect change and, at worst the false impression that management practices have failed to store SOC. Furthermore, continued omission of soil erosion in crop production, C accounting and C sequestration will most likely undermine confidence in policy designed to encourage adoption of C farming and the attendant benefits for soil stewardship and food security.

  11. Field observations of wind profiles and sand fluxes above the windward slope of a sand dune before and after the establishment of semi-buried straw checkerboard barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunlai; Li, Qing; Zhou, Na; Zhang, Jiaqiong; Kang, Liqiang; Shen, Yaping; Jia, Wenru

    2016-03-01

    Straw checkerboard barriers are effective and widely used measures to control near-surface sand flow. The present study measured the wind profiles and sand mass flux above the windward slope of a transverse dune before and after the establishment of semi-buried straw checkerboards. The 0.2 m high checkerboards enhanced the aerodynamic roughness length to larger than 0.02 m, which was two to three orders of magnitude higher than that of the bare sand. The modified Charnock model predicted the roughness length of the sand bed during saltation well, with Cm = 0.138 ± 0.003. For the checkerboards, z0 increased slowly to a level around 0.037 m with increasing wind velocity and the rate of increase tended to slow down in strong wind. The barriers reduced sand flux and altered its vertical distribution. The total height-integrated dimensionless mass flux of saltating particles (q0) above bare sand followed the relationship ln q0 = a + b(u∗t/u∗) + c(u∗t/u∗)2, with a peak at u∗/u∗t ≈ 2, whereas a possible peak appeared at u∗/u∗t ≈ 1.5 above 1 m × 1 m straw checkerboards. The vertical distribution of mass flux above these barriers resembled an "elephant trunk", with maximum mass flux at 0.05-0.2 m above the bed, in contrast with the continuously and rapidly decreasing mass flux with increasing height above the bare sand. The influences of the barriers on the wind and sand flow prevent dune movement and alter the evolution of dune morphology.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and application of a novel chemical sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Jun [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang Fang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Fang Li [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tan Tianwei [Beijing Key Laboratory of Bioprocess, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)]. E-mail: twtan@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2007-09-15

    A novel sand-fixing agent-poly(aspartic acid) and its composites were synthesized to improve sand particles compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties. The relationship between the concentration of sand-fixing agent and the sand-fixing properties was studied by three kinds of aging tests. Some composites were choose to improve the sand-fixing property and the composition of 40% xanthan gum and 60% ethyl cellulose were chosen to compare sand-fixing property with lignosulfonate. The results showed that the sand-fixing and water-retaining properties of xanthan gum and ethyl cellulose composites were better than that of lignosulfonate. The biodegradability experiment showed that the PASP and its composites were environment-friendly products and the field test showed that the PASP composites could improve wind erosion disturbance. - A novel biodegradability polymer significantly improved sand particles' compressive strength and anti-wind erosion properties.

  13. A universal meteorological method to identify potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Středová Hana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The climate of Central Europe, mainly winter seasons with no snow cover at lower altitudes and a spring drought as well, might cause erosion events on heavy-textured soils. The aim of this paper is to define a universal method to identify the potential risk of wind erosion on heavy-textured soils. The categorization of potential wind erosion risk due to meteorological conditions is based on: (i an evaluation of the number of freeze-thaw episodes forming bare soil surfaces during the cold period of year; and (ii, an evaluation of the number of days with wet soil surfaces during the cold period of year. In the period 2001–2012 (from November to March, episodes with temperature changes from positive to negative and vice versa (thaw-freeze and freeze-thaw cycles and the effects of wet soil surfaces in connection with aggregate disintegration, are identified. The data are spatially interpolated by GIS tools for areas in the Czech Republic with heavy-textured soils. Blending critical categories is used to locate potential risks. The level of risk is divided into six classes. Those areas identified as potentially most vulnerable are the same localities where the highest number of erosive episodes on heavy-textured soils was documented.

  14. Responses of Wind Erosion to Climate-Induced Vegetation Changes on the Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, S. M.; Belnap, J.; Okin, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    Projected increases in aridity throughout the southwestern United States due to anthropogenic climate change will likely cause reductions in perennial vegetation cover, which leaves soil surfaces exposed to erosion. Accelerated rates of dust emission from wind erosion have large implications for ecosystems and human well-being, yet there is poor understanding of the sources and magnitude of dust emission in a hotter and drier climate. Here we use a two-stage approach to compare the susceptibility of grasslands and three different shrublands to wind erosion on the Colorado Plateau and demonstrate how climate can indirectly moderate the magnitude of aeolian sediment flux through different responses of dominant plants in these communities. First, using results from 20 years of vegetation monitoring, we found perennial grass cover in grasslands declined with increasing mean annual temperature in the previous year, whereas shrub cover in shrublands either showed no change or declined as temperature increased, depending on the species. Second, we used these vegetation monitoring results and measurements of soil stability as inputs into a field-validated wind erosion model and found that declines in perennial vegetation cover coupled with disturbance to biological soil crust resulted in an exponential increase in modeled aeolian sediment flux. Thus the effects of increased temperature on perennial plant cover and the correlation of declining plant cover with increased aeolian flux strongly suggest that sustained drought conditions across the southwest will accelerate the likelihood of dust production in the future on disturbed soil surfaces.; Perennial grasses and all perennial vegetation canopy cover (top panel) and modeled aeolian sediment flux (bottom panel) at five wind speeds (15.0, 17.5, 20.0, 22.5, and 25.0 ms-1) in relationship to mean annual temperature in the previous year in perennial grasslands across the Colorado Plateau, USA.

  15. Wind tunnel tests of biodegradable fugitive dust suppressants being considered to reduce soil erosion by wind at radioactive waste construction sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Dennis, G.W.; Bushaw, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed of three fugitive dust control agents derived from potato and sugar beet products. These materials are being considered for use as dust suppressants to reduce the potential for transport of radioactive materials by wind from radioactive waste construction and remediation sites. Soil and dust control agent type, solution concentrations, application quantities, aging (or drying) conditions, surface disturbance, and wind and saltating sand eolian erosive stresses were selected and controlled to simulate application and exposure of excavated soil surfaces in the field. A description of the tests, results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this report. The results of this study indicate that all three dust control agents can protect exposed soil surfaces from extreme eolian stresses. It is also clear that the interaction and performance of each agent with various soil types may differ dramatically. Thus, soils similar to that received from ML should be best protected by high concentration ({approximately}2.5%) solutions of potato starch at low water application levels ({approximately}1 to 2 L/m{sup 2}). Because the effectiveness of PS on this soil type is degraded after a moderate amount of simulated rainfall, other options or additives should be considered if surfaces are to be protected for long intervals or during periods of intermittent rainfall and hot, windy conditions. On the other hand, XDCA should be considered when excavating sandy soils. It should be noted, however, that because the Hanford soil test results are based on a small number of tests, it would be prudent to perform additional tests prior to selecting a fugitive dust control agent for use at the Hanford Site. While fermented potato waste was not the best fixative used on either soil, it did perform reasonably well on both soil types (better than XDCA on Idaho soil and better than PS on Hanford soil).

  16. Numerical Modeling and Simulation of Wind Blown Sand Morphology under Complex Wind-Flow Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xamxinur Abdikerem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow field and the sand flow field constitutive equations are analyzed at first, then the different desert highway numerical models are established by considering the crossroad and by changing the road surface height and air stream flow field, then three kinds of different models with different complex air flow fields are made for simulating the sand ripple formation process by weak coupling of air and sand flow field, and finally the numerical simulations of these models are conducted and the affect process of sand morphology under complex air flow fields are discussed. The results show that under the uniform airflow field, the straight parallel ripple formed and the flared ripple formed in the middle region of the crossroad, and the wavelength of the ripples on the desert highway is bigger than that of the ripples around the road when the road height is higher than that of the sand surface height. Under the nonuniform complex airflow field, the complex curved ripples are formed, and some of the local area, where the whirlwind exits, no ripples are formed.

  17. Glyphosate and AMPA contents in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Virginia; Aimar, Silvia; De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Buschiazzo, Daniel; Mendez, Mariano; Costa, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    Wind erosion of soils is an important event in arid and semiarid regions of Argentina. The magnitude of wind erosion occurring under different management practices is relatively well known in this region but less information is available on the quality of the eroded material. Considering that the intensification of agriculture may increase the concentrations of substances in the eroded material, producing potential negative effects on the environment, we analyzed the amount of glyphosate and AMPA in sediments produced by wind erosion of agricultural soils of Argentina. Wind eroded materials were collected by means of BSNE samplers in two loess sites of the semiarid region of Argentina: Chaco and La Pampa. Samples were collected from 1 ha square fields at 13.5, 50 and 150 cm height. Results showed that at higher heights the concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA were mostly higher. The glyphosate concentration was more variable and higher in Chaco (0.66 to 313 µg kg-1) than in La Pampa (4.17 to 114 µg kg-1). These results may be due to the higher use of herbicides in Chaco, where the predominant crops are soybeans and corn, produced under no-tillage. Under these conditions the use of glyphosate for weeds control is a common practice. Conversely, AMPA concentrations were higher in La Pampa (13.1 to 101.3 µg kg-1) than in Chaco (1.3 to 83 µg kg-1). These preliminary results show high concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA in wind eroded materials of agricultural soils of Argentina. More research is needed to confirm these high concentrations in other conditions in order to detect the temporal and spatial distribution patterns of the herbicide.

  18. Application of sediment transport formulae to sand-dike breach erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Technical Advisory Committee on Water Defences in the Netherlands has decided to develop a mathematical model for breach erosion in dunes and dikes, with which it will be possible to predict the growth of the breach and the discharge rate through the breach in case of a dike-burst. An essential

  19. Separation of dry and wet periods from regular weather station data for the analysis of wind erosion risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naeini, Mohammadali Saremi; Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    ), climate (e.g. air temperature, solar radiation, evaporation) and soil (e.g. infiltration rate, adhesion). The purpose of this study is to overcome the lack of soil moisture data for wind erosion risk assessment by developing a method to estimate the soil wetness based on easy available weather data......, such as daily precipitation, hourly/sub hourly ambient air temperature and hourly/sub hourly relative humidity. This new method was used to identify periods of wet and dry soil moisture conditions of a time series from 20 weather stations in Denmark. The length of the time series varied between 8 to 37 years...... that using wind data without the influence of soil moisture most likely lead to an overestimation of the wind erosion risk. It is, therefore, strongly recommended for wind erosion risk assessments to associate more importance to winds that occur during dry times of the year, by including soil moisture...

  20. Remote sensing of land use/cover changes and its effect on wind erosion potential in southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mahrooz; Sameni, Abdolmajid; Fallah Shamsi, Seyed Rashid; Bartholomeus, Harm

    2016-01-01

    Wind erosion is a complex process influenced by different factors. Most of these factors are stable over time, but land use/cover and land management practices are changing gradually. Therefore, this research investigates the impact of changing land use/cover and land management on wind erosion potential in southern Iran. We used remote sensing data (Landsat ETM+ and Landsat 8 imagery of 2004 and 2013) for land use/cover mapping and employed the Iran Research Institute of Forest and Rangeland (IRIFR) method to estimate changes in wind erosion potential. For an optimal mapping, the performance of different classification algorithms and input layers was tested. The amount of changes in wind erosion and land use/cover were quantified using cross-tabulation between the two years. To discriminate land use/cover related to wind erosion, the best results were obtained by combining the original spectral bands with synthetic bands and using Maximum Likelihood classification algorithm (Kappa Coefficient of 0.8 and 0.9 for Landsat ETM+ and Landsat 8, respectively). The IRIFR modelling results indicate that the wind erosion potential has increased over the last decade. The areas with a very high sediment yield potential have increased, whereas the areas with a low, medium, and high sediment yield potential decreased. The area with a very low sediment yield potential have remained constant. When comparing the change in erosion potential with land use/cover change, it is evident that soil erosion potential has increased mostly in accordance with the increase of the area of agricultural practices. The conversion of rangeland to agricultural land was a major land-use change which lead to more agricultural practices and associated soil loss. Moreover, results indicate an increase in sandification in the study area which is also a clear evidence of increasing in soil erosion.

  1. Analysis of the forces acting on the saltating particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the theoretical model describing the saltation of sand particles in the coupled wind-sand- electricity fields, the numerical simulations of the forces acting on saltating particles, such as the aerodynamic drag force, Magnus effect, Saffman force and electrostatic force, are analyzed in com- parison to the gravity force of the particles in the steady windblown sand movement. Furthermore, the laws of the above forces vary with the friction velocity, the diameter of the sand particle, the initial an- gular velocity and the lift-off velocity are discussed.

  2. Analysis of the forces acting on the saltating particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianJun; YAN GuangHu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the theoretical model describing the saltation of sand particles in the coupled wind-sand-electricity fields, the numerical simulations of the forces acting on saltating particles, such as the aerodynamic drag force, Magnus effect, Saffman force and electrostatic force, are analyzed in com-parison to the gravity force of the particles in the steady windblown sand movement. Furthermore, the laws of the above forces vary with the friction velocity, the diameter of the sand particle, the initial an-gular velocity and the lift-off velocity are discussed.

  3. A Maine romance. [Solar heating, wind power and cliff erosion control at a Maine site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    The construction of a house on the coast of Maine included terracing of the bluff for erosion control, installation of water solar collectors for space and water heating, and construction of a wind turbine for electric power generation. A total of 4,027 ft/sup 2/ of house area is heated by a system of 10 collectors and 4,000 gal water storage. Insulation values are R-19 in the walls, R-40 in the ceiling, R-26 in the floors, and R-14 in the basement. South-facing windows provide additional heat gain. The wind turbine and generator system supplies alternating current to the house and also heats auxiliary water storage when necessary. The house, collectors, and wind turbine are designed to supply 85% of the heating load.

  4. Mapping wind erosion hazard in Australia using MODIS-derived ground cover, soil moisture and climate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Leys, J.

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes spatial modeling methods to identify wind erosion hazard (WEH) areas across Australia using the recently available time-series products of satellite-derived ground cover, soil moisture and wind speed. We implemented the approach and data sets in a geographic information system to produce WEH maps for Australia at 500 m ground resolution on a monthly basis for the recent thirteen year period (2000-2012). These maps reveal the significant wind erosion hazard areas and their dynamic tendencies at paddock and regional scales. Dust measurements from the DustWatch network were used to validate the model and interpret the dust source areas. The modeled hazard areas and changes were compared with results from a rule-set approach and the Computational Environmental Management System (CEMSYS) model. The study demonstrates that the time series products of ground cover, soil moisture and wind speed can be jointly used to identify landscape erodibility and to map seasonal changes of wind erosion hazard across Australia. The time series wind erosion hazard maps provide detailed and useful information to assist in better targeting areas for investments and continuous monitoring, evaluation and reporting that will lead to reduced wind erosion and improved soil condition.

  5. Validation of a Switching Operation in the External Grid of Gunfleet Sand Offshore Wind Farm by Means of EMT Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arana Aristi, Iván; Okholm, J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the voltage signals occurring during a switching operation recorded in the external grid of Gunfleet Sands Offshore Wind Farm recorded with an Elspec measurement system. The measurements are compared to electromagnetic (EMT) simulations for validation of the wind farm model...

  6. 基于土壤粒度和大风日数的风蚀风险预报%Wind erosion prediction based on soil particle size characteristics and strong wind days

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒙仲举; 高永; 王淮亮; 任晓萌

    2015-01-01

    residual amount of coarse surface was calculated. On the basis of wind erosion estimation model of Inner Mongolia Houshan Area, surface un-erodible particle (>0.84 mm) was chosen as key indicator combined with local strong wind days, and then an applicable soil erosion potential risk exponential equation was established and the soil potential wind erosion risk was evaluated. The results suggested that wind erosion was a physical process of erodible particle loss, as a result, serious degradation surface kept a high content of coarse grains. Jilantai Gebi and surface around shrub has experienced severe wind erosion, for there existed a large proportion of coarse particles, indicating that the area was in late period of the coarsening process with strong anti-erosion ability, and the average anti-erosion indices were 91.40%and 81.40%respectively. Soil particles of Ulan Buh Desert showed obvious spatial heterogeneous characteristics due to the effect of few shrub communities, and the soil anti-wind erosion ability was Artemisia xerophytica Krasch plot>Artemisia arenaria DC.plot>Nitraria tangutorum plot. In Mu Us Sandy land, aeolian material was the main component and the vegetation coverage was less than 5%;the area was dominated by barchan, and soil particle content showed intensive spatial heterogeneity with variation coefficient of 37%, which was mainly caused by different position of sand dunes. The anti-erosion index was only 13.40%indicating that wind erosion occurred easily in this site. In terms of typical farming land, surface fine material was maintained at a high level due to frequent plow activities, which led to a lower anti-erosion index of 29.40%; on the contrary, due to long-term wind erosion, much fine particle of abandoned farmland got lost, at last soil surface was covered by coarsening grains mostly, and the anti-wind erosion index was greater than that of farming land. Soil particle turned to show obvious spatial heterogeneity in deserted grassland, un

  7. Wave-induced flow and its influence on ridge erosion and channel deposition in Lanshayang channel of radial sand ridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈可峰; 安翔; 陆培东; 张玮; 徐卓

    2014-01-01

    Very limited modeling studies were available of the wave-induced current under the complex hydrodynamic conditions in the South Yellow Sea Radial Sand Ridge area (SYSRSR). Partly it is due to the difficulties in estimating the influence of the wave-induced current in this area. In this study, a coupled 3-D storm-surge-wave model is built. In this model, the time-dependent varying Collins coefficient with the water level method (TCL) are used. The wave-flow environment in the Lanshayang Channel (LSYC) during the “Winnie” typhoon is successfully represented by this model. According to the modelling results, at a high water level (HWL), the wave-induced current similar to the long-shore current will emerge in the shallow area of the ridges, and has two different motion trends correlated with the morphological characteristics of the ridges. The wave-induced current velocity could be as strong as 1 m/s, which is at the same magnitude as the tidal current. This result is verified by the bathymetric changes in the LSYC during the “Matsa” typhoon. Thus, the wave-induced current may be one of the driven force of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR. These conclusions will help to further study the mechanism of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR.

  8. Effects of disturbance on vegetation by sand accretion and erosion across coastal dune habitats on a barrier island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas E

    2015-01-12

    Coastal geomorphology and vegetation are expected to be particularly sensitive to climate change, because of disturbances caused by sea-level rise and increased storm frequency. Dunes have critical reciprocal interactions with vegetation; dunes create habitats for plants, while plants help to build dunes and promote geomorphological stability. These interactions are also greatly affected by disturbances associated with sand movement, either in accretion (dune building) or in erosion. The magnitude and intensity of disturbances are expected to vary with habitat, from the more exposed and less stable foredunes, to low-lying and flood-prone interdunes, to the protected and older backdunes. Permanent plots were established at three different spatial scales on St George Island, FL, USA, where the vegetation and dune elevation were quantified annually from 2011 to 2013. Change in elevation, either through accretion or erosion, was used as a measure of year-to-year disturbance over the 2 years of the study. At the scale of different dune habitats, foredunes were found to have the greatest disturbance, while interdunes had the least. Elevation and habitat (i.e. foredune, interdune, backdune) were significantly correlated with plant community composition. Generalized linear models conducted within each habitat show that the change in elevation (disturbance) is also significantly correlated with the plant community, but only within foredunes and interdunes. The importance of disturbance in exposed foredunes was expected and was found to be related to an increasing abundance of a dominant species (Uniola paniculata) in eroding areas. The significant effect of disturbance in the relatively stable interdunes was surprising, and may be due to the importance of flooding associated with small changes in elevation in these low-lying areas. Overall, this study documents changes in the plant community associated with elevation, and demonstrates that the foredune and interdune

  9. Regional Evaluation of Wind Erosion of the Loess Plateau in Pengyang County, Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Baoping; Ding Guodong; Li Yubao

    2003-01-01

    The loess plateau in China is well-known for its severe water erosion. A nationwide soil erosion survey discovered that wind erosion of the loess land is also greatly concerned. The severity of wind erosion for each land use in Pengyang County of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region, China, was evaluated according to the national standard of soil erosion classification. The evaluation system includes a GIS database, an evaluation indicator system and a classification system for land and land use. The erodible nature of soil and annual soil loss of the most erodible land were obtained as follows: (1) Croplands plowed and harrowed in late autumn were the most erodible land,with an erosion intensity of medium grade and an erodible proportion of 46%; (2) The erodible proportion of natural grasslands was between 19.3% and 21.5%, whose erosion intensity was of mostly tolerable grade; (3) When it came to the whole county, there was 21.3% of the total area in tolerable grade in terms of wind erosion intensity, 42.1% slight and 34.8% medium.

  10. First quantification of severe wind erosion in yardang fields using cosmogenic 10Be within the western Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, A.; Heermance, R.; Kapp, P. A.; Mc-Callister, A.

    2010-12-01

    Desert environments are a major source of global loess and may undergo substantial wind-erosion as evidenced by yardangs, which are streamlined bedrock ridges sculpted from uni-directional winds. However, there are few quantitative estimates of wind erosion rates in deflationary deserts, globally. Here, we report the first quantitative rates of bedrock wind erosion determined using cosmogenic 10Be in the western Qaidam basin, China, where roughly one-third of the modern basin floor (~3.88 × 104 km2) exposes yardangs. Eleven Neogene bedrock sandstone samples and one pre-Cenozoic granite sample were analyzed for 10Be concentrations. The Neogene samples were collected from crests and limbs of broad and actively growing anticlines, where in most places strata have been wind-sculpted into yardangs. Sedimentary bedrock erosion rates vary from 0.04-0.34 mm/yr, although 60 percent (n=7) of all samples cluster tightly at 0.1 ± 0.03 mm/yr. Erosion rates assume steady-state erosion over ~10,000 years. The lowest rate of 0.0025 mm/yr was obtained from a granite bedrock sample along the Altyn-Tagh range bounding the northwestern margin of the Qaidam basin and is consistent with other 10Be bedrock erosion rates collected from granitic bedrock elsewhere on the Tibetan Plateau. These results demonstrate the importance of lithology in controlling bedrock erodibility by wind. The highest erosion rates of 0.17, 0.25, and 0.34 mm/yr were determined along a transect across an active anticline. The lowest of the three rates was obtained from the top of the structure, suggesting that wind erosion and thus wind speeds are highest on the limbs of an anticline as wind is forced around the obstacle (Bernoulli-effect), rather than flowing over it. The determined sedimentary bedrock erosion rates of 0.04-0.34 mm/yr are in good agreement with previous analysis of basin wide-average erosion rates from geological cross-sections (0.29 mm/yr) and simple erosion calculations using previous lake

  11. Illustrative Experiments of the Erosion of Sand and Accompanying Theoretical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderbauer, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Winds in desert regions form the well-known barchan dunes. Frequently, human settlements are threatened by the migration of these dunes. But why do these dunes move? And how is dune migration in deserts connected to scour development in the vicinity of pylons in river beds or to snow cornices in alpine regions? This paper introduces the topic of…

  12. 海滩湿润沙面起动摩阻风速的风洞实验%Wind Tunnel Experiment of the Threshold Friction Wind Velocity on Wet Beach Sand Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩庆杰; 屈建军; 张克存; 俎瑞平; 廖空太; 牛清河

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion is one kind of important geomorphology processes and geological disasters,which has significant impacts on dune growth and desertification,and causes damages to architecture on sea coasts.The moisture of sand surface layer greatly affects the threshold wind velocity and sand stability,thus,it is also one of the important influence factors on wind erosion.In this study,we investigated the influence of surface moisture content at 1-mm depth on sand erosion in tropical humid coast of southern China,and established a new predicting model.The modeling results indicated that the threshold friction velocity increased linearly with increasing of ln100M(M is gravimetric moisture content) in condition of given sand diameters.Evaluation was given to seven popular models for predicting the threshold friction velocity on moisture sediments,and found that there were significant differences among their predicted results.At a surface sand moisture content of 0.0124(M1.5),the predicted threshold friction velocity predicted by the seven models were 34% to 195% larger than the observed threshold friction velocity on dry sands;at a surface sand moisture content of lower than 0.0062(0.5 M1.5),the predicted values by models of Chepil and Saleh well matched the experimental data;but when surface sand moisture content of more than 0.0062(0.5 M1.5),the data simulated by the Belly's empirical model were seem same as the experimental data.%风蚀是一种重要的地貌过程和地质灾害,它影响海岸沙丘的增长,加速土地沙漠化并危害沿岸建筑。沙面湿度强烈影响沙粒的临界起动风速和沙面稳定性,因此,也是影响风蚀过程的一个重要因子。本项风洞实验使用华南热带湿润海岸的海滩沙,研究了表面湿度(1mm深)对海滩沙风蚀起动的影响,建立了一个新的预测热带湿润海滩湿沙起动摩阻风速的模型,该模型指明给定粒径下,湿沙的起动摩阻风速随ln100 M

  13. Wind erosion simulation along with the Qinghai-Tibet Railway and its response to the climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y.; Gao, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Wind erosion is one of the major processes of desertification. It has been widely analyzed using field observation, wind tunnel experiments and wind erosion models at arid and semi-arid agricultural areas in North China. It was seldom studies in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) yet because of the cold environment and fewer human activities over there. However, the desertification has been reported intensified and expanded in recent decades over central and eastern QTP [Dong et al., 2009]. Land surface models are useful tool in land processes simulation, and underwent several generations with various progresses in geophysical and geochemical processes. For instance, the new generation community Noah land surface model with multi-parameterization options (Noah-MP) has been worldwide implied and performs well in simulating the land surface conditions in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. However, none of the land surface models involves the wind erosion process. In this study, a wind erosion model -- Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) is coupled with the Noah-MP. According to Li et al. (2015), the majority land cover type over the QTP is grassland, meadow and bare land. Thus the concerning of crop and cultivated lands are not included in the coupling. The coupled model is called Noah-MPES in which Noah-MP serves as the basic system providing the climate and land surface variables for wind erosion calculation. The coupled Noah-MPES was implemented and tested at five stations near the Qinghai-Tibet Railway: BJ, Anduo, D66, from GAME-Tibet, Tanggula and Xidatan, where Noah-MP simulation shows well performance in soil temperature and soil water content at upper soil levels. The wind erosion will be validated by comparing to the results from 137Cs tracer method [Yan et al., 2001]. Wind erosion along the Qinghai-Tibet Railway will be simulated and investigated then. Reference: Dong, Z., G. Hu, C. Yan, W. Wang, and J. Lu (2009), Aeolian desertification and its causes in the Zoige

  14. Development and validation of a method to estimate the potential wind erosion risk in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Roger; Deumlich, Detlef; Völker, Lidia

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of the Cross Compliance (CC) regulations for soil protection resulted in the demand for the classification of the the wind erosion risk on agricultural areas in Germany nationwide. A spatial highly resolved method was needed based on uniform data sets and validation principles, which provides a fair and equivalent procedure for all affected farmers. A GIS-procedure was developed, which derives the site specific wind erosion risk from the main influencing factors: soil texture, wind velocity, wind direction and landscape structure following the German standard DIN 19706. The procedure enables different approaches in the Federal States and comparable classification results. Here, we present the approach of the Federal State of Brandenburg. In the first step a complete soil data map was composed in a grid size of 10 x 10 m. Data were taken from 1.) the Soil quality Appraisal (scale 1:10.000), 2.) the Medium-scale Soil Mapping (MMK, 1:25.000), 3.) extrapolating the MMK, 4.) new Soil quality Appraisal (new areas after coal-mining). Based on the texture and carbon content the wind erosion susceptibility was divided in 6 classes. This map was combined with data of the annual average wind velocity resulting in an increase of the risk classes for wind velocities > 5 ms-1 and a decrease for < 3 ms-1. The sheltering effect of landscape structure is regarded by allocating a height to each landscape element, corresponding to the described features in the digital "Biotope and Land Use Map". The "hill shade" procedure of ArcGIS was used to set virtual shadows behind the landscape elements for eight directions. The relative frequency of wind from each direction was used as a weighting factor and multiplied with the numerical values of the shadowed cells. Depending on the distance to the landscape element the shadowing effect was combined with the risk classes. The results show that the wind erosion risk is obviously reduced by integrating landscape structures into

  15. Agglomeration of a comprehensive model for the wind-driven sand transport at the Belgian Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strypsteen, Glenn; Rauwoens, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    Although a lot of research has been done in the area of Aeolian transport, it is only during the last years that attention has been drawn to Aeolian transport in coastal areas. In these areas, the physical processes are more complex, due to a large number of transport limiting parameters. In this PhD-project, which is now in its early stage, a model will be developed which relates the wind-driven sand transport at the Belgian coast with physical parameters such as the wind speed, humidity and grain size of the sand, and the slope of beach and dune surface. For the first time, the interaction between beach and dune dynamics is studied at the Belgian coast. The Belgian coastline is only 67km long, but densely populated and therefore subject to coastal protection and safety. The coast mostly consists of sandy beaches and dikes. Although, still 33km of dunes exist, whose dynamics are far less understood. The overall research approach consists of three pathways: (i) field measurements, (ii) physical model tests, and (iii) numerical simulations. Firstly and most importantly, several field campaigns will provide accurate data of meteo-marine conditions, morphology, and sand transport events on a wide beach at the Belgian Coastline. The experimental set-up consists of a monitoring station, which will provide time series of vegetation cover, shoreline position, fetch distances, surficial moisture content, wind speed and direction and transport processes. The horizontal and vertical variability of the event scale Aeolian sand transport is analyzed with 8 MWAC sand traps. Two saltiphones register the intensity and variations of grain impacts over time. Two meteo-masts, each with four anemometers and one wind vane, provide quantitative measurements of the wind flow at different locations on the beach. Surficial moisture is measured with a moisture sensor. The topography measurements are typically done with laser techniques. To start, two sites are selected for measurement

  16. Wind tunnel experimental study on sand-fixing effect of fly ash and polyacrylamide%粉煤灰和聚丙烯酰胺固沙效果的风洞试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨凯; 唐泽军; 赵智; 封建章; 郭平; 丁涛

    2012-01-01

    寻找经济高效的固沙措施对于防治风沙危害具有重要意义.该文采用室内风洞试验,研究了不同粉煤灰施用率(10%,20%和30%)的固沙效果及在粉煤灰最佳施用率的基础上不同聚丙烯酰胺(PAM)施用率(0.05%和0.1%)对其的强化作用.试验研究结果表明,沙土施加粉煤灰后起动风速显著提高,施加PAM进一步小幅提高其起动风速;粉煤灰施用率为20%的沙土可以最有效地抵御8m/s净风和风沙流历时10 min的吹蚀;施加粉煤灰的沙土在14 m/s净风和风沙流历时10 min的吹蚀条件下发生中度风蚀,其风蚀率随着粉煤灰施用率的增大而呈逐步降低的趋势;施加粉煤灰和PAM的沙土可以有效地抵御14 m/s风沙流历时30 min的吹蚀;从经济意义上考虑,推荐粉煤灰施用率为20%和PAM施用率为0.05%的用量水平处理用于风蚀防治.%Searching for an effective and economical sand fixation measure has important significance in wind erosion control. Wind tunnel experiments were conducted to study the sand-fixing effect of fly ash at three different application rates (10%, 20% and 30%) and the intensifying action of polyacrylamide (PAM) at two different application rates (0.05% and 0.1%) on it on the basis of the optimum fly ash application rate. The results indicated that fly ash increased the threshold wind speed of the treated soil significantly, which was further increased by PAM slightly. The soil treated with 20% fly ash could most effectively withstand pure wind and sand-carrying wind with a wind speed of 8 m/s for 10 min respectively. Moderate wind erosion occurred after exposure to pure wind and sand-carrying wind with a wind speed of 14 m/s for 10 min respectively, and there was a decline in the wind erosion rate with the increase of fly ash application rate. The soil treated with 20% fly ash and PAM could effectively withstand sand-carrying wind with a wind speed of 14 m/s for 30 min. 20% fly ash

  17. Sand-Mud Sediment Transport induced by tidal currents and wind waves in shallow microtidal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniello, L.; Defina, A.; D'Alpaos, L.

    2011-12-01

    Field data and mathematical modeling have demonstrated that the morphological evolution of shallow tidal basins is the result of the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves. Tidal currents, in particular, drive the morphological evolution of shallow tidal systems in proximity of the inlets and within the channel network, whereas in shallow areas tidal current mainly acts enhancing the bottom shear stress due to wind waves and redistributing sediments within the basin. In this study we present a mathematical model for sediment entrainment, transport and deposition due to the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves. The model is coupled with a hydrodynamic module based on the shallow water equations and with a module for the generation and propagation of wind waves. The sediment transport model describes the sediments by the way of a bi-granular mixtures composed by both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments thus considering the contemporary presence of clay, silt and sand which usually characterizes estuaries and tidal basins. Moreover, the model describes the bed evolution and evaluates the variation of bed sediment composition considering also the transition between cohesive and non-cohesive behavior. Attention is focused on some issues concerning the definition of a reliable initial bed composition and the incipient sediment motion which is treated following a stochastic approach for the bottom shear stress and for the critical shear stress distribution. The model is applied to the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) and the results of different simulations are compared, with good agreement, to a series of turbidity measurements collected inside the lagoon. The application of the model to the present bathymetry of the Venice lagoon allows for a first estimation of the actual net amount of sand and mud flowing through the three inlets and also gives some information on bottom evolution in terms of elevation and composition.

  18. In-situ erosion of cohesive sediment in a large shallow lake experiencing long-term decline in wind speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tingfeng; Timo, Huttula; Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Janne, Ropponen; Yan, Wenming

    2016-08-01

    In order to address the major factors affecting cohesive sediment erosion using high-frequency in-situ observations in Lake Taihu, and the response of this erosion to long-term decline in wind speed, high-frequency meteorological, hydrological and turbidity sensors were deployed to record continuous field wind-induced wave, current and sediment erosion processes; Statistical analyses and mathematic modeling spanning 44 years were also conducted. The results revealed that the unconsolidated surficial cohesive sediment frequently experiences the processes of erosion, suspension and deposition. Wind waves, generated by the absorption of wind energy, are the principal force driving this cycle. When the wavelength-to-water depth ratio (L/D) is 2-3, wave propagation is affected by lakebed friction and surface erosion occurs. When L/D > 3, the interaction between wave and lakebed increases to induce massive erosion. However, influenced by rapid urbanization in the Lake Taihu basin, wind speed has significantly decreased, by an average rate of -0.022 m s-1 a-1, from 1970 to 2013. This has reduced the erodible area, represented by simulated L/D, at a rate of -16.9 km2 a-1 in the autumn and winter, and -8.1 km2 a-1 in the spring and summer. This significant decrease in surface erosion area, and the near disappearance of areas experiencing massive erosion, imply that Lake Taihu has become calmer, which can be expected to have adverse effects on the lake ecosystem by increasing eutrophication and nuisance cyanobacteria blooms.

  19. Preliminary results of the study on wind erosion in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau using 137Cs technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The worldwide fallout of caesium-137 (137Cs) associated with the nuclear weapon tests during the 1950s and 1960s has provided a valuable man-made tracer for studies of soil erosion and sediment delivery. But relatively few researchers have used it to estimate wind erosion. In this note, the 137Cs technique is introduced into the studies of wind erosion and its modern processes in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. Two 137Cs reference inventories of 982.11 and 2 376.04 Bq·m-2 were established preminarily, distributed in the south and middle-north parts of the studied area respectively. By analyzing the patterns of 137Cs depth profiles from sampling sites, the aeolian processes of erosion and deposition in nearly 40 years have been revealed, i.e. the shrub coppice dunes (S1) and semi-fixed dunefields (S3) experienced the alternation of erosion and deposition, while the grasslands (S4, S6 and S7) and dry farmlands (S5) suffered erosion only. By using 137Cs model, the average wind erosion rates for shrub coppice dune (S1), semi-fixed dune fields (S3), dry farmlands (S5) and grasslands (S4, S6 and S7) were estimated to be 84.14, 69.43, 30.68 and 21.84 t·ha-1·a-1 respectively, averaging 47.59 t·ha-1·a-1 for the whole plateau, which can be regarded as of the medium erosion standard. These results derived from 137Cs for the first time have significant implications for the further research of wind erosion and desertification control in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  20. Assessment of future scenarios for wind erosion sensitivity changes based on ALADIN and REMO regional climate model simulation data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezősi Gábor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The changes in rate and pattern of wind erosion sensitivity due to climate change were investigated for 2021–2050 and 2071–2100 compared to the reference period (1961–1990 in Hungary. The sensitivities of the main influencing factors (soil texture, vegetation cover and climate factor were evaluated by fuzzy method and a combined wind erosion sensitivity map was compiled. The climate factor, as the driving factor of the changes, was assessed based on observed data for the reference period, while REMO and ALADIN regional climate model simulation data for the future periods. The changes in wind erosion sensitivity were evaluated on potentially affected agricultural land use types, and hot spot areas were allocated. Based on the results, 5–6% of the total agricultural areas were high sensitive areas in the reference period. In the 21st century slight or moderate changes of wind erosion sensitivity can be expected, and mostly ‘pastures’, ‘complex cultivation patterns’, and ‘land principally occupied by agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation’ are affected. The applied combination of multi-indicator approach and fuzzy analysis provides novelty in the field of land sensitivity assessment. The method is suitable for regional scale analysis of wind erosion sensitivity changes and supports regional planning by allocating priority areas where changes in agro-technics or land use have to be considered.

  1. Assessment of future scenarios for wind erosion sensitivity changes based on ALADIN and REMO regional climate model simulation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezősi, Gábor; Blanka, Viktória; Bata, Teodóra; Ladányi, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Gábor; Meyer, Burghard C.

    2016-07-01

    The changes in rate and pattern of wind erosion sensitivity due to climate change were investigated for 2021-2050 and 2071-2100 compared to the reference period (1961-1990) in Hungary. The sensitivities of the main influencing factors (soil texture, vegetation cover and climate factor) were evaluated by fuzzy method and a combined wind erosion sensitivity map was compiled. The climate factor, as the driving factor of the changes, was assessed based on observed data for the reference period, while REMO and ALADIN regional climate model simulation data for the future periods. The changes in wind erosion sensitivity were evaluated on potentially affected agricultural land use types, and hot spot areas were allocated. Based on the results, 5-6% of the total agricultural areas were high sensitive areas in the reference period. In the 21st century slight or moderate changes of wind erosion sensitivity can be expected, and mostly `pastures', `complex cultivation patterns', and `land principally occupied by agriculture with significant areas of natural vegetation' are affected. The applied combination of multi-indicator approach and fuzzy analysis provides novelty in the field of land sensitivity assessment. The method is suitable for regional scale analysis of wind erosion sensitivity changes and supports regional planning by allocating priority areas where changes in agro-technics or land use have to be considered.

  2. Long-term Soil C and N Dynamics in Response to Enhanced Wind Erosion in Semiarid Grassland, Using CENTURY Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Okin, G. S.; Alavrez, L.; Epstein, H.

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies show that enhanced wind erosion changes soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in desert grasslands of southern New Mexico. However, long-term effects at the scale of decades to centuries are less known, especially under the conditions of drought, directional changes in climate, and land use pressures. Additionally, previous studies have focused on the isolated response of soil C and N, with little understanding of their interactions and differential response of other sub-pools. Using CENTURY, a process-based biogeochemical model, we evaluate the potential impacts of enhanced wind erosion on the long-term dynamics of C and N in the Jornada Experimental Range, southern New Mexico. We find that enhanced wind erosion does have a significant effect on long-term dynamics of C and N that are similar to the short-term dynamics observed in a field experiment at Jornada. The relationships between pools of C and N, levels of wind erosion and vegetation cover reduction as well as the mechanisms by which wind erosion changes C and N cycling in desert grasslands are discussed.

  3. 风蚀预报系统(WEPS)在民勤荒漠地区的应用分析研究%Application of wind erosion prediction system in Minqin Desert Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕; 王萍

    2013-01-01

    Wind erosion results in degradation of the land resources and destroys the ecological environment, which had stimulated a great deal research work in this region. How to predict the soil erosion and the changes of ecological environment aroused by the wind erosion has become an important problem, and it is necessary in the wind erosion control and sustainable use of the land. Based on the field observation of three sand storms in Minqin Desert, the paper investigated the application of Wind Erosion Prediction System (WEPS) in this area. The sand storms occurred on April 19, April 22 and April 23, April 30 of 2009, respectivly. Because there was a continuous wind on April 22 and April 23, the Aeolian sediments after the storm on April 23 was adopted and the two days' storm was accounted as a sand storm. The paper applied the wind erosion submodel of WEPS to calculate the aeolian discharge in Minqin desert, aiming at exploring the adaptability of WEPS in China, or rather in this region. The results showed that there is a big difference between the practical measured aeolian discharge and the predicted wind-blown mass transport. For fields without natural vegetation and any other plant, WEPS gave a relative good estimation of Aeolian discharge , the maximum calculated value is about 2.2 times as the measured soil discharge mass, and the minimal value is just 0.47. For fields with natural vegetation at and around the research plot, WEPS overestimated the aeolian discharge mass. The maximum calculated value by WEPS is about 41 times as the measured, and the minimal ratio is about 6.7. So, if this model is used without any amendment, it will give a wrong aerolian discharge. Input parameters for WEPS such as wind speed, roughness length, vegetation cover, soil crust and soil diameter were measured to determine friction velocity and threshold friction velocity. Therefore, to want a good prediction of WEPS in China, a great deal of experiments should be conducted to measure

  4. 风水复合侵蚀研究述评%A review of the research on complex erosion by wind and water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋阳; 严平; 刘连友

    2006-01-01

    Complex erosion by wind and water, which is also called aeolian-fluvial interactions, is an important erosion process and landscape in arid and semiarid regions. The effectiveness of links between wind and water process, spatial environmental transitions and temporal environmental change are the three main driving forces determining the geomorphologic significance of aeolian-fluvial interactions. As a complex interrelating and intercoupling system, complex erosion by wind and water has spatialtemporal variation features. The process of complex erosion by wind and water can be divided into palaeoenvironmental process and contemporary process. Early work in drylands has often been attributed 1930s that the research on complex erosion by wind and water had been conducted. There are two obstacles restricting the research of complex erosion by wind and water. Firstly, how to transform in different temporal and spatial scales is still unsettled; and secondly, the research methodology is still immature. In the future, the mechanism and control of erosion, the complex soil erodibility in wind and water erosion will be the focus of research on complex erosion by wind and water.

  5. Wind erosion as an environmental transport pathway of glyphosate and AMPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Célia P. M.; Goossens, Dirk; Rezaei, Mahrooz; Riksen, Michel; Mol, Hans G. J.; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    health risk assessment studies. Moreover, glyphosate applications during dry periods in regions susceptible to wind erosion should be avoided.

  6. Variable wind ripple migration at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, observed by timelapse imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Valdez, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    Granule ripples at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GSDNPP) were observed using inexpensive digital timelapse cameras over a 70-day period in winter 2010-2011. The ripples migrated during a handful of discrete events — visible ripple movement occurred on only 11 days during the observation period. The movement conditions are documented with hourly and 15-minute records from two nearby weather stations, and by a cup anemometer at the site itself. During the most prominent movement episode, when local winds averaged ~ 10 m/s, ripples of several sizes were observed simultaneously and a reciprocal relationship of ripple size and propagation speed was seen, with small (~ 10 cm) ripples moving at ~ 1.4 cm/min, and larger (~ 80 cm) ripples at ~ 0.15 cm/min. Ripple sizes and morphologies evolve throughout the observation period.

  7. Wind-blown sand movement periods on the Nyírség alluvial fan, Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buró, Botond; Lóki, József; Sipos, György; Négyesi, Gábor; Andrási, Bence; Jakab, Attila; Félegyházi, Enikő; Molnár, Mihály

    2017-04-01

    Wind-blown sand movement periods on the Nyírség alluvial fan, Hungary The Nyírség is an alluvial fan, was built by rivers, which were flown down from the NE Carpathians. When the weather was dry, wind-blown sand was blowed out and the wind started to develop the aeolian landforms. The first significant sand movements in the Nyírség was in the Upper plenniglacial and the Late glacial. The main landforms of the Nyírség were developed at this time. The aeolic transformation of the land was not completed in the Nyírség at the end of the Pleistocene. In the Holocene the sand moved within small area, mainly by anthropogenic impact. Our aim is clarify the age of the wind-blown sand movements period, with different absolute (Radiocarbon dating method, OSL), and relative (Archaeological finds, Pollen analyses) dating methods. We have collected for the age determining charcoal from many sand quarry (Gégény, Kántorjánosi, Nyíradony, Nagyvarsány, Máriapócs and Lövőpetri) which contain fossil soil layer. For the OSL measurements samples were collected from Baktalórántháza, Gégény and Kántorjánosi sand quarries. We collected samples from 5 places for the pollen analyses (Nyírtanya, Máriapócs, Nyírbéltek-Nyírlúgos, Nyírábrány, Vámospércs), and also from an archaeological excavation (Nyíregyháza- Oros). The new age dates show us, that in the Nyírség the first significant sand movements were in the cold and drier period of the Upper pleniglacial and Late glacial (Baktalórántháza, Nyírtanya, Vámospércs). At the end of the Pleistocene the sand movements not competed in the Nyírség (Gégény, Kántorjánosi, Nyírábrány). In the Holocene there were many little sand movement periods, mainly caused by anthropogenic impact (Nyíradony, Nyíregyháza-Oros). The research was supported by the European Union and the State of Hungary, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund in the project of GINOP-2.3.2.-15-2016-00009 'ICER

  8. Shelter Index and a simple wind speed parameter to characterize vegetation control of sand transport threshold and Flu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nield, J. M.; Nickling, W. G.; Furtak-Cole, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in many dryland environments from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (SI=distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height) and particle threshold expressed as the ratio of wind speed measured at 0.45 times the mean plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m when saltation commences, and saltation flux. The results are used to evaluate SI as a parameter to characterize the influence of vegetation on local winds and sediment transport conditions. Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in two vegetation communities: mature streets of mesquite covered nebkhas and incipient nebkhas dominated by low mesquite plants. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each 10° wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning. SI can show the susceptibility to wind erosion at different time scales, i.e., event, seasonal, or annual, but in a supply-limited system it can fail to define actual flux amounts due to a lack of knowledge of the distribution of sediment across the surface of interest with respect to the patterns of SI.

  9. An improved numerical model suggests potential differences of wind-blown sand between on Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, T. L.; Fu, L. T.; Liu, L.; Zheng, X. J.

    2017-06-01

    The studies on wind-blown sand are crucial for understanding the change of climate and landscape on Mars. However, the disadvantages of the saltation models may result in unreliable predictions. In this paper, the saltation model has been improved from two main aspects, the aerodynamic surface roughness and the lift-off parameters. The aerodynamic surface roughness is expressed as function of particle size, wind strength, air density, and air dynamic viscosity. The lift-off parameters are improved through including the dependence of restitution coefficient on incident parameters and the correlation between saltating speed and angle. The improved model proved to be capable of reproducing the observed data well in both stable stage and evolution process. The modeling of wind-blown sand is promoted by all improved aspects, and the dependence of restitution coefficient on incident parameters could not be ignored. The constant restitution coefficient and uncorrelated lift-off parameter distributions would lead to both the overestimation of the sand transport rate and apparent surface roughness and the delay of evolution process. The distribution of lift-off speed and the evolution of lift-off parameters on Mars are found to be different from those on Earth. This may thus suggest that it is inappropriate to predict the evolution of wind-blown sand by using the lift-off velocity obtained in steady state saltation. And it also may be problematic to predict the wind-blown sand on Mars through applying the lift-off velocity obtained upon terrestrial conditions directly.

  10. Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.-P.; Newman, C. E.; Richardson, M. I.; Lucas, A.; Leprince, S.; Bridges, N. T.

    2014-09-01

    Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1-100 km scale) of τs=0.01±0.0015 N m-2.

  11. Soil Wind Erosion Risk Assessment in Yulin City Using T-S Fuzzy Neural Network Model%基于T-S模糊神经网络模型的榆林市土壤风蚀危险度评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新颜; 曹晓仪; 董治宝

    2013-01-01

    Soli wind erosion,one of the major causes of environmental problems such as farmland degradation and desertification,producing large scale of sandstorm,polluting the environment and harming human beings' health in arid and semi-arid regions,is the detachment,entrainment,transport deposition of soil particles caused by wind.It is also a serious socio-economic issue which limits the development in those ecologically fragile areas.In the previous studies,methods for accessing wind erosion are based on land use information.In this article,however,another approach that uses GIS and T-S fuzzy neural network model to access soil wind erosion risk is presented.The approach is applied to a case study of the Yulin City located on the wind-sand transition regions of Mu Us sandy land,Inner Mongolian plateau and loess plateau,northwest China,where most serious expansion of desertification is proceeding.Environmental elements of soil wind erosion were selected and their spatial distribution data were extracted using GIS technology and T-S fuzzy neural network model was constructed after training the sample data of different wind erosion risk level.The model was applied to mapping wind erosion risk after inputting the extracted date.The entire jobs were based on the software of ArcGIS9.3 and MATLAB.The results show that:Firstly,the comparison of the risk assessment with land use information in Yulin City demonstrates that the result is in conformity with actual conditions.T-S fuzzy neural network model can reveal the relationship between risk of soil wind erosion and its environment effectively,and provide the basis for predicting wind erosion.Secondly,environmental elements such as wind energy,vegetation coverage,temperature,precipitation,topography control the distribution properties of wind erosion risk in Yulin City.Thirdly,there are 4 divisions of wind erosion risk in Yulin City:the severe risk level,the intense risk level,the moderate risk level and the slight risk level

  12. Data report for the geologic and scenic quality evaluation of selected sand and gravel sites on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William H.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Arbogast, Belinda; Lindsey, David A.

    2011-01-01

    In April 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field studies on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, to inventory and evaluate sand and gravel deposits underlying river terraces on tribal lands along the Wind River. This report contains the results for 12 sites of sand and gravel deposits evaluated for their potential use as aggregate in Portland cement concrete, asphalt, and base course. The report provides the results of: * The USGS geologic studies and engineering tests. * A conclusion and recommendation for the best use of sand and gravel materials. * Calculations of available sand and gravel materials. * A scenic quality landscape inventory and evaluation.

  13. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  14. Grazing impacts on the susceptibility of rangelands to wind erosion: The effects of stocking rate, stocking strategy and land condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubault, Hélène; Webb, Nicholas P.; Strong, Craig L.; McTainsh, Grant H.; Leys, John F.; Scanlan, Joe C.

    2015-06-01

    An estimated 110 Mt of dust is eroded by wind from the Australian land surface each year, most of which originates from the arid and semi-arid rangelands. Livestock production is thought to increase the susceptibility of the rangelands to wind erosion by reducing vegetation cover and modifying surface soil stability. However, research is yet to quantify the impacts of grazing land management on the erodibility of the Australian rangelands, or determine how these impacts vary among land types and over time. We present a simulation analysis that links a pasture growth and animal production model (GRASP) to the Australian Land Erodibility Model (AUSLEM) to evaluate the impacts of stocking rate, stocking strategy and land condition on the erodibility of four land types in western Queensland, Australia. Our results show that declining land condition, over stocking, and using inflexible stocking strategies have potential to increase land erodibility and amplify accelerated soil erosion. However, land erodibility responses to grazing are complex and influenced by land type sensitivities to different grazing strategies and local climate characteristics. Our simulations show that land types which are more resilient to livestock grazing tend to be least susceptible to accelerated wind erosion. Increases in land erodibility are found to occur most often during climatic transitions when vegetation cover is most sensitive to grazing pressure. However, grazing effects are limited during extreme wet and dry periods when the influence of climate on vegetation cover is strongest. Our research provides the opportunity to estimate the effects of different land management practices across a range of land types, and provides a better understanding of the mechanisms of accelerated erosion resulting from pastoral activities. The approach could help further assessment of land erodibility at a broader scale notably if combined with wind erosion models.

  15. Testing Shelter Index and a Simple Wind Speed Parameter to Characterize Vegetation Control of Sand Transport Threshold and Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, John; Nield, Joanna; Nickling, William; Furtak-Cole, Eden

    2013-04-01

    Wind erosion and dust emissions occur in the Chihuahuan Desert surrounding Las Cruces NM from a range of surfaces with different types and amounts of vegetation. Understanding how vegetation modulates these processes remains a research challenge. One important aspect of research is to develop a relationship between a descriptor of the surface roughness that can be used to provide an indication of how susceptible the sediment transport system is to activation by wind. Here we present results from a study that examines the relationship between an index of shelter (distance from a point to the nearest upwind vegetation/vegetation height), as originally proposed by Okin (2008), and particle threshold expressed as a ratio of wind measured at 0.45 times the plant height divided by the wind speed at 17 m, and saltation flux (g cm-2 s-1). Saltation flux was measured using sediment traps positioned 15 cm above the surface and nearby optical gate sensors (Wenglor® model YH03PCT8)measuring saltation activity also placed at a height of 15 cm. The results are used to evaluate shelter index as a parameter to characterize the local winds as influenced by the vegetation and sediment transport conditions (threshold and transport). Wind speed, wind direction, saltation activity and point saltation flux were measured at 35 locations in defined test areas (~13,000 m2) in three vegetation communities: mature mesquite covered nebkha dunes, incipient nebkha dunes dominated by low mesquite plants, and a mature creosote bush area. Measurement positions represent the most open areas, and hence those places most susceptible to wind erosion among the vegetation elements. Shelter index was calculated for each measurement position for each approximately 10 degree wind direction bin using digital elevation models for each site acquired using terrestrial laser scanning.

  16. Comparison of residual stresses in sand- and chill casting of ductile cast iron wind turbine main shafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Frandsen, J. O.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2015-01-01

    In this work, simulations of pouring, solidification and cooling, and residual stress evolution of sand and chill cast wind turbine main shafts is performed. The models are made in the commercial software MAGMAsoft. As expected, the cooling rate of the sand casting is shown to be much lower than...... for the chill casting, resulting in a very course microstructure.From the simulations the nodule count is found to be 17 nodules per mm2 and 159 nodules permm2 for the sand and chill casting, respectively, in the critical region of the main bearing seat.This is verified from nodule counts performed on the real...... cast main shafts. Residual stressevaluations show an overall increase of the maximum principal stress field for the chill casting,which is expected. However, the stresses are found to be in compression on the surface of thechill cast main shaft, which is unforeseen....

  17. Droplet evaporation from porous surfaces; model validation from field and wind tunnel experiments for sand and concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R. F.; Roberts, I. D.

    The evaporation model of Roberts and Griffiths (1995 Atmospheric Environment 29, 1307-1317) has been subjected to an extensive validation exercise based on a major campaign of field experiments on evaporation from surfaces composed of sand and of concrete. This complements the previous validation which was limited to wind tunnel experiments on sand surfaces. Additionally, the validation using wind tunnel data has been extended to include concrete surfaces. The model describes the constant-rate and falling-rate periods that characterise evaporation from porous media. During the constant-rate period, the evaporation is solely determined by the vapour transport rate into the air. During the falling-rate period, the process in the porous medium is modelled as a receding evaporation front, the overall evaporation rate being determined by the combined effects of vapour transport through the pore network and subsequently into the air. The field trials programme was conducted at sites in the USA and the UK, and examined the evaporation of diethyl malonate droplets from sand and concrete surfaces. Vapour concentrations at several heights in the plume were measured at the centre of a 1 m radius annular source (of width 10 cm) contaminated by uniformly sized droplets (2.4 or 4.1 mm in diameter), key meteorological data being measured at the same time. The evaporation was quantified by coupling concentration and wind speed data. In all, 22 trials were performed on sand and concrete; a further 8 were performed on non-porous surfaces (aluminium foil and slate) as references. The model performance was evaluated against the experimental data in terms of two quantities, the initial evaporation rate of the embedded droplets, and the mass-fraction remaining in the substrate at intervals over the evaporation episode. Overall, the model performance was best in the case of the field experiments for concrete, and the wind tunnel experiments for sand; the performance for wind tunnel

  18. Extensive formation of sinkholes in unconsolidated rock due to underground erosive removal of sand at a marginal batter of an opencast mine - causes, process and geotechnical safety measures. Grossflaechige Erdfallbildungen im Lockergestein durch unterirdische erosive Ausraeumung von Sand and einer Tagebauendboeschung - Ursachen, Verlauf und geotechnische Sicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, H.

    1991-08-01

    When the ground water rose in the marginal batter of an opencast mine damage occurred. This was caused by the processes of internal erosion and suffusion in fine sand layers of slight thickness and by the disintegration of the overlying strata due to the formation of sinkholes. Effective safety measures involved lowering the ground-water level in the zone immediately in front of the area in question and installing an auxiliary filter unit at the marginal batter. (orig.).

  19. A case for wind enhanced tectonics: Plio-Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, and structural evolution controlled by wind within the Qaidam Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heermance, R. V.; Kapp, P. A.; Pullen, A.; Garzione, C. N.

    2012-12-01

    The interplay between tectonics and localized erosion through fluvial and/or glacial processes has been widely documented. Wind erosion, however, has gone largely un-recognized as a potentially important process in this concept. We document an acceleration in shortening in response to wind deflation above actively deforming fault propagation anticlines since ~3.0 Ma in the Qaidam Basin, China. Evidence for this comes from a 1750 m measured section along the southwestern flank of an intra-basin anticline (38.33°N, 93.46°E) and regional cross-sections. Magnetostratigraphy provides age control for prominent stratigraphic and isotopic changes within the section. A positive shift of ~6‰ in the δ18O values of lake carbonates occurs at 1090 m (3.1 Ma), interpreted to be the result of increased aridity at that time. An intraformational angular unconformity, associated with anticline growth, appears at 1172 m (3.0 Ma) and records the initiation of growth strata deposition. At 1235 m (2.6 Ma), a marked lithofacies change to sub-aerial, evaporitic conditions is observed, and is associated with a 3-fold reduction in sedimentation rate. Paleo-yardangs, which are wind-eroded landforms preserved in the stratigraphic record, appear at 1260 m (2.4 Ma). These observations indicate that regional aridification at 3.1 Ma was followed closely by or coincident with fold growth. Facies changes to more evaporitic strata and erosion of the basin floor (based on paleo-yardangs) trailed initial climate and tectonic changes by 500,000-700,000 years. Although the on-lap relationship of post-growth strata implies that syn-tectonic strata may have pinched-out along the flanks of the anticline, our new analysis indicates that at least 1172 m of pre-growth strata must have been eroded from the core of the anticline since 3.0 Ma at a time-averaged rate of ~0.4 mm/year, comparable to fluvial and glacial erosion rates within active tectonic settings. The lack of an integrated fluvial channel

  20. Unprecedented wind erosion and perturbation of surface geochemistry marks the Anthropocene in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Samuel K.; McGowan, Hamish A.; Kamber, Balz S.; Knight, Jon M.; Denholm, John; Zawadzki, Atun

    2014-01-01

    the last continent to undergo industrial development, is an ideal environment in which to quantify the magnitude of human-induced environmental change during the Anthropocene because its entire agricultural and industrial history has occurred within this period. Analysis of an alpine peat mire showed that rapid industrial and agricultural development (both pastoral and cropping) over the past 200 years has resulted in significant environmental change in Australia. Beginning in the 1880s, rates of wind erosion and metal enrichment were up to 10 and 30 times that of background natural conditions, respectively. Increased dust deposition and an expansion in dust source areas were found to map the progression of European farming across the continent, while dust deposition pulses in the mire matched known land degradation events. After 1990 dust deposition decreased, returning to pre-1880 rates. This was attributed to three factors: net soil loss following more than a century of agricultural activity, increased environmental awareness and soil conservation, and changing windiness. Metal enrichment in the mire reached approximately 2 times natural background accumulation rates by the 1980s as Australia's mining industry expanded. However, metal enrichment continued to increase after the 1980s reaching an average of ~5 times background rates by 2006 and reflecting increased mineral resource development in Australia. Collectively, the results show that changes to Australia's geochemical and sedimentary systems, as a result of agricultural and industrial development, have profoundly changed the Australian environment during the past two centuries.

  1. Parameterization of volcanic ash remobilization by wind-tunnel erosion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bello, Elisabetta; Taddeucci, Jacopo; Merrison, Jonathan; Alois, Stefano; Iversen, Jens Jacob; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2017-04-01

    The remobilization of volcanic ash from the ground is one of the many problems posing threat to life and infrastructures during and after the course of an explosive volcanic eruption. A proper management of the risks connected to this problem requires a thorough understanding of the factors that influence and promote the dispersal of particles over large distances. Towards this target, we conducted a series of experiments aimed at defining first-order processes controlling the remobilization threshold of ash particles by wind erosion. In the framework of the EU-funded Europlanet project, we joinly used the environmental wind tunnel facility at Aarhus University (DK) and the state-of-the art high-speed imaging equipment of INGV experimental lab (Italy) to capture at unparalleled temporal and spatial resolution the removal dynamics of ash-sized (half-millimetre to micron-sized) particles. A homogenous layer of particles was set at on a plate placed downwind a boundary layer setup. Resuspension processes were filmed at 2000 fps and 50 micron pixel resolution, and the plate weighted pre and post-experiment. Explored variables include: 1) wind speed (from ca. 1 to 7 m/s) and boundary layer structure; 2) particle grain size (from 32-63 to 90-125 micron), and sample sorting); 3) chemical and textural features, using basalt and trachyte samples from Campi Flegrei (Pomici Principali,10 ka) and Eyjafjallajökull (May 2010) eruptions; and 4) temperature and humidity, by conducting experiments either at ambient conditions or with a heated sample. We found that the grain size distribution exerts a strong control on the fundamental dynamics of gas-particle coupling. Particles > 90 micron detach from the particles layer individually, also entering the gas flow individually. Conversely, removal < 63 micron particles occurs in clumps of aggregates. These clumps, once taken in charge by the gas flow, are frequently disaggregated and dispersed rapidly (order of few milliseconds). Our

  2. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  3. Evaluation of the Synergistic Effect of Erosion-Corrosion on AISI 4330 Steel in Saline-Sand Multiphase Flow by Electrochemical and Gravimetric Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Yesid Peña Ballesteros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The synergistic effects of fluid flow, sand particles, and solution pH on erosion-corrosion of AISI 4330 steel alloy in saline-sand medium were studied through a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE system by weight-loss and electrochemical measurements. The worn surface was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results show that, under all the test conditions assessed, the passivity of the steel alloy could not be maintained; as a result, an activation mechanism dominates the corrosion process of steel alloy. Furthermore, the potentiodynamic curves show that, with the increasing of the electrode flow rate and particle size, the anodic current density increased, which is due to deterioration of the electrode by the impacting slurry. Although the increase of particle size affects the anodic current density, the effect of particle size does not cause a significant change in the polarization behavior of the steel electrode. The electrochemical impedance and potentiodynamic curves suggest that erosion-corrosion phenomenon of the ASISI 4330 steel is under mixed control of mass transport and charge transfer. The inductive loops formed in the impedance plots are representative of an increase in roughness of the electrode caused by the particles impacting at the surface. The change in the passivity of the steel alloy as the pH is altered plays an important role in the corrosion rate.

  4. 风沙运动中沙粒旋转角速度变化规律的数值模拟%Numerical simulation of variation of sands angular speed in wind- blown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳高伟; 蔺海晓; 贾慧娜

    2011-01-01

    针对风沙运动中沙粒旋转这一风沙灾害的重要因素,建立风-沙-温度相互耦合作用的描述风沙运动发展过程的数学模型,数值模拟了风沙运动中沙粒旋转角速度的变化及分布规律.定量分析表明:不同高度处沙粒旋转角速度的分布概率服从单峰非对称分布,峰值呈尖点,且沙粒下旋旋转角速度约400r/s时沙粒概率密度最大;旋转沙粒起跳后开始上升及快要落地阶段,其旋转速度变化较大.同时,Magnus效应对沙粒平均跃移轨迹、输沙率等风沙运动宏观因素均有显著影响.%Spinning of sands is an important factor in wind - blown sand casualty, so a theoretical model is suggested in this paper to mathematically describe the effect of spinning of sands on the evolution of a wind - blown sand movement, which is considered the coupling interaction among the wind flow, sahating sands, and temperature. The numerical results show that at different height the distribution probabilities of angular speed of sands is single - peaked and asymmetric in wind - blown sand movement, and when the distribution probabilities reaches the maximal value, sands are downward spinning and angular speed reaches 400 r/s. When rotational sands lift - off and will fall the ground, variation of sands angular speed sands are more obvious. Meanwhile, Magnus effect apparently influence the trajectories of sahating sands, the transport rate of sand, and so on.

  5. Attraction of the sand fly Nyssomyia neivai (Diptera: Psychodidae) to chemical compounds in a wind tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Vicente Estevam; Corrêa, Arlene Gonçalves; Goulart, Thais Marchi; Silva, Flávia Benini da Rocha; Ortiz, Dennys Ghenry Samillan; Pinto, Mara Cristina

    2015-03-07

    Similar to other hematophagous insects, male and female sand flies must feed on plants to obtain sugar and, subsequently, energy to complete their life cycles. A large number of compounds emitted by plants may act as volatile signals to these insects. Primary alcohols have been detected in some plants, but in small amounts. In a previous report, the attractiveness of saturated primary alcohols with 7 to 9 carbons was evaluated for Lutzomyia longipalpis, the vector of American visceral leishmaniasis, with positive results. In the present study, a wide range of primary alcohols, 3 to 10 carbons, were tested to investigate their attractiveness to another sand fly species, Nyssomyia neivai, a putative vector of American cutaneous leishmaniasis. The mixture of compounds that induced the best sand fly response was also evaluated. Of the eight compounds evaluated, hexanol and octanol elicited the best attractive responses for sand fly females. Phytochemicals may be an interesting source of search for new sand fly attractants.

  6. The National Wind Erosion Research Network: Building a standardized long-term data resource for aeolian research, modeling and land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and USDI Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for a broad and coordinated research program to develop wind ...

  7. [Estimation of the effect derived from wind erosion of soil and dust emission in Tianjin suburbs on the central district based on WEPS model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Han, Ting-Ting; Li, Tao; Ji, Ya-Qin; Bai, Zhi-Peng; Wang, Bin

    2012-07-01

    Due to the lack of a prediction model for current wind erosion in China and the slow development for such models, this study aims to predict the wind erosion of soil and the dust emission and develop a prediction model for wind erosion in Tianjin by investigating the structure, parameter systems and the relationships among the parameter systems of the prediction models for wind erosion in typical areas, using the U.S. wind erosion prediction system (WEPS) as reference. Based on the remote sensing technique and the test data, a parameter system was established for the prediction model of wind erosion and dust emission, and a model was developed that was suitable for the prediction of wind erosion and dust emission in Tianjin. Tianjin was divided into 11 080 blocks with a resolution of 1 x 1 km2, among which 7 778 dust emitting blocks were selected. The parameters of the blocks were localized, including longitude, latitude, elevation and direction, etc.. The database files of blocks were localized, including wind file, climate file, soil file and management file. The weps. run file was edited. Based on Microsoft Visualstudio 2008, secondary development was done using C + + language, and the dust fluxes of 7 778 blocks were estimated, including creep and saltation fluxes, suspension fluxes and PM10 fluxes. Based on the parameters of wind tunnel experiments in Inner Mongolia, the soil measurement data and climate data in suburbs of Tianjin, the wind erosion module, wind erosion fluxes, dust emission release modulus and dust release fluxes were calculated for the four seasons and the whole year in suburbs of Tianjin. In 2009, the total creep and saltation fluxes, suspension fluxes and PM10 fluxes in the suburbs of Tianjin were 2.54 x 10(6) t, 1.25 x 10(7) t and 9.04 x 10(5) t, respectively, among which, the parts pointing to the central district were 5.61 x 10(5) t, 2.89 x 10(6) t and 2.03 x 10(5) t, respectively.

  8. Measurements of wind friction speeds over lava surfaces and assessment of sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Iversen, James D.

    1987-01-01

    Wind velocity profiles were obtained over alluvial plains, lava flows, and a cinder cone in the Mojave Desert to determine the wind shear and the potential for particle transport. It was found that aerodynamic roughness for winds increases nearly a factor of 5 as flow crosses from the alluvium to the lava surface, resulting in wind shear that is 21 percent greater. Thus, wind erosion and sand flux may be substantially enhanced over the lava field. Moreover, wind flow turbulence is enhanced in the wake of the cinder cone, which also increases erosion and sediment transportation by the wind.

  9. Growth and form of the mound in Gale Crater, Mars: Slope-wind enhanced erosion and transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kite, Edwin S

    2012-01-01

    Gale crater, the landing site of the Curiosity Mars rover, hosts a 5 kilometer high layered mound of uncertain origin which may represent an important archive of the planet's past climate. Although widely considered to be an erosional remnant of a once crater-filling unit, we combine structural measurements and a new model of formation to show how this mound may have grown in place near the center of the crater under the influence of topographic slope-induced winds. This mechanism implicates airfall-dominated deposition with a limited role for lacustrine or fluvial activity in the formation of the Gale mound, and is not favorable for the preservation of organic carbon. Slope-wind enhanced erosion and transport is widely applicable to a range of similar sedimentary mounds found across the Martian surface.

  10. The Effect of Climate Change on Wind-water Complex Erosion Region%气候变化对风水蚀复合区的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安志山; 李栋梁; 王涛; 张伟民; 屈建军

    2012-01-01

    风水蚀复合区作为农牧交错带的敏感区域,对气候变化有着显著的响应。通过实地考察和气象资料的分析,厘定了风水蚀复合区的概念并对其范围加以界定。由于风水蚀复合区区内气候类型复杂、侵蚀动力多样、风季和雨季的交错分布及其脆弱的生态环境,造成水土流失和沙漠化相当严重,并发育了独特的地貌景观。风水蚀复合区的界限受降水的影响而呈南北摆动,干旱年,向东南方向移动;多雨年,向西北方向移动。%The wind-water complex erosion region is a sensitive part of agro-pasture interlocked zone in northern China, and has significant response to global climate change. The concept and geographical scope of the wind-water complex erosion region have been defined through on-the-spot investigation and meteoro- logical data analysis. In the wind-water complex erosion region, wind and water have combined action, and ecological environment there is vulnerable. Therefore, the diverse weather and erosion forces give rise to soil erosion and desertification, which are serious in the wind-water complex erosion region. It has also de- veloped unique geomorphologic landscape. The boundary of wind-water complex erosion region is influenced by precipitation and it exhibits a characteristic of north-south direction swing. It moves to southeast in dry years, and to northwest in humid years.

  11. The National Wind Erosion Research Network: Building a standardized long-term data resource for aeolian research, modeling and land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Van Zee, Justin W.; Courtright, Ericha M.; Hugenholtz, Christopher H.; Zobeck, Ted M.; Okin, Gregory S.; Barchyn, Thomas E.; Billings, Benjamin J.; Boyd, Robert; Clingan, Scott D.; Cooper, Brad F.; Duniway, Michael C.; Derner, Justin D.; Fox, Fred A.; Havstad, Kris M.; Heilman, Philip; LaPlante, Valerie; Ludwig, Noel A.; Metz, Loretta J.; Nearing, Mark A.; Norfleet, M. Lee; Pierson, Frederick B.; Sanderson, Matt A.; Sharratt, Brenton S.; Steiner, Jean L.; Tatarko, John; Tedela, Negussie H.; Toledo, David; Unnasch, Robert S.; Van Pelt, R. Scott; Wagner, Larry

    2016-09-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the United States Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the United States Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for a long-term research program to meet critical challenges in wind erosion research and management in the United States. The Network has three aims: (1) provide data to support understanding of basic aeolian processes across land use types, land cover types, and management practices, (2) support development and application of models to assess wind erosion and dust emission and their impacts on human and environmental systems, and (3) encourage collaboration among the aeolian research community and resource managers for the transfer of wind erosion technologies. The Network currently consists of thirteen intensively instrumented sites providing measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions, and soil and vegetation properties that influence wind erosion. Network sites are located across rangelands, croplands, and deserts of the western US.

  12. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.

    1978-09-01

    This study of the potential links between soil freezing and wind erosion was conducted at Rocky Flats during 4 winters. Most of the study has involved the conditions leading to the growth of segregation ice in the surface soil and the ground heave which that produces. This occurs about 15 times in the average winter at Rocky Flats, always on a diurnal cycle. Such frost action is preferentially distributed in time and space and cannot be estimated from air temperatures alone. November and March are the months of most frequent frost heave, and then only in the days following precipitation or snowmelt. The most marked frost effects are found on exposed interfluve and hillcrest situations, where there are patches of bare soil. Almost no effects are found on the valley floors. Soil disturbance by segregation ice leads to a marked decrease in soil bulk density, and presumably in soil strength though this change has not been quantitatively defined. However, this does not lead to wind erosion of the soil at the study site because that surface is more influenced by the vegetation cover than by the soil characteristics.

  13. WIND TUNNEL EXPERIMENT OF SAND VELOCITY IN NATURE AEOLIAN SAND TRANSPORT USING PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY%天然混合沙运动速度特征的风洞PIV实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟鼎; 黄宁

    2011-01-01

    Sand velocity in aeolian sand transport is measured using the PIV system(Particle Imaging Velocimetry) in a wind tunnel.The velocity probability distribution of ascending and descending particles,as well the influences of sand ripple on the sand particle motion are analyzed.The results show that velocity distributions of take-off particles and particles during sand movement accord with logarithm normal distribution.The mean incident velocity of sand particles is 1.005-1.4 times higher than take-off ones with different wind speed.It is found that sand ripples play an important role on the sand particles motion,which is a key factor that can not be neglected.%采用PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry)系统测量了天然混合沙风沙两相流中沙粒的速度分布特征,得到了沙粒入射以及起跳的速度分布情况,并且分析了沙波纹对风沙运动的影响。结果表明:沙粒运动过程中的速度分布与沙粒起跳速度的分布可以应用对数正态分布来表明;当有沙波纹存在时,沙粒总体速度分布与平坦沙床面差别很大,是不可忽略的重要因素;平坦沙床面沙粒平均入射速度是起跳平均速度的1.005倍~1.4倍,具体关系可以应用线性函数来拟合。

  14. The National Wind Erosion Research Network: Building a standardized long-term data resource for aeolian research, modeling and land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Nicholas P.; Herrick, Jeffrey E.; Van Zee, Justin W; Courtright, Ericha M; Hugenholtz, Ted M; Zobeck, Ted M; Okin, Gregory S.; Barchyn, Thomas E; Billings, Benjamin J; Boyd, Robert A.; Clingan, Scott D; Cooper, Brad F; Duniway, Michael C.; Derner, Justin D; Fox, Fred A; Havstad, Kris M.; Heilman, Philip; LaPlante, Valerie; Ludwig, Noel A; Metz, Loretta J; Nearing, Mark A; Norfleet, M Lee; Pierson, Frederick B; Sanderson, Matt A; Sharrat, Brenton S; Steiner, Jean L; Tatarko, John; Tedela, Negussie H; Todelo, David; Unnasch, Robert S; Van Pelt, R Scott; Wagner, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The National Wind Erosion Research Network was established in 2014 as a collaborative effort led by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service, and the United States Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management, to address the need for a long-term research program to meet critical challenges in wind erosion research and management in the United States. The Network has three aims: (1) provide data to support understanding of basic aeolian processes across land use types, land cover types, and management practices, (2) support development and application of models to assess wind erosion and dust emission and their impacts on human and environmental systems, and (3) encourage collaboration among the aeolian research community and resource managers for the transfer of wind erosion technologies. The Network currently consists of thirteen intensively instrumented sites providing measurements of aeolian sediment transport rates, meteorological conditions, and soil and vegetation properties that influence wind erosion. Network sites are located across rangelands, croplands, and deserts of the western US. In support of Network activities, http://winderosionnetwork.org was developed as a portal for information about the Network, providing site descriptions, measurement protocols, and data visualization tools to facilitate collaboration with scientists and managers interested in the Network and accessing Network products. The Network provides a mechanism for engaging national and international partners in a wind erosion research program that addresses the need for improved understanding and prediction of aeolian processes across complex and diverse land use types and management practices.

  15. A wind tunnel simulation of the dynamic processes involved in sand dune formation on the western coast of Hainan Island%海南岛西海岸沙丘形成动力过程的风洞模拟试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李森; 刘贤万; 李会川; 郑影华; 魏兴琥

    2007-01-01

    The western coast of Hainan Island exhibits a savanna landscape. Many types of sand dunes, including transverse dune ridges, longitudinal dune ridges, elliptical dunes, coppice dunes, and climbing dunes, are widely distributed in the coastal zone. In winter, high-frequency and high-energy NE winds (dominant winds) are prevalent, with a resultant drift direction (RDD) of S35.6°W. In spring, low-frequency and low-energy SW secondary winds prevail, with a RDD of N25.1°E. Wind tunnel simulations revealed that the airflow over the dune surface is the main factor controlling the erosion and deposition patterns of dune surfaces and the morphological development of dunes. In the region's bidirectional wind environment, with two seasonally distinct energy levels, the airflow over the surface of elliptical dunes, barchan dunes, and transverse dune ridges will exhibit a transverse pattern, whereas the airflow over longitudinal dunes ridges exhibits a lateral pattern and that over climbing dunes exhibits a climbing-circumfluent pattern. These patterns represent different dynamic processes. The coastal dunes on the western coast of Hainan Island are influenced by factors such as onshore winds, sand sources, coastal slopes, rivers, and forest shelter belts. The source of the sand that supplements these dunes particularly influences the development pattern: when there is more sand, the pattern shows positive equilibrium deposition between dune ridges and dunes; otherwise, it shows negative equilibrium deposition. The presence or absence of forest shelter belts also influences deposition and dune development patterns and transformation of dune forms. Coastal dunes and inland desert dunes experience similar dynamic processes, but the former have more diversified shapes and more complex formation mechanisms.

  16. Measurement and data analysis methods for field-scale wind erosion studies and model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zobeck, T.M.; Sterk, G.; Funk, R.F.; Rajot, J.L.; Stout, J.E.; Scott Van Pelt, R.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate and reliable methods of measuring windblown sediment are needed to confirm, validate, and improve erosion models, assess the intensity of aeolian processes and related damage, determine the source of pollutants, and for other applications. This paper outlines important principles to conside

  17. Wind erosion and its impact on soil carbon and moisture scarcity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang Xiaobin,; Cai, D.; Oenema, O.; Perdok, U.D.; Hoogmoed, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses the duststorm-related soil erosion and its impact on soil carbon losses and moisture scarcity in northern China. Heavily affected areas show a loss of nutrients, organic carbon and field water capacity of soils. Compared with nondegraded soil, the carbon content in degraded soi

  18. The cumulative effects of using fine particles and cyanobacteria for rehabilitation of disturbed active sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaady, Eli; Katra, Itzhak; Barkai, Daniel; Knoll, Yaakov; Sarig, Shlomo

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems in desertified lands worldwide is active wind-borne sand dunes, which lead to covering of fertile soils and agricultural fields. In regions with more than 100 mm of annual rainfall, sand dunes may be naturally stabilized by biocrusts (biological soil crusts). One of the main restraints of biocrust development is the typical lack of fine particles in sand dunes. Our study investigated the combined application of fine particles [coal fly-ash <100 micrometer] and bio-inoculant of filamentous cyanobacteria, isolated from nearby natural stabilized sand dunes, on the soil surface of active sands for increasing resistance to wind erosion. Boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments were conducted in experimental plots within a greenhouse for examining the effects of adding coal fly-ash and bio-inoculant to active sands. The biocrust development was evaluated via several physical and bio-physiological variables. In all the physical measurements and the bio-physiological variables, the treatment of "sand+inoculum+coal fly-ash" showed significant differences from the "sand-control". The combination led to the best results of surface stabilization in boundary-layer wind tunnel experiments, with the lowest sand fluxes. The filamentous cyanobacteria use the fine particles of the coal fly-ash as bridges for growing toward and adhering to the large sand particles. The cumulative effects of biocrusts and coal fly-ash enhance soil surface stabilization and may allow long-term sustainability.

  19. Responses of wind erosion to disturbance in a desert scrub grassland: grass vs. bush cover, and a snapshot into recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddock, M.; Zobeck, T. M.; D'Odorico, P.; van Pelt, S.; Ravi, S.; Over, T. M.; Bhattachan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The mixture of grass and bush vegetation that typifies many desert scrublands is a distinctive feature of the northern Chihuahuan Desert, where it represents a change in land cover driven by shrub encroachment. In such environments, the redistribution of nutrients by aeolian transport has been recognized as an important biophysical process, with a role in sustaining shrub presence. Investigation of disturbances in these landscapes (e.g. fire and grazing) will enable better understanding of their dust emission behavior with changing climate, perturbance regime and management scenarios. Here we use a portable wind tunnel to investigate the impact of fire and animals on soil erodibilty and dust emissions from different vegetation types in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge, central New Mexico. Plots were selected that were a) predominantly creosote bush or b) predominantly grass covered. Dust emission was measured for these surfaces both before and after a prescribed burn was conducted. The grass plots were also clipped and artificially trampled to simulate grazing. PM10 concentrations and emission rates from the test surfaces are shown for initial blow-off experiments as the wind tunnel flow accelerates to a target velocity, plus the steady state emission flux produced under constant wind flow with an added abrader sand. An adjacent area burned 8 months previously also allowed investigation of the change in erodibility of the soil for a known time after fire. Our preliminary results indicate the extent that dust emission is changed by the introduced disturbances, and their differing effect on creosote bush and grass dominated covers.

  20. 戈壁地区公路防沙措施防沙效应的风洞试验%Wind Tunnel Experiment of the Effect of Sand Prevention Measures along Gobi Highway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤全刚; 薛娴; 王涛; 赵发章; 张伟民; 刘光琇; 俎瑞平; 韩邦帅; 连富铖

    2011-01-01

    以穿越河西走廊西部戈壁荒漠的嘉峪关至安西一级公路为研究对象,基于风洞模拟试验,针对不同类型公路路基横断面和防护措施设计模型,采用粒子图像测速系统,研究模型的流场变化,进而探讨戈壁公路风沙危害形成机理及防沙措施.研究结果表明:①由于研究区内风沙活动以不饱和风沙流为主,携沙风对公路路基掏蚀、磨蚀严重,需要对路基边坡进行有效砌护;②为了在公路表面形成输沙通道,中央隔离带地表与行车路面应保持同一高度,隔离带采用空隙度大于30%的疏透型;③在公路两侧沙源丰富地段,公路边坡的坡角应小于40°,并且取消防洪沟,以防止沟内积沙;④在沙源丰富地区,公路两侧由外到内依次铺设草方格、覆盖砾石、设置积沙沟的防沙带,可以减少气流中的含沙量,阻止流沙上路,有效解决公路风沙危害问题.%Wind erosion and sand sediment are two main problems affecting highways in Gobi area of Western China. This paper investigated the effect of sand prevention measures on highways in Gobi area by simulating different highway segments and sand prevention designs in wind tunnel and surveying fields by Particle Image Velocimetry. The wind tunnel experiment results indicated that unsaturated blown sand flow played a dominant role in the sapping and abrasion of highway cross section and some effective protection measures should be adopted to improve the protection of embankment slope of highway. In addition, the surface of isolation belts should be kept the same height as the driving pavement to form a sediment transportation pathway. The voidage of isolation belts should be more than 30%. For reducing sand deposition near highway, highway slope angle should be kept less than 40°. The flood discharge trench should be removed and some other protection measures should be adopted in some areas with abundant sand source. The experimental results

  1. Weathering of Pisha-Sandstones in the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region on the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Two types of pisha-sandstones of purple sandstones and gray sandstones, widely distributing in the wind-water erosion crisscross region of China, were selected and used in laboratory experiments for a better understanding of the drying-wetting-freezing weathering process resulting from the apportionment of water or salt solution to rock samples. Weathering experiments were carried out under the conditions of environment control (including temperature, moisture and salt solution). All rock samples were frequently subjected to 140 drying-wetting-freezing cycles. The influences of weathering process were evaluated. It was found that the different treatments of moisture and salt solution applications could affect the nature of the weathering products resulting from drying-wetting-freezing. It was also observed that salt solution could effectively alleviate the weathering of pisha-sandstones. Although not all the observations could be explained, it was apparent that simulated environmental factors had both direct and indirect effects on the weathering of rocks.

  2. Long-term dynamic behavior of monopile supported offshore wind turbines in sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu-Qing Yu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the loads acting on the offshore wind turbines (OWTs structures and the significance of investigation on structure dynamics are explained. Test results obtained from a scaled wind turbine model are also summarized. The model is supported on monopile, subjected to different types of dynamic loading using an innovative out of balance mass system to apply cyclic/dynamic loads. The test results show the natural frequency of the wind turbine structure increases with the number of cycles, but with a reduced rate of increase with the accumulation of soil strain level. The change is found to be dependent on the shear strain level in the soil next to the pile which matches with the expectations from the element tests of the soil. The test results were plotted in a non-dimensional manner in order to be scaled to predict the prototype consequences using element tests of a soil using resonant column apparatus.

  3. Impact of gully on soil moisture of shrubland in wind-water erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Zhu; SHAO Ming-An; LISI

    2008-01-01

    The most serious erosion on the Loess Plateau of China exists in the wind-water erosion crisscross region where the annual precipitation is about 400 ram,the ecological environment is very fragile,and water is the key limiting factor for improving the environment.In this study,changes of soil moisture content for Caragana korshinskii Kom.shrubland in the gully bank of the Loess Plateau were studied using the methods of soil sampling and neutron probe.A typical gully (75 m long,28 m wide,and 10 m deep) was selected,and six neutron probe access tubes (6 m long) were installed at points 50,100,200,300,400,and 500 cm from the gully border for obtaining soil moisture data from July to October 2004 at approximately 10 d intervals.Soil samplings were simultaneously carried out for moisture determination at the six points.Results showed that the soil moisture of the shrubland in the gully bank significantly varied between 300 and 400 cm in the horizontal direction and up to 600 cm in vertical direction of the gully.Seasonal changes in soil moisture revealed a curve with a single peak that occurred at the end of August or early September.A linear regression equation was fit for soil water storage and the distance from the gully border,with coefficients depending on rainfall characteristics,sampling point,and time of measurement.

  4. 内蒙古拐子湖地区风沙运动若干参数计算%Several caculations of parameters of wind-sand movement at Guaizi Lake area of Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何清; 胡文峰; 杨兴华; 艾力·买买提明; 赵聪敏

    2012-01-01

    Dust storms are disastrous weather phenomena frequently occurring in spring ( March - April - May) in North China. Since 2000, the dust weather has frequently occurred in this region, resulting in serious environmental problems and disruption of social & economic activities. In recent years, due to the impact of desertification in China, dust storms appear to have aggravated. Besides, domestic and foreign scholars have noticed that the aerosol in atmosphere has recently been increasing due to wind erosion and it has become a hot topic in the research field. What is more, wind erosion, a very complex physical process, acts as a key progress of basic research on aerosol in the atmosphere. As to wind erosion, theoretical and experimental studies by the domestic & foreign have established a lot of mathematical models on dust emission. A case in point is the research in Guaizi Lake. Guaizi Lake, located in the northern margin of Badan Jaran Desert, is one of Chinese major centers of dust storms. Apart from that, as the north path of Chinese dust storms, Guaizi Lake usually raised dust in the region, which may affect the whole northern China. With the limitation of natural conditions and experimental equipment, it is difficult to do experimental research in Chinese major centers of dust storms for a quite long time. Fortunately, the " National Scientific and Technological Support Project" advocated establishing the Guaizi Lake wind observation site in order to further study the dust storms. The experimental system consists of a 2-m high meteorological tower, a piezoelectric saltation sensor (Sensit) and a big Spring Number Eight (BSNE) sampler station. The piezoelectric saltation sensor (Sensit) can continuously record the occurrence and intensity of saltating particles, while the BSNE station consists of five BSNE samplers with the lowest sampler at 0.05 m and the highest sampler at 2.0 m above the soil surface, thus getting the monitoring data about the dust storms

  5. Erosion of Earthen Levees by Wave Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeren, Y.; Wren, D. G.; Reba, M. L.

    2016-02-01

    Earthen levees of aquaculture and irrigation reservoirs in the United States often experience significant erosion due to wind-generated waves. Typically constructed using local soils, unprotected levees are subjected to rapid erosion and retreat due to wind generated waves and surface runoff. Only a limited amount of published work addresses the erosion rates for unprotected levees, and producers who rely on irrigation reservoirs need an economic basis for selecting a protection method for vulnerable levees. This, in turn, means that a relationship between wave energy and erosion of cohesive soils is needed. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out in order to quantify wave induced levee erosion and retreat. A model erodible bank was packed using a soil consisting of approximately 14% sand, 73% silt, and 13% clay in a 20.6 m long 0.7 m wide and 1.2 m deep wave tank at the USDA-ARS, National Sedimentation Laboratory in Oxford MS. The geometry of the levee face was monitored by digital camera and the waves were measured by means of 6 capacitance wave staffs. Relationships were established between levee erosion, edge and retreat rates, and incident wave energy.

  6. Discussion on wind factor influencing the distribution of biological soil crusts on surface of sand dunes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YongSheng Wu; Hasi Erdun; RuiPing Yin; Xin Zhang; Jie Ren; Jian Wang; XiuMin Tian; ZeKun Li; HengLu Miao

    2013-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions, whose formation and development have an important impact on the restoration process of the desert ecosystem. In order to explore the relationship between surface airflow and development characteristics of biological soil crusts, we studied surface airflow pattern and development characteristics of biological soil crusts on the fixed dune profile through field observation. Results indicate that the speed of near-surface airflow is the lowest at the foot of windward slope and the highest at the crest, showing an increasing trend from the foot to the crest. At the leeward side, although near-surface airflow increases slightly at the lower part of the slope after an initial sudden decrease at upper part of the slope, its overall trend decreases from the crest. Wind velocity variation coefficient varied at different heights over each observation site. The thickness, shear strength of biological soil crusts and percentage of fine particles at crusts layer decreased from the slope foot to the upper part, showing that biological soil crusts are less developed in high wind speed areas and well developed in low wind speed areas. It can be seen that there is a close relationship between the distribution of biological soil crusts in different parts of the dunes and changes in airflow due to geomorphologic variation.

  7. Evaluation of Sand Dunes Stabilization Techniques in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This research was conducted at the sand dunes stabilization research station in Baiji district, Iraq. Three techniques for sand dunes stabilization are selected: the first method is stabilization by clayey block barriers; the second method is stabilization by dry planting of tamarix (tamarix articulata)cuttings and the third is stabilization by using cane branch barriers. Randomized samples were taken from the surface and subsurface layers of the stabilized and shifting sand dunes to evaluate the effect of the three techniques on wind erosion parameters. The results indicate high significant differences between the wind erosion parameters in the surface and subsurface layers in the stabilized sand dunes, while there are insignificant differences between the subsurface layer of the stabilized dunes and the surface and subsurface layers in the active sand dunes. The results clarify the fact that there is an increase in the percentage of clay, silt, organic matter, mean weight diameter and the percentage of the dry aggregates (>0. 84 mm). A decrease is found in the rate of disaggregation for the dry aggregates in the samples of the surface layer of stabilized dunes when compared with the subsurface layer of stabilized dunes and the surface layer of the shifting sand dunes. There is a positive high significant correlation among the aggregate stability parameters and the percentage of clay and silt, and the content of organic matter in the studied layers.

  8. Sand Dunes Fixation in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out at Sand Dunes Stabilization Researches Station in Baiji district (230 ln north of Baghdad, Iraq) to evaluate the effects of local soil conditioners manufactured from oil derivatives and plant residuals on sand dunes fixation as the first step for sand dunes stabilization. The results indicate that the fuel oil has the first place in improving wind erosion parameters in the study area, such as increasing mean weight diameter, dry aggregates percentage, the needed time for complete disaggregation by dry sieving, and decreasing the disaggregation rates. Bitumen emulsion occupies the second place, while the plant residuals occupies the third place and has slight effects on the studied parameters. Effects of conditioners on natural vegetation cover are negative in oil derivatives treatments,while positive in plants residuals treatments.

  9. A review of soil erodibility in water and wind erosion research%水蚀风蚀过程中土壤可蚀性研究述评

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋阳; 刘连友; 严平

    2005-01-01

    Soil erodibility is an important index to evaluate the soil sensitivity to erosion. The research on soil erodibility is a crucial tache in understanding the mechanism of soil erosion. Soil erodibility can be evaluated by measuring soil physiochemical properties, scouring experiment, simulated rainfall experiment, plot experiment and wind tunnel experiment. We can use soil erosion model and nomogram to calculate soil erodibility. Many soil erodibility indices and formulae have been put forward. Soil erodibility is a complex concept, it is influenced by many factors, such as soil properties and human activities. Several obstacles restrict the research of soil erodibility. Firstly, the research on soil erodibility is mainly focused on farmland; Secondly, soil erodibility in different areas cannot be compared sufficiently; and thirdly, the research on soil erodibility in water-wind erosion is very scarce. In the prospective research, we should improve method to measure and calculate soil erodibility, strengthen the research on the mechanism of soil erodibility, and conduct research on soil erodibility by both water and wind agents.

  10. Erosion Testing of Coatings for V-22 Aircraft Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Y. Richardson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity (183 m/sec sand erosion tests in a wind tunnel were conducted to evaluate developmental coatings from three separate companies under funding by the Navy's phase I small business innovative research program. The purpose of the coatings was to address a particular problem the V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft (Osprey was having with regard to ingestion of sand particles by a titanium impeller that was associated with the aircraft's environmental control system. The three coatings that were deposited on titanium substrates and erosion-tested included (1 SixCy/DLC multilayers deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD; (2 WC/TaC/TiC processed by electrospark deposition; and (3 polymer ceramic mixtures applied by means of an aqueous synthesis. The erosion test results are presented; they provided the basis for assessing the suitability of some of these coatings for the intended application.

  11. Mosaic-pattern vegetation formation and dynamics driven by the water-wind crisscross erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gao-Lin; Wang, Dong; Liu, Yu; Hao, Hong-Min; Fang, Nu-Fang; Shi, Zhi-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Theoretical explanations for vegetation pattern dynamic emphasized on banded pattern-forming systems on the dynamics of the spot pattern. In this context, we explore the patch pattern forming and development in the desertification land. We hypothesized that spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes would determine vegetation pattern dynamics theory. The spatial heterogeneity of microtopography and soil properties with different patch sizes were studied. Differences between the inside and outside of the canopy of soil carbon content and soil total nitrogen content were significantly increasing with patches sizes. Sampling location across vegetation patch was the main factor controlling soil properties. Soil nutrient content and saturated hydraulic conductivity were the largest, while bulk density and the coarse sand content were the lowest at the sampling location of half-way between taproot and downslope edge of the canopy. The height of the mound relative to the adjacent soil interspace between shrubs increased as patches diameter increased at the upslope of the taproot. Hydrological and aeolian processes resulted in spatial distributions of soil moisture, nutrition properties, which lead to patch migrated to downslope rather than upslope. A conceptual model was integrated hydrological and nutrient facilitation and competition effects among the plant-soil in mosaic-pattern patch formation and succession process.

  12. Flashover Characteristics of Flat Plate Model Under DC Voltage in Wind-sand Condition%风沙条件下的平板模型直流沿面放电特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司马文霞; 马高权; 杨庆

    2008-01-01

    The influence of sand dust on discharge of external insulation has caused widespread concern. At present, the research results show wind-sand electricity has a remarkable effect on the discharge characteristics of insulator and has little influence on the discharge characteristics of air gap. The flashover of insulator strings occurs along the insulator surface and air gaps, and the sand dust deposited on the insulator surface may affect the flashover characteristics of insulator strings. This paper studies the flashover characteristics of flat plate model under DC voltage in wind-sand condition. The experimental results show that under positive polarity voltage, the flashover voltage of the flat plate model has a maximum value, while under negative polarity voltage, the flashover voltage of the flat plate model has a minimum value with a certain degree of sand dust deposition. The wind or sand in sand-dust weather has an important effect on the flashover characteristics of the flat plate model. In certain variation range of electric charge, electric charge of sand dust has little effect on the flashover voltage of flat plate model under DC voltage. The deposition of sand has significant influence on the flashover process of flat plate model, which is related to the deposition density and moisture content of sand particle.

  13. Simulation model of erosion and deposition on a barchan dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, A. D.; Morton, J. B.; Gal-El-hak, M.; Pierce, D. B.

    1977-01-01

    Erosion and deposition over a barchan dune near the Salton Sea, California, are modeled by bookkeeping the quantity of sand in saltation following streamlines of transport. Field observations of near surface wind velocity and direction plus supplemental measurements of the velocity distribution over a scale model of the dune are combined as input to Bagnold type sand transport formulas corrected for slope effects. A unidirectional wind is assumed. The resulting patterns of erosion and deposition compare closely with those observed in the field and those predicted by the assumption of equilibrium (downwind translation of the dune without change in size or geometry). Discrepancies between the simulated results and the observed or predicted erosional patterns appear to be largely due to natural fluctuations in the wind direction. The shape of barchan dunes is a function of grain size, velocity, degree of saturation of the oncoming flow, and the variability in the direction of the oncoming wind. The size of the barchans may be controlled by natural atmospheric scales, by the age of the dunes, or by the upwind roughness. The upwind roughness can be controlled by fixed elements or by sand in the saltation. In the latter case, dune scale is determined by grain size and wind velocity.

  14. Rain erosion of wind turbine blade coatings using discrete water jets: Effects of water cushioning, substrate geometry, impact distance, and coating properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Bernad, Pablo L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid and reliable rain erosion screening of blade coatings for wind turbines is a strong need in the coatings industry. One possibility in this direction is the use of discrete water jets, where so-called jet slugs are impacted on a coating surface. Previous investigations have mapped...... the influence of water jet slug velocity and impact frequency. In the present work, the effects on coating erosion of water cushioning, substrate curvature, and water nozzle-coating distance were explored. The investigations showed that in some cases water cushioning (the presence of a liquid film...... on the coating surface prior to impact) influences the erosion. Contrary to this, substrate curvature and the water nozzle-coating distance (coatings, including tensile strength, flexibility...

  15. WIND VELOCITIES AND SAND FLUXES IN MESQUITE DUNE-LANDS IN THE NORTHERN CHIHUAHUAN DESERT: A COMPARISON BETWEEN FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND THE QUIC (QUICK URBAN AND INDUSTRIAL COMPLEX) MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The poster shows comparisons of wind velocities and sand fluxes between field measurements and a computer model, called QUIC (Quick Urban & Industrial Complex). The comparisons were made for a small desert region in New Mexico.

  16. Seasonally Active Slipface Avalanches in the North Polar Sand Sea of Mars: Evidence for a Wind-Related Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horgan, Briony H. N.; Bell, James F., III

    2012-01-01

    Meter-scale MRO/HiRISE camera images of dune slipfaces in the north polar sand sea of Mars reveal the presence of deep alcoves above depositional fans. These features are apparently active under current climatic conditions, because they form between observations taken in subsequent Mars years. Recently, other workers have hypothesized that the alcoves form due to destabilization and mass-wasting during sublimation of CO2 frost in the spring. While there is evidence for springtime modification of these features, our analysis of early springtime images reveals that over 80% of the new alcoves are visible underneath the CO2 frost. Thus, we present an alternative hypothesis that formation of new alcoves and fans occurs prior to CO2 deposition. We propose that fans and alcoves form primarily by aeolian processes in the mid- to late summer, through a sequence of aeolian deposition on the slipface, over-steepening, failure, and dry granular flow. An aeolian origin is supported by the orientations of the alcoves, which are consistent with recent wind directions. Furthermore, morphologically similar but much smaller alcoves form on terrestrial dune slipfaces, and the size differences between the terrestrial and Martian features may reflect cohesion in the near-subsurface of the Martian features. The size and preservation of the largest alcoves on the Martian slipfaces also support the presence of an indurated surface layer; thus, new alcoves might be sites of early spring CO2 sublimation and secondary mass-wasting because they act as a window to looser, less indurated materials that warm up more quickly in the spring.

  17. experimental studies of sand production from unconsolidated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    Production of sand during oil and gas exploration causes severe operational prob- ... duction such as risk of well failure, erosion of pipelines and surface facilities, sand separa- tion and disposal ... ment, theoretical and numerical analysis have.

  18. Effects of Long-term Conservation Tillage on Soil Nutrients in Sloping Fields in Regions Characterized by Water and Wind Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chunjian; Cao, Xue; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Weiyu; Feng, Yongzhong; Qiao, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Conservation tillage is commonly used in regions affected by water and wind erosion. To understand the effects of conservation tillage on soil nutrients and yield, a long-term experiment was set up in a region affected by water and wind erosion on the Loess Plateau. The treatments used were traditional tillage (CK), no tillage (NT), straw mulching (SM), plastic-film mulching (PM), ridging and plastic-film mulching (RPM) and intercropping (In). Our results demonstrate that the available nutrients in soils subjected to non-traditional tillage treatments decreased during the first several years and then remained stable over the last several years of the experiment. The soil organic matter and total nitrogen content increased gradually over 6 years in all treatments except CK. The nutrient content of soils subjected to conservative tillage methods, such as NT and SM, were significantly higher than those in soils under the CK treatment. Straw mulching and film mulching effectively reduced an observed decrease in soybean yield. Over the final 6 years of the experiment, soybean yields followed the trend RPM > PM > SM > NT > CK > In. This trend has implications for controlling soil erosion and preventing non-point source pollution in sloping fields by sacrificing some food production.

  19. Post-IR IRSL290 dating of K-rich feldspar sand grains in a wind-dominated system on Sardinia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreucci, S.; Sechi, D.; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2017-01-01

    block sand-sized grains for quartz SAR-OSL and K-feldspar pIRIR dating were collected. The natural quartz SAR-OSL sample lies below the saturation limit of the dose response curve (De ... with the quartz result. A further test on older samples was carried out on the sedimentary succession at Bue Marino cave, which includes a sandy wind-blown unit, enclosed between two calcareous crusts. U-series dates of crusts constrain the aeolianite formation between ∼130 and ∼86 ka. The quartz SAR-OSL signals....... The pIRIR290 ages indicate an offset up to ∼1000 years. We can conclude that the pIRIR290 method on sand-sized K-feldspar grains shows great promise for samples at or beyond the quartz OSL age limit but should not be applied to Late Holocene or modern deposits....

  20. 脉动风场下风沙流结构的数值模拟%Numerical Simulation on Windblown Sand Cloud in the Fluctuating Wind Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武建军; 罗生虎; 闫光虎; 何丽红

    2011-01-01

    基于野外观测实验和Langevin方程对风场脉动的描述,研究了脉动风场下沙粒的跃移运动以及风沙流结构特征.结果表明,脉动风场对沙粒的跃移运动有着显著的影响,沙粒粒径越小,脉动风场对跃移运动轨迹的影响越大;考虑风场脉动时给出的风沙流结构具有明显的分层特征,并与实验测量结果吻合得更好.%Based on experiment and the description of fluctuating wind field by Langevin equation, the characteristics of saltating grains as well as the windblown sand cloud have been discussed. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the fluctuating wind field exerts a great influence on saltation of grains, and the smaller the grain size is, the greater the influence would be. Moreover, the windblown sand cloud in the fluctuating wind field also shows a stratified characteristic and the mass fluxes agree well with the previous experiments.

  1. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  2. Architecture design of soil wind erosion model software based on GIS%基于GIS的土壤风蚀模型软件构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亦超; 史明昌; 岳德鹏; 杨贵森; 孙成宝; 徐晓桃; 王珊

    2013-01-01

    针对当前土壤风蚀监测的实际需求,提出基于GIS技术构建土壤风蚀模型软件的思路和方法.该软件基于DTGIS核心服务平台,以C#为主开发语言,Silverlight为界面开发工具,采用轻型数据库SQLite进行数据存储;该软件可为用户提供GIS查询功能、站点数据管理、风力因子计算、土壤侵蚀模数计算、土壤侵蚀强度分级、时间分析、空间分析等功能服务,支持远程客户端连接和多点同时上传数据;同时,该软件将风蚀模型与GIS系统有机地集成到一起,不仅支持风蚀运算过程的交互,而且可以直接将模型运行结果显示在软件中;软件亦可以制作土壤侵蚀模数专题图、土壤侵蚀强度分级专题图、时空分析图,实现土壤风蚀数据系统化管理和数据可视化管理,为评价土壤风蚀的危害提供科学依据.%Aiming at the current demand for soil wind erosion monitoring, a modeling software on wind erosion was present based on the GIS. Supporting by DTGIS core service platform, the new software was developed with C# language, in addition to Silverlight as the interface designing tool and light database SQLite for data storage. This system provides customers with a number of new functionalities, including GIS inquiry service, site data management, wind factor calculation, soil erosion modulus calculation, soil erosion intensity classification, temporal analysis, spatial analysis, availability of remote cl'ents connection and simultaneous multi-spot data uploading, and so on. Furthermore, the software was successfully integrated with GIS in the new development, which supported not only the interaction during soil erosion calculating procedures, but also the display of model process results. Finally, the software can be used to make thematic maps of soil erosion modulus, classification of soil erosion intensity, conduct spatial-temporal analysis, and achieve systematization as well as visualization of

  3. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  4. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating-Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Enrique; Sánchez, Fernando; O'Carroll, Anthony; Madramany, Borja; Hardiman, Mark; Young, Trevor M

    2017-09-28

    Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating) applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP). The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER). The materials, specifically the coating-laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), pull-off testing, peeling-adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case study compares two

  5. On the Material Characterisation of Wind Turbine Blade Coatings: The Effect of Interphase Coating–Laminate Adhesion on Rain Erosion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Cortés

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rain erosion damage, caused by repeated droplet impact on wind turbine blades, is a major cause for concern, even more so at offshore locations with larger blades and higher tip speeds. Due to the negative economic influence of blade erosion, all wind turbine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs are actively seeking solutions. In most cases, since the surface coating plays a decisive role in the blade manufacture and overall performance, it has been identified as an area where a solution may be obtained. In this research, two main coating technologies have been considered: In-mould coatings (Gel coating applied during moulding on the entire blade surface and the post-mould coatings specifically developed for Leading Edge Protection (LEP. The coating adhesion and erosion is affected by the shock waves created by the collapsing water droplets on impact. The stress waves are reflected and transmitted to the laminate substrate, so microstructural discontinuities in coating layers and interfaces play a key role on its degradation and may accelerate erosion by delamination. Analytical and numerical models are commonly used to relate lifetime prediction and to identify suitable coating and composite substrate combinations based on their potential stress reduction on the interface. Nevertheless, in order to use them, it is necessary to measure the contact adhesion resistance of the multi-layered system interfaces. The rain erosion performance is assessed using an accelerated testing technique, whereby the test material is repeatedly impacted at high speed with water droplets in a Whirling Arm Rain Erosion Rig (WARER. The materials, specifically the coating–laminate interphase region and acoustic properties, are further characterised by several laboratory tests, including Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, pull-off testing, peeling–adhesion testing and nanoindentation testing. This body of work includes a number of case studies. The first case

  6. Experimental study of surface texture and resonance mechanism of booming sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU; JianJun; ZHANG; KeCun; SUN; Bo; JIANG; ShengXiang; DONG; GuangRong; ZU; RuiPing; FANG; HaiYan

    2007-01-01

    The sound-producing mechanism of booming sand has long been a pending problem in the blown sand physics. Based on the earlier researches, the authors collected some silent sand samples from Tengger Desert, Australian Desert, Kuwait Desert, beaches of Hainan Island and Japanese coast as well as the soundless booming sand samples from the Mingsha Mountain in Dunhuang to make washing experiments. In the meantime the chemical corrosion experiment of glass micro-spheres, surface coating experiment and SEM examination were also conducted. The experimental results show that the sound production of booming sand seems to have nothing to do with the presence of SiO2 gel on the surface of sand grains and unrelated to the surface chemical composition of sand grains but is related to the resonance cavities formed by porous (pit-like) physical structure resulting from a number of factors such as wind erosion, water erosion, chemical corrosion and SiO2 gel deposition, etc. Its resonance mechanism is similar to that of Hemholz resonance cavity. Under the action of external forces, numerous spherical and sand grains with smooth surface and porous surface are set in motion and rub with each other to produce extremely weak vibration sound and then become audible sound by human ears through the magnification of surface cavity resonance. However the booming sands may lose their resonance mechanism and become silent sand due to the damping action caused by the invasion of finer particles such as dust and clay into surface holes of sand grains. Therefore, clearing away fine pollutants on the quartz grain surface is an effective way to make silent sand emit audible sound.

  7. Estimation of the rational water area for controlling wind erosion in the dried-up basin of the Ebinur Lake and its effect detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Anming; MU Guijin; ZHANG Yi; FENG Xianwei; CHANG Gun; YIN Xiaojun

    2006-01-01

    The Ebinur Lake region was described as a "Green Labyrinth" in "Xinjiang Map Records:Records of Rivers" published in 1910, however, the ecology and environment in the region have been seriously degenerated due to the impacts of human activities during the recent 40 years. A dried-up lake basin with an area of 107.4 km2 forms in its northwestern part, is covered by unconsolidated silt deposit without vegetation, and has become one of the main dust sources of dust weathers in north Xinjiang,and the dust with an annual amount of 4.8×106 t is blown out of the region by strong winds from the Alataw mountain-gap where there are 164 days occurring strong winds in a year. The rational water area and inflow of the Ebinur Lake for improving the ecology in the lake region and effectively controlling wind erosion in the dried-up lake basin are estimated using the water balance equation after analyzing the current ecological problems and the relationship between the granular composition of deposit in the dried-up lake basin and the dust weathers, and the ecological effects in recent years are monitored. It is considered that the water area of the Ebinur Lake for improving the ecology in the lake region and effectively controlling wind erosion in the dried-up lake basin should be 800 km2 at least, and the annual volume of surface runoff and groundwater recharging the lake should be over 7.92×108 m3.

  8. Wind-eroded silicate as a source of hydrogen peroxide on Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Ebbe Norskov; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Svend Knak

    soil. Methods: We simulated wind-erosion of silicates by tumbling quartz sand in sealed quartz ampoules with defined atmospheres. The eroded sand was suspended in water and the hydrogen peroxide concentration was followed using a sco-poletin/horseradish peroxidase assay. Results: The simulated wind......-erosion effectively eroded the sand over weeks of tumbling and we saw a clear correlation between an increase in surface area and the release of hydrogen peroxide. The production of hydrogen peroxide depended on the presence of atmospheric oxygen and was inhibited by atmospheric carbon dioxide. Nevertheless, taking...... into account the high surface area of Martian soil and the atmospheric oxygen and carbon dioxide content, wind-eroded sili-cate could result in the formation of at least 7 to 31 nmol hydrogen peroxide per cm3 soil, which could explain the amount of 14CO2 released in the Labelled Release Experiments [6...

  9. Runoff erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Evelpidou, Niki; Cordier, Stephane; Merino, Agustin (Ed.); Figueiredo, Tomás; Centeri, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    Table of Contents PART I – THEORY OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 1 - RUNOFF EROSION – THE MECHANISMS CHAPTER 2 - LARGE SCALE APPROACHES OF RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 3 - MEASURING PRESENT RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 4 - MODELLING RUNOFF EROSION CHAPTER 5 - RUNOFF EROSION AND HUMAN SOCIETIES: THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE AND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON SOIL EROSION PART II - CASE STUDIES CASE STUDIES – INTRODUCTION: RUNOFF EROSION IN MEDITERRANEAN AREA CASE STUDY 1: Soil Erosion Risk...

  10. Cooperative wind erosion mechanics research between USDA-ARS Wind Erosion and Water Conservation Research Unit(WEWC) and Key Lab of Western Environmental Disaster (KLWED), Lanzhou University, Gansu, P.R. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad expanses of bare, fragile soil and frequent high-velocity winds create conditions leading to wind-induced soil loss and fugitive dust generation in the semi-arid regions of the United States and People’s Republic of China. Mechanistic process driven models have necessitated an increased under...

  11. Change of precipitation characteristics in the water-wind erosion crisscross region on the Loess Plateau, China, from 1958 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingkai; Li, Zengyao; Zhu, Qingke

    2017-08-14

    Precipitation plays an important and crucial role in processes in the water-wind erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau than in other parts of the region. We analyzed precipitation data and standardized precipitation index (SPI) at 14 representative synoptic stations from 1958 to 2015 used trend-free prewhitening, linear trend estimation, Spearman's rho test, the Mann-Kendall trend test, the Mann-Kendall abrupt change test and rescaled range analysis. The following conclusions were drawn. First, the analysis of monthly precipitation at all stations suggested that precipitation during the rainy season (July, August, September), especially rain in July and August, exhibited a general decreasing trend, while both increasing and decreasing trends were observed in other months. Moreover, the annual precipitation of all stations continued to exhibit decreasing trends except Wuzhai. Erosive rainfall frequency in the rainy season and the annual scale was weakly reduced but erosive force of single rainfall has been enhanced. Second, the SPI exhibited different increasing degrees in winter, while decreasing trends were observed in other seasons. Additionally, the annual-scale SPI at most stations exhibited a stable and sustained downward trend. Therefore, this region is currently associated with a drought trend, and the drought degree will likely continue to increase.

  12. Erosion Pressure on the Danish Coasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Sørensen, Per; Kroon, Aart

    , neglects the need for sand replenishment i.e. in the form of repeated sand nourishments. Here we present a conceptual model and method for dividing coastal erosion into acute and chronic erosion pressure, respectively. We focus on the model use for management and climate change adaptation purposes...

  13. Erosion of wind turbine blade coatings - Design and analysis of jet-based laboratory equipment for performance evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shizhong; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Nørkjær, Sten

    2015-01-01

    of the blades in such equipment. To reduce expensive blade maintenance repairs and to avoid out-of-service periods, energy-absorbing blade coatings are required to protect rotor blades from rain erosion. In this work we describe the design, construction and evaluation of a laboratory setup for fast screening...... of up to 22 coating samples that is based on water jet slugs. Our objective is to study the effect of the parameters involved in the rain erosion process and to correlate our experimental results with data obtained with the complex and expensive whirling arm rig, which has become the industry standard...

  14. Runoff and soil loss characteristics on loess slopes covered with aeolian sand layers of different thicknesses under simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Bai, Y. J.; Xie, L. Y.; Yang, M. Y.; Li, Z. B.; Wu, X. R.

    2017-06-01

    In the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region of the northern Loess Plateau, parts of loess slopes have been covered by layers of aeolian sand of different thicknesses. Knowledge of soil erosion processes and magnitudes on these slopes is essential to understanding the coupled water-wind erosion processes and to address the resulting downstream coarse sediment problems in the Yellow River. Simulated rainfall (intensity 90 mm h-1) was performed to explore the effects of sand layer thickness on runoff and soil loss from loess slopes covered with different sand layer thicknesses (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm). Initial runoff time increased with increasing sand layer thickness, with greater changes occurring for the increases in the thinner (0-5 cm) than for the thicker layers (5-25 cm). Total runoff yield from the sand-covered loess slopes was 18%-55% lower than from the uncovered loess slope and decreased with increasing sand layer thickness. In contrast, total sediment yield was up to 14 times greater from the sand-covered loess slopes than from the uncovered loess slope and rapidly increased with increasing sand layer thickness. During the rainstorm, runoff and soil loss rates exhibited unimodal distributions, and they were related by a positive linear function, both before and after the maximum soil loss rate, that had a high determination coefficient (R2 > 0.8, p qualitative change in runoff and sediment production modes, appeared to be in the range of 5-10 cm. These results indicated that the thickness of the sand layer on the loess slope significantly influenced runoff and sediment production processes and mechanisms. These effects should be considered when assessing and predicting soil losses in this region and from similar slopes elsewhere.

  15. A wind proxy based on migrating dunes at the Baltic coast: statistical analysis of the link between wind conditions and sand movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierstedt, Svenja E.; Hünicke, Birgit; Zorita, Eduardo; Ludwig, Juliane

    2017-07-01

    We statistically analyse the relationship between the structure of migrating dunes in the southern Baltic and the driving wind conditions over the past 26 years, with the long-term aim of using migrating dunes as a proxy for past wind conditions at an interannual resolution. The present analysis is based on the dune record derived from geo-radar measurements by Ludwig et al. (2017). The dune system is located at the Baltic Sea coast of Poland and is migrating from west to east along the coast. The dunes present layers with different thicknesses that can be assigned to absolute dates at interannual timescales and put in relation to seasonal wind conditions. To statistically analyse this record and calibrate it as a wind proxy, we used a gridded regional meteorological reanalysis data set (coastDat2) covering recent decades. The identified link between the dune annual layers and wind conditions was additionally supported by the co-variability between dune layers and observed sea level variations in the southern Baltic Sea. We include precipitation and temperature into our analysis, in addition to wind, to learn more about the dependency between these three atmospheric factors and their common influence on the dune system. We set up a statistical linear model based on the correlation between the frequency of days with specific wind conditions in a given season and dune migration velocities derived for that season. To some extent, the dune records can be seen as analogous to tree-ring width records, and hence we use a proxy validation method usually applied in dendrochronology, cross-validation with the leave-one-out method, when the observational record is short. The revealed correlations between the wind record from the reanalysis and the wind record derived from the dune structure is in the range between 0.28 and 0.63, yielding similar statistical validation skill as dendroclimatological records.

  16. A wind proxy based on migrating dunes at the Baltic coast: statistical analysis of the link between wind conditions and sand movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Bierstedt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We statistically analyse the relationship between the structure of migrating dunes in the southern Baltic and the driving wind conditions over the past 26 years, with the long-term aim of using migrating dunes as a proxy for past wind conditions at an interannual resolution. The present analysis is based on the dune record derived from geo-radar measurements by Ludwig et al. (2017. The dune system is located at the Baltic Sea coast of Poland and is migrating from west to east along the coast. The dunes present layers with different thicknesses that can be assigned to absolute dates at interannual timescales and put in relation to seasonal wind conditions. To statistically analyse this record and calibrate it as a wind proxy, we used a gridded regional meteorological reanalysis data set (coastDat2 covering recent decades. The identified link between the dune annual layers and wind conditions was additionally supported by the co-variability between dune layers and observed sea level variations in the southern Baltic Sea. We include precipitation and temperature into our analysis, in addition to wind, to learn more about the dependency between these three atmospheric factors and their common influence on the dune system. We set up a statistical linear model based on the correlation between the frequency of days with specific wind conditions in a given season and dune migration velocities derived for that season. To some extent, the dune records can be seen as analogous to tree-ring width records, and hence we use a proxy validation method usually applied in dendrochronology, cross-validation with the leave-one-out method, when the observational record is short. The revealed correlations between the wind record from the reanalysis and the wind record derived from the dune structure is in the range between 0.28 and 0.63, yielding similar statistical validation skill as dendroclimatological records.

  17. Likely effects of construction of Scroby Sands offshore wind farm on a mixed population of harbour Phoca vitulina and grey Halichoerus grypus seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Eleanor R; Perrow, Martin R; Gilroy, James J

    2012-04-01

    Scroby Sands offshore wind farm was built close to a haul-out and breeding site for harbour seal, a species of conservation concern. An aerial survey programme conducted during a five-year period spanning wind farm construction, revealed a significant post-construction decline in haul-out counts. Multivariate model selection suggested that the decline was not related to the environmental factors considered, nor did it mirror wider population trends. Although cause and effect could not be unequivocally established, the theoretical basis of hearing in pinnipeds and previous studies suggested that extreme noise (to 257 dB re 1 μ Pa(pp) @ 1m) generated by pile-driving of turbine bases led to displacement of seals. A lack of full recovery of harbour seal during the study was also linked to their sensitivity to vessel activity and/or rapid colonisation of competing grey seal. Any impact of offshore wind farm development upon pinnipeds would be much reduced without pile-driving.

  18. Soil Erosion. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    Soil erosion is the detachment and movement of topsoil or soil material from the upper part of the soil profile. It may occur in the form of rill, gully, sheet, or wind erosion. Agents of erosion may be water, wind, glacial ice, agricultural implements, machinery, and animals. Soil conservation measures require a thorough understanding of the…

  19. Patchiness in wind erosion-deposition patterns in response to a recent state change reversal in the Chihuahuan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifts from shrub-dominated states to grasslands are believed to be irreversible as a result of positive feedbacks between woody plants and soil properties. In the Chihuahuan Desert, mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) expansion into black grama (Bouteloua eriopoda) grasslands is maintained by wind redis...

  20. Research on pavement performance of wind-blown sand for highways across the desert%穿沙公路风积沙的路用性能探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩莹

    2014-01-01

    Based on some soil samples with different sediment percentage of wind-blown sand, the paper analyzes the particle compositions of va-rious sand samples nonuniform coefficient and gradation composition, and according to various experiments, the physical and mechanical charac-teristics of wind-blown sand for highways across the desert. This paper can provide basis for applying wind-blown sand as subgrade materials of highways across the desert.%以穿沙公路风积沙中掺加不同含泥量的土样为研究对象,分析了不同风沙试样的颗粒组成、不均匀系数及级配组成等,并通过各项试验研究,探讨了穿沙公路风积沙的物理特性和力学特性,为风积沙广泛应用于穿沙公路的路基材料提供了相关的科学依据。

  1. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering Enhancements of Lunar Regolith Erosion: The Contribution of the Heavy Multicharged (Minority) Solar Wind Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    We report preliminary results for H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, obtain ed at the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility using quadrupole ma ss spectrometry. The multi-charged Ar ions were used as proxies for i ntermediate mass solar wind multicharged ions. Prior to the Ar beam e xposures, the sample was exposed to high fluence H+ irradiation to si mulate H-loading due to the dominant solar wind constituent. A x80 en hancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same velocity H+ was measu red and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same velocity Ar+ was demonstrated, giving clear evidence of the importance of potential s puttering by multicharged ions. This enhancement was observed to pers ist to the maximum fluences investigated (approx 10(exp 16)/sq cm). As discussed in a companion abstract by N. Barghouty, such persistent s puttering enhancement has significant implications on weathering and aging of lunar regolith. In addition, XPS measurements showed strong evidence of Fe reduction for those target areas that had been exposed to high fluence Ar+ and Ar+8 beams. Preferential oxidation of the Fe -reduced beam-exposed regions during transfer to the XPS system led t o enhanced O concentrations in those regions as well. On the basis of these very promising preliminary results, a NASA-LASER project on mo re extensive measurements was recently selected for funding. The prop osal expands the collaboration with NASA-MSFC for the simulation effort, and adds a new collaboration with NASA-GSFC for lunar mission-rele vant measurements.

  2. Numerical Simulation Analysis of Response Law of Wind-blown Sand Flow around Wind-break Wall in Gobi Area%风沙流对戈壁地区挡风墙响应规律的数值模拟分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓军; 蒋富强

    2016-01-01

    Numerical Simulation of the motion characteristics of wind-blown sand flow around the existing wind-break wall along Lanzhou-Urumqi Railway based on FLUENT eulerian two-fluid model is conducted to identify the distribution features of the flow field and accumulated sand at the leeward side of wind-break. The results show that, wind profile change law shows an exponential increasing tendency at the leeward side of wind-break wall, the changes at the height of 0. 5 m to wind-break wall itself are complex and tend to decrease and then increase;the airflow velocity on near-surface at the leeward side of wind-break wall is increased in the reserve direction, reduced to 0 along the direction of the initial velocity, continued to increase to the initial velocity, and the maximum wind speed increase rate remains at about 50%, the higher the wind speed, the more obvious the airflow of weakening effect; when the initial velocity is small, less sand is accumulated on the line, and sand accumulation is concentrated at the corner of the leeward side of wind-break wall; with the increase of wind speed, more sand passes through the windbreak in unit time and even more sand is deposited along the line due to the reduction of flow cross-section and diffusion of air; in strong wind areas, the surface conditions affecting wind direction should be investigated before wind-break wall is located, engineering measures should be taken where sand source is rich to reduce sand flow density and prevent sand invasion.%基于FLUENT欧拉双流体模型,对兰新铁路沿线既有挡风墙周围风沙两相流运动特性进行数值模拟,得到挡风墙背风侧的流场分布特点以及积沙情况。结果表明:挡风墙背风侧风速廓线变化规律呈指数增长趋势,在0.5 m至挡风墙自身高度区间内变化较为复杂,呈先减小后增加的趋势;挡风墙背风侧近地表气流速度反向增大后沿着初始速度的方向减小为0且继续增大至初

  3. Coastal Erosion Control Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, V.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal erosion is bad because the ecosystem there will be washed away and the animals could drown or be displaced and have to adapt to a new ecosystem that they are not prepared for. I'm interested in this problem because if there aren't beaches when I grow up I won't be able to do the things I would really like to do. I would like to be a marine biologist. Secondly, I don't want to see beach houses washed away. I would like to see people live in harmony with their environment. So, to study ways in which to preserve beaches I will make and use models that test different erosion controls. Two different ideas for erosion control I tested are using seaweed or a rock berm. I think the rock berm will work better than the model of seaweed because the seaweed is under water and the waves can carry the sand over the seaweed, and the rock berm will work better because the rocks will help break the waves up before they reach the shore and the waves can not carry the sand over the rocks that are above the water. To investigate this I got a container to use to model the Gulf of Mexico coastline. I performed several test runs using sand and water in the container to mimic the beach and waves from the Gulf of Mexico hitting the shoreline. I did three trials for the control (no erosion control), seaweed and a rock berm. Rock berms are a border of a raised area of rock. The model for seaweed that I used was plastic shopping bags cut into strips and glued to the bottom of my container to mimic seaweed. My results were that the control had the most erosion which ranged from 2.75 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The seaweed was a little better than the control but was very variable and ranged from 1.5 - 3 inches over 3 trials. The rock berm worked the best out of all at controlling erosion with erosion ranging from 1.5 - 2 inches. My hypothesis was correct because the rock berm did best to control erosion compared to the control which had no erosion control and the model with seaweed.

  4. Study of Sand Dunes and Their Effect on Desertification of Cultivated Lands in Shaanxi Province, China Using Remote Sensing Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    About half of the arid and semi-arid lands in the world are deserts that comprise various types of aeolian sand dunes deposits. In Shaanxi Province, aeolian sand dunes cover considerable areas of the Yulin desert and northern Jinbian. Sand dunes are moving in the main wind direction and converting some agricultural area to wasteland. Remote sensing of sand dunes helps in the understanding of aeolian process and desertification. Remote sensing data combined with field studies are valuable in studying sand dunes, regional aeolian depositional history. In particular, active and inactive sand dunes of the north Shaanxi Province were studied using remote sensing and geographic information system. In this study, we describe the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) images, covering north Shaanxi Province, which were used to study the distribution, shape, size, trends, density and movement of sand dunes and their effect on desertification of cultivated lands. Estimation was made depending on soil erodibility factor (Ⅰ) and local climatic factor (C) during the period (June to September). The result indicates that soil erosion caused sand drift of 8.957 5, 7.03 ton for Yulin and Jinbian, respectively. The mean sand dunes movement rate were 4.37, 3.11 m, whereas, monthly sand dune advance rate were 1.092 5, 0.777 5 m, for the two locations, respectively. The study reveals that cultivated lands extended obliquely to the direction of sand dune movement are extremely affected, while other segments that extend parallel to the direction of the movement are not affected. Accordingly the north Shaanxi Province was divided into areas of different classes of potential risk. Moreover, blown sands and sand movement from neighboring highlands also affect the area of western desert.

  5. Weather resistance of CaSO4 ṡ 1/2H2O-based sand-fixation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Tie, Shengnian

    2017-07-01

    Searching for an economical and effective sand-fixing material and technology is of great importance in Northwest China. This paper described the use of a semihydrated gypsum-(CaSO4 ṡ 1/2H2O-)based composite as a sand-fixing material. Its morphology and composition were characterized by SEM, and its water resistance, freezing-thawing resistance and wind erosion resistance were tested in the field. The results indicated that semihydrated gypsum-(CaSO4 ṡ 1/2H2O-)based sand-fixing composite has good water resistance and water-holding capacity. Its strength is maintained at 1.42 MPa after 50 freezing and thawing cycles, and its wind erosion increases with increasing wind speed and slope. Its compressive strength starts to decrease after nine months of field tests with no change in appearance, but it still satisfies the requirements of fixation technology. This sand-fixing material should have wide application owing to its good weather resistance.

  6. [Spatio-temporal change of sand-fixing function and its driving forces in desertification control ecological function area of Hunshandake, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Tian, Mei-rong; Gao, Ji-xi; Qian, Jin-ping

    2016-01-01

    Soil erosion is an important ecological and environmental problem in Hunshandake Desert, and the sand-fixing function determines the degree of ecological security in the entire region. In order to clarify the situation of windbreak and sand fixation in Hunshandake area, and to guide the prevention and treatment of desertification on regional scale, based on the meteorological and remote sensing data, this paper quantitatively analyzed the temporal and spatial pattern of windbreak and sand fixation ability between 2000-2010 by the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ) model, meanwhile, the driving forces for each county ( or banner) in the functional zone were analyzed with the method of principal component analysis. The results showed that there was a fluctuation of the sand fixing capacity in Hunshandake over time, generally rendering a decline trend. The coniferous forest and grassland had strong windbreak and sand fixation capacity in unit area among the various land categories. In terms of spatial distribution, the windbreak and sand fixation function in western and southeastern region was weak and needed to be strengthened with ecological restoration efforts. Through the study of the social driving forces of each administrative region in the function zone, there were 3 main social driving forces of soil erosion in the administrative functions: the intensity of input-output, the level of economic development and the level of agriculture-husbandry development.

  7. Spatial distribution of surface rock fragment on hillslopes in a small catchment in wind-water erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The cover and size distributions of surface rock fragment in hillslopes were investigated by using digital photographing and treating technique in a small catchment in wind-water erosion crisscross region of the Loess Plateau. The results indicated that the maximal cover of rock fragment was pre-sented at mid-position in steep hillslope. Rock fragment presented a general decreasing-trend along the hillslope in gentle hillslope. Rock fragment cover was positively related to gradient, rock fragment size decreased generally along the hillslope, and the size reduced with the gradient. The mean size of rock fragment was at a range of 6―20 mm in the steep hillslope, rock fragment size > 50 mm was rarely presented. The covers of rock fragment at different positions were markedly related to the quantities of rock fragment < 40 mm. The area of rock fragment of 2―50 mm accounted for 60% or more of the total area, dominating the distribution of rock fragment in the hillslopes.

  8. 兰新二线桥墩防风蚀措施及施工方法%Method and measure of wind-erosion prevention for bridge piers on Lanzhou-Xinjiang second railway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    公彦良

    2016-01-01

    The second double-track rail line in Xinjiang of Lanzhou-Xinjiang railway crosses five strong wind areas. In order to solve the wind-erosion problem of bridge concrete piers,the measure of rigid-flexible combination of wind-erosion prevention was adopted by test. T he technology is a multistep process,using flexible polyester resin and steel wire webs to make a rigid-flexible composite on the surface of piers. It has high compressive and tensile strength,corrosion and erosion resistance,satisfactory anti-ultraviolet aging and durability,then contribute to wind-erosion prevention of bridge piers.%兰新铁路第二双线新疆段穿越新疆风力最强的五大风区,为了解决风蚀对兰新铁路桥墩混凝土结构的磨蚀问题,经过试验研究兰新铁路第二双线采取了刚柔结合的防风蚀措施。由柔性树脂胶加不锈钢丝网经过多道工序施工,在桥墩表面形成具有较高的压缩与拉伸强度、优良的耐风蚀和磨蚀性能、良好的耐紫外光老化性能及耐气候性的一种刚柔结合复合体,从而实现了桥墩抗风蚀的目标。

  9. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  10. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter G.; Webb, Robert H.; Fisher, Mark; Muth, Allan

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  11. Plants and ventifacts delineate late Holocene wind vectors in the Coachella Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, P.G.; Webb, R.H.; Fisher, M.; Muth, A.

    2009-01-01

    Strong westerly winds that emanate from San Gorgonio Pass, the lowest point between Palm Springs and Los Angeles, California, dominate aeolian transport in the Coachella Valley of the western Sonoran Desert. These winds deposit sand in coppice dunes that are critical habitat for several species, including the state and federally listed threatened species Uma inornata, a lizard. Although wind directions are generally defined in this valley, the wind field has complex interactions with local topography and becomes more variable with distance from the pass. Local, dominant wind directions are preserved by growth patterns of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush), a shrub characteristic of the hot North American deserts, and ventifacts. Exceptionally long-lived, Larrea has the potential to preserve wind direction over centuries to millennia, shaped by the abrasive pruning of windward branches and the persistent training of leeward branches. Wind direction preserved in Larrea individuals and clones was mapped at 192 locations. Compared with wind data from three weather stations, Larrea vectors effectively reflect annual prevailing winds. Ventifacts measured at 24 locations record winds 10° more westerly than Larrea and appear to reflect the direction of the most erosive winds. Based on detailed mapping of local wind directions as preserved in Larrea, only the northern half of the Mission-Morongo Creek floodplain is likely to supply sand to protected U. inornata habitat in the Willow Hole ecological reserve.

  12. Radar remote sensing of wind-driven land degradation processes in northeastern Patagonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, H F; Blanco, P D; Metternicht, G I; Zinck, J A

    2010-01-01

    Wind-driven land degradation negatively impacts on rangeland production and infrastructure in the Valdes Peninsula, northeastern Patagonia. The Valdes Peninsula has the most noticeable dunefields of the Patagonian drylands. Wind erosion has been assessed at different scales in this region, but often with limited data. In general, terrain features caused by wind activity are better discriminated by active microwaves than by sensors operating in the visible and infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper aims to analyze wind-driven land degradation processes that control the radar backscatter observed in different sources of radar imagery. We used subsets derived from SIR-C, ERS-1 and 2, ENVISAT ASAR, RADARSAT-1, and ALOS PALSAR data. The visibility of aeolian features on radar images is mostly a function of wavelength, polarization, and incidence angle. Stabilized sand deposits are clearly observed in radar images, with defined edges but also signals of ongoing wind erosion. One of the most conspicuous features corresponds to old track sand dunes, a mixture of active and inactive barchanoid ridges and parabolic dunes. This is a clear example of deactivation of migrating dunes under the influence of vegetation. The L-band data reveal details of these sand ridges, whereas the C-band data only allow detecting a few of the larger tracks. The results of this study enable us to make recommendations about the utility of some radar sensor configurations for wind-driven land degradation reconnaissance in mid-latitude regions.

  13. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  14. Sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, N.; Greeley, R. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA))

    1990-07-10

    Data from studies of the cross-sectional area of terrestrial transverse dunes have been combined with maps of dune morphometry derived from Viking orbiter images to generate new estimates of sediment thickness and dune sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars. A relationship between dune spacing and equivalent sediment thickness (EST) was developed from field data on Namibian and North American dunes and was applied to data on dune spacing and dune cover measured on Viking orbiter images to generate maps of dune sediment thickness for Martian north polar sand seas. There are four major sand seas in the north polar region of Mars, covering an area of 6.8 x 10{sup 5} km{sup 2}. Equivalent sediment thickness ranges between 0.5 and 6.1 m with a mean of 1.8 m. The sand seas contain a total of 1158 km{sup 3} of dune sediment, which may have been derived by erosion of polar layered deposits and concentrated in its present location by winds that change direction seasonally.

  15. Predicting the occurrence of sand banks in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Henriët H.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sand banks have a wavelength between 1 and 10 km, and they are up to several tens of meters high. Also, sand banks may have an impact on large-scale human activities that take place in the North Sea like sand mining, shipping, offshore wind farms, etc. Therefore, it is important to know where sand b

  16. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  17. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  18. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  19. Influence of Rotation Rate of Sand Particles on Measurement Results by PIV in Wind Sand Flux%风沙流中沙粒旋转对PIV测量结果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严杰; 谢莉

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, based on the measurement principle of particle image velocimetry (PIV), we analyze the measurement error of PIV. For two frame images of a single sand.par tide taken by charge-coupled device (CCD) camera at an interval of a pulse time, we calculate the displacement of the mass center of the sand particle and the displacement of the center of image, and calculate the difference between the displacements of the two centers. Then we derive the error's formulas of sand particle velocity and sand particle diameter measurement used by PIV due to the sand particle rotation. It indicates that the velocity error measured by PIV relates to the velocity of sand particles, and the higher is the velocity of sand particles, the larger is the error. The maximum error of velocity measurement by PIV is not beyond 10%, and the measurement error can be decreased by increasing the pulse time. For a single irregular sand particle, the diameters measured by PIV at different moment are not same due to the rotation of sand particles, and the differences among the measurement errors of particle diameters depend on the sand shapes. For lager sand particle, it is pointed out that there is a long way to validate diameter measurement.%基于粒子图像测速仪(ParticleImageVelocimetry,简称PIV)测速度原理以及测量颗粒粒径原理,分析了经过一个激光脉冲时间前后CCD拍摄到的两帧沙粒二维图像,计算了沙粒因旋转而导致的沙粒质心位移与成像中点位移的差别以及不同时刻成像面的大小,导出PIV测量不规则旋转沙粒速度和粒径的测量误差公式.结果表明,PIV测速误差与沙粒速度有关,速度越大测速误差越小,最大测速误差不超过10%,可通过增大激光脉冲时间间隔以减小PIV的测速误差;由于沙粒旋转,使得不同时刻PIV测量到的同一个不规则沙粒的粒径也可能不同,其差别由沙粒形状的不规则程度决定,并指出PIV测量风沙流中不规

  20. 埋土防寒区葡萄冬剪后挂枝的防风效果%Wind erosion prevention effect of suspending shoots on wires after winter pruning in soil-burying zones over-wintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王珊; 李华; 王华

    2015-01-01

    为了改善葡萄传统栽培方式冬春季地表裸露导致的风蚀状况,该文研究了“爬地龙”栽培模式下,葡萄冬剪后枝条悬挂在铁丝上形成风障的防风阻沙效果。结果表明:此防护措施的透光疏透度值75.6%分布在0.48~0.68,均值0.58,确定为通风结构;分析风速与防护长度的关系,得到1 m高度处风速在途经风障时变化过程:遇风障减弱、集流加速、迅速减弱、恢复和背风侧消减;在风障中距迎风侧边缘34 m处风速达到最低值,较旷野风速值减小84.20%,防风效能达80.72%;从背风侧风障边缘到距离边缘34 m处,均属于相对有效防护距离以内,防风效能均值达40.94%;该研究中葡萄园的输沙量沿高度分布遵循幂函数,输沙量均集中在近地面。挂枝的距地表5~150 cm高度的总输沙量比对照高39.0%。该研究可为中国葡萄埋土防寒区的防风阻沙工作提供参考。%Ninety percent of Chinese viticulture regions are distributed in soil-burying over-wintering zones. Traditional viticulture management causes soil surface to be exposed for about 6 months per year during the cold winter and the dry windy spring when there is almost no rain but strong wind. Large area of bare soil, which comes from grape soil-burying over-wintering, results in increasing risks of wind erosion in viticulture regions. In order to reduce this erosion, a new training system called crawled cordon training (CCT) is used in the experiment. CCT has one horizontal cordon which is above the soil surface, and vertical shoots are distributed equally on cordon of the first wire and tied. Vines are trained to the regular canopy during the growth period, and the shoots of vines on the wires after pruning in winter form a kind of windbreak and play a protective role as shelterbelt network. The experiments studied the degree of porosity of shoot windbreak and the windbreak potency according to typical

  1. A simple method to downscale daily wind statistics to hourly wind data

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Zhongling

    2013-01-01

    Wind is the principal driver in the wind erosion models. The hourly wind speed data were generally required for precisely wind erosion modeling. In this study, a simple method to generate hourly wind speed data from daily wind statistics (daily average and maximum wind speeds together or daily average wind speed only) was established. A typical windy location with 3285 days (9 years) measured hourly wind speed data were used to validate the downscaling method. The results showed that the overall agreement between observed and simulated cumulative wind speed probability distributions appears excellent, especially for the wind speeds greater than 5 m s-1 range (erosive wind speed). The results further revealed that the values of daily average erosive wind power density (AWPD) calculated from generated wind speeds fit the counterparts computed from measured wind speeds well with high models' efficiency (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient). So that the hourly wind speed data can be predicted from daily average and maximu...

  2. 阴山北麓残茬间作带田土壤风蚀规律%Wind Erosion Law in Strip Intercropping Field in North Yin-shan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵沛义; 妥德宝; 康暄; 李焕春; 段玉; 张君; 安昊; 姚俊卿; 付贵锁

    2011-01-01

    为了探究带状间作农田残茬带宽度对土壤风蚀模数的影响,进一步验证野外移动式风洞对研究区带田土壤风蚀模数进行的原位测试结果,采用风蚀圈和陷阱诱捕的方法对研究区土壤风积和风蚀情况进行监测.风积量结果表明,不同宽度莜麦残茬带宽小于6 m时,风积量随带宽增加而减小,带宽6~10 m风积量随带宽增加而增加,带宽大于10 m后风积量开始下降;与残茬带等宽间作裸地中,随带宽加大风积量不断降低,带宽在3.6 m左右时达到最低值,带宽大于3.6 m后风积量随带宽增加而不断增加.风蚀量结果表明,不同宽度莜麦残茬带中,5 m带宽内土壤风蚀量显著降低,5~10 m范围缓慢上升,带宽超出10 m土壤风蚀量又呈现稳中有降的变化趋势;不同带宽间作裸地中,土壤风蚀量基本在带宽3 m之内呈直线下降,带宽在3 m左右时土壤风蚀量最低,带宽在3~7 m时土壤风蚀量呈直线上升趋势,在7~10 m时土壤风蚀量基本保持稳定,带宽大于10 m后土壤风蚀量又呈直线上升趋势;不同带宽残茬+等宽秋翻地的土壤风蚀量变化规律,基本与间作裸地的变化趋势相同;不同带宽间作裸地带中不同位置土壤风蚀量随距莜麦残茬距离的增加而增大.%The method of wind erosion ring and pitfall tripping were used to observe the effect of strip width on the wind erosion modulus and verify the results received by field mobile wind tunnel. The wind erosion and wind-blown quantity were determined and the results showed that wind-blown quantity was decreased when the width was narrower than 6 m and increased with the increasing of strip width when the width was 6~10 m, and decreased when the width was wider than 10 m in the stubble of naked oat. The wind-blown quantity decreased with the increasing of strip width in naked field when the width was less than 3. 6 m, and increased when the width was wider than 3. 6 m. The wind erosion

  3. Comparative Experimental Research on Concrete Surface Treatment Materials Resistance to Wind Erosion%混凝土抗风蚀磨损表面强化处理材料的对比试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章岩; 王起才; 张粉芹; 马华军

    2012-01-01

    The second double-track section in Xinjiang of Lanzhou-Xinjiang Railway crosses the five most powerful wind areas of the nine wind areas in Xinjiang. For wind erosion to the railway concrete structure, by means of abrasion resistance and hydrophobicity tests, four kinds of concrete surface treatment materials were chosen to carried through research to improve the abrasion resistance of concrete surface. The results show that four kinds of surface treatment materials can all improve the abrasion resistance of concrete surface to wind erosion. Among which, permeable composite latex concrete surface treatment material has comprehensive advantages in abrasion resistance, hydrophobicity and price. It can penetrate through the surface of concrete by surface seepage method and react with concrete to form a dense hydrophobic net structure on the surface to achieve the effects of protection and resistance to wind erosion. It can improve the abrasion resistance of concrete surface more than doubled, and the surface drying time is reduced 99. 35%. It has better effect in anti-ultraviolet, anti-cracking and anti-freezing, etc.%兰新铁路第二双线新疆段穿越新疆九大风区中风力最强的五大风区.针对风蚀对铁路混凝土结构物的磨蚀问题,选用4种表面强化材料,通过混凝土耐磨蚀和疏水性试验,进行提高混凝土表面耐风蚀性能研究.结果表明:4种表面强化材料均可提高混凝土表面的抗风蚀磨损能力;其中渗透性复合乳液型混凝土表面抗风蚀处理材料在提高混凝土的耐磨蚀性和疏水性以及价格方面具有综合优势,它通过表面渗透方式渗入混凝土中并和混凝土发生反应,在混凝土表面形成致密疏水的网状结构,达到防护和抗风蚀的效果,可提高混凝土表面耐磨度一倍多,表干时间缩短99.35%,且在抗紫外线、抗开裂、抗冻等方面均表现出较好的效果.

  4. The Wind-breaking Efficiency of Low Vertical Sand Barriers with Different Materials in Northern Edge of the Hobq Desert%库布齐沙漠北缘不同作物秸秆平铺式沙障的防风效能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文彪; 党晓宏; 张吉树; 袁立敏; 王淮亮; 姜海荣; 尹晓伟

    2013-01-01

    The wind-breaking efficiency of low vertical sand barriers from reed straws, sunflower straws and corn straws on sand dune of Seven-Star Lake Desert Scenic Spot in the Hobq Desert was evaluated by measuring wind speed at different heights over surface inside sand barriers and on bare sand dune. The results showed that: (1) all the three types of sand barriers had obvious wind-breaking efficiency at the 10cm height. With the height increased, wind-breaking efficiency decreased. From 10 cm to 100 cm height, the mean wind-breaking efficiency of the three types of sand barriers dropped by 63% . (2) on windward slope of sand dune, wind-breaking efficiency and surface roughness of reed straw sand barrier were respectively 1. 36 and 2. 34 times that of sunflower straw sand barriers, and respectively 1. 76 and 1. 88 times that of corn straw sand barriers; On crest and leeward slope of sand dune, wind-breaking efficiency and surface roughness of corn straw sand barriers were significantly higher than the other two sand barriers (P<0. 01). (3) the wind velocity profiles over the three types of sand barriers showed an S-type, while wind velocity profile on bare sand dune showed as a exponential function distribution.%本研究以七星湖沙漠风景区沙丘上的芦苇秸秆、向日葵秸秆和玉米秸秆平铺式沙障为研究对象,通过测定各沙障障格内以及裸沙丘近地表不同高度处的风速,对比研究了各沙障的防风效益.结果表明,①3种沙障在10 cm高度处均具有明显的防风效能,且随着高度的增加,防风效能减小,从10 cm到100 cm高度,3种沙障的防风效能平均降幅达63%.②在沙丘迎风坡,芦苇秸秆沙障的防风效能和地表粗糙度分别是向日葵秸秆沙障的1.36倍和2.34倍,是玉米秸秆沙障的1.76倍和1.88倍;在沙丘坡顶和背风坡,玉米秸秆沙障的防风效能及地表粗糙度均显著高于另外两者(P<0.01).③3种沙障的风速廓线均呈现出一种类似于

  5. Soil erosion dynamics response to landscape pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Wei; Skidmore, Andrew K; Hao, Fanghua; Wang, Tiejun

    2010-02-15

    Simulating soil erosion variation with a temporal land use database reveals long-term fluctuations in landscape patterns, as well as priority needs for soil erosion conservation. The application of a multi-year land use database in support of a Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) led to an accurate assessment, from 1977 to 2006, of erosion in the upper watershed of the Yellow River. At same time, the impacts of land use and landscape service features on soil erosion load were assessed. A series of supervised land use classifications of Landsat images characterized variations in land use and landscape patterns over three decades. The SWAT database was constructed with soil properties, climate and elevation data. Using water flow and sand density data as parameters, regional soil erosion load was simulated. A numerical statistical model was used to relate soil erosion to land use and landscape. The results indicated that decadal decrease of grassland areas did not pose a significant threat to soil erosion, while the continual increase of bare land, water area and farmland increased soil erosion. Regional landscape variation also had a strong relationship with erosion. Patch level landscape analyses demonstrated that larger water area led to more soil erosion. The patch correlation indicated that contagious grassland patches reduced soil erosion yield. The increased grassland patches led to more patch edges, in turn increasing the sediment transportation from the patch edges. The findings increase understanding of the temporal variation in soil erosion processes, which is the basis for preventing local pollution.

  6. The June 2016 Australian East Coast Low: Importance of Wave Direction for Coastal Erosion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Mortlock

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In June 2016, an unusual East Coast Low storm affected some 2000 km of the eastern seaboard of Australia bringing heavy rain, strong winds and powerful wave conditions. While wave heights offshore of Sydney were not exceptional, nearshore wave conditions were such that beaches experienced some of the worst erosion in 40 years. Hydrodynamic modelling of wave and current behaviour as well as contemporaneous sand transport shows the east to north-east storm wave direction to be the major determinant of erosion magnitude. This arises because of reduced energy attenuation across the continental shelf and the focussing of wave energy on coastal sections not equilibrated with such wave exposure under the prevailing south-easterly wave climate. Narrabeen–Collaroy, a well-known erosion hot spot on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, is shown to be particularly vulnerable to storms from this direction because the destructive erosion potential is amplified by the influence of the local embayment geometry. We demonstrate the magnified erosion response that occurs when there is bi-directionality between an extreme wave event and preceding modal conditions and the importance of considering wave direction in extreme value analyses.

  7. Altitude of the top of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand in three areas of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Westerfield, Paul W.; Gonthier, Gerard; Poynter, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand form the second most productive aquifer in Arkansas. The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand range in thick- ness from 0 to 900 feet, consisting of fine- to medium-grained sands interbedded with layers of silt, clay, shale, and minor amounts of lignite. Within the three areas of interest, the top surface of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand dips regionally east and southeast towards the axis of the Mississippi Embayment syncline and Desha Basin. Local variations in the top surface may be attributed to a combination of continued development of structural features, differential compaction, localized faulting, and erosion of the surface prior to subsequent inundation and deposition of younger sediments.

  8. National assessment of hurricane-induced coastal erosion hazards: Southeast Atlantic Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Thompson, David M.; Sopkin, Kristin L.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Beaches serve as a natural barrier between the ocean and inland communities, ecosystems, and natural resources. However, these dynamic environments move and change in response to winds, waves, and currents. During extreme storms, changes to beaches can be large, and the results are sometimes catastrophic. Lives may be lost, communities destroyed, and millions of dollars spent on rebuilding. During storms, large waves may erode beaches, and high storm surge shifts the erosive force of the waves higher on the beach. In some cases, the combined effects of waves and surge may cause overwash or flooding. Building and infrastructure on or near a dune can be undermined during wave attack and subsequent erosion. During Hurricane Ivan in 2004, a five-story condominium in Orange Beach, Alabama, collapsed after the sand dune supporting the foundation eroded. The September 1999 landfall of Hurricane Dennis caused erosion and undermining that destroyed roads, foundations, and septic systems. Waves overtopping a dune can transport sand inland, covering roads and blocking evacuation routes or emergency relief. If storm surge inundates barrier island dunes, currents flowing across the island can create a breach, or new inlet, completely severing evacuation routes. Waves and surge during the 2003 landfall of Hurricane Isabel left a 200-meter (m) wide breach that cut the only road to and from the village of Hatteras, N.C. Extreme coastal changes caused by hurricanes may increase the vulnerability of communities both during a storm and to future storms. For example, when sand dunes on a barrier island are eroded substantially, inland structures are exposed to storm surge and waves. Absent or low dunes also allow water to flow inland across the island, potentially increasing storm surge in the back bay, on the soundside of the barrier, and on the mainland. During Hurricane Isabel the protective sand dunes near the breach were completely eroded, increasing vulnerability to future

  9. A new turbulence-based model for sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome; Wiggs, Giles; Bailey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. While many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. However, turbulence has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study we present a new transport model (the 'turbulence model') that accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) and vertical (w) components of wind flow. The turbulence model is fitted to wind velocity and sediment transport data from a field experiment undertaken in Namibia's Skeleton Coast National Park, and its performance at three temporal resolutions (10 Hz, 1 Hz, 1 min) is compared to two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003). The validity of the three models is analysed under a variety of saltation conditions, using a 2-hour (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset from the Skeleton Coast and a 5-hour (1 min measurement resolution) dataset from the southwestern Kalahari Desert. The turbulence model is shown to outperform the Radok and Dong models when predicting total saltation count over the three experimental periods. For all temporal resolutions presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the turbulence model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.34%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The strong performance of the turbulence model can be attributed to a lag in mass flux response built into its formulation, which can be adapted depending on the temporal resolution of investigation. This accounts for the inherent lag within the physical

  10. Ecogeomorphology of Sand Dunes Shaped by Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoar, H.

    2014-12-01

    Two dune types associated with vegetation are known: Parabolic and Vegetated Linear Dunes (VLDs), the latters are the dominant dune type in the world deserts. Parabolic dunes are formed in humid, sub-humid and semi-arid environments (rather than arid) where vegetation is nearby. VLDs are known today in semiarid and arid lands where the average yearly rainfall is ≥100 mm, enough to support sparse cover of vegetation. These two dune types are formed by unidirectional winds although they demonstrate a different form and have a distinct dynamics. Conceptual and mathematical models of dunes mobility and stability, based on three control parameters: wind power (DP), average annual precipitation (p), and the human impact parameter (μ) show that where human impact is negligible the effect of wind power (DP) on vegetative cover is substantial. The average yearly rainfall of 60-80 mm is the threshold of annual average rainfall for vegetation growth on dune sand. The model is shown to follow a hysteresis path, which explains the bistability of active and stabilized dunes under the same climatic conditions with respect to wind power. We have discerned formation of parabolic dunes from barchans and transverse dunes in the coastal plain of Israel where a decrease in human activity during the second half of the 20th century caused establishment of vegetation on the crest of the dunes, a process that changed the dynamics of these barchans and transverse dunes and led to a change in the shape of the windward slope from convex to concave. These dunes gradually became parabolic. It seems that VLDs in Australia or the Kalahari have always been vegetated to some degree, though the shrubs were sparser in colder periods when the aeolian erosion was sizeable. Those ancient conditions are characterized by higher wind power and lower rainfall that can reduce, but not completely destroy, the vegetation cover, leading to the formation of lee (shadow) dunes behind each shrub. Formation of

  11. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  12. Wind erosion modulus and quantity evaluation of aeolian sediment feed into river in watershed of Ningxia-Inner Mongolia Reach of Yellow River from 1986 to 2013%1986-2013年黄河宁蒙河段风蚀模数与风沙入河量估算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜鹤强; 薛娴; 王涛; 邓晓红

    2015-01-01

    为缓解宁(宁夏)蒙(内蒙古)河段的淤积问题,需要对该河段风蚀灾害和风沙入黄量的时空变化进行研究。该文选取综合风蚀模拟系统(integrated wind-erosion modeling system,IWEMS)和修订版风蚀方程(revised wind erosion equation,RWEQ)对1986-2013年黄河宁蒙河段风蚀模数进行了估算,并结合风沙输移方程,对不同河段的风沙入黄量进行了计算。发现宁蒙河段的风蚀灾害主要发生在乌兰布和沙漠、库布奇沙漠和河东沙地等沙漠区域。自1986年以来河东沙地的风蚀模数逐渐降低,而乌兰布和沙漠的风蚀模数则逐渐凸显,成为宁蒙河段风蚀最严重的区域。1986-2013年间,整个宁蒙河段受风蚀灾害的面积逐渐减小,平均风蚀模数迅速下降,线性拟合函数斜率高达−182.81。风沙入黄量结果显示,石嘴山—巴彦高勒段的年均风沙入黄量最大,高达9.31×106 t/a;下河沿—青铜峡段最小,其值仅为7.6×105 t/a。另外,除石嘴山—巴彦高勒段之外,其余河段风沙入黄量并未呈现出明显的减小趋势。通过对宁蒙河段气象和土地利用数据的分析,发现宁蒙河段的风蚀模数的变化主要受气候条件的影响。该研究结果可为解决黄河淤积问题、完善黄河沿岸风沙防护体系提供参考。%The Yellow River flows through an extensive aeolian alluvial plain in Ningxia and Inner Mongolia plateau, which extends from Xiaheyan in Ningxia to Toudaoguai in Inner Mongolia. The Hedong sandy land, the Ulanbuh Desert and the Kubuqi Desert all border on the Yellow River. Frequent strong winds and erodible surfaces cause extreme wind-erosion process in the watershed of Ningxia-Inner Mongolia reach of the Yellow River. A large amount of aeolian sediment flows into the main stream and tributaries of the Yellow River by particle saltation and dune avalanche, which result in the continuous elevation of

  13. Morphological characteristics and sand volumes of different coastal dune types in Essaouira Province, Atlantic Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor-Blanco, Germán; Flor, Germán; Lharti, Saadia; Pando, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Altogether three coastal dune fields, one located north and two south of the city of Essaouira, Atlantic Morocco, have been investigated to establish the distribution and overall sand volumes of various dune types. The purpose of the study was to characterize and classify the aeolian landforms of the coastal dune belt, to estimate their sand volumes and to assess the effectiveness of coastal dune stabilization measures. The northern dune field is 9 km long and lined by a wide artificial foredune complex fixed by vegetation, fences and branches forming a rectangular grid. Active and ephemeral aklé dunes border the inner backshore, while some intrusive dunes have crossed the foredune belt and are migrating farther inland. The total sand volume of the northern dune belt amounts 13,910,255 m3. The central coastal sector comprises a much smaller dune field located just south of the city. It is only 1.2 km long and, with the exception of intrusive dunes, shows all other dune types. The overall sand volume of the central dune field amounts to about 172,463 m3. The southern dune field is characterized by a narrower foredune belt and overall lower dunes that, in addition, become progressively smaller towards the south. In this sector, embryonic dunes (coppice, shadow dunes), tongue-like and tabular dunes, and sand sheets intrude from the beach, the profile of which has a stepped appearance controlled by irregular outcrops of old aeolianite and beach rock. The total volume of the southern dune field amounts 1,446,389 m3. For the whole study area, i.e. for all three dune fields combined, a sand volume of about 15,529,389 m3 has been estimated. The sand of the dune fields is derived from coastal erosion and especially the Tensift River, which enters the sea at Souira Qedima some 70 km north of Essaouira. After entering the sea, the sand is transported southwards by littoral drift driven by the mainly north-westerly swell climate and the Trade Winds blowing from the NNE. This

  14. Sand Dune Movement in Xinjiang of Northwest China and Prevention of Desertification by Windbreak Facilities in Arid Lands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. MAKI; M. DU; R. SAMESHIMA; B. PAN

    1996-01-01

    .... There are various countermeasure against desertification in arid lands of the world. In this paper, we demonstrated the situation of sand erosion and movement of sand dunes, and we propose the prevention method by using windbreak facilities, i. e...

  15. Effects of slope gradient on hydro-erosional processes on an aeolian sand-covered loess slope under simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Yang, M. Y.; Li, B. B.; Li, Z. B.; Shi, W. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The aeolian sand-covered loess slope of the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region of the Loess Plateau in China may play a key role in contributing excessive sediment to the Yellow River. Understanding its hydro-erosional processes is crucial to assessing, controlling and predicting soil and water losses in this region and maintaining the ecological sustainability of the Yellow River. Simulated rainfall (intensity 90 mm h-1) was used to investigate the runoff and soil loss from loess slopes with different slope gradients (18%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%) and overlying sand layer thicknesses (0, 5 and 10 cm). As compared with uncovered loess slopes, an overlying sand layer delayed runoff production, reduced cumulative runoff and increased cumulative soil loss, as well as enhancing variations among slope gradients. Cumulative runoff and soil loss from the sand-covered loess slopes increased with increasing slope gradients and then slightly decreased, with a peak at about 47% gradient; they both were greater from the 10-cm sand-covered loess slope than from the 5-cm except for with 18% slope gradient. In general, differences in cumulative runoff between sand layer thicknesses became smaller, while those in cumulative soil loss became larger, with increasing slope gradient. Runoff and soil loss rates on the sand-covered loess slopes exhibited unimodal distributions during the rainstorms. Maximum values tended to occur at the same rain duration, and increased considerably with increasing slope gradient and sand layer thickness on slopes that were less than 47%. Liquefaction process might occur on the lower loess slopes covered with thinner sand layers but failures similar to shallow landslides might occur when the sand layer was thicker on steeper slopes. The presence of an overlying sand layer changed the relationship between runoff and soil loss rates during intense rainstorms and this change varied with different slope gradients. Our results demonstrated that the effects

  16. Tensile and Erosion-wear Properties of Composite Material for Wind Turbine Blade%风力机叶片用复合材料的拉伸及冲蚀磨损性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董旭旭; 李新梅; 董兰兰; 曹祥辉

    2015-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced resin composite material for wind turbine blade was prepared by vacuum infusion method and the microstructure,mechanical and erosion-wear properties under gas-solid two phase flow were also studied.The results show that the tensile curve of the composite material was in accordance with Weibull distribution and no obvious yield point was observed before fracture.The tensile strength of the composite material with 6 fiber layers was 456.87 MPa and of 12 fiber layers was 646.69 MPa.The elastic modulus of the composite material was 4 720.36 MPa.The erosion rate of the composite material increased with the increase of impact angle and velocity of the erosion particles,and showed a decreased fluctuation with the increase of the particle size.%采用真空灌注成型工艺制备了风力机叶片用玻璃纤维增强树脂基复合材料,研究了其显微结构、拉伸性能以及在气固两相流下的冲蚀磨损性能.结果表明:复合材料的拉伸曲线呈Weibull 分布,断裂前无明显的屈服现象;铺设6层纤维织物复合材料的拉伸强度为456.87 MPa,12层的拉伸强度为646.69 MPa,其弹性模量均为4720.36 MPa;复合材料冲蚀率分别随冲蚀颗粒冲击角和冲击速度的增加而增大,随着颗粒粒径的增大成波动性下降.

  17. Impact-generated winds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter H.; Quintana, Stephanie N.

    2017-08-01

    Bright and dark wind streaks across Mars record wind patterns related to atmospheric circulation. In some cases these streaks represent erosion of a surface veneer; in others, they indicate sand grains mobilized by strong vortices shed off of positive relief, such as crater rims. While many streaks change length or orientation over time, others not only remain unchanged but also may indicate a completely different wind direction. These permanent streaks could reflect past circulation patterns in response to conditions related to orbital forcing (e.g., Thomas and Veverka, 1979; Veverka et al., 1981). Here, however, we focus on a subset of permanent wind streaks unrelated to global circulation, rather to impact-generated winds that can extend more than 500 km away from the crater. Nighttime images from the Mars Odyssey's Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) reveal certain large craters (> 15 km in diameter) having sets of thermally bright streaks that radiate from certain fresh impact craters. These streaks extend from pre-existing topographic highs (crater rims, wrinkle ridges) beyond the continuous ejecta deposits to more than 6 crater radii, unrelated to secondary craters. For illustration, this contribution primarily focuses on the 20 km-diameter Santa Fe crater in Chryse Planitia. Context Camera (CTX) images reveal that these streaks correspond to zones of erosion. The thermally bright rays in nighttime images correlate with regions where coarser materials have been exposed, not always resolved even in HiRISE images. Models of the impact process indicate impact-generated vapor most likely generated intense winds that scoured the region, well before arrival of secondary craters and later ejecta run-out flows. Pre-existing relief (such as crater rims) disturbed this flow and generated intense cross-flow instabilities resulting in long parallel streaks.

  18. Erosion resistance of bionic functional surfaces inspired from desert scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwu, Han; Junqiu, Zhang; Chao, Ge; Li, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a bionic method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components. Desert scorpion (Androctonus australis) is a typical animal living in sandy deserts, and may face erosive action of blowing sand at a high speed. Based on the idea of bionics and biologic experimental techniques, the mechanisms of the sand erosion resistance of desert scorpion were investigated. Results showed that the desert scorpions used special microtextures such as bumps and grooves to construct the functional surfaces to achieve the erosion resistance. In order to understand the erosion resistance mechanisms of such functional surfaces, the combination of computational and experimental research were carried out in this paper. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was applied to predict the erosion performance of the bionic functional surfaces. The result demonstrated that the microtextured surfaces exhibited better erosion resistance than the smooth surfaces. The further erosion tests indicated that the groove surfaces exhibited better erosion performance at 30° injection angle. In order to determine the effect of the groove dimensions on the erosion resistance, regression analysis of orthogonal multinomials was also performed under a certain erosion condition, and the regression equation between the erosion rate and groove distance, width, and height was established.

  19. 保护性耕作下农田土壤风蚀量及其影响因子的研究初报%A Preliminary Study on Soil Wind Erosion and its Impact Factors with Conservation Tillage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琳; 王俊英; 刘永霞; 周继红; 韩烈刚

    2009-01-01

    [研究目的]通过对保护性耕作下土壤风蚀影响与控制的研究,旨在为指导京郊裸露农田治理和结构调整,生态补贴的实施提供理论依据.[方法]2008年4月采用移动式风洞仪进行研究,并得出以下初步结论:[结果](1)六种地块下土壤风蚀量以裸露翻旋地最高,种植越冬覆盖作物能显著降低土壤风蚀量;不同免耕播种机和秸秆处理方式下,风蚀量区别主要在于播种机,以迪尔风蚀量最低,农哈哈机型最高;四种耕作方式下土壤风蚀量以旋耕地最高,翻耕地比旋耕地降低80.81%,重耙和免耕地风蚀量分别比旋耕地降低95.35%和97.71%;冬小麦五种不同播期下土壤风蚀量随着播期的推后逐渐增大.(2)四种作物中小麦田的覆盖率最高,其次为紫花苜蓿和小黑麦,油菜覆盖率最低;四种耕作方式下耙耕小麦田覆盖率最高为84.00%,旋耕最低为55.33%;五个播期下9月27日播种的小麦田覆盖率显著高于其他播期,10月7日和10月12日最低.(3)将土壤风蚀量作为依变量,覆盖率、作物株高和土壤容重作为自变量进行多元回归分析,并建立多元回归方程:Y=173.186-0.449X1-0.485X2-72.699X3.%In this paper, we studied farmland soil wind erosion and its impact factors in Beijing city under con-servation tillage in use of Movable Erosion Wind Tunnel. The results show that (1) the volume of soil wind ero-sion in rotary exposed farmland shows the highest spin in Six plots, cover crops planted in winter can signifi-cantly reduce the volume of soil erosion; In different no-tillage methods and straw treatment, the amount of wind erosion depends on seeding-machine, and the volume of Deere comes up to minimum, agricultural haha maximum; Volume of soil erosion in rotary reach the highest spin in four farming methods, plough tillage less 80.81% than rotary, and harrow tillage less 97.71%,no tillage less 95.35%; With the delay of sowing dates, the amount of soil erosion in

  20. Revegetação com plantas de cobertura em solos arenizados sob erosão eólica no Rio Grande do Sul Revegetation with cover crops for soils under arenization and wind erosion in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Moreira Rovedder

    2008-02-01

    revegetation with cover crops such as Avena strigosa Schieb. and Lupinus albescens H. et Arn., was developed to reduce the soil particle movement by eolic erosion. The experiment was carried out on a Quartzipsament soil, from September to December 2001 and from January to December 2002, in a completely randomizased design and nine replications, on a degraded area and on a degraded area under cover crops. Galvanized metal boxes of 0.5 x 0.5 m, in a pyramid base shape, were buried in the center of the plots, with the upper opening at the ground level. The sand volume deposited in the boxes by the wind was measured every fortnight, and the water content determined. In 2001, the amount of transported sand was 365 Mg ha-1 from the area with cover crops and 5.053 Mg ha-1 from the degraded area, expressing a reduction of 93 % in sand transport by eolic erosion. In 2002, 775 Mg ha-1 of sand was transported from the area with cover crops, whereas 11080 Mg ha-1 was moved from the degraded area, with the same reduction of 93 % in sediment transport due to soil covering. These results indicate that the technique of revegetation with cover plants may be used to detain the sand in degraded areas.

  1. Recent coastal dune development: Effects of sand nourishments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.A.J.; Heteren, S. van; Vonhgen, L.M.; Spek, A.J.F. van der; Valk, B. van der

    2012-01-01

    Much of the Dutch coast has been subject to structural erosion. From 1990 onward, sand nourishments have been used under a government policy of dynamic preservation. Annual monitoring and field inspections show that the structural erosion has decreased or even turned into coastal progradation after

  2. Mesophilic Actinomycetes in the natural and reconstructed sand dune vegetation zones of Fraser Island, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtböke, D I; Neller, R J; Bellgard, S E

    2007-08-01

    The natural coastal habitat of Fraser Island located in the State of Queensland, Australia, has been disturbed in the past for mining of the mineral sand ilmenite. Currently, there is no information available on whether these past mining disturbances have affected the distribution, diversity, and survival of beneficial soil microorganisms in the sand dunes of the island. This in turn could deleteriously affect the success of the natural regeneration, plant growth, and establishment on the sand dunes. To support ongoing restoration efforts at sites like these mesophilic actinomycetes were isolated using conventional techniques, with particular emphasis on the taxa previously reported to produce plant-growth-promoting substances and providing support to mycorrhizal fungi, were studied at disturbed sites and compared with natural sites. In the natural sites, foredunes contained higher densities of micromonosporae replaced by increasing numbers of streptomycete species in the successional dune and finally leading to complex actinomycete communities in the mature hind dunes. Whereas in the disturbed zones affected by previous mining activities, which are currently being rehabilitated, no culturable actinomycete communities were detected. These findings suggest that the paucity of beneficial microflora in the rehabilitated sand dunes may be limiting the successful colonization by pioneer plant species. Failure to establish a cover of plant species would result in the mature hind dune plants being exposed to harsh salt and climatic conditions. This could exacerbate the incidence of wind erosion, resulting in the destabilization of well-defined and vegetated successional dunal zones.

  3. Linking rapid erosion of the Mekong River delta to human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Edward J.; Brunier, Guillaume; Besset, Manon; Goichot, Marc; Dussouillez, Philippe; Nguyen, Van Lap

    2015-10-01

    As international concern for the survival of deltas grows, the Mekong River delta, the world’s third largest delta, densely populated, considered as Southeast Asia’s most important food basket, and rich in biodiversity at the world scale, is also increasingly affected by human activities and exposed to subsidence and coastal erosion. Several dams have been constructed upstream of the delta and many more are now planned. We quantify from high-resolution SPOT 5 satellite images large-scale shoreline erosion and land loss between 2003 and 2012 that now affect over 50% of the once strongly advancing >600 km-long delta shoreline. Erosion, with no identified change in the river’s discharge and in wave and wind conditions over this recent period, is consistent with: (1) a reported significant decrease in coastal surface suspended sediment from the Mekong that may be linked to dam retention of its sediment, (2) large-scale commercial sand mining in the river and delta channels, and (3) subsidence due to groundwater extraction. Shoreline erosion is already responsible for displacement of coastal populations. It is an additional hazard to the integrity of this Asian mega delta now considered particularly vulnerable to accelerated subsidence and sea-level rise, and will be exacerbated by future hydropower dams.

  4. Erosion sculptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristroph, Leif; Moore, M. N. J.; Childress, Stephen; Shelley, Michael; Zhang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    Erosion by flowing fluids carves the striking landscapes imprinted on the Earth and on the surfaces of our neighboring worlds. In these processes, solid boundaries both influence and are shaped by the surrounding fluid, but the emergence of morphology as a result of this interaction is not well understood. We study the coevolution of shape and flow in the context of clay bodies immersed in fast flowing water. Although commonly viewed as a smoothing process, we discover that erosion sculpts surprisingly sharp points and corners that persist as the body shrinks. These features result from a natural tendency to form surfaces that erode uniformly, and we argue that this principle may also apply to the more complex scenarios that occur in nature.

  5. Impact of Sand-Dust Weather on Meteorological Elements and Study on Structure of Wind-blown Sand Flow in the Northern Margin of the Badain Jaran Desert%巴丹吉林沙漠北缘沙尘天气过程中近地面气象要素变化及风沙流结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆; 郑新倩; 努尔阿米娜·依明; 阿吉买买提·日西提; 杨兵; 王会青; 王毅; 崔勇超

    2015-01-01

    Based on the data of sandstorms in spring 2013 from flux observation stations at Guaizi lake region in the northern margin of the Badain Jaran desert, which was built by the Institute of Desert Meteorology of China Meteorological Administration, we analyzed the characteristics of blown-sand activites and meteorological elements of the near surface layer under different weather conditions (clear day, rising dust day and sandstorm day). The results showed that the higher wind speed brought about stronger dust process. The wind speed and direction showed significant adjustment process before the dust weather, but it was relatively stable when it outbreaked. The ground temperature decreased with dust weather intensity increased. The floating dust resulted in that each layer of soil temperature showed a decrease tendency, but the degree of reduction was relatively weak. Moreover, the each layer of soil temperature under dust weather maintained good gradient changes and showed a diurnal variation trend of sine function curve. At the height of 2 m above surface, the instant sand-laden wind velocity for naturally mixed sands was about 6.5 m/s at one-minute interval. In the sand drift structure, the vertical sand flux was all in an increase trend with the increase of height below 20 cm from the ground. The vertical sand flux at all the height was exponent function decreased with the increase of height above 20 cm. The 50% and 90% of the total sand flux occurred mainly in the air layer below 20 cm and 56 cm from the ground, respectively. The sand flux within 0~100 cm height was 195.13 kg/m during the observation period.%利用2013年春季在巴丹吉林沙漠北缘拐子湖地区的沙尘暴加强观测资料,对比分析该地区典型流动沙面晴天、扬沙和沙尘暴三种天气背景下各气象要素的变化特征及差异,以便进一步了解沙尘天气过程中近地层风沙活动特征。结果表明:随风速增加沙尘天气强度逐步提升且

  6. Mechanics of aeolian processes: Soil erosion and dust production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabadi, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Aeolian (wind) processes occur as a result of atmosphere/land-surface system interactions. A thorough understanding of these processes and their physical/mechanical characterization on a global scale is essential to monitoring global change and, hence, is imperative to the fundamental goal of the Earth observing system (Eos) program. Soil erosion and dust production by wind are of consequence mainly in arid and semi arid regions which cover 36 percent of the Earth's land surface. Some recent models of dust production due to wind erosion of agricultural soils and the mechanics of wind erosion in deserts are reviewed and the difficulties of modeling the aeolian transport are discussed.

  7. A method to estimate wind turbine blade damage and to design damage-resilient blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Giovanni

    Wind turbine blades are affected by continuous impacts with airborne particles that deteriorate the blade surface and yield to a drop in output power. Based on the climatic conditions and geographic locations of a given wind farm, multiple types of particles are observed in air. The present study focuses on simulating the impact of four types of particles, namely insects, sand grains, hailstones, and rain drops with the blade surface. A numerical inviscid flowfield code, coupled with a particle position predictor code was used. Upon impact, the damaging effect to the blade surface was evaluated. Each type of particle was associated with a damage mode, which depends on the mass, size, and hardness of the particle. It was found that insects strike and adhere to the blade in a region close to the leading edge. On the other hand, it was seen that sand grains promote erosion just downstream of the leading edge, where local velocity reaches a maximum and the impact angle is shallow. Moreover, particles such as rain drops are associated with fatigue and erosion at the very leading edge and on the upper side of the blade section. Finally, hailstones promote delamination and fatigue in the composite panels of the blade surface. Photographic evidence of damaged blade surfaces was used in the present research as a comparison with the simulations performed for various types of particle and different initial conditions. Based on such observations, a theorization of the damage pattern and evolution was proposed. Finally, given a set of well-established blade section geometries, such as the Delft University and NREL S airfoil families, a comparison of airfoil damage fitness was proposed and possible means of shape optimization were discussed. The investigation of blade geometry features to mitigate damage was performed. Based on previous results, it was argued that a viable blade section optimization may be performed for the lightest and smallest particles considered in the study

  8. Exogenic forces action mechanism in the development process of erosion landform on alluvial plains composed of fluvial-lacustrine deposits in the Taklimakan Desert%塔克拉玛干沙漠河湖相沉积平原风蚀地貌发育的外营力作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李生宇; 谷峰; 王海峰; 庞营军; 穆桂金; 雷加强; 刘小路; 张忠良; 闫健

    2012-01-01

    role in erosion landform development. ( 3) At the same time, weathering, running water and gravity also play important roles. Some records of summer strong rainfall events in the Taklimakan Desert indicate that the function of running water in erosion landform development cant be neglected. Rain infiltration and soil cracks, main weathering forma, loosen the surface soil structure, smash sediments to pieces, and make soil be eroded easily. Moreover, all these exogenic forces have different importance in different stages of erosion landform development. But they work co - oper-alively and mutually reinforce. Wind erosion breakthroughs can develop under aeolian erosion together with weathering and running waler in the initial stage, A aeries of erosion landforms, including deflation furrow, wind erosion groove, blowout pit, wind erosion depression, erosion platform, wind erosion residual pier, and wind erosion plain, can rapidly develop under aeolian erosion together with gravity and weathering in the rest of stages. Sand wedges, composed of sand particles deposited in the wedge - shaped space of soil cracks, are of great importance in erosion landform development. Rainwater flows into sand wedges and is adsorbed by sand. Due to good penetrability of sand deposits, water can infiltrate quickly without evaporation loss and reach the bottoms of cracks. The deep soil can be destroyed by soil expansion of wetting and unfreezing; soil cracks widen and extend into deep soil further. Lateral erosion and undercutting are the main forms of wind erosion as well as sheet erosion, they make the sediments hang up. Lateral emsion, undercutting and sand wedges provide good conditions for gravity collapse and accelerate the negative erosion landform development on the sediments with nonhomogeneous texture. Collapse diluvium also can slow down the speed of wind erosion landform development. (4) The morphological characteristics of erosion kndform depend on the special exogenic forces

  9. Aeolian sedimentation in the middle buntsandstein in the eifel north-south depression zone: Summary of the variability of sedimentary processes in a buntsandstein erg as a base for evaluation of the mutual relationships between aeolian sand seas and fluvial river systems in the mid-european buntsandstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Detlef

    The spectrum of aeolian depositional subenvironments in the upper Middle Buntsandstein Karlstal-Schichten sequence in the Eifel North-South-zone at the western margin of the Mid-European Triassic Basin comprises trains of larger and higher narrowly-spaced dunes in sand seas, isolated smaller and lower widely-spaced dunes in floodplains and interdune playas, dry interdune sheet sands, damp interdune adhesive sandflats, wet interdune playa lakes, rainfall runoff watercourses and ephemeral channels cutting through the dune belt, and deflation gravel lag veneers. Distinction of aeolian and fluvial sediments within the succession of closely intertonguing wind- and water-laid deposits is possible by independent analysis of the conventional criteria and the more modern stratification styles. Thick cross-bedded aeolian sand sequences originate as barchanoid-type dunes which accumulate and migrate in the regime of narrow to wide unimodal southeasterly to southwesterly trade winds in low northern palaeolatitude in summer when the intertropical convergence zone is shifted to the north. The predominantly transverse-ridge dunes accrete mainly by grainfall and subcritical climbing of wind ripples, subordinately also by grainflow interfingering with grainfall. Horizontal-laminated aeolian sands form as sand sheets in dry interdune playas by subcritical migration of wind ripple trains, rarely also by plane bed accretion. Thin cross-bedded dune sands or horizontal-laminated aeolian sands capping fluvial cyclothems originate by deflation of emerged alluvial bar sands during low-water stages and subsequent accumulation of the winnowed sand as widely-spaced dunelets or chains of wind ripples in desiccated parts of the adjoining floodplain. The aeolian sand layers at the base of lacustrine cyclothems record migration of isolated little dunes across the dry playa floor at the beginning of a wetting-upwards cyclothem, with the sand deriving from deflation of fluvial incursions or

  10. Effects of the construction of Scroby Sands offshore wind farm on the prey base of Little tern Sternula albifrons at its most important UK colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrow, Martin R; Gilroy, James J; Skeate, Eleanor R; Tomlinson, Mark L

    2011-08-01

    Despite widespread interest in the impacts of wind farms upon birds, few researchers have examined the potential for indirect or trophic (predator-prey) effects. Using surface trawls, we monitored prey abundance before and after construction of a 30 turbine offshore wind farm sited close to an internationally important colony of Little terns. Observations confirmed that young-of-the-year clupeids dominated chick diet, which trawl samples suggested were mainly herring. Multivariate modelling indicated a significant reduction in herring abundance from 2004 onwards that could not be explained by environmental factors. Intensely noisy monopile installation during the winter spawning period was suggested to be responsible. Reduced prey abundance corresponded with a significant decline in Little tern foraging success. Unprecedented egg abandonment and lack of chick hatching tentatively suggested a colony-scale response in some years. We urge a precautionary approach to the timing and duration of pile-driving activity supported with long-term targeted monitoring of sensitive receptors.

  11. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  12. Simulation of aeolian sand saltation with rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Wang, Cong; Pan, Xiying

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model based on the distribution functions of initial liftoff velocity and angular velocity of sand grains to describe a sand saltation process in which both wind field-sand grain coupling and the Magnus force experienced by saltating sand grains have been incorporated. The computation results showed that the Magnus force had significant effects on sand grain saltation. In particular, when the Magnus force was incorporated, the calculated sand transport fluxes and sand transport rate per unit width were closer to the experimental value than when this force was excluded. The sand transport flux is enhanced because the Magnus force owing to particle rotation causes the particles to have higher and longer trajectories, so the particles can get more speed and energy from the wind, which leads to a larger sand transport flux. In addition, it was found that when taking the Magnus force into account, the probability density of the impact velocity and angular velocity of saltating sand grains followed an exponential distribution and a unimodal asymmetric distribution, respectively. Moreover, the sand energy flux increased with the height above the sand surface until the energy flux reached its maximum and then decreased. Furthermore, the energy flux near the ground surface decreased as the grain diameter increased, but beyond a specific height the energy flux increased with the grain diameter. Finally, for the same sand grain diameter, the energy flux increased with the friction velocity.

  13. Significance of frost action and surface soil characteristics to wind erosion at Rocky Flats, Colorado. Second progress report, October 1, 1975--May 30, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caine, N.; Morin, P.

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes information on soil frost effects collected on Rocky Flats during the 1975-1976 winter. On a broad scale, work on soil textures at and just below the ground surface corroborates the conclusion reached earlier that the general frost susceptibility of the Rocky Flats soils is quite well keyed to topography. This is incorporated into a mapping procedure for potential soil frost activity which is applied to the northwestern part of the Rocky Flats area. On a site scale, instrumental records of weather conditions and soil responses have been maintained from October, 1975, to May, 1976, at the Lindsay Ranch study site, northwest of the Rocky Flats Plant. During that period, 33 needle ice events have been observed and recorded and are described in this report. A preliminary examination of wind data for the same period suggests that the soil in areas of natural vegetation on the site are not exposed to wind action. If, however, they were exposed, winds capable of eroding them are common.

  14. Present-day erosion of Martian polar terrain by the seasonal CO2 jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankina, Ganna; Hansen, Candice J.; Aye, Klaus-Michael

    2017-01-01

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) detected the new troughs during its campaign for seasonal monitoring of the polar areas. The newly detected dendritic troughs are small shallow branching troughs (≈ 1.4 m wide) similar to the seasonal furrows previously detected in the northern hemisphere (Bourke, 2013). The essential difference between the new troughs and furrows lies in the fact that the troughs in the south are persistent while the northern furrows are erased each Martian year by the sand movement due to summer winds. From year to year the new southern troughs extend and develop new tributaries and their overall geometry turns from linear to dendritic, a characteristic shared with araneiform terrains. We believe that furrows have the same origin as the southern dendritic troughs but do not develop into dendritic shapes because of the high mobility of the dune material into which they are carved. Several locations where new dendritic troughs are observed lie in the vicinity of dunes. This gives us an observational indication that presence of erosive sand material is an important factor in creating (or at least starting) erosive processes that lead to the formation of dendritic troughs. By extrapolation the same mechanism should be acting to create the much larger araneiform terrains. Detection of the present day erosion working in polar areas and creating new topographical features is important for understanding of the processes that shape polar areas. Several years of HiRISE observations provide us with the information about the current rate of erosion and hence help estimate minimum ages of the araneiforms and the surface into which they are carved to be 1.3 × 103 Martian years.

  15. Commonalities in WEPP and WEPS and efforts towards a single erosion process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Flanagan, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been developing process-based erosion models to predict water erosion and wind erosion. During much of that time, the development efforts of the Water Erosion Prediction Project (

  16. Commonalities in WEPP and WEPS and efforts towards a single erosion process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.M.; Flanagan, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has been developing process-based erosion models to predict water erosion and wind erosion. During much of that time, the development efforts of the Water Erosion Prediction Project

  17. The water erosion processes in the retreat erosive of cliff on soft rocks in the province of Cadiz (Spain); Los procesos de erosion hidrica en el retroceso erosivo de acantilados sobre rocas blandas en la provincia de Cadiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendon Aragon, J. J.; Gracia Prieto, F. J.; Rio Rodriguez, L. del

    2009-07-01

    The littoral cliffs on soft materials of the Atlantic Cadiz coast show an important activity of the fresh water erosion processes, sometimes even more significant than the marine erosion processes. The connection of the lower cliffs with sandy beaches favours aeolian sand invasion, which fills previous rills and reduces the water erosion intensity by increasing infiltration. Cliff retreat and rill erosion measurement by using erosion sticks has shown very variables values, most of them higher than the estimated error of the employed methods. This indicates the existence of other factors influencing the distribution of water erosion processes along these cliffs, which have to be studied through different techniques. (Author) 5 refs.

  18. Research on characteristics of wind-sand fluid and sandy disaster reduction at Kecheng(K454~45g) section along Qing-Zang Railway%青藏铁路客城区段风沙流特点及沙害防治措施的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于云江; 史培军; 鲁春霞

    2001-01-01

    青藏线哈(尔盖)-格(尔木)段位于青藏高原,横穿柴达木沙漠,集沙漠特征与高原气候于一体.不少地段曾因沙害造成行车中断和机车掉道等事故,其中以客城最为突出.在以往相关研究的文献中.确定主风向是以风的频率为主。但在以防止沙子上道为主要目标的铁路防沙中.本文提出的以输沙量为依据所确定的主风向,能为防沙措施提供更为合理的依据.在该段铁路防沙中,采用了竹片栅栏与碎石方格相结合的阻、固措施,其中碎石方格系在铁路防沙中首次使用.经过观测,证实阻沙措施降低了风速;固沙措施增加了地面的粗糙度,大大减少了输沙量,为植物的生长创造了有利条件。在该地采用碎石方格固沙既有使用寿命长,又有取材方便的优点。自防沙工程竣工以来取得了明显的经济效益,同时减轻了工人的劳动强度,确保了该段行车安全。%Railway section from Hargei to Germu lies in Qing-Zang Plateau crosses Caidamu desert, with desert feature and plateau climate. Accident of interrupting and derailment had once happened in some sections because of wind-sand calamity, especially at Kecheng section. In the past literature, the main wind direction was defined by the frequency of wind, but the authors found that it is reliable to ascertain main wind direction in terms of transported sand amount in controlling shifting sand for railway safety. In order to control mobile sand along railway at Kecheng section, we used integrated measures combining sand obstruction and sand fixation using bamboo fence and broken stone-checker as windbreak which was put into practice firstly in mobile sand-control along railway. The observation results showed that the obstructing-sand measure reduced velocity of wind greatly; the fixing-sand measures increased roughness of earth surface, and thus shifting sand were decreased, which created a favorable

  19. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  20. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  1. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  2. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  3. The Gale Crater Mound in a Regional Geologic Setting: Comparison Study of Wind Erosion in Gale Crater and Within a 1000 KM Radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapremont. A.; Allen, C.; Runyon, C.

    2014-01-01

    Gale is a Late Noachian/Early Hesperian impact crater located on the dichotomy boundary separating the southern highlands and the northern lowlands of Mars. NASA's Curiosity Rover is currently exploring Gale, searching for evidence of habitability early in Mars history. With an approximate diameter of 155 km, and a approx. 5 km central mound informally titled Mt. Sharp, Gale represents a region of geologic interest due to the abundance of knowledge that can be derived, through its sedimentary deposits, pertaining to the environmental evolution of Mars. This study was undertaken to compare wind erosional features in Gale Crater and within sediments in a 1000 km radial area. The ultimate objective of this comparison was to determine if or how Gale relates to the surrounding region.

  4. Trajectories of saltating sand particles behind a porous fence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Lee, Sang Joon; Chen, Ting-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Trajectories of aeolian sand particles behind a porous wind fence embedded in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer were visualized experimentally, to investigate the shelter effect of the fence on sand saltation. Two sand samples, one collected from a beach (d = 250 μm) and the other from a desert (d = 100 μm), were tested in comparison with the previous studies of a 'no-fence' case. A wind fence (ε = 38.5%) was installed on a flat sand bed filled with each sand sample. A high-speed photography technique and the particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) method were employed to reconstruct the trajectories of particles saltating behind the fence. The collision processes of these sand particles were analyzed, momentum and kinetic energy transfer between saltating particles and ground surface were also investigated. In the wake region, probability density distributions of the impact velocities agree well with the pattern of no-fence case, and can be explained by a log-normal law. The horizontal component of impact velocity for the beach sand is decreased by about 54%, and about 76% for the desert sand. Vertical restitution coefficients of bouncing particles are smaller than 1.0 due to the presence of the wind fence. The saltating particles lose a large proportion of their energy during the collision process. These results illustrate that the porous wind fence effectively abates the further evolution of saltating sand particles.

  5. Sand production prediction using ratio of shear modulus to bulk compressibility (case study)

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Khamehchi; Ebrahim Reisi

    2015-01-01

    Sand production is a serious problem widely existing in oil/gas production. The problems resulting from sand influx include abrasion of downhole tubular/casing, subsurface safety valve and surface equipment; casing/tubing buckling, failure of casing or liners from removal of surrounding formation, compaction and erosion; and loss of production caused by sand bridging in tubing and/or flow lines. There are several methods for predicting sand production. The methods include use of production da...

  6. Current surges and seabed erosion near the shelf break in the Canadian Beaufort Sea: A response to wind and ice motion stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Alexandre; Osborne, Philip D.; Curtiss, Gregory; Lowings, Malcolm G.

    2016-08-01

    Estimating the erosion potential of seabed sediments and the magnitude of the resulting suspended load in relation to current dynamics near the shelf break is a key issue for better understanding shelf-slope sediment transport. On the outer Mackenzie Shelf (Canadian Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean), a thin and discontinuous veneer of recent surficial clays overlie old glaciomarine sediments that further pinch out at the shelf edge. Gas and fluid venting is known to underlie part of sediment instability in the area, but recent mooring-based measurements also indicate that sediments near the shelf break are recurrently remobilized by strong subsurface currents. Here, we relate storms to the development of current surges that resulted in the abrupt resuspension of sediments at two locations along the shelf break. Near-bottom concentrations of suspended sediments were estimated using the acoustic backscatter of high-frequency acoustic Doppler current profilers deployed from September 2011 to September 2013 as part of the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment (BREA) program. Near-bottom currents near the shelf edge (140 to 150 m isobaths) were characterized by recurring episodes of elevated velocities (instantaneous speeds up to ~ 40-50 cm s-1) that were extensions of current surges (~ 60-80 cm s-1) occurring in the core of the shelfbreak jet located at ca. 90-120 m. Sudden peaks in suspended sediments (above 100 g m-3) corresponded closely with current surges in the near-bottom boundary layer (fade, such as during the major ice fracturing events of January to March 2013 that were associated with strong and persistent current speeds.

  7. Buhne Point Shoreline Erosion Demonstration Project. Volume 4. Appendices H-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    alinement for rows of wind reducing devices like sand fencing, brush rows and vegetation is perpendicular to the effective prevailing wind. This optimum...substrate stability and trap moving sand. Sand fencing was alined perpendicular to the effective prevailing wind which was determined to be North...John Murray Humboldt County Leon Hamilton Humboldt County Pete Petterson Cal Trans District 01 Rick Storre Humboldt Bay Harbor District 1. Meeting

  8. Experimental sand burial affects seedling survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiao; Busso, Carlos Alberto; Jiang, Deming; Musa, Ala; Wu, Dafu; Wang, Yongcui; Miao, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    As a native tree species, Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm) is widely distributed in the Horqin Sandy Land, China. However, seedlings of this species have to withstand various depths of sand burial after emergence because of increasing soil degradation, which is mainly caused by overgrazing, climate change, and wind erosion. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the changes in its survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation when seedlings were buried at different burial depths: unburied controls and seedlings buried vertically up to 33, 67, 100, or 133 % of their initial mean seedling height. The results showed that partial sand burial treatments (i.e., less than 67 % burial) did not reduce seedling survivorship, which still reached 100 %. However, seedling mortality increased when sand burial was equal to or greater than 100 %. In comparison with the control treatment, seedling height and stem diameter increased at least by 6 and 14 % with partial burial, respectively. In the meantime, seedling taproot length, total biomass, and relative mass growth rates were at least enhanced by 10, 15.6, and 27.6 %, respectively, with the partial sand burial treatment. Furthermore, sand burial decreased total leaf area and changed biomass allocation in seedlings, partitioning more biomass to aboveground organs (e.g., leaves) and less to belowground parts (roots). Complete sand burial after seedling emergence inhibited its re-emergence and growth, even leading to death. Our findings indicated that seedlings of sandy elm showed some resistance to partial sand burial and were adapted to sandy environments from an evolutionary perspective. The negative effect of excessive sand burial after seedling emergence might help in understanding failures in recruitments of sparse elm in the study region.

  9. Effect of erodent particles on the erosion of metal specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, M. Mahbubur; Alam, M. Khorshed; Khan, M. Ishak

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of the measurement of erosion rate of carbon steel specimens in sand water slurry system in a slurry pot tester. Sylhet sand has been sieved to get three sizes of erodent particles; namely, less than 250 micron, 250 to 590 micron and 590 to 1190 micron. Experiments are done with three sand concentrations (10%, 15% and 20%). The rate of erosion of the carbon steel specimens is measured as the loss of weight per unit surface area per unit time under the dynamic action of solid particles. The eroded surfaces of the specimens are examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to visualize the impact of the slurry of various conditions. It is seen that irrespective of the particle size the rate of erosion increases with the increase of slurry concentration. This increment of erosion rate at high concentration is high for large particles. High erosion rate is observed in case of large sand particles. In case of small and fine particles erosion rate is small because of low impact energy as well as the wastage of energy to overcome the hindrance of the finer particles before striking on the specimen surface.

  10. Real-Time Simulation of Aeolian Sand Movement and Sand Ripple Evolution: A Method Based on the Physics of Blown Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Bao-Gang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Simulation and visualization of aeolian sand movement and sand ripple evolution are a challenging subject.In this paper,we propose a physically based modeling and simulating method that can be used to synthesize sandy terrain in various patterns.Our method is based on the mechanical behavior of individual sand grains,which are widely studied in the physics of blown sand.We accounted significant mechanisms of sand transportation into the sand model,such as saltation,successive saltation and collapsing,while simplified the vegetation model and wind field model to make the simulation feasible and affordable.We implemented the proposed method on the programming graphics processing unit (GPU) to get real-time simulation and rendering.Finally,we proved that our method can reflect many characteristics of sand ripple evolution through several demonstrations.We also gave several synthesized desert scenes made from the simulated height field to display its significance on application.

  11. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  12. Recent Sand Avalanching on Rabe Crater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Dark streaks on the steep, down-wind slopes of sand dunes in Rabe Crater are seen at several locations in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. These streaks indicate relatively recent (i.e., in the past few years or less) movement of sand down these slopes.Sand dunes move forward by the combined action of wind that drives sand up the shallow slope on the windward side of the dune (in this case, the slopes that face toward the lower right) and the avalanching of this sand down the steeper, lee-side slope. The steep slope is also known as the slip face. The dark streaks indicated by arrows are evidence for sand avalanches that occurred within a few months or years of the time when the picture was taken in March 1999. Other streaks which are seen criss-crossing the dunes may be the result of passing dust devils. This image is illuminated from the upper left and located in Rabe Crater of the Hellespontus-Noachis region near 44.2oS, 325.6oW.

  13. Formation mechanism and development pattern of aeolian sand landform in Yarlung Zangbo River valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李森; 董光荣; 申建友; 杨萍; 刘贤万; 王跃; 靳鹤龄; 王强

    1999-01-01

    Aeolian sand landforms in the Yarlung Zangbo River valley can be divided into 4 classes and 21 types. The river valley has favourable environment conditions for the development of aeolian sand landforms. Simulation of MM4 mid-scale climate model showed that the near-surface flow field and wind vector field during the winter half year in the fiver valley are generally favourable for the aeolian sand deposition and as a whole they also affect the distribution zones and sites of aeolian sand landforms. Sand dunes and sand dune groups in the fiver valley developed mainly in three ways, namely windward retarding deposition, leeward back flow deposition and bend circumfluence deposition. Through alternating positive-reverse processes of sand dune formation under wind actions and sand dune vanishing under water actions, sand dunes developed from primary zone through main-body zone then to vanishing zone where climbing dunes and falling dunes are declining and are even disappearing.

  14. Airborne sand and dust soiling of solar collecting mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansom, Christopher; Almond, Heather; King, Peter; Endaya, Essam; Bouaichaoui, Sofiane

    2017-06-01

    The reflectance of solar collecting mirrors can be significantly reduced by sand and dust soiling, particularly in arid environments. Larger airborne sand and dust particles can also cause damage by erosion, again reducing reflectance. This work describes investigations of the airborne particle size, shape, and composition in three arid locations that are considered suitable for CSP plants, namely in Iran, Libya, and Algeria. Sand and dust has been collected at heights between 0.5 to 2.0m by a variety of techniques, but are shown not to be representative of the particle size found either in ground dust and sand, or on the solar collecting mirror facets themselves. The possible reasons for this are proposed, most notably that larger particles may rebound from the mirror surface. The implications for mirror cleaning and collector facet erosion are discussed.

  15. Erosion behaviour of epoxy based unidirectionl (GFRP composite materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fouad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the solid particle erosion behaviour and wear mechanism of commercial epoxy based unidirectional glass fibre reinforced plastics (GFRP composites were investigated. The erosion experiments have been carried out using irregular silica sand (SiC particles (150 ± 15 μm as an erodent. The erosion losses of these composites were evaluated at various impingement angles (30°, 60° and 90° with the change of both of erosion time and pressure. The erosion behaviour of (GFRP has changed from ductile to brittle at 60° impingement angle and the erosion loss was the highest. The morphology of eroded surfaces was observed under scanning electron microscope and damage mechanisms were discussed.

  16. Cyclic Triaxial Loading of Cohesionless Silty Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2015-01-01

    To engineer efficient structures offshore, we need to extend our knowledge of soil response. Cyclic loading and high water pressure encountered offshore greatly influence cohesionless soil performance. Silty sand from Frederikshavn wind turbine farm was tested using single diameter height samples...

  17. Planet-wide sand motion on mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.T.; Bourke, M.C.; Geissler, P.E.; Banks, M.E.; Colon, C.; Diniega, S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hansen, C.J.; Mattson, S.; McEwen, A.S.; Mellon, M.T.; Stantzos, N.; Thomson, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data, images of Mars showed no direct evidence for dune and ripple motion. This was consistent with climate models and lander measurements indicating that winds of sufficient intensity to mobilize sand were rare in the low-density atmosphere. We show that many sand ripples and dunes across Mars exhibit movement of as much as a few meters per year, demonstrating that Martian sand migrates under current conditions in diverse areas of the planet. Most motion is probably driven by wind gusts that are not resolved in global circulation models. A past climate with a thicker atmosphere is only required to move large ripples that contain coarse grains. ?? 2012 Geological Society of America.

  18. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF CRUSHED SAND FOR CONCRETE PRODUCTION WITH MICROPROPORTIONING

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Sand and gravel are mined all over the globe and form the largest volume of solid material extracted world-wide. These materials that have been formed by erosive processes over thousands of years are now being extracted at a rate that is far greater than their possible renewal. This has led to a situation when suitable natural sand and gravel resources that previously were taken for granted and historically used for concrete production, are now depleted around many densely popu...

  20. Dune formation under bimodal winds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parteli, Eric J R; Durán, Orencio; Tsoar, Haim; Schwämmle, Veit; Herrmann, Hans J

    2009-12-29

    The study of dune morphology represents a valuable tool in the investigation of planetary wind systems--the primary factor controlling the dune shape is the wind directionality. However, our understanding of dune formation is still limited to the simplest situation of unidirectional winds: There is no model that solves the equations of sand transport under the most common situation of seasonally varying wind directions. Here we present the calculation of sand transport under bimodal winds using a dune model that is extended to account for more than one wind direction. Our calculations show that dunes align longitudinally to the resultant wind trend if the angle(w) between the wind directions is larger than 90 degrees. Under high sand availability, linear seif dunes are obtained, the intriguing meandering shape of which is found to be controlled by the dune height and by the time the wind lasts at each one of the two wind directions. Unusual dune shapes including the "wedge dunes" observed on Mars appear within a wide spectrum of bimodal dune morphologies under low sand availability.

  1. Predicción de la erosión eólica potencial con el modelo EWEQ en dos suelos loesicos: efectos de las condiciones climáticas Wind erosion prediction with the EWEQ model in two loess soils: effects of climatic condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Beatriz Aimar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La erosión eólica potencial del suelo (EEP es un dato básico utilizado en varios modelos de predicción para calcular la erosión eólica de suelos agrícolas. El objetivo de este estudio fue cuantificar la EEP de un Haplustol y un Ustipsammente de la Región Semiárida Pampeana (RSP y compararla con las predicciones del modelo Ecuación de Erosión Eólica en Español (EWEQ, realizadas con diferentes factores climáticos (C. Se efectuaron mediciones de EEP a campo durante un año en ambos suelos, mantenidos sin cobertura y con mínima rugosidad. Los resultados indicaron que la EEP medida a campo fue mayor en el Ustipsammente (270 Mg ha-1 año-1 que en el Haplustol (40 Mg ha-1 año -1 , con una reducción en el espesor del horizonte de 21,3 y 3,1 mm, respectivamente. La erosión del Ustipsammente fue dos veces mayor en primavera-verano que en otoño-invierno. Este efecto no se observó en el Haplustol, debido a su menor desecamiento y mayores contenidos de humedad luego de las lluvias. La erosión del Haplustol, por desecarse más lentamente luego de una lluvia, fue más condicionada por las precipitaciones que la del Ustipsammente. Un 40% de la erosión de ambos suelos fue definida por la duración de las tormentas. Las tasas de erosión (EEP por unidad de tiempo, Qt se correlacionaron positivamente con la velocidad promedio del viento (V, ajustando a una función polinómica en ambos suelos. A la misma V, Qt fue siempre mayor en el Ustipsammente. La EEP calculada con la EWEQ, utilizando el factor C correspondiente al año de muestreo (30,3, fue la más semejante a la erosión medida a campo, aunque el modelo la subestimó en un 43% en el Haplustol y en un 18% en el Ustipsammente. La EWEQ deberá ofrecer al usuario distintos factores C para poder predecir EEP en escenarios climáticos variables.The potential wind erosion of a soil (EEP is a basic data for predicting wind erosion of agricultural soils in most wind erosion prediction models

  2. TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

    2007-06-12

    Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

  3. Biogenic crust dynamics on sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Kinast, Shai; Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2012-01-01

    Sand dunes are often covered by vegetation and biogenic crusts. Despite their significant role in dune stabilization, biogenic crusts have rarely been considered in studies of dune dynamics. Using a simple model, we study the existence and stability ranges of different dune-cover states along gradients of rainfall and wind power. Two ranges of alternative stable states are identified: fixed crusted dunes and fixed vegetated dunes at low wind power, and fixed vegetated dunes and active dunes at high wind power. These results suggest a cross-over between two different forms of desertification.

  4. Saltation and suspension of wind-blown particle movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Several factors that affect the trajectories of sand particles in a wind-blown sand flux are analyzed by considering the stochastic movement of sand particles transported within turbulent flow in the atmospheric boundary layer. The results show that there are remarkably different trajectories for particles with the same diameter, the same vertical liftoff velocity from sand bed and the same friction ve-locity of wind because of the presence of turbulence flow. The vertical fluctuating velocity of sand particles can be regarded as a reflection of the transport mode, which is related to not only the diameters and liftoff velocity of sand particles but also the shear stress velocity of wind. The critical liftoff velocity and the fraction of each transport mode are calculated for the given particle diameter and friction ve-locity of wind. A comparison of the predicted fraction and the statistical fraction with and without the wind-sand couple effect is made.

  5. Numerical Analysis on the Features of Sand Flow Movement around the Embankment of Lan-Xin Railway in Gobi Region%兰新铁路戈壁地区路基周围风沙流运动特征数值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张军平; 王引生; 蒋富强

    2011-01-01

    FLUNENT software was used to simulate and analyze the sand flow field near the embankment of Lan-Xin Railway in gobi region. The results demonstrate that relatively low-speed areas occur at the slope foot of the windward side, near the embankment surface and at the slope foot of the leeward side, while relatively high-speed areas occur at the shoulder of windward side in the sand flow field around the embankment. Wind erosion occurs at the relatively high-speed area while, sand accretion happens at the relatively low-speed area and the sand accretion at the slope foot of the windward side is more serious than that on the leeward side. The numerical analyses of sand flow surrounding embankment with anti-sand walls of different height illustrate that the maximum wind regions shift from the shoulder of the windward side to the above of anti-sand walls. Meanwhile, the wind erosion at the shoulder of windward side is weakened. Most sand accretes in front of the anti-sand walls and sand crossing the walls falls down under the impact of the relatively low speed vortex areas between the anti-sand walls and embankment. The reasonable height of the anti-sand wall should meet the following requirements; firstly, most sand in the air flow should be blocked by the anti-sand wall. Secondly, no relatively high-speed area occurs at the shoulder of the windward side so as to avoid the strong wind erosion there. Thirdly, the boundary line of the high and low speed areas gets across the embankment surface steadily.%运用FLUENT软件,进行兰新铁路戈壁地区路基周围风沙流场数值分析.结果表明,在路基周围风沙流场中,迎风侧坡脚、路基表面附近和背风侧坡脚出现气流运动的相对低速区,迎风侧路肩上方出现气流运动的相对高速区;在相对高速区产生风蚀沙害;在相对低速区产生积沙,且迎风侧坡脚的积沙多于背风侧坡脚.设置不同高度挡沙墙的路基周围风沙流场数值分析表明,

  6. Wind tunnel experiments of air flow patterns over nabkhas modeled after those from the Hotan River basin,Xinjiang,China(Ⅰ):non-vegetated

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhong LI; Wanjuan LI; Shengli WU; Janis DALE; Lin GE; Mudan HE; Xiaofeng WANG; Jianhui JIN; Rong MA; Jinwei LIU

    2008-01-01

    A nabkha is a vegetated sand mound,which is ypical of the aeolian landforms found in the Hotan River pasin in Xinjiang,China.This paper compares the results of a series of wind tunnel experiments with an on-site field survey of nabkhas in the Hotan River basin of Xinjiang.Wind tunnel experiments were conducted on semi-sphercal and conical sand mounds without vegetation or shadow dunes.Field mounds were 40 times as large as the size of the wind tunnel models.In the wind tunnel experiments,five different velocities from 6 to 14 m/s were selected and used to model the wind flow pattern over mdividual sand mound using clean air without additional sand.Changes in the flow pattern at different wind speeds resulted in changes to the characteristic structure of the babkha surface.The results of the experiments for the semi-spherical sand mound at all wind velocities show the formation of a vortex at the bottom of the upwind side of the mound that resulted in scouring and deposition of a crescentic dune upwind of the main mound.The top part of the sand mound is strongly eroded.In the field,these dunes exhibited the same scouring and crescentic dune formation and the eroded upper surface was often topped by a layer of peat within the mound suggesting destroyed vegetation due to river channel migration or by possible anthropogenic forces such as fuel gathering,etc.Experiments for the conical mounds exhibit only a small increase in velocity on the upwind side of the mound and no formation of a vortex at the bottom of the upwind side.Instead,a vortex formed on the leeward side of the mound and overall,no change occurred in the shape of the conical mound.In the field,conical mounds have no crescentic dunes on the upwind side and no erosion at the top exposed below peat beds.Therefore,the field and laboratory experiments show that semi-spherical and conical sand mounds respond differently to similar wind conditions with different surface configuration and development of crescent

  7. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Špirutová; J. Beňo; V. Bednářová; J. Kříž; M. Kandrnál

    2012-01-01

    Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron) are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this co...

  8. A Preliminary Study on Water and Soil Erosion and Control Measures in Wind Power Project in the Mountainous Area of Northern Guangdong%粤北山区风电场建设水土流失特点及防治措施初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗春玲; 陈子平; 王小军

    2014-01-01

    风电场在建设的过程中具有扰动面积大、植被破坏点多面广、地表扰动强度差异显著,以及水土流失以水力侵蚀为主,点、线、面共存且侵蚀强度大等特点。该文以粤北山区风电工程为例,针对水土流失及工程特点,进行了防治分区和工程措施布设,并针对粤北山区植被特点,对植被措施恢复中的植物种类配置和后期护育管理进行了探讨。%Characteristics that large disturbance area , multiple vegetation destruction areas , significant differences of disturbance intensity among surfaces , predominately water erosion , and high erosion intensity with point , line and surface coexistence , have been shown in the wind farm construction .Take the wind power project in mountainous area of northern Guangdong as an example , aiming at the water and soil erosion and project features , control zoning and engineering measures layout have been constructed . Vegetation types'distribution and caring management in later period have been discussed based on the vegetation features in moun -tainous area of northern Guangdong .

  9. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  10. The effects of psammophilous plants on sand dune dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bel, Golan

    2013-01-01

    Psammophilous plants are special plants that flourish in sand moving environments. There are two main mechanisms by which the wind affects these plants: (i) sand drift exposes roots and covers branches--the exposed roots turn into new plants and the covered branches turn into new roots; both mechanisms result in an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes; (ii) strong winds, often associated with sand movement, tear branches and seed them in nearby locations, resulting in new plants and an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes. Despite their important role in dune dynamics, to our knowledge, psammophilous plants have never been incorporated into mathematical models of sand dunes. Here, we attempt to model the effects of these plants on sand dune dynamics. We construct a set of three ordinary differential equations for the fractions of surface cover of regular vegetation, biogenic soil crust and psammophilous plants. The latter reach their optimal growth u...

  11. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  12. Soil Erosion: Advanced Crop and Soil Science. A Course of Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E.

    The course of study represents the last of six modules in advanced crop and soil science and introduces the agriculture student to the topic of soil erosion. Upon completion of the two day lesson, the student will be able to: (1) define conservation, (2) understand how erosion takes place, and (3) list ways of controlling wind and water erosion.…

  13. Surface sand-laden wind movement on fluvial aggradations sandy land and use of vegetation in controlling sand-laden wind erosion in Yongding River of Beijing,China%河流冲积沉积沙地风蚀规律及植被防风蚀效应——以北京市永定河沙地为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳德鹏; 刘永兵; 王计平; 王冬梅; 徐伟; 黄月艳

    2006-01-01

    在河流冲积沉积沙地--永定河沙地演变研究的基础上,选择耕地、荒草地、流动沙地、防护林带、片林、果园等永定河沙地典型的土地利用类型,通过定位实验观测与数学定量分析,进行沙地地表风沙活动与植被阻滞风沙规律研究.研究结果认为:近地层风速随高度分布服从对数分布;下垫面性质导致对应的摩阻速率大小不同;不同利用类型下垫面对应的起沙风速明显不同;0~20cm高度范围内各层的输沙率百分含量随着高度的增加而减少,两者呈负指数函数;输沙率与风速呈正指数关系;由于植被类型结构不同,导致植被的防风、阻滞风沙效益在空间位置的不同;积沙形态随林分结构呈现不同的分布规律.

  14. Soil erosion in China based on the 2000 national remote sensing survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discussed the spatial distribution of soil erosion in China at the end of the 20thcentury based on the second national soil erosion survey. The result indicated soil erosion is still theprime environmental problem in China. Soil erosion mainly occurs in the western regions of China,and the slight erosion type, ion the whole, exerts the greatest impact on soil erosion pattern. Thedistribution of water erosion shows the impact of landforms: slight water erosion mainly inmountainous and hilly areas, and half of violent water erosion on the loess landforms. Farmland,forestland and grassland are the major land use types of slight hydraulic erosion distribution, while theserious hydraulic erosion and slight wind erosion mainly occur on grassland. Thus, the conservation ofthe grassland is the key to either hydraulic and wind erosion control. The huangmian soil (a major typeof cultivated soil developed from loess mother material) is the one facing the most serious threat fromsoil erosion in Chinas soil resources. Further discussion on the soil erosion distribution still needs moreresearch on the method and relevant data analysis.

  15. Sedimentation process of saturated sand under impact loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Junfeng; MENG; Xiangyue

    2005-01-01

    The initial small inhomogeneity of saturated sand could be amplified during the sedimentation process after liquefaction, and cracks could be observed in the sand column. Layers of fine sand could also be found at the exact place where cracks developed and disappeared. The phenomena and the whole process were experimentally shown by X-rays images. To account for the phenomena, a linearized stability analysis of the sedimentation of saturated sand was conducted; however, it did not produce a satisfactory result. A three-phase flow model describing the transportation of fine sand is presented in this paper. It is shown that such a kind of erosion/deposition model was qualitatively in good agreement with the experimental observation.

  16. Rainfall erosivity in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, Andreas; Haas, Kathrin; Dvorackova, Anna; Fuller, Ian

    2014-05-01

    Rainfall and its kinetic energy expressed by the rainfall erosivity is the main driver of soil erosion processes by water. The Rainfall-Runoff Erosivity Factor (R) of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation is one oft he most widely used parameters describing rainfall erosivity. This factor includes the cumulative effects of the many moderate-sized storms as well as the effects oft he occasional severe ones: R quantifies the effect of raindrop impact and reflects the amopunt and rate of runoff associated with the rain. New Zealand is geologically young and not comparable with any other country in the world. Inordinately high rainfall and strong prevailing winds are New Zealand's dominant climatic features. Annual rainfall up to 15000 mm, steep slopes, small catchments and earthquakes are the perfect basis for a high rate of natural and accelerated erosion. Due to the multifacted landscape of New Zealand its location as island between the Pacific and the Tasmanian Sea there is a high gradient in precipitation between North and South Island as well as between West and East Coast. The objective of this study was to determine the R-factor for the different climatic regions in New Zealand, in order to create a rainfall erosivity map. We used rainfall data (breakpoint data in 10-min intervals) from 34 gauging stations for the calcuation of the rainfall erosivity. 15 stations were located on the North Island and 19 stations on the South Island. From these stations, a total of 397 station years with 12710 rainstorms were analyzed. The kinetic energy for each rainfall event was calculated based on the equation by Brown and Foster (1987), using the breakpoint precipitation data for each storm. On average, a mean annual precipitation of 1357 mm was obtained from the 15 observed stations on the North Island. Rainfall distribution throughout the year is relatively even with 22-24% of annual rainfall occurring in spring , fall and winter and 31% in summer. On the South Island

  17. Erosion and Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Heeres, Glenn; Os, van Bertil; Derickx, Willem; Schoorl, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Slope soil erosion is one of the main threats to archaeological sites. Several methods were applied to establish the erosion rates at archaeological sites. Digital elevation models (DEMs) from three different dates were used. We compared the elevations from these three models to estimate erosion. We

  18. Conditions and processes affecting sand resources at archeological sites in the Colorado River corridor below Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Amy E.; Collins, Brian D.; Sankey, Joel B.; Corbett, Skye C.; Fairley, Helen C.; Caster, Joshua

    2016-05-17

    This study examined links among fluvial, aeolian, and hillslope geomorphic processes that affect archeological sites and surrounding landscapes in the Colorado River corridor downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona. We assessed the potential for Colorado River sediment to enhance the preservation of river-corridor archeological resources through aeolian sand deposition or mitigation of gully erosion. By identifying locally prevailing wind directions, locations of modern sandbars, and likely aeolian-transport barriers, we determined that relatively few archeological sites are now ideally situated to receive aeolian sand supply from sandbars deposited by recent controlled floods. Whereas three-fourths of the 358 river-corridor archeological sites we examined include Colorado River sediment as an integral component of their geomorphic context, only 32 sites currently appear to have a high degree of connectivity (coupled interactions) between modern fluvial sandbars and sand-dominated landscapes downwind. This represents a substantial decrease from past decades, as determined by aerial-photograph analysis. Thus, we infer that recent controlled floods have had a limited, and declining, influence on archeological-site preservation.

  19. Erosion-corrosion interactions and their affect on marine and offshore components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Robert JK [Surface Engineering and Tribology Group, School of Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The operation of modern fluid handling systems demands for low costs, reliability, longevity and no loss of fluid containment. All these can be achieved by minimising the material damage caused by the combined attack of solid particle or cavitation impingement and corrosion. This paper will cover the rationale behind the selection of erosion resistance surfaces for fluid handling equipment and highlight the complexities encountered when these surfaces are exposed to environments which contain sand particles or cavitation in a corrosive medium. The erosion and erosion-corrosion performance of a variety of coatings and bulk surfaces will be discussed using volume loss rate versus sand impact energy maps. Recent research into the erosion-corrosion of polymer coatings, PEO and HVOF aluminium and nickel aluminium bronze coatings will be reviewed. Electrochemical techniques designed to monitor the erosion-corrosion mechanisms and coating integrity will be presented and used to quantify the synergistic terms present when both erosion and corrosion act concurrently. (author)

  20. A quantitative approach to monitoring new sand cay migration in Nansha Islands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Haitian; JIANG Xingwei; MENG Xuelian; FENG Qian; CUI Songxue; LIANG Chao

    2016-01-01

    Sand cay is a special kind of islet formed by coral detritus and bioclast, which is common in Nansha Islands of China. Some sand cays play an important role in ocean strategy and economy, but surprisingly we know little about them, especially those recently formed sand cays. In this research, we monitor migration of a new sand cay in Nanxun Jiao (Gaven Reef) using a series of QuickBird and WorldView-2 satellite images between June 2006 and August 2013. We conduct a regression between migration distance and wind observational data to examine the migration patterns of the new sand cay. The migration distance is calculated based on the sand cay locations extracted based on Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI). The wind observational data downloaded from NOAA are reformed into four wind direction vectors. Based on the results of regression, we concluded that the migration of the new sand cay on Nanxun Jiao was significantly associated with the east, west and north wind. East wind was the main influence factor of the migration; its impact strength was almost twice as the west and north wind. The south wind has little effect on the migration of the sand cay, which is partly blocked by the artificial structure in the south.

  1. Dental erosion, summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Imfeld, T

    1996-04-01

    Although reports on dental erosion have always appeared in the dental literature, there is currently a growing interest among researchers and clinicians. Potential risk factors for dental erosion are changed lifestyle and eating patterns, with increased consumption of acidic foods and beverages. Various gastrointestinal and eating disorders expose the dentition to frequent contacts with very acidic gastric content, which may lead to erosion. Whether these factors indeed lead, on a population scale, to a higher prevalence and incidence of erosion is yet to be established. This article summarizes the different aspects of the prevalence, pathology, etiology, assessment, prevention and treatment of dental erosion, and concludes with recommendations for future research.

  2. 寒区积雪堆蚀路基的室内风洞试验研究%Studied on Depositing Erosion of Accumulated Snow on Subgrade Slope Through Indoor wind Tunnel Experiment in Cold Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高瑜; 李驰

    2014-01-01

    以寒区公路路基作为研究对象,采用麸皮作为模型雪,通过室内风洞试验研究风雪流下雪粒子的起动,以及在路基不同部位的堆积,确定雪粒子沿路基坡面的堆积区域与路基断面之间的关系。试验结果表明,雪粒子在路基坡面的堆积区域与路基沿程风雪流的运动规律、雪粒子的天然密度、路基断面型式等密切相关。当路基模型高度不大于250mm时,雪粒子在路基迎风坡面和背风坡面堆积高度随路基高度的增加而增大,随路基边坡坡率的增加而增大。当路基边坡坡率为1∶1时,雪粒子在迎风坡面上的堆积高度约为路基模型高度的57.5%,在背风坡的堆积高度为路基模型高度的79%。当边坡坡率1∶2.5时,雪粒子在迎风坡面上的堆积高度为路基模型高度的34.4%;雪粒子在背风坡的堆积高度为路基模型高度的76.7%。%Taking the subgrade in cold region highway as the research object ,using bran as simu‐lant snow in indoor wind tunnel experiment ,the relationship between accumulation area of snow parti‐cles along the subgrade and embankment section was determined by analyzing experimental results . The experiment results were summarized for the movement and accumulation of snow particles ,depos‐iting erosion and carrying processes of snow particles in different parts along the subgrade slope .The results indicated that :the accumulation area of the snow particles in the subgrade slope surface was closely related to these factors including the moving rules of the wind -drift snow ,natural density of the snow particles and the sections of subgrade .When the subgrade height was no more than 250mm , the more subgrade height and the great slope gradient was ,the more accumulation areas along the windward and leeward slope surface .While the slope rate was 1∶1 ,accumulation height of snow par‐ticles along the windward slopes was 57 .5 percent

  3. When erosion ruins the chronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Steffen; Enters, Dirk; Blume, Katharina; Lücke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Human land-use has considerably shaped the landscape of north-western Germany over the past millennia. Deforestation and agriculture created a predominantly open scenery preserved until today with only a few remnants of former landscape elements such as woodlands, peat bogs, heath lands and lakes. Here we present a multi-proxy approach including sedimentological and geochemical parameters (e. g. element concentrations and stable isotopes) as well as biological proxies (pollen, macro fossils and diatoms) combined with an archaeological site analysis to investigate the effects of prehistoric land-use on lake systems and their catchment areas with a special focus on changes of the water quality, e. g. eutrophication and acidification and its natural regeneration during phases of weaker land-use impact. The study reveals a millenia-long history of erosion processes caused by successive selective woodland clearances starting in Neolithic Times. The geochemical evidence of soil erosion is recorded by distinct peaks of the terrigenic elements K and Ti. However, due to (1) the low sensitivy of the XRF scanner for Si and (2) the prevalence of diatom related biogenic silicon XRF-scanning of highly organic lake sediments fails to reflect the actual sand input caused by erosion. Particularly single quartz grains are not detected in the organic sediment matrix. Therefore we make successful use of mineral grain analysis which previously has only been applied to record aeolian input in bogs. K and Ti concentrations are not correlated with the content of mineral grains which suggest two different erosion processes. Our efforts to construct robust age-depth relationships based on AMS 14C-dates of terrestrial plant macrofossils reveal a specific dating issue of northwest German lakes. Especially in younger sediments we observe 14C-dates which are on the one hand too old and on the other hand among themselves roughly contemporaneous. We explain this feature with the extensive bog

  4. Erosion wear behaviour and mechanism of abradable seal coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉丽萍

    2002-01-01

    The erosion wear behaviour and mechanism of several middle temperature seal coatings were investigated by a CMS-100 self-made vacuum sand erosion machine. The results show that the relationship between the erosion mass loss and the erosion time is linear, the coatings hold a maximum erosion rate at 60° impact angle, and the relationship between the erosion rate and the impact speed is an exponential function. The speed exponent increases with the increase of the impact angle. At 90° impact, indentations and extruded lips were generated on the coating surface subjected to impact. With repetitive impact by the abrasive particles, the extruded lips were work-hardened and peeled off, while flattened metal phase grains were impacted repeatedly, loosed and debonded. At 30° impact, the erosion wear of the coating is characterized by micro-cutting, plowing and tunneling via pores and non-metal phase. The model of the erosion mechanism is advanced on the basis of the above-mentioned erosion wear behaviour.

  5. Provenance of coastal dune sands along Red Sea, Egypt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir M Zaid

    2017-06-01

    Texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element geochemistry of 26 coastal dune sand samples were studied to determine the provenance and tectonic environment of two dune fields close to the beaches of Safaga (SF) and Quseir (QS) at the Egyptian Red Sea coast. Onshore winds generate fine, moderate, moderately-well to well-sorted, coarse-skewed to near-symmetrical dune sands with mesokurtic distributions. Winds pick up and transport grains from nearby beach sands and alluvial deposits into a wide Red Sea coastal plain at the border of the beach. The mineralogical (Qt–Ft–Lt) and geochemical composition of the sands, indicate that SF and QS coastal dune sands are mature and influenced by quartz-rich sands. The average CIA values in SF and QS coastal dune sands are low relative to the range of the PAAS, suggesting an arid climate and a low intensity of chemical weathering. The SF and QS coastal dune sand samples are plotted in the recycled orogen and partly in craton interior fields suggesting recycled older sedimentary and partly metamorphic-plutonic sources. The high content of quartz with shell debris and carbonates in coastal dune sands support the recycled sedimentary beach and alluvial sand sources. The dominance of heavy minerals like amphiboles (hornblende) and biotite in the coastal dune sands also supports the effect of metamorphic-plutonic source rocks. The new tectonic discriminant-function diagrams suggest that the coastal dune sands were deposited in a passive margin of a synrift basin. The results provide a good evidence for the extension in the Red Sea rift system during Oligocene-post Pliocene, which is consistent with the general geology of Egypt.

  6. Lateral erosion in an experimental bedrock channel: The influence of bed roughness on erosion by bed load impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Theodore K.; Gran, Karen B.; Sklar, Leonard S.; Paola, Chris

    2016-05-01

    Physical experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of bed load particle impacts as a mechanism of lateral bedrock erosion. In addition, we explored how changes in channel bed roughness, as would occur during development of an alluvial cover, influence rates of lateral erosion. Experimental channels were constructed to have erodible walls and a nonerodible bed using different mixtures of sand and cement. Bed roughness was varied along the length of the channel by embedding sediment particles of different size in the channel bed mixture. Lateral wall erosion from clear-water flow was negligible. Lateral erosion during periods in which bed load was supplied to the channel removed as much as 3% of the initial wetted cross-sectional area. The vertical distribution of erosion was limited to the base of the channel wall, producing channels with undercut banks. The addition of roughness elements to an otherwise smooth bed caused rates of lateral erosion to increase by as much as a factor of 7 during periods of bed load supply. However, a minimum roughness element diameter of approximately half the median bed load particle diameter was required before a substantial increase in erosion was observed. Beyond this minimum threshold size, further increases in the relative size of roughness elements did not substantially change the rate of wall erosion despite changes in total boundary shear stress. The deflection of saltating bed load particles into the channel wall by fixed roughness elements is hypothesized to be the driver of the observed increase in lateral erosion rates.

  7. Structural variations of sand-bearing airflow over dune at southeastern fringe of Tengger Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasi Eerdum

    2004-01-01

    From the analytical results of observed data on sand transport rates at different positions of dune surface at southeastern fringe of Tengger Desert, it has been found that the vertical distribution of blown sand flux exhibits a noticeable variation when sand grains move upslope and downslope of dune surface under the action of wind force. Within the height of 20 cm above the sand surface, the vertical distribution of mass flux at different positions from toe to dune crest of stoss slope of sand dunes coincides with a single exponentially decaying law; while the vertical distribution of mass flux over the lee slope occurs as two variable zones, with the height of 8—12 cm as the dividing line, the sand transport rate below this height exponentially decreases with increasing height, but above this height decreases in a power function law. On the stoss slope, the relative sand transport rate in the upper layer of sand flow tends to decrease with the increasing wind velocity and the total sand transport rate towards the dune crest due to the shortened trajectory length of saltation sand grains moving upslope. On the lee slope, the increase in lift-off height and trajectory length of saltation sand grains moving downslope leads to the increase in relative sand transport rate in the upper layer of sand flow.

  8. PERMEABILITY AND CONSOLIDATION OF SEDIMENT MIXTURES AS FUNCTION OF SAND CONTENT AND CLAY MINERALOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The current study is the first step in a systematic experimental research on the erosion behaviour of sand-mud mixtures. It concerns the effect of a varying sand content and clay mineralogy on the porosity, structure, strength and permeability of artificially generated sediment mixtures. The permeability of a sediment mixture is an especially significant parameter concerning the type of erosion that occurs. It determines ifthe erosion of the bed is either a drained or an undrained process,respectively indicating surface erosion or mass erosion. Measurements on various mixtures concerning the consolidation coefficient and the permeability have been executed. Results show a distinct transition of behaviour between a sand-silt dominated network structure and a clay-water matrix. The occurrence of these two types of structures appears to depend on the porosity of the volume fraction of sand related to silt, which is, therefore, an important parameter concerning the type of erosion. Finally, the study provides a valuable data set that can be used as a reference for following stages of this research on the erosion behaviour of natural cohesive sediments.

  9. 长三角浅海辐射沙洲风能资源开发与非并网风电产业发展研究%Exploitation of Wind Resources and Development of Wind Power Industry over Shallow Sea Radial Sand Ridges of the Yangtze River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾为东; 周志莹; 邱涛

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the economy of the Yangtze River Delta has been growing rapidly, leading to an increasing demand for energy and resources in which the gap of electricity is especially large. On the other hand, the area is facing more and more serious eco-environmental problems, making it quite urgent to optimize energy structure, improve the eco-environment, and to carry out a large scale development and application of new resources and renewable resources. Located in the Yangtze River Delta, Dongtai, Rudong, and Dafeng Cities are very abundant in wind energy over their radial sand ridges of shallow sea. In addition, they bear a wide range of advantages, like relatively good geology conditions, small probabilities of extreme weather, no navigation channels, large fishing grounds and underground cables. They are all located at power load centers, possessing a good industrial foundation of high and new technologies, rich talents, a developed capital market, and a strong intrinsic force, all of which would be jointly conducive to development of a large scale, or a super scale offshore wind farm. Also, it has a tremendous development space. For example, developing 10%-15% of the wind resources is equal to building a sustainable green resource base which is of a great capability to produce standard coal of 25 million tons per year (equal to the mining quantity of four Nanbao oil fields), and meanwhile to reduce CO_2 emission of 123 million tons per year. Moreover, it enjoys a number of advantages like not occupying cultivated land, not producing an immigrant, and not resulting in degradation of the eco-environment. In the paper, we offered a new combination way to integrate large scale non-grid-connected wind power with heavy power consumption load based on an analysis on the difficulty of power grids in holding an intermittent and fluctuant power provided by large scale offshore wind power field. Several suggestions are also given as follows: building a series of

  10. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  11. Erosion-corrosion; Erosionkorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghili, B

    1999-05-01

    A literature study on erosion-corrosion of pipings in the nuclear industry was performed. Occurred incidents are reviewed, and the mechanism driving the erosion-corrosion is described. Factors that influence the effect in negative or positive direction are treated, as well as programs for control and inspection. Finally, examples of failures from databases on erosion-corrosion are given in an attachment 32 refs, 16 figs, tabs

  12. Redevelopment of liftoff rates of saltating sand grains based on a simple optimization model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a redevelopment result of liftoff rates of saltating sand grains based on our previous work.Aeolian sand flow is a complex multi-phase flow because of a special two-phase gas-solid flow near ground surface.Despite extensive research on the movement of blowing sand,no model fully characterizes aeolian sand flow,and large differences often exist between simulations of aeolian sand movement and field observations.One key problem is a few of sufficient research on liftoff rates of saltating sand grains(also called the number of liftoff sand grains per unit time and per unit bed area).It is necessary to re-search in advance liftoff rates of saltating sand grains.We redeveloped liftoff rates of saltating sand grains by establishing an optimization model based on the flux of aeolian sand flow at different heights of the sampler in wind tunnel and the simulated capture of saltating sand grains by different heights of the sampler that are from different liftoff position(distance from the sampler) in order to revise previous inversion condition of liftoff rates of saltating sand grains.Liftoff rates increased rapidly with increasing wind speed.For frictional wind velocities of u=0.67,0.77,0.82,0.83,and 0.87 m s-1,liftoff rates were 3840,954502,5235114,5499407,and 7696291 sand grain s-1 m-2,respectively.These rates could be expressed as the square of the instantaneous frictional wind velocity and a constant(0.663) that differs from the critical(threshold) frictional wind velocity at which saltation begins.Although our results require additional experimental validation and the simple optimization model must be improved,they nonetheless provide a strong basis for future research.

  13. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  14. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  15. Calibrating thermal erosion models along an Arctic coastline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, C. W.; Anderson, R. S.; Overeem, I.; Urban, F. E.; Clow, G. D.; Stanton, T. P.

    2009-12-01

    Coastal erosion rates of 20-30 meters per year have been documented along Alaska’s Beaufort Sea coastline, and a number of studies suggest that erosion rates have accelerated as a result of climate change. However, a lack of direct observational evidence has limited our progress in quantifying the role of climate change on coastal erosion rates in the Arctic. In particular, while longer ice-free periods are likely to lead to both warmer surface waters and longer fetch, the relative roles of thermal and mechanical (wave) erosion in driving coastal retreat have not been comprehensively quantified. We focus on the potential magnitude of thermal erosion along a permafrost coastline in the northern National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), where erosion rates have averaged 10-15 meters/year over two years of direct monitoring. We take advantage of these extraordinary rates of coastal erosion to directly observe erosion processes via time-lapse photography, while monitoring temperature, solar radiation and wind speed at the same time. These combined observations are used to calibrate models of thermal erosion. Our observations suggest that virtually all of the erosion in this setting can be explained as a purely thermal process. Coastal bluffs are first notched and then topple into the ocean, failing dominantly along ice wedges that serve as planes of weakness. Furthermore, the high ice content and the fine grain size of the coastal plain materials that comprise the bluffs appear to limit any strong negative feedback on erosion rates, since the sediments are readily dispersed on the shallow shelf. Although erosion driven purely by thermal processes may be unique to this particular coastal zone, these observations implicate a direct relationship between climatic warming and landscape change. Erosion of sandy coastlines in other parts of the NPR-A may also be ultimately controlled by thermal energy, once a thin veneer of clastic material is removed by wave action from

  16. Sea-cliff erosion at Pacifica, California caused by 1997/98 El Niño storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Charles B.; Lajoie, Kenneth R.; Medley, Edward W.

    2000-01-01

    Twelve homes were constructed in 1949 at the top of a sea cliff along Esplanade Drive in the City of Pacifica, located on the northern coast of San Mateo County, California. The rear yards of those properties were bounded by an approximately 20-meter (70-foot) high cliff that has retreated episodically at an average rate of 0.5 to 0.6 meter (1.5 to 2 feet) per year over the past 146 years. During the heavy storms of the 1997/1998 El Niño winter, a severe episode of cliff retreat undermined seven homes and threatened three others. All ten homes were condemned and demolished by the City of Pacifica. In this study we analyze geologic, tide, wave, rainfall and wind data in an attempt to determine the causes of this most recent erosion event. We identify the following possible contributory causes of the cliff retreat: 1) wave-induced undercutting of the cliff landward of an old revetment, 2) reduction in beach width over time, 3) reduction in cliff-face stability owing to infiltration from heavy rains, 4) erosion of the cliff face by groundwater piping, and 5) wind-induced erosion of loose dune sand at the top of the cliff. While these factors may explain the retreat of the cliff below the twelve homes along Esplanade Drive, the question remains as to why other geologically similar sites in the region were not severely eroded during the 1997/1998 El Niño winter.

  17. Release of Escherichia coli from Foreshore Sand and Pore Water during Intensified Wave Conditions at a Recreational Beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Laura J; O'Carroll, Denis M; Edge, Thomas A; Robinson, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Foreshore beach sands and pore water may act as a reservoir and nonpoint source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to surface waters. This paper presents data collected at a fine sand beach on Lake Huron, Canada over three field events. The data show that foreshore sand erosion as wave height increases results in elevated Escherichia coli concentrations in surface water, as well as depletion of E. coli from the foreshore sand and pore water. E. coli initially attached to foreshore sand rather than initially residing in the pore water was found to be the main contributor to elevated surface water concentrations. Surface water E. coli concentrations were a function of not only wave height (and associated sand erosion) but also the time elapsed since a preceding period of high wave intensity. This finding is important for statistical regression models used to predict beach advisories. While calculations suggest that foreshore sand erosion may be the dominant mechanism for releasing E. coli to surface water during intensified wave conditions at a fine sand beach, comparative characterization of the E. coli distribution at a coarse sand-cobble beach suggests that interstitial pore water flow and discharge may be more important for coarser sand beaches.

  18. Erosion Negril Beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Ham, D.; Henrotte, J.; Kraaijeveld, R.; Milosevic, M.; Smit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The ongoing erosion of the Negril Beach has become worse the past decade. In most places along the coast line, the beach will be gone in approximately 10 years. This will result in a major decrease of incomes that are made by the local tourist sector. To prevent the erosion this study has been perfo

  19. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  20. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  1. Distribution of sand dunes and sand shifts along the southern fringe of the Mu Us Desert since the Ming Dynasty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This article takes the two segments of the Ming Great Walls, Dabian and Erbian, and their associated barracks and forts as geographical references. Based on a detailed scrutiny of historical records of the Ming and Qing dynasties, and on field surveys, the southern boundaries of the sand dunes and sand shifts of the Mu Us Desert in the Ming and Qing dynasties are carefully reconstructed. A comparison of the southern boundaries of the sand dunes and sand shifts of the Mu Us Desert in Ming and Qing with the modern boundary revealed in remote sensing imagery clearly shows that the southern boundary of dunes and shifts in the Mu us Desert has expanded only in a few areas and on a small scale. In the area to the south of Changle Fort, along the direction of annually prevailing winds, sand drifts have penetrated through the Jialu River valley into the loess region and have formed a sand strip of 32 km long and 3 km wide. To the east of Qingping Fort, sand drifts penetrated toward the eastern loess region through the Luhe River valley and have formed another sand strip of 8 km long and 2 km wide. Generally speaking, though the intensity of human activity has been increasing in this area since the Ming Dynasty, the Mu Us Desert has not significantly expanded toward the southeast or southwest. The sand-loess boundary in the southern fringe of the Mu Us Desert has been almost unchanged since the Ming Dynasty.

  2. Solid particle erosion of polymers and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, K.; Almajid, A. A.

    2014-05-01

    After a general introduction to the subject of solid particle erosion of polymers and composites, the presentation focusses more specifically on the behavior of unidirectional carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyetheretherketone (PEEK) composites under such loadings, using different impact conditions and erodents. The data were analyzed on the basis of a newly defined specific erosive wear rate, allowing a better comparison of erosion data achieved under various testing conditions. Characteristic wear mechanisms of the CF/PEEK composites consisted of fiber fracture, matrix cutting and plastic matrix deformation, the relative contribution of which depended on the impingement angles and the CF orientation. The highest wear rates were measured for impingement angles between 45 and 60°. Using abrasion resistant neat polymer films (in this case PEEK or thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) ones) on the surface of a harder substrate (e.g. a CF/PEEK composite plate) resulted in much lower specific erosive wear rates. The use of such polymeric films can be considered as a possible method to protect composite surfaces from damage caused by minor impacts and erosion. In fact, they are nowadays already successfully applied as protections for wind energy rotor blades.

  3. A Comparative Study on Sand Transport Modeling for Horizontal Multiphase Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Wai Choong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Presence of sand causes adverse effects on hydrocarbon production, pipeline erosion and problems at wellbore. If the problems persist, production may be stopped and delayed. This imposes workover cost. Hence, operating expenses increase and revenue reduces. There is no explicit calculation algorithm for sand transportation modeling readily available in flow simulators. Therefore, this study aims to develop an Excel-based spreadsheet on sand transportation to predict sand critical velocity and onset of sand deposition based on published literature. The authors reviewed nine sand transportation models in pipelines and made comparisons on the selected models based on various criteria. Four of which were then developed into a sand modeling spreadsheet. The four models are the Turian et al. (1987, Oudeman (1993, Stevenson et al. (2002b Model and Danielson (2007. The spreadsheet presently focuses on sand production prediction in horizontal two-phase flow. The Danielson model can predict sand hold up while the other models estimate grain size transportable and critical velocity of sand. Flowing pipeline properties, sand properties and results of simulations like using OLGA (for flow rate, velocity and superficial velocity of different phases are necessary inputs of the spreadsheet. A user selects any model based on different operating conditions or user preference. The spreadsheet was validated by comparing data extracted from the research papers. Sensitivity analyses can also be performed with the spreadsheet by manipulating the parameters such as grain size and flow rate. This review is useful for flow simulators’ development to include sand transport modeling.

  4. Wind Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 12 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 6.9, Longitude 69.4 East (290.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing

  5. 青海共和盆地威连滩沙地冲沟风水交互作用研究%Study on Aeolian-fluvial Interactions of Gully Erosion in Sandy Land in Weiliantan, Gonghe Basin, Qinghai Province "

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马玉凤; 严平; 李双权

    2012-01-01

    The authors chose gully erosion in sandy land in Weiliantan, Gonghe basin, Qinghai province as the studied object. By field investigation, collection of sediment samples and analysis, with the assistant of aerial photo in 1982 and the remotely-sensed imagery Quick Bird data in 2006, the authors analyzed the environ- mental change of aeolian-fluvial interaction in geologic time and the modern characteristics of aeolian-fluvial interaction of gully erosion in sandy land. The results show that sedimentary environment has been in the transition from water erosion to wind erosion, and had a little sedimentary cycle since early Holocene. Climate became relatively warm and moist in middle Holocene, thus wind-sand activity weakened and sand dunes experienced soil formation. Again, aeolian activities have enhanced since late Holoeene. Gully in sandy land has been eroded by water and wind since gully formation. Wind accumulation(windblown deposit) on the undulate gully bank and at the winding bottom of gully supplies water erosion with sandy deposit. Sand flow has a function of gully reshaping on the sandy land; in turn, gully erosion also has an effect on aeolian activities. Annual sediment from gully erosion is about 8.3 X 104 t, so it can be considered as an important source of dune growth. In addition, long and narrow gully has funneling effect, and this fact can induce more serious aeolian erosion and sand storm disaster.%选择青海共和盆地威连滩沙地冲沟为研究区,通过野外调查,沉积物样品采集和分析,结合1982年航片和2006年快鸟影像数据,分析研究区地质历史时期风水交互作用的环境变化和沙地冲沟风水交互侵蚀的现代特征。结果表明:全新世初期,研究区由水成沉积环境逐渐过渡到风成沉积环境,并有小的沉积旋回,到了全新世中期,气候变得较温润,风沙活动减弱,风成沙逐渐生草成土,但弱砂质古土壤层较薄,从全新世晚期至今,风沙活动

  6. Solitary Dunes under Bimodal Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reffet, Erwan; Courrech du Pont, S.; Hersen, P.; Fulchignoni, M.; Douady, S.

    2009-01-01

    The high resolution and coverage achieved on Mars' surface have detailed lots of sand dunes of various types [1]. Many are reported as barchan or barchanoid dunes and present a diversity of shape ascribed to compound wind regimes, collisions or cementation. This diversity reminds us that aeolian structures are fairly complex. Although dunes have been extensively observed and documented, the conditions of their formation and evolution are still difficult to study because of the long time required for their development and their large length-scale. We developed a laboratory approach using underwater experiments to study the morphology of dunes. This method has been used successfully to reproduce various types of dunes downsized to a few centimeters. Barchan dunes are formed using a unidirectional wind-equivalent regime on a pile of ceramic sand-sized grains [2]. Changing the wind regime to a more complex one reveals other structures. In the case of multiple wind directions star dunes can be observed. A bimodal wind regime, e.g. switching between two distinct directions, over an homogeneous layer of sand leads to transverse, longitudinal or complex compound sandbeds depending on the angle between these wind directions [3]. Here, we apply bimodal wind regimes to isolated patches of sand in order to observe the variation of morphology of the resulting dunes. We present the barchanoid dunes obtained for various angles of bimodal wind and show the transition to the "chestnut” dunes type. We also investigate sudden variations in wind direction over a barchan dune. Therefore, we illustrate how the (not so) simple barchan shape can be affected by a more complex wind regime and give a new insight in understanding dunes on Mars. [1] http://www.mars-dunes.org/ . [2] Hersen et al. PRL, 2003. [3] Reffet et al. pldu.work 2008.

  7. Determination of the Critical Erosion Threshold of Cohesive Sediments on Intertidal Mudflats Along the Dutch Wadden Sea Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwing, E.-J.

    1999-10-01

    The bed shear strength on an intertidal mudflat bordering salt marshes along the Dutch Wadden Sea coast was determined by means of an in situ erosion flume (ISEF). Characteristic erosion patterns (type I- and type II-erosion) were observed for most measurements. The critical erosion threshold varied between 0·11-0·18 (Pa) for all measurements and erosion rates varied between 5×10 -5and 3×10 -3(kg m -2 s -1). No clear relationship was found between distinct parameters like bed density, moisture content or biological activity and the critical erosion threshold. A more pronounced effect of the erodability of the mudflat was found when the erosion rate was taken into account. Basically two clusters were distinguished. High mean peak erosion rates of the substratum were found at locations which were characterized by a low mud content of the substratum (below 20% mud by weight). In these situations bed load transport is expected to be the most important process which determined erosion of the bed and erosion of predominantly the sand fraction was found. At higher rates of the mud content (over 20% mud by weight) mean peak erosion rates decreased substantially (an order 6 to 10 times lower) and both erosion of the mud and sand fraction was found.

  8. Sedimentology and preservation of aeolian sediments on steep terrains: Incipient sand ramps on the Atacama coast (northern Chile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventra, Dario; Rodríguez-López, Juan Pedro; de Boer, Poppe L.

    2017-05-01

    The origin of topographically controlled aeolian landforms in high-relief settings is difficult to synthesize under general models, given the dependence of such accumulations on local morphology. Quaternary sand ramps have been linked to palaeoclimate, regional geomorphology and wind patterns; however, controls on the early development and preservation of such landforms are poorly known. This study describes the morphology and sedimentology of complex sedimentary aprons along steep coastal slopes in the Atacama Desert (Chile). Direct slope accessibility and continuous stratigraphic exposures enable comparisons between active processes and stratigraphic signatures. Stratigraphic facies distribution and its links with patterns of aeolian deposition show that the preservation of wind-laid sediments depends on the morphology and processes of specific slope sectors. The spatial organization of runoff depends on bedrock configuration and directly controls the permanence or erosion of aeolian sediment. The occurrence of either water or mass flows depends on the role of aeolian fines in the rheology of flash floods. In turn, the establishment of a rugged surface topography controlled by patterns of mass-flow deposition creates local accommodation for aeolian fines, sustaining the initial aggradation of a colluvial-aeolian system. By contrast, slopes subject to runoff develop a thin, extensive aeolian mantle whose featureless surface is subject mostly to sediment bypass down- and across-slope; the corresponding stratigraphic record comprises almost exclusively thin debris-flow and sheetflood deposits. Slope morphology and processes are fundamental in promoting or inhibiting aeolian aggradation in mountain settings. Long-term sand-ramp construction depends on climate and regional topography, but the initial development is probably controlled by local geomorphic factors. The observed interactions between wind and topography in the study area may also represent a process

  9. Polyanhydride degradation and erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göpferich, A; Tessmar, J

    2002-10-16

    It was the intention of this paper to give a survey on the degradation and erosion of polyanhydrides. Due to the multitude of polymers that have been synthesized in this class of material in recent years, it was not possible to discuss all polyanhydrides that have gained in significance based on their application. It was rather the intention to provide a broad picture on polyanhydride degradation and erosion based on the knowledge that we have from those polymers that have been intensively investigated. To reach this goal this review contains several sections. First, the foundation for an understanding of the nomenclature are laid by defining degradation and erosion which was deemed necessary because many different definitions exist in the current literature. Next, the properties of major classes of anhydrides are reviewed and the impact of geometry on degradation and erosion is discussed. A complicated issue is the control of drug release from degradable polymers. Therefore, the aspect of erosion-controlled release and drug stability inside polyanhydrides are discussed. Towards the end of the paper models are briefly reviewed that describe the erosion of polyanhydrides. Empirical models as well as Monte-Carlo-based approaches are described. Finally it is outlined how theoretical models can help to answer the question why polyanhydrides are surface eroding. A look at the microstructure and the results from these models lead to the conclusion that polyanhydrides are surface eroding due to their fast degradation. However they switch to bulk erosion once the device dimensions drop below a critical limit.

  10. Contribution to Improving the Performance of Concrete: The Case of the Use of Desert Sand of the Region of Dakar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cisse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the extraction of sea sand is not the only factor responsible for coastal erosion, it is an important phenomenon in the degradation of the coastal environment. For this reason, local authorities have banned the use of sea sand and also operators in the construction sector (Public Works and Water Resources should use the desert sand that is the only current alternative. Indeed, the alluvial sand usually has better features than the desert sand, but it is not available in sufficient reserves to the needs of the construction sector. The purpose of this study is to characterize (granularity, cleanliness some quarries of desert sand used in the Dakar region to verify the extent to which they are used in construction and more specifically in hydraulic concrete composition. Furthermore, a method of mixing improved this desert sand with crushed sand 0/3, from the rock crushing mass, is studied below.

  11. Production of Wind Turbine Main Shaft by Ester Cured Sodium Silicate Sand%用酯硬化水玻璃砂铸造生产风机主轴

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟开华; 肖方志; 傅骏

    2013-01-01

    利用华铸CAE/InteCAST对风机主轴进行铸造工艺CAE优化设计,采用酯硬化水玻璃砂成功地铸造生产了风机主轴样品.%The process optimal-design of wind turbine main shaft was designed by InteCAST soft. By adopting formulated Ester cured sodium silicate process parameters, the wind turbine main shaft was successfully produced.

  12. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  13. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  14. Sets resilient to erosion

    CERN Document Server

    Pegden, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    The erosion of a set in Euclidean space by a radius r>0 is the subset of X consisting of points at distance >/-r from the complement of X. A set is resilient to erosion if it is similar to its erosion by some positive radius. We give a somewhat surprising characterization of resilient sets, consisting in one part of simple geometric constraints on convex resilient sets, and, in another, a correspondence between nonconvex resilient sets and scale-invariant (e.g., 'exact fractal') sets.

  15. Vestled - Hvide Sande

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten; Hesselbjerg, Marianne; Schønherr, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side......Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side...

  16. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  17. Long-term cosmogenic 10Be catchment-wide erosion rates in the Kruger National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbach, Christoph; Paape, Alexander; Reinwarth, Bastian; Baade, Jussi; Miller, Jordan; Rowntree, Kate

    2015-04-01

    In this study we estimated long-term catchment-wide erosion rates in the central and southern Kruger National Park with cosmogenic 10Be analyses. Samples were collected in small catchments (2-100 km2) upstream of dams, which were used to determine short-term sediment yield rates. 10Be-derived erosion rates vary from 4-15 mm/kyr. Although there are significant site-specific differences in geomorphic parameters and precipitation we could not identify a single parameter controlling long-term erosion. Geomorphic fieldwork reveals that an unknown fraction of sampled sand-sized channel sediments derived from partly extensive and up to a few-meters deep gully erosion, which may lead to an overestimation of 10Be-derived erosion rates. Cosmogenic nuclide production is rapidly decreasing with depth and consequently the measured 10Be concentration of stream sediments is a mixture of (i) sand with high 10Be concentration from colluvial creep or sheet flow from hillslopes and (ii) sand with low 10Be concentration from gully erosion. To correct erosion rates, we quantify sediments derived from gullies using a combination of mapping gullies using remote sensing data and field work and geochemical characterisation of intact hillslopes and gully side walls.

  18. Predicted Research of the Erosion Damage of the Rammed Earth Wall of Fujian Earth Buildings Caused by the Wind-driven Rain%福建土楼夯土墙风驱雨侵蚀损伤预测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    花长城; 彭兴黔; 吴仁伟; 邵昆

    2012-01-01

    The World Heritage Fujian Earth Buildings are located in China's southeast coastal area where is frequently suffered from typhoon and severe weather,the annual amount of rainfall can be as much as 1600 mm.Whenever typhoon landed,the gustiness,gathering with the torrential rain,tends to erode and cause damages to these Earth Buildings,with that,the wind-driven rain's erosion of the rammed earth wall has become the main form causing such damages.The accurate simulation of numerical wind tunnel can be completed by the adoption of methods of CFD numerical simulation and wind tunnel test,according to the analysis of the raindrops' motion form and the rainfall characteristics under the effect of the wind-driven rain.Considering the various combinative conditions of the rain strength and wind speed based on the numerical wind field and rainfall model,followed by analyzing the erosion damage of the rammed earth wall caused by the weather beaten,in such way,whose inherent regularity can be revealed.The last step is to predict the annual range of average erosion damage which is from 0.4 mm to 2.6 mm by the calculation example based on the local meteorological statistical data.The result will provide the earth buildings' maintenance reinforcement and exploitation with scientific basis,and provide the other rammed earth architecture with reference as well.%世界文化遗产福建土楼地处中国东南沿海,年降雨高达1 600 mm,频繁遭受台风和极端天气袭击,每当台风登陆时,狂风挟着暴雨常常侵蚀危害着土楼建筑,风驱雨冲击侵蚀土楼夯土墙已成为土楼建筑的主要损坏形式。论文通过分析风驱雨作用下雨滴的运动形式及降雨特征,采用CFD数值模拟及风洞试验的方法完成数值风洞准确性模拟,以数值风场为基础加入降雨模型,考虑多种雨强和风速相互组合,分析风驱雨对土楼夯土墙的风雨侵蚀影响,揭示了夯土墙风雨侵蚀的内在规律。并通过

  19. Using Cesium-137 to estimate soil particle redistribution by wind in an arid region of central Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Gheysari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to estimate soil erosion and deposition rates along a transect using 137Cs technique in an arid of Isfahan Province, central Iran. Sixteen sites along a northeast-southwest transect with 42 km length were used. Eighty soil samples collected from five depths (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-50 cm were analyzed for 137Cs concentration. Additional 20 soil samples were collected from the reference site for computing soil loss and deposition using 137Cs measurement. The results showed that the northern part of the transect showed erosion rates ranging from12.90 to 46.86 t ha-1yr-1. The major factor affecting soil erosion process in northern part of the studied transect is associated dominantly with occurrence of improper gypsum mining operations and human activities. In the southern part of the transect deposition rates changed between 3.10 - 7.44 t ha-1yr-1, presumably influenced by increasing plant cover. Significant correlations between 137Cs and magnetic susceptibility, soil organic matter (SOM, total nitrogen (TN and particle size distributions indicated that soil redistribution by wind erosion might have modified the soil properties along the studied transect. A multiple linear regression model was developed for estimating 137Cs by frequency dependence (χfd, TN, clay and sand contents which explained about 87% of the 137Cs variability. This study of using 137Cs to assess wind erosion is unique in the arid region of central Iran and had significant implications for further research.

  20. Formational Mechanisms and Morphology of Windblown Coarse-Grained Sand Ripples at White Sands, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Pelletier, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse-grained ripples, also known as "megaripples," are large sand ripples found in both aeolian and aquatic environments on Earth, and are common on Mars. The formation and morphology of coarse-grained ripples are not as well understood as more common splash ripples. Current understanding suggests that formative wind speeds are above the saltation threshold for the fine grains, but below this threshold for coarse grains found on the crests, such that they creep. Based on this idea, we hypothesize that wind speeds above this coarse-grain saltation threshold will destroy the ripples. We further hypothesize that these ripples do not have an equilibrium size; rather, their size is related to the persistence of formative winds in a given direction. To test this model, we studied windblown coarse-grained ripples in White Sands, New Mexico. Terrestrial LiDAR was used to obtain high resolution ripple morphology and migration over a three month period. Wind velocity profiles and concurrent saltating grain size data were collected during a wind storm to directly relate modes of transport to particle size and wind stress. These local data were used to calibrate wind records from a nearby meteorological station to estimate local fluid stress using a long-term record. LiDAR data indicate that these ripples were destroyed and reoriented between March and June 2013, while the wind record shows that the coarse-grain saltation threshold was indeed exceeded during this time. Morphological analysis indicates that the lee slope of these ripples is set by saltation impact - similar to splash ripples - but that height, wavelength and stoss slope are not related to instantaneous transport conditions. The historical wind record also shows that the range of wind directions decreases rapidly with increasing speed, restricting strong winds to a narrow range of direction. From these results we explore the idea that coarse-grained ripples are typically larger and less frequently destroyed

  1. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Fifield L. K.; Tims S.G.

    2012-01-01

    Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace...

  2. Wind erodibility response of physical and biological crusts to rain and flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubault, H.; Bullard, J. E.; Strong, C. L.; Ghadiri, H.; McTainsh, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Soil surface crusts are important controllers of the small-scale wind entrainment processes that occur across all dust source regions globally. The crust type influences water and wind erosion by impacting infiltration, runoff, threshold wind velocity and surface storage capacity of both water and loose erodible material. The spatial and temporal patterning of both physical and biological crusts is known to change with rainfall and flooding. However, little is known about the impact of differing water quantity (from light rainfall through to flooding) on soil crusting characteristics (strength, roughness, sediment loss). This study compares the response of two soil types (loamy sand - LS, sandy loam - SL) with and without BSCs to three different rainfall events (2mm, 8mm, 15mm). Two BSC treatments were used one that simulated a young cyanobacteria dominated crust and an older flood induced multi species biological crust. For both soil types, soil surface strength increased with increasing rainfall amount with LS having consistently higher resistance to rupture than SL. Regardless of texture, soils with BSCs were more resistant and strength did not change in response to rainfall impact. Soil loss due to wind erosion was substantially higher on bare LS (4 times higher) and SL (3 times higher) soils compared with those with BSCs. Our results also show that young biological crust (formed by the rainfall event) have reduced soil erodibility with notably greater strength, roughness and reduced sediment losses when compared to soils with physical crust. Interestingly though, the erodibility of the old BSC did not differ greatly from that of the young BSC with respect to strength, roughness and sediment loss. This raises questions regarding the rapid soil surface protection offered by young colonising cyanobacteria crusts. Further analyses exploring the role of biological soil crusts on surface response to rainfall and wind saltation impact are ongoing.

  3. Comparison of two Satellite Imaging Platforms for Evaluating Sand Dune Migration in the Ubari Sand Sea (Libyan Fazzan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Els, A.; Merlo, S.; Knight, J.

    2015-04-01

    Sand dunes can change location, form or dimensions depending on wind direction and strength. Sand dune movements can be effectively monitored through the comparison of multi-temporal satellite images. However, not all remote sensing platforms are suitable to study sand dunes. This study compares coarse (Landsat) and fine (Worldview) resolution platforms, specifically focussing on sand dunes within the Ubari Sand Sea (Libya). Sand dune features (crest line, dune ridge basal outlines) were extracted from Landsat and Worldview 2 imagery in order to construct geomorphic maps. These geomorphic maps were then compared using image overlay and differencing, and the Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) was used to determine if the mapped dune patterns were significantly different. It was found that Landsat is a sufficient data source when studying dune patterns within a regional sand sea, but smaller dunes identified from Worldview data were not capable of being extracted in the data sourced from Landsat. This means that for studies concerned with the dune patterns and movements within sand seas, Landsat is sufficient. But in studies where the specific dynamics of specific dunes are required, a finer resolution is required; platforms such as Worldview are needed in order to gain more detailed insight and to link the past and present day climate and environmental change.

  4. Dark grains of sand: a geological storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Maresca, Magda

    2017-04-01

    In the secondary Italian school the Earth science learning begins at first year, in synergy with other natural science subjects such as Astronomy, Chemistry and Biology. Italian teachers have to focus on the landscape geomorphological aspects and often Earth processes are difficult to display since they are related to certain phenomena happened during the past and often far from the involved country. In order to better understand the environment surrounding us, very simple and poor materials, like sands, allow the teachers to create attractive lab experiences. According to the IBSE (Inquiry Based Science Education) approach, a learning unit has been implemented starting from a walking along the light carbonate beaches of the Adriatic sea: a smart look to the sands ("engage step"), stroke the students fantasy pushing them to explore some strange black grains on the sands. Dirty sands? Or rock landscape, soil degradation and Ofanto river and coastal processes (erosion, transportation and deposition)? This was the teaching challenge. Due to the youngest age, a third level, guided inquiry, was adopted so the teacher is the "guide of inquiry" encouraging the students using the research question ("Why is the sand dark?", "Do all sands look the same?", "Where does it come from?") and driving the students around their investigation plans ("How can I measure grain size?"). A procedure to answer the above questions and validate the results and explanations has been implemented to allow the students to be proactive in their study. During the learning activities will be the students to ask for field trip to elaborate their new knowledge, verify and visualize the speculated processes. The teaching skills allow to address several geosciences domains such as mineralogy, petrology, regional geology and geodynamics as well as other scientific disciplines such as mathematics (more specifically statistics), forensic science and even life sciences (the presence of bioclasts might

  5. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation

  6. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation re

  7. Aeolian sand transport and its effects on the stability of Miramar-Caranzalem beach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, G.V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Removal of sand by wind from the beach at Miramar-Caranzalem, Goa, has been found to effect its stability over a relatively longer time scale. This aeolian sand transport has been computed for this strip of the beach utilising the relation between...

  8. Phase diagrams of dune shape and orientation depending on sand availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier; Courrech du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-09-30

    New evidence indicates that sand availability does not only control dune type but also the underlying dune growth mechanism and the subsequent dune orientation. Here we numerically investigate the development of bedforms in bidirectional wind regimes for two different conditions of sand availability: an erodible sand bed or a localized sand source on a non-erodible ground. These two conditions of sand availability are associated with two independent dune growth mechanisms and, for both of them, we present the complete phase diagrams of dune shape and orientation. On an erodible sand bed, linear dunes are observed over the entire parameter space. Then, the divergence angle and the transport ratio between the two winds control dune orientation and dynamics. For a localized sand source, different dune morphologies are observed depending on the wind regime. There are systematic transitions in dune shape from barchans to linear dunes extending away from the localized sand source, and vice-versa. These transitions are captured fairly by a new dimensionless parameter, which compares the ability of winds to build the dune topography in the two modes of dune orientation.

  9. Sand fences: An environment-friendly technique to restore degraded coastal dunes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    . Wind speeds crossed 36 km/h (IMD, on phone). Sand blown landwards got trapped wherever obstructions such as pillars, benches or road dividers were encountered. By estimating the approximate volume of each sand mound, and comparing it with the amount...

  10. Use of palm-mat geotextiles for rainsplash erosion control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Fullen, M. A.; Davies, K.; Booth, C. A.

    2010-07-01

    Soil detachment by raindrop action (rainsplash erosion) is a very important subprocess of erosion by water. It is a particular problem in the UK as most soils are sandy or loamy sand in texture and lands have gentle to medium slope. However, few studies report potential rainsplash erosion control options under field conditions. Hence, the utilization of palm-mat geotextiles as a rainsplash erosion control technique was investigated at Hilton, east Shropshire, U.K. (52°33'5.7″ N, 2°19'18.3″ W). Geotextile-mats constructed from Borassus aethiopum (Borassus palm of West Africa) and Mauritia flexuosa (Buriti palm of South America) leaves are termed Borassus mats and Buriti mats, respectively. Two-year field experiments were conducted at Hilton to study the effects of emplacing Borassus and Buriti mats on rainsplash erosion of a loamy sand soil. Two sets (12 plots each) of experiments were established to study the effects of these mats on splash height and splash erosion. Splash height needs to be known to assess the transport mechanism of major soil fraction and its constituents on sloping land by rainsplash. In both sets, six randomly-selected plots were covered with mats, and the rest were bare. Results (during 22/01/2007‒23/01/2009; total precipitation = 1731.5 mm) show that Borassus mat-covered plots had ˜ 89% ( P 0.05) effect in rainsplash erosion control during that period, although plots with Buriti mats significantly ( P 0.05) improve selected soil properties (i.e., soil organic matter, particle size distribution, aggregate stability and total soil carbon) as soil organic matter (SOM) input from mat-decomposition was much less than total SOM content. However, the changes in fine and medium sand contents (after 2 years) in the Borassus covered plots were significantly ( P < 0.05; n = 6) related to the total rainsplash erosion during 2007‒2009. Emplacement of Borassus and Buriti mats on bare soils did not decrease SOM contents after 2 years, indicating

  11. Reduction of the efficacy of biochar as soil amendment by soil erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Greenwood, Philip

    of biochar by wind erosion was due to very rainy wet soil surface conditions, tested with dried soil in the laboratory, in order to be able to at least reflect the worst case scenario. The results of the study show that for both experiments (wind and water ero-sion), the sediment from plots with biochar......, the preferential mobilization and redistribution of biochar in the landscape seems probable. Therefore, the question has been raised in recent years of how vulnerable biochar actually is to soil erosion. This is especially relevant on soils which are regularly cultivated and are vulnerable to soil erosion...... for farmers committed to its use, as a high net annual loss of biochar by erosion could exceed any net annual economic gain. The overall objective of this study was, therefore, to investigate the erodibility of biochar, when erosion events occur directly or soon after its application. The estimation...

  12. Experiments for understanding soil erosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion processes are usually quantified by observation and measurement of their related forms. Rill, and gullies, moulds or sediment sinks are often used to estimate the soil loss. These forms are generally related directly to different types of processes, thus are also used to identify the dominant processes on a certain type of land-use. Nevertheless, the direct observation of erosion processes is constrained by their temporal and spatial erratic occurrence. As a consequence, the process understanding is generally deduced by analogies. Another possibility is to reproduce processes in experiments in both, the lab and in the field. Laboratory experiments are implemented when we want to have full control over all parameters we think are relevant for the process in our focus. So are very useful for identification of parameters influencing processes and their intensities, but also as physical models of the processes and process interactions in our focus. Therefore, we can use them to verify our concepts, and to define relevant parameters. Field experiments generally only simulate with controlled driving forces, this is the rain or the runoff, but dealing with the uncertainty of our study object, the soil. This enables two things: 1) similar as with lab experiments, we are able to identify processes and process interactions and so, to get a deeper understanding of soil erosion; 2) experiments are suitable for providing data about singular processes in the field and thus, to provide data suitable for model parametrisation and calibration. These may be quantitative data about erodibility or soil resistance, sediment detachment or transport. The Physical Geography Group at Trier University has a long lasting experience in the application of experiments in soil erosion research in the field, and has become lead in the further development conception and of devices and procedures to investigate splash detachment and initial transport of soil particles by wind and water

  13. Effects of the mid-air collision on sand saltation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As to the fact that the effects of saltating particles’ mid-air collision on the sand transport rate are often neglected in the current theoretical models describing sand saltation movement,expressions to calculate velocity diversity of saltating parti-cles after mid-air collision are presented through collision theory of hard ball in this paper. Then,the theoretical model of the wind blown sand movement at the steady state,taking account of coupled interaction between saltation particles and wind,is combined with the model of the mid-air collision probability to calculate the sal-tating particles’ mass flux at heights,the sand transport rate,and further,their changing rules. The comparison of the results with those when the mid-air collision is not considered suggests that the mass flux at heights and the sand transport rate in this paper are less,and much closer,respectively,to the corresponding experi-mental values. The difference between the sand mass fluxes without and with con-sideration of mid-air collision increases at first,and then decreases as the height increases,exhibiting the stratified characteristics.

  14. Solid Particle Erosion of Date Palm Leaf Fiber Reinforced Polyvinyl Alcohol Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti R. Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particle erosion behavior of short date palm leaf (DPL fiber reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA composite has been studied using silica sand particles (200 ± 50 μm as an erodent at different impingement angles (15–90° and impact velocities (48–109 m/s. The influence of fiber content (wt% of DPL fiber on erosion rate of PVA/DPL composite has also been investigated. The neat PVA shows maximum erosion rate at 30° impingement angle whereas PVA/DPL composites exhibit maximum erosion rate at 45° impingement angle irrespective of fiber loading showing semiductile behavior. The erosion efficiency of PVA and its composites varies from 0.735 to 16.289% for different impact velocities studied. The eroded surfaces were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM to understand the erosion mechanism.

  15. 改性水溶性聚氨酯的固沙促生性能及其机理%Performances and mechanism of sand fixation and growth promotion based on modified hydrophilic polyurethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁止水; 吴智仁

    2016-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of sand fixation and growth promotion by modified hydrophilic polyurethane (W-OHC), experiments both in laboratory and in field were conducted. In the laboratory experiment, the sand was taken from flowing sand dunes around Qinghai Lake. The permeability of W-OHC on sand was tested through the free infiltration method and the penetration thickness was gauged by a plastic ruler (precision accuracy of 2 mm). The performance of compressive strength of the sand-fixing layer was assessed in accordance with GB/T50123-1999 and the specimen was tested on a AG-X plus universal testing machine. As an important indication of vegetation germination and growth, the surface hardness was measured using a Yamanaka soil hardness tester. The wind tunnel test for wind erosion resistance evaluation was conducted in the Key Laboratory of Desert and Desertification in Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute,Chinese Academy of Sciences. The spraying concentration of W-OHC was 3% and the wind with velocity of 10, 15, 20, 25 m/s lasted for 20, 15, 10, and 7 min, respectively. The property of freezing-thawing of the sand-fixing layer was evaluated. The freezing-thawing cycles was 50 times under -25℃ for 22 h and 25℃ for 2 h. Both the wind erosion resistance and freezing-thawing performances were assessed by compressive strength and surface hardness. Then the experiment of water retention was carried out in different spraying amounts and concentrations of W-OHC solution, and the rate of water content in sand-fixing layer was obtained. Finally, a field test in the flowing sand dunes around Qinghai Lake was carried out. The 2% and 3% W-OHC with spraying amount of 3 L/m2were compared. The results showed that: 1) W-OHC solution had good permeability on sand and a flexible sand fixation layer with porosity was formed when different concentrations of W-OHC solution were used. The penetration thickness decreased with the increase of

  16. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs.

  17. Geologic and paleoecologic studies of the Nebraska Sand Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.; Fryberger, S.G.; Hanley, John H.; Bradbury, J. Platt

    1980-01-01

    . Further, our measurements indicate that dunes in the western part of the Sand Hills did not develop in response to present-day effective wind regimes. The presence of 'transverse' and en echelon barchan dunes in the Sand Hills corresponds to a developmental sequence of barchan to linear dunes proposed by Tsoar (1978). Dune and interdune deposits of the Sand Hills are subfeldsarenites to feldsarenites. Sand grains are commonly coated with montmorillonitic clay, which may be the local source of the clay concentrated in the dissipation structures. Textures of sand samples taken from adjacent layers within a dune were as dissimilar as textures of samples taken from widely separated dunes. This common occurrence indicates that textural data must be used carefully and in combination with other data to recognize ancient rocks of eolian origin. Organic material derived from a variety of flora and fauna that inhabit the interdunes (chapters B and C) generated both oil and gas upon heating. Thus, interdune sediments may be an indigenous hydrocarbon source if buried in eolianites. The twofold stratigraphy of loess and correlative dune deposits in the Sand Hills proposed by Reed and Dreeszen (1965) could not be confirmed by the present study. Rather, available data indicate that the dunes represent a single formation as suggested by Lugn (1935). PART B: Three assemblages of nonmarine Mollusca from paleointerdune deposits in the Nebraska Sand Hills inhabited shallow, quiet, vegetated, subpermanent or temporary, freshwater interdune ponds and adjacent terrestrial habitats. Analysis of factors affecting the taxonomic composition, diversity, and abundance of species in living assemblages of mollusks support this interpretation. The mollusks have long biostratigraphic ranges and broad biogeographic distributions. They fail to establish precise age relations of the faunas othe

  18. [Biological soil crust nitrogenase activity and its responses to hydro-thermic factors in different erosion regions on the Loess Plateau, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jiao; Zhao, Yun-Ge; Xu, Ming-Xiang; Yang, Li-Na; Wang, Ai-Guo

    2013-07-01

    Based on field survey, the biological soil crusts at their stable development stage were collected from the water erosion region, water-wind erosion region, and wind erosion region on the Loess Plateau, aimed to study the effects of the variations of moisture and temperature on the crusts nitrogenase activity (NA). The NA of the crusts in the erosion regions decreased in the order of water erosion region (127.7 micromol x m(-2) x h(-1)) > water-wind erosion region (34.6 micromol x m(-2) x h(-1)) > wind erosion region (6.0 micromol x m(-2) x h(-1)), and the optimal temperature for the crust nitrogen fixation was 35 degrees C, 25 degrees C, and 15 degrees C, respectively. At the optimal temperature and 100% -40% field water-holding capacity, the NA of the crusts from the water erosion and water-wind erosion regions had no significant difference. The NA of the crusts from the wind erosion region was more sensitive to the variation of moisture, showing a dramatic decline when the moisture decreased to 80% field water-holding capacity, and totally lost when the moisture decreased to 20% field water-holding capacity. The differences in the NA of the crusts from the three erosion regions and the responses of the NA to the variations of moisture and temperature were likely associated with the climate, environment, and the crust species composition.

  19. Longshore sediment transport at Golden Sands (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Nikolov

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the qualitative and quantitative features of the littoral drift at Golden Sands (Bulgaria, carried out jointly by Polish and Bulgarian researchers. The mathematical modelling of physical coastal processes took wave transformation (wave diffraction and refraction; the effects of shoaling and wave breaking and longshore sediment transport into account. The computations were carried out for the mean statistical annual wave climate, determined on the basis of IO BAS wave data, simulated using the WAM method from long-term Black Sea wind data. The results of sediment transport computations clearly show that its direction off the Golden Sands shore is from north to south.

  20. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  1. Sand drift encroachment in the Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes District and its control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈建军; 董光荣; 文子祥; 张伟民; 胡世雄

    1997-01-01

    Analysis on sand drift damages to the Dunhuang Mogao Grottoes showed that the actual sand drift hazards in the area are mainly attributed to the gobi wind-sand stream formed by sand coming from the Mingsha Mountain (megadune), while the migration of the megadune and its frontal edge dunes is actually not a major threat to the grottoes. The gobi belt on the cliff top of the Mogao Grottoes is not only a natural sand transport field but also a natural protective screen which prevents the megadune and its frontal edge dunes from advancing towards the grottoes or burying the grottoes. Therefore efforts to protect the Mogao Grottoes should be focussed on halting the gobi wind-sand stream rather than on checking the migration of sand dunes. For this reason, effective sand blockade and stabilization measures should be adopted at the frontal edge of the megadune but no sand retarding works are allowed to be set up in the gobi belt so as to avoid sand accumulation and entering the grottoes.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Temperature Effects on Microparticle Sand Rebound Characteristics at Gas Turbine Representative Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Delimont, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    When a gas turbine operates in a particle laden environment, such as a desert, small solid particles are ingested into the engine. The ingested sand particles can cause damage to engine components and reduce the service life of the engine. Particle ingestion causes the erosion of metal blades and vanes, and, if the firing temperature is hot enough, deposition of molten particles in the hot sections of the engine. Both deposition and erosion phenomena can severely reduce overall engine perfo...

  3. Aeolian sand transport and aeolian deposits on Venus: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsly, Mikhail A.; Bondarenko, Nataliya V.

    2017-06-01

    We review the current state of knowledge about aeolian sand transport and aeolian bedforms on planet Venus. This knowledge is limited by lack of observational data. Among the four planetary bodies of the Solar System with sufficient atmospheres in contact with solid surfaces, Venus has the densest atmosphere; the conditions there are transitional between those for terrestrial subaerial and subaqueous transport. The dense atmosphere causes low saltation threshold and short characteristic saltation length, and short scale length of the incipient dunes. A few lines of evidence indicate that the typical wind speeds exceed the saltation threshold; therefore, sand transport would be pervasive, if sand capable of saltation is available. Sand production on Venus is probably much slower than on the Earth; the major terrestrial sand sinks are also absent, however, lithification of sand through sintering is expected to be effective under Venus' conditions. Active transport is not detectable with the data available. Aeolian bedforms (transverse dunes) resolved in the currently available radar images occupy a tiny area on the planet; however, indirect observations suggest that small-scale unresolved aeolian bedforms are ubiquitous. Aeolian transport is probably limited by sand lithification causing shortage of saltation-capable material. Large impact events likely cause regional short-term spikes in aeolian transport by supplying a large amount of sand-size particles, as well as disintegration and activation of older indurated sand deposits. The data available are insufficient to understand whether the global aeolian sand transport occurs or not. More robust knowledge about aeolian transport on Venus is essential for future scientific exploration of the planet, in particular, for implementation and interpretation of geochemical studies of surface materials. High-resolution orbital radar imaging with local to regional coverage and desirable interferometric capabilities is the

  4. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  5. Wind forces and related saltation transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, J.K.; Boxel, van J.H.; Sterk, G.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of several wind characteristics on sand transport was studied in three experiments in north Burkina Faso, West Africa. The first experiment is used to analyse the relation between wind speed and shear stress fluctuations across height. The second experiment is used to study the relation

  6. Study of erosion characterization of carbon fiber reinforced composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Uttam Kumar; Chowdhury, Mohammad Asaduzzaman; Kowser, Md. Arefin; Mia, Md. Shahin

    2017-06-01

    Carbon fiber composite materials are widely used at different engineering and industrial applications there are good physical, mechanical, chemical properties and light weight. Erosion behavior of materials depends on various factors such as impact angle, particle velocity, particle size, particle shape, particle type, particle flux, temperature of the tested materials. Among these factors impact angle and particle velocity have been recognized as two parameters that noticeably influence the erosion rates of all tested materials. Irregular shaped sand (SiO2) particles of various sizes (200-300 µm, 400-500 µm, and 500-600 µm) were selected erosive element. Tested conditions such as impingement angles between 15 degree to 90 degree, impact velocities between 30-50 m/sec, and stand-off distances 15-25 mm at surrounding room temperature were maintained. The highest level of erosion of the tested composite is obtained at 60° impact angle, which signifies the semi-ductile behavior of this material. Erosion showed increasing trend with impact velocity and decreasing nature in relation to stand-off distance. Surface damage was analyzed using SEM to examine the nature of the erosive wear mechanism.

  7. Influence of Impact Parameters on the Erosion Wear of Lanxin Railway Concrete Structure%冲击参数对兰新铁路混凝土结构冲蚀磨损的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彦平; 居春常; 王起才

    2013-01-01

    兰新铁路第二双线(新疆段)穿越五大风区,风区地段,强风携带的沙粒对兰新铁路混凝土结构产生严重的冲蚀磨损,造成混凝土结构耐久性的降低.本文针对戈壁风沙流环境特点,采用气流挟沙喷射法,对混凝土结构材料进行冲蚀磨损试验,研究冲击参数(冲蚀速度、角度和时间)对混凝土冲蚀磨损的影响.实验结果表明,混凝土靶材在各冲蚀速度下,90°冲蚀时冲蚀率最高,而30°冲蚀时冲蚀率最低,与传统的脆性材料的冲蚀规律相一致.在不同攻角下,冲蚀速度越大,冲蚀率越高;在低角度冲蚀时,速度指数与传统的脆性材料的冲蚀模型预测值相一致,而在高角度冲蚀时,速度指数偏离了理论预测范围.随着冲蚀时间的延长,混凝土材料的冲蚀率逐渐降低,且冲蚀率开始下降迅速,而后逐渐变缓.%The second double-track section in Xinjiang of Lanzhou-Xinjiang railway crosses five wind areas. In these areas, railway concrete structure are seriously eroded by grains of sand carried by strong winds, causing the durability of concrete construction to reduce. In this paper, the erosion wear test of concrete samples were carried out by gritblasting experiments, and the effect of impact parameters, such as erosion speed, angle and time, on the concrete erosion wear was investigated. The results show that under different erosion speed for concrete target material , erosion rates were highest at 90° impact, and lowest at 30° impact, which was consistent with traditional brittle material erosion laws. At different attack angles, the erosion rate increased with increasing of erosion speed. In the low angle erosion, speed index was consistent with the value predicted by traditional brittle material erosion model, however, in high angle erosion, speed index deviated from the theoretical prediction range. The erosion rate of concrete material decreased gradually with the extension of erosion time, and

  8. 阿拉善雅布赖风沙区荒漠植物群落结构和物种多样性研究%Community Structure and Species Diversity of Desert Plants in the Wind-sand Area of Yabulai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司建华; 冯起; 常宗强; 王耀斌; 田永祯; 谢宗才; 高立平

    2011-01-01

    根据阿拉善雅布赖风沙区30个样地的调查资料,对该区荒漠植物群落物种多样性进行分析.结果表明:雅布赖风沙区天然植被物种组成简单,以旱生、盐生或超旱生的小灌木和多年生草本植物占主导地位,体现出荒漠半荒漠和草原化荒漠植物群落的特点.群落优势层片为灌木层,其物种组成以矮化的半灌木和小灌木为主(占41%~90%),受环境变化的影响较小,结构比较稳定;草本层片组成中以多年生草本为主,但一年生草本的数量却占到81.5%~98.8%,为不稳定层片.雅布赖风沙区荒漠植物群落多样性数量特征值差异较大,在植被生态建设时应关注不同生活型植被的防护效应与当地大风和沙尘暴在发生时间上的匹配性,针对半灌木、小灌木和多年生草本覆盖特有的防风性能,重视灌木和多年生草本的恢复与建设,以取得抵抗风沙、稳定当地生态环境的效果.%Species diversity is an objective index that measures the abundant degree of biological resources in a certain region. This paper studied community characteristics and species diversity of Yabulai wind-sand area based on the investigation of 30 sampling plots. The results showed that the vegetative composition was simple and dominated by xeric,halophilic and hyper-xeric small shrubs and perennial herbage plants,which represented the characteristics of desert,half-desert and steppification? desert vegetative community. The predominant layer in the community was shrub, consisting of dwarf half shrubs and small ones,which the structure was more stable because of less effect of environmental variation. The herbage layer was mainly comprised of perennial herbage plants,but the quantity of annul herbage accounted for 81.5~98.8 percentage, belonging to the various layer. The diversity index and quantity of vegetative community in the wind-sand area of Yabulai had larger difference. Therefore,we should pay much attention to

  9. Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Oude Essink, Gualbert H. P.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2016-08-01

    The anticipation of sea-level rise and increases in extreme weather conditions has led to the initiation of an innovative coastal management project called the Sand Engine. In this pilot project a large volume of sand (21.5 million m3) - also called sand replenishment or nourishment - was placed on the Dutch coast. The intention is that the sand is redistributed by wind, current, and tide, reinforcing local coastal defence structures and leading to a unique, dynamic environment. In this study we investigated the potential effect of the long-term morphological evolution of the large sand replenishment and climate change on fresh groundwater resources. The potential effects on the local groundwater system were quantified with a calibrated three-dimensional (3-D) groundwater model, in which both variable-density groundwater flow and salt transport were simulated. Model simulations showed that the long-term morphological evolution of the Sand Engine results in a substantial growth of fresh groundwater resources, in all adopted climate change scenarios. Thus, the application of a local sand replenishment could provide coastal areas the opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of the local fresh groundwater availability.

  10. Investigations on Several Mechanical Problems in Windblown Sand Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiaojing

    2007-01-01

    It is very necessary for the investigation on mechanism of windblown sand movement to understand and find out effective measures of preventing and reducing danger of windblown sands, which also deals with some general characters and hot spots in the scientific forelands, such as multi-scale problems, interactions among multi-physical-fields, randomness and nonlinearity as well as complex systems. In recent years, a series of experiments in wind tunnels and theoretical modeling as well as computer simulation have been undertaken in the research group of environmental mechanics on windblown sand movement in Lanzhou University with the point of mechanical and geography intersecting view. Some original and essential progress has been achieved, which includes that the main regularities of charges on sand particles and the electric field in windblown sand flux and the effect of the electric field on the flux and the microwave propagation are revealed, and the evolution process of windblown sand flux under the mutual couple interactions among several physical fields are predicted as well as the main features of Aeolian sand ripples are simulated.

  11. Investigations on Several Mechanical Problems in Windblown Sand Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Zheng

    2006-01-01

    It is very necessary for investigation on mechanism of windblown sand movement to understand and find out effective measures of preventing and reducing windblown sand. This also deals with some general features and hot spots in the scientific forelands, such as multi-scale problems, interactions among multi-physical-fields, randomness and nonlinearity as well as complex systems. In recent years, a series of experiments in wind tunnels and theoretical modeling as well as computer simulation have been taken by our research group (the Laboratory of Environmental Mechanics on Windblown Sand Movement in Lanzhou University) in a cross-disciplinary (mechanics and geography) viewpoint. Several original and essential studies were explored such as the main regularities of charges on sand particles, the mechanisms of electric field in windblown sand flux, the effects induced by the electric field on the flux, the microwave propagations, the evolution process of windblown sand flux under mutual couple interactions among several physical fields, and the simulation of the main features of Aeolian sand ripples.

  12. 'Sharks Teeth' -- Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sometimes, pictures received from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are 'just plain pretty.' This image, taken in early September 2000, shows a group of sand dunes at the edge of a much larger field of dark-toned dunes in Proctor Crater. Located at 47.9oS, 330.4oW, in the 170 km (106 mile) diameter crater named for 19th Century British astronomer Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), the dunes shown here are created by winds blowing largely from the east/northeast. A plethora of smaller, brighter ripples covers the substrate between the dunes. Sunlight illuminates them from the upper left.

  13. Space Environmental Erosion of Polar Icy Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, William M.; Killen, R. M.; Vondrak, R. R.; Hurley, D. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Delory, G. T.; Halekas, J. S.; Zimmerman, M. I.

    2011-01-01

    While regions at the floors of permanently shadowed polar craters are isolated from direct sunlight, these regions are still exposed to the harsh space environment, including the interplanetary Lyman-a background, meteoric impacts, and obstacle-affected solar wind. We demonstrate that each of these processes can act to erode the polar icy regolith located at or near the surface along the crater floor. The Lyman-a background can remove/erode the icy-regolith via photon stimulated desorption [1], meteoric impacts can vaporize the regolith [2], and redirected solar wind ions can sputter the ice-regolith mix [3]. As an example we shall examine in detail the inflow of solar wind ions and electrons into polar craters, One might expect such ions to flow horizontally over the crater top (see Figure). However, we find that plasma ambipolar processes act to deflect passing ions into the craters [3]. We examine this plasma process and determine the ion flux as a function of position across a notional crater floor. We demonstrate that inflowing solar wind ions can indeed create sputtering along the crater floor, effectively eroding the surface. Erosion time scales rrom sputtering will be presented. We shall also consider the effect of impact vaporization on buried icy-regolith regions. There will also be a discussion of solar wind electrons that enter into the PSR, demonstrating that these also have the ability rree surface-bound atoms via electron stimulated desorption processes [l].

  14. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  15. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  16. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  17. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  18. Virksomhedens sande ansigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholt, Marianne Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Er modhistorier en byrde eller en styrke i forandringsprocesser? Hvad stiller vi op, når adgangen til organisationens sande identitet går gennem medarbejdernes modhistorier? Når vi sammenholder denne erkendelse med vores viden om, at medarbejdere helt naturligt afholder sig fra at videregive disse...

  19. Sand (CSW4)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  20. Sand supply to beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2017-04-01

    In most cases, beaches and dunes are built by sand that has been transported onshore from the shoreface. While this has been known for a long time, we are still not able to quantitatively predict onshore sediment transport and sand supply to beaches. Sediment transport processes operating during brief, high-energy stormy conditions - when beaches erode and sand moves offshore - are fairly well known and they can be modelled with a reasonable degree of confidence. However, the slower onshore sand transport leading to beach recovery under low-to-moderate energy conditions - and the reason why beaches and dunes exist in the first place - is not yet well understood. This severely limits our capability to understand and predict coastal behaviour on long time scales, for example in response to changing sea level or wave conditions. This paper will discuss issues and recent developments in sediment transport measurement and prediction on the lower and upper shoreface and into the swash zone. The focus will be on the integration and upscaling of small-scale deterministic process measurements into parametric models that may increase modelling capabilities of coastal behaviour on larger temporal and spatial scales.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of the effect of different city designs on the wind environment of a downwind natural heritage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BenLi LIU; JianJun QU; QingHe NIU; JunZhan WANG; KeCun ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Disturbance in wind regime and sand erosion deposition balance may lead to burial and eventual van-ishing of a site. This study conducted 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to evaluate the effect of a proposed city design on the wind environment of the Crescent Spring, a downwind natural heritage site located in Dunhuang, Northwestern China. Satellite terrain data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Re-flection Radiometer (ASTER) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) were used to construct the solid surface model. Steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) with shear stress transport (SST) k-ωturbulence model were then applied to solve the flow field problems. Land-use changes were modeled implicitly by dividing the underlying surface into different areas and by applying corresponding aerodynamic roughness lengths. Simulations were performed by using cases with different city areas and building heights. Results show that the selected model could capture the surface roughness changes and could adjust wind profile over a large area. Wind profiles varied over the greenfield to the north and over the Gobi land to the east of the spring. Therefore, different wind speed reduction effects were observed from various city construction scenarios. The current city design would lead to about 2 m/s of wind speed reduction at the downwind city edge and about 1 m/s of wind speed reduction at the north of the spring at 35-m height. Reducing the city height in the north greenfield area could efficiently eliminate the negative effects of wind spee. By contrast, restricting the city area worked better in the eastern Gobi area compared with other parts of the study area. Wind speed reduction in areas near the spring could be limited to 0.1 m/s by combining these two abatement strategies. The CFD method could be applied to simulate the wind environment affected by other land-use changes over a large terrain.

  2. Clinical studies of dental erosion and erosive wear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M; Chew, H.P; Ellwood, R.P

    2011-01-01

    We define erosion as a partial demineralisation of enamel or dentine by intrinsic or extrinsic acids and erosive tooth wear as the accelerated loss of dental hard tissue through the combined effect...

  3. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  4. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  5. SEDIMENTATION AND EROSION STUDIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chih Ted YANG

    2005-01-01

    @@ The river systems observed today is the cumulative result of surface, rill, and gully erosion, and sediment transport, scour, and deposition. The divisions of approach between these two related areas are man-made, and are not based on sound science. Most of the erosion studies are done by geologists and agricultural engineers who are concerned of the surface, rill, and gully erosion and the loss of agricultural land productivity. Hydraulic engineers are more interested in the study of sediment transport, scour, and deposition, and their impacts on river engineering and hydraulic structures in rivers and reservoirs. Erosion studies are often based on empirical relationships or field data to determinate the annual sediment yield from a watershed. On the other hand, hydraulic engineers focus their attention on solving equations based on assumed initial and boundary conditions with a time scale of days, hours, or seconds. Both approaches have their complementary strengths and weaknesses. It is important to provide a forum for specialists in both areas to communicate, exchange ideas, and learn from each other.

  6. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  7. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  8. Erosion by an Alpine glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Frédéric; Beyssac, Olivier; Brughelli, Mattia; Lane, Stuart N; Leprince, Sébastien; Adatte, Thierry; Lin, Jiao Y Y; Avouac, Jean-Philippe; Cox, Simon C

    2015-10-09

    Assessing the impact of glaciation on Earth's surface requires understanding glacial erosion processes. Developing erosion theories is challenging because of the complex nature of the erosion processes and the difficulty of examining the ice/bedrock interface of contemporary glaciers. We demonstrate that the glacial erosion rate is proportional to the ice-sliding velocity squared, by quantifying spatial variations in ice-sliding velocity and the erosion rate of a fast-flowing Alpine glacier. The nonlinear behavior implies a high erosion sensitivity to small variations in topographic slope and precipitation. A nonlinear rate law suggests that abrasion may dominate over other erosion processes in fast-flowing glaciers. It may also explain the wide range of observed glacial erosion rates and, in part, the impact of glaciation on mountainous landscapes during the past few million years. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Severe Environmental Corrosion Erosion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany, OR, allows researchers to safely examine the performance of materials in highly corrosive or erosive...

  10. Replacement of Natural Sand with Efficient Alternatives: Recent Advances in Concrete Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzar Hamid Mir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the most undisputable material being used in infrastructure development throughout the world. It is a globally accepted construction material in all types of Civil Engineering structures. Natural sand is a prime material used for the preparation of concrete and also plays an important role in Mix Design. Now a day‟s river erosion and other environmental issues have led to the scarcity of river sand. The reduction in the sources of natural sand and the requirement for reduction in the cost of concrete production has resulted in the increased need to find new alternative materials to replace river sand so that excess river erosion is prevented and high strength concrete is obtained at lower cost. Partial or full replacement of natural sand by the other alternative materials like quarry dust, foundry sand and others are being researched from past two decades, in view of conserving the ecological balance. This paper summarizes conclusions of experiments conducted for the properties like strength, durability etc. It was observed the results have shown positive changes and improvement in mechanical properties of the conventional concrete due to the addition or replacement of fine sand with efficient alternatives.

  11. Soil erosion in Iran: Issues and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed; Cerdà, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Journal of Geosciences, 7(5), 1941-1950. Khaledi Darvishan, A., Sadeghi, S. H., Homaee, M., Arabkhedri, M. 2013. Measuring sheet erosion using synthetic color-contrast aggregates. Hydrological Processes. Mahmoodabadi, M. Cerdà, A. 2013. WEPP calibration for improved predictions on interril erosion in semi-arid to arid enviorments. Geoderma, 204-205,75-83. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.geoderma.2013.04.013, Mehdizade, B., Asadi, H., Shabanpour, M., Ghadiri, H. 2013. Impact of erosion and tillage on the productivity and quality of selected semiarid soils of Iran. International Agrophysics, 27(3), 291-297. Moghadam, B. K., Jabarifar, M., Bagheri, M., Shahbazi, E. 2015. Effects of land use change on soil splash erosion in the semi-arid region of Iran. Geoderma, 241, 210-220. Nosrati, K., Ahmadi, F. 2013. Monitoring of soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks in different land use under surface water erosion in a semi-arid drainage basin of Iran. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management, 17(2), 225-230. Nourzadeh, M., Bahrami, H. A., Goossens, D., Fryrear, D. W. 2013. Determining soil erosion and threshold friction velocity at different soil moisture conditions using a portable wind tunnel. Zeitschrift für Geomorphologie, 57(1), 97-109. Sadeghi, S. H. R., Seghaleh, M. B., Rangavar, A. S. 2013. Plot sizes dependency of runoff and sediment yield estimates from a small watershed. Catena, 102, 55-61. Sadeghi, S. H. R., Seghaleh, M. B., Rangavar, A. S. 2013. Plot sizes dependency of runoff and sediment yield estimates from a small watershed. Catena, 102, 55-61. Sadeghi, S. H., Najafi, S., Riyahi Bakhtiari, A., Abdi, P. 2014. Ascribing soil erosion types for sediment yield using composite fingerprinting technique. Hydrological Sciences Journal, 59(9), 1753-1762. Taghizadeh-Mehrjardi, R., Minasny, B., Sarmadian, F., Malone, B. P. 2014. Digital mapping of soil salinity in Ardakan region, central Iran. Geoderma, 213, 15-28.

  12. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report.

  13. The sedimentary structure of linear sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow; Bailey; Lancaster

    2000-07-06

    Linear sand dunes--dunes that extend parallel to each other rather than in star-like or crescentic forms--are the most abundant type of desert sand dune. But because their development and their internal structure are poorly understood, they are rarely recognized in the rock record. Models of linear dune development have not been able to take into account the sub-surface structure of existing dunes, but have relied instead either on the extrapolation of short-term measurements of winds and sediment transport or on observations of near-surface internal sedimentary structures. From such studies, it has not been clear if linear dunes can migrate laterally. Here we present images produced by ground penetrating radar showing the three-dimensional sedimentary structure of a linear dune in the Namib sand sea, where some of the world's largest linear dunes are situated. These profiles show clear evidence for lateral migration in a linear dune. Moreover, the migration of a sinuous crest-line along the dune produces divergent sets of cross-stratification, which can become stacked as the dune height increases, and large linear dunes can support superimposed dunes that produce stacked sets of trough cross-stratification. These clear structural signatures of linear dunes should facilitate their recognition in geological records.

  14. Clear cutting (10-13th century) and deep stable economy (18-19th century) as responsible interventions for sand drifting and plaggic deposition in cultural landscapes on aeolian sands (SE-Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Jan; Vera, Hein; Wallinga, Jakob

    2013-04-01

    The landscape in extensive areas in SE-Netherlands is underlain by coversand, deposited during the Late Glacial of the Weichselian. In the Preboreal, aeolian processes reduced soil formation. From the Preboreal to the Atlantic a deciduous climax forest developed. The geomorphology was a coversand landscape, composed of ridges (umbric podzols), coversand plains (gleyic podzols), coversand depressions (histic podzols) and small valleys (gleysols). The area was used by hunting people during the Late Paleolithic and Mesolithic. During the Bronze and Iron Ages the area was populated by people, living from forest grazing, shifting cultivation and trade. The natural deciduous forest gradually degraded into Calluna heath. The deforestation accelerated the soil acidification and affected the hydrology, which is reflected in drying out of ridges and wetting of depressions, promoting the development of histic podzols and even histosols. Aeolian erosion was during this period restricted to local, small scale sand drifting, related to natural hazards as forest fires and hurricanes and shifting cultivation. Sustainable crop productivity on chemically poor sandy substrates required application of organic fertilizers, composed of a mixture of organic litter and animal manure with a very low mineral compound, produced in shallow stables. At least since 1000 AD, heath management was regulated by a series of rules that aimed to protect the valuable heat lands against degradation. During the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries there was an increasing demand for wood and clear cutting transformed the majority of the forests in driftsand landscapes. The most important market was formed by the very wealthy Flemish cities. The exposed soil surface was subjected to wind erosion and sand drifting which endangered the Calluna heath, arable land and even farmhouses. As a consequence, umbric podzols, the natural climax soil under deciduous forests on coversand, degraded into larger scale driftsand

  15. PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

  16. Physical Characterizations of Sands and Their Influence in Fall Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancun beach is one of the most important tourist resorts on the Mexican coast, and is of prime importance to the local and national economies. As a result of the intense use of the beach and the unavailability of sand reserves, the extreme weather events that occur in the region (hurricanes have permanently damaged the beach. Over the last two decades several strong hurricanes severely weakened the system, but hurricane Wilma, October 2005, caused devastating erosion to the beach. After Wilma, an emergency nourishment project was implemented pumping a volume of 2.7 million m3 of sand onto the beach. Clearly, the sand used for the nourishment has a different shape factor, diameter distribution and density property compared to the native sand. The main goal of this paper is to characterize and compare the fall velocities of sand samples taken in and around Cancun. The settling velocities obtained for several samples were compared with the empirical formulations proposed by various authors. The influence of several parameters measured in the laboratory is discussed and a new formulation is presented.

  17. Erosive Wear and Wear Mechanism of in situ TiCp/Fe Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaojing LIU; Zhiliang NING; Fengzhen LI; Xiurong YAO; Shanzhi REN

    2005-01-01

    The base structure of in situ TiCP/Fe composites fabricated under industrial condition was changed by different heat treatments. Erosive wear tests were carried out and the results were compared with that of wear-resistant white cast iron. The results suggest that the wear resistance of the in situ TiCp/Fe composite is higher than that of wear-resistant white cast iron under the sand erosive wear condition. The wear mechanism of the wear-resistant white cast iron was a cycle process that base surface was worn and carbides were exposed, then carbides was broken and wear pits appeared. While the wear mechanism of in situ TiCp/Fe composite was a cycle process that base surface was worn and TiC grains were exposed and dropped. The wear resistance of in situ TiCp/Fe composite was lower than that of wear-resistant white cast iron under the slurry erosive wear condition. Under such circumstance,the material was not only undergone erosive wear but also electrochemistry erosion due to the contact with water in the medium. The wear behaviours can be a combination of two kinds of wear and the sand erosive wear is worse than slurry erosive wear.

  18. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  19. Characteristic and paleoenvironmental evolution of subaerial tidal sand body in Subei coastal plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李从先; 张家强; 杨守业; 范代读

    1999-01-01

    The subaerial tidal sand area in the northern Jiangsu Province (Subei), stretching from Dongtai towards east with a fan shape, is an early developing stage of radial sand ridges distributed in the South Yellow Sea. Since 5 000—6 000 a BP, after the Holoeene transgression maximum in the northern Jiangsu Province, subaqueous tidal sand bodies were exposed and changed into land gradually. The environmental magnetism analysis shows that subaerial tidal sand strata are formed by the convergent-divergent palco-tidal current field. The sediment source of tidal sand strata came early from the Changjiang River and late from the Yellow River. Sea floor erosion by tidal currents also served as an important sand source. Drilling cores and ground-penetrating profile show that there exists no probability of sand supplying directly by a large river through the apical area of tidal sand ridges either on land or in the sea. Fluvial deposits supplied the tidal sand bodies by alongshore transportation, which corresponds

  20. An Extreme Event as a Game Changer in Coastal Erosion Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Drønen, Nils K.; Knudsen, Per;

    2016-01-01

    of cyclone Xaver in December 2013 with severe coastal erosion led to collaboration between the involved municipalities to work on a coherent solution for the entire coastline that involves sand nourishments, renovation and optimization of hard protection structures, and the restoration of recreational values......The construction of hard protection measures along the northeast coast of Sealand, Denmark, has gradually led to profile steepening, loss of beaches, and increased storm erosion. Although the problem has been addressed for decades no common solutions have been implemented yet. However, the impact....... We present a concept of 'erosion pressure' as a simple method to estimate potential chronic (longshore) and acute (cross-shore) erosion on protected coasts. The erosion pressure estimates are reliable at the investigated coast and the concept has proved useful for dissemination to stakeholders about...

  1. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  2. Present status of effect of microorganisms from sand beach on public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Velonakis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms are significant components of beach sand. According to the research, all kind of microorganisms have been isolated from beach sand; certain genera and species are potential pathogens for humans and animals. In resort areas, especially during the summer, certain infections (e.g. gastroenteritis and dermatitis are usually related to polluted bathing water. Lately, the interest of scientists is also focused on the potential association of some of the above diseases with the beach sand. Relatively, recent epidemiological studies in the USA revealed positive correlation between time spent at the beach and gastroenteritis. New parameters such as wind blowing and beach users’ density are also introduced for discussion in association with the sand microbial load. Regarding the preventative measures, the microbiological quality of beach sand can be improved by raising the general level of hygiene, as well as by using simple methods, such as sweeping and aeration of the sand, together with constant beach supervision.

  3. Present status of effect of microorganisms from sand beach on public health

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emmanuel Velonakis; Dimitra Dimitriadi; Emmanuel Papadogiannakis; Alkiviades Vatopoulos

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are significant components of beach sand. According to the research, all kind of microorganisms have been isolated from beach sand; certain genera and species are potential pathogens for humans and animals. In resort areas, especially during the summer, certain infections (e.g. gastroenteritis and dermatitis) are usually related to polluted bathing water. Lately, the interest of scientists is also focused on the potential association of some of the above diseases with the beach sand. Relatively, recent epidemiological studies in the USA revealed positive correlation between time spent at the beach and gastroenteritis. New parameters such as wind blowing and beach users’ density are also introduced for discussion in association with the sand microbial load. Regarding the preventative measures, the microbiological quality of beach sand can be improved by raising the general level of hygiene, as well as by using simple methods, such as sweeping and aeration of the sand, together with constant beach supervision.

  4. Effect of compost on erodibility of loamy sand under simulated rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.M.; Vermang, J.

    2011-01-01

    Three types of composts [vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost (VFYW), garden waste compost (GW), and spent mushroom compost (SM)] were applied at a rate of 30 m3 ha−1 for 10 years to loamy sand, to determine its effect on the aggregate stability and susceptibility to water erosion. Aggregate...

  5. Sand spit and shoreline dynamics near Terekhol river mouth, Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasekaran, C.; Jayakumar, S.; Gowthaman, R.; Jishad, M.; Yadhunath, E.M.; Pednekar, P.S.

    between the sediment discharge from the river and the littoral transport Around 2km stretch of shoreline is under severe erosion in which a stretch of 500m of sea wall is completely damaged Sand spit present in the northern part of the shoreline plays a...

  6. Effects of Different Tillage on Soil Moisture and Temperature on Sloping Farmland in the Wind-water Erosion Crisscross Region%水蚀风蚀交错区坡耕地不同耕作措施水温效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘强; 冯永忠; 杨世琦; 廖允成; 杨改河

    2011-01-01

    Studying the effects of different tillage on soil moisture and temperature in sloping farmland will provide some effective tillage measures and the credible background for reasonable tillage usage in the wind-water erosion crisscross region. The methods of positioning monitoring and Statistics were served to study the effects of conventional tillage and five conservation tillage on soil moisture and temperature in sloping farmland of the wind-water erosion crisscross region. The result shows that, straw mulching(SM), no-tillage (NT) and plastic film mulching (PM) can significantly increased soil moisture in the surface layer, and soil moisture of the deeper layer is lower in NT and higher in SM. All of the conservation tillage can keep the suitable soil temperature at the stages of extremes. Based on soil moisture and temperature, all of the conservation tillage showed positive effects, and SM is better than the other tillage.%通过对坡耕地保护性耕作水温效应的研究,为水蚀风蚀交错区提供多种有效的耕作措施,并为当地农田采用合理的耕作措施提供依据.运用定位监测和数理统计的方法,研究黄土高原水蚀风蚀交错带坡耕地传统耕作与免耕、秸秆覆盖、地膜覆盖、起垄地膜覆盖、套种5种保护性耕作措施陡坡地的水温效应.结果表明,秸秆覆盖、免耕、地膜覆盖都能够显著提高表层水分含量,而深层免耕水分含量较低,秸秆覆盖水分含量较高;各保护性耕作都有在气温低时保温和在高温时降温的作用.各保护性耕作对水温有正效应,其中秸秆覆盖更优于其他保护性耕作.

  7. Sand Fences in the Coastal Zone: Intended and Unintended Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafals-Soto, Rosana; Nordstrom, Karl

    2009-09-01

    Sand-trapping fences modify the character of the coastal landscape and change its spatial structure, image, and meaning. This paper examines the relationship between these changes and fence usage at the municipal level, where most decisions about fence deployment are made. Use of fences in 29 municipalities on the developed coast of New Jersey is examined over a 6-year period. Interviews with municipal officers indicate that wooden slat sand-trapping fences are used primarily to build dunes to provide protection against wave uprush and flooding, but they are also used to control pedestrian traffic and demarcate territory. These uses result in changes in landforms and habitats. An aerial video inventory of fences taken in 2002 indicates that 82% of the shoreline had fences and 72% had dunes. Single and double straight fence rows are the most commonly used. Fences are often built to accomplish a specific primary purpose, but they can cause many different and often unanticipated changes to the landscape. The effects of a sand fence change through time as the initial structure traps sand, creates a dune that is colonized by vegetation, and becomes integrated into the environment by increasing topographic variability and aesthetic and habitat value. Sand fences can be made more compatible with natural processes by not placing them in locations where sources of wind blown sand are restricted or in unnatural shore perpendicular orientations. Symbolic fences are less expensive, are easy to replace when damaged, are less visually intrusive, and can be used for controlling pedestrian access.

  8. An Extreme Event as a Game Changer in Coastal Erosion Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Drønen, Nils K.; Knudsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    of cyclone Xaver in December 2013 with severe coastal erosion led to collaboration between the involved municipalities to work on a coherent solution for the entire coastline that involves sand nourishments, renovation and optimization of hard protection structures, and the restoration of recreational values...

  9. Complexity confers stability: Climate variability, vegetation response and sand transport on longitudinal sand dunes in Australia's deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Paul P.; Telfer, Matt W.; Farebrother, Will

    2017-04-01

    The relationship between antecedent precipitation, vegetation cover and sand movement on sand dunes in the Simpson and Strzelecki Deserts was investigated by repeated (up to four) surveys of dune crest plots (≈25 × 25 m) over a drought cycle (2002-2012) in both winter (low wind) and spring (high wind). Vegetation varied dramatically between surveys on vegetated and active dune crests. Indices of sand movement had significant correlations with vegetation cover: the depth of loose sand has a strong inverse relationship with crust (cyanobacterial and/or physical) while the area covered by ripples has a strong inverse relationship with the areal cover of vascular plants. However, the relationship between antecedent rainfall and vegetation cover was found to be complex. We tentatively identify two thresholds; (1) >10 mm of rainfall in the preceding 90 days leads to rapid and near total cover of crust and/or small plants 400 mm of rainfall in the preceding three years leads to higher cover of persistent and longer-lived plants >50 cm tall. These thresholds were used to predict days of low vegetation cover on dune crests. The combination of seasonality of predicted bare-crest days, potential sand drift and resultant sand drift direction explains observed patterns of sand drift on these dunes. The complex vegetation and highly variable rainfall regime confer meta-stability on the dunes through the range of responses to different intervals of antecedent rainfall and non-linear growth responses. This suggests that the geomorphic response of dunes to climate variation is complex and non-linear.

  10. Mulitple Origins of Sand Dune-Topography Interactions on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, H.; Ewing, R. C.; Hayes, A.; Cisneros, J.; Epps, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between sand dune patterns and topographic obstacles is a primary signal of sand transport direction in the equatorial region of Saturn's moon, Titan. The streamlined, tear drop appearance of the sand-dune patterns as they wrap around obstacles and a dune-free zone on the east side of many obstacles gives the impression that sand transport is from the west to east at equatorial latitudes. However, the physical mechanism behind the dune-obstacle interaction is not well explained, leaving a gap in our understanding of the equatorial sand transport and implied wind directions and magnitudes on Titan. In order to better understand this interaction and evaluate wind and sand transport direction, we use morphometric analysis of optical images on Earth and Cassini SAR images on Titan combined with analog wind tunnel experiments to study dune-topography interactions. Image analysis is performed in a GIS environment to map spatial variations in dune crestline orientations proximal to obstacles. We also use digital elevation models to and analyze the three-dimensional geometry - height, length, width and slope of the dune-topography relationships on Earth. Preliminary results show that dune patterns are deflected similarly around positive, neutral, or negative topography, where positive topography is greater than the surrounding dune height, neutral topography is at dune height and negative topography is lower than dune heights. In the latter case these are typically intra-dune field playas. The obstacle height, width, slope and wind variability appear to play a primary role in determining if a lee-dune, rather than a dune-free lee-zone, develops. In many cases a dune-free playa with evaporite and mud desiccation polygons forms lee-ward of the obstacle. To support and elaborate on the mapping and spatial characterization of dune-topography interactions, a series of experiments using a wind tunnel were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments examine the formation

  11. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Many offshore str