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Sample records for sand waves ripples

  1. Dynamical models for sand ripples beneath surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Chabanol, M.-L.; v. Hecke, M.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce order parameter models for describing the dynamics of sand ripple patterns under oscillatory flow. A crucial ingredient of these models is the mass transport between adjacent ripples, which we obtain from detailed numerical simulations for a range of ripple sizes. Using this mass...... transport function, our models predict the existence of a stable band of wave numbers limited by secondary instabilities. Small ripples coarsen in our models and this process leads to a sharply selected final wave number, in agreement with experimental observations....

  2. Sand ripples under sea waves. Part 4. Tile ripple formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Pieter C.; Blondeaux, P.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the formation of small-scale three-dimensional bedforms due to interactions of an erodible bed with a sea wave that obliquely approaches the coast, being partially reflected at the beach. In this case the trajectories of fluid particles at the top of the bottom boundary layer are

  3. Wave-induced ripple development in mixed clay-sand substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuxu; Parsons, Daniel; Baas, Jaco H.; Mouazé, Dominique; McLelland, Stuart; Amoudry, Laurent; Eggenhuisen, Jorris; Cartigny, Matthieu; Ruessink, Gerben

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on a series of experiments that aim to provide a fuller understanding of ripple development within clay-sand mixture substrates under oscillatory flow conditions. The work was conducted in the Total Environment Simulator at the University of Hull and constituted 6 separate runs, in which 5 runs were conducted under identical sets of regular waves (an additional run was conducted under irregular waves, but is not discussed in present paper). The bed content was systematically varied in its composition ranging from a pure sand bed through to a bed comprising 7.4% clay. A series of state-of-the-art measurements were employed to quantify interactions of near-bed hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and turbulence over rippled beds formed by wave action, during and after, each run. The experimental results demonstrate the significant influence of the amount of cohesive clay materials in the substrate on ripple evolution under waves. Most importantly, addition of clay in the bed dramatically slowed down the rate of ripple development and evolution. The equilibrium time of each run increased exponentially from 30 minutes under the control conditions of a pure sand bed, rising to ~350 minutes for the bed with the highest fraction of clay. The paper discusses the slower ripple growth rates with higher cohesive fractions, via an influence on critical shear, but highlights that the end equilibrium size of ripples is found to be independent of increasing substrate clay fraction. The suspended particles mass (SPM) concentration indicates that clay particles were suspended and winnowed by wave action. Additionally, laser granulometry of the final substrates verified that ripple crests were composed of pure sand layers that were absent at ripple troughs, reflecting a relatively higher winnowing efficiency at wave ripples crest. The winnowing process and its efficiency is inexorably linked to wave ripple development and evolution. The implications of the results

  4. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  5. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  6. Pattern formation - Instabilities in sand ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. L.; v. Hecke, M.; Haaning, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sand ripples are seen below shallow wavy water and are formed whenever water oscillates over a bed of sand. Here we analyse the instabilities that can upset this perfect patterning when the ripples are subjected to large changes in driving amplitude or frequency, causing them to deform both...

  7. Mars Rover Curiosity Traverses of Sand Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, N.; Arvidson, R. E.; Zhou, F.; Heverly, M.; Maimone, M.; Hartman, F.; Bellutta, P.; Iagnemma, K.; Senatore, C.

    2014-12-01

    Martian sand ripples present a challenge for rover mobility, with drives over ripples often characterized by high wheel sinkage and slippage that can lead to incipient embedding. Since landing in Gale Crater, Curiosity has traversed multiple sand ripples, including the transverse aeolian ridge (TAR) straddling Dingo Gap on sols 533 and 535. On sol 672, Curiosity crossed backward over a series of sand ripples before ending its drive after high motor currents initiated visual odometry (VO) processing, which detected 77% slip, well in excess of the imposed 60% slip limit. At the end of the drive, the right front wheel was deeply embedded at the base of a ripple flank with >20 cm sinkage and the rear wheels were near a ripple crest. As Curiosity continues its approach to Mount Sharp it will have to cross multiple ripples, and thus it is important to understand Curiosity's performance on sol 672 and over similar ripples. To this end the sol 672 drive was simulated in ARTEMIS (Adams-Based Rover Terramechanics Interaction Simulator), a software tool consisting of realistic rover mechanical models, a wheel-terrain interaction module for deformable and non-deformable surfaces, and realistic terrain models. ARTEMIS results, Dumont Dunes tests performed in the Mojave Desert using the Scarecrow test rover, and single wheel tests performed at MIT indicate that the high slip encountered on sol 672 likely occurred due to a combination of rover attack angle, ripple geometry, and soil properties. When ripple wavelength approaches vehicle length, the rover can reach orientations in which the leading wheels carry minimal normal loads and the trailing wheels sink deeply, resulting in high slippage and insufficient thrust to propel the rover over ripples. Even on relatively benign (i.e. low tilt) terrains, local morphology can impose high sinkage, thus impeding rover motion. Work is underway to quantify Curiosity's drive performance over various ripple geometries to retrieve soil

  8. Regeneration of dredged sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Knaapen, Michiel; Scholl, Olaf; Scholl, O.; Trenteseaux., A.; Garlan, T.

    2000-01-01

    Sand waves form a wavy pattern in the offshore sandy seabed. Since their crests reduce the navigability, it is important to know their evolution. A simple model is presented to estimate the recovery of sand wave amplitudes. This model is partially based on the similarity with sea ripples and

  9. Sand Ripple Dynamics on the Inner Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sand Ripple Dynamics on the Inner Shelf Donald N. Slinn Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611...Florida,Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering,Gainesville,FL,32611-6590 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...2002. 452: p. 1-24. Acrivos, A., Shear-Induced Particle Diffusion in Concentrated Suspensions of Noncolloidal Particles. Journal of Rheology , 1995

  10. A particle model of rolling grain ripples under waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste

    2001-01-01

    A simple model for the formation of rolling grain ripples on a flat sand bed by the oscillatory flow generated by a surface wave is presented. An equation of motion is derived for the individual ripples, seen as "particles," on the otherwise flat bed. The model accounts for the initial appearance...... of the ripples, the subsequent coarsening of the ripples, and the final equilibrium state. The model is related to the physical parameters of the problem, and an analytical approximation for the equilibrium spacing of the ripples is developed. It is found that the spacing between the ripples scales...... with the square-root of the nondimensional shear stress (the Shields parameter) on a flat bed. The results of the model are compared with measurements, and reasonable agreement between the model and the measurements is demonstrated. ©2001 American Institute of Physics....

  11. Cross Ripples and Wave Directional Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheel, R. A.; Hay, A. E.

    2006-12-01

    Cross ripples are a 3-dimensional bed state composed of two sets of ripples with different orientations: one set of smaller wavelength (4-10 cm) ripples residing within the troughs of a larger wavelength (30-50 cm) set. Cross ripples occur at intermediate wave energies. In contrast, at slightly higher energies the bed undergoes a transition to a highly 2-dimensional linear transition rippled state. In this study, the characteristics of the wave directional spectra during the occurrences of these 2- and 3-dimensional bed states are compared. The rotary fanbeam sonar record from SandyDuck97 shows that cross ripples and linear transition ripples occurred in approximately 11% and 42% of the sonar images respectively. Wave directional spectra are calculated with the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method from collocated measurements of pressure and horizontal velocity. Using the sonar record and wave directional spectra the correlation between bimodal wave directional spectra and the occurrence of the two distinct ripple types is examined and compared. Since ripple crest alignment is typically orthogonal to the direction of wave propagation, one possible creation mechanism for cross ripples is a bidirectional wave field. We find that bimodality of the wave spectrum, neither in direction nor in frequency, is unique to the occurrence of cross ripples.

  12. Amplitude equation for under water sand-ripples in one dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand-ripples under oscillatory water flow form periodic patterns with wave lengths primarily controlled by the amplitude d of the water motion. We present an amplitude equation for sand-ripples in one spatial dimension which captures the formation of the ripples as well as secondary bifurcations...... observed when the amplitude $d$ is suddenly varied. The equation has the form h_t=- ε(h-mean(h))+((h_x)^2-1)h_(xx)- h_(xxxx)+ δ((h_x)^2)_(xx) which, due to the first term, is neither completely local (it has long-range coupling through the average height mean(h)) nor has local sand conservation. We argue...

  13. Modelling and measurement of sand transport processes over full-scale ripples in oscillatory flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, van der Jebbe J.; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom; Doucette, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    A new series of laboratory experiments was performed in the Aberdeen Oscillatory Flow Tunnel (AOFT) and the Large Oscillating Water Tunnel (LOWT) to investigate time-averaged suspended sand concentrations and transport rates over rippled beds in regular and irregular oscillatory flow. The wave-induc

  14. Wavelength selection and symmetry breaking in orbital wave ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuis, Jaap H.; Perron, J. Taylor; Kao, Justin C. T.; Myrow, Paul M.

    2014-10-01

    Sand ripples formed by waves have a uniform wavelength while at equilibrium and develop defects while adjusting to changes in the flow. These patterns arise from the interaction of the flow with the bed topography, but the specific mechanisms have not been fully explained. We use numerical flow models and laboratory wave tank experiments to explore the origins of these patterns. The wavelength of "orbital" wave ripples (λ) is directly proportional to the oscillating flow's orbital diameter (d), with many experimental and field studies finding λ/d ≈ 0.65. We demonstrate a coupling that selects this ratio: the maximum length of the flow separation zone downstream of a ripple crest equals λ when λ/d ≈ 0.65. We show that this condition maximizes the growth rate of ripples. Ripples adjusting to changed flow conditions develop defects that break the bed's symmetry. When d is shortened sufficiently, two new incipient crests appear in every trough, but only one grows into a full-sized crest. Experiments have shown that the same side (right or left) wins in every trough. We find that this occurs because incipient secondary crests slow the flow and encourage the growth of crests on the next flank. Experiments have also shown that when d is lengthened, ripple crests become increasingly sinuous and eventually break up. We find that this occurs because crests migrate preferentially toward the nearest adjacent crest, amplifying any initial sinuosity. Our results reveal the mechanisms that form common wave ripple patterns and highlight interactions among unsteady flows, sediment transport, and bed topography.

  15. Formation of sand ripples under a turbulent liquid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Erick de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Sand ripples are commonly observed in both nature and industry. For example, they are found on riverbeds and in oil pipelines that transport sand. In both natural and industrial cases, ripples increase friction between the bed and fluid and are related to flooding, high pressure drops, and transients. Ripples appear when sediments are entrained as bed load (a mobile granular layer) and are usually considered to be the result of initial bedforms that eventually saturate. Given the small aspect ratio of the initial bedforms, linear analyses can be used to understand the formation of ripples. This paper presents a linear stability analysis of a granular bed under a turbulent flow of a liquid. This analysis takes into consideration all the main mechanisms and parameters involved in the turbulent liquid case, including some important parameters that have not yet been considered together such as the bed compactness and the bed-load threshold shear stress. The results of this analysis are compared with published exp...

  16. Formational Mechanisms and Morphology of Windblown Coarse-Grained Sand Ripples at White Sands, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glade, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Pelletier, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse-grained ripples, also known as "megaripples," are large sand ripples found in both aeolian and aquatic environments on Earth, and are common on Mars. The formation and morphology of coarse-grained ripples are not as well understood as more common splash ripples. Current understanding suggests that formative wind speeds are above the saltation threshold for the fine grains, but below this threshold for coarse grains found on the crests, such that they creep. Based on this idea, we hypothesize that wind speeds above this coarse-grain saltation threshold will destroy the ripples. We further hypothesize that these ripples do not have an equilibrium size; rather, their size is related to the persistence of formative winds in a given direction. To test this model, we studied windblown coarse-grained ripples in White Sands, New Mexico. Terrestrial LiDAR was used to obtain high resolution ripple morphology and migration over a three month period. Wind velocity profiles and concurrent saltating grain size data were collected during a wind storm to directly relate modes of transport to particle size and wind stress. These local data were used to calibrate wind records from a nearby meteorological station to estimate local fluid stress using a long-term record. LiDAR data indicate that these ripples were destroyed and reoriented between March and June 2013, while the wind record shows that the coarse-grain saltation threshold was indeed exceeded during this time. Morphological analysis indicates that the lee slope of these ripples is set by saltation impact - similar to splash ripples - but that height, wavelength and stoss slope are not related to instantaneous transport conditions. The historical wind record also shows that the range of wind directions decreases rapidly with increasing speed, restricting strong winds to a narrow range of direction. From these results we explore the idea that coarse-grained ripples are typically larger and less frequently destroyed

  17. Laboratory Experiments of Sand Ripples with Bimodal Size Distributions Under Asymmetric Oscillatory Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calantoni, J.; Landry, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of sand ripples are vital to understanding numerous coastal processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, boundary layer development, and seafloor acoustic properties. Though significant laboratory research has been conducted to elucidate oscillatory flow morphodynamics under various constant and transient forcing conditions, the majority of the previous experiments were conducted only for beds with unimodal size distributions of sediment. Recent oscillatory flow experiments as well as past laboratory observations in uniform flows suggest that the presence of heterogeneous size sand compositions may significantly impact ripple morphology, resulting in a variety of observable effects (e.g., sediment sorting, bed armoring, and altered transport rates). Experimental work was conducted in a small oscillatory flow tunnel at the Sediment Dynamics Laboratory at the Naval Research Laboratory, Stennis Space Center. Three different monochromatic oscillatory forcings having velocity asymmetry were used to study sand ripple dynamics over five bimodal and two unimodal sediment beds. The seven different mixtures were composed using two unimodal sands of different colors (blue/white) and median grain diameters (d=0.31 mm / d=0.65 mm) combined into various mixtures by mass (i.e., 0/100; 10/90; 25/75; 50/50; 75/25; 90/10; and 100/0 which denotes mass percentage of blue/white sand, respectively, within each mixture). High-definition video of the sediment bed profile was acquired in conjunction with sediment trap measurements to resolve differences in ripple geometries, migration and evolution rates due to the different sediment mixtures and flow conditions. Observational findings clearly illustrate sediment stratification within ripple crests and the depth of the active mixing layer in addition to supporting sediment sorting in previous research on symmetric oscillatory flows in which the larger grains collect on top of ripple crests and smaller grains in the

  18. Wave-formed sediment ripples: Transient analysis of ripple spectral development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joseph P.; Walker, David J.; Townsend, Murray; Young, Ian R.

    2004-07-01

    A new method has been developed that models the changes a wave-formed rippled sediment bed undergoes as it is actively evolving between two given equilibrium states due to a change in surface wave conditions. The transient analysis of rippled beds has received very little attention within the literature. Dynamic changes within ripple parameters have implications for the estimation of flow dissipation and sediment transport by changing the bottom roughness height. The method uses the spectral density function of the rippled bed and is based on a series of ripple growth and ripple transition experimental tests. The ripple evolution model was developed from the well-known Logistic Growth Law. Fitting the general solution of the logistic nonlinear differential equation to the experimental data enabled the evolution rate of the bed to be determined for each experimental test. It was concluded that there was no difference between the evolution rate determined from the ripple growth tests and the ripple transition tests. This indicated that the two types of growth are special cases of the same evolution processes, which is adequately modeled by the logistic growth equation. A functional dependence was established between the ripple evolution rate and the Shields parameter. This allows the evolution rate to be estimated from flow and sediment properties. The estimation of the rate at which rippled sediment beds evolve under a variable sea state has the potential to lead to significant improvements to the way ripple transition and hence bottom roughness is approximated in coastal wave models.

  19. A Wave Modulation Model of Ripples over Long Surface Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Peixiu; ZHENG Guizhen

    2011-01-01

    A study is presented on the modulation of ripples induced by a long surface wave (LW) and a new theoretical modulation model is proposed. In this model, the wind surface stress modulation is related to the modulation of tipple spectrum. The model results show that in the case of LW propagating in the wind direction with the wave age parameter of LW increasing, the area with enhanced shear stress shifts from the region near the LW crest on the upwind slope to the LW trough. With a smaller wave age parameter of LW, the tipple modulation has the maximum on the upwind slope in the vicinity of LW crest, while with a larger parameter the enhancement of ripple spectrum does not occur in that region. At low winds the amplitude of ripple modulation transfer function (MTF) is larger in the gravity wave range, while at moderate or high winds it changes little in the range from short gravity waves to capillary waves.

  20. THE LOSS OF STABILITY OF LAMINAR FLOW IN OPEN CHANNEL AND THE MECHANISM OF SAND RIPPLE FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白玉川; 罗纪生

    2002-01-01

    In the flow on a mobile bed in an open channel, sand ripple often appears after the sediment begins to move. Different scholars have different views on the formation of sand ripples. This paper holds that as the ripple in general is very small, its formation is due to the instability of the laminar flow or the evolution of the small-scale coherent structures in the sublayer adjacent to the wall of the open channel. When the shear stresses caused by the disturbing waves or the coherent structure near the bed surface boundary and the water flow itself are greater than the shields stresses, responses on the bed surface appear and the sand ripple forms. If the frequency of the shear stress caused by the disturbance is close to the natural frequency of the sand grains that produced resonance,such a phenomenon is called the "detection property" of the sediment. It is at this point that the maximum resonance appears and the sand ripple develops rapidly.

  1. The dimensions of sand ripples in full-scale oscillatory flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donoghue, T.; Doucette, J.C.; Werf, van der J.J.; Ribberink, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    New large-scale experiments have been carried out in two oscillatory flow tunnels to study ripple regime sand suspension and net sand transport processes in full-scale oscillatory flows. The paper focuses on ripple dimensions and the new data are combined with existing data to make a large dataset o

  2. Stability characteristics of the open channel flow above the asymmetrical irregular sand ripples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sandy bed cannot keep its original smoothness as the flows pass. With the increase of the flow intensity, the bed forms will appear as sand ripples and dune in turn. Among these morphologies, the sand ripple scale is the smallest, which is generally symmetrical when it just appears, but as time goes on, the asymmetrical form gradually develops. Just because of this sand ripples asymmetry, it manifests the influence of the flow on the bed morphology and also the impact on the laminar flow dynamical process, especially the stability characteristics. The stability features of laminar flow on open channels with the asymmetrical sand ripples are discussed, and also the results on the symmetrical sand ripples are compared in detail.

  3. Relaxation time effects of wave ripples on tidal beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, M. J.; Masselink, G.; O'Hare, T. J.; Russell, P. E.

    2007-08-01

    Seabed roughness due to wave ripples is a key factor in controlling sediment transport processes in the nearshore zone. Roughness is commonly considered a function of the ripple geometry, which in turn, can be predicted from sediment and hydrodynamic parameters. Existing ripple predictors consider the bed morphology to be in equilibrium with the hydrodynamics, whereas recent laboratory measurements show that the time scale for ripple development is of the order of tens of minutes to hours. Here we show that wave ripples on tidal beaches are significantly affected by relaxation time effects, with ripple height and length progressively increasing during the rising tide and remaining constant during the falling tide. Moreover, we examine the ripples in the context of existing empirical models and suggest how the temporal evolution over a tidal cycle may be predicted.

  4. Wave plus current over a ripple-covered bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsøe, Jørgen; Andersen, Ken Haste; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    1999-01-01

    -visualization study in the laboratory with ripples, 22 cm in length, and 3.5 cm in height. One wave-alone, three current-alone, and three combined waves and current tests were conducted. The wave-velocity-to-current-velocity ratio ranges from 1 to 2.4. The orbiral-amplitude-ro-ripple-length ratio (at the bed) is 0...... of the now around fixed ripples by use of a k - w model to calculate the roughness, and friction of a rippled bed. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Variable wind ripple migration at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, observed by timelapse imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Valdez, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    Granule ripples at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GSDNPP) were observed using inexpensive digital timelapse cameras over a 70-day period in winter 2010-2011. The ripples migrated during a handful of discrete events — visible ripple movement occurred on only 11 days during the observation period. The movement conditions are documented with hourly and 15-minute records from two nearby weather stations, and by a cup anemometer at the site itself. During the most prominent movement episode, when local winds averaged ~ 10 m/s, ripples of several sizes were observed simultaneously and a reciprocal relationship of ripple size and propagation speed was seen, with small (~ 10 cm) ripples moving at ~ 1.4 cm/min, and larger (~ 80 cm) ripples at ~ 0.15 cm/min. Ripple sizes and morphologies evolve throughout the observation period.

  6. Fluid Dynamical Control of Spacing and Symmetry Breaking in Orbital Wave Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhuis, J.; Perron, J.; Kao, J. C.; Myrow, P.

    2013-12-01

    Sand ripples in coastal environments and the rock record are a ubiquitous signature of the interaction of flows, bed topography and sediment transport. A common class of ripples, orbital wave ripples, exhibits a well-known linear relationship between the wavelength of the ripple pattern and the amplitude of wave-generated oscillatory flow. Based on this relationship, the ripple wavelength is often used as a paleoenvironmental indicator; and the height and spacing of modern ripples are major controls on bed roughness. However, the mechanism that selects the observed ratio of ripple wavelength to flow amplitude has not been explained. Orbital wave ripples are sustained by zones of reversed flow on the lee side of the crest that moves sand upslope toward the crest. Using a lattice Boltzmann numerical flow model to simulate two-dimensional flow over a rippled bed, we demonstrate a coupling of flow and ripples that leads to the observed equilibrium: if the ratio between the orbital diameter (double the flow amplitude) and ripple wavelength is 0.65 - the equilibrium ratio observed in laboratory experiments and in the field - the maximum length of the separation zone downstream of a ripple crest is exactly equal to the ripple wavelength. Longer separation zones, with vortices advected further, will erode the neighboring crest. Shorter separation zones will not be able to erode the adjacent troughs. In addition to this equilibrium morphology, orbital wave ripples display characteristic patterns as they evolve in response to changes in wave conditions. Multiple experiments have shown that large-scale symmetry is lost during adjustment to a new equilibrium. When the wave orbital diameter is shortened sufficiently, two new crests appear in every trough. Of these two, one decays, while the other keeps growing. Interestingly, the same side (right or left) is observed to 'win' in every trough. When the orbital diameter is lengthened, a 'bulging' instability occurs, in which

  7. Three-dimensional sand ripples as the product of vortex instability

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Erick de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional sand ripples can be observed under steady liquid flows in both nature and industry. Some examples are the ripples observed on the bed of rivers and in petroleum pipelines conveying sand. Although of importance, the formation of these patterns is not completely understood. There are theoretical and experimental evidence that aquatic ripples grow from two-dimensional bed instabilities, so that a straight vortex is formed just downstream of their crests. The proposition of Raudkivi (2006), that three-dimensionality has its origin in a vortex instability, is employed here. This paper presents a linear stability analysis of the downstream vortex in order to obtain the transverse scales of three-dimensional ripples. The obtained wavelength is compared with experimentally observed ripples.

  8. Real-Time Simulation of Aeolian Sand Movement and Sand Ripple Evolution: A Method Based on the Physics of Blown Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Bao-Gang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Simulation and visualization of aeolian sand movement and sand ripple evolution are a challenging subject.In this paper,we propose a physically based modeling and simulating method that can be used to synthesize sandy terrain in various patterns.Our method is based on the mechanical behavior of individual sand grains,which are widely studied in the physics of blown sand.We accounted significant mechanisms of sand transportation into the sand model,such as saltation,successive saltation and collapsing,while simplified the vegetation model and wind field model to make the simulation feasible and affordable.We implemented the proposed method on the programming graphics processing unit (GPU) to get real-time simulation and rendering.Finally,we proved that our method can reflect many characteristics of sand ripple evolution through several demonstrations.We also gave several synthesized desert scenes made from the simulated height field to display its significance on application.

  9. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  10. Amplitude equation and long-range interactions in underwater sand ripples in one dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnipper, Teis; Mertens, Keith; Ellegaard, Clive;

    2008-01-01

    We present an amplitude equation for sand ripples under oscillatory flow in a situation where the sand is moving in a narrow channel and the height profile is practically one dimensional. The equation has the form h(t)=epsilon-(h-(h) over bar) + ((h(x))(2)-1)h(xx)-h(xxxx) + delta((h(x))(2))(xx) w...... finally present surprising experimental results showing that long-range coupling is indeed seen in the initial details of the doubling transition, where in fact two small ripples are initially formed, followed by global symmetry breaking removing one of them....... in particular on the so-called doubling transition, a secondary instability caused by the sudden decrease in the amplitude of the water motion, leading to the appearance of a new ripple in each trough. This transition is well reproduced for sufficiently large delta (asymmetry between trough and crest). We...

  11. Pattern dynamics of vortex ripples in sand: Nonlinear modeling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Abel, M.; Krug, J.;

    2002-01-01

    Vortex ripples in sand are studied experimentally in a one-dimensional setup with periodic boundary conditions. The nonlinear evolution, far from the onset of instability, is analyzed in the framework of a simple model developed for homogeneous patterns. The interaction function describing the mass...

  12. Laser Plasmas : Effect of rippled laser beam on excitation of ion acoustic wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nareshpal Singh Saini; Tarsem Singh Gill

    2000-11-01

    Growth of a radially symmetrical ripple, superimposed on a Gaussian laser beam in collisional unmagnetised plasma is investigated. From numerical computation, it is observed that self-focusing of main beam as well as ripple determine the growth dynamics of ripple with the distance of propagation. The effect of growing ripple on excitation of ion acoustic wave (IAW) has also been studied

  13. Large-eddy simulation of formation of three-dimensional aeolian sand ripples in a turbulent field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    With the method of large-eddy simulation,the equation of spherule motion and the method of immersed boundary condition,numerical simulations of three-dimen-sional turbulent aeolian motion and the formation of sand ripples under three-di-mensional turbulent wind and the mutual actions of saltation and creeping motion were carried out. The resulting sand ripples have the form that is flat on the upwind side and steep on the leeward,which is identical to the sand ripples in nature. We also realized the self-restoration process of three-dimensional sand ripples,which shows the correctness of the method of numerical simulation and the models of saltation and creeping. Finally,We analyzed the influence of sand ripples on the three-dimensional turbulent wind field,and found that due to the appearance and development of sand ripples,in the normal direction of ground there exists stronger energy exchange,and moreover,there is close correspondence between the forms of sand ripples and the vorticity close to the ground surface.

  14. The formation and migration of sand ripples in closed conduits: experiments with turbulent water flows

    CERN Document Server

    Florez, Jorge Eduar Cardona

    2016-01-01

    The transport of solid particles by a fluid flow is frequently found in nature and industry. Some examples are the transport of sand in rivers and hydrocarbon pipelines. When the shear stresses exerted by a fluid flow on a granular bed remain moderate, some grains are set in motion without fluidizing the bed; the moving grains form a layer, known as bed load, that moves while maintaining contact with the fixed part of the bed. Under bed load conditions, the granular bed may become unstable, generating ripples and dunes. Sand ripples are commonly observed in closed conduits and pipes such as in petroleum pipelines, sewer systems, and dredging lines. Although of importance for many scientific domains and industrial applications, the formation of ripples in closed conduits is not well understood, and the problem is still open. This paper presents an experimental study on the formation and migration of sand ripples under a turbulent closed-conduit flow and bed-load conditions. In our experiments, fully-developed ...

  15. Assessment of existing sediment transport models for sand barrier dynamics under wave and currents

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thuy, T.T.V.; Nghiem, L.T.; Jayakumar, S.; Nielsen, P.

    The paper summarizes morphology changes over rippled sand barriers under wave and wave combined current of 27 laboratorial experiments. Data of 4 wave conditions (H=10cm, T=1s; H=12cm, T=1s; H=12cm, T=1.5s; H=14cm, T=1.5s) and 6 currents (Q= 10, -10...

  16. Mechanisms of sharp wave initiation and ripple generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlingloff, Dániel; Káli, Szabolcs; Freund, Tamás F; Hájos, Norbert; Gulyás, Attila I

    2014-08-20

    Replay of neuronal activity during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SWRs) is essential in memory formation. To understand the mechanisms underlying the initiation of irregularly occurring SWRs and the generation of periodic ripples, we selectively manipulated different components of the CA3 network in mouse hippocampal slices. We recorded EPSCs and IPSCs to examine the buildup of neuronal activity preceding SWRs and analyzed the distribution of time intervals between subsequent SWR events. Our results suggest that SWRs are initiated through a combined refractory and stochastic mechanism. SWRs initiate when firing in a set of spontaneously active pyramidal cells triggers a gradual, exponential buildup of activity in the recurrent CA3 network. We showed that this tonic excitatory envelope drives reciprocally connected parvalbumin-positive basket cells, which start ripple-frequency spiking that is phase-locked through reciprocal inhibition. The synchronized GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents give rise to a major component of the ripple-frequency oscillation in the local field potential and organize the phase-locked spiking of pyramidal cells. Optogenetic stimulation of parvalbumin-positive cells evoked full SWRs and EPSC sequences in pyramidal cells. Even with excitation blocked, tonic driving of parvalbumin-positive cells evoked ripple oscillations. Conversely, optogenetic silencing of parvalbumin-positive cells interrupted the SWRs or inhibited their occurrence. Local drug applications and modeling experiments confirmed that the activity of parvalbumin-positive perisomatic inhibitory neurons is both necessary and sufficient for ripple-frequency current and rhythm generation. These interneurons are thus essential in organizing pyramidal cell activity not only during gamma oscillation, but, in a different configuration, during SWRs.

  17. Engineering Modeling of Wave-Related Suspended Sediment Transport Over Ripples

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our study is to improve the description of suspended sediment transport over wave ripples. We will first show the importance of sediment diffusivity with convective transfer (hereafter called) which is different from the sediment diffusivity associated to turbulent flux . It is possible to interpret concentration profiles, in semi-log plots, thanks to a relation between second derivative of the logarithm of concentration and derivative of (Absi, 2010). An analytical profile for will be presented and validated by experimental data obtained by Thorne et al. (2009) for medium sand. The proposed profile allows a good description of suspended sediment concentrations for fine and coarse sediments.

  18. Sand Bed Morphodynamics under Standing Waves and Vegetated Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, B. J.; Garcia, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    Littoral processes such as sediment transport, wave attenuation, and boundary layer development are governed by the presence of bathymetric features, which include large-scale sand bars upon which smaller-scale sand ripples are superimposed, as well as the presence of submarine vegetation. Numerous studies on sand ripples and bars have aided to elucidate the dynamics in oscillatory flows; however, the effect of vegetation on the system is less understood. Recent laboratory studies have focused on quantifying wave attenuation by emergent vegetation as a natural method to mitigate storm surges. The emergent vegetation, while promising for coastal protection, alters sediment transport rates directly by the physical presence of the plants near the bed and indirectly from reduction in near-bed shear stresses due to attenuated wave energy. The experimental work herein focuses on the area near the deeply submerged vegetated canopy limit (current work has a ratio of mean still water depth to plant height, H/h, = 7.9) to minimize the effect on the surface waves and discern the direct impact vegetation has on sand bed morphodynamics. Experiments were conducted in the large wave tank (49-m long by 1.83-m wide by 1.22-m deep) in the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory at the University of Illinois in which a high reflection wave forcing was used over a uniform sand bed with a 0.25-mm median sediment diameter in which staggered and uniform arrangements of idealized vegetation (i.e., 6.35-mm diameter rigid wooden cylinders) were positioned along the bed (e.g., at predetermined sand bar troughs and over an entire sand bar). The resulting bathymetric evolution from the vegetated case experiments were compared to the base case of no vegetation using two optical methods: a high-resolution laser displacement sensor for three-dimensional surveys and digitized profiles via high-definition panoramic images of the entire test section. The experimental findings illustrate the profound

  19. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  20. Sand Waves. Report 1. Sand Wave Shoaling in Navigation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    heights range from 0.8 m in the Minas Basin, Bay of Fundy (Dalrymple 1984) to 6.0 m in the Bahia Blanca Estuary, Argentina (Aliotta and Perillo 1987...26 PART IV: SITE-SPECIFIC SAND WAVE SHOALING PROBLEMS .. ........ 30 Columbia River Navigation Channel ........ ............... .. 30 Panama ...problem location discussed in this report is at St. Andrew Bay near Panama City, Florida. A relatively short section of the jettied inlet channel requires

  1. WAVE BOTTOM LAYERS DYNAMIC WITH SUSPENDED SEDIMENT OVER VORTEX RIPPLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Chang-bo; BAI Yu-chuan; ZHAO Zi-dan; ZHANG Hong-wu

    2004-01-01

    Vortex ripple is widely formed in the coastal region, and the dynamic of vortex is quite important because it is responsible for sediment transport. The flow structure around the vortex ripples can be modeled as 2D flow due to the geometry of the flow boundaries. In this paper, 2D Large-Ed dy-Simulation (LES) method was used to predict the flow structure and the dynamic of vortex in the bottom layers under the action of the wave, the numerical simulation results show a completely process of vortex formation, evolvement and disappearance. Based on the study of flow structure, the suspended sediment transport was modeled in present paper. The simulated sediment concentrations were compared to measurements from the literature. The agreement between the time averaged simulated concentration profiles and measurements is satisfactory. For a high setting velocity, the suspended sediment is confined to the vicinity of the bed, and it is dominated by the local bottom shear stress. For a small setting velocity,the suspension is more dominated by the characteristic of vor tex. There are two suspended sediment transport peaks observed in the cross-section at the trough and crest in the half period, the second peak is due to the separation bubble taking the sediment.

  2. The wave plus current flow over vortex ripples at an arbitrary angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Faraci, C

    2003-01-01

    to a regular ripple pattern formation. Numerical simulations were conducted changing the direction between the waves and the current from 0degrees to 90degrees and the ratio between the current strength and the wave orbital velocity from 0.2 to 1.5. Close to the bed, the current aligns parallel to the ripple....... (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  3. Slow waves, sharp waves, ripples, and REM in sleeping dragons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein-Idelson, Mark; Ondracek, Janie M; Liaw, Hua-Peng; Reiter, Sam; Laurent, Gilles

    2016-04-29

    Sleep has been described in animals ranging from worms to humans. Yet the electrophysiological characteristics of brain sleep, such as slow-wave (SW) and rapid eye movement (REM) activities, are thought to be restricted to mammals and birds. Recording from the brain of a lizard, the Australian dragon Pogona vitticeps, we identified SW and REM sleep patterns, thus pushing back the probable evolution of these dynamics at least to the emergence of amniotes. The SW and REM sleep patterns that we observed in lizards oscillated continuously for 6 to 10 hours with a period of ~80 seconds. The networks controlling SW-REM antagonism in amniotes may thus originate from a common, ancient oscillator circuit. Lizard SW dynamics closely resemble those observed in rodent hippocampal CA1, yet they originate from a brain area, the dorsal ventricular ridge, that has no obvious hodological similarity with the mammalian hippocampus.

  4. Serotonin dependent masking of hippocampal sharp wave ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ul Haq, Rizwan; Anderson, Marlene L; Hollnagel, Jan-Oliver; Worschech, Franziska; Sherkheli, Muhammad Azahr; Behrens, Christoph J; Heinemann, Uwe

    2016-02-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) are thought to play an important role in memory consolidation. By rapid replay of previously stored information during slow wave sleep and consummatory behavior, they result from the formation of neural ensembles during a learning period. Serotonin (5-HT), suggested to be able to modify SPW-Rs, can affect many neurons simultaneously by volume transmission and alter network functions in an orchestrated fashion. In acute slices from dorsal hippocampus, SPW-Rs can be induced by repeated high frequency stimulation that induces long-lasting LTP. We used this model to study SPW-R appearance and modulation by 5-HT. Although stimulation in presence of 5-HT permitted LTP induction, SPW-Rs were "masked"--but appeared after 5-HT wash-out. This SPW-R masking was dose dependent with 100 nM 5-HT being sufficient--if the 5-HT re-uptake inhibitor citalopram was present. Fenfluramine, a serotonin releaser, could also mask SPW-Rs. Masking was due to 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor activation. Neither membrane potential nor membrane conductance changes in pyramidal cells caused SPW-R blockade since both remained unaffected by combining 5-HT and citalopram. Moreover, 10 and 30 μM 5-HT mediated SPW-R masking preceded neuronal hyperpolarization and involved reduced presynaptic transmitter release. 5-HT, as well as a 5-HT1A agonist, augmented paired pulse facilitation and affected the coefficient of variance. Spontaneous SPW-Rs in mice hippocampal slices were also masked by 5-HT and fenfluramine. While neuronal ensembles can acquire long lasting LTP during higher 5-HT levels, lower 5-HT levels enable neural ensembles to replay previously stored information and thereby permit memory consolidation memory.

  5. Asynchronous ripple oscillations between left and right hippocampi during slow-wave sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Claudio; Maldonado, Pedro E; Valdés, José L

    2017-01-01

    Spatial memory, among many other brain processes, shows hemispheric lateralization. Most of the published evidence suggests that the right hippocampus plays a leading role in the manipulation of spatial information. Concurrently in the hippocampus, memory consolidation during sleep periods is one of the key steps in the formation of newly acquired spatial memory traces. One of the most characteristic oscillatory patterns in the hippocampus are sharp-wave ripple (SWR) complexes. Within this complex, fast-field oscillations or ripples have been demonstrated to be instrumental in the memory consolidation process. Since these ripples are relevant for the consolidation of memory traces associated with spatial navigation, and this process appears to be lateralized, we hypothesize that ripple events between both hippocampi would exhibit different temporal dynamics. We tested this idea by using a modified "split-hyperdrive" that allows us to record simultaneous LFPs from both right and left hippocampi of Sprague-Dawley rats during sleep. We detected individual events and found that during sleep periods these ripples exhibited a different occurrence patterns between hemispheres. Most ripple events were synchronous between intra- rather than inter-hemispherical recordings, suggesting that ripples in the hippocampus are independently generated and locally propagated within a specific hemisphere. In this study, we propose the ripples' lack of synchrony between left and right hippocampi as the putative physiological mechanism underlying lateralization of spatial memory.

  6. Geometry and dynamics of wave ripples in the nearshore zone of a coarse sandy beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselink, G.; Austin, M. J.; O'Hare, T. J.; Russell, P. E.

    2007-10-01

    Extensive measurements of ripple characteristics and dynamics along with associated suspended sediment fluxes and hydrodynamic conditions were made in the shoaling and surf zones of a macrotidal coarse grained beach at Sennen Cove, Cornwall, England (median grain diameter 0.69 mm). Suborbital vortex ripples were observed during the majority of the study period with height ˜5 cm and length ˜35 cm. The scale and shape of the ripples did not vary significantly as the bed shear stress increased during wave shoaling and breaking. However, ripple migration rates (onshore directed) were strongly dependent on their location relative to the breakpoint, increasing from ˜0.1 cm min-1 under shoaling waves to 2 cm min-1 in the outer surf zone during low-energy conditions. Farther inside the surf zone, ripples persisted but migration rates slowed, probably owing to the presence of the offshore-directed mean flow which impedes landward migration of the ripples. Under low-wave conditions (during which measured sediment fluxes peaked around the outer surf zone and decreased through the saturated surf zone), bed form transport rates under shoaling waves were of the same magnitude as net suspended sediment fluxes but at least an order of magnitude smaller in the outer surf zone. Under high-energy conditions (during which suspended sediment fluxes in the surf zone were offshore directed owing to the presence of the seaward directed mean flow), bed form transport rates were several orders of magnitude smaller than suspended fluxes.

  7. A Granular Model of Rolling Grain Ripples

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, K H

    1999-01-01

    A simple model is presented for the formation of rolling grain ripples on a flat sand bed by the oscillatory flow from a surface wave. The model is related to physical parameters of the problem, and is solved for the equilibrium spacing and height of the ripples. Good agreement between the model and measurements of rolling grain ripples is demonstrated. It is found that the length of the ripples scale with the square-root of the non-dimensional shear stress on a flat bed.

  8. Asynchronous ripple oscillations between left and right hippocampi during slow-wave sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Spatial memory, among many other brain processes, shows hemispheric lateralization. Most of the published evidence suggests that the right hippocampus plays a leading role in the manipulation of spatial information. Concurrently in the hippocampus, memory consolidation during sleep periods is one of the key steps in the formation of newly acquired spatial memory traces. One of the most characteristic oscillatory patterns in the hippocampus are sharp-wave ripple (SWR) complexes. Within this complex, fast-field oscillations or ripples have been demonstrated to be instrumental in the memory consolidation process. Since these ripples are relevant for the consolidation of memory traces associated with spatial navigation, and this process appears to be lateralized, we hypothesize that ripple events between both hippocampi would exhibit different temporal dynamics. We tested this idea by using a modified "split-hyperdrive" that allows us to record simultaneous LFPs from both right and left hippocampi of Sprague-Dawley rats during sleep. We detected individual events and found that during sleep periods these ripples exhibited a different occurrence patterns between hemispheres. Most ripple events were synchronous between intra- rather than inter-hemispherical recordings, suggesting that ripples in the hippocampus are independently generated and locally propagated within a specific hemisphere. In this study, we propose the ripples’ lack of synchrony between left and right hippocampi as the putative physiological mechanism underlying lateralization of spatial memory. PMID:28158285

  9. Sand Waves along the Dutch Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Sand waves, defined as longshore wave-like movements of the shoreline, measured in a horizontal plane, are described along several stretches of the shoreline of The Netherlands. They have a celerity in the order of 50-200 m/yr, a period of 50- 150 years and an amplitude of 30- 500 m. They are found

  10. Simulating and understanding sand wave variation: A case study of the Golden Gate sand waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterlini, F.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Hanes, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed comparison between measured features of the Golden Gate sand wave field and the results of a nonlinear sand wave model. Because the Golden Gate sand waves exhibit large variation in their characteristics and in their environmental physics, this area gives us the opportunity to study sand wave variation between locations, within one well-measured, large area. The nonlinear model used in this paper is presently the only tool that provides information on the nonlinear evolution of large-amplitude sand waves. The model is used to increase our understanding of the coupling between the variability in environmental conditions and the sand wave characteristics. Results show that the model is able to describe the variation in the Golden Gate sand waves well when both the local oscillating tidal current and the residual current are taken into account. Current and water depth seem to be the most important factors influencing sand wave characteristics. The simulation results give further confidence in the underlying model hypothesis and assumptions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Relativistic nonlinearity and wave-guide propagation of rippled laser beam in plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Khanna; K Baheti

    2001-06-01

    In the present paper we have investigated the self-focusing behaviour of radially symmetrical rippled Gaussian laser beam propagating in a plasma. Considering the nonlinearity to arise from relativistic phenomena and following the approach of Akhmanov et al, which is based on the WKB and paraxial-ray approximation, the self-focusing behaviour has been investigated in some detail. The effect of the position and width of the ripple on the self-focusing of laser beam has been studied for arbitrary large magnitude of nonlinearity. Results indicate that the medium behaves as an oscillatory wave-guide. The self-focusing is found to depend on the position parameter of ripple as well as on the beam width. Values of critical power has been calculated for different values of the position parameter of ripple. Effects of axially and radially inhomogeneous plasma on self-focusing behaviour have been investigated and presented here.

  12. TURBULENT COHERENT STRUCTURES IN CHANNELS WITH SAND WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sand wave bed is one of the typical shape of complicated boundaries in hydraulics and river dynamics, and sand wave motion is the main form of the bed load motion in-rivers, thence the study of turbulent structures over sand waves is of importance both in theory and practice. In this paper turbulent coherent structures over single-and multi-sand waves were studied experimentally, the formulae for the separation length and vortex shedding period of the turbulent flow over single-sand wave were suggested, and the characteristics of turbulent coherent structures over multi-sand waves were also given.

  13. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  14. Dendritic spikes induce ripples in parvalbumin interneurons during hippocampal sharp waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovini, Balázs; Turi, Gergely F; Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Pálfi, Dénes; Maák, Pál; Szalay, Gergely; Szabó, Mátyás Forián; Szabó, Gábor; Szadai, Zoltán; Káli, Szabolcs; Rózsa, Balázs

    2014-05-21

    Sharp-wave ripples are transient oscillatory events in the hippocampus that are associated with the reactivation of neuronal ensembles within specific circuits during memory formation. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (FS-PV INs) are thought to provide fast integration in these oscillatory circuits by suppressing regenerative activity in their dendrites. Here, using fast 3D two-photon imaging and a caged glutamate, we challenge this classical view by demonstrating that FS-PV IN dendrites can generate propagating Ca(2+) spikes during sharp-wave ripples. The spikes originate from dendritic hot spots and are mediated dominantly by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Notably, Ca(2+) spikes were associated with intrinsically generated membrane potential oscillations. These oscillations required the activation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, had the same frequency as the field potential oscillations associated with sharp-wave ripples, and controlled the phase of action potentials. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the smallest functional unit that can generate ripple-frequency oscillations is a segment of a dendrite.

  15. Learning-induced plasticity regulates hippocampal sharp wave-ripple drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardeau, Gabrielle; Cei, Anne; Zugaro, Michaël

    2014-04-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) and associated place-cell reactivations are crucial for spatial memory consolidation during sleep and rest. However, it remains unclear how learning and consolidation requirements influence and regulate subsequent SPW-R activity. Indeed, SPW-R activity has been observed not only following complex behavioral tasks, but also after random foraging in familiar environments, despite markedly different learning requirements. Because transient increases in SPW-R rates have been reported following training on memory tasks, we hypothesized that SPW-R activity following learning (but not routine behavior) could involve specific regulatory processes related to ongoing consolidation. Interfering with ripples would then result in a dynamic compensatory response only when initial memory traces required consolidation. Here we trained rats on a spatial memory task, and showed that subsequent sleep periods where ripple activity was perturbed by timed electrical stimulation were indeed characterized by increased SPW-R occurrence rates compared with control sleep periods where stimulations were slightly delayed in time and did not interfere with ripples. Importantly, this did not occur following random foraging in a familiar environment. We next showed that this dynamic response was abolished following injection of an NMDA receptor blocker (MK-801) before, but not after training. Our results indicate that NMDA receptor-dependent processes occurring during learning, such as network "tagging" and plastic changes, regulate subsequent ripple-mediated consolidation of spatial memory during sleep.

  16. Synaptic gating at axonal branches, and sharp-wave ripples with replay: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, Nikita; Tu, Yuhai; Traub, Roger D

    2013-11-01

    Mechanisms of place cell replay occurring during sharp-wave ripples (SPW-Rs) remain obscure due to the fact that ripples in vitro depend on non-synaptic mechanisms, presumably via axo-axonal gap junctions between pyramidal cells. We suggest a model of in vivo SPW-Rs in which synaptic excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSPs) control the axonal spiking of cells in SPW-Rs: ripple activity remains hidden in the network of axonal collaterals (connected by gap junctions) due to conduction failures, unless there is a sufficient dendritic EPSP. The EPSP brings the axonal branching point to threshold, and action potentials from the collateral start to propagate to the soma and to the distal axon. The model coherently explains multiple experimental data on SPW-Rs, both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of synaptic gating leads to the following implication: a sequence of pyramidal cells can be replayed at ripple frequency by the superposition of subthreshold dendritic EPSPs and ripple activity in the axonal plexus. Replay is demonstrated in both forward and reverse directions. We discuss several testable predictions. In general, the mechanism of synaptic gating suggests that pyramidal cells under certain conditions can act like a transistor.

  17. Diversity of sharp-wave-ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F; Logothetis, Nikos K; Besserve, Michel

    2015-11-17

    Sharp-wave-ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R-triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions.

  18. Hippocampal sharp wave/ripples during sleep for consolidation of associative memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiâm Ramadan

    Full Text Available The beneficial effect of sleep on memory has been well-established by extensive research on humans, but the neurophysiological mechanisms remain a matter of speculation. This study addresses the hypothesis that the fast oscillations known as ripples recorded in the CA1 region of the hippocampus during slow wave sleep (SWS may provide a physiological substrate for long term memory consolidation. We trained rats in a spatial discrimination task to retrieve palatable reward in three fixed locations. Hippocampal local field potentials and cortical EEG were recorded for 2 h after each daily training session. There was an increase in ripple density during SWS after early training sessions, in both trained rats and in rats randomly rewarded for exploring the maze. In rats learning the place -reward association, there was a striking further significant increase in ripple density correlated with subsequent improvements in behavioral performance as the rat learned the spatial discrimination aspect of the task. The results corroborate others showing an experience-dependent increase in ripple activity and associated ensemble replay after exploratory activity, but in addition, for the first time, reveal a clear further increase in ripple activity related to associative learning based on spatial discrimination.

  19. Toward Improving Prediction of Sediment Transport over Wave-Induced Ripples

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    Sediment transport over wave-induced ripples is a very complex phenomenon where available models fail to provide accurate predictions. For coastal engineering applications, the 1-DV advection-diffusion equation could be used with an additional parameter {\\alpha} related to the process of vortex shedding above ripples (Absi, 2010). The aim of this study is to provide simple practical analytical tools. An analytical eddy viscosity profile was validated by DNS data of turbulent channel flows (Absi et al., 2011). In this study, we will show that: (1) the period-averaged eddy viscosity in oscillatory boundary layers could be described by this simple analytical formulation; (2) The shape of the vertical profile is validated by period-averaged eddy viscosity of baseline (BSL) k-{\\omega} model (Suntoyo and Tanaka, 2009) for sinusoidal and asymmetric waves; (3) The vertical eddy viscosity profile depends on the wave non-linearity parameter and requires therefore a specific calibration.

  20. Disrupting neural activity related to awake-state sharp wave-ripple complexes prevents hippocampal learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Shirin Nokia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oscillations in hippocampal local-field potentials reflect the crucial involvement of the hippocampus in memory trace formation: theta (4-8 Hz oscillations and ripples (~200 Hz occurring during sharp waves are thought to mediate encoding and consolidation, respectively. During sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs, hippocampal cell firing closely follows the pattern that took place during the initial experience, most likely reflecting replay of that event. Disrupting hippocampal ripples using electrical stimulation either during training in awake animals or during sleep after training retards spatial learning. Here, adult rabbits were trained in trace eyeblink conditioning, a hippocampus-dependent associative learning task. A bright light was presented to the animals during the inter-trial interval, when awake, either during SPW-Rs or irrespective of their neural state. Learning was particularly poor when the light was presented following SPW-Rs. While the light did not disrupt the ripple itself, it elicited a theta-band oscillation, a state that does not usually coincide with SPW-Rs. Thus, it seems that consolidation depends on neuronal activity within and beyond the hippocampus taking place immediately after, but by no means limited to, hippocampal SPW-Rs.

  1. Concentration profiles for fine and coarse sediments suspended by waves over ripples: An analytical study with the 1-DV gradient diffusion model

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2010-01-01

    Field and laboratory measurements of suspended sediments over wave ripples show, for time-averaged concentration profiles in semi-log plots, a contrast between upward convex profiles for fine sand and upward concave profiles for coarse sand. Careful examination of experimental data for coarse sand shows a near-bed upward convex profile beneath the main upward concave profile. Available models fail to predict these two profiles for coarse sediments. The 1-DV gradient diffusion model predicts the main upward concave profile for coarse sediments thanks to a suitable $\\beta$(y)-function (where $\\beta$ is the inverse of the turbulent Schmidt number and y is the distance from the bed). In order to predict the near-bed upward convex profile, an additional parameter {\\alpha} is needed. This parameter could be related to settling velocity ($\\alpha$ equal to inverse of dimensionless settling velocity) or to convective sediment entrainment process. The profiles are interpreted by a relation between second derivative of ...

  2. Efficient modelling of sand wave behaviour [Powerpoint Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Joris; Damme, van Ruud

    2004-01-01

    Sand waves form a pattern of more or less parallel ridges. The wave length is about 300 meters and the height up to 10 meters, which is a considerable amount of the total water depth. Sand waves migrate with speeds of about 10 meters per year. Information on their behaviour is valuable: the larger p

  3. STEM for Females goes from a Ripple to a Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rita

    2015-11-01

    At the 2015 World Conference of Science Journalists in Seoul on June 9, 2015 Nobel Prize Winner Sir Tim Hunt gave a speech with remarks which offended females in science around the world. Following the social media reaction several STEM education foundation for girls received justified attention. Programs are being supported for the education of girls and women around the world and they are gaining media attention. I will discuss the growing popularity and availability of all-girl science programs. These eager-to-learn young females are preparing themselves for serious careers in the hopes that their generation will close the gender gap. I will present a statistical analysis of workplace gender equality in professional STEM environments, including a focus on select fluid dynamics corporations, which will show that there is room for improvement across the industry. The goal of this presentation is to endorse and promote the ever-growing wave of qualified female applicants to graduate programs and industrial job placements.

  4. Hippocampal sharp wave-ripple: A cognitive biomarker for episodic memory and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzsáki, György

    2015-10-01

    Sharp wave ripples (SPW-Rs) represent the most synchronous population pattern in the mammalian brain. Their excitatory output affects a wide area of the cortex and several subcortical nuclei. SPW-Rs occur during "off-line" states of the brain, associated with consummatory behaviors and non-REM sleep, and are influenced by numerous neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. They arise from the excitatory recurrent system of the CA3 region and the SPW-induced excitation brings about a fast network oscillation (ripple) in CA1. The spike content of SPW-Rs is temporally and spatially coordinated by a consortium of interneurons to replay fragments of waking neuronal sequences in a compressed format. SPW-Rs assist in transferring this compressed hippocampal representation to distributed circuits to support memory consolidation; selective disruption of SPW-Rs interferes with memory. Recently acquired and pre-existing information are combined during SPW-R replay to influence decisions, plan actions and, potentially, allow for creative thoughts. In addition to the widely studied contribution to memory, SPW-Rs may also affect endocrine function via activation of hypothalamic circuits. Alteration of the physiological mechanisms supporting SPW-Rs leads to their pathological conversion, "p-ripples," which are a marker of epileptogenic tissue and can be observed in rodent models of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's Disease. Mechanisms for SPW-R genesis and function are discussed in this review.

  5. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels. Howeve

  6. Sharp wave/ripple network oscillations and learning-associated hippocampal maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csicsvari, Jozsef; Dupret, David

    2014-02-01

    Sharp wave/ripple (SWR, 150-250 Hz) hippocampal events have long been postulated to be involved in memory consolidation. However, more recent work has investigated SWRs that occur during active waking behaviour: findings that suggest that SWRs may also play a role in cell assembly strengthening or spatial working memory. Do such theories of SWR function apply to animal learning? This review discusses how general theories linking SWRs to memory-related function may explain circuit mechanisms related to rodent spatial learning and to the associated stabilization of new cognitive maps.

  7. Sand Wave Migrations Within Monterey Submarine Canyon, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Wong, F. L.

    2006-12-01

    Repeated high-resolution multi-beam surveys revealed the existence of a sand wave field along the axis of the Monterey submarine canyon between 20 and 300 m water depth. These sand waves range in wave length from 20 to 70 m and 2 to 5 m in height. Comparison of sequential multi-beam grid data (months apart) indicates that the sand waves apparently migrate upcanyon at some places while the same data clearly show that the sand waves migrate downcanyon at other locations. One hypothesis is that strong internal tidal flows, whose upcanyon component is intensified by the narrow canyon, are responsible for forming the sand wave field and for migrating the sand waves upcanyon. Another hypothesis is that the sand wave field is formed by creeping (analogous to the movement within glaciers), and in general they move in the downcanyon direction. A field experiment was conducted in 2005-06 to measure the driving forces (in hypothesis #1) that form and move the sand waves, and to collect the internal sedimentological structure within the sand waves that could reveal information on hypothesis #2. A mooring designed to measure near-floor velocity profiles, temperature, salinity, and sediment concentration in the water column was deployed for one year (June 2005 -July 2006) at 250 m water depth, slightly downcanyon of the sand wave field. In addition, a mapping survey was conducted in February, 2006 for collecting multi-beam and chirp profiles in the canyon head area of the sand wave field. Preliminary examination of the ADCP (downward looking) showed some very interesting features - the near- floor current dramatically changes with the spring-neap cycle of the surface tide. The time variation of the along-canyon current during neap tides - a sudden jump of upcanyon velocity before gradually tapering down, is typical of internal tides (internal bores). The time variation during spring tides when along canyon velocities reverse directions from upcanyon to downcanyon and gradually

  8. Experimental and theoretical modelling of sand-water-object interaction under nonlinear progressive waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testik, Firat Yener

    An experimental and theoretical study has been conducted to obtain a fundamental understanding of the dynamics of the sand, water and a solid object interaction as progressive gravity waves impinge on a sloping beach. Aside from obvious scientific interest, this exceedingly complex physical problem is important for naval applications, related to the behavior of disk/cylindrical shaped objects (mines) in the coastal waters. To address this problem, it was divided into a set of simpler basic problems. To begin, nonlinear progressive waves were investigated experimentally in a wave tank for the case of a rigid (impermeable) sloping bottom. Parameterizations for wave characteristics were proposed and compared with the experiments. In parallel, a numerical wave tank model (NWT) was calibrated using experimental data from a single run, and wave field in the wave tank was simulated numerically for the selected experiments. Subsequently, a layer of sand was placed on the slope and bottom topography evolution processes (ripple and sandbar dynamics, bottom topography relaxation under variable wave forcing, etc.) were investigated experimentally. Models for those processes were developed and verified by experimental measurements. Flow over a circular cylinder placed horizontally on a plane wall was also studied. The far-flow field of the cylinder placed in the wave tank was investigated experimentally and numerical results from the NWT simulations were compared with the experimental data. In the mean time, the near-flow velocity/vorticity field around a short cylinder under steady and oscillatory flow was studied in a towing tank. Horseshoe vortex formation and periodic shedding were documented and explained. With the understanding gained through the aforementioned studies, dynamics and burial/scour around the bottom objects in the wave tank were studied. Possible scenarios on the behavior of the disk-shaped objects were identified and explained. Scour around 3D cylindrical

  9. Richtmyer-Meshkov instability of a flat interface subjected to a rippled shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liyong; Liu, Jinhong; Liao, Shenfei; Zheng, Xianxu; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng

    2017-01-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability of a nominally flat interface (N2/SF6 ) subjected to a rippled shock, as the counterpart of a corrugated interface interacting with a planar shock, is studied experimentally in a vertical shock tube using both schlieren photography and fog visualization diagnostics. The nonplanar incident shock wave is produced by a planar shock diffracting around a rigid cylinder, and the flat interface is created by a membraneless technique. Three different distances η (the ratio of spacing from cylinder to interface over cylinder diameter) are considered. Schlieren images indicate that the nonplanar incident shock can be divided into three different segments separated by two triple points. Fog visualization pictures show the formation of overall "Λ " shaped interface structures and a N2 cavity at the center and two interface steps at both sides. With the increase of the dimensionless time, the dimensionless interface amplitude increases as well as the penetration depth of the cavity, and both curves exhibit reasonable collapse for different η numbers. Through equating the preinterface perturbation of the rippled shock with a preshock perturbation of a corrugated interface, the growth rate of this instability is found to be noticeably smaller than that of the standard RM instability.

  10. Ripples Make Waves: Binding Structured Activity and Plasticity in Hippocampal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef H. L. P. Sadowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing novel episodic memories and stable spatial representations depends on an exquisitely choreographed, multistage process involving the online encoding and offline consolidation of sensory information, a process that is largely dependent on the hippocampus. Each step is influenced by distinct neural network states that influence the pattern of activation across cellular assemblies. In recent years, the occurrence of hippocampal sharp wave ripple (SWR oscillations has emerged as a potentially vital network phenomenon mediating the steps between encoding and consolidation, both at a cellular and network level by promoting the rapid replay and reactivation of recent activity patterns. Such events facilitate memory formation by optimising the conditions for synaptic plasticity to occur between contingent neural elements. In this paper, we explore the ways in which SWRs and other network events can bridge the gap between spatiomnemonic processing at cellular/synaptic and network levels in the hippocampus.

  11. Plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular backward wave oscillator driven by sheet electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hadap; J Mondal; K C Mittal; K P Maheshwari

    2011-03-01

    Performance of the backward wave oscillator (BWO) is greatly enhanced with the introduction of plasma. Linear theory of the dispersion relation and the growth rate have been derived and analysed numerically for plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular waveguide driven by sheet electron beam. To see the effect of plasma on the TM01 cold wave structure mode and on the generated frequency, the parameters used are: relativistic factor = 1.5 (i.e. / = 0.741), average waveguide height 0 = 1.445 cm, axial corrugation period 0 = 1.67 cm, and corrugation amplitude = 0.225 cm. The plasma density is varied from zero to 2 × 1012 cm-3. The presence of plasma tends to raise the TM01 mode cut-off frequency (14 GH at 2 × 1012 cm-3 plasma density) relative to the vacuum cut-off frequency (5 GH) which also causes a decrease in the group velocity everywhere, resulting in a flattening of the dispersion relation. With the introduction of plasma, an enhancement in absolute instability was observed.

  12. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S. [NDE Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence.

  13. Modeling sharp wave-ripple complexes through a CA3-CA1 network model with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxidis, Jiannis; Coombes, Stephen; Mason, Robert; Owen, Markus R

    2012-05-01

    The hippocampus, and particularly the CA3 and CA1 areas, exhibit a variety of oscillatory rhythms that span frequencies from the slow theta range (4-10 Hz) up to fast ripples (200 Hz). Various computational models of different complexities have been developed in an effort to simulate such population oscillations. Nevertheless the mechanism that underlies the so called Sharp Wave-Ripple complex (SPWR), observed in extracellular recordings in CA1, still remains elusive. We present here, the combination of two simple but realistic models of the rat CA3 and CA1 areas, connected together in a feedforward scheme mimicking Schaffer collaterals. Both network models are computationally simple one-dimensional arrays of excitatory and inhibitory populations interacting only via fast chemical synapses. Connectivity schemes and postsynaptic potentials are based on physiological data, yielding a realistic network topology. The CA3 model exhibits quasi-synchronous population bursts, which give rise to sharp wave-like deep depolarizations in the CA1 dendritic layer accompanied by transient field oscillations at ≈ 150-200 Hz in the somatic layer. The frequency and synchrony of these oscillations is based on interneuronal activity and fast-decaying recurrent inhibition in CA1. Pyramidal cell spikes are sparse and come from a subset of cells receiving stronger than average excitatory input from CA3. The model is shown to accurately reproduce a large number of basic characteristics of SPWRs and yields a new mechanism for the generation of ripples, offering an interpretation to a range of neurophysiological observations, such as the ripple disruption by halothane and the selective firing of pyramidal cells during ripples, which may have implications for memory consolidation during SPWRs.

  14. Giant sand waves at the mouth of San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P.L.; Hanes, D.M.; Rubin, D.M.; Kvitek, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    A field of giant sand waves, among the largest in the world, recently was mapped in high resolution for the first time during a multibeam survey in 2004 and 2005 through the strait of the Golden Gate at the mouth of San Francisco Bay in California (Figure la). This massive bed form field covers an area of approximately four square kilometers in water depths ranging from 30 to 106 meters, featuring more than 40 distinct sand waves with crests aligned approximately perpendicular to the dominant tidally generated cross-shore currents, with wavelengths and heights that measure up to 220 meters and 10 meters, respectively. Sand wave crests can be traced continuously for up to two kilometers across the mouth of this energetic tidal inlet, where depth-averaged tidal currents through the strait below the Golden Gate Bridge exceed 2.5 meters per second during peak ebb flows. Repeated surveys demonstrated that the sand waves are active and dynamic features that move in response to tidally generated currents. The complex temporal and spatial variations in wave and tidal current interactions in this region result in an astoundingly diverse array of bed form morphologies, scales, and orientations. Bed forms of approximately half the scale of those reported in this article previously were mapped inside San Francisco Bay during a multibeam survey in 1997 [Chin et al., 1997].

  15. Omni-directional Slotted Waveguide Antenna with Low Omni Ripple at MM Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramendra Kumar Verma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the design, simulation, and realisation of a slotted waveguide based horizontally polarized omni-directional antenna at millimeter wave frequency. This design has been optimised for minimum ripple in omni pattern and wide elevation coverage. It is based on radiating slots on both sides of waveguide for generating omni pattern and reduced height waveguide along with metallic wings on both sides used to obtain minimum omni pattern variation. The designed antenna has been simulated on finite element method-based ANSYS’s HFSS EM Simulator software using proper boundary conditions. A metallic strip on both side of slot on upper face of antenna has been used to provide flatness as well as strength to antenna. The antenna has the advantages of being robust, low cost, and easy to fabricate being in waveguide configuration. Measured VSWR of antenna is less than 2.0 over the frequency band of 37-40 GHz and minimum omni gain of the antenna is 0 dBi over the frequency band.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 2, March 2015, pp.159-162, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.8025

  16. Sand Waves in Environmental Flows: Insights gained by LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-11-01

    In fluvial and coastal environments, sediment transport processes induced by near-bed coherent structures in the turbulent boundary layer developing over a mobile sediment bed result in the formation of dynamically rich sand waves, or bed forms, which grow and migrate continuously. Bed form migration alters streambed roughness and provides the primary mechanism for transporting large amounts of sediment through riverine systems impacting the morphology, streambank stability, and ecology of waterways. I will present recent computational advances, which have enabled coupled, hydro-morphodynamic large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent flow in mobile-bed open channels. Numerical simulations: 1) elucidate the role of near-bed sweeps in the turbulent boundary layer as the mechanism for initiating the instability of the initially flat sand bed; 2) show how near-bed processes give rise to aperiodic eruptions of suspended sediment at the free surface; and 3) clarify the mechanism via which sand waves migrate. Furthermore, in agreement with recent experimental observations, the computed spectra of the resolved velocity fluctuations above the bed exhibit a distinct spectral gap whose width increases with distance from the bed. The spectral gap delineates the spectrum of turbulence from that of slowly evolving coherent structures associated with sand wave migration. The talk will also present computational results demonstrating the feasibility of carrying out coupled, hydro-morphodynamic LES of large dunes migrating in meandering streams and rivers with embedded hydraulic structures and discuss future challenges and opportunities. This work was supported by NSF Grants EAR-0120914 and EAR-0738726, and National Cooperative Highway Research Program Grant NCHRP-HR 24-33.

  17. A shoreline sand wave formation event at Dungeness, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falqués, A.; Arriaga, J.; Francesca, R.; Eddie, C.

    2016-12-01

    Alongshore rhythmic morphological patterns at different length scales are quite common along sandy beaches. Well known examples are megacusps and crescentic bars/rip channel systems with alongshore wavelengths ˜ 100-1000 m. At larger scales (˜ 1-10 km or more) there are the km-scale shoreline sand waves. During the last two decades there has been much research to unravel the origin of such intriguing patterns and to get insight into their dynamics. The hypothesis that they emerge out of positive feedbacks between hydrodynamics and morphology has been amply confirmed by mathematical modelling. In particular, the potential role of high-angle waves (large incidence angles with respect to shore) in driving km-scale shoreline sand waves has been investigated (Ashton et al., 2001, van den Berg et al., 2012). However, direct tests with nature are very difficult and are inexistent to our knowledge. This is so because these tests would require detailed measurements of the bathymetry and the wave conditions at the moment of their formation from a featureless morphology. Dungeness beach is located at the English shore of the Dover straight facing northeast part of a cuspate foreland. It is a gravel beach (D50=6-10 mm) quite steep until 1 m depth (β≈0.13) and gentle until 3 m depth (β≈0.005) without shore-parallel bars. Bathymetric maps of this beach are available since 2007 and the wave conditions are also known from a wave buoy in 43 m depth. The shorelines from 2007 until 2013 show some subtle and evolving undulations. But remarkably, in 2014 a series of two undulations develop with a wavelength of about 0.5 km. They persist until 2016 and migrate to the N. This is a clear formation event that provides a unique opportunity to compare observations with the outputs of morphodynamic models for the initial formation of such features. Therefore, the objectives are: 1) Characterize the bathymetric evolution and the wave conditions prior/during the formation event, 2) run

  18. Laboratory monitoring of P-waves in partially saturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrière, J.; Bordes, C.; Brito, D.; Sénéchal, P.; Perroud, H.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic data depends on a variety of hydrogeological properties of the prospected porous media such as porosity, permeability and fluid saturation. We have performed a laboratory experiment in the kiloHertz range in order to analyze the role of partial saturation on direct propagating P-waves phase velocity and attenuation. The experiment consists of a sand-filled tank 107 cm x 34 cm x 35cm equipped with accelerometers and water capacitance probes. The P-waves seismic propagation is generated by hitting a steel ball on a granite plate on the one lateral side of the container. Several imbibition/drainage cycles are performed between the water residual saturation and the gas residual saturation. The laboratory seismic data are processed by two Continuous Wavelet Transforms using one real mother wavelet (Mexican hat) and one complex (Morlet) to recover velocity and attenuation as a function of frequency. Phase velocity of direct P-wave decreases with an increase of water content and is quite consistent with the low frequency limit of the Biot's theory both for imbibition and drainage. The interpretation of the P-waves attenuation needs to go beyond the macroscopic fluid flow of Biot's theory and to introduce a viscoelastic contribution linked to the grain to grain overall losses which are described by a constant Q-model. A strong hysteresis between imbibition and drainage is observed and explained by introducing an effective permeability depending on water and gas relative permeabilities (Van Genuchten model).

  19. Effects of charged sand on electromagnetic wave propagation and its scattering field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Qinshu; ZHOU; Youhe; ZHENG; Xiaojing

    2006-01-01

    Based on the Rayleigh's scattering theory, the effects of sandstorms on the propagation of electromagnetic wave with different visibilities are presented by solving the scattering field of charged sand particles. Because of the electric charges on the sand surface, the theoretical attenuation will be large enough to match the measured value under certain conditions. And the results show that the effect of sand with electric charges all over its surface on electromagnetic wave attenuation is the same as that of sand without charge, which proves that electric charges distribute on partial surface of the sand in fact.

  20. At clinically relevant concentrations the anaesthetic/amnesic thiopental but not the anticonvulsant phenobarbital interferes with hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiriou Evangelos

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many sedative agents, including anesthetics, produce explicit memory impairment by largely unknown mechanisms. Sharp-wave ripple (SPW-R complexes are network activity thought to represent the neuronal substrate for information transfer from the hippocampal to neocortical circuits, contributing to the explicit memory consolidation. In this study we examined and compared the actions of two barbiturates with distinct amnesic actions, the general anesthetic thiopental and the anticonvulsant phenobarbital, on in vitro SPW-R activity. Results Using an in vitro model of SPW-R activity we found that thiopental (50–200 μM significantly and concentration-dependently reduced the incidence of SPW-R events (it increased the inter-event period by 70–430 %. At the concentration of 25 μM, which clinically produces mild sedation and explicit memory impairment, thiopental significantly reduced the quantity of ripple oscillation (it reduced the number of ripples and the duration of ripple episodes by 20 ± 5%, n = 12, P P P Conclusion We hypothesize that thiopental, by interfering with SPW-R activity, through enhancement of the GABAA receptor-mediated transmission, affects memory processes which involve hippocampal circuit activation. The quantity but not the frequency of ripple oscillation was affected by the drug.

  1. The role of suspended load transport in the occurrence of tidal sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, B.W.; Kranenburg, W.M.; Roos, P.C.; Matthieu, J.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Tidal sand waves are dynamic bed patterns which are formed by the complex interaction between hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and geomorphology. Field data from the southern North Sea reveal that sand waves are absent where suspended load transport is the dominant transport mode. In order to unde

  2. Scour at Vertical Piles in Sand-Clay Mixtures under Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dey, Subhasish; Helkjær, Anders; Sumer, B. Mutlu;

    2011-01-01

    Marine sediments often contain sand-clay mixtures in widely varying proportions. This study presents the results of equilibrium scour and time variation of scour depths at circular piles embedded vertically in clay alone and sand-clay mixed beds under waves. Experiments were conducted in a wave f...

  3. The role of suspended load transport in the occurrence of tidal sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, Bastiaan Wijnand; Kranenburg, Wouter; Roos, Pieter C.; Matthieu, J.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Tidal sand waves are dynamic bed patterns which are formed by the complex interaction between hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and geomorphology. Field data from the southern North Sea reveal that sand waves are absent where suspended load transport is the dominant transport mode. In order to unde

  4. The influence of storms on finite amplitude sand wave dynamics: an idealized nonlinear model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans, G.H.P.; Roos, P.C.; de Vriend, H.J.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of storms on finite amplitude sand wave growth using a new idealized nonlinear morphodynamic model. We find that the growth speed initially linearly increases with sand wave amplitude, after which nonlinear effects cause the growth to decrease. This finally leads to an

  5. DISSIPATION OF WAVE ENERGY ON VERY MILD SLOPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis and calculation of wave attenuation when waves travel on sand bed, sand ripple bed and muddy bed, respectively. The study shows that (1) The dissipation of wave energy due to bottom percolation may be neglected on sand bed; (2) The wave attenuation due to the friction of sand ripples is one order higher than that of flat sand bed and (3) The energy loss of waves propagating on muddy bed is the largest. Then, the equivalent coefficients of friction are calculated in order to compare with the solution by the bottom-friction model. Wave attenuation are also computed by the Bingham-model and the principle of conservation of wave energy flux on very mild muddy slope. The results coincide well with the wave information from the Lianyungang Wave Observation Station. Theoretical prediction proves that the equivalent coefficients of friction strongly rely on water depth, which inerease with decreasing depth.

  6. At clinically relevant concentrations the anaesthetic/amnesic thiopental but not the anticonvulsant phenobarbital interferes with hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Sotiriou, Evangelos; Kotzadimitriou, Dimitrios; Drimala, Panagiota

    2007-01-01

    Background Many sedative agents, including anesthetics, produce explicit memory impairment by largely unknown mechanisms. Sharp-wave ripple (SPW-R) complexes are network activity thought to represent the neuronal substrate for information transfer from the hippocampal to neocortical circuits, contributing to the explicit memory consolidation. In this study we examined and compared the actions of two barbiturates with distinct amnesic actions, the general anesthetic thiopental and the anticonvulsant phenobarbital, on in vitro SPW-R activity. Results Using an in vitro model of SPW-R activity we found that thiopental (50–200 μM) significantly and concentration-dependently reduced the incidence of SPW-R events (it increased the inter-event period by 70–430 %). At the concentration of 25 μM, which clinically produces mild sedation and explicit memory impairment, thiopental significantly reduced the quantity of ripple oscillation (it reduced the number of ripples and the duration of ripple episodes by 20 ± 5%, n = 12, P Phenobarbital significantly accelerated SPWs at 50 and 100 μM whereas it reduced their rate at 200 and 400 μM. Furthermore, it significantly prolonged SPWs, reduced their synchrony and reduced the quantity of ripples only at the clinically very high concentration of 400 μM, reported to affect memory. Conclusion We hypothesize that thiopental, by interfering with SPW-R activity, through enhancement of the GABAA receptor-mediated transmission, affects memory processes which involve hippocampal circuit activation. The quantity but not the frequency of ripple oscillation was affected by the drug. PMID:17672909

  7. Apolipoprotein E4 Causes Age-Dependent Disruption of Slow Gamma Oscillations during Hippocampal Sharp-Wave Ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Anna K; Jones, Emily A; Lin, Yuan-Hung; Karlsson, Mattias P; Kay, Kenneth; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Tong, Leslie M; Nova, Philip; Carr, Jessie S; Frank, Loren M; Huang, Yadong

    2016-05-18

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanism by which it causes cognitive decline is unclear. In knockin (KI) mice, human apoE4 causes age-dependent learning and memory impairments and degeneration of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Here we report two functional apoE4-KI phenotypes involving sharp-wave ripples (SWRs), hippocampal network events critical for memory processes. Aged apoE4-KI mice had fewer SWRs than apoE3-KI mice and significantly reduced slow gamma activity during SWRs. Elimination of apoE4 in GABAergic interneurons, which prevents learning and memory impairments, rescued SWR-associated slow gamma activity but not SWR abundance in aged mice. SWR abundance was reduced similarly in young and aged apoE4-KI mice; however, the full SWR-associated slow gamma deficit emerged only in aged apoE4-KI mice. These results suggest that progressive decline of interneuron-enabled slow gamma activity during SWRs critically contributes to apoE4-mediated learning and memory impairments. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  8. Input-output features of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during hippocampal sharp wave/ripple oscillation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hájos, Norbert; Karlócai, Mária R; Németh, Beáta; Ulbert, István; Monyer, Hannah; Szabó, Gábor; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Freund, Tamás F; Gulyás, Attila I

    2013-07-10

    Hippocampal sharp waves and the associated ripple oscillations (SWRs) are implicated in memory processes. These network events emerge intrinsically in the CA3 network. To understand cellular interactions that generate SWRs, we detected first spiking activity followed by recording of synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during SWRs that occurred spontaneously in mouse hippocampal slices. We observed that the vast majority of interneurons fired during SWRs, whereas only a small portion of pyramidal cells was found to spike. There were substantial differences in the firing behavior among interneuron groups; parvalbumin-expressing basket cells were one of the most active GABAergic cells during SWRs, whereas ivy cells were silent. Analysis of the synaptic currents during SWRs uncovered that the dominant synaptic input to the pyramidal cell was inhibitory, whereas spiking interneurons received larger synaptic excitation than inhibition. The discharge of all interneurons was primarily determined by the magnitude and the timing of synaptic excitation. Strikingly, we observed that the temporal structure of synaptic excitation and inhibition during SWRs significantly differed between parvalbumin-containing basket cells, axoaxonic cells, and type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1)-expressing basket cells, which might explain their distinct recruitment to these synchronous events. Our data support the hypothesis that the active current sources restricted to the stratum pyramidale during SWRs originate from the synaptic output of parvalbumin-expressing basket cells. Thus, in addition to gamma oscillation, these GABAergic cells play a central role in SWR generation.

  9. On the formation of current ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Flemming, Burg W.

    2015-01-01

    For grain sizes finer than coarse sand, the first flow-transverse bedforms to develop are current ripples. Although numerous studies have analysed different aspects of bedform morphodynamics, to date no comprehensive physical explanation for the formation of ripples has been given. We offer...... such an explanation based on a virtual boundary layer concept, and present a model predicting ripple height on the basis of grain size, current velocity and water depth. The model contradicts the conventional view of current ripples as bedforms not scaling with flow depth. Furthermore, it confirms the dependence...

  10. The hippocampal CA3 region can generate two distinct types of sharp wave-ripple complexes, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Katharina T; Kandrács, Ágnes; Ulbert, István; Pál, Ildikó; Szabó, Csilla; Héja, László; Wittner, Lucia

    2015-02-01

    Hippocampal sharp wave-ripples (SPW-Rs) occur during slow wave sleep and behavioral immobility and are thought to play an important role in memory formation. We investigated the cellular and network properties of SPW-Rs with simultaneous laminar multielectrode and intracellular recordings in a rat hippocampal slice model, using physiological bathing medium. Spontaneous SPW-Rs were generated in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA3, and CA1 regions. These events were characterized by a local field potential gradient (LFPg) transient, increased fast oscillatory activity and increased multiple unit activity (MUA). Two types of SPW-Rs were distinguished in the CA3 region based on their different LFPg and current source density (CSD) pattern. Type 1 (T1) displayed negative LFPg transient in the pyramidal cell layer, and the associated CSD sink was confined to the proximal dendrites. Type 2 (T2) SPW-Rs were characterized by positive LFPg transient in the cell layer, and showed CSD sinks involving both the apical and basal dendrites. In both types, consistent with the somatic CSD source, only a small subset of CA3 pyramidal cells fired, most pyramidal cells were hyperpolarized, while most interneurons increased firing rate before the LFPg peak. Different neuronal populations, with different proportions of pyramidal cells and distinct subsets of interneurons were activated during T1 and T2 SPW-Rs. Activation of specific inhibitory cell subsets-with the possible leading role of perisomatic interneurons-seems to be crucial to synchronize distinct ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells finally resulting in the expression of different SPW-R activities. This suggests that the hippocampus can generate dynamic changes in its activity stemming from the same excitatory and inhibitory circuits, and so, might provide the cellular and network basis for an input-specific and activity-dependent information transmission.

  11. A study on the stability of laminar open-channel flow over a sandy rippled bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Yuchuan; XU; Haijue

    2005-01-01

    The bed of a river often features some kinds of bedform, such as sand ripples, dunes, and so on. Even if the bed is smooth initially, disturbances arising from the bed or other external sources will cause the laminar flow in an open channel to become unstable as soon as the flow develops, thereby leading to the formation of sand ripples on the bed. In return, the formation of the sand ripples will modify the instability path of the laminar flow passing over them. The wavy character of the bed will induce further instability of the flow, which is essentially different from that on a smooth bed: the neutral curve will move forward and the critical Reynolds number will decrease. The flow is unstable in response to a wider range of the disturbance wave number, or the laminar flow instability can happen more easily. The propagation speed of the sand ripples also affects the flow instability, since the stability of open channel flow over a movable bed is fundamentally different from that on a rigid bed. These instability effects are discussed in detail in this paper.

  12. Stress Wave Propagation in Unsaturated Sands. Volume 1. Centrifuge Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    122 xii LIST OF TABLES 2.1 Soil properties from explosive testing in sand by Drake and Little (1983...Ottawa, Illinois (ASTM C190). A summary of the physical properties of both Tyndall and Ottawa sands is given in Tablas 3.3a and 3.3b. Grain size

  13. A unifying model for planform straightness of ripples and dunes in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Geologists, physicists, and mathematicians have studied ripples and dunes for more than a century, but despite considerable effort, no general model has been proposed to explain perhaps the most fundamental property of their morphology: why are some bedforms straight, continuous, parallel, and uniform in planform geometry (i.e. two-dimensional) whereas others are irregular (three-dimensional)? Here we argue that physical coupling along the crest of a bedform is required to produce straight crests and that along-crest flow and sand transport provide effective physical mechanisms for that coupling. Ripples and dunes with the straightest and most continuous crests include longitudinal and oblique dunes in unidirectional flows, wave ripples, dunes in reversing flows, wind ripples, and ripples migrating along a slope. At first glance, these bedforms appear quite different (ripples and dunes; air and water; transverse, oblique, and longitudinal orientations relative to the net sand-transport direction), but they all have one property in common: a process that increases the amount of along-crest sand transport (that lengthens and straightens their crests) relative to the across-crest transport (that makes them migrate and take the more typical and more three-dimensional planform geometry). In unidirectional flows that produce straight bedforms, along-crest transport of sand is caused by along-crest flow (non-transverse bedform orientation), gravitational transport along an inclined crest, or ballistic splash in air. Bedforms in reversing flows tend to be straighter than their unidirectional counterparts, because reverse transport across the bedform crest reduces the net across-crest transport (that causes the more typical irregular geometry) relative to the along-crest transport (that smoothes and straightens planform geometry).

  14. Numerical research on evolvement of submarine sand waves in the Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qikun; Hu, Guanghai; Sun, Yongfu; Liu, Xiaohui; Song, Yupeng; Dong, Lifeng; Dong, Changming

    2016-05-01

    Submarine sand waves, vital to seabed stability, are an important consideration for oceanic engineering projects such as oil pipe lines and submarine cables. The properties of surface sediment and the evolvement of submarine sand waves in a specified area in the South China Sea are studied using both a hydrological model and field observational data. The bottom flow field data between 2010 and 2011 in the study area are simulated by the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). The migration of submarine sand waves is calculated using Rubin's formula along with typhoon data and bottom flow field data, which allows for the analysis of sand wave response under the influence of typhoons. The migration direction calculated by Rubin's formula and bottom flow are very similar to collected data. The migration distance of different positions is between 0.0 m and 21.8 m, which reciprocates cumulatively. This shows that Rubin's formula can predict the progress of submarine sand waves with the bottom flow simulated by ROMS. The migration distances of 2 sites in the study area are 2.0 m and 2.9 m during the typhoon "Fanapi". The proportion of the calculated migration distance by the typhoon is 9.17% and 26.36% of the annual migration distance, respectively, which proves that the typhoon can make a significant impact on submarine sand waves.

  15. Numerical research on evolvement of submarine sand waves in the Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qikun; Hu, Guanghai; Sun, Yongfu; Liu, Xiaohui; Song, Yupeng; Dong, Lifeng; Dong, Changming

    2017-03-01

    Submarine sand waves, vital to seabed stability, are an important consideration for oceanic engineering projects such as oil pipe lines and submarine cables. The properties of surface sediment and the evolvement of submarine sand waves in a specified area in the South China Sea are studied using both a hydrological model and field observational data. The bottom flow field data between 2010 and 2011 in the study area are simulated by the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS). The migration of submarine sand waves is calculated using Rubin's formula along with typhoon data and bottom flow field data, which allows for the analysis of sand wave response under the influence of typhoons. The migration direction calculated by Rubin's formula and bottom flow are very similar to collected data. The migration distance of different positions is between 0.0 m and 21.8 m, which reciprocates cumulatively. This shows that Rubin's formula can predict the progress of submarine sand waves with the bottom flow simulated by ROMS. The migration distances of 2 sites in the study area are 2.0 m and 2.9 m during the typhoon "Fanapi". The proportion of the calculated migration distance by the typhoon is 9.17% and 26.36% of the annual migration distance, respectively, which proves that the typhoon can make a significant impact on submarine sand waves.

  16. Climbing ripple structure and associated storm-lamination from a Proterozoic carbonate platform succession: Their environmental and petrogenetic significance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asru K Chaudhuri

    2005-06-01

    The Mesoproterozoic Pandikunta Limestone, a shallow water carbonate platform succession in the Pranhita–Godavari Valley, south India, displays well developed climbing ripple lamination and storm deposited structures, such as HCS, wave ripple-lamination, combined-flow ripple-lamination and low angle trough cross-stratification. Different types of stratification developed in calcisiltite with minor amounts of very fine quartz sand and silt. The climbing ripple structures exhibit a complex pattern of superposition of different types (type A, B and S) within cosets pointing to a fluctuating rate of suspension deposition versus bedform migration, and an unsteady character of the flow. Close association of climbing ripple structures, HCS with anisotropic geometry, wavy lamination and combined-flow ripple-lamination suggest that the structures were formed by storm generated combined-flow in a mid-shelf area above the storm wave base. The combined-flow that deposited the climbing ripple structures had a strong unidirectional flow component of variable magnitude. The climbing ripple structure occurs as a constituent of graded stratified beds with an ordered vertical sequence of different types of lamination, reflecting flow deceleration and increased rate of suspension deposition. It is inferred that the beds were deposited from high-density waning flows in the relatively deeper part of the ancient shelf. The structures indicate that the Pandikunta platform was subjected to open marine circulation and intense storm activities. The storm deposited beds, intercalated with beds of lime-mudstone, consist primarily of fine sand and silt size carbonate particles that were hydrodynamically similar to quartz silt. Detrital carbonate particles are structureless and are of variable roundness. The particles were generated as primary carbonate clasts in coastal areas by mechanical disintegration of rapidly lithified beds, stromatolites or laminites, and the finest grade was

  17. Passive millimeter-wave imagery of helicopter obstacles in a sand environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David A.

    2006-05-01

    Operation of military helicopters in a dusty environment challenges pilots with reduced visibility. Passive millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging has the potential to be used in these environments to image through dust cloud obscurants. The millimeter-wave phenomenology of the sand environment and the obstacles present in that environment are explored in this work. A 93 GHz polarimetric passive MMW imager was used to characterize an obstacle-rich sand environment and the results are presented. It is shown that there is a strong polarimetric signature present for both sand and cinder block between 10 and 30 degrees depression angles. Also shown is the phenomenology associated with shadows on sand. It was determined that berms and ditches can be very difficult to detect using even a sensitive MMW radiometer. The results can be used to model the performance of passive MMW imaging systems in a sandy environment.

  18. Analysis of Ripple Effect on PSM Modulator of Short Wave Transmitter%纹波对短波发射机PSM调制器的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任凯

    2016-01-01

    DC regulated power supply due to voltage fluctuations exist ripple. PSM short wave transmitters by PSM modulator control ladder DC and audio signal,and the signal exist ladder ripple effect of the transmitter distortion index. This paper mainly introduces the PSM modulator ripple generation and elimination of ripple method to reduce the distortion of the transmitter.%直流稳压电源由于电压波动而存在纹波,短波PSM发射机由PSM调制器控制产生阶梯状直流加音频信号,而该信号中存在阶梯纹波会影响发射机的失真指标,本文主要介绍PSM调制器纹波产生及消除纹波降低发射机失真的办法。

  19. Dynamics of Nearshore Sand Bars and Infra-gravity Waves: The Optimal Theory Point of View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchette, F.; Mohammadi, B.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that the dynamics of near-shore sand bars are partly controlled by the features (location of nodes, amplitude, length, period) of the so-called infra-gravity waves. Reciprocally, changes in the location, size and shape of near-shore sand bars can control wave/wave interactions which in their turn alter the infra-gravity content of the near-shore wave energy spectrum. The coupling infra-gravity / near-shore bar is thus definitely two ways. Regarding numerical modelling, several approaches have already been considered to analyze such coupled dynamics. Most of them are based on the following strategy: 1) define an energy spectrum including infra-gravity, 2) tentatively compute the radiation stresses driven by this energy spectrum, 3) compute sediment transport and changes in the seabottom elevation including sand bars, 4) loop on the computation of infra-gravity taking into account the morphological changes. In this work, we consider an alternative approach named Nearshore Optimal Theory, which is a kind of breakdown point of view for the modeling of near-shore hydro-morphodynamics and wave/ wave/ seabottom interactions. Optimal theory applied to near-shore hydro-morphodynamics arose with the design of solid coastal defense structures by shape optimization methods, and is being now extended in order to model dynamics of any near-shore system combining waves and sand. The basics are the following: the near-shore system state is through a functional J representative of the energy of the system in some way. This J is computed from a model embedding the physics to be studied only (here hydrodynamics forced by simple infra-gravity). Then the paradigm is to say that the system will evolve so that the energy J tends to minimize. No really matter the complexity of wave propagation nor wave/bottom interactions. As soon as J embeds the physics to be explored, the method does not require a comprehensive modeling. Near-shore Optimal Theory has already given

  20. Wave Characteristics at the South Part of the Radial Sand Ridges of the Southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨斌; 冯卫兵; 张俞

    2014-01-01

    Based on one-year wave field data measured at the south part of the radial sand ridges of the Southern Yellow Sea, the wave statistical characteristics, wave spectrum and wave group properties are analyzed. The results show that the significant wave height (H1/3) varies from 0.15 to 2.22 m with the average of 0.59 m and the mean wave period (Tmean) varies from 2.06 to 6.82 s with the average of 3.71 s. The percentage of single peak in the wave spectra is 88.6 during the measurement period, in which 36.3%of the waves are pure wind waves and the rest are young swells. The percentage with the significant wave height larger than 1 m is 12.4. The dominant wave directions in the study area are WNW, W, ESE, E and NW. The relationships among the characteristic wave heights, the characteristic wave periods, and the wave spectral parameters are identified. It is found that the tentative spectral model is suitable for the quantitative description of the wave spectrum in the study area, while the run lengths of the wave group estimated from the measured data are generally larger than those in other sea areas.

  1. A LINEAR THEORY FOR DISTURBANCE OF COHERENT STRUCTURE AND MECHANISM OF SAND WAVES IN OPEN-CHANNEL FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuchuan BAI; Andreas MALCHEREK; Changbo JIANG

    2001-01-01

    The formation of sand wave is such a process in which the roughness and discontinuity of the original bed surface cause the disturbance of the bottom laminar flow in an open channel,and the development of the disturbance in turn leads to instability of the flow and the appearance of the coherent structure. The evolution and development of the coherent structure further promote the undulations of bed surface and sand waves rise finally. The sand wave is explained as a result of action that the bed sediment particles are disturbed by the coherent structure. This study shows that the sand wave formation is the result of disturbance action of neutral coherent structure, and the sand wave shape obtained in computations is identical to the practical one.

  2. Introduction to special section on marine sand wave and river dune dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Dohmen-Janssen, C. Marjolein

    2005-01-01

    Marine sand waves and river dunes are rhythmic patterns, formed at the interface between a sandy bed and turbulent flows, driven by tidal and river currents. Their origin, development, and dynamics are far from being fully understood. To enhance the discussion on this topic we organized the internat

  3. On the parameterization of biological influences on offshore sand wave dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borsje, B.W.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Herman, P.M.J.; De Vries, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    The bed of the North Sea is covered by sand waves and houses a great number of macrobenthic animals. These bio-engineers are known to have a significant influence on the stability of the bed and thereby on the geomorphology of the seabed. This paper proposes a parameterization of these bio-geomorpho

  4. Release of Escherichia coli from Foreshore Sand and Pore Water during Intensified Wave Conditions at a Recreational Beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Laura J; O'Carroll, Denis M; Edge, Thomas A; Robinson, Clare E

    2016-06-01

    Foreshore beach sands and pore water may act as a reservoir and nonpoint source of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) to surface waters. This paper presents data collected at a fine sand beach on Lake Huron, Canada over three field events. The data show that foreshore sand erosion as wave height increases results in elevated Escherichia coli concentrations in surface water, as well as depletion of E. coli from the foreshore sand and pore water. E. coli initially attached to foreshore sand rather than initially residing in the pore water was found to be the main contributor to elevated surface water concentrations. Surface water E. coli concentrations were a function of not only wave height (and associated sand erosion) but also the time elapsed since a preceding period of high wave intensity. This finding is important for statistical regression models used to predict beach advisories. While calculations suggest that foreshore sand erosion may be the dominant mechanism for releasing E. coli to surface water during intensified wave conditions at a fine sand beach, comparative characterization of the E. coli distribution at a coarse sand-cobble beach suggests that interstitial pore water flow and discharge may be more important for coarser sand beaches.

  5. Wave climate, sediment supply and the depth of the sand-mud transition: A global survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D.A.; Hill, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The influences of wave climate and sediment supply on the depths of sand-mud transitions (hSMT) are investigated. Depths of sand-mud transitions (SMT) are based on published granulometric data from surface samples gathered from 14 sites in different wave-dominated coastal environments with fluvial input, including high energy (Columbia, Eel, Russian, San Lorenzo, Copper, and Nepean rivers), moderate energy (Ebro, Nile, Santa Clara, Tseng-wen and Kao-ping rivers), and low energy (Po, Pescara and Tronto rivers) regimes. Geometric mean diameter (GMD) and mud percent are compiled from samples along shore-normal transects, and significant correlation is found between these two textural descriptors. Nominally, the SMT is defined as the transition from GMD > 63????m to 25% mud. This dual definition is applied to the 14 systems, and hSMT is tabulated for each system. Correlation is found between hSMT and the depth at which wave-induced bottom shear stress equals the critical erosion shear stress of the largest mud particles and also between hSMT and significant wave height. Lack of correlation between hSMT and sediment load of nearby rivers indicates either that the influence of sediment supply on depth of the sand-mud transition is small or is not adequately represented in this study. Shelf width and slope do not correlate with residuals from a formalized linear relationship between hSMT and significant wave height. The relationship between hSMT and wave climate is useful for calibration of numerical models of erosion and deposition in wave-dominated coastal environments, for prediction of seabed properties in remote or inaccessible areas, and for reconstruction of paleodepth based on facies changes from sand to mud in ancient rocks. ?? 2008.

  6. Origin of the Two Scales of Wind Ripples on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotre, Mathieu G. A.; Ewing, Ryan C.; Lamb, Michael P.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Grotzinger, John P.; Rubin, David M.; Lewis, Kevin W.; Day, Mackenzie; Gupta, Sanjeev; Banham, Steeve G.; Bridges, Nathan T.; DesMarais, David J.; Fraeman, Abigail A.; Grant, John A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Ming, Douglas W.; Mischna, Michael A.; Rice, Melissa S.; Sumner, Dawn A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Earth's sandy deserts host two main types of bedforms - decimeter-scale ripples and larger dunes. Years of orbital observations on Mars also confirmed the existence of two modes of active eolian bedforms - meter-scale ripples, and dunes. By analogy to terrestrial ripples, which are thought to form from a grain mechanism, it was hypothesized that large martian ripples also formed from grain impacts, but spaced further apart due to elongated saltation trajectories from the lower martian gravity and different atmospheric properties. However, the Curiosity rover recently documented the coexistence of three scales of bedforms in Gale crater. Because a grain impact mechanism cannot readily explain two distinct and coeval ripple modes in similar sand sizes, a new mechanism seems to be required to explain one of the scales of ripples. Small ripples are most similar to Earth's impact ripples, with straight crests and subdued profiles. In contrast, large martian ripples are sinuous and asymmetric, with lee slopes dominated by grain flows and grainfall deposits. Thus, large martian ripples resemble current ripples formed underwater on Earth, suggesting that they may form from a fluid-drag mechanism. To test this hypothesis, we develop a scaling relation to predict the spacing of fluid-drag ripples from an extensive flume data compilation. The size of large martian ripples is predicted by our scaling relation when adjusted for martian atmospheric properties. Specifically, we propose that the wavelength of martian wind-drag ripples arises from the high kinematic viscosity of the low-density atmosphere. Because fluid density controls drag-ripple size, our scaling relation can help constrain paleoatmospheric density from wind-drag ripple stratification.

  7. Sand wave migration predictor based on shape information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaapen, M.A.F.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Migration of offshore seabed waves, which endangers the stability of pipelines and communication cables, is hard to measure. The migration rates are small compared to the measurement errors. Here, sandwave migration rates are determined from the change in the crest position deduced from long tim

  8. Coastline sand waves on a low-energy beach at El Puntal spit, Spain: Linear stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MedellíN, G.; FalquéS, A.; Medina, R.; GonzáLez, M.

    2009-03-01

    Shoreline sand waves of approximately 125-150 m of wavelength and ≈15 m of amplitude in the offshore direction (reached in a few days) are often observed at the west end of El Puntal spit, Santander, Spain. They tend to last for about 2 months and do not show an evident alongshore propagation during that time. Since wave incidence on that beach is typically very oblique, a shoreline linear stability analysis is performed to test whether those sand waves could be generated by shoreline instability. Because of the low-energy wave climate and the steep mean bathymetric profile, the predicted wavelength (100-150 m) and growth time (4-8 days) are much smaller than is typical on open ocean beaches. This provides a unique opportunity to test high-angle wave instability. Thus, the role of the instability on the growth, evolution, and subsequent destruction of the sand waves is examined. A remarkable agreement between predictions and observations regarding the wavelength and growth time is found. Furthermore, by analyzing shoreline instability for a 2 year period where sand waves sometimes occur and sometimes do not, a clear correlation is found between sand wave occurrence and predicted instability growth rate. Intriguingly, results are less satisfactory regarding alongshore migration since the model predicts some migration that is not supported by observations. However, it becomes clear that the instability caused by high-angle waves is crucial for shoreline sand wave formation at El Puntal and should be considered for any future research.

  9. Windblown Dunes and Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-411, 4 July 2003July 4, 2003, is the 6th anniversary of the Mars Pathfinder landing. One of the elements carried to the red planet by Pathfinder was the Wind Sock Experiment. This project was designed to measure wind activity by taking pictures of three aluminum 'wind socks.' While the winds at the Mars Pathfinder site did not blow particularly strong during the course of that mission, dust storms seen from orbit and Earth-based telescopes attest to the fact that wind is a major force of change on the dry, desert surface of Mars today. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) narrow angle image shows dark sand dunes and lighter-toned ripples trapped among the mountainous central peak of an old impact crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 13.9oS, 246.7oW. The dune slip faces--the steepest slope on the larger dunes--indicate sand transport is from the top/upper left toward the bottom/lower right. North is toward the top/upper right; the picture is 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left. This picture was obtained in April 2003.

  10. Large submarine sand waves and gravel lag substrates on Georges Bank off Atlantic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, B.J.; Valentine, Page C.; Harris, Peter T; Baker, E.K.

    2012-01-01

    Georges Bank is a large, shallow, continental shelf feature offshore of New England and Atlantic Canada. The bank is mantled with a veneer of glacial debris transported during the late Pleistocene from continental areas lying to the north. These sediments were reworked by marine processes during postglacial sea-level transgression and continue to be modified by the modern oceanic regime. The surficial geology of the Canadian portion of the bank is a widespread gravel lag overlain in places by well sorted sand occurring as bedforms. The most widespread bedforms are large, mobile, asymmetrical sand waves up to 19 m in height formed through sediment transport by strong tidal-driven and possibly storm-driven currents. Well-defined curvilinear bedform crests up to 15 km long form a complex bifurcating pattern having an overall southwest–northeast strike, which is normal to the direction of the major axis of the semidiurnal tidal current ellipse. Minor fields of immobile, symmetrical sand waves are situated in bathymetric lows. Rare mobile, asymmetrical barchan dunes are lying on the gravel lag in areas of low sand supply. On Georges Bank, the management of resources and habitats requires an understanding of the distribution of substrate types, their surface dynamics and susceptibility to movement, and their associated fauna.

  11. Dune-like dynamic of Martian Aeolian large ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestro, S.; Vaz, D. A.; Yizhaq, H.; Esposito, F.

    2016-08-01

    Martian dunes are sculpted by meter-scale bed forms, which have been interpreted as wind ripples based on orbital data. Because aeolian ripples tend to orient and migrate transversely to the last sand-moving wind, they have been widely used as wind vanes on Earth and Mars. In this report we show that Martian large ripples are dynamically different from Earth's ripples. By remotely monitoring their evolution within the Mars Science Laboratory landing site, we show that these bed forms evolve longitudinally with minimal lateral migration in a time-span of ~ six terrestrial years. Our observations suggest that the large Martian ripples can record more than one wind direction and that in certain cases they are more similar to linear dunes from a dynamic point of view. Consequently, the assumption of the transverse nature of the large Martian ripples must be used with caution when using these features to derive wind directions.

  12. A Stellar Ripple

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This false-color composite image shows the Cartwheel galaxy as seen by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer's far ultraviolet detector (blue); the Hubble Space Telescope's wide field and planetary camera 2 in B-band visible light (green); the Spitzer Space Telescope's infrared array camera at 8 microns (red); and the Chandra X-ray Observatory's advanced CCD imaging spectrometer-S array instrument (purple). Approximately 100 million years ago, a smaller galaxy plunged through the heart of Cartwheel galaxy, creating ripples of brief star formation. In this image, the first ripple appears as an ultraviolet-bright blue outer ring. The blue outer ring is so powerful in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer observations that it indicates the Cartwheel is one of the most powerful UV-emitting galaxies in the nearby universe. The blue color reveals to astronomers that associations of stars 5 to 20 times as massive as our sun are forming in this region. The clumps of pink along the outer blue ring are regions where both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation are superimposed in the image. These X-ray point sources are very likely collections of binary star systems containing a blackhole (called massive X-ray binary systems). The X-ray sources seem to cluster around optical/ultraviolet-bright supermassive star clusters. The yellow-orange inner ring and nucleus at the center of the galaxy result from the combination of visible and infrared light, which is stronger towards the center. This region of the galaxy represents the second ripple, or ring wave, created in the collision, but has much less star formation activity than the first (outer) ring wave. The wisps of red spread throughout the interior of the galaxy are organic molecules that have been illuminated by nearby low-level star formation. Meanwhile, the tints of green are less massive, older visible-light stars. Although astronomers have not identified exactly which galaxy collided with the Cartwheel, two of three candidate galaxies can be

  13. Geotechnical centrifuge model tests for explosion cratering and propagation laws of blast wave in sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-kai FAN; Zu-yu CHEN; Xiang-qian LIANG; Xue-dong ZHANG; Xin HUANG

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the explosion cratering effects and their propagation laws of blast waves in dry standard sands using a 450 g-t geotechnical centrifuge apparatus.Ten centrifuge model tests were completed with various ranges of explosive mass,burial depth and centrifuge accelerations.Eleven accelerometers were installed to record the acceleration response in sand.The dimensions of the explosion craters were measured after the tests.The results demonstrated that the relationship between the dimensionless parameters of cratering efficiency and gravity scaled yield is a power regression function.Three specific function equations were obtained.The results are in general agreement with those obtained by other studies.A scaling law based on the combination of the r terms was used to fit the results of the ten model tests with a correlation coefficient of 0.931.The relationship can be conveniently used to predict the cratering effects in sand.The results also showed that the peak acceleration is a power increasing function of the acceleration level.An empirical exponent relation between the proportional peak acceleration and distance is proposed.The propagation velocity of blast waves is found to be ranged between 200 and 714 m/s.

  14. Breaking of storm waves on sand and reef zone in the Lesser Antilles Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorville, Jean-François; Berthelot, Hugues; Zahibo, Narcisse

    2010-05-01

    The most part of the exposed coastal zone of the Lesser Antilles Arc are composed by sand and coral reef. The high frequencies of passage of cyclones near these islands and anticyclone's swell subject them to waves of large amplitude. These waves are 4 to 5 times lager to the normal conditions. The weak slopes observed on these zones are particularly sensitive to this type of waves and cause the process of surfing. The mode of dissipation of these waves influenced the run-up and the floods on the coast. The surf zones are situated in 5 in 20 meters of the line of coast. A displacement of sea water towards the coast line is provoked by the breaking of the waves. These quantities of water are held by the particularly bathymetry of these islands and provoke a raised of the sea level. The propagation of the waves are allowed by the sea elevation in the surf zone In the evaluation of the marine risk in the Lesser Antilles Arc, a model of sea state forecast are developed in the Laboratory of Geosciences and Energy (LaRGE) in the French West Indies and French Guiana University (Guadeloupe , FWI). This forecast model is based on the coupling of several numerical models. WaveWatch III and SWAN are used for the wave propagation on large and small sectors. An ocean circulation model based on POM is used to evaluate the sea current and the sea level. To improve the forecasts on the exposed coast, in the zone included between the surf and swash, the sea elevation induced by the large amplitude wave are particularly studies. The numerical model of wave propagation near the coast SWAN is used to determine the sea state before the surf zone. The dissipation and the breaking of the large amplitude waves are studied with the spectral values give by SWAN and the local conditions (bathymetry, sea level, slope, bottom friction). During the months of November and December 2009, several large amplitude waves, coming from the North Atlantic Ocean, impact the west coast of Guadeloupe. The

  15. Sensitivity of growth characteristics of tidal sand ridges and long bed waves to formulations of bed shear stress, sand transport and tidal forcing: A numerical model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bing; de Swart, Huib E.; Panadès, Carles

    2016-09-01

    Tidal sand ridges and long bed waves are large-scale bedforms that are observed on continental shelves. They differ in their wavelength and in their orientation with respect to the principal direction of tidal currents. Previous studies indicate that tidal sand ridges appear in areas where tidal currents are above 0.5 m s-1, while long bed waves occur in regions where the maximum tidal current velocity is slightly above the critical velocity for sand erosion and the current is elliptical. An idealized nonlinear numerical model was developed to improve the understanding of the initial formation of these bedforms. The model governs the feedbacks between tidally forced depth-averaged currents and the sandy bed on the outer shelf. The effects of different formulations of bed shear stress and sand transport, tidal ellipticity and different tidal constituents on the characteristics of these bedforms (growth rate, wavelength, orientation of the preferred bedforms) during their initial formation were examined systematically. The results show that the formulations for bed shear stress and slope-induced sand transport are not critical for the initial formation of these bedforms. For tidal sand ridges, under rectilinear tidal currents, increasing the critical bed shear stress for sand erosion decreases the growth rate and the wavelength of the preferred bedforms significantly, while the orientation angle slightly decreases. The dependence of the growth rate, wavelength and the orientation of the preferred bedforms on the tidal ellipticity is non-monotonic. A decrease in tidal frequency results in preferred bedforms with larger wavelength and smaller orientation angle, while their growth rate hardly changes. In the case of joint diurnal and semidiurnal tides, or spring-neap tides, the characteristics of the bedforms are determined by the dominant tidal constituent. For long bed waves, the number of anticyclonically/cyclonically oriented bedforms with respect to the principal

  16. Ripples and Dunes in Directionally Varying Flows--Three Decades of Experiments, Theory, and Modeling (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The morphology and dynamics of ripples and dunes have received considerable study for the past half-century, but most studies have focused on only the small subset of flows that are convenient to study in a lab: using flumes with flows that are constant in direction or wave tanks with flows that reverse by 180°. Many natural flows are free to change in direction by other angles (seasonal or daily cycles in wind direction; reversing wave-generated flows combined with alongshore currents; reversing tidal currents in curved channels; unsteady separated flows). A handful of studies have addressed a broader set of such flows using specialized lab setups (rotating beds in unidirectional flows; oscillating or pulsed beds in static or flowing water; unsteady flows that arise in channel expansions or topographic depressions). Other studies have applied theory or modeling (usually incorporating simplified relations between topography, flow, and sediment transport) to bedform morphology and orientation. The studies that have addressed this broader variety of natural flows have found that compared to the relatively sinuous barchanoid morphology of ripples and dunes in unidirectional flows, bedforms in bi-directional flows can have relatively long straight crests (wave ripples or linear dunes); and multi-directional flows have been shown to produce brick- or tile-pattern ripples under interfering waves, star dunes in deserts, and polygonal dunes within craters on Mars. The topic receiving most study in directionally varying flows is bedform orientation in bi-directional flows. A number of lab, field, theoretical, and modeling studies have found that bedforms arise with the orientation subject to maximum gross-normal transport, but some recent results suggest other orientations are possible where a bed is only partially covered in sand.

  17. Sand-Mud Sediment Transport induced by tidal currents and wind waves in shallow microtidal basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carniello, L.; Defina, A.; D'Alpaos, L.

    2011-12-01

    Field data and mathematical modeling have demonstrated that the morphological evolution of shallow tidal basins is the result of the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves. Tidal currents, in particular, drive the morphological evolution of shallow tidal systems in proximity of the inlets and within the channel network, whereas in shallow areas tidal current mainly acts enhancing the bottom shear stress due to wind waves and redistributing sediments within the basin. In this study we present a mathematical model for sediment entrainment, transport and deposition due to the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves. The model is coupled with a hydrodynamic module based on the shallow water equations and with a module for the generation and propagation of wind waves. The sediment transport model describes the sediments by the way of a bi-granular mixtures composed by both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments thus considering the contemporary presence of clay, silt and sand which usually characterizes estuaries and tidal basins. Moreover, the model describes the bed evolution and evaluates the variation of bed sediment composition considering also the transition between cohesive and non-cohesive behavior. Attention is focused on some issues concerning the definition of a reliable initial bed composition and the incipient sediment motion which is treated following a stochastic approach for the bottom shear stress and for the critical shear stress distribution. The model is applied to the Lagoon of Venice (Italy) and the results of different simulations are compared, with good agreement, to a series of turbidity measurements collected inside the lagoon. The application of the model to the present bathymetry of the Venice lagoon allows for a first estimation of the actual net amount of sand and mud flowing through the three inlets and also gives some information on bottom evolution in terms of elevation and composition.

  18. Large wind ripples on Mars: A record of atmospheric evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotre, M G A; Ewing, R C; Lamb, M P; Fischer, W W; Grotzinger, J P; Rubin, D M; Lewis, K W; Ballard, M J; Day, M; Gupta, S; Banham, S G; Bridges, N T; Des Marais, D J; Fraeman, A A; Grant, J A; Herkenhoff, K E; Ming, D W; Mischna, M A; Rice, M S; Sumner, D A; Vasavada, A R; Yingst, R A

    2016-07-01

    Wind blowing over sand on Earth produces decimeter-wavelength ripples and hundred-meter- to kilometer-wavelength dunes: bedforms of two distinct size modes. Observations from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal that Mars hosts a third stable wind-driven bedform, with meter-scale wavelengths. These bedforms are spatially uniform in size and typically have asymmetric profiles with angle-of-repose lee slopes and sinuous crest lines, making them unlike terrestrial wind ripples. Rather, these structures resemble fluid-drag ripples, which on Earth include water-worked current ripples, but on Mars instead form by wind because of the higher kinematic viscosity of the low-density atmosphere. A reevaluation of the wind-deposited strata in the Burns formation (about 3.7 billion years old or younger) identifies potential wind-drag ripple stratification formed under a thin atmosphere.

  19. Large wind ripples on Mars: A record of atmospheric evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotre, M. G. A.; Ewing, R. C.; Lamb, M. P.; Fischer, W. W.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Rubin, D. M.; Lewis, K. W.; Ballard, M. J.; Day, M.; Gupta, S.; Banham, S. G.; Bridges, N. T.; Des Marais, D. J.; Fraeman, A. A.; Grant, J. A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Ming, D. W.; Mischna, M. A.; Rice, M. S.; Sumner, D. A.; Vasavada, A. R.; Yingst, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    Wind blowing over sand on Earth produces decimeter-wavelength ripples and hundred-meter- to kilometer-wavelength dunes: bedforms of two distinct size modes. Observations from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal that Mars hosts a third stable wind-driven bedform, with meter-scale wavelengths. These bedforms are spatially uniform in size and typically have asymmetric profiles with angle-of-repose lee slopes and sinuous crest lines, making them unlike terrestrial wind ripples. Rather, these structures resemble fluid-drag ripples, which on Earth include water-worked current ripples, but on Mars instead form by wind because of the higher kinematic viscosity of the low-density atmosphere. A reevaluation of the wind-deposited strata in the Burns formation (about 3.7 billion years old or younger) identifies potential wind-drag ripple stratification formed under a thin atmosphere.

  20. Calibration and validation of a sand model considering the effects of wave-induced principal stress axes rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Peng; WANG Zhongtao; LI Xinzhong; CHAN Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Principal stress axes rotation influences the stress-strain behavior of sand under wave loading. A constitutive model for sand, which considers principal stress orientation and is based on generalized plasticity theory, is proposed. The new model, which employs stress invariants and a discrete memory factor during reloading, is original because it quantifies model parameters using experimental data. Four sets of hollow torsion experiments were conducted to calibrate the parameters and predict the capability of the proposed model, which describes the effects of principal stress orientation on the behavior of sand. The results prove the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method.

  1. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Malerba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  2. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Paola; Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  3. Permeation through graphene ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tao; He, Guangyu; Wu, Xu; Ren, Jindong; Guo, Hongxuan; Kong, Yuhan; Iwai, Hideo; Fujita, Daisuke; Gao, Hongjun; Guo, Haiming; Liu, Yingchun; Xu, Mingsheng

    2017-06-01

    Real graphene sheets show limited anti-permeation performance deviating from the ideally flat honeycomb carbon lattice that is impermeable to gases. Ripples in graphene are prevalent and they could significantly influence carrier transport. However, little attention has been paid to the role of ripples in the permeation properties of graphene. Here, we report that gases can permeate through graphene ripples at room temperature. The feasibility of gas permeation through graphene ripples is determined by detecting the initial oxidation sites of Cu surface covered with isolated graphene domain. Nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations demonstrate that the oxygen atom permeation occurs via the formation of C-O-C bond, in which process the energy barrier through the rippled graphene lattice is much smaller than that through a flat graphene lattice, rendering permeation through ripples more favorable. Combining with the recent advances in atoms intercalation between graphene and metal substrate for transfer-free and electrically insulated graphene, this discovery provides new perspectives regarding graphene’s limited anti-permeation performance and evokes for rational design of graphene-based encapsulation for barrier and selective gas separation applications through ripple engineering.

  4. Dependence of ripple dimensions on cohesive and non-cohesive bed properties in the intertidal Dee Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Ian; Thorne, Peter; Baas, Jacobus; O'Boyle, Louise; Cooke, Richard; Amoudry, Laurent; Bell, Paul; Aspden, Rebecca; Bass, Sarah; Davies, Alan; Hope, Julie; Malarkey, Jonathan; Manning, Andrew; Parsons, Daniel; Paterson, David; Peakall, Jeffrey; Schindler, Robert; Ye, Leiping

    2014-05-01

    There is a need to better understand the effects of cohesive and mixed sediments on coastal processes, to improve sediment transport models for the management of coastal erosion, siltation of navigation channels and habitat change. Although reasonable sediment transport predictors are available for pure sands, it still is not the case for mixed cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. Existing predictors mostly relate ripple dimensions to hydrodynamic conditions and median sediment grain diameter, assuming a narrow unimodal particle size distribution. Properties typical of mixed conditions, such as composition and cohesion for example, are not usually taken into account. This presents severe shortcomings to predictors' abilities. Indeed, laboratory experiments using mixed cohesive sediments have shown that bedform dimensions decrease with increasing bed mud content. In the field, one may expect current predictors to match data for well-sorted sands closely, but poorly for mixed sediments. Our work is part of the COHBED project and aims to: (1) examine, in field conditions, if ripple dimensions are significantly different for mixed cohesive sediment beds compared to beds with pure sand; (2) compare the field data with laboratory results that showed reduced ripple length due to cohesive mud content; and (3) assess the performance of a selection of ripple predictors for mixed sediment data. The COHBED project was set up to undertake laboratory experiments and fieldwork to study how physical and biological processes influence bedform development in a mixed cohesive-cohesionless sediment environment. As part of COHBED, a suite of instruments was deployed on tidal flats in the Dee Estuary (on the NW coast of England), collecting co-located measurements of the hydrodynamics, suspended sediment properties and bed morphology. The instruments occupied three sites collecting data over different bed compositions during a two week period (21 May to 4 June 2013). One site was

  5. Research on The Technique of Suppression of BUS Ripple Wave Using Active Filter Circuit in UPS%有源滤波电路抑制UPS电源BUS电压纹波技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张迎新

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, one type of active filter circuit is added into the half bridge inverter group. Relevant circuit model is established, voltage and current double control loop is also designed 3 The technique of suppression of BUS ripple wave is discussed based on the circuit architectare. Simulation results show that the BUS ripple voltage is decreased to about one third through the active filter circuit, experiment results show the BUS ripple voltage is decreased to one half. Both results verify feasibility of the filter circuit.%在半桥逆变电路拓扑中加入有源滤波电路,建立基于该滤波电路的电路分析模型,设计了电压、电流双环控制回路,探讨了基于此电路架构抑制BUS电压纹波技术.仿真结果表明在有滤波电路比没有滤波电路的情况下,BUS电压纹波降为原来的三分之一左右,实验结果显示在该情况下BUS电压纹波减小了约一倍,理论和仿真结果均验证该滤波电路的适用性.

  6. Rippling of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Maria; Thompson-Flagg, Rebecca; Marder, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Experiments found that free standing, single-layer graphene sheets display ripples [1]. Here we show that graphene can develop ripples as a consequence of adsorbed molecules sitting on random sites. The adsorbates cause the bonds between the carbon atoms to lengthen slightly. Static buckles then result from a mechanism like the one that leads to buckling of leaves. Ripples caused by roughly 20% coverage of adsorbates are consistent with experimental observation. We show why this mechanism is more likely to explain ripples than are thermal fluctuations or the Mermin-Wagner theorem (previously invoked [2]). This work was recently published [3]. [4pt] [1] J. C. Meyer, A. K. Geim, M. I. Katsnelson, K. S. Novoselov, T. J. Booth, and S. Roth, Nature, 446, 60 (2007). [0pt] [2] A. Fasolino, J. H. Los, and M. I. Katsnelson, Nature Materials, 6, 858, (2007). [0pt] [3] R. Thompson-Flagg, M. J. B. Moura, and M. Marder, EPL, 85, 46002 (2009).

  7. Mathematical model of wave transformation over radial sand ridge field on continental shelf of South Yellow Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-zhong YANG

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available According to a deformed mild-slope equation derived by Guang-wen Hong and an enhanced numerical method, a wave refraction-diffraction nonlinear mathematical model that takes tidal level change and the high-order bathymetry factor into account has been developed. The deformed mild-slope equation is used to eliminate the restriction of wave length on calculation steps. Using the hard disk to record data during the calculation process, the enhanced numerical method can save computer memory space to a certain extent, so that a large-scale sea area can be calculated with high-resolution grids. This model was applied to wave field integral calculation over a radial sand ridge field in the South Yellow Sea. The results demonstrate some features of the wave field: (1 the wave-height contour lines are arc-shaped near the shore; (2 waves break many times when they propagate toward the shore; (3 wave field characteristics on the northern and southern sides of Huangshayang are different; and (4 the characteristics of wave distribution match the terrain features. The application of this model in the region of the radial sand ridge field suggests that it is a feasible way to analyze wave refraction-diffraction effects under natural sea conditions.

  8. Electromagnetic effects on rippling instability and tokamak edge fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Sadayoshi; Saleem, Hamid [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Electromagnetic effects on rippling mode are investigated as a cause of low frequency electromagnetic fluctuations in tokamak edge region. It is shown that, in a current-carrying resistive plasma, the purely growing electrostatic rippling mode can turn out to be an electromagnetic oscillatory instability. The resistivity fluctuation and temperature gradient are the main sources of this instability, which requires both parallel and perpendicular wave vectors. The Alfven waves in a coupled dispersion relation are found heavily damped in such dissipative plasmas. (author)

  9. Two-dimensional vertical moisture-pressure dynamics above groundwater waves: Sand flume experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoushtari, Seyed Mohammad Hossein Jazayeri; Cartwright, Nick; Perrochet, Pierre; Nielsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new laboratory dataset on the moisture-pressure relationship above a dispersive groundwater wave in a two-dimensional vertical unconfined sand flume aquifer driven by simple harmonic forcing. A total of five experiments were conducted in which all experimental parameters were kept constant except for the oscillation period, which ranged from 268 s to 2449 s between tests. Moisture content and suction head sensor pairings were co-located at two locations in the unsaturated zone both approximately 0.2 m above the mean watertable elevation and respectively 0.3 m and 0.75 m from the driving head boundary. For all oscillation periods except for the shortest (T = 268s), the formation of a hysteretic moisture-pressure scanning loop was observed. Consistent with the decay of the saturated zone groundwater wave, the size of the observed moisture-pressure scanning loops decayed with increasing distance landward and the decay rate is larger for the shorter oscillation periods. At the shortest period (T = 268s), the observed moisture-pressure relationship was observed to be non-hysteretic but with a capillary capacity that differs from that of the static equilibrium wetting and drying curves. This finding is consistent with observations from existing one-dimensional vertical sand column experiments. The relative damping of the moisture content with distance landward is higher than that for the suction head consistent with the fact that transmission of pressure through a porous medium occurs more readily than mass transfer. This is further supported by the fact that observed phase lags for the unsaturated zone variables (i.e. suction head and moisture content) relative to the driving head are greater than the saturated zone variables (i.e. piezometric head). Harmonic analysis of the data reveals no observable generation of higher harmonics in either moisture or pressure despite the strongly non-linear relationship between the two. In addition, a phase lag

  10. Experimental study on impact-induced seismic wave propagating through quartz sand simulating asteroid regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsue, Kazuma; Arakawa, Masahiko; Yasui, Minami; Matsumoto, Rie; Tsujido, Sayaka; Takano, Shota; Hasegawa, Sunao

    2015-08-01

    Introduction: Recent spacecraft surveys clarified that asteroid surfaces were covered with regolith made of boulders and pebbles such as that found on the asteroid Itokawa. It was also found that surface morphologies of asteroids formed on the regolith layer were modified. For example, the high-resolution images of the asteroid Eros revealed the evidence of the downslope movement of the regolith layer, then it could cause the degradation and the erasure of small impact crater. One possible process to explain these observations is the regolith layer collapse caused by seismic vibration after projectile impacts. The impact-induced seismic wave might be an important physical process affecting the morphology change of regolith layer on asteroid surfaces. Therefore, it is significant for us to know the relationship between the impact energy and the impact-induced seismic wave. So in this study, we carried out impact cratering experiments in order to observe the seismic wave propagating through the target far from the impact crater.Experimental method: Impact cratering experiments were conducted by using a single stage vertical gas gun set at Kobe Univ and a two-stage vertical gas gun set at ISAS. We used quartz sands with the particle diameter of 500μm, and the bulk density of 1.48g/cm3. The projectile was a ball made of polycarbonate with the diameter of 4.75mm and aluminum, titan, zirconia, stainless steel, cupper, tungsten carbide projectile with the diameter of 2mm. These projectiles were launched at the impact velocity from 0.2 to 7km/s. The target was set in a vacuum chamber evacuated below 10 Pa. We measured the seismic wave by using a piezoelectric uniaxial accelerometer.Result: The impact-induced seismic wave was measured to show a large single peak and found to attenuate with the propagation distance. The maximum acceleration of the seismic wave was recognized to have a good relationship with the normalized distance x/R, where x is the propagation distance

  11. Electromagnetic wave attenuation due to the charged particles in dust&sand (DUSA) storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, X. Q.; Xie, L.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we calculated the attenuation of the electromagnetic waves (EMWs) propagating through the dust&sand (DUSA) storms using the predicting model based on Mie theory, in which the charges carried on the DUSA particles, the ambient relative humidity (RH) and the particle size distribution are considered simultaneously. It can be found that the charges carried on the DUSA particles and the RH can change the value of the absorption and scattering efficiency, but they can't change the domain attenuation mechanism caused by the DUSA storms in the EMWs frequency regions (3 GHz, 4 GHz), (8 GHz, 40 GHz) and (75 GHz, 100 GHz). Whatever the DUSA storms are formed by equal-size particles or the mixed-size particles, the charge carried on the particle surface and the RH have a significant impact on the attenuation caused by the DUSA storms, and the change ratio of the attenuation caused by the charge or RH depends on the particle size. By the comparison of the calculated attenuation with the measured one, we found that the charges carried on the particles and the RH will be important factors to affect the attenuation of the EMWs.

  12. Ripple reduction control of the undulation pump total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Itsuro; Chinzei, Tsuneo; Mochizuki, Shuichi; Abe, Yusuke; Isoyama, Takashi; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka; Suzuki, Takafumi; Karita, Tatsuro; Ono, Toshiya; Kouno, Akimasa; Ishimaru, Mitsuhiko; Baba, Atsushi; Ozeki, Toshinaga; Tohyama, Takahiro; Kobayashi Si, Shin-ichi; Imachi, Kou

    2002-01-01

    An undulation pump total artificial heart (UPTAH) in which the revolutions of the motor are converted to undulation motion of a disk has been developed. In an experiment, a goat using the UPTAH survived for 54 days. However, a large ripple was observed in the device's output pressure and flow waveform. In calculating the spectrum of the ripple, we found that the ripple mainly comprised 2 frequency sine waves: 1 having the same frequency as and 1 having double the frequency of the motor revolutions. To reduce the ripple, 2 sine waves, 1 having the same frequency as and 1 having double the frequency of the motor revolutions, were provided to the motor current to modulate the pulse width of the pulse width modulation controlling the motor revolutions. This ripple control method reduced the pressure ripple by 90% in a mock circulation and by 70% in animal experiments. These results revealed that the ripple generated in the UPTAH could be controlled through the use of motor control software.

  13. Characteristics of ripple structures revealed in OH airglow images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Li, Tao; Dou, Xiankang; Fang, Xin; Cao, Bing; She, Chiao-Yao; Nakamura, Takuji; Manson, Alan; Meek, Chris; Thorsen, Denise

    2017-03-01

    Small-scale ripple structures observed in OH airglow images are most likely induced by either dynamic instability due to large wind shear or convective instability due to superadiabatic lapse rate. Using the data set taken in the mesopause region with an OH all-sky imager at Yucca Ridge Field Station, Colorado (40.7°N, 104.9°W), from September 2003 to December 2005, we study the characteristics and seasonal variations of ripple structures. By analyzing the simultaneous background wind and temperature observed by the nearby sodium temperature/wind lidar at Fort Collins, Colorado (40.6°N, 105°W), and a nearby medium-frequency radar at Platteville, Colorado (40.2°N, 105.8°W), we are able to statistically study the possible relation between ripples and the background atmosphere conditions. Characteristics and seasonal variations of ripples are presented in detail in this study. The occurrence frequency of ripples exhibits clear seasonal variability, with peak in autumn. The occurrence of ripples shows a local time dependence, which is most likely associated with the solar tides. The lifetime and spatial scale of these ripples are typically 5-20 min and 5-10 km, respectively, and most of the ripples move preferentially either southward or northward. However, more than half of the observed ripples do not advect with background flow; they have higher Richardson numbers than those ripples that advect with background flow. It is possible that they are not instability features but wave structures that are hard to be distinguished from the real instability features.

  14. Wave-induced flow and its influence on ridge erosion and channel deposition in Lanshayang channel of radial sand ridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈可峰; 安翔; 陆培东; 张玮; 徐卓

    2014-01-01

    Very limited modeling studies were available of the wave-induced current under the complex hydrodynamic conditions in the South Yellow Sea Radial Sand Ridge area (SYSRSR). Partly it is due to the difficulties in estimating the influence of the wave-induced current in this area. In this study, a coupled 3-D storm-surge-wave model is built. In this model, the time-dependent varying Collins coefficient with the water level method (TCL) are used. The wave-flow environment in the Lanshayang Channel (LSYC) during the “Winnie” typhoon is successfully represented by this model. According to the modelling results, at a high water level (HWL), the wave-induced current similar to the long-shore current will emerge in the shallow area of the ridges, and has two different motion trends correlated with the morphological characteristics of the ridges. The wave-induced current velocity could be as strong as 1 m/s, which is at the same magnitude as the tidal current. This result is verified by the bathymetric changes in the LSYC during the “Matsa” typhoon. Thus, the wave-induced current may be one of the driven force of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR. These conclusions will help to further study the mechanism of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR.

  15. Ripple marks as indicators of Late Ordovician sedimentary environments in Northwest Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hints, Linda

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Late Ordovician sedimentary environments promoting the development of ripple marks in shallow shelf carbonate deposits of northern Estonia are analysed. Ripple marks are described using different parameters (wavelength, height, and wave and asymmetry indexes. Rippled bedding is exposed in a large area in the uppermost Keila Stage, on the upper boundary of micritic-peloidal limestones (Pääsküla Member of the Kahula Formation. Beds with ripples are overlain by organodetrital lime­stones (Saue Member of the Kahula Formation transitional to grainstones or mud mounds of the Vasalemma Formation. The content of peloids in the Pääsküla Member is relatively high and their size (0.04–0.06 mm corresponds to the grain size of sediments capable of forming ripple marks. Weakly asymmetrical sinusoidal ripple marks are oriented in a north–south direction and have likely been formed in the shallow-water zone of the shoal at some distance from the shore. The wave-current origin of the studied ripples can be inferred from ripple indexes. Ripples were subjected to some erosion and in the shallowing-upwards conditions a rocky bottom with the Trypanites ichnofacies evolved. The rippled surface terminates a small-scale cycle (parasequence of the depositional sequence.

  16. The properties and causes of rippling in quasi-perpendicular collisionless shock fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. Lowe

    Full Text Available The overall structure of quasi-perpendicular, high Mach number collisionless shocks is controlled to a large extent by ion reflection at the shock ramp. Departure from a strictly one-dimensional structure is indicated by simulation results showing that the surface of such shocks is rippled, with variations in the density and all field components. We present a detailed analysis of these shock ripples, using results from a two-dimensional hybrid (particle ions, electron fluid simulation. The process that generates the ripples is poorly understood, because the large gradients at the shock ramp make it difficult to identify instabilities. Our analysis reveals new features of the shock ripples, which suggest the presence of a surface wave mode dominating the shock normal magnetic field component of the ripples, as well as whistler waves excited by reflected ions.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies; shock waves; waves and instabilities

  17. Analysis of ripple formation in single crystal spot welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaz, M.; Corrigan, D.; Boatner, L. A.

    1997-01-01

    Stationary spot welds have been made at the (001) surface of Fe-l5%Ni-15%Cr single crystals using a Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA). On the top surface of the spot welds, very regular and concentric ripples were observed after solidification by differential interference color microscopy. Their height (typically 1--5 micrometers and spacing, typically approximately 60 micrometers) decreased with the radius of the pool. These ripples were successfully accounted for in terms of capillary-wave theory using the fundamental mode frequency f(sub 0) given by the first zero of the zero-order Bessel function. The spacing d between the ripples was then equated to v(sub s)/f(sub 0), where v(sub s) is the solidification rate. From the measured ripple spacing, the velocity of the pool was deduced as a function of the radius, and this velocity was in good agreement with the results of a heat-flow simulation.

  18. Incipient Motion of Sand and Oil Agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T. R.; Dalyander, S.; Jenkins, R. L., III; Penko, A.; Long, J.; Frank, D. P.; Braithwaite, E. F., III; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Weathered oil mixed with sediment in the surf zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, forming large mats of sand and oil. Wave action fragmented the mats into sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) with diameters of about 1 to 10 cm. These SOAs were transported by waves and currents along the Gulf Coast, and have been observed on beaches for years following the spill. SOAs are composed of 70%-95% sand by mass, with an approximate density of 2107 kg/m³. To measure the incipient motion of SOAs, experiments using artificial SOAs were conducted in the Small-Oscillatory Flow Tunnel at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory under a range of hydrodynamic forcing. Spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs ranging in size from 0.5 to 10 cm were deployed on a fixed flat bed, a fixed rippled bed, and a movable sand bed. In the case of the movable sand bed, SOAs were placed both proud and partially buried. Motion was tracked with high-definition video and with inertial measurement units embedded in some of the SOAs. Shear stress and horizontal pressure gradients, estimated from velocity measurements made with a Nortek Vectrino Profiler, were compared with observed mobility to assess formulations for incipient motion. For SOAs smaller than 1 cm in diameter, incipient motion of spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs was consistent with predicted critical stress values. The measured shear stress at incipient motion of larger, spherical SOAs was lower than predicted, indicating an increased dependence on the horizontal pressure gradient. In contrast, the measured shear stress required to move ellipsoidal SOAs was higher than predicted, even compared to values modified for larger particles in mixed-grain riverine environments. The laboratory observations will be used to improve the prediction of incipient motion, transport, and seafloor interaction of SOAs.

  19. Shape and Dimensions of Ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl

    In this work, the flow and bed load transport over ripple profiles under the influence of oscillatory will be investigated. The investigation is made through a parametric study, where the bed shape and the ripple steepness are varied. For the sediment transport, the Shields parameter relative to ...

  20. Transduction on Kadanoff Sand Pile Model Avalanches, Application to Wave Pattern Emergence

    CERN Document Server

    Perrot, Kévin

    2011-01-01

    Sand pile models are dynamical systems describing the evolution from $N$ stacked grains to a stable configuration. It uses local rules to depict grain moves and iterate it until reaching a fixed configuration from which no rule can be applied. The main interest of sand piles relies in their {\\em Self Organized Criticality} (SOC), the property that a small perturbation | adding some sand grains | on a fixed configuration has uncontrolled consequences on the system, involving an arbitrary number of grain fall. Physicists L. Kadanoff {\\em et al} inspire KSPM, a model presenting a sharp SOC behavior, extending the well known {\\em Sand Pile Model}. In KSPM($D$), we start from a pile of $N$ stacked grains and apply the rule: $D-1$ grains can fall from column $i$ onto the $D-1$ adjacent columns to the right if the difference of height between columns $i$ and $i+1$ is greater or equal to $D$. This paper develops a formal background for the study of KSPM fixed points. This background, resumed in a finite state word tr...

  1. Modelling of sand transport under wave-generated sheet flows with a RANS diffusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    A 1DV-RANS diffusion model is used to study sand transport processes in oscillatory flat-bed/sheet flow conditions. The central aim is the verification of the model with laboratory data and to identify processes controlling the magnitude and direction (‘onshore’/‘offshore’) of the net time-averaged

  2. Infragravity-wave dynamics in shallow water : energy dissipation and role in sand suspension and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, A.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Infragravity waves (20-200 s) receive their energy from sea-swell waves (2-20 s), and are thought to be important to beach erosion during storms, when they can reach up to several meters in height. Numerous studies have observed that on sandy beaches infragravity waves can lose a large part of their

  3. Infragravity-wave dynamics in shallow water : energy dissipation and role in sand suspension and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, A.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Infragravity waves (20-200 s) receive their energy from sea-swell waves (2-20 s), and are thought to be important to beach erosion during storms, when they can reach up to several meters in height. Numerous studies have observed that on sandy beaches infragravity waves can lose a large part of their

  4. Suppressing rippling with minimized corner rounding through OPC fragmentation optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Wei, Alexander; Wilkinson, William; Chen, Norman

    2016-10-01

    As technology shrinks, the requirements placed on the post-OPC solution become so exacting that even small residual optical effects are significant. Simultaneously minimizing rippling and corner rounding cannot be accom- plished in parallel in wafer patterning especially when complex asymmetric pixelated sources are used. While either effect can be moderated by accurate application of optical proximity correction, they are both charac- teristic of unfiltered diffraction due to asymmetric illumination or design geometry and will remain inherent. Corrections that over emphasize reduced corner-rounding necessarily sacrifice edge convergence, resulting in a standing wave or unacceptable rippling along an entire edge. OPC can be used to reduce the magnitude of this rippling, but fragment placing is extremely critical. In this paper, we discuss optimized OPC fragmentation that offers balanced consideration to suppressing rippling and minimizing corner rounding. Specifically, we correlate design shapes with simulated post-OPC contours to account for design geometry-dependent rippling signature given existing illumination conditions. In contrast to adaptive fragmentation that relies on multiple iterations of simulation of intensity extrema redistribution, our method predicts the optimum contour as allowed by process and fragments the mask accordingly. The maximum imaging curvature resolvable by process coupled with the rippling signature, gives rise to the exact locations of the inflection points of the wafer contour. From there we achieve the best correction results by segmenting edges at the inflection points.

  5. Unclassical ripple patterns in single-crystal silicon produced by femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710119 (China); Cheng Guanghua [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi' an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710119 (China); Feng Qiang, E-mail: qfeng@skl.ustb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); National Center for Materials Service Safety, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transition from classical ripples to unclassical ripples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser fluence has a significant effect on the unclassical ripple period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship between structures and their parametric dependence is established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Capillary wave is responsible for the formation of unclassical ripples. - Abstract: Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) in single-crystal silicon upon irradiation with multiple linearly polarized femtosecond (fs) laser pulses (120 fs, 800 nm, 1 kHz) were investigated under different laser fluence and pulse number. Unclassical ripples (U-ripples), which were nearly parallel to the polarization of the laser beam, were observed to form gradually on the top of classical ripples with the effective pulse number. Their periods were significantly longer than the laser wavelength, and increased with increasing both the laser fluence and pulse number in the current study. The relationship between the types of ripple patterns and their parametric dependence was established. The mechanism of U-ripple formation was attributed to the capillary wave, arising from the inhomogeneous temperature gradient combined with the electric field of the pulses in the molten surface layer.

  6. Bed forms created by simulated waves and currents in a large flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Rubin, David M.; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Mokudai, Kuniyasu; Hanes, Daniel M.

    2007-01-01

    The morphology and evolution of bed forms created by combinations of waves and currents were investigated using an oscillating plate in a 4-m-wide flume. Current speed ranged from 0 to 30 cm/s, maximum oscillatory velocity ranged from 20 to 48 cm/s, oscillation period was 8 s (except for one run with 12 s period), and the median grain size was 0.27 mm. The angle between oscillations and current was 90°, 60°, or 45°. At the end of each run the sand bed was photographed and ripple dimensions were measured. Ripple wavelength was also determined from sonar images collected throughout the runs. Increasing the ratio of current to wave (i.e., oscillatory) velocity decreased ripple height and wavelength, in part because of the increased fluid excursion during the wave period. Increasing the ratio of current to waves, or decreasing the angle between current and waves, increased the three-dimensionality of bed forms. During the runs, ripple wavelength increased by a factor of about 2. The average number of wave periods for evolution of ripple wavelength to 90% of its final value was 184 for two-dimensional ripples starting from a flat bed. Bed form orientations at the end of each run were compared to four potential controlling factors: the directions of waves, current, maximum instantaneous bed shear stress, and maximum gross bed form normal transport (MGBNT). The directions of waves and of MGBNT were equally good predictors of bed form orientations, and were significantly better than the other two factors.

  7. Passband ripple observed in MSFVW delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talisa, S. H.; Emtage, P. R.; Daniel, M. R.; Adam, J. D.

    1986-09-01

    It is suggested that the long-period (100-200 MHz) ripple noted in magnetostatic forward volume wave (MSFVW) delay lines comprising YIG samples a few millimeters wide by a few centimeters long is due to the nonuniformity in the DC demagnetizing field across the YIG sample width. The results indicate that even very small variations in the internal field near the center of the sample can cause the MSFVWs to focus at distances close to the input transducers, and that ray bending is stronger outside the central half of the sample. Experimental studies confirm the strong effects of sample width on the breadth and smoothness of the passband.

  8. Wavelength selection of rippling patterns in myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L. L.; Glavan, A.; Marquina, A.

    2016-01-01

    Rippling patterns of myxobacteria appear in starving colonies before they aggregate to form fruiting bodies. These periodic traveling cell density waves arise from the coordination of individual cell reversals, resulting from an internal clock regulating them and from contact signaling during bacterial collisions. Here we revisit a mathematical model of rippling in myxobacteria due to Igoshin et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 14913 (2001), 10.1073/pnas.221579598 and Phys. Rev. E 70, 041911 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.70.041911]. Bacteria in this model are phase oscillators with an extra internal phase through which they are coupled to a mean field of oppositely moving bacteria. Previously, patterns for this model were obtained only by numerical methods, and it was not possible to find their wave number analytically. We derive an evolution equation for the reversal point density that selects the pattern wave number in the weak signaling limit, shows the validity of the selection rule by solving numerically the model equations, and describes other stable patterns in the strong signaling limit. The nonlocal mean-field coupling tends to decohere and confine patterns. Under appropriate circumstances, it can annihilate the patterns leaving a constant density state via a nonequilibrium phase transition reminiscent of destruction of synchronization in the Kuramoto model.

  9. Numerical modeling of wave overwash on low-crested sand barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, T.Q.; Verhagen, H.J.; Visser, P.J.; Stive, M.

    2006-01-01

    For management of coastal breaching hazards it is critical to be able to assess the potential of coastal barrier breaching as a result of wave actions during storm surges (wave overwash). This phenomenon is known as the breach initiation phase; the mechanisms behind this are not very well understood

  10. The Use of GPR in Delineating an Iron Sand Boundary and the Determination of Its Electromagnetic Wave Velocity: A Case Study in Jepara, Central Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bijaksana

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Exploring the vertical extent of iron sand deposit is challenging as conventional geophysical methods (electrical resistivity, geomagnetic, and seismic refraction are inappropriate and unsuccessful in delineating the iron sand deposit from the bedrock. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR offers a solution to the above problem as radar is not affected negatively by the physical properties of iron sand. In the year 2003, a RAMAC’s GPR survey was carried out in the coast of Bayuran in the Regency of Jepara, Central Java to map the distribution of sub-bottom iron sand. The sand is highly magnetic. The survey used 100 MHz antennas. The survey is also complimented by a novel method in determining the electromagnetic (EM wave velocity of iron sand. Combination of reflection profiling and CMP sounding was deployed. Results of CMP sounding were processed using CMP-semblance analysis that produces the RMS velocity in velocity-time spectra. The RMS velocity is then converted to interval velocity using Dix’s formula and is found to be about 135 mm/ns. Meanwhile, combination of magnetic susceptibility, relative permittivity, and dissipation factors produces radiowaves velocity of iron sand as a function of frequency. The velocities of radiowaves estimated from laboratory match that estimated from CMP analysis.

  11. Resonant interaction of acoustic waves with subaqueous bedforms: Sand dunes in the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Linus Y S; Chang, Andrea Y Y; Reeder, D Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    The large subaqueous sand dunes in the South China Sea are expected to produce the coupling of energy between acoustic normal modes. In this letter, resonant interaction between acoustic propagating modes and subaqueous bedforms are numerically investigated as a function of bedform wavelength, acoustic frequency and bedform packet length. The results demonstrate that bedform wavelength impacts acoustic mode coupling behavior, with the principal transfer of energy occurring between acoustic modes whose eigenvalue difference is equal to the peak value in the bedform wavenumber spectrum. The observed effect of wavelength is greater than that of acoustic frequency and bedform packet length.

  12. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  13. Planet-wide sand motion on mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.T.; Bourke, M.C.; Geissler, P.E.; Banks, M.E.; Colon, C.; Diniega, S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hansen, C.J.; Mattson, S.; McEwen, A.S.; Mellon, M.T.; Stantzos, N.; Thomson, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data, images of Mars showed no direct evidence for dune and ripple motion. This was consistent with climate models and lander measurements indicating that winds of sufficient intensity to mobilize sand were rare in the low-density atmosphere. We show that many sand ripples and dunes across Mars exhibit movement of as much as a few meters per year, demonstrating that Martian sand migrates under current conditions in diverse areas of the planet. Most motion is probably driven by wind gusts that are not resolved in global circulation models. A past climate with a thicker atmosphere is only required to move large ripples that contain coarse grains. ?? 2012 Geological Society of America.

  14. Neocortical very fast oscillations (ripples, 80-200 Hz) during seizures: intracellular correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, François; Timofeev, Igor; Steriade, Mircea

    2003-02-01

    Multi-site field potential and intracellular recordings from various neocortical areas were used to study very fast oscillations or ripples (80-200 Hz) during electrographic seizures in cats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. The animals displayed spontaneously occurring and electrically induced seizures comprising spike-wave complexes (2-3 Hz) and fast runs (10-20 Hz). Neocortical ripples had much higher amplitudes during seizures than during the slow oscillation preceding the onset of seizures. A series of experimental data from the present study supports the hypothesis that ripples are implicated in seizure initiation. Ripples were particularly strong at the onset of seizures and halothane, which antagonizes the occurrence of ripples, also blocked seizures. The firing of electrophysiologically defined cellular types was phase-locked with ripples in simultaneously recorded field potentials. This indicates that ripples during paroxysmal events are associated with a coordination of firing in a majority of neocortical neurons. This was confirmed with dual intracellular recordings. Based on the amplitude that neocortical ripples reach during paroxysmal events, we propose a mechanism by which neocortical ripples during normal network activity could actively participate in the initiation of seizures on reaching a certain threshold amplitude. This mechanism involves a vicious feedback loop in which very fast oscillations in field potentials are a reflection of synchronous action potentials, and in turn these oscillations help generate and synchronize action potentials in adjacent neurons through electrical interactions.

  15. Excitation and inhibition compete to control spiking during hippocampal ripples: intracellular study in behaving mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Daniel F; Peyrache, Adrien; Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Vallentin, Daniela; Long, Michael A; Buzsáki, György

    2014-12-01

    High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation of the rhythm and the recruitment of spikes from pyramidal neurons are still poorly understood. Using intracellular, sharp electrode recordings in freely moving, drug-free mice, we observed consistent large depolarizations in CA1 pyramidal cells during sharp wave ripples, which are associated with ripple frequency fluctuation of the membrane potential ("intracellular ripple"). Despite consistent depolarization, often exceeding pre-ripple spike threshold values, current pulse-induced spikes were strongly suppressed, indicating that spiking was under the control of concurrent shunting inhibition. Ripple events were followed by a prominent afterhyperpolarization and spike suppression. Action potentials during and outside ripples were orthodromic, arguing against ectopic spike generation, which has been postulated by computational models of ripple generation. These findings indicate that dendritic excitation of pyramidal neurons during ripples is countered by shunting of the membrane and postripple silence is mediated by hyperpolarizing inhibition.

  16. Bathymetric mapping of submarine sand waves using multiangle sun glitter imagery: a case of the Taiwan Banks with ASTER stereo imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-guo; Yang, Kang; Lou, Xiu-lin; Li, Dong-ling; Shi, Ai-qin; Fu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Submarine sand waves are visible in optical sun glitter remote sensing images and multiangle observations can provide valuable information. We present a method for bathymetric mapping of submarine sand waves using multiangle sun glitter information from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer stereo imagery. Based on a multiangle image geometry model and a sun glitter radiance transfer model, sea surface roughness is derived using multiangle sun glitter images. These results are then used for water depth inversions based on the Alpers-Hennings model, supported by a few true depth data points (sounding data). Case study results show that the inversion and true depths match well, with high-correlation coefficients and root-mean-square errors from 1.45 to 2.46 m, and relative errors from 5.48% to 8.12%. The proposed method has some advantages over previous methods in that it requires fewer true depth data points, it does not require environmental parameters or knowledge of sand-wave morphology, and it is relatively simple to operate. On this basis, we conclude that this method is effective in mapping submarine sand waves and we anticipate that it will also be applicable to other similar topography types.

  17. Modelling of wave propagation over a submerged sand bar using SWASH

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jishad, M.; Vu, T.T.T.; JayaKumar, S.

    for the case of a moderately high wave energy, due to significant variations in the bed morphology, the model under-performed towards the later part of the simulation However, incorporating a modified bathymetry considering the variation in the bed morphology...

  18. Numerical modelling of wave overwash at low-crested sand barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, T.Q.

    2005-01-01

    In overwash beaches, response of a barrier profile as a whole to storm wave attacks can be distinguished into seaward and landward parts that are associated with two respective across-shore driving processes i.e. surge erosion, and overwash. Modeling of overwash relies heavily on the specification o

  19. Ultrasound Wave Attenuation of Grain Refined High – Zinc Aluminium Sand-cast Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krajewski W.K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of measuring attenuation coefficient of the Al-20 wt.% Zn alloy (AlZn20 inoculated with different grain refiners. During experiments the melted alloys were doped with Al-Ti3-C0.15 refining master alloy. Basing on measurements performed by Krautkramer USLT2000 device with 1MHz ultrasound wave frequency it was stated that grain refinement reduces the attenuation coefficient by about 20-25%. However, the examined alloys can be still classified as the high-damping ones of attenuation greater than 150 dB/m.

  20. Ripple-associated high-firing interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    By simultaneously recording the activity of individual neurons and field potentials in freely behaving mice, we found two types of interneurons firing at high frequency in the hippocampal CA1 region, which had high correlations with characteristic sharp wave-associated ripple oscillations (100―250 Hz) during slow-wave sleep. The firing of these two types of interneurons highly synchronized with ripple oscillations during slow-wave sleep, with strongly increased firing rates corresponding to individual ripple episodes. Interneuron type I had at most one spike in each sub-ripple cycle of ripple episodes and the peak firing rate was 310±33.17 Hz. Interneuron type II had one or two spikes in each sub-ripple cycle and the peak firing rate was 410±47.61 Hz. During active exploration, their firing was phase locked to theta oscillations with the highest probability at the trough of theta wave. Both two types of interneurons increased transiently their firing rates responding to the startling shake stimuli. The results showed that these two types of high-frequency interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region were involved in the modulation of the hippocampal neural network during different states.

  1. Ripple-associated high-firing interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying; ZHANG Lu; PAN JingWei; XIE Kun; LI ShiQi; WANG ZhiRu; LIN LongNian

    2008-01-01

    By simultaneously recording the activity of individual neurons and field potentials in freely behaving mice, we found two types of interneurons firing at high frequency in the hippocampal CA1 region,which had high correlations with characteristic sharp wave-associated ripple oscillations (100-250 Hz)during slow-wave sleep. The firing of these two types of interneurons highly synchronized with ripple oscillations during slow-wave sleep, with strongly increased firing rates corresponding to individual ripple episodes. Interneuron type Ⅰ had at most one spike in each sub-ripple cycle of ripple episodes and the peak firing rate was 310±33.17 Hz. Interneuron type Ⅱ had one or two spikes in each sub-ripple cycle and the peak firing rate was 410±47.61 Hz. During active exploration, their firing was phase locked to theta oscillations with the highest probability at the trough of theta wave. Both two types of interneurons increased transiently their firing rates responding to the startling shake stimuli. The results showed that these two types of high-frequency interneurone in the hippocsmpal CA1 region were involved in the modulation of the hippocampal neural network during different states.

  2. Magnetic ripple and the modeling of lower-hybrid current drive in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peysson, Y.; Arslanbekov, R.; Basiuk, V.; Carrasco, J.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Bizarro, J.P. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica

    1996-01-01

    Using ray-tracing, a detailed investigation of the lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation in presence of toroidal magnetic field ripple is presented. By coupling ray tracing with a one-dimensional relativistic Fokker-Planck code, simulations of LH experiments have been performed for the Tore Supra tokamak. Taking into account magnetic ripple in LH simulations, a better agreement is found between numerical predictions and experimental observations, such as non-thermal Bremsstrahlung emission, current profile, ripple-induced power losses in local magnetic mirrors, when plasma conditions correspond to the ` `few passes` regime. (author). 47 refs.

  3. Rippling Patterns in Aggregates of Myxobacteria Arise from Cell-Cell Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Uwe; Deutsch, Andreas; Reichenbach, Hans; Bär, Markus

    2002-07-01

    Experiments with myxobacterial aggregates reveal standing waves called rippling patterns. Here these structures are modeled with a simple discrete model based on the interplay between migration and collisions of cells. Head-to-head collisions of cells result in cell reversals. To correctly reproduce the rippling patterns, a refractory phase after each cell reversal has to be assumed, during which further reversal is prohibited. The duration of this phase determines the wavelength and period of the ripple patterns as well as the reversal frequency of single cells.

  4. Effect of Low Energy Waves on the Accumulation and Transport of Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Sand and Pore Water at Freshwater Beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming Zhi; O'Carroll, Denis M; Vogel, Laura J; Robinson, Clare E

    2017-02-24

    Elevated fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in beach sand and pore water represent an important nonpoint source of contamination to surface waters. This study examines the physical processes governing the accumulation and distribution of FIB in a beach aquifer. Field data indicate E. coli and enterococci can be transported 1 and 2 m, respectively, below the water table. Data were used to calibrate a numerical model whereby FIB are delivered to a beach aquifer by wave-induced infiltration across the beach face. Simulations indicate FIB rapidly accumulate in a beach aquifer with FIB primarily associated with sand rather than freely residing in the pore water. Simulated transport of E. coli in a beach aquifer is complex and does not correlate with conservative tracer transport. Beaches with higher wave-induced infiltration rate and vertical infiltration velocity (i.e., beaches with higher beach slope and wave height, and lower terrestrial groundwater discharge) had greater E. coli accumulation and E. coli was transported deeper below the beach face. For certain beach conditions, the amount of FIB accumulated in sand over 5-6 days was found to be sufficient to trigger a beach advisory if eroded to surface water.

  5. Priori knowledge based a bathymetry assessment method using the sun glitter imagery:a case study of sand waves on the Taiwan Banks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Hao; LI Yan; LI Li

    2014-01-01

    High resolution optical satellite imageries containing the sun glitter, similar to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imageries, are useful in identifying and mapping of bottom topography in shallow waters. The errors in the previous studies are corrected, and a method for mapping submarine bottom topography is devel-oped using the sun glitter satellite imagery. The method is established on the basis of empirical description of a sand wave using an equation with two unknowns named r and k . In order to determine r and k , a“trial and error”approach is introduced and testified by a case study on the Taiwan Banks using an ASTER imagery. The results show that the inversed water depths match well with the sounding water depths. The a-greement between the inversed results and the in situ measurements is about 78%by comparing 371 points. Moreover, this method has the advantage in keeping the original appearance of a sand wave, especially in positions around the sand wave crest. The fine agreement indicates that the imaging model is flexible and the approach developed is feasible.

  6. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  7. Coherent transition radiation from REB in plasma ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The coherent transition-radiation emission from an underdense relativistic beam of electrons, travelling through a dense plasma ripple, was studied. The evolution of this radiation field is described by a set of self-consistent pendulum-wave equations. Analytic calculations of the small-signal gain and numerical computations of the nonlinear saturation of this emission are presented. It is shown that such a device may provide a source of tunable coherent radiation ranging from the microwave to the infrared region.

  8. A Rare Chance to Observe a Centimeters Scale Cross-Cutting Rippling on the Lunar Surface: The Chang'e-3 Landing Place on the Mare Imbrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic bodies move in several orbits: in Galaxy, around star, around planet. The moving in keplerian orbits has a wave nature. Lower fr. waves modulate the higher fr. ones making side fr. Centimeter space lunar ripples are calculated and discovered.

  9. Numerical Modeling and Simulation of Wind Blown Sand Morphology under Complex Wind-Flow Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xamxinur Abdikerem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The flow field and the sand flow field constitutive equations are analyzed at first, then the different desert highway numerical models are established by considering the crossroad and by changing the road surface height and air stream flow field, then three kinds of different models with different complex air flow fields are made for simulating the sand ripple formation process by weak coupling of air and sand flow field, and finally the numerical simulations of these models are conducted and the affect process of sand morphology under complex air flow fields are discussed. The results show that under the uniform airflow field, the straight parallel ripple formed and the flared ripple formed in the middle region of the crossroad, and the wavelength of the ripples on the desert highway is bigger than that of the ripples around the road when the road height is higher than that of the sand surface height. Under the nonuniform complex airflow field, the complex curved ripples are formed, and some of the local area, where the whirlwind exits, no ripples are formed.

  10. 一种减小无刷直流电机转矩脉动的广角波控制方法%A wide-angle wave control method of reducing torque ripple for brushless DC motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴春华; 陈国呈; 孙承波

    2007-01-01

    In order to deal with torque pulsation problem caused by traditional control method for brushless DC(BLDC)motor and to achieve high precision and good stability,a novel control strategy is proposed.Compared with the traditional control scheme,by using phase voltage as a control objective and making waveform of phase current approximately quasi-sinusoidal,torque ripple of BLDC motor is reduced from the original 14% to 3.4%,while toque is increased by 3.8%.Furthermore,by detecting zero-crossings of back electromotive force(BEMF)with non-conducting phases,sensorless control is realized.The new control strategy is simple.It carl minimize torque ripple,increase torque,and realize sensorless control for BLDC motor.Simulation and experiments show good performance of BLDC motor by using the new control method.

  11. 基于微观尺度的砂土剪切波速度%Shear wave velocity in sand based on microscopic size

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄博; 夏唐代; 周新民; 刘志军

    2016-01-01

    运用宏观等效与微观接触理论相结合的方法研究砂土剪切波速度。在宏观上将砂土看作均匀连续各向同性介质,在微观尺度上假设砂土为等效球体半径相等、材料性质相同、随机堆积的固体颗粒的集合体,结合颗粒接触理论,引入颗粒形状修正系数,推导出砂土的等效剪切模量和宏观剪切波速度公式。通过定量计算进行参数分析。研究结果表明:孔隙比、砂土颗粒弹性模量、埋深和颗粒形状修正系数对砂土剪切波速的影响显著;有效内摩擦角、砂土颗粒泊松比、砂土密度和与配位数有关的常数对剪切波速影响较小。将理论计算结果与实测值进行对比,吻合较好,验证了本方法的可行性与正确性。%Based on the macroscopic equivalent model and microscopic contact theories, the shear wave velocity was studied. Considered as a kind of homogeneous, continuous and isotropic media macroscopically, the sand was assumed microscopically as an aggregate of randomly packed uniform equivalent spheres with the same material properties. Then, the formulas of the equivalent shear modulus and shear wave velocity in sand were derived by using particle contact theory and by introducing the correcting coefficient of the granule shape. The main influencing factors were analyzed through quantitative calculations. The results indicate that the shear wave velocity is mainly influenced by void ratio, elastic modulus of sand granule, burial depth and the correcting coefficient of the granule shape, while it is hardly influenced by inner friction angle, Poisson’s ratio of sand granule, density of the sand and the constant connected with the coordination number. Through comparison, the calculation results using the present formulas agree well with measured data so as to verify the validity of the proposed method.

  12. Molecular structure of the lecithin ripple phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, AH; Yefimov, S; Mark, AE; Marrink, SJ

    2005-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lecithin lipid bilayers in water as they are cooled from the liquid crystalline phase show the spontaneous formation of rippled bilayers. The ripple consists of two domains of different length and orientation, connected by a kink. The organization of the lipids in

  13. Parallelization of Reversible Ripple-carry Adders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Michael Kirkedal; Axelsen, Holger Bock

    2009-01-01

    The design of fast arithmetic logic circuits is an important research topic for reversible and quantum computing. A special challenge in this setting is the computation of standard arithmetical functions without the generation of \\emph{garbage}. Here, we present a novel parallelization scheme...... wherein $m$ parallel $k$-bit reversible ripple-carry adders are combined to form a reversible $mk$-bit \\emph{ripple-block carry adder} with logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(m+k)$ for a \\emph{minimal} logic depth $\\mathcal{O}(\\sqrt{mk})$, thus improving on the $mk$-bit ripple-carry adder logic depth $\\mathcal......{O}(m\\cdot k)$. The underlying mechanisms of the parallelization scheme are formally proven correct. We also show designs for garbage-less reversible comparison circuits. We compare the circuit costs of the resulting ripple-block carry adder with known optimized reversible ripple-carry adders in measures...

  14. Targets, ripples and spirals in a precipitation system with anomalous dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayass, Mahmoud M; Lagzi, Istvan; Al-Ghoul, Mazen

    2015-08-14

    We present a novel reaction-diffusion system that exhibits three-dimensional superdiffusive traveling waves without utilizing any external forces. These waves include single circular targets, spirals, and ripples as well as phase-like waves. The system is based on the interplay of the precipitation reaction of mercuric iodide in a gel medium, its polymorphic transformation to a different crystalline form, and its redissolution in excess iodide. A phase diagram is constructed as a function of the initial concentrations of the reagents. The spatiotemporal evolution of these waves is thoroughly analyzed and seems to be a consequence of an anomalous dispersion relationship. Pattern selection and wavelengths of propagating waves are found to depend on initial concentrations of the reactants. The breakup of the waves is also investigated. While the breakdown of ripples and spirals is shown to be a consequence of a Doppler-like instability in conjunction with anomalous dispersion, the targets undergo a boundary defect-mediated breakup.

  15. Conceptual study of electron ripple injection for tokamak transport control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Chang, C.S. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Courant Inst. of Mathematical Sciences

    1995-08-01

    A non-intrusive method for inducing radial electric field based on electron ripple injection is under development by the Princeton CDX-U group. The radial electric field is known to play an important role in the L-H and H-VH mode transition according to the recent theoretical and experimental research. It is therefore important to develop a non-intrusive tool to control the radial electric field profile in tokamak plasmas. The present technique utilizes externally-applied local magnetic ripple fields to trap electrons at the edge, allowing them to penetrate towards the plasma center via {gradient}B and curvature drifts, causing the flux surfaces to charge up negatively. Electron cyclotron resonance heating is utilized to increase the trapped population and the electron drift velocity by raising the perpendicular energy of trapped electrons. In order to quantify the effects of cyclotron resonance heating on electrons, the temperature anisotropy of resonant electrons in a tokamak plasma is calculated. For the calculation of anisotropic temperatures, energy moments of the bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck equation with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function for heated electrons are solved, assuming a moderate wave power and a constant quasilinear diffusion coefficient. Simulation using a guiding-center orbit model have been performed to understand the behavior of suprathermal electrons in the presence of ripple fields. Examples for CDX-U and ITER parameters are given.

  16. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  17. Prediction of Ripple Properties in Shelf Seas. Mark 2 Predictor for Time Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    coefficient that governs the rate of change (small for small waves, large for large waves). Eq (4.4) applies for a step change from one steady wave...during one tide. He also reported geological evidence of current ripples in turbidite beds found in the Pyrenees Mountains (Spain), many of which showed... Government in 1947, the Company became a private entity in 1982, and has since operated as an independent, non profit distributing firm committed to

  18. Disruption of ripple-associated hippocampal activity during rest impairs spatial learning in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ego-Stengel, Valérie; Wilson, Matthew A

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a key role in the acquisition of new memories for places and events. Evidence suggests that the consolidation of these memories is enhanced during sleep. At the neuronal level, reactivation of awake experience in the hippocampus during sharp-wave ripple events, characteristic of slow-wave sleep, has been proposed as a neural mechanism for sleep-dependent memory consolidation. However, a causal relation between sleep reactivation and memory consolidation has not been established. Here we show that disrupting neuronal activity during ripple events impairs spatial learning. We trained rats daily in two identical spatial navigation tasks followed each by a 1-hour rest period. After one of the tasks, stimulation of hippocampal afferents selectively disrupted neuronal activity associated with ripple events without changing the sleep-wake structure. Rats learned the control task significantly faster than the task followed by rest stimulation, indicating that interfering with hippocampal processing during sleep led to decreased learning.

  19. Stress and temperature distributions of individual particles in a shock wave propagating through dry and wet sand mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Merit G.; Kennedy, Gregory; Thadhani, Naresh; Hankin, Markos; Stewart, Sarah T.; Borg, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Determining stress and temperature distributions of dynamically compacted particles is of interest to the geophysical and astrological research communities. However, the researcher cannot easily observe particle interactions during a planar shock experiment. By using mesoscale simulations, we can unravel granular particle interactions. Unlike homogenous materials, the averaged Hugoniot state for heterogeneous granular materials differs from the individual stress and temperature states of particles during a shock event. From planar shock experiments for dry and water-saturated Oklahoma sand, we constructed simulations using Sandia National Laboratory code known as CTH and then compared these simulated results to the experimental results. This document compares and presents stress and temperature distributions from simulations, with a discussion on the difference between Hugoniot measurements and distribution peaks for dry and water-saturated sand.

  20. Equatorial Cross-Cutting Ripples on Titan - Regularly Warped Subsiding Methane Plains, not Eolian Dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    Widely circulating opinion that titanian methane lowlands in a broad equatorial region are covered with eolian formations needs to be carefully checked. Of coarse, all three solid bodies with atmospheres in the inner solar system have dunes. Why do not have them on Titan? Most probably they do exist but discovered by radar up to now cross-cutting rippling features cannot be taken for them. For this there are several reasons. How it can be that prevailing "dune" strike coincides with prevailing wind direction? Normally (with some African exceptions) one sees real terrestrial dunes stretching across winds. And this is understandable from a point of view eolian dunes formation. This formation gives particular cross profile to dunes. Asymmetric profile - one slope is long and gentle and another one short and abrupt. But titanian "dunes" are mostly uniform and symmetric. And this characteristic is preserved for many hundreds of kilometers of very straight features. Then, the finest solid particles precipitation from the thick atmosphere of Titan should be distributed on the satellite surface more uniformly and cover dark lowlands and light icy highlands of the wide equatorial belt more or less evenly. But "dunes" are strictly associated with dark lowlands and tend to turn round light icy obstacles. Cindering smoggy particles to produce sands for making dunes is a pure imagination. Then, radar preferably sees one direction but nevertheless one or more crossing directions of rippling are distinguished (Fig.3, 4) They mean two wind directions at the same time or another wind direction at another time? If so, the earlier "dunes" should be more or less obliterated by the later ones. Nothing of the kind! Both crossing ripples directions are fresh. Then, eolian action is not seen at the higher latitudes (Fig. 5). There are no winds there? Probably it is not so. Only a liquid state of methane can help (but liquid should be disturbed by winds). Solid methane there is also

  1. Graphene cardboard: From ripples to tunable metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Pekka

    2014-03-01

    Recently, graphene was introduced with tunable ripple texturing, a nanofabric enabled by graphene's remarkable elastic properties. However, one can further envision sandwiching the ripples, thus constructing composite nanomaterial, graphene cardboard. Here, the basic mechanical properties of such structures are investigated computationally. It turns out that graphene cardboard is highly tunable material, for its elastic figures of merit vary orders of magnitude, with Poisson ratio tunable from 10 to -0.5 as one example. These trends set a foundation to guide the design and usage of metamaterials made of rippled van der Waals solids.

  2. The three-level ripples induced by femtosecond laser on a 6H-SiC single crystal and the formation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Tao, Wenjun; Gong, Min; Ye, Junyi; Dai, Ye; Ma, Guohong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a line-scanning irradiation of 6H-SiC single crystal by a femtosecond laser focus was implemented for laser fluence of 2.2 J/cm2 at different scanning velocities from 1000 down to 100 μm/s. The morphology of the obtained ablation lines characterized by a scanning electron microscope shows that there progressively appear three-level ripples with average period of about 222, 600 nm and that between them. Possible formation mechanisms for these three-level ripples were analyzed by numerical simulation employing finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD). Analysis shows that as Obara proposed, the interference of incident wave with the wave scattered by scratches possibly left by fine polishing is the most possible reason for inducing 222 nm-period and 600 nm-period ripples. Main discussions were focused on the orientation characteristics of ripples. Both isolated scratches and crossed scratches with different orientation angles were considered for evaluating their role in field redistribution. The detailed simulations indicate that for scratches oriented 90° with respect to laser polarization generate a pair of strongest ripple-like optical field enhancement compared to scratches with other orientation angles. It is these advantages of 90°-oriented scratch in field enhancement that make the final ripple perpendicular to laser polarization most competitive and finally left on the surface. This complements the physical picture of Obara et al. in terms of their negligence in addressing the orientation characteristics of ripples. Further FDTD simulation of the interaction of incident wave with as-formed 600 nm-period ripples shows that the optical field enhancement located between any two adjacent 600 nm-period ripples is the driving force for splitting 600 nm-period ripples into the third ripples with period between 222 and 600 nm.

  3. Rippled disc electrostatic generator/motor configurations utilizing magnetic insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Richard F

    2017-04-04

    Electrostatic generators/motors designs are provided that generally may include a first rippled stator centered about a longitudinal axis; a second rippled stator centered about the axis, a first rippled rotor centered about the axis and located between the first rippled stator and the second rippled stator. A magnetic field having field lines about parallel with the average plane of at least one of the first rippled stator or the second rippled stator is provided with either a Halbach array configuration or a conductor array configuration.

  4. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C.; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern `wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  5. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W T; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A G

    2015-11-05

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface-atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern 'wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today.

  6. The dune effect on sand-transporting winds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Derek W. T.; Bourke, Mary C; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Wind on Mars is a significant agent of contemporary surface change, yet the absence of in situ meteorological data hampers the understanding of surface–atmospheric interactions. Airflow models at length scales relevant to landform size now enable examination of conditions that might activate even small-scale bedforms (ripples) under certain contemporary wind regimes. Ripples have the potential to be used as modern ‘wind vanes' on Mars. Here we use 3D airflow modelling to demonstrate that local dune topography exerts a strong influence on wind speed and direction and that ripple movement likely reflects steered wind direction for certain dune ridge shapes. The poor correlation of dune orientation with effective sand-transporting winds suggests that large dunes may not be mobile under modelled wind scenarios. This work highlights the need to first model winds at high resolution before inferring regional wind patterns from ripple movement or dune orientations on the surface of Mars today. PMID:26537669

  7. A generalized discrete model linking rippling pattern formation and individual cell reversal statistics in colonies of myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Uwe; Deutsch, Andreas; Bär, Markus

    2006-06-01

    Self-organization processes in multicellular aggregates of bacteria and amoebae offer fascinating insights into the evolution of cooperation and differentiation of cells. During myxobacterial development a variety of spatio-temporal patterns emerges such as counterpropagating waves of cell density that are known as rippling. Recently, several models have been introduced that qualitatively reproduce these patterns. All models include active motion and a collision-triggered reversal of individual bacteria. Here, we present a systematic study of a generalized discrete model that is based on similar assumptions as the continuous model by Igoshin et al (2001 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 98 14913). We find counterpropagating as well as unidirectional rippling waves in extended regions of the parameter space. If the interaction strength and the degree of cooperativity are large enough, rippling patterns appear even in the absence of a refractory period. We show for the first time that the experimentally observed double peak in the reversal statistics of bacteria in rippling colonies (Welch and Kaiser 2001 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 98 14907) can be reproduced in simulations of counterpropagating rippling waves which are dominant in experiments. In addition, the reversal statistics in the pre-rippling phase is correctly reproduced.

  8. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  9. Phase-matched relativistic second harmonic generation in clusters with density ripple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Shivani; Aggarwal, Munish; Kant, Niti

    2017-01-01

    An intense short-pulse laser obliquely incident on a clustered gas quickly converts the atomic clusters into hot plasma balls. The laser beam produces a second harmonic due to nonlinear response of cluster and plasma electrons. For enhancement of efficiency of second harmonic generation, there should be appropriate phase-matching between the incident laser beam and the generated harmonic. To achieve the required phase-matching, the ripple in cluster density and plasma electron density outside the cluster is introduced. The efficiency of second harmonic generation is sensitive to the angle between ripple wave vector k→o and the direction of the incident laser beam.

  10. Hurricane Sandy's Fingerprint: Ripple Bedforms at an Inner Continental Shelf Sorted Bedform Field Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVal, C.; Trembanis, A. C.; Beaudoin, J. D.; Schmidt, V. E.; Mayer, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrodynamics and seabed morphodynamics on the inner continental shelf and near shore environments have increasing relevance with continued development of near shore structures, offshore energy technologies and artificial reef construction. Characterizing the stresses on and response of the seabed near and around seabed objects will inform best practices for structural design, seabed mine and unexploded ordnance detection, and archaeological and benthic habitat studies. As part of an ONR funded project, Delaware's Redbird Reef is being studied for object scour and sorted bedform morphodynamics (Trembanis et al., in press). Central to this study are the effects of large storm events, such as Hurricane Sandy, which have had significant impact on the seafloor. Previous studies of inner shelf bedform dynamics have typically focused on near bed currents and bed stressors (e.g. Trembanis et al., 2004), sorted bedforms (e.g. Green et al., 2004) and object scour (e.g. Quinn, 2006; Trembanis et al., 2007; Mayer et al., 2007), but our understanding of the direct effects of objects and object scour on bedform morphodynamics is still incomplete. With prominent sorted bedform ripple fields, the Delaware Redbird artificial reef site, composed of 997 former New York City subway cars, as well as various military vehicles, tugboats, barges and ballasted tires, has made an ideal study location (Raineault et al., 2013 and 2011). Acoustic mapping of the Redbird reef three days prior to Sandy and two days after the following nor'easter, captured the extensive effects of the storms to the site, while acoustic Doppler current profilers characterized both the waves and bottom currents generated by the storm events. Results of the post-Sandy survey support the theory of sorted bedform evolution proposed by Murray and Thieler (2004). Acoustic imagery analysis indicates a highly energized and mobile bed during the storms, leading to self-organization of bedforms and creation of large

  11. Listening to Whispers of Ripple: Linking Wallets and Deanonymizing Transactions in the Ripple Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno-Sanchez Pedro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The decentralized I owe you (IOU transaction network Ripple is gaining prominence as a fast, low-cost and efficient method for performing same and cross-currency payments. Ripple keeps track of IOU credit its users have granted to their business partners or friends, and settles transactions between two connected Ripple wallets by appropriately changing credit values on the connecting paths. Similar to cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, while the ownership of the wallets is implicitly pseudonymous in Ripple, IOU credit links and transaction flows between wallets are publicly available in an online ledger. In this paper, we present the first thorough study that analyzes this globally visible log and characterizes the privacy issues with the current Ripple network. In particular, we define two novel heuristics and perform heuristic clustering to group wallets based on observations on the Ripple network graph. We then propose reidentification mechanisms to deanonymize the operators of those clusters and show how to reconstruct the financial activities of deanonymized Ripple wallets. Our analysis motivates the need for better privacy-preserving payment mechanisms for Ripple and characterizes the privacy challenges faced by the emerging credit networks.

  12. Magnetic anisotropies in ferromagnetic and exchange-coupled systems on rippled surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Liedke, Bartosz; Marko, Daniel; Keller, Adrian; Muecklich, Arndt; Facsko, Stefan; Fassbender, Juergen [FZ Dresden-Rossendorf, FWI, Dresden (Germany); Cizmar, Erik; Zvyagin, Sergei; Wosnitza, Joachim [FZ Dresden-Rossendorf, HLD, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The influence of a surface and interface modulation on the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials (Py, Fe and Co) and an exchange bias system (Py/FeMn) is studied. A periodic surface modulation (the so-called ripples) is achieved by low energy ion erosion. Subsequently the magnetic stack is deposited. Due to the film morphology a strong uniaxial anisotropy is induced in the ferromagnetic layers, which is fixed in its orientation along ripples elongation. In the case of the exchange bias system the direction of the induced unidirectional anisotropy can be varied by means of different field annealing cycles. For all mutual orientations both anisotropy contributions are superimposed independently. The angular dependence of the magnetization reversal behavior can be described perfectly by a coherent rotation model. In addition, the magnitude of the uniaxial and the unidirectional anisotropy scales with the step density or wave length of the rippled substrate, which is in full agreement with theoretical predictions.

  13. Convective-absolute nature of ripple instabilities on ice and icicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, Carlo; Vesipa, Riccardo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-05-01

    Film hydrodynamics is crucial in water-driven morphological pattern formation. A prominent example is given by icicle ripples and ice ripples, which are regular patterns developing on freezing-melting inclined surfaces bounding open-channel flows. By a suitable mathematical model based on conservation principles and the use of the cusp map method, in this paper we address the convective-absolute nature of these two kinds of instabilities. The obtained results show that icicle ripples, which develop at inverted (overhang) conditions, have subcentimetric wavelengths which are unstable when the Reynolds number of the liquid flow (Re ) is small and the supercooling is intensive. With the increase in Re , the instability switches from absolute to convective. Ice ripples instead exhibit the opposite dependance on Re and are highly affected by the surface slope. In addition, the evaluation of the so-called absolute wave number, which is responsible for the asymptotic impulse response, suggests a different interpretation of some recent experiments about ice ripples.

  14. Hippocampal ripple-contingent training accelerates trace eyeblink conditioning and retards extinction in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokia, Miriam S; Penttonen, Markku; Wikgren, Jan

    2010-08-25

    There are at least two distinct oscillatory states of the hippocampus that are related to distinct behavioral patterns. Theta (4-12 Hz) oscillation has been suggested to indicate selective attention during which the animal concentrates on some features of the environment while suppressing reactivity to others. In contrast, sharp-wave ripples ( approximately 200 Hz) can be seen in a state in which the hippocampus is at its most responsive to any kind of afferent stimulation. In addition, external stimulation tends to evoke and reset theta oscillation, the phase of which has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Theoretically, training on a hippocampus-dependent learning task contingent upon ripples could enhance learning rate due to elevated responsiveness and enhanced phase locking of the theta oscillation. We used a brain-computer interface to detect hippocampal ripples in rabbits to deliver trace eyeblink conditioning and extinction trials selectively contingent upon them. A yoked control group was trained regardless of their ongoing neural state. Ripple-contingent training expedited acquisition of the conditioned response early in training and evoked stronger theta-band phase locking to the conditioned stimulus. Surprisingly, ripple-contingent training also resulted in slower extinction in well trained animals. We suggest that the ongoing oscillatory activity in the hippocampus determines the extent to which a stimulus can induce a phase reset of the theta oscillation, which in turn is the determining factor of learning rate in trace eyeblink conditioning.

  15. Transition from wavelets to ripples in a laboratory flume with a diverging channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William B.RAUEN; Binliang LIN; Roger A.FALCONER

    2008-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the initiation and development of bed forms on a bed of fine silica sand was conducted under alluvial flow conditions in a laboratory flume with a diverging channel.The main aims of the study were to assess:I)the steepness of bed forms in the transition stage of development;and ii)the threshold height of wavelets(nt)that triggered the start of ripple development.Detailed bed profile measurements were carried out using an acoustic Doppler probe,traversed longitudinally over the sediment bed at various experimentation times.The bed form dimensions were extracted from such bed profile records and analysed for the wavelet,transition and equilibrium stages.It was found that the steepness of ripples in the transition and equilibrium stages were similar,confirming predictions of previous mathematical model simulations.A lognormal distribution fitted the wavelet length data.The wavelet threshold height was estimated as ηt≈7 mm,or y+≈80 in wall units.Such a height magnitude suggested that ripple development could be triggered by the wavelets reaching the outer flow zone of a turbulent boundary layer.The ηt value obtained corresponded generally to the intersection point between two predictive equations for bed form dimensions.A formulation was developed to predict ηt as a function of the sediment grain size,which was confirmed for the fine sand used in this study.

  16. Early Cambrian wave-formed shoreline deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Glad, Aslaug Clemmensen; Pedersen, Gunver Krarup

    2017-01-01

    -preserved subaqueous dunes and wave ripples indicates deposition in a wave-dominated upper shoreface (littoral zone) environment, and the presence of interference ripples indicates that the littoral zone environment experienced water level fluctuations due to tides and/or changing meteorological conditions. Discoidal...

  17. Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet Christopher Martens Dept. of Marine Sciences CB...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...was noted that there was substantially higher organic material in the shallow troughs of the sand ripples than on the crests. Most of this appears

  18. Molecular structure of the lecithin ripple phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Alex H.; Yefimov, Serge; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2005-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lecithin lipid bilayers in water as they are cooled from the liquid crystalline phase show the spontaneous formation of rippled bilayers. The ripple consists of two domains of different length and orientation, connected by a kink. The organization of the lipids in one domain of the ripple is found to be that of a splayed gel; in the other domain the lipids are gel-like and fully interdigitated. In the concave part of the kink region between the domains the lipids are disordered. The results are consistent with the experimental information available and provide an atomic-level model that may be tested by further experiments. molecular dynamics simulation | structural model

  19. Linear and nonlinear instabilities of a granular bed: determination of the scales of ripples and dunes in rivers

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Erick de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Granular media are frequently found in nature and in industry and their transport by a fluid flow is of great importance to human activities. One case of particular interest is the transport of sand in open-channel and river flows. In many instances, the shear stresses exerted by the fluid flow are bounded to certain limits and some grains are entrained as bed-load: a mobile layer which stays in contact with the fixed part of the granular bed. Under these conditions, an initially flat granular bed may be unstable, generating ripples and dunes such as those observed on the bed of rivers. In free-surface water flows, dunes are bedforms that scale with the flow depth, while ripples do not scale with it. This article presents a model for the formation of ripples and dunes based on the proposition that ripples are primary linear instabilities and that dunes are secondary instabilities formed from the competition between the coalescence of ripples and free surface effects. Although simple, the model is able to expl...

  20. Wave scattering by a permeable barrier over undulating bed topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, A.; Martha, S. C.

    2016-06-01

    The scattering of surface water waves by bottom undulation in the presence of a permeable vertical barrier is investigated for its solution. A mixed boundary value problem (BVP) arises here in a natural way while examining this physical problem. Regular perturbation analysis is employed to determine the solution of the BVP. By utilizing this analysis the given BVP reduces to two different BVPs up to first order. The solution of the zeroth order BVP is obtained with the aid of eigenfunction expansion method in conjunction with least-squares approximation. The first order BVP is solved with the help of the Green's integral theorem and the physical quantities, namely the reflection and transmission coefficients, are obtained in the form of integrals which involve the bottom undulation and the solution of the zeroth order BVP. A particular form of the bottom undulation which closely resembles to some obstacles made by nature due to sedimentation and ripple growth of sand, is considered to evaluate these integrals. The variation of these coefficients is examined for different values of the porous effect parameter, barrier length, number of ripples and ripple amplitude.

  1. Measuring Social Capital Change Using Ripple Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barbara; Johannes, Elaine M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a detailed description of how to implement a ripple mapping activity to assess youth program effects on community capital and concludes with examples from Maine and Kansas. The maps lead to group reflection on project outcomes and further research and evaluation questions for group members. The results from five Maine…

  2. Caveolin-3 Mutations in Rippling Muscle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Two unrelated patients with novel homozygous missense mutations (L86P and A92T in caveolin-3 gene (CAV3, presenting with a severe form of rippling muscle disease (RMD, are reported from the University of Bonn, and other centers in Germany.

  3. A Simple Ripple Filter for FLUKA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels; Herrmann, Rochus

    In heavy ion radiotherapy, pristine C-12 beams are usually widened a few mm (FWHM) along the beam axis, before the actual spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is build. The pristine beam widening is commonly performed with a ripple filter, known from the facility at GSI (Darmstadt) and at HIT (Heidelberg...

  4. Analysis of Wind-blown Sand Movement over Transverse Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

    2014-12-01

    Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification.

  5. Mega-ripples in Iran: A new analog for transverse aeolian ridges on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan, M.; Zimbelman, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    A new terrestrial analog site for transverse aeolian ridges (TARs) is described in this study. The Lut desert of Iran hosts large ripple-like aeolian bedforms, with the same horizontal length scales and patterns of TARs on Mars. Different classes of TARs and different types of other aeolian features such as sand dunes, zibars, dust devil tracks and yardangs can be found in this area, which signify an active aeolian region. This area represents a unique site to study the formation and evolution of these enigmatic features, with potential relevance toward a better understanding of TARs on Mars.

  6. The Ripple Pond: Enabling Spiking Networks to See

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed eAfshar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the biologically inspired Ripple Pond Network (RPN, a simply connected spiking neural network which performs a transformation converting two dimensional images to one dimensional temporal patterns suitable for recognition by temporal coding learning and memory networks. The RPN has been developed as a hardware solution linking previously implemented neuromorphic vision and memory structures such as frameless vision sensors and neuromorphic temporal coding spiking neural networks. Working together such systems are potentially capable of delivering end-to-end high-speed, low-power and low-resolution recognition for mobile and autonomous applications where slow, highly sophisticated and power hungry signal processing solutions are ineffective. Key aspects in the proposed approach include utilising the spatial properties of physically embedded neural networks and propagating waves of activity therein for information processing, using dimensional collapse of imagery information into amenable temporal patterns and the use of asynchronous frames for information binding.

  7. Self-focusing dynamics of patches of ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, P. A.; Wang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of focussing of extended patches of nonlinear capillary-gravity waves within the primitive fluid dynamic equations is presented. It is found that, when the envelope has certain properties, the patch focusses initially in accordance to predictions from nonlinear Schrödinger equation, and focussing can concentrate energy to the vicinity of a point or a curve on the fluid surface. After initial focussing, other effects dominate and the patch breaks up into a complex set of localised structures-lumps and breathers-plus dispersive radiation. We perform simulations both in the inviscid regime and for small viscosities. Lastly we discuss throughout the similarities and differences between the dynamics of ripple patches and self-focussing light beams.

  8. Lattice gas cellular automation model for rippling and aggregation in myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alber, Mark S.; Jiang, Yi; Kiskowski, Maria A.

    2004-05-01

    A lattice gas cellular automation (LGCA) model is used to simulate rippling and aggregation in myxobacteria. An efficient way of representing cells of different cell size, shape and orientation is presented that may be easily extended to model later stages of fruiting body formation. This LGCA model is designed to investigate whether a refractory period, a minimum response time, a maximum oscillation period and non-linear dependence of reversals of cells on C-factor are necessary assumptions for rippling. It is shown that a refractory period of 2-3 min, a minimum response time of up to 1 min and no maximum oscillation period best reproduce rippling in the experiments of Myxococcus xanthus. Non-linear dependence of reversals on C-factor is critical at high cell density. Quantitative simulations demonstrate that the increase in wavelength of ripples when a culture is diluted with non-signaling cells can be explained entirely by the decreased density of C-signaling cells. This result further supports the hypothesis that levels of C-signaling quantitatively depend on and modulate cell density. Analysis of the interpenetrating high density waves shows the presence of a phase shift analogous to the phase shift of interpenetrating solitons. Finally, a model for swarming, aggregation and early fruiting body formation is presented.

  9. Influence of pulsed laser heating on morphological relaxation of surface ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenner, M

    2005-07-01

    A continuum (Mullins-type) model is proposed for the nonisothermal, isotropic evolution of a crystal surface on which mass transport occurs by surface diffusion. The departure from constant temperature is assumed induced by incident pulsed radiation. It has been shown experimentally and theoretically [see, e.g., Yakunkin, High Temp. 26, 585 (1988); Yilbas and Kalyon, J. Phys. D. 34, 222 (2001)] that such a heating mode gives rise to the quasistationary regime, in which the surface temperature of a thick solid film oscillates about the mean value with the pulse repetition frequency. The implications of oscillatory driving with high frequency values on relaxation of surface ripples are examined; in particular, the traveling wave solutions with decreasing amplitude are detected numerically. Pulsed heating also results in faster smoothing of the ripple, compared to the case when the surface is at constant temperature which is same as the mean temperature in the pulsed heating mode. Impact on ripple shape is minor for ripple amplitudes considered.

  10. Sand supply to beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2017-04-01

    In most cases, beaches and dunes are built by sand that has been transported onshore from the shoreface. While this has been known for a long time, we are still not able to quantitatively predict onshore sediment transport and sand supply to beaches. Sediment transport processes operating during brief, high-energy stormy conditions - when beaches erode and sand moves offshore - are fairly well known and they can be modelled with a reasonable degree of confidence. However, the slower onshore sand transport leading to beach recovery under low-to-moderate energy conditions - and the reason why beaches and dunes exist in the first place - is not yet well understood. This severely limits our capability to understand and predict coastal behaviour on long time scales, for example in response to changing sea level or wave conditions. This paper will discuss issues and recent developments in sediment transport measurement and prediction on the lower and upper shoreface and into the swash zone. The focus will be on the integration and upscaling of small-scale deterministic process measurements into parametric models that may increase modelling capabilities of coastal behaviour on larger temporal and spatial scales.

  11. 'Sharks Teeth' -- Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sometimes, pictures received from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are 'just plain pretty.' This image, taken in early September 2000, shows a group of sand dunes at the edge of a much larger field of dark-toned dunes in Proctor Crater. Located at 47.9oS, 330.4oW, in the 170 km (106 mile) diameter crater named for 19th Century British astronomer Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), the dunes shown here are created by winds blowing largely from the east/northeast. A plethora of smaller, brighter ripples covers the substrate between the dunes. Sunlight illuminates them from the upper left.

  12. Femtosecond laser-induced periodic structure adjustments based on electron dynamics control: from subwavelength ripples to double-grating structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuesong; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Wang, Sumei; Yuan, Yanping; Lu, Yongfeng

    2013-10-01

    This study proposes a method for adjusting subwavelength ripple periods and the corresponding double-grating structures formed on fused silica by designing femtosecond laser pulse trains based on localized transient electron density control. Four near-constant period ranges of 190-490 nm of ripples perpendicular to the polarization are obtained by designing pulse trains to excite and modulate the surface plasmon waves. In the period range of 350-490 nm, the double-grating structure is fabricated in one step, which is probably attributable to the grating-assisted enhanced energy deposition and subsequent thermal effects.

  13. A 10 MHz ripple-based on-time controlled buck converter with dual ripple compensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Danzhu; Yu Jiale; Hong Zhiliang

    2013-01-01

    A 10 MHz ripple-based on-time controlled buck converter is presented.A novel low-cost dual ripple compensation,which consists of coupling capacitor compensation and passive equivalent series resistance compensation,is proposed to achieve a fast load transient response and robust stability simultaneously.Implemented in a 2P4M 0.35 μm CMOS process,the converter achieves fix-frequency output with a ripple of below 10 mV and an overshoot of 10 mV at 400 mA step load transient response.With width optimization of the power transistors in an ultra-heavy load and PFM control in a light load,the efficiency stays at over 83% for a load range from 20 mA to 1.5 A and the peak efficiency reaches 90.16%.

  14. Enhanced water droplet mobility on superhydrophobic rippled nanoshell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hwon; Ji, Seungmuk; Moon, Dong-Il; Lim, Hyuneui; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-10-01

    A 3-dimensional rippled nanoshell structure (a hollow pillar with wriggly sidewall morphology) is demonstrated for superhydrophobicity. As a control group, a straight nanoshell structure without a rippled shape was also prepared. The rippled structure showed improved superhydrophobicity with a large contact angle and a small sliding angle compared to the straight nanoshell structure. These enhancements originate from the minimum of interfacial energy at the triple-phase contact line, which is located at the most protruded circular line along the rippled structure. Using a drop impingement test, the stabilization of a Cassie Baxter state on the rippled structure was also verified. The experimental observation of wetting transition from a Cassie-Baxter to a Wenzel state is well explained by a revamped capillary pressure model, which was customized for the rippled structure.

  15. Robot Vibrations Caused by Torque Ripples in Power Transmission Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    小島, 宏行; 田口, 和哉; 辻, 浩明

    1989-01-01

    When an industrial robot with a power transmission mechanism such as a harmonic drive gear is operated, vibrations resulting from the torque ripple of the power transmission mechanism are frequently generated. However, few studies on robot vibration characteristics owing to torque ripples have been reported. In this paper, the vibrations of a horizontal two-link robot are investigated with consideration given to the torque ripple and the nonlinearity of the power transmission mechanism. In th...

  16. Automatic detection and visualisation of MEG ripple oscillations in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole van Klink

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillations (HFOs, 80–500 Hz in invasive EEG are a biomarker for the epileptic focus. Ripples (80–250 Hz have also been identified in non-invasive MEG, yet detection is impeded by noise, their low occurrence rates, and the workload of visual analysis. We propose a method that identifies ripples in MEG through noise reduction, beamforming and automatic detection with minimal user effort. We analysed 15 min of presurgical resting-state interictal MEG data of 25 patients with epilepsy. The MEG signal-to-noise was improved by using a cross-validation signal space separation method, and by calculating ~2400 beamformer-based virtual sensors in the grey matter. Ripples in these sensors were automatically detected by an algorithm optimized for MEG. A small subset of the identified ripples was visually checked. Ripple locations were compared with MEG spike dipole locations and the resection area if available. Running the automatic detection algorithm resulted in on average 905 ripples per patient, of which on average 148 ripples were visually reviewed. Reviewing took approximately 5 min per patient, and identified ripples in 16 out of 25 patients. In 14 patients the ripple locations showed good or moderate concordance with the MEG spikes. For six out of eight patients who had surgery, the ripple locations showed concordance with the resection area: 4/5 with good outcome and 2/3 with poor outcome. Automatic ripple detection in beamformer-based virtual sensors is a feasible non-invasive tool for the identification of ripples in MEG. Our method requires minimal user effort and is easily applicable in a clinical setting.

  17. Beach monitoring project Sand Key Phase II Beach nourishment program (North Redington Beach and Redington Shores) Post-Nourishment Report Part II Offshore Profiles and Wave Data

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    This study presents the third post-nourishment survey (January 1989) results for the Sand Key Phase II beach nourishment project carried out in June, 1988. The monitoring program to this beach nourishment project is a joint effort between the University of South Florida and University of Florida. The field surveys include a total of 26 profiles, encompassing approximately 3 miles of shoreline extending from DNR R-96 to R-1ll. The total calculated volume loss of sand in the n...

  18. A NEW MEASURE FOR DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE BED SHEAR STRESS OF WAVE BOUNDARY LAYER IN WAVE FLUME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, a shear plate was mounted on the bottom in a wave flume and direct measurements of the smooth and rough bed shear stress under regular and irregular waves were conducted with the horizontal force exerted on the shear plates by the bottom shear stress in the wave boundary layer. Under immobile bed condition, grains of sand were glued uniformly and tightly onto the shear plate, being prevented from motion with the fluid flow and generation of sand ripples. The distribution of the bottom mean shear stress varying with time was measured by examining the interaction between the shear plate and shear transducers. The relation between the force measured by the shear transducers and its voltage is a linear one. Simultaneous measurements of the bottom velocity were carried out by an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), while the whole process was completely controlled by computers, bottom shear stress and velocity were synchronously measured. Based on the experimental results, it can be concluded that (1) the friction coefficient groews considerably with the increase of the Reynolds number, (2) the shear stress is a function varying with time and linearly proportional to the velocity. Compared with theoretical results and previous experimental data, it is shown that the experimental method is feasible and effective, A further study on the bed shear stress under regular or irregular waves can be carried out. And applicability to the laboratory studies on the initiation of sediments and the measurement of the shear stress after sediment imigration.

  19. Effect of Intrinsic Ripples on Elasticity of the Graphene Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjun

    2015-12-01

    The effect of intrinsic ripples on the mechanical response of the graphene monolayer is investigated under uniaxial loading using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with a focus on nonlinear behavior at a small strain. The calculated stress-strain response shows a nonlinear relation through the entire range without constant slopes as a result of the competition between ripple softening and bond stretching hardening. For a small strain, entropic contribution is dominant due to intrinsic ripples, leading to elasticity softening. As the ripples flatten at increasing strain, the energetic term due to C-C bonds stretching competes with the entropic contribution, followed by energetic dominant deformation. Elasticity softening is enhanced at increased temperature as the ripple amplitude increases. The study shows that the intrinsic ripple of graphene affects elasticity. This result suggests that a change of ripple amplitudes due to various environmental conditions such as temperature, and substrate interactions can lead to a change of the mechanical properties of graphene. The understanding of the rippling effect on the mechanical behavior of 2D materials is useful for strain-based ripple manipulation for their engineering applications.

  20. Numerical modeling of wind-blown sand on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, HaoJie; Bo, TianLi; Zheng, XiaoJing

    2014-09-01

    Recent observation results show that sand ripples and dunes are movable like those on Earth under current Martian climate. And the aeolian process on Mars therefore is re-attracting the eyes of scientific researchers in different fields. In this paper, the spatial and temporal evolution of wind-blown sand on Mars is simulated by the large-eddy simulation method. The simulations are conducted under the conditions of both friction wind speed higher and lower than the "fluid threshold", respectively. The fluid entrainment of the sand particles, the processes among saltation sand particles and sand bed, and the negative feedback of sand movement to flow field are considered. Our results show that the "overshoot" phenomenon also exists in the evolution of wind-blown sand on Mars both temporally and spatially; impact entrainment affects the sand transport rate on Mars when the wind speed is smaller or larger than the fluid threshold; and both the average saltation length and height are one order of magnitudes larger than those on Earth. Eventually, the formulas describing the sand transport rate, average saltation length and height on Mars are given, respectively.

  1. Simple stochastic cellular automaton model for starved beds and implications about formation of sand topographic features in terms of sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Noritaka

    2016-12-01

    A simple stochastic cellular automaton model is proposed for simulating bedload transport, especially for cases with a low transport rate and where available sediments are very sparse on substrates in a subaqueous system. Numerical simulations show that the bed type changes from sheet flow through sand patches to ripples as the amount of sand increases; this is consistent with observations in flume experiments and in the field. Without changes in external conditions, the sand flux calculated for a given amount of sand decreases over time as bedforms develop from a flat bed. This appears to be inconsistent with the general understanding that sand flux remains unchanged under the constant-fluid condition, but it is consistent with the previous experimental data. For areas of low sand abundance, the sand flux versus sand amount (flux-density relation) in the simulation shows a single peak with an abrupt decrease, followed by a long tail; this is very similar to the flux-density relation seen in automobile traffic flow. This pattern (the relation between segments of the curve and the corresponding bed states) suggests that sand sheets, sand patches, and sand ripples correspond respectively to the free-flow phase, congested phase, and jam phase of traffic flows. This implies that sand topographic features on starved beds are determined by the degree of interference between sand particles. Although the present study deals with simple cases only, this can provide a simplified but effective modeling of the more complicated sediment transport processes controlled by interference due to contact between grains, such as the pulsatory migration of grain-size bimodal mixtures with repetition of clustering and scattering.

  2. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  3. Effect of State of Stress on Velocity of Low-Amplitude Shear Waves Propagating along Principal Stress Directions in Dry Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    overconsolidation ratio, k = function of soil plasticity (k = 0 for sands), e = void ratio, Pa = atmospheric pressure in units of Gax* max K1 27 n slope of log G max...on soil Plasticity Index, w 37 j = elastic Poisson’s ratio, r 2 F(e) = function of void ratio (F(e) = 0.3 + 0.7e2), n = slope of log G - log a0...OCR = overconsolidation ratio, k = factor related to soil plasticity (for sand, k = 0), Pa = atmospheric pressure in same units as Gm e = void ratio

  4. Angular tuning of the magnetic birefringence in rippled cobalt films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arranz, Miguel A., E-mail: MiguelAngel.Arranz@uclm.es [Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologías Químicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Camilo J. Cela 10, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Colino, José M. [Instituto de Nanociencia, Nanotecnología y Materiales Moleculares, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Campus de la Fábrica de Armas, 45071 Toledo (Spain)

    2015-06-22

    We report the measurement of magnetically induced birefringence in rippled Co films. For this purpose, the magneto-optical properties of ion beam eroded ferromagnetic films were studied using Kerr magnetometry and magnetic birefringence in the transmitted light intensity. Upon sufficient ion sculpting, these ripple surface nanostructures developed a defined uniaxial anisotropy in the in-plane magnetization, finely tuning the magnetic birefringence effect. We have studied its dependence on the relative orientation between the ripple direction and the magnetic field, and found this effect to be dramatically correlated with the capability to neatly distinguish the mechanisms for the in-plane magnetization reversal, i.e., rotation and nucleation. This double refraction corresponds univocally to the two magnetization axes, parallel and perpendicular to the ripples direction. We have also observed that tuned birefringence in stack assemblies of rippled Co films, which enables us to technically manipulate the number and direction of refraction axes.

  5. Pyramidal cell-interneuron interactions underlie hippocampal ripple oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Senzai, Yuta; Royer, Sebastien; Buzsáki, György

    2014-07-16

    High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation, frequency control, and spatial coherence of the rhythm are poorly understood. Using multisite optogenetic manipulations in freely behaving rodents, we found that depolarization of a small group of nearby pyramidal cells was sufficient to induce high-frequency oscillations, whereas closed-loop silencing of pyramidal cells or activation of parvalbumin- (PV) or somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons aborted spontaneously occurring ripples. Focal pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors abolished ripples. Localized PV interneuron activation paced ensemble spiking, and simultaneous induction of high-frequency oscillations at multiple locations resulted in a temporally coherent pattern mediated by phase-locked interneuron spiking. These results constrain competing models of ripple generation and indicate that temporally precise local interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons support ripple generation in the intact hippocampus.

  6. PathShuffle: Credit Mixing and Anonymous Payments for Ripple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno-Sanchez Pedro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The I owe you (IOU credit network Ripple is one of the most prominent alternatives in the burgeoning field of decentralized payment systems. Ripple’s path-based transactions set it apart from cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. Its pseudonymous nature, while still maintaining some regulatory capabilities, has motivated several financial institutions across the world to use Ripple for processing their daily transactions. Nevertheless, with its public ledger, a credit network such as Ripple is no different from a cryptocurrency in terms of weak privacy; recent demonstrative deanonymization attacks raise important concerns regarding the privacy of the Ripple users and their transactions. However, unlike for cryptocurrencies, there is no known privacy solution compatible with the existing credit networks such as Ripple.

  7. Experimental study on influence of particle roughness on shear wave velocity of sand%砂土颗粒粗糙度对剪切波速影响的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘瑜; 夏唐代

    2011-01-01

    6 sand samples are made by use of Fujian standard sand, Hangzhou sand and man-made quartz sand, respectively, with each sample composed of the single sand particle in diameter.The average particle roughness of every sample and the shear wave velocities (Vs) of each sample in different porosities are obtained by electron microscope and bender element testing equipment.The analytic results indicate that Vs is greatly influenced by the particle roughness, and the magnitude of Vs decreases with the increase of the particle roughness.The roughness coefficient is introduced to deduce the formula of Vs by means of the researches on micro fabrics and constitutive relations of granular materials, elastic contact of rough particles, etc.Moreover, the results drawn from the present method are compared with the measured data, and the calculating method of the roughness coefficient for low sands is obtained.In addition, the relationship between the roughness coefficient and the stress is discussed.%将福建标准砂、杭州黄砂和人工石英砂制备成6个砂样,每个砂样只由一种粒径的砂颗粒组成,从每个砂样中选取一定数量的颗粒进行电镜扫描并分析砂样的颗粒平均粗糙度,用弯曲元测试仪测试各砂样在不同孔隙比下的剪切波速(Vs).对比分析说明颗粒粗糙度对Vs的影响显著,Vs随着颗粒粗糙度的增大而减小.引入粗糙度修正系数,在散粒体介质细观组构与本构关系、弹性粗糙颗粒接触等研究的基础上推导了砂土Vs计算公式.将计算结果与试验实测值进行对比,得到了浅层砂土的粗糙度修正系数的计算方法,讨论了粗糙度修正系数随应力大小的变化趋势.

  8. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  9. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  10. Hippocampal sharp wave‐ripple: A cognitive biomarker for episodic memory and planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sharp wave ripples (SPW‐Rs) represent the most synchronous population pattern in the mammalian brain. Their excitatory output affects a wide area of the cortex and several subcortical nuclei. SPW‐Rs occur during “off‐line” states of the brain, associated with consummatory behaviors and non‐REM sleep, and are influenced by numerous neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. They arise from the excitatory recurrent system of the CA3 region and the SPW‐induced excitation brings about a fast network oscillation (ripple) in CA1. The spike content of SPW‐Rs is temporally and spatially coordinated by a consortium of interneurons to replay fragments of waking neuronal sequences in a compressed format. SPW‐Rs assist in transferring this compressed hippocampal representation to distributed circuits to support memory consolidation; selective disruption of SPW‐Rs interferes with memory. Recently acquired and pre‐existing information are combined during SPW‐R replay to influence decisions, plan actions and, potentially, allow for creative thoughts. In addition to the widely studied contribution to memory, SPW‐Rs may also affect endocrine function via activation of hypothalamic circuits. Alteration of the physiological mechanisms supporting SPW‐Rs leads to their pathological conversion, “p‐ripples,” which are a marker of epileptogenic tissue and can be observed in rodent models of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's Disease. Mechanisms for SPW‐R genesis and function are discussed in this review. © 2015 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26135716

  11. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  12. Thermal ripples in model molybdenum disulfide monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remsing, Richard C.; Klein, Michael L. [Institute for Computational Molecular Science, Center for the Computational, Design of Functional Layered Materials, and Department of Chemistry, Temple University, 1925 N. 12th St., 19122, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Waghmare, Umesh V. [Theoretical Sciences Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, 560 064, Jakkur, Bangalore (India)

    2017-01-15

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) monolayers have the potential to revolutionize nanotechnology. To reach this potential, it will be necessary to understand the behavior of this two-dimensional (2D) material on large length scales and under thermal conditions. Herein, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the nature of the rippling induced by thermal fluctuations in monolayers of the 2H and 1T phases of MoS{sub 2}. The 1T phase is found to be more rigid than the 2H phase. Both monolayer phases are predicted to follow long wavelength scaling behavior typical of systems with anharmonic coupling between vibrational modes as predicted by classic theories of membrane-like systems. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Chirped mirrors with low dispersion ripple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervak, V; Naumov, S; Krausz, F; Apolonski, A

    2007-10-17

    We demonstrate a chirped dielectric multilayer mirror (CM) with controlled reflectivity and dispersion in the wavelength range 760-840 nm. It exhibits a reflectivity of >99.9% and a mean group delay dispersion (GDD) of about -30 fs(2) with a theoretical GDD ripple of less than 0.5 fs(2) in the working spectral range. Deviations of the measured GDD from the calculated one are restricted to less than +/- 3 fs(2), limited by our measurement system. Simulations reveal that a dispersive delay line composed of 120 bounces off these mirrors introduces negligible distortion to a femtosecond pulse and largely preserves its contrast. The mirrors constitute an ideal tool for precision intracavity or extracavity dispersion control in the range of several thousand fs(2), particularly if pulses with high contrast are to be generated.

  14. Geometric control of rippling in supported polymer nanolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumala, Vijay R; Stafford, Christopher M; Ocola, Leonidas E; Douglas, Jack F; Mahadevan, L

    2012-03-14

    We study the swelling behavior of finlike polymer line gratings supported on a rigid substrate and show that the edge-supported polymer laminae undergo a rippling instability with a well-defined ripple wavelength λ transverse to the plane of the solid supporting substrate and a ripple amplitude that monotonically decreases from its maximum at the free-edge. These ripple patterns develop due to inhomogeneous compressive strains that arise from the geometric constraints that progressively suppress swelling near the supporting substrate where the laminae are clamped. By experimentally examining the influence of swelling strain and pattern geometry on the observed rippling instability, we find that the ripple wavelength λ scales with line width w for sufficiently long gratings, which is consistent with a simple theory. These trends were validated for polymer nanoline test patterns having w between (50 to 250) nm and a height-to-width aspect-ratio in the range 0.5 to 5. Our results suggest that line geometry, rather than material properties, governs the onset of rippling and suggest simple rules for their control.

  15. Design and Analysis of LT Codes with Decreasing Ripple Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Popovski, Petar; Østergaard, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new design of LT codes, which decreases the amount of necessary overhead in comparison to existing designs. The design focuses on a parameter of the LT decoding process called the ripple size. This parameter was also a key element in the design proposed in the original...... work by Luby. Specifically, Luby argued that an LT code should provide a constant ripple size during decoding. In this work we show that the ripple size should decrease during decoding, in order to reduce the necessary overhead. Initially we motivate this claim by analytical results related...

  16. Analysis of Input and Output Ripples of PWM AC Choppers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekik Argo Dahono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of input and output ripples of PWM AC choppers. Expressions of input and output current and voltage ripples of single-phase PWM AC choppers are first derived. The derived expressions are then extended to three-phase PWM AC choppers. As input current and output voltage ripples specification alone cannot be used to determine the unique values of inductance and capacitance of the LC filters, an additional criterion based on the minimum reactive power is proposed. Experimental results are included in this paper to show the validity of the proposed analysis method.

  17. Simulations of Neutral Beam Ion Ripple Loss on EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李吉波; 丁斯晔; 吴斌; 胡纯栋

    2012-01-01

    Predictions on the ripple loss of neutral beam fast ions on EAST are investigated with a guiding center code, including both ripple and collisional effects. A 6% to 16% loss of neutral beam ions is predicted for typical EAST experiments, and a synergistic enhancement of fast ion loss is found for toroidal field (TF) ripples with collisions. The lost ions are strongly localized and will cause a maximum heat load of - 0.05 MW/m^2 on the first wall.

  18. Methods of torque ripple reduction for flux reversal motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Gaurang; Sheth, N. K.; Miller, David

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents two-dimensional finite element based results for various methods of torque ripple reduction in flux-reversal motors. The effects of variation in magnet and rotor pole heights, rotor pole skewing, and multiple teeth per rotor pole on the cogging torque, developed torque, torque ripple, and phase inductance and also an optimum value of the magnet and rotor pole heights, skew angle, and choice of teeth per rotor pole with the teeth depth resulting in torque ripple reduction are presented.

  19. FPGA Implementation of ADPLL with Ripple Reduction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj kumar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper FPGA implementation of ADPLL using Verilog is presented. ADPLL with ripple reduction techniques is also simulated and implemented on FPGA. For simulation ISE Xilinx 10.1 CAD is used.Vertex5 FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array is used for implementation. ADPLL performance improvement, while using ripple reduction techniques is also discussed. The ADPLL is designed at the central frequency of 100 kHz. The frequency range of ADPLL is 0 kHz to 199 kHz. But when it is implemented with ripple reduction techniques, the frequency range observed is from 11 kHz to 216 kHz.

  20. FPGA Implementation of ADPLL with Ripple Reduction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper FPGA implementation of ADPLL using Verilog is presented. ADPLL with ripple reduction techniques is also simulated and implemented on FPGA. For simulation ISE Xilinx 10.1 CAD is used.Vertex5 FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array is used for implementation. ADPLL performance improvement, while using ripple reduction techniques is also discussed. The ADPLL is designed at the central frequency of 100 kHz. The frequency range of ADPLL is 0 kHz to 199 kHz. But when it is implemented with ripple reduction techniques, the frequency range observed is from 11 kHz to 216 kHz.

  1. Investigations on Several Mechanical Problems in Windblown Sand Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiaojing

    2007-01-01

    It is very necessary for the investigation on mechanism of windblown sand movement to understand and find out effective measures of preventing and reducing danger of windblown sands, which also deals with some general characters and hot spots in the scientific forelands, such as multi-scale problems, interactions among multi-physical-fields, randomness and nonlinearity as well as complex systems. In recent years, a series of experiments in wind tunnels and theoretical modeling as well as computer simulation have been undertaken in the research group of environmental mechanics on windblown sand movement in Lanzhou University with the point of mechanical and geography intersecting view. Some original and essential progress has been achieved, which includes that the main regularities of charges on sand particles and the electric field in windblown sand flux and the effect of the electric field on the flux and the microwave propagation are revealed, and the evolution process of windblown sand flux under the mutual couple interactions among several physical fields are predicted as well as the main features of Aeolian sand ripples are simulated.

  2. Investigations on Several Mechanical Problems in Windblown Sand Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Zheng

    2006-01-01

    It is very necessary for investigation on mechanism of windblown sand movement to understand and find out effective measures of preventing and reducing windblown sand. This also deals with some general features and hot spots in the scientific forelands, such as multi-scale problems, interactions among multi-physical-fields, randomness and nonlinearity as well as complex systems. In recent years, a series of experiments in wind tunnels and theoretical modeling as well as computer simulation have been taken by our research group (the Laboratory of Environmental Mechanics on Windblown Sand Movement in Lanzhou University) in a cross-disciplinary (mechanics and geography) viewpoint. Several original and essential studies were explored such as the main regularities of charges on sand particles, the mechanisms of electric field in windblown sand flux, the effects induced by the electric field on the flux, the microwave propagations, the evolution process of windblown sand flux under mutual couple interactions among several physical fields, and the simulation of the main features of Aeolian sand ripples.

  3. Effect of a TBM on the Toroidal Magnetic Field Ripple in the ITER and Measures to Reduce the Ripple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Young Dug; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Suk Kwon; Hong, Bong Guen

    2008-11-15

    The ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) tokamak has 18 toroidal magnetic field (TF) coils, and the discreteness of these TF coils causes toroidally non-axisymmetric perturbations of the magnetic field. It is called a TF ripple and could lead to losses of high-energy particles, and an unfavorable heat load on the plasma facing components. In the ITER design, a ferromagnetic insert (FI) is employed to reduce the TF ripple, and an optimization of the FI design is ongoing. Also, since test blanket modules (TBMs) will be installed in the ITER, which are made of a ferromagnetic material, they also affect the TF ripple. We assessed the effects of the thickness of the FIs on the TF ripple in order to optimize the FI. And we analyzed how the TBMs distort the TF, and calculated the TF ripple for various amounts of a ferromagnetic material and the positions of the TBMs. A simple correction coil was adopted in order to reduce the TBM induced TF ripple to the required value of 0.3 %. We proposed technically available measures to reduce the TF ripple to the required value.

  4. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  5. Membrane Potential Dynamics of CA1 Pyramidal Neurons during Hippocampal Ripples in Awake Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Brad K; Moreaux, Laurent C; Lubenov, Evgueniy V; Siapas, Athanassios G

    2016-02-17

    Ripples are high-frequency oscillations associated with population bursts in area CA1 of the hippocampus that play a prominent role in theories of memory consolidation. While spiking during ripples has been extensively studied, our understanding of the subthreshold behavior of hippocampal neurons during these events remains incomplete. Here, we combine in vivo whole-cell and multisite extracellular recordings to characterize the membrane potential dynamics of identified CA1 pyramidal neurons during ripples. We find that the subthreshold depolarization during ripples is uncorrelated with the net excitatory input to CA1, while the post-ripple hyperpolarization varies proportionately. This clarifies the circuit mechanism keeping most neurons silent during ripples. On a finer timescale, the phase delay between intracellular and extracellular ripple oscillations varies systematically with membrane potential. Such smoothly varying delays are inconsistent with models of intracellular ripple generation involving perisomatic inhibition alone. Instead, they suggest that ripple-frequency excitation leading inhibition shapes intracellular ripple oscillations.

  6. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  7. Development of an ultra low field-ripple electromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Naritoshi, E-mail: nari.kawamura@kek.jp [Muon Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Irie, Yoshiro [Muon Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Fujimori, Hiroshi; Miyake, Yasuhiro [Muon Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2014-03-21

    We developed an ultra low field-ripple magnet by adopting a mineral insulation cable (MIC) which is used under high radiation field, and of which conductor is surrounded by MgO insulation layer and copper sheath. Magnetic field due to an alternating current in conductor is canceled by the induced current in the sheath. We made a solenoid magnet by MIC, and observed this cancelation effect in alternating currents from 50 Hz to 2.4 kHz. This effect has a tendency which is inversely proportion to the AC frequency, and the field ripple is suppressed by 10{sup −2} in 50 Hz and 3×10{sup −4} in 2.4 kHz. Namely, a power supply with the current ripple of 10{sup −4} is expected to generate a magnetic field with the ripple of 10{sup −6} or lower.

  8. Exploring rippled scour depressions offshore Huntington Beach, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Eleyne L.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Dartnell, Peter; Edwards, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists used 1999 multibeam data, and 2002 lidar data collected on the inner shelf off southern California to investigate a field of (<1 m) features, termed "Rippled Scour Depressions" (RSDs). RSDs are elongate, shore-normal, and bathymetrically depressed features; their morphology was determined from multibeam and lidar bathymetry. Wavelengths of ripples seen within RSDs and on the surrounding seafloor were calculated from photography and video collected in 2004 and related to sediment samples collected in the same year. The RSDs were divided into two areas: Region I RSDs contained large (∼80 cm wavelength), straight-crested ripples with coarse-grained lag, and decreased in area between 1999 and 2002; Region II RSDs were smaller, in shallower water, closer to shore, and contained shorter (∼30 cm wavelength) ripples, and increased in area from 1999–2002. The RSDs did not display marked alongshore asymmetry.

  9. Dynamic Rippling, Middle-Out Reasoning and Lemma Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Moa; Dixon, Lucas; Bundy, Alan

    We present a succinct account of dynamic rippling, a technique used to guide the automation of inductive proofs. This simplifies termination proofs for rippling and hence facilitates extending the technique in ways that preserve termination. We illustrate this by extending rippling with a terminating version of middle-out reasoning for lemma speculation. This supports automatic speculation of schematic lemmas which are incrementally instantiated by unification as the rippling proof progresses. Middle-out reasoning and lemma speculation have been implemented in higher-order logic and evaluated on typical libraries of formalised mathematics. This reveals that, when applied, the technique often finds the needed lemmas to complete the proof, but it is not as frequently applicable as initially expected. In comparison, we show that theory formation methods, combined with simpler proof methods, offer an effective alternative.

  10. On nonstationarity and rippling of the quasiperpendicular zone of the Earth bow shock: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Lobzin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A new method for remote sensing of the quasiperpendicular part of the bow shock surface is presented. The method is based on analysis of high frequency electric field fluctuations corresponding to Langmuir, upshifted, and downshifted oscillations in the electron foreshock. Langmuir waves usually have maximum intensity at the upstream boundary of this region. All these waves are generated by energetic electrons accelerated by quasiperpendicular zone of the shock front. Nonstationary behavior of the shock, in particular due to rippling, should result in modulation of energetic electron fluxes, thereby giving rise to variations of Langmuir waves intensity. For upshifted and downshifted oscillations, the variations of both intensity and central frequency can be observed. For the present study, WHISPER measurements of electric field spectra obtained aboard Cluster spacecraft are used to choose 48 crossings of the electron foreshock boundary with dominating Langmuir waves and to perform for the first time a statistical analysis of nonstationary behavior of quasiperpendicular zone of the Earth's bow shock. Analysis of hidden periodicities in plasma wave energy reveals shock front nonstationarity in the frequency range 0.33 fBiBi, where fBi is the proton gyrofrequency upstream of the shock, and shows that the probability to observe such a nonstationarity increases with Mach number. The profiles observed aboard different spacecraft and the dominating frequencies of the periodicities are usually different. Hence nonstationarity and/or rippling seem to be rather irregular both in space and time rather than resembling a quasiregular wave propagating on the shock surface.

  11. MD 1691: Active halo control using tune ripple at injection

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia Morales, Hector; Bruce, Roderik; Redaelli, Stefano; Fitterer, Miriam; Fiascaris, Maria; Nisbet, David; Thiesen, Hugues; Valentino, Gianluca; Xu, Chen; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    In this MD we performed halo excitation through tune ripple. This consists in an excitation that introduces new resonance sidebands around the existing resonance lines. In presence of sufficient detuning with amplitude, these sidebands can in principle affect only the dynamics of the halo particles at large amplitudes. Tune ripple was induced through a current modulation of the warm trim quadrupoles in IR7. This is the first time this method is experimentally tested at the LHC.

  12. Maintaining Stability During a Conducted-Ripple EMC Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorperian, Vatche

    2007-01-01

    An improved technique, and electronic circuitry to implement the technique, have been developed for a military-standard electromagnetic-compatibility (EMC) test in which one analyzes susceptibility to low-frequency ripple conducted into the equipment under test via a DC power line. In the traditional technique for performing the particular test, the ripple is coupled onto the DC power line via a transformer. Depending upon some design details of the equipment under test, the inductance of the transformer can contribute a degree of instability that results in an oscillation of amplitude large enough to destroy the equipment. It is usually possible to suppress the oscillation by connecting a damping resistor to the primary terminals of the ripple-injection transformer. However, it is important to emphasize the usually in the preceding sentence: sometimes, the resistive damping becomes insufficient to suppress destructive oscillation. In addition, undesirably, the resistor contributes to power dissipation and power demand, and thereby also necessitates the use of a larger ripple voltage amplifier. Yet another disadvantage of the transformer-coupling technique is that the transformer introduces low-frequency distortion of the injected ripple voltage. The improved technique makes it possible to inject ripple with very low distortion at low frequency, without inducing oscillation. In this technique, a transformer is not used: Instead, power is fed to the equipment under test via series power field-effect transistors (FETs) controlled by a summing operational amplifier. One of the inputs to the amplifier controls the DC component of the power-line voltage; the other input, generated by an external oscillator, controls the ripple component. The circuitry for implementing this technique includes panel displays, an internal power supply for the operational amplifier and panel displays, and amplitude controls for the DC and ripple powerline voltage components.

  13. Controlled ripple texturing of suspended graphene and ultrathin graphite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wenzhong; Miao, Feng; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Hang; Jang, Wanyoung; Dames, Chris; Lau, Chun Ning

    2009-09-01

    Graphene is nature's thinnest elastic material and displays exceptional mechanical and electronic properties. Ripples are an intrinsic feature of graphene sheets and are expected to strongly influence electronic properties by inducing effective magnetic fields and changing local potentials. The ability to control ripple structure in graphene could allow device design based on local strain and selective bandgap engineering. Here, we report the first direct observation and controlled creation of one- and two-dimensional periodic ripples in suspended graphene sheets, using both spontaneously and thermally generated strains. We are able to control ripple orientation, wavelength and amplitude by controlling boundary conditions and making use of graphene's negative thermal expansion coefficient (TEC), which we measure to be much larger than that of graphite. These results elucidate the ripple formation process, which can be understood in terms of classical thin-film elasticity theory. This should lead to an improved understanding of suspended graphene devices, a controlled engineering of thermal stress in large-scale graphene electronics, and a systematic investigation of the effect of ripples on the electronic properties of graphene.

  14. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  15. Locomotory transition from water to sand and its effects on undulatory kinematics in sand lances (Ammodytidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidmark, Nicholas J; Strother, James A; Horton, Jaquan M; Summers, Adam P; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2011-02-15

    Sand lances, fishes in the genus Ammodytes, exhibit a peculiar burrowing behavior in which they appear to swim rapidly into the substrate. They use posteriorly propagated undulations of the body to move in both water, a Newtonian fluid, and in sand, a non-Newtonian, granular substrate. In typical aquatic limbless locomotion, undulations of the body push against water, which flows because it is incapable of supporting the static stresses exerted by the animal, thus the undulations move in world space (slipping wave locomotion). In typical terrestrial limbless locomotion, these undulations push against substrate irregularities and move relatively little in world space (non-slipping wave locomotion). We used standard and X-ray video to determine the roles of slipping wave and non-slipping wave locomotion during burrowing in sand lances. We find that sand lances in water use slipping wave locomotion, similar to most aquatic undulators, but switch to non-slipping waves once they burrow. We identify a progression of three stages in the burrowing process: first, aquatic undulations similar to typical anguilliform locomotion (but without head yaw) push the head into the sand; second, more pronounced undulations of the aquatic portion of the body push most of the animal below ground; third, the remaining above-ground portion of the body ceases undulation and the subterranean portion takes over, transitioning to non-slipping wave locomotion. We find no evidence that sand lances use their body motions to fluidize the sand. Instead, as soon as enough of the body is underground, they undergo a kinematic shift and locomote like terrestrial limbless vertebrates.

  16. Modeling turbulent mixing and sand distribution in the bottom boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Absi, Rafik

    2011-01-01

    For the calculation of turbulent mixing in the bottom boundary layer, we present simple analytical tools for the mixing velocity wm and the mixing length lm. Based on observations of turbulence intensity measurements, the mixing velocity wm is represented by an exponential function decaying with z. We suggest two theoretical functions for the mixing length, a first lm1 obtained from the k-equation written as a constant modeled fluctuating kinetic energy flux and a second lm2 based on von K\\'arm\\'an's similarity hypothesis. These analytical tools were used in the finite-mixing-length model of Nielsen and Teakle (2004). The modeling of time-mean sediment concentration profiles C(z) over wave ripples shows that at the opposite of the second equation lm2 which increases the upward convexity of C(z), the first equation lm1 increases the upward concavity of C(z) and is able to reproduce the shape of the measured concentrations for coarse sand.

  17. Longshore sediment transport at Golden Sands (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Nikolov

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the qualitative and quantitative features of the littoral drift at Golden Sands (Bulgaria, carried out jointly by Polish and Bulgarian researchers. The mathematical modelling of physical coastal processes took wave transformation (wave diffraction and refraction; the effects of shoaling and wave breaking and longshore sediment transport into account. The computations were carried out for the mean statistical annual wave climate, determined on the basis of IO BAS wave data, simulated using the WAM method from long-term Black Sea wind data. The results of sediment transport computations clearly show that its direction off the Golden Sands shore is from north to south.

  18. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Špirutová; J. Beňo; V. Bednářová; J. Kříž; M. Kandrnál

    2012-01-01

    Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron) are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this co...

  19. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  20. Modelling TF ripple loss of alpha particles in TFTR DT experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, M.H.; Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S. [and others

    1995-07-01

    Modelling of TF ripple loss of alphas in DT experiments on TFTR now includes neoclassical calculations of first orbit loss, stochastic ripple diffusion, ripple trapping and collisional effects. A rapid way to simulate experiment has been developed which uses a simple stochastic domain model for TF ripple loss within the TRANSP analysis code, with the ripple diffusion threshold evaluated by comparison with more accurate but computationally expensive Hamiltonian coordinate guiding center code simulations. Typical TF collisional ripple loss predictions are 6-10% loss of alphas for TFTR D-T experiments at I{sub p} = 1.0-2.0 MA and R = 2.52 m.

  1. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  2. VHTR Construction Ripple Effect using Inter-Industry Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. H.; Lee, K. Y.; Shin, Y. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    As a part of a VHTR economic analysis, we have studied the VHTR construction cost and operation and maintenance cost. However, it is somewhat difficult to expect the exact cost due to insufficient reference data and experience. As a result, we propose quantitative analysis techniques for ripple effects such as the production inducement effect, added value inducement effect, and employment inducement effect for VHTR 600MWt x 4 module construction and operation ripple effect based on NOAK. This paper presents a new method for the ripple effect and preliminary ripple effect consequence. We proposed a ripple effect analysis method using a time series and inter-industry table. As a result, we can predict that a 600MWth x 4 module VHTR reactor construction will bring about a 43771 employment effect, 24160 billion KRW production effect, and 4472 billion added value effect for 22 years. It is necessary to use the sub-account values of an inter-industry table to obtain a more precise effect result. However, the methodology can be applied with minor modification to another reactor type.

  3. Thermal dynamics of silver clusters grown on rippled silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Mukul; Ranjan, Mukesh; Jolley, Kenny; Lloyd, Adam; Smith, Roger; Mukherjee, Subroto

    2017-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles have been deposited on silicon rippled patterned templates at an angle of incidence of 70° to the surface normal. The templates are produced by oblique incidence argon ion bombardment and as the fluence increases, the periods and heights of the structures increase. Structures with periods of 20 nm, 35 nm and 45 nm have been produced. Moderate temperature vacuum annealing shows the phenomenon of cluster coalescence following the contour of the more exposed faces of the ripple for the case of 35 nm and 45 nm but not at 20 nm where the silver aggregates into larger randomly distributed clusters. In order to understand this effect, the morphological changes of silver nanoparticles deposited on an asymmetric rippled silica surface are investigated through the use of molecular dynamics simulations for different deposition angles of incidence between 0° and 70° and annealing temperatures between 500 K and 900 K. Near to normal incidence, clusters are observed to migrate over the entire surface but for deposition at 70°, a similar patterning is observed as in the experiment. The random distribution of clusters for the periodicity ≈ of 20 nm is linked to the geometry of the silica surface which has a lower ripple height than the longer wavelength structures. Calculations carried out on a surface with such a lower ripple height also demonstrate a similar effect.

  4. Mulitple Origins of Sand Dune-Topography Interactions on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, H.; Ewing, R. C.; Hayes, A.; Cisneros, J.; Epps, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction between sand dune patterns and topographic obstacles is a primary signal of sand transport direction in the equatorial region of Saturn's moon, Titan. The streamlined, tear drop appearance of the sand-dune patterns as they wrap around obstacles and a dune-free zone on the east side of many obstacles gives the impression that sand transport is from the west to east at equatorial latitudes. However, the physical mechanism behind the dune-obstacle interaction is not well explained, leaving a gap in our understanding of the equatorial sand transport and implied wind directions and magnitudes on Titan. In order to better understand this interaction and evaluate wind and sand transport direction, we use morphometric analysis of optical images on Earth and Cassini SAR images on Titan combined with analog wind tunnel experiments to study dune-topography interactions. Image analysis is performed in a GIS environment to map spatial variations in dune crestline orientations proximal to obstacles. We also use digital elevation models to and analyze the three-dimensional geometry - height, length, width and slope of the dune-topography relationships on Earth. Preliminary results show that dune patterns are deflected similarly around positive, neutral, or negative topography, where positive topography is greater than the surrounding dune height, neutral topography is at dune height and negative topography is lower than dune heights. In the latter case these are typically intra-dune field playas. The obstacle height, width, slope and wind variability appear to play a primary role in determining if a lee-dune, rather than a dune-free lee-zone, develops. In many cases a dune-free playa with evaporite and mud desiccation polygons forms lee-ward of the obstacle. To support and elaborate on the mapping and spatial characterization of dune-topography interactions, a series of experiments using a wind tunnel were conducted. Wind tunnel experiments examine the formation

  5. Quantifying denitrification in rippled permeable sands through combined flume experiments and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Adam J.; Glud, Ronnie N.; Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2012-01-01

    insight into the coupled hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes. There was broad agreement between the model results and experimental data. The model showed that the coupling between nitrification and denitrification was relatively weak in comparison to that in cohesive sediments. This was due...... to the direct advective transport between anoxic pore water and the overlying water column, and little interaction between the mostly oxic advective region and the underlying anoxic region. Denitrification was therefore mainly fueled by nitrate supplied from the water column. This suggests that the capacity...

  6. Strength and sintering effects at ejection of explosively driven sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Weckert, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    A description of the response of sand to extreme loads is very important for the evaluation of the sand ejecta impact effects on various targets. Sand is a complex material to simulate because of its porosity where the inter-phase equilibrium is hard to achieve under transient shock wave loading. A previously developed two-phase model with strength has been implemented in CTH and applied to sand. The shock response of the sand, including the Hugoniot abnormality known from the literature for highly porous silica, is adequately described with the material model. The sand unloading effects appearing as the ejecta are observed in the present work using dynamic flash X-ray of an aluminium target plate loaded by limestone sand ejecta from the detonation of a buried high explosive charge. The CTH modelling results compared with the flash X-ray images have demonstrated good agreement, particularly, in the description of momentum transfer to the target.

  7. Channeling motion of gold nanospheres on a rippled glassed surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnecco, Enrico; Nita, Pawel; Casado, Santiago; Pimentel, Carlos; Mougin, Karine; Caterina Giordano, Maria; Repetto, Diego; Buatier de Mongeot, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Gold nanospheres have been manipulated by atomic force microscopy on a rippled glass surface produced by ion beam sputtering and coated with an ultrathin (10 nm thick) graphitic layer. This substrate is characterized by irregular wavy grooves running parallel to a preferential direction. Measurements in ambient conditions show that the motion of the nanoparticles is confined to single grooves (‘channels’), along which the particles move till they are trapped by local bottlenecks. At this point, the particles cross the ripple pattern in a series of consecutive jumps and continue their longitudinal motion along a different channel. Moreover, due to the asymmetric shape of the ripple profiles, the jumps occur in the direction of minimum slope, resembling a ratchet mechanism. Our results are discussed, extending a collisional model, which was recently developed for the manipulation of nanospheres on flat surfaces, to the specific geometry of this problem.

  8. Nonlinear vibration and rippling instability for embedded carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Payam; Mehdipour, I. [Islamic Azad University, Semnan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farshidianfar, A. [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganji, D. D. [Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Based on the rippling deformations, a nonlinear continuum elastic model is developed to analyze the transverse vibration of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded on a Winkler elastic foundation. The nonlinear natural frequency has been derived analytically for typical boundary conditions using the perturbation method of multi-scales. The results indicate that the nonlinear resonant frequency due to the rippling is related to the stiffness of the foundation, the boundary conditions, the excitation load-to-damping ratio, and the diameter-to-length ratio. Moreover, the rippling instability of carbon nanotubes, as a structural instability, is introduced and the influences of several effective parameters on this kind of instability are widely discussed.

  9. Output Current Ripple Reduction Algorithms for Home Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Hyuk Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an output current ripple reduction algorithm using a proportional-integral (PI controller for an energy storage system (ESS. In single-phase systems, the DC/AC inverter has a second-order harmonic at twice the grid frequency of a DC-link voltage caused by pulsation of the DC-link voltage. The output current of a DC/DC converter has a ripple component because of the ripple of the DC-link voltage. The second-order harmonic adversely affects the battery lifetime. The proposed algorithm has an advantage of reducing the second-order harmonic of the output current in the variable frequency system. The proposed algorithm is verified from the PSIM simulation and experiment with the 3 kW ESS model.

  10. Petrophysical Analysis of Oil Sand in Athabasca

    Science.gov (United States)

    cheong, S.; Lee, H.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands are the major unconventional energy sources which have great reserves in Alberta, Canada. Recovery techniques such as CSS (Cyclic Steam Stimulation) and SAGD (Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage) enabled to develop deeper bitumen about several hundred meter depth. Before applying CSS and SAGD, reservoir heterogeneity of mud barriers or shale breccias should be clarified to establish injection and production wells successfully. We conducted the integrated petro-physical analysis for oil sands deposits in Athabasca by correlating well logs with seismic data. From 33 well logs and 3D seismic, we have made P-wave impedance by recursive inversion. Target formations of our analysis were the top of Wabiskaw member. Using inverted impedance and multi-attributes, porosity volume was derived at a target depth. Porosity of time slice 375 ms ranged 20 ~ 40 % stretching porous sand body from NE to SW direction. Characteristics of porosity distribution may be useful to design optimum oil sands recovery in Athabasca.

  11. Comparative study between the measured ripple in a x-ray equipment and calculated ripple; Estudo comparativo entre o ripple medido em um equipamento de raios X e o ripple calculado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiecher, Maria Ester S.; Pereira, Leslie; Dias, Simone K. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: mester@ird.gov.br; leslie@ird.gov.br; simone@ird.gov.br

    2005-07-01

    This work was developed to evaluate the percentage of difference between the measured and calculated ripple in order to show up the necessity of calibration of kVp measuring instruments. To reduce this difference is very important since this can lead to a bad image quality and a high dose. The objective of the work is to demonstrate the necessity of calibration of non-invasive kV measuring instruments since the image quality is directly related to the dose and to the voltage potential applied to the x ray tube. X ray equipment can have the following systems for producing high voltage: tri-phase, constant potential (high frequency) and single-phase. In all of those systems there is a factor called ripple, which is the difference between the highest and lowest value of the kV during the exposure time. This factor is very important mainly for calibration purposes. A comparison between the ripple measured with an invasive meter and the calculated one. The data for calculating the ripple were obtained with a non-invasive instrument. The tests were done in a high frequency x-ray system model Pulsar Plus manufactured by VMI. For the data acquisition a program developed using the LabView software was applied. Lately the data were processed using an Excel spreadsheet. The equipment applied in this work were a Dynalyser III from Radcal Corporation and a 4000M+ from Victoreen. Some National standards like the 453 Health Minister regulation [1] and international recommendations like IEC 61627 [2] define the checking tests for kVp [3]. The same recommendation indicates a ripple percentage lower than 10% for a tri-phase or high frequency x ray machines. If the instrument present a value higher it need to be repaired and cannot be applied for calibration purposes. Meanwhile the ripples measured in this work were higher than this value. (au0010th.

  12. Large variations in the onset of rippling in concentric nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, H.; Krakhmalev, P.; Svensson, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of the onset of rippling in highly crystalline carbon nanotubes. Modeling has shown that there should be a material constant, called the critical length, describing the dependence of the critical strain on the nanotube outer radius. Surprisingly, we have found very large variations, by a factor of three, in the critical length. We attribute this to a supporting effect from the inner walls in multiwalled concentric nanotubes. We provide an analytical expression for the maximum deflection prior to rippling, which is an important design consideration in nanoelectromechanical systems utilizing nanotubes.

  13. Buck supplies output voltage ripple reduction using fuzzy control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicu BIZON

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the PWM control for switching power supplies the peaks EMI noise appear at the switching frequency and its harmonics. Using randomize or chaotic PWM control techniques in these systems the power spectrum is spread out in all frequencies band spectral emissions, but with a bigger ripple in the output voltage. The proposed nonlinear feedback control method, which induces chaos, is based by fuzzy rules that minimize the output voltage ripple. The feasibility and effectiveness of this relative simple method is shown by simulation. A comparison with the previous control method is included, too.

  14. PWM Switching Strategy for Torque Ripple Minimization in BLDC Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Wael A.; Ishak, Dahaman; Hammadi, Khaleel J.

    2011-05-01

    This paper describes a new PWM switching strategy to minimize the torque ripples in BLDC motor which is based on sensored rotor position control. The scheme has been implemented using a PIC microcontroller to generate a modified Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) signals for driving power inverter bridge. The modified PWM signals are successfully applied to the next up-coming phase current such that its current rise is slightly delayed during the commutation instant. Experimental results show that the current waveforms of the modified PWM are smoother than that in conventional PWM technique. Hence, the output torque exhibits lower ripple contents.

  15. Laser absorption and electron propagation in rippled plasma targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-10-01

    Efficient absorption of laser energy and the collimated propagation of relativistic electron beams (generated by the laser target interaction) in plasma are two issues which are of significant importance for applications such as fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is shown with the help of 2-D Particle- In- Cell simulations that introducing density ripples transverse to the laser propagation direction enhances the efficiency of laser power absorption. Furthermore, the density ripples are also instrumental in suppressing the Weibel instability of the propagating electron beam (which is responsible for the divergence of the beam). A physical understanding of the two effects is also provided.

  16. Sand transport processes in the surf and swash zones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, van der Joep

    2016-01-01

    Long-term predictions of beach morphology using numerical models contribute to cost-effective coastal protection strategies. The physics of sand transport in the wave breaking region and the swash zone are not fully understood, leading to poor predictive capability of existing sand transport models

  17. Basilar-membrane interference patterns from multiple internal reflection of cochlear traveling waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shera, Christopher A; Cooper, Nigel P

    2013-04-01

    At low stimulus levels, basilar-membrane (BM) mechanical transfer functions in sensitive cochleae manifest a quasiperiodic rippling pattern in both amplitude and phase. Analysis of the responses of active cochlear models suggests that the rippling is a mechanical interference pattern created by multiple internal reflection within the cochlea. In models, the interference arises when reverse-traveling waves responsible for stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) reflect off the stapes on their way to the ear canal, launching a secondary forward-traveling wave that combines with the primary wave produced by the stimulus. Frequency-dependent phase differences between the two waves then create the rippling pattern measurable on the BM. Measurements of BM ripples and SFOAEs in individual chinchilla ears demonstrate that the ripples are strongly correlated with the acoustic interference pattern measured in ear-canal pressure, consistent with a common origin involving the generation of SFOAEs. In BM responses to clicks, the ripples appear as temporal fine structure in the response envelope (multiple lobes, waxing and waning). Analysis of the ripple spacing and response phase gradients provides a test for the role of fast- and slow-wave modes of reverse energy propagation within the cochlea. The data indicate that SFOAE delays are consistent with reverse slow-wave propagation but much too long to be explained by fast waves.

  18. Integrating turbulent flow, biogeochemical, and poromechanical processes in rippled coastal sediment (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, M. B.; Cook, P. L.; Jiang, H.; Traykovski, P.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal sediments are the locus of multiple coupled processes. Turbulent flow associated with waves and currents induces porewater flow through sediment leading to fluid exchange with the water column. This porewater flow is determined by the hydraulic and elastic properties of the sediment. Porewater flow also ultimately controls biogeochemical reactions in the sediment whose rates depend on delivery of reactants and export of products. We present results from numerical modeling studies directed at integrating these processes with the goal of shedding light on these complex environments. We show how denitrification rates inside ripples are largest at intermediate permeability which represents the optimal balance of reactant delivery and anoxic conditions. It is clear that nutrient cycling and distribution within the sediment is strongly dependent on the character of the multidimensional flow field inside of sediment. More recent studies illustrate the importance of the elastic properties of the saturated sediment on modulating fluid exchange between the water column and the sediment when pressure fluctuations along the sediment-water interface occur at the millisecond scale. Pressure fluctuations occur at this temporal scale due to turbulence and associated shedding of vortices due to the ripple geometry. This suggests that biogeochemical cycling may also be affected by these high-frequency elastic effects. Future studies should be directed towards this and should take advantage of modeling tools such as those we present.

  19. LEARNING ABOUT THE OCEANS FROM SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    As a young geophysicist in the 1980s, Rob Holman attended a conference in San Francisco that included a field trip to a beach. Dr Holman, who grew up inland, stared at the ocean, assessing the strengths of the waves. But when he looked around, everyone else was studying the sand.

  20. Wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2008-01-01

    Estimates for the amount of potential wave energy in the world range from 1-10 TW. The World Energy Council estimates that a potential 2TW of energy is available from the world’s oceans, which is the equivalent of twice the world’s electricity production. Whilst the recoverable resource is many t...

  1. Microscopy study of ripples created on steel surface by use of ultra short laser pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincenc Obona, J.; Ocelik, V.; Visser, B.; Visser, B.; de Hosson, J.Th.M.; Skolski, J.Z.P.; Mitko, S.; Mitko, V.S.; Römer, Gerardus Richardus, Bernardus, Engelina; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2010-01-01

    This paper concentrates on ripples on the surface of steel that arise from lasermaterial interaction. In particular we have observed two different sets of ripples on steel samples that were machined by 210 fs laser pulses with 800 nm wavelength at normal incidence. Small ripples were found with

  2. Ripple design of LT codes for AWGN channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analytical framework for designing LT codes in additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channels. We show that some of analytical results from binary erasure channels (BEC) also hold in AWGN channels with slight modifications. This enables us to apply a ripple-based design...

  3. Ripple Design of LT Codes for BIAWGN Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip;

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel framework, which enables a design of rateless codes for binary input additive white Gaussian noise (BIAWGN) channels, using the ripple-based approach known from the works for the binary erasure channel (BEC). We reveal that several aspects of the analytical results from...

  4. Epidemic Modelling by Ripple-Spreading Network and Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Qin Liao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical analysis and modelling is central to infectious disease epidemiology. This paper, inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, proposes a novel ripple-spreading network model for the study of infectious disease transmission. The new epidemic model naturally has good potential for capturing many spatial and temporal features observed in the outbreak of plagues. In particular, using a stochastic ripple-spreading process simulates the effect of random contacts and movements of individuals on the probability of infection well, which is usually a challenging issue in epidemic modeling. Some ripple-spreading related parameters such as threshold and amplifying factor of nodes are ideal to describe the importance of individuals’ physical fitness and immunity. The new model is rich in parameters to incorporate many real factors such as public health service and policies, and it is highly flexible to modifications. A genetic algorithm is used to tune the parameters of the model by referring to historic data of an epidemic. The well-tuned model can then be used for analyzing and forecasting purposes. The effectiveness of the proposed method is illustrated by simulation results.

  5. Uncovering Transdisciplinary Team Project Outcomes through Ripple Effect Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Catherine H.; Chalker-Scott, Linda; Martini, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The Garden Team at Washington State University is a transdisciplinary, geographically dispersed group of faculty and staff. As with many such teams, member retention requires effort, as busy individuals may not see the overall benefits of active team membership. Ripple effect mapping is a strategy that can illustrate the tangible and often…

  6. Thermomechanics of monolayer graphene: Rippling, thermal expansion and elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Huang, Rui

    2014-05-01

    Thermomechanical properties of monolayer graphene with thermal fluctuation are studied by both statistical mechanics analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. While the statistical mechanics analysis in the present study is limited by a harmonic approximation, significant anharmonic effects are revealed by MD simulations. The amplitude of out-of-plane thermal fluctuation is calculated for graphene membranes under both zero stress and zero strain conditions. It is found that the fluctuation amplitude follows a power-law scaling with respect to the linear dimension of the membrane, but the roughness exponents are different for the two conditions due to anharmonic interactions between bending and stretching modes. Such thermal fluctuation or rippling is found to be responsible for the effectively negative in-plane thermal expansion of graphene at relatively low temperatures, while a transition to positive thermal expansion is predicted as the anharmonic interactions suppress the rippling effect at high temperatures. Subject to equi-biaxial tension, the amplitude of thermal rippling decreases nonlinearly, and the in-plane stress-strain relation of graphene becomes nonlinear even at infinitesimal strain, in contrast with classical theory of linear elasticity. It is found that the tangent biaxial modulus of graphene depends on strain non-monotonically, decreases with increasing temperature, and depends on membrane size. Both statistical mechanics and MD simulations suggest considerable entropic contribution to the thermomechanical properties of graphene, and as a result thermal rippling is intricately coupled with thermal expansion and thermoelasticity for monolayer graphene membranes.

  7. Ripple Effect Mapping: A "Radiant" Way to Capture Program Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollock, Debra Hansen; Flage, Lynette; Chazdon, Scott; Paine, Nathan; Higgins, Lorie

    2012-01-01

    Learn more about a promising follow-up, participatory group process designed to document the results of Extension educational efforts within complex, real-life settings. The method, known as Ripple Effect Mapping, uses elements of Appreciative Inquiry, mind mapping, and qualitative data analysis to engage program participants and other community…

  8. Ripple due to asymmetry in symmetrical Cockcroft-Walton cascade rectifier circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haibo; Takaoka, Akio

    1994-12-01

    We experimentally examine the ripple and its spectra in the dc output of a symmetrical Cockcroft-Walton (CW) cascade rectifier circuit. Results show that the ripple due to the load consists of even harmonics and the ripple due to the circuit asymmetry consists of odd harmonics. In the latter, the ripple caused by the asymmetry of circuit elements cannot be compensated for completely through the asymmetry of the input voltage because of nonlinearity of a CW circuit. Approximately, the residual ripple is inversely proportional to the load resistance.

  9. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  10. Analysis of DC output voltage ripple in an electromagnetic doubly salient brushless DC generator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; YAN Yangguang; CAO Xiaoqing; MENG Xiaoli

    2007-01-01

    Considering the salient pole and high magnetic nonlinearity of the electromagnetic doubly salient (EMDS)DC generator,a 12/8 pole prototype EMDS generator is designed and calculated using a 2-D finite element method (FEM).The phenomenon is analyzed and that the phase voltage wave changes between 120°and 180°.The influence of the exciting current and armature reaction on the DC voltage ripple of the generator is discussed in detail.and the nonlinear rules are gained that DC voltage rippie changes accordingly.The theoretical analysis is verified by the simulation and expefimental results.The results are helpful for the optimal design of the generator and the optimal control of excitingwinding.We conelude mat the filter-capacitance of the rectifier can be designed.

  11. Shocks, Ripples, and Bubbles: A Very Deep Observation of Abell 2052

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Elizabeth

    2008-09-01

    The cooling flow cluster A2052 has, arguably, the morphology most similar to the Perseus cluster as seen with Chandra. Two clear bubbles to the N and S of the center of A2052 are filled with the radio lobes associated with 3C 317. Surface brightness discontinuities consistent with shocks with Mach numbers of 1.8 and 1.2 are seen near the cluster center. These may be isothermal shocks. We propose to observe Abell 2052 much more deeply to study these shock features, ripple features due to sound waves that may be found at larger radii, possible ghost bubbles, cooling gas in the bright shells around the radio source that may link the X-ray and H-alpha emission, and possible hot gas within the X-ray holes. We will directly compare the star formation and cooling rates in the cluster center.

  12. Complexity confers stability: Climate variability, vegetation response and sand transport on longitudinal sand dunes in Australia's deserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Paul P.; Telfer, Matt W.; Farebrother, Will

    2017-04-01

    The relationship between antecedent precipitation, vegetation cover and sand movement on sand dunes in the Simpson and Strzelecki Deserts was investigated by repeated (up to four) surveys of dune crest plots (≈25 × 25 m) over a drought cycle (2002-2012) in both winter (low wind) and spring (high wind). Vegetation varied dramatically between surveys on vegetated and active dune crests. Indices of sand movement had significant correlations with vegetation cover: the depth of loose sand has a strong inverse relationship with crust (cyanobacterial and/or physical) while the area covered by ripples has a strong inverse relationship with the areal cover of vascular plants. However, the relationship between antecedent rainfall and vegetation cover was found to be complex. We tentatively identify two thresholds; (1) >10 mm of rainfall in the preceding 90 days leads to rapid and near total cover of crust and/or small plants 400 mm of rainfall in the preceding three years leads to higher cover of persistent and longer-lived plants >50 cm tall. These thresholds were used to predict days of low vegetation cover on dune crests. The combination of seasonality of predicted bare-crest days, potential sand drift and resultant sand drift direction explains observed patterns of sand drift on these dunes. The complex vegetation and highly variable rainfall regime confer meta-stability on the dunes through the range of responses to different intervals of antecedent rainfall and non-linear growth responses. This suggests that the geomorphic response of dunes to climate variation is complex and non-linear.

  13. Annular wave packets at Dirac points and probability oscillation in graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Ji; Valencia, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Wave packets in graphene whose central wave vector is at Dirac points are investigated by numerical calculations. Starting from an initial Gaussian function, these wave packets form into annular peaks that propagate to all directions like ripple-rings on water surface. At the beginning, electronic probability alternates between the central peak and the ripple-rings and transient oscillation occurs at the center. As time increases, the ripple-rings propagate at the fixed Fermi speed, and their widths remain unchanged. The axial symmetry of the energy dispersion leads to the circular symmetry of the wave packets. The fixed speed and widths, however, are attributed to the linearity of the energy dispersion. Interference between states that respectively belong to two branches of the energy dispersion leads to multiple ripple-rings and the probability-density oscillation. In a magnetic field, annular wave packets become confined and no longer propagate to infinity. If the initial Gaussian width differs greatly fro...

  14. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  15. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  16. Data-Wave-Based Features Extraction and Its Application in Symbol Identifier Recognition and Positioning Suitable for Multi-Robot Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xilong Liu; Hanbo Qian; Zhiqiang Cao; Chao Zhou; Yuequan Yang; Min Tan

    2012-01-01

    ...‐term which are detected based on ripple and wave filters. Supported by data‐wave, a novel symbol identifier with significant structure features is designed and these features are extracted by constructing pixel chains...

  17. High Speed Boosted Cmos Differential Logic for Ripple Carry Adders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Roy,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a high speed boosted CMOS differential logic which is applicable in Ripple Carry Adders. The proposed logic operating with supply voltage approaching the MOS threshold voltage. The logic style improves switching speed by boosting the gate-source voltage of transistors along timing critical signal path. It allows a single boosting circuit to be shared by complementary outputs as a result the area overhead also minimizes. As compared to the conventional logic gates the EDP (energy delay product is improved. The test sets of logic gates and adders where designed in tsmc0.18μm of Mentor Graphics EDA tool. The experimental result for Ripple Carry Adders using the proposed logic style revealed that the addition time is reduced as compared with the conventional CMOS circuits.

  18. Ripple formation on nickel irradiated with radially polarized femtosecond beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibidis, George D; Skoulas, Evangelos; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2015-11-15

    We report on the morphological effects induced by the inhomogeneous absorption of radially polarized femtosecond laser irradiation of nickel (Ni) in sub-ablation conditions. A theoretical prediction of the morphology profile is performed, and the role of surface plasmon excitation in the production of self-formed periodic ripple structures is evaluated. Results indicate a smaller periodicity of the ripples profile compared to that attained under linearly polarized irradiation conditions. A combined hydrodynamical and thermoelastic model is presented in laser beam conditions that lead to material melting. The simulation results are presented to be in good agreement with the experimental findings. The ability to control the size of the morphological changes via modulating the beam polarization may provide an additional route for controlling and optimizing the outcome of laser micro-processing.

  19. Stabilization of beam-weibel instability by equilibrium density ripples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@gmail.com; Kaw, Predhiman; Das, A.; Sengupta, S. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Ravindra Kumar, G. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, we present an approach to achieve suppression/complete stabilization of the transverse electromagnetic beam Weibel instability in counter streaming electron beams by modifying the background plasma with an equilibrium density ripple, shorter than the skin depth; this weakening is more pronounced when thermal effects are included. On the basis of a linear two stream fluid model, it is shown that the growth rate of transverse electromagnetic instabilities can be reduced to zero value provided certain threshold values for ripple parameters are exceeded. We point out the relevance of the work to recent experimental investigations on sustained (long length) collimation of fast electron beams and integral beam transport for laser induced fast ignition schemes, where beam divergence is suppressed with the assistance of carbon nano-tubes.

  20. Comparative research on three types of coaxial slow wave structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Ren-Zhen; Liu Guo-Zhi; Chen Chang-Hua

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies three types of coaxial slow wave structures(SWSs):(1)with ripples on both the inner and outer conductors;(2)with ripples on the outer conductor and smooth on the inner one;and(3)with ripples on the inner conductor and smooth on the outer one.The frequencies,coupling impedances,time growth rates and beam-wave interaction efficiencies of the three types of coaxial SWSs are obtained by theoretical analysis.Moreover,the relativistic Cerenkov generators(RCGs)with the three types of coaxial SWSs are simulated with a fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell code,and the results verify the theoretical analysis.It is proved that the RCG with double-rippled coaxial SWS has the highest conversion efficiency and the shortest starting time.

  1. A phenomenological model for self-rippling energy of free graphene monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bingjie; Ru, C. Q.

    2016-07-01

    Several candidate phenomenological expressions are studied for self-rippling energy that drives ripple formation of free single-layer graphene sheets. One phenomenological expression is admitted, while all others are rejected because they cannot admit stable periodic ripple mode. The admitted phenomenological expression contains two terms: one quadratic term which acts like a compressive force and has a destabilizing effect, and another fourth-order term which acts like a nonlinear elastic foundation and has a stabilizing effect. The two associated coefficients depend on specific mechanism of self-rippling and can be determined based on observed wavelength and amplitude of ripple mode. Based on the admitted expression, the effect of an applied force on ripple formation is studied. The present model predicts that the rippling can be controlled or even suppressed with an applied tensile force or collapsed into narrow wrinkles (of deformed wavelengths down to around 2 nm) under an applied compressive force, and the estimated minimum tensile strain to suppress rippling is in remarkable agreement with some known data. Our results show that self-rippling energy dominates ripple formation of sufficiently long free graphene ribbons, although it cannot drive self-rippling of sufficiently short free graphene ribbons. Consequently, a critical length is estimated so that self-rippling occurs only when the length of free single-layer graphene ribbons is much longer than the critical length. The estimated critical length is reasonably consistent with the known fact that self-rippling cannot occur in shorter free graphene sheets (say, of length below 20 nm).

  2. Ripple-Spreading Network Model Optimization by Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-world and scale-free properties are widely acknowledged in many real-world complex network systems, and many network models have been developed to capture these network properties. The ripple-spreading network model (RSNM is a newly reported complex network model, which is inspired by the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon on clam water surface. The RSNM exhibits good potential for describing both spatial and temporal features in the development of many real-world networks where the influence of a few local events spreads out through nodes and then largely determines the final network topology. However, the relationships between ripple-spreading related parameters (RSRPs of RSNM and small-world and scale-free topologies are not as obvious or straightforward as in many other network models. This paper attempts to apply genetic algorithm (GA to tune the values of RSRPs, so that the RSNM may generate these two most important network topologies. The study demonstrates that, once RSRPs are properly tuned by GA, the RSNM is capable of generating both network topologies and therefore has a great flexibility to study many real-world complex network systems.

  3. Electron ripple injection concept for tokamak transport control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Chang, C. S.

    1996-02-01

    A non-intrusive method for inducing a radial electric field (Er) based on electron ripple injection (ERI) is under development by the Princeton CDX-U group. Since Er is known to play an important role in the L-H and H-VH mode transition, it is therefore important to develop a non-intrusive tool to control the Er profile in tokamak plasmas. The present technique utilizes externally-applied local magnetic ripple fields to trap electrons at the edge, allowing them to penetrate towards the plasma center via ∇B and curvature drifts, causing the flux surfaces to charge up negatively. Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) is utilized to increase the trapped population and the electron drift velocity by raising the perpendicular energy of trapped electrons. The temperature anisotropy of resonant electrons in a tokamak plasma is calculated in order to investigate effects of ECRH on electrons. Simulations using a guiding-center orbit model have been performed to understand the behavior of suprathermal electrons in the presence of ripple fields. Examples for CDX-U and ITER are given.

  4. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Acunto, Mario; Dinelli, Franco; Pingue, Pasqualantonio

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level.

  5. Reactivity of periodically rippled graphene grown on Ru(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borca, B; Calleja, F; Hinarejos, J J; Vazquez de Parga, A L; Miranda, R [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-04-01

    We report here the reactivity of epitaxial graphene islands and complete monolayers on Ru(0001) towards molecular oxygen and air. The graphene is prepared by thermal decomposition of ethylene molecules pre-adsorbed on an Ru(0001) surface in an ultra-high vacuum chamber. The graphene layer presents a periodically rippled structure that is dictated by the misfit between graphene and Ru(0001) lattice parameters. The periodic ripples produce spatial charge redistribution in the graphene and modifies its electronic structure around the Fermi level. In order to investigate the reactivity of graphene we expose graphene islands to a partial pressure of oxygen and following the evolution of the surface by STM during the exposure. For the exposure to air we removed the sample from the UHV chamber and we re-introduce it after several hours, taking STM images before and after. The surface areas not covered by the graphene islands present a dramatic change but the graphene structure, even the borders of the islands, remain intact. In the case of a complete graphene monolayer the exposure to oxygen or to air does not affect or destroy the rippled structure of the graphene monolayer.

  6. Analytical calculation of the minimum wind speed required to sustain wind-blown sand on Earth and Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F

    2010-01-01

    The wind-driven hopping motion of sand grains, known as saltation, forms dunes and ripples and ejects fine dust particles into the atmosphere on both Earth and Mars. While the wind speed at which saltation is initiated, the fluid threshold, has been studied extensively, the wind speed at which it is halted, the impact threshold, has been poorly quantified for Mars conditions. We present an analytical model of the impact threshold, which we show to be in agreement with measurements and recent numerical simulations for Earth conditions. For Mars conditions, we find that the impact threshold is approximately an order of magnitude below the fluid threshold, in agreement with previous studies. Saltation on Mars can thus be sustained at wind speeds an order of magnitude less than required to initiate it, leading to the occurrence of hysteresis. These results confirm earlier simulations with a detailed numerical saltation model, and have important implications for the formation of sand dunes, ripples, and dust storm...

  7. Hummocky cross-stratification-like structures and combined-flow ripples in the Punta Negra Formation (Lower-Middle Devonian, Argentine Precordillera): A turbiditic deep-water or storm-dominated prodelta inner-shelf system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilici, Giorgio; de Luca, Pedro Henrique Vieira; Poiré, Daniel G.

    2012-08-01

    Turbidity-current and storm-induced deposits may exhibit similarities, in particularly when the latter is laid down by a combination of oscillatory and unidirectional flows. Recent progress in facies analysis helps to discriminate the sedimentary effects of oscillatory from unidirectional components of the flow. On the basis of detailed analysis of sedimentary facies, strata geometry, and palaeocurrent data, the present study reinterprets the Punta Negra Formation (PNF) (Lower-Middle Devonian, Argentine Precordillera), previously considered as a depositional system of deep-water, as a storm-dominated prodeltaic shelf depositional system. In the sandstone beds of the PNF, planar, low-angle and undulating laminations with weakly asymmetric hummocky and swaley bedforms, combined-flow ripples, accretionary hummocky cross-stratification-like (HCS-like), and anisotropic HCS-like suggest the action of oscillatory currents combined with unidirectional currents in forming the deposits. Different hypotheses on the origin of the oscillatory currents have been examined. The most convincing interpretation is that the oscillatory component of the velocity is attributed to storm-induced waves. The palaeocurrent data indicate offshore current directions, suggesting that the unidirectional flow was a gravity-induced bottom current. Inverse grading at the base and overlying normally graded divisions of the sandstone beds testify to waxing-waning behaviour of the depositional flows; interbedding of sedimentary structures (undulating laminations, low-angle and parallel laminations, and combined-flow ripples) in the lower and intermediate divisions of the beds indicate fluctuations of flow velocity. This organisation of the sedimentary structures permits association of the unidirectional component with hyperpycnal bottom currents. The terrestrial origin of the hyperpycnal flows is suggested by the abundance of terrestrial plant remains, the mineralogical and textural immaturity of the

  8. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  9. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  10. Vestled - Hvide Sande

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten; Hesselbjerg, Marianne; Schønherr, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side......Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side...

  11. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  12. Controlled nanodot fabrication by rippling polycarbonate surface using an AFM diamond tip

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The single scratching test of polymer polycarbonate (PC) sample surface using an atomic force microscope (AFM) diamond tip for fabricating ripple patterns has been studied with the focus on the evaluation of the effect of the tip scratching angle on the pattern formation. The experimental results indicated that the different oriented ripples can be easily machined by controlling the scratching angles of the AFM. And, the effects of the normal load and the feed on the ripples formation and the...

  13. Simulation analyzing of torque-ripple minimization for switched reluctance motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the inevitability of torque-ripple of switchedreluctance motor (SRM) for its double saliency construction and switch power supply, and the minimization of torque-ripple, under traditional current chopping control mode, and presents a varying current amplitude chopping control method with a linear control model of varying current amplitude chopping shown, and the simulation of torque profiles under two kinds of current chopping control modes to demonstrate the validity of decreasing torque-ripple.

  14. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Model Application for OSAT3 Guidance: Ratio of wave- and current-induced shear stress to critical values for oil-sand ball and sediment mobilization

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method for estimating the mobility and potential alongshore transport of heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates...

  15. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Model Application for OSAT3 Guidance: Surf-zone integrated alongshore potential flux for oil-sand balls of varying sizes weighted by probability of wave scenario occurrence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method for estimating the mobility and potential alongshore transport of heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates...

  16. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Model Application for OSAT3 Guidance: Ratio of wave- and current-induced shear stress to critical values for oil-sand ball and sediment mobilization

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method for estimating the mobility and potential alongshore transport of heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates...

  17. Hydrodynamic and Sediment Transport Model Application for OSAT3 Guidance: Surf-zone integrated alongshore potential flux for oil-sand balls of varying sizes weighted by probability of wave scenario occurrence

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a method for estimating the mobility and potential alongshore transport of heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates...

  18. Mechanical behavior of carbon nanotubes in the rippled and buckled phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, H.; Krakhmalev, P.; Svensson, K.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the mechanical behavior of multi-walled carbon nanotubes for bending strains beyond the onset for rippling and buckling. We found a characteristic drop in the bending stiffness at the rippling and buckling onset and the relative retained stiffness was dependent on the nanotube dimensions and crystallinity. Thin tubes are more prone to buckle, where some lose all of their bending stiffness, while thicker tubes are more prone to ripple and on average retain about 20% of their bending stiffness. In defect rich tubes, the bending stiffness is very low prior to rippling, but these tubes retain up to 70% of their initial bending stiffness.

  19. Selective display of multiple patterns encoded with different oriented ripples using femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiawen; Li, Guoqiang; Hu, Yanlei; Zhang, Chenchu; Li, Xiaohong; Chu, Jiaru; Huang, Wenhao

    2015-08-01

    Uniform oriented ripples were induced on stainless steel surface by polarized femtosecond laser. Multiple patterns were successfully encoded with the different oriented ripples on the surface without spatial overlap. Each pattern can be selectively displayed with structural color while the others cannot be in the meantime when white light is irradiated on the surface from different directions. The influence of ripples with different periods for selecting pattern is also investigated. The ripple period is crucial to the color effects. This approach can be used in the fields of color display, identifying codes and anti-counterfeiting patterns.

  20. Control of periodic ripples growth on metals by femtosecond laser ellipticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanfu; Yang, Jianjun; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Mingwei; Zhu, Xiaonong

    2012-11-01

    Formation of the periodic ripples on metallic surfaces is investigated comprehensively using variable ellipticities of femtosecond lasers. Compared with the linearly polarized incidence, the well defined grating-like ripple structures rather than the uniform arrays of nanoparticle can always be obtained for the elliptical polarization lasers. The ripple orientation is slanted clockwise or anticlockwise depending on the laser helicity but always display a maximum angle of 45°. Theoretical analyses indicate that no circular polarization is achieved for femtosecond lasers passing through quarter waveplate, and the induced ripple orientation is determined by the major axis of the polarization ellipse. The simulation results agree well with the experimental observations.

  1. A non-unity torque sharing function for torque ripple minimization of switched reluctance generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Kiwoo; Liu, Xiao; Chen, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new torque ripple minimization technique for a Switched Reluctance Generator (SRG). Although the SRG has many advantageous characteristics as a generator, it has not been widely employed in the industry. One of the most notorious disadvantages of the SRG is its high torque r...... ripple. In this paper, a non-unity Torque Sharing Function (TSF) is proposed to minimize the torque ripple over a wide speed range of operation. Simulation results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed torque ripple minimization technique....

  2. Mechanic waves in sand: effect of polydispersity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, S.; Mouraille, O.; Peukert, W.; Schreglmann, C.

    2008-01-01

    The sound propagation mechanisms inside dense granular matter are challenging the attempts to describe it because of the discrete nature of the material. Phenomena like dissipation, scattering, and dispersion are hard to predict based on the material state and/or properties and vice-versa. We propos

  3. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  4. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2017-06-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  5. Nike Experiment to Observe Strong Areal Mass Oscillations in a Rippled Target Hit by a Short Laser Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Metzler, N.; Oh, J.

    2010-11-01

    When a short (sub-ns) laser pulse deposits finite energy in a target, the shock wave launched into it is immediately followed by a rarefaction wave. If the irradiated surface is rippled, theory and simulations predict strong oscillations of the areal mass perturbation amplitude in the target [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 10, 3270 (2003).] The first experiment designed to observe this effect has become possible by adding short-driving-pulse capability to the Nike laser, and has been scheduled for the fall of 2010. Simulations show that while the driving pulse of 0.3 ns is on, the areal mass perturbation amplitude grows by a factor ˜2 due to ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. It then decreases, reverses phase, and reaches another maximum, also about twice its initial value, shortly after the shock breakout at the rear target surface. This signature behavior is observable with the monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostics fielded on Nike.

  6. Microbes in Beach Sands: Integrating Environment, Ecology and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Richard; Harwood, Valerie J; Edge, Thomas A; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Vijayavel, Kannappan; Brandão, João; Sadowsky, Michael J; Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Crowe, Allan; Ferguson, Donna; Ge, Zhongfu; Halliday, Elizabeth; Kinzelman, Julie; Kleinheinz, Greg; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Staley, Christopher; Staley, Zachery; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2014-09-01

    Beach sand is a habitat that supports many microbes, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa (micropsammon). The apparently inhospitable conditions of beach sand environments belie the thriving communities found there. Physical factors, such as water availability and protection from insolation; biological factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all contribute to the characteristics of the micropsammon. Sand microbial communities include autochthonous species/phylotypes indigenous to the environment. Allochthonous microbes, including fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate of these microbes ranges from death, to transient persistence and/or replication, to establishment of thriving populations (naturalization) and integration in the autochthonous community. Transport of the micropsammon within the habitat occurs both horizontally across the beach, and vertically from the sand surface and ground water table, as well as at various scales including interstitial flow within sand pores, sediment transport for particle-associated microbes, and the large-scale processes of wave action and terrestrial runoff. The concept of beach sand as a microbial habitat and reservoir of FIB and pathogens has begun to influence our thinking about human health effects associated with sand exposure and recreational water use. A variety of pathogens have been reported from beach sands, and recent epidemiology studies have found some evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB and enteric pathogens have consequences for watershed/beach management strategies and regulatory standards for safe beaches. This review summarizes our understanding of the community structure, ecology, fate, transport, and public health implications of microbes in beach sand. It concludes with recommendations for future work in

  7. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs.

  8. Pattern formation in a reaction-advection model with delay: a continuum approach to myxobacterial rippling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, U.; Bär, M.

    2004-07-01

    Standing wave oscillations of the cell density (rippling) are observed in premature aggregates of developing myxobacteria. Recently the underlying pattern formation mechanism was shown to be based on the interplay between active cell motion and local interactions triggering reversals in the cells' direction of motion. The propagation of information through the system is mediated by the internal state of moving cells rather than by diffusible chemical signals. Discrete cellular automata and coupled-map lattices have been investigated earlier and indicate the importance of a minimum refractory period between subsequent reversals of a cell. In this paper we consider the continuum limit of the process, that yields a set of hyperbolic partial differential equations with a a single discrete time delay. The time delay corresponds to the duration of the mentioned refractory period of the cells. According to linear stability analysis a minimal time delay is required for a wave instability to occur. The results of the continuum model are in reasonable agreement with the findings in the discrete models adding credibility to the earlier studies.

  9. WIND TUNNEL EXPERIMENT OF SAND VELOCITY IN NATURE AEOLIAN SAND TRANSPORT USING PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY%天然混合沙运动速度特征的风洞PIV实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佟鼎; 黄宁

    2011-01-01

    Sand velocity in aeolian sand transport is measured using the PIV system(Particle Imaging Velocimetry) in a wind tunnel.The velocity probability distribution of ascending and descending particles,as well the influences of sand ripple on the sand particle motion are analyzed.The results show that velocity distributions of take-off particles and particles during sand movement accord with logarithm normal distribution.The mean incident velocity of sand particles is 1.005-1.4 times higher than take-off ones with different wind speed.It is found that sand ripples play an important role on the sand particles motion,which is a key factor that can not be neglected.%采用PIV(Particle Image Velocimetry)系统测量了天然混合沙风沙两相流中沙粒的速度分布特征,得到了沙粒入射以及起跳的速度分布情况,并且分析了沙波纹对风沙运动的影响。结果表明:沙粒运动过程中的速度分布与沙粒起跳速度的分布可以应用对数正态分布来表明;当有沙波纹存在时,沙粒总体速度分布与平坦沙床面差别很大,是不可忽略的重要因素;平坦沙床面沙粒平均入射速度是起跳平均速度的1.005倍~1.4倍,具体关系可以应用线性函数来拟合。

  10. Multispectral Kerr frequency comb initiated by Faraday ripples

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Shu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In a uniform microresonator, the generation of a broadband Kerr frequency comb is triggered by Turing patterns. Here, we study a distinctly different route to initiate the Kerr frequency comb by Faraday ripples. Momentum conservation is ensured by azimuthal modulation of the cavity dispersion. With a good agreement with the theoretical analysis, we demonstrate a multispectral Kerr frequency comb covering telecommunication O, C, L, and 2 {\\mu}m bands. Comb coherence and absence of a subcomb offset are confirmed by cw heterodyne beat note and amplitude noise spectra measurements. The device can be used for achieving broadband optical frequency synthesizer and high-capacity coherent telecommunication.

  11. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  12. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  13. Small Strain Behaviour and Viscous Effects on Sands and Sand-Clay Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, H.

    This lecture paper focuses on sands and sand-clay mixtures behaviour in the small strain domain. Non viscous and viscous components are measured, identified and modelled within the framework of a 3 component model. Two precision prototype devices (triaxial and hollow cylinder) both equipped with piezoelectric sensors are used. Non viscous measured behaviour considering small quasi-static cycles and wave properties are compared with simulations obtained from 2 recently formulated anisotropic hypoelastic models (DBGS and DBGSP). Then, viscous experimental part is compared with the proposed model prediction. This model is an asymptotic expression, for the small strain domain, of a viscous evanescent formalism proposed by the author. It takes into account very peculiar behaviour observed on sands. Simulation for loadings with and without rotation of axes and for different rate histories, are quite satisfactory.

  14. Elevated Serum Aminotransferases Secondary to Rippling Muscle Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumanan Nalankilli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old man was referred by his general practitioner to the hepatology clinic with deranged serum aminotransferases, discovered as part of routine blood tests. The objective was to identify the cause of elevated serum aminotransferases in this patient in a systematic manner. Thorough history and physical examination revealed a background history of rippling muscle disease secondary to caveolin-3 protein deficiency, with typical clinical signs. There was a positive family history of musculoskeletal disease in the patient's father and brother. Previous diagnostic tests performed to investigate the patient's musculoskeletal symptoms, including muscle biopsies, were revisited. Subsequent systematic investigations such as blood tests, liver ultrasound scan and Fibroscan® were performed to exclude potential causes of the deranged serum aminotransferases. Liver biopsy was not performed. A consistent pattern of chronic low-grade elevations of serum aminotransferases, less than three times the upper limit of the normal range, was found. This was associated with a consistently elevated serum creatine kinase and normal renal function tests. Previous muscle biopsies had revealed chronic degenerative and regenerative changes suggestive of a focal necrotizing myopathy. Liver ultrasound scan and Fibroscan® were normal. With exclusion of other liver diseases and identification of profoundly elevated serum creatine kinase concentration, the deranged aminotransferases were attributed to rippling muscle disease.

  15. High speed non-latching squid binary ripple counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, A.H.; Phillips, R.R.; Sandell, R.D.

    1985-03-01

    High speed, single flux quantum (SFQ) binary scalers are important components in superconducting analog-to-digital converters (ADC). This paper reviews the concept for a SQUID ADC and the design of an SFQ binary ripple counter, and reports the simulation of key components, and fabrication and performance of non-latching SQUID scalers and SFQ binary ripple counters. The SQUIDs were fabricated with Nb/Nb/sub 2/O/sub 5//PbIn junctions and interconnected by monolithic superconducting transmission lines and isolation resistors. Each SQUID functioned as a bistable flip-flop with the input connected to the center of the device and the output across one junction. All junctions were critically damped to optimize the pulse response. Operation was verified by observing the dc I-V curves of successive SQUIDs driven by a cw pulse train generated on the same chip. Each SQUID exhibited constant-voltage current steps at 1/2 the voltage of the preceding device as expected from the Josephson voltage-to-frequency relation. Steps were observed only for the same voltage polarity of successive devices and for proper phase bias of the SQUID. Binary frequency division was recorded up to 40GHz for devices designed to operate to 28GHz.

  16. Missing lynx and trophic cascades in food webs: A reply to Ripple et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Squires; Nicholas J. DeCesare; Mark Hebblewhite; Joel Berger

    2012-01-01

    Ripple et al. (2011) proposed a hypothesis that the recovery of gray wolves (Canis lupus) may positively affect the viability of threatened Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) populations in the contiguous United States through indirect species interactions. Ripple et al. (2011) proposed 2 key trophic linkages connecting wolf restoration with lynx recovery. First, recovering...

  17. Mode-selective terahertz emission from rippled air irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Junghun; Zhidkov, Alexei; Jin, Zhan; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2014-04-01

    Terahertz (THz) emission from rippled air is studied in multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations that include optical field ionization. The ionization modulation in a plasma channel produced by a laser pulse propagating along a ripple and the pulse self-focusing result in THz mode selection with the generation of intense signals having quasi-monochromatic spectral distributions.

  18. Evolution of a Rippled Membrane during Phospholipase A2 Hydrolysis Studied by Time-Resolved AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent;

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) for lipid membrane curvature is explored by monitoring, through time-resolved atomic force microscopy, the hydrolysis of supported double bilayers in the ripple phase. The ripple phase presents a corrugated morphology. PLA2 is shown to have higher activi...

  19. Stochastic Ripple Diffusion of Energetic Particles in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Qing-Di; LONG Yong-Xing

    2004-01-01

    @@ The stochastic ripple diffusion is investigated in a realistic reversed magnetic shear discharge. Rippled field produces variations in the velocity of trapped particles leading to excursion of the tip position for successive banana bounces. When the excursion is large enough, the trapped energetic particles are lost rapidly via stochastic banana diffusion.

  20. Influence of PWM Modes on Commutation Torque Ripples in Sensorless Brushless DC Motor Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXiang-jun; CHENBo-shi; 等

    2001-01-01

    This paper introduces four PWM modes used in the sensorless brushless DC motor control system,analyzes their different influences on the commutation torque ripple in detail,and selects the best PWM mode in four given types to reduce commutation torque ripple of Brushless OC( BLDC) motors,Simulation and experimental results show that the selection is correct and practical.

  1. Temperature-controlled structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one- and two-component supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Crowe, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    ripples was seen. From height profiles of the AFM images, estimates of the amplitudes of the different ripple phases are reported. To elucidate the processes of ripple formation and disappearance, a ripple-phase DPPC lipid bilayer was taken through the pretransition in the cooling and the heating......Temperature-controlled atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to visualize and study the structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one-component dipalmitoylphosphaticlylcholine (DPPC) and two-component dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC-DSPC) lipid bilayers....... The lipid bilayers are mica-supported double bilayers in which ripple-phase formation occurs in the top bilayer. In one-component DPPC lipid bilayers, the stable and metastable ripple phases were observed. In addition, a third ripple structure with approximately twice the wavelength of the metastable...

  2. Temperature-controlled structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one- and two-component supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Crowe, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    ripples was seen. From height profiles of the AFM images, estimates of the amplitudes of the different ripple phases are reported. To elucidate the processes of ripple formation and disappearance, a ripple-phase DPPC lipid bilayer was taken through the pretransition in the cooling and the heating...... was heated from the ripple phase and into the ripple-phase/fluid-phase coexistence temperature region, the AFM images revealed that several dynamic properties of the ripple phase are important for the melting behavior of the lipid mixture. Onset of melting is observed at grain boundaries between different......Temperature-controlled atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to visualize and study the structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one-component dipalmitoylphosphaticlylcholine (DPPC) and two-component dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC-DSPC) lipid bilayers...

  3. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  4. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  5. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  6. Virksomhedens sande ansigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholt, Marianne Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Er modhistorier en byrde eller en styrke i forandringsprocesser? Hvad stiller vi op, når adgangen til organisationens sande identitet går gennem medarbejdernes modhistorier? Når vi sammenholder denne erkendelse med vores viden om, at medarbejdere helt naturligt afholder sig fra at videregive disse...

  7. Sand (CSW4)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  8. Penetration of a resonant magnetic perturbation in an adiabatically rippled plasma slab

    CERN Document Server

    Dewar, Robert L; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-01-01

    The adiabatic limit of a recently proposed dynamical extension of Taylor relaxation, \\emph{multi-region relaxed magnetohydrodynamics} (MRxMHD) is summarized, with special attention to the appropriate definition of relative magnetic helicity. The formalism is illustrated using a simple two-region, sheared-magnetic-field model similar to the Hahm--Kulsrud--Taylor (HKT) rippled-boundary slab model. In MRxMHD a linear Grad--Shafranov equation applies, even at finite ripple amplitude. The adiabatic switching on of boundary ripple excites a shielding current sheet opposing reconnection at a resonant surface. The perturbed magnetic field as a function of ripple amplitude is calculated by invoking conservation of magnetic helicity in the two regions separated by the current sheet. At low ripple amplitude "half islands" appear on each side of the current sheet, locking the rotational transform at the resonant value. Beyond a critical amplitude these islands disappear and the rotational transform develops a discontinui...

  9. Femtosecond laser fabrication of large-area periodic surface ripple structure on Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, L. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, X.C., E-mail: xcwang@SIMTech.a-star.edu.sg [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Zheng, H.Y. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Wang, H. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Yu, H.Y. [South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we report the fabrication of a large area uniformly distributed periodic nano-ripple structure on silicon substrate through the proper scanning of a line-shaped femtosecond laser beam. The fabricated nano-ripple structure has a periodicity of ∼600 nm and a ripple depth of ∼300 nm. The modulation depth is much deeper than the one previously reported. The developed structure is demonstrated to be able to substantially reduce light reflection due to the effective optical coupling between the incident sunlight with the nano-ripple structure and exhibit an absorption enhancement of ∼41% compared with planar silicon wafer. The physics underlying the formation of the nano-ripple structure is also discussed.

  10. Collisional stochastic ripple diffusion of alpha particles and beam ions on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, M.H.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; White, R.B.; Budny, R.V.; Janos, A.C.; Owens, D.K.; Schivell, J.F.; Scott, S.D.; Zweben, S.J.

    1995-07-01

    Predictions for ripple loss of fast ions from TFTR are investigated with a guiding center code including both collisional and ripple effects. A synergistic enhancement of fast ion diffusion is found for toroidal field ripple with collisions. The total loss is calculated to be roughly twice the sum of ripple and collisional losses calculated separately. Discrepancies between measurements and calculations of plasma beta at low current and large major radius are resolved when both effects are included for neutral beam ions. A 20--30% reduction in alpha particle heating is predicted for q{sub a} = 6--14, R = 2.6 m DT plasmas on TFTR due to first orbit and collisional stochastic ripple diffusion.

  11. Thrust ripple optimization and experiment for a permanent magnet linear synchronous motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yue-tong; FU Jian-zhong; CHEN Zi-chen

    2006-01-01

    Thrust ripple such as end force,slot force and normal force are key factors that affect the properties of permanent magnet linear synchronous motors (PMLSM).According to different mechanics and analytical models,end force resulting from open magnetic circuit of PMLSM was greatly decreased by optimizing the length of the PMLSM mover.Slot force caused by slot effect was greatly reduced by using fraction slot structure,and normal force was calculated through the finite element method (FEM).After thrust ripple was calculated,its uniform formula was obtained through Fourier series nonlinear regression.An experimental system was set up to measure thrust ripple,and experiment results demonstrated that experimental force ripple was quite in line with that calculated by the fitting formula.The optimal theory and analysis method is effective,and the obtained formula can be utilized to compensate thrust ripple in practical applications and improve the motion performance of PMLSM.

  12. FORCE RIPPLE SUPPRESSION TECHNOLOGY FOR LINEAR MOTORS BASED ON BACK PROPAGATION NEURAL NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dailin; CHEN Youping; AI Wu; ZHOU Zude; KONG Ching Tom

    2008-01-01

    Various force disturbances influence the thrust force of linear motors when a linear motor (LM) is running. Among all of force disturbances, the force ripple is the dominant while a linear motor runs in low speed. In order to suppress the force ripple, back propagation(BP) neural network is proposed to learn the function of the force ripple of linear motors, and the acquisition method of training samples is proposed based on a disturbance observer. An off-line BP neural network is used mainly because of its high running efficiency and the real-time requirement of the servo control system of a linear motor. By using the function, the force ripple is on-line compensated according to the position of the LM. The experimental results show that the force ripple is effectively suppressed by the compensation of the BP neural network.

  13. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  14. Comparing auditory filter bandwidths, spectral ripple modulation detection, spectral ripple discrimination, and speech recognition: Normal and impaired hearinga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Venn, Evelyn; Nelson, Peggy; Souza, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Some listeners with hearing loss show poor speech recognition scores in spite of using amplification that optimizes audibility. Beyond audibility, studies have suggested that suprathreshold abilities such as spectral and temporal processing may explain differences in amplified speech recognition scores. A variety of different methods has been used to measure spectral processing. However, the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition is still inconclusive. This study evaluated the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and with hearing loss. Narrowband spectral resolution was assessed using auditory filter bandwidths estimated from simultaneous notched-noise masking. Broadband spectral processing was measured using the spectral ripple discrimination (SRD) task and the spectral ripple depth detection (SMD) task. Three different measures were used to assess unamplified and amplified speech recognition in quiet and noise. Stepwise multiple linear regression revealed that SMD at 2.0 cycles per octave (cpo) significantly predicted speech scores for amplified and unamplified speech in quiet and noise. Commonality analyses revealed that SMD at 2.0 cpo combined with SRD and equivalent rectangular bandwidth measures to explain most of the variance captured by the regression model. Results suggest that SMD and SRD may be promising clinical tools for diagnostic evaluation and predicting amplification outcomes. PMID:26233047

  15. Comparing auditory filter bandwidths, spectral ripple modulation detection, spectral ripple discrimination, and speech recognition: Normal and impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Venn, Evelyn; Nelson, Peggy; Souza, Pamela

    2015-07-01

    Some listeners with hearing loss show poor speech recognition scores in spite of using amplification that optimizes audibility. Beyond audibility, studies have suggested that suprathreshold abilities such as spectral and temporal processing may explain differences in amplified speech recognition scores. A variety of different methods has been used to measure spectral processing. However, the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition is still inconclusive. This study evaluated the relationship between spectral processing and speech recognition in listeners with normal hearing and with hearing loss. Narrowband spectral resolution was assessed using auditory filter bandwidths estimated from simultaneous notched-noise masking. Broadband spectral processing was measured using the spectral ripple discrimination (SRD) task and the spectral ripple depth detection (SMD) task. Three different measures were used to assess unamplified and amplified speech recognition in quiet and noise. Stepwise multiple linear regression revealed that SMD at 2.0 cycles per octave (cpo) significantly predicted speech scores for amplified and unamplified speech in quiet and noise. Commonality analyses revealed that SMD at 2.0 cpo combined with SRD and equivalent rectangular bandwidth measures to explain most of the variance captured by the regression model. Results suggest that SMD and SRD may be promising clinical tools for diagnostic evaluation and predicting amplification outcomes.

  16. Wave transformation and attenuation along the west coast of India: Measurements and numerical simulations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Aboobacker, V.M.; Vethamony, P.; Samiksha, S.V.; Rashmi, R.; Jyoti, K.

    and Sorensen, 1993]. Interaction of waves with bottom produces a boundary layer, which results in the loss of wave energy to the bed due to bottom friction [Bagnold, 1946]. Vortex ripples and their feedback on the waves through enhanced bottom roughness...

  17. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  18. Assessment of Enterococcus Levels in Recreational Beach Sand Along the Rhode Island Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Eugenie; Parris, Amie L; Wyman, Al; Latowsky, Gretchen

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that coastal beach sand as well as coastal ocean water can be contaminated with fecal indicator Enterococcus bacteria (ENT). A study of sand ENT concentrations over a four-week period at 12 Rhode Island beaches was conducted during the summer of 2009. While average contamination was low relative to water quality standards, every beach had at least one day with very high sand ENT readings. On 10 of the 12 beaches, a statistically significant gradient occurred in geometric mean ENT concentrations among tidal zones, with dry (supratidal, or above high tide mark) sand having the highest level, followed by wet (intratidal, or below high tide mark) and underwater sand. Beaches with higher wave action had significantly lower ENT levels in wet and underwater sand compared to beaches with lower wave action.

  19. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report.

  20. PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

  1. Ripples and Shear Bands in Plowed Granular Media

    CERN Document Server

    Gravish, Nick; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    Monodisperse packings of dry, air-fluidized granular media typically exist between volume fractions from $\\Phi$= 0.585 to 0.64. We demonstrate that the dynamics of granular drag are sensitive to volume fraction $\\Phi$ and their exists a transition in the drag force and material deformation from smooth to oscillatory at a critical volume fraction $\\Phi_{c}=0.605$. By dragging a submerged steel plate (3.81 cm width, 6.98 cm depth) through $300 \\mu m$ glass beads prepared at volume fractions between 0.585 to 0.635 we find that below $\\Phi_{c}$ the media deformation is smooth and non-localized while above $\\Phi_{c}$ media fails along distinct shear bands. At high $\\Phi$ the generation of these shear bands is periodic resulting in the ripples on the surface. Work funded by The Burroughs Wellcome Fund and the Army Research Lab MAST CTA

  2. The ripples of "The Big (agricultural) Bang": the spread of early wheat cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbo, Shahal; Gopher, Avi; Peleg, Zvi; Saranga, Yehoshua; Fahima, Tzion; Salamini, Francesco; Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2006-08-01

    Demographic expansion and (or) migrations leave their mark in the pattern of DNA polymorphisms of the respective populations. Likewise, the spread of cultural phenomena can be traced by dating archaeological finds and reconstructing their direction and pace. A similar course of events is likely to have taken place following the "Big Bang" of the agricultural spread in the Neolithic Near East from its core area in southeastern Turkey. Thus far, no attempts have been made to track the movement of the founder genetic stocks of the first crop plants from their core area based on the genetic structure of living plants. In this minireview, we re-interpret recent wheat DNA polymorphism data to detect the genetic ripples left by the early wave of advance of Neolithic wheat farming from its core area. This methodology may help to suggest a model charting the spread of the first farming phase prior to the emergence of truly domesticated wheat types (and other such crops), thereby increasing our resolution power in studying this revolutionary period of human cultural, demographic, and social evolution.

  3. Apparent rippling with honeycomb symmetry and tunable periodicity observed by scanning tunneling microscopy on suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, A.; Nemes-Incze, P.; Szafranek, B.; Neumaier, D.; Geringer, V.; Liebmann, M.; Morgenstern, M.

    2016-11-01

    Suspended graphene is difficult to image by scanning probe microscopy due to the inherent van der Waals and dielectric forces exerted by the tip, which are not counteracted by a substrate. Here, we report scanning tunneling microscopy data of suspended monolayer graphene in constant-current mode, revealing a surprising honeycomb structure with amplitude of 50-200 pm and lattice constant of 10-40 nm. The apparent lattice constant is reduced by increasing the tunneling current I , but does not depend systematically on tunneling voltage V or scan speed vscan. The honeycomb lattice of the rippling is aligned with the atomic structure observed on supported areas, while no atomic corrugation is found on suspended areas down to the resolution of about 3 -4 pm. We rule out that the honeycomb structure is induced by the feedback loop using a changing vscan, that it is a simple enlargement effect of the atomic lattice, as well as models predicting frozen phonons or standing phonon waves induced by the tunneling current. Although we currently do not have a convincing explanation for the observed effect, we expect that our intriguing results will inspire further research related to suspended graphene.

  4. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  5. Effects of magnetic ripple on 3D equilibrium and alpha particle confinement in the European DEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferlé, D.; Cooper, W. A.; Fasoli, A.; Graves, J. P.

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of alpha particle confinement is performed in the European DEMO reference design. 3D MHD equilibria with nested flux-surfaces and single magnetic axis are obtained with the VMEC free-boundary code, thereby including the plasma response to the magnetic ripple created by the finite number of TF coils. Populations of fusion alphas that are consistent with the equilibrium profiles are evolved until slowing-down with the VENUS-LEVIS orbit code in the guiding-centre approximation. Fast ion losses through the last-closed flux-surface are numerically evaluated with two ripple models: (1) using the 3D equilibrium and (2) algebraically adding the non-axisymmetric ripple perturbation to the 2D equilibrium. By virtue of the small ripple field and its non-resonant nature, both models quantitatively agree. Differences are however noted in the toroidal location of particles losses on the last-closed flux-surface, which in the first case is 3D and in the second not. Superbanana transport, i.e. ripple-well trapping and separatrix crossing, is expected to be the dominant loss mechanism, the strongest effect on alphas being between 100-200 KeV. Above this, stochastic ripple diffusion is responsible for a rather weak loss rate, as the stochastisation threshold is observed numerically to be higher than analytic estimates. The level of ripple in the current 18 TF coil design of the European DEMO is not found to be detrimental to fusion alpha confinement.

  6. Torque Ripple Reduction of Reluctance Torque Assisted Motors Using Asymmetric Flux Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Kenji; Takeda, Yoji; Sanada, Masayuki; Morimoto, Shigeo

    Interior permanent magnet synchronous motor (IPMSM) is efficient and can be operated in wide speed region; therefore it is used widely. However, torque ripple of reluctance torque assisted motors, for example IPMSM and synchronous reluctance motor (SynRM), is very large. The skew is known in the prior art as a torque ripple reduction method of AC motors. Although the skew is effective for torque ripple reduction, structure is complicated and it has the disadvantage that average torque will decrease. The discontinuous variation of magnetic resistance between flux barriers and teeth cause the torque ripple. In this paper, in order to ease the discontinuous variation of magnetic resistance, flux barriers are asymmetrically designed so that the relative position relation between flux barriers and teeth may not be in agreement as much as possible. As a result, the torque ripple can be reduced dramatically without the average torque decrease. The experimental motor has been fabricated and the results of measuring torque ripple prove the validity of the torque ripple reduction using asymmetric flux barriers.

  7. Adaptive feedforward of estimated ripple improves the closed loop system performance significantly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1998-12-31

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of LLRF control system for LEDA. The authors propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and a control law which is based on PID control and adaptive feedforward of estimated ripple. The control law reduces the effect of the deterministic cathode ripple that is due to high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points.

  8. Online high voltage power supply ripple estimation and feedforward in LEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.; Regan, A.; Wang, Y.M.; Rohlev, T.

    1999-06-01

    The Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) being constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will serve as the prototype for the low energy section of Acceleration Production of Tritium (APT) accelerator. This paper addresses the problem of LLRF control system for LEDA. They propose an estimator of the ripple and its time derivative and a control law which is based on PID control and adaptive feedforward of estimated ripple. The control law reduces the effect of the deterministic cathode ripple that is due to high voltage power supply and achieves tracking of desired set points.

  9. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  10. Effects of the poloidal variation of the magnetic field ripple on enhanced heat transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A.; Tsang, K.T.; Callen, J.D.

    1976-06-01

    The use of a finite number of coils to generate the toroidal field of a tokamak introduces a magnetic field asymmetry and is responsible for an additional particle trapping that can affect the plasma confinement. The enhanced transport coefficients associated with the ripple-induced drifts have been calculated. The calculations include both the radial and poloidal variation in the magnitude of the field ripple. It is found that the consideration of poloidal variation significantly reduces the ripple-trapped transport but does not affect the banana-drift diffusion. Results relevant to the ORNL Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) reference design are discussed.

  11. Advanced RF-KO slow-extraction method for the reduction of spill ripple

    CERN Document Server

    Noda, K; Shibuya, S; Uesugi, T; Muramatsu, M; Kanazawa, M; Takada, E; Yamada, S

    2002-01-01

    Two advanced RF-knockout (RF-KO) slow-extraction methods have been developed at HIMAC in order to reduce the spill ripple for accurate heavy-ion cancer therapy: the dual frequency modulation (FM) method and the separated function method. As a result of simulations and experiments, it was verified that the spill ripple could be considerably reduced using these advanced methods, compared with the ordinary RF-KO method. The dual FM method and the separated function method bring about a low spill ripple within standard deviations of around 25% and of 15% during beam extraction within around 2 s, respectively, which are in good agreement with the simulation results.

  12. Advanced RF-KO slow-extraction method for the reduction of spill ripple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, K.; Furukawa, T.; Shibuya, S.; Uesugi, T.; Muramatsu, M.; Kanazawa, M.; Takada, E.; Yamada, S.

    2002-10-01

    Two advanced RF-knockout (RF-KO) slow-extraction methods have been developed at HIMAC in order to reduce the spill ripple for accurate heavy-ion cancer therapy: the dual frequency modulation (FM) method and the separated function method. As a result of simulations and experiments, it was verified that the spill ripple could be considerably reduced using these advanced methods, compared with the ordinary RF-KO method. The dual FM method and the separated function method bring about a low spill ripple within standard deviations of around 25% and of 15% during beam extraction within around 2 s, respectively, which are in good agreement with the simulation results.

  13. Evaluation of wet tantalum capacitors after exposure to extended periods of ripple current, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The application of tantalum capacitors in the Viking Lander includes dc voltage and ripple current electrical stress, high temperature during nonoperating times (sterilization), and high vibration and shock loads. The capacitors must survive these severe environments without any degradation if reliable performance is to be achieved. A test program was established to evaluate both wet-slug tantalum and wet-foil capacitors under conditions accurately duplicating actual Viking applications. Test results of the electrical performance characteristics during extended periods of ripple current, the characteristics of the internal silver migration as a function of extended periods of ripple current, and the existence of any memory characteristics are presented.

  14. Evaluation of wet tantalum capacitors after exposure to extended periods of ripple current, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. W.; Lasharr, J. C.; Shumaker, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The application of tantalum capacitors in the Viking Lander includes both dc voltage and ripple current electrical stress, high temperature during nonoperating times (sterilization), and high vibration and shock loads. The capacitors must survive these severe environments without any degradation if reliable performance is to be achieved. A test program was established to evaluate both wet-slug tantalum and wet-foil capacitors under conditions accurately duplicating actual Viking applications. Test results of the electrical performance characteristics during extended periods of ripple current, the characteristics of the internal silver migration as a function for extended periods of ripple current, and the existence of any memory characteristics are presented.

  15. ADAPTIVE CONTROL APPROACH FOR PERIODIC RATE RIPPLES IN INERTIAL GUIDANCE TEST EQUIPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUGuo-zhu; LIUYue; ZHANGYuan-sheng

    2005-01-01

    The rate performance of inertial guidance test equipment (IGTE) affects the performance testing of inertia devices and navigation systems. Periodic rate ripples caused by periodic disturbances have a great effect on the rate performance of rotation test tables. The mechanism caused by the rate ripple in IGTE is analyzed. Based on the nonlinear self-adaptive control system approach, a control system scheme is proposed to eliminate the period disturbances for its uncertainty. Experimental results show that the periodic rate ripple can efficiently be controlled.

  16. Gravitational-Wave Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Theory of Relativity is our best classical description of gravity, and informs modern astronomy and astrophysics at all scales: stellar, galactic, and cosmological. Among its surprising predictions is the existence of gravitational waves -- ripples in space-time that carry energy and momentum away from strongly interacting gravitating sources. In my talk, I will give an overview of the properties of this radiation, recent breakthroughs in computational physics allowing us to calculate the waveforms from galactic mergers, and the prospect of direct observation with interferometric detectors such as LIGO and LISA.

  17. Sand Resources and Geological Character of Long Island Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    Ashraf (1973a, 1973b), Coch (1974), and Williams (1976) identified deeply buried stream channels which are pre-Pleistocene but acted as conduits for...Migration of Sand Waves in a Large Estuary, Long Island Sound," Marine Geology, Vol. 24, 1977, pp. 185-199. COCH , N., "Morphology and Sediment

  18. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  19. Validating Experimental Bedform Dynamics on Cohesive Sand-Mud Beds in the Dee Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, Jaco H.; Baker, Megan; Hope, Julie; Malarkey, Jonathan; Rocha, Renata

    2014-05-01

    Recent laboratory experiments and field measurements have shown that small quantities of cohesive clay, and in particular 'sticky' biological polymers, within a sandy substrate dramatically reduce the development rate of sedimentary bedforms, with major implications for sediment transport rate calculations and process interpretations from the sedimentary record. FURTHER INFORMATION Flow and sediment transport predictions from sedimentary structures found in modern estuaries and within estuarine geological systems are impeded by an almost complete lack of process-based knowledge of the behaviour of natural sediments that consist of mixtures of cohesionless sand and biologically-active cohesive mud. Indeed, existing predictive models are largely based on non-organic cohesionless sands, despite the fact that mud, in pure form or mixed with sand, is the most common sediment on Earth and also the most biologically active interface across a range of Earth-surface environments, including rivers and shallow seas. The multidisciplinary COHBED project uses state-of-the-art laboratory and field technologies to measure the erosional properties of mixed cohesive sediment beds and the formation and stability of sedimentary bedforms on these beds, integrating the key physical and biological processes that govern bed evolution. The development of current ripples on cohesive mixed sediment beds was investigated as a function of physical control on bed cohesion versus biological control on bed cohesion. These investigations included laboratory flume experiments in the Hydrodynamics Laboratory (Bangor University) and field experiments in the Dee estuary (at West Kirby near Liverpool). The flume experiments showed that winnowing of fine-grained cohesive sediment, including biological stabilisers, is an important process affecting the development rate, size and shape of the cohesive bedforms. The ripples developed progressively slower as the kaolin clay fraction in the sandy substrate

  20. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  1. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  2. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  3. A New Method for Reducing Commutation Torque Ripples in BLDC Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new compensation method and an algorithm for compensating for the commutation torque ripples of the trapezoidal EMF brushless DC motor are put forward. Simulation and experimental results show that this method is correct and practical.

  4. Contribution of synchrotron oscillation to spill ripple in RF-knockout slow-extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, T.; Noda, K.

    2005-02-01

    We have studied the effect of synchrotron oscillations on the spill ripple in RF-knockout extraction, in order to investigate the ripple component of the synchrotron-oscillation frequency and to suppress this component. By using a simplified model of RF-knockout extraction and the simulation, it was found that the following conditions are essential for suppressing the spill ripple including the component of the synchrotron-oscillation frequency: (1) sufficient amplitude of the synchrotron oscillation and (2) uniform distribution in longitudinal phase-space. In the experiment at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) synchrotron, the debunch-recapture was carried out before the extraction to obtain the larger oscillation amplitude and the uniform distribution in the longitudinal phase-space. In this article, the contribution of the synchrotron oscillation to the spill ripple is described in detail.

  5. A high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved DC-DC converter for fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Long-Yi; Chao, Kuei-Hsiang; Chang, Tsang-Chih

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a high voltage ratio and low ripple interleaved boost DC-DC converter, which can be used to reduce the output voltage ripple. This converter transfers the low DC voltage of fuel cell to high DC voltage in DC link. The structure of the converter is parallel with two voltage-doubler boost converters by interleaving their output voltages to reduce the voltage ripple ratio. Besides, it can lower the current stress for the switches and inductors in the system. First, the PSIM software was used to establish a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and a converter circuit model. The simulated and measured results of the fuel cell output characteristic curve are made to verify the correctness of the established simulation model. In addition, some experimental results are made to validate the effectiveness in improving output voltage ripple of the proposed high voltage ratio interleaved boost DC-DC converters.

  6. Ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation via laser double pulses excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guangqing; Wu, Yanmin; Uddin, Noor; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Lu, Yu; Bian, Hao; Hou, Xun

    2016-09-01

    The ultrafast thermal dynamics of nano-ripples formation on gold film via ultrafast laser double pulses excitation is theoretically investigated by numerical simulations. The non-equilibrium thermal modulations with respect to the electron and phonon energy transfers within gold film is proposed for predicting the nano-ripples formation. It is revealed that the nano-ripples contrast on gold film surface can be well controlled via tuning the pulse energy ratio, pulse separation and pulse exchange of ultrafast laser double-pulse. It is attributed to the tunable energy transfer routes between the electron thermal diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling via tuning double pulses parameters. The study provides theoretical basis for producing high-contrast ripples for a wide range application in the fields such as high-absorptive solar cells, surface friction devices and super-hydrophobic surface.

  7. Subwavelength ripples adjustment based on electron dynamics control by using shaped ultrafast laser pulse trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lan; Shi, Xuesong; Li, Xin; Yuan, Yanping; Wang, Cong; Lu, Yongfeng

    2012-09-10

    This study reveals that the periods, ablation areas and orientations of periodic surface structures (ripples) in fused silica can be adjusted by using designed femtosecond (fs) laser pulse trains to control transient localized electron dynamics and corresponding material properties. By increasing the pulse delays from 0 to 100 fs, the ripple periods are changed from ~550 nm to ~255 nm and the orientation is rotated by 90°. The nearwavelength/subwavelength ripple periods are close to the fundamental/second-harmonic wavelengths in fused silica respectively. The subsequent subpulse of the train significantly impacts free electron distributions generated by the previous subpulse(s), which might influence the formation mechanism of ripples and the surface morphology.

  8. Analysis of Torque Ripple Reduction in Induction Motor DTC Drive with Multiple Voltage Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSIC, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows an analysis of torque ripple reduction in modified DTC algorithm by using multiple voltage vectors with the appropriate multilevel hysteresis controller. A short theoretical background of classical and proposed DTC algorithm was given at the beginning. Experimental results of the proposed DTC algorithm, implemented on digital signal processor F2812, were analysed in comparison with classical DTC. It is shown that the torque ripple can be reduced by selecting voltage vectors with an appropriate intensity. Motor current oversampling was used to analyse the estimated torque behaviour during one DSP sampling period. Furthermore, the analysis of torque ripple reduction with oversampled torque values was conducted in relation to the number of available voltage vectors. The analysis shows that the proposed DTC algorithm allows significant torque ripple reduction while retaining the simplicity, small computational burden and good dynamic characteristics of the classical DTC.

  9. New Torque Estimation Method Considering Spatial Harmonics and Torque Ripple Reduction in Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Hajime; Tomigashi, Yoshio; Ueyama, Kenji; Inoue, Yukinori; Morimoto, Shigeo

    This paper proposes a new torque estimation method that takes into account the spatial harmonics of permanent magnet synchronous motors and that is capable of real-time estimation. First, the torque estimation equation of the proposed method is derived. In the method, the torque ripple of a motor can be estimated from the average of the torque calculated by the conventional method (cross product of the fluxlinkage and motor current) and the torque calculated from the electric input power to the motor. Next, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by simulations in which two kinds of motors with different components of torque ripple are considered. The simulation results show that the proposed method estimates the torque ripple more accurately than the conventional method. Further, the effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by performing on experiment. It is shown that the torque ripple is decreased by using the proposed method to the torque control.

  10. Nanoscale ripple formation in Co/Si(100) thin films with Ar{sup +} beam etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arranz, M A [Fac. Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Camilo Jose Cela 10, 13071, Ciudad Real (Spain); Colino, Jose M, E-mail: HiguelAngel.Arranz@uclm.e [Instituto de Nanociencia, NanotecnologIa y Materiales Moleculares, UCLM, Campus de la Fabrica de Armas, 45071 Toledo (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the formation of nanoscale ripples on etched Co/Si(100) films with Ar{sup +} beam in grazing incidence. Topography and dimensions of those nanoscale patterns were characterized by means of atomic force microscopy. Polycrystalline cobalt thin films were deposited by d.c. magnetron sputtering onto Si(100) wafers and, later transferred in situ to a process chamber for the production of ripples. Their average width, W{sub d}, and separation between them, i.e. their periodicity {Lambda}, were found to monotonously increase first with the etching time and, finally, reach saturation values for long irradation times (around 30 min). The same Ar{sup +} beam etching applied on thicker Co films resulted in much wider and higher ripples, providing a more defined nanostructure for ulterior uniaxial magnetic anisotropy measurements. These changes in the ripple dimensions on increasing the Co film thickness are discussed in terms of the surface roughness in the as-deposited film.

  11. Control of surface ripple amplitude in ion beam sputtered polycrystalline cobalt films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colino, Jose M., E-mail: josemiguel.colino@uclm.es [Institute of Nanoscience, Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Campus de la Fabrica de Armas, Toledo 45071 (Spain); Arranz, Miguel A. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real 13071 (Spain)

    2011-02-15

    We have grown both polycrystalline and partially textured cobalt films by magnetron sputter deposition in the range of thickness (50-200 nm). Kinetic roughening of the growing film leads to a controlled rms surface roughness values (1-6 nm) increasing with the as-grown film thickness. Ion erosion of a low energy 1 keV Ar+ beam at glancing incidence (80{sup o}) on the cobalt film changes the surface morphology to a ripple pattern of nanometric wavelength. The wavelength evolution at relatively low fluency is strongly dependent on the initial surface topography (a wavelength selection mechanism hereby confirmed in polycrystalline rough surfaces and based on the shadowing instability). At sufficiently large fluency, the ripple wavelength steadily increases on a coarsening regime and does not recall the virgin surface morphology. Remarkably, the use of a rough virgin surface makes the ripple amplitude in the final pattern can be controllably increased without affecting the ripple wavelength.

  12. A family of sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We study some dynamical properties of a family of two-dimensional cellular automata: those that arise from an underlying one dimensional sand automaton whose local rule is obtained using a latin square. We identify a simple sand automaton G whose local rule is algebraic, and classify this automaton as having equicontinuity points, but not being equicontinuous. We also show it is not surjective. We generalise some of these results to a wider class of sand automata.

  13. Dilatometric Characterization of Foundry Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Břuska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this contribution is summary of physical – chemistry properties of usually used foundry silica and no – silica sands in Czech foundries. With the help of dilatometry analysis theoretical assumptions of influence of grain shape and size on dilatation value of sands were confirmed. Determined was the possibility of dilatometry analysis employment for preparing special (hybrid sands with lower and/or more linear character of dilatation.

  14. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note that the tes......The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...... that the testing procedure and the data processing were carried out according to the specifications of ETCS-F1.97....

  15. Versatile CAMAC power supply controller-monitor with built-in ramping and ripple monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, H.; Horelick, D.

    1984-10-01

    An integrated power supply controller-monitor has been designed and is in use to control large power supplies for SLC dc magnets. This single-width CAMAC module contains a 14-bit DAC, a 14-bit ADC, and several channels of optically coupled digital status and control signals. Additional features include built-in selectable ramping rates, self-test capabilities, and a ripple monitor circuit to measure ac ripple in the power supply current.

  16. Design of Low-Torque-Ripple Synchronous Reluctance Motor with External Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrinovicha L.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new designs for synchronous reluctance motors that have external rotor (segment-shaped rotor, rotor with additional non-magnetic space to the quadrature axis of the rotor, and rotor with several flux barriers. Impact of the external rotor configuration on the electromagnetic torque and torque ripple is analysed. Electromagnetic torque ripple factor is calculated for each studied motor using the results of magnetic field numerical calculations.

  17. Calculation of prompt loss and toroidal field ripple loss under neutral beam injection on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Hao, Baolong; White, Roscoe; Wang, Jinfang; Zang, Qing; Han, Xiaofeng; Hu, Chundong

    2017-02-01

    Neutral beam injection is a major auxiliary heating method in the EAST experimental campaign. This paper gives detailed calculations of beam loss with different plasma equilibria using the guiding center code ORBIT and NUBEAM/TRANSP. Increasing plasma current can dramatically lower the beam ion prompt loss and ripple loss. Countercurrent beam injection gives a much larger prompt loss fraction than co-injection, and ripple-induced collisionless stochastic diffusion is the dominant loss channel.

  18. Studies of suprathermal electron loss in the magnetic ripple of Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basiuk, V.; Lipa, M.; Martin, G.; Chantant, M.; Guilhem, D.; Imbeaux, F.; Mitteau, R.; Peysson, Y.; Surle, F. [Association Euratom-CEA sur la fusion, CEA Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2000-03-01

    A new prototype of protection against fast electron trapped in the magnetic ripple was installed on Tore-Supra in 1998. It was designed to support the high flux of fast electron generated by lower hybrid in the CIEL project (up to 6 MW/m{sup 2}) during steady state experiments. So it is actively cooled and allows a direct measurement of the energy lost in the ripple. (author)

  19. Removal of Direct Current Link Harmonic Ripple in Single Phase Voltage Source Inverter Systems Using Supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    current. In practice , SC bank voltage dropped as low as approximately 5.0 V before the BBC entered DCM and data became invalid. 44 B. LABORATORY...distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) For an Energy Management System (EMS)-controlled microgrid that... bank as the only DC energy storage device, the DC link voltage ripple causes a second-order harmonic ripple in battery current that leads to a

  20. Study on rate ripple and its adaptive suppression method in inertia guidance test equipment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan-sheng; XU Guo-zhu; LIU Yue

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses causes of the rate ripple in inertia guidance test equipment IGET, systematically analyses their effects on the rate ripple in IGTE. The analysis result shows: The rate ripple caused by the periodic errors of inductosyn and angular encoder is higher at high speed than that caused by nagnetic ripple torque and friction torque, and it cannot be eliminated by adjusting control parameters of the system. And based on the nonlinear adaptive control system theory, the paper puts forward a new control system scheme to eliminate the rate ripple caused by the periodic errors of inductosyn and angular encoder, develops the adaptive control rules and makes simulation and test. Experimental result shows a significant improvement on those tables for the period disturbs under the system scheme designed. By this plan,with the input of rate 200°/s, the rate ripple falls from 5°/s to 0. 4°/s within about 6s adaptive adjustment time, being a twelfth of before adaptation,which can not be reached by common classical controls. The experimental results conform with the simulation,which proves the validity and practicability of the plan.

  1. A High Power Density Integrated Charger for Electric Vehicles with Active Ripple Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a high power density on-board integrated charger with active ripple compensation circuit for electric vehicles. To obtain a high power density and high efficiency, silicon carbide devices are reported to meet the requirement of high-switching-frequency operation. An integrated bidirectional converter is proposed to function as AC/DC battery charger and to transfer energy between battery pack and motor drive of the traction system. In addition, the conventional H-bridge circuit suffers from ripple power pulsating at second-order line frequency, and a scheme of active ripple compensation circuit has been explored to solve this second-order ripple problem, in which a pair of power switches shared traction mode, a ripple energy storage capacitor, and an energy transfer inductor. Simulation results in MATLAB/Simulink validated the eligibility of the proposed topology. The integrated charger can work as a 70 kW motor drive circuit or a converter with an active ripple compensation circuit for 3 kW charging the battery. The impact of the proposed topology and control strategy on the integrated charger power losses, efficiency, power density, and thermal performance has also been analysed and simulated.

  2. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21-31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18-75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  3. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Nazir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21–31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18–75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  4. Sand Fences in the Coastal Zone: Intended and Unintended Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafals-Soto, Rosana; Nordstrom, Karl

    2009-09-01

    Sand-trapping fences modify the character of the coastal landscape and change its spatial structure, image, and meaning. This paper examines the relationship between these changes and fence usage at the municipal level, where most decisions about fence deployment are made. Use of fences in 29 municipalities on the developed coast of New Jersey is examined over a 6-year period. Interviews with municipal officers indicate that wooden slat sand-trapping fences are used primarily to build dunes to provide protection against wave uprush and flooding, but they are also used to control pedestrian traffic and demarcate territory. These uses result in changes in landforms and habitats. An aerial video inventory of fences taken in 2002 indicates that 82% of the shoreline had fences and 72% had dunes. Single and double straight fence rows are the most commonly used. Fences are often built to accomplish a specific primary purpose, but they can cause many different and often unanticipated changes to the landscape. The effects of a sand fence change through time as the initial structure traps sand, creates a dune that is colonized by vegetation, and becomes integrated into the environment by increasing topographic variability and aesthetic and habitat value. Sand fences can be made more compatible with natural processes by not placing them in locations where sources of wind blown sand are restricted or in unnatural shore perpendicular orientations. Symbolic fences are less expensive, are easy to replace when damaged, are less visually intrusive, and can be used for controlling pedestrian access.

  5. Self-organized surface ripple pattern formation by ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofsäss, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Bobes, Omar

    2016-10-01

    Ion induced ripple pattern formation on solid surfaces has been extensively studied in the past and the theories describing curvature dependent ion erosion as well as redistribution of recoil atoms have been very successful in explaining many features of the pattern formation. Since most experimental studies use noble gas ion irradiation, the incorporation of the ions into the films is usually neglected. In this work we show that the incorporation or implantation of non-volatile ions also leads to a curvature dependent term in the equation of motion of a surface height profile. The implantation of ions can be interpreted as a negative sputter yield; and therefore, the effect of ion implantation is opposite to the one of ion erosion. For angles up to about 50°, implantation of ions stabilizes the surface, whereas above 50°, ion implantation contributes to the destabilization of the surface. We present simulations of the curvature coefficients using the crater function formalism and we compare the simulation results to the experimental data on the ion induced pattern formation using non-volatile ions. We present several model cases, where the incorporation of ions is a crucial requirement for the pattern formation.

  6. The Relationship Between Shoreline Change and Surf Zone Sand Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miselis, J. L.; McNinch, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    There is a lack of information concerning surf zone geologic processes and their relationship to shoreline behavior despite the consensus that the two are intimately linked. Variations in sand thickness over a highly irregular migration surface close to the shoreline may influence wave dynamics and sediment transport and thus may be connected to hotspot formation. A nearshore survey, spanning 40km from north of the USACE-FRF pier in Duck, NC to just north of Oregon Inlet, was conducted using an interferometric swath bathymetry system and a chirp sub-bottom profiler. The study was conducted within 1km of the shore (in the surf zone) to investigate the processes that may be responsible for the behavior of shoreline hotspots in the area. The topmost reflector and the seafloor of the seismic profile were digitized and the depth difference between them was calculated. Though no ground truths were done in the survey area, cores collected from just north of the site suggest that the topmost reflector is a pre-modern ravinement surface (cohesive muds with layers of sand and gravel) upon which the Holocene sands migrate. An isopach map was generated and shows that the layer of sand above the first sub-bottom reflector is very thin and in some places, exposed. There are many variables that may influence hotspot behavior, including bar position and wave conditions, however, the purpose of this study is to determine if there is a spatial correlation between a thin or absent (exposed reflector) nearshore sand layer and the presence of a shoreline hotspot. In an area associated with a hotspot approximately 14km south of the USACE-FRF pier in Duck, the maximum thickness of Holocene sands was less than 2.5m. The average thickness was less than 1m (0.705m). Thicknesses that were less than 0.2m were classified as areas where the reflector was exposed and accounted for 5 percent of those calculated. It seems the thin layer of sand may represent a deficient nearshore sand source

  7. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  8. Assessment of the physical disturbance of the northern European Continental shelf seabed by waves and currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, J. N.; Parker, E. R.; Bricheno, L. M.; Green, S. L.; van der Molen, J.

    2015-10-01

    Natural seabed disturbance was quantified by estimating the number of days in a year that movement of the seabed occurred due to waves and currents. Disturbance over gravel substrates was based on the concept of a critical threshold for bed movement. For mud substrates disturbance was assessed on the basis of bed failure under extreme hydrodynamic stress. For sand beds the disturbance frequency was calculated by reference to the predicted occurrence of small scale bedforms using established relationships for estimating ripple and megaripple height. The method was applied to the northern European Continental Shelf (48°N to 58.5°N and 10°W to 10°E) using modelled annual wave and current forcing with a temporal resolution of one hour and spatial resolution of approximately 11 km. Highest levels of disturbance occurred in areas of high tidal stress where dune/megaripple type bedforms were predicted and in shallow regions exposed to waves with large fetch. However, the detailed distribution of disturbance showed a complex relationship between water depth, tidal stress, wave fetch and grain size. An assessment of the uncertainty in the results was made by use of a simple Monte Carlo approach. In most locations this indicated a large uncertainty in disturbance frequency values suggesting that present predictive relationships need improvement if assessments of natural disturbance are to be made with confidence. Nevertheless the results give a broad understanding of the location and intensity of natural physical bed disturbance and the ability to compare the relative intensity between different regions. This has applications to management of the seabed where human impacts have to be assessed in the context of the underlying natural disturbance. Recommendations are given for further research that might help decrease the uncertainty in natural disturbance prediction.

  9. Waves and aggregation patterns in myxobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg A.; Welch, Roy; Kaiser, Dale; Oster, George

    2004-03-01

    Under starvation conditions, a population of myxobacteria aggregates to build a fruiting body whose shape is species-specific and within which the cells sporulate. Early in this process, cells often pass through a "ripple phase" characterized by traveling linear, concentric, and spiral waves. These waves are different from the waves observed during slime mold aggregation that depend on diffusible morphogens, because myxobacteria communicate by direct contact. The difference is most dramatic when waves collide: rather than annihilating one another, myxobacterial waves appear to pass through one another unchanged. Under certain conditions, the spacing and location of the nascent fruiting bodies is determined by the wavelength and pattern of the waves. Later in fruiting body development, waves are replaced by streams of cells that circulate around small initial aggregates enlarging and rounding them. Still later, pairs of motile aggregates coalesce to form larger aggregates that develop into fruiting bodies. Here we present a mathematical model that quantitatively explains these wave and aggregation phenomena.

  10. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  11. Sand harm in taklimakan Desert highway and sand control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANZhiwen; WANGTao; SUNQingwei; DONGZhibao; WANGXunming

    2003-01-01

    Reputed as a wonderful achievement of the world’s highway construction history,the Taklimakan Desert highway is nor facing serious sand drift encroachment problems due to its 447-km-long passage of sand sea consisting of crescent dunes,barchan chains,compound transverse dune ridges and complex megadunes.To solve some technical problems in the protection of the highway from sang drift encroachment,desert experts have been conducting the theoretical and applied studies on sand movement laws;causes,severities and time-space differentiation of sand drift damages;and control ways including mechanical,chemical and biological measures.In this paper the authors give an overall summry on the research contents and recent progress in the control of sand drift damages in China and hold that the theoretical researc results and practices in the prevention of sand drift encroachment on the cross-desert highway represnt a breakthrough and has an cpoch-making significance.Since the construction of protective forest along the cross-desert highway requires large amount of ground water,what will be its environmental consequence and whether it can effectively halt sand drift encroachment on the highway forever are the questions to be studied urgently.

  12. Mathematical Relationship Between Particle Reynolds Number and Ripple Factor using Tapi River Data, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Yadav

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The computation of bed load allows for the fact that only part of the shear stress is used for transport of sediments and some of the shear stress is wasted in overcoming the resistance due to bed forms therefore the total shear stress developed in the open channel requires correction in the form of correction factor called ripple factor. Different methods have been followed for correcting the actual shear stress in order to compute the sediment load. Correction factors are based on particular characteristics grain size of particle. In the present paper the ripple factor has been obtained for non uniform bed material considering the various variables like discharge, hydraulic mean depth, flow velocity, bed slope, average diameter of particle etc. by collecting the field data of Tapi river for 15 years for a particular gauging station. The ripple factor is obtained using Meyer Peter and Muller formula, Einstein Formula, Kalinske’s formula, Du Boy’s formula, Shield’s formula, Bagnold’s formula, average of six formulae and multiple regression analysis. The variation of ripple factor with particle Reynolds Number is studied. The ripple factor obtained by different approaches are further analyzed using Origin software and carrying out multiple regression on the 15 years of data with more than 10 parameters, ripple factor by multiple regression has been obtained. These values are further analysed and giving statistical mean to the parameters a relationship of power form has been developed. The ripple factor increases with the increase in the value of Particle Reynolds number. The large deviation is observed in case of Kalinske’s approach when compare with other approaches

  13. Characterizing and hindcasting ripple bedform dynamics: Field test of non-equilibrium models utilizing a fingerprint algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuVal, Carter B.; Trembanis, Arthur C.; Skarke, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Ripple bedform response to near bed forcing has been found to be asynchronous with rapidly changing hydrodynamic conditions. Recent models have attempted to account for this time variance through the introduction of a time offset between hydrodynamic forcing and seabed response with varying success. While focusing on temporal ripple evolution, spatial ripple variation has been partly neglected. With the fingerprint algorithm ripple bedform parameterization technique, spatial variation can be quickly and precisely characterized, and as such, this method is particularly useful for evaluation of ripple model spatio-temporal validity. Using time-series hydrodynamic data and synoptic acoustic imagery collected at an inner continental shelf site, this study compares an adapted time-varying ripple geometric model to observed field observations in light of the fingerprint algorithm results. Multiple equilibrium ripple predictors are tested within the time-varying model, with the algorithm results serving as the baseline geometric values. Results indicate that ripple bedforms, in the presence of rapidly changing high-energy conditions, reorganize at a slower rate than predicted by the models. Relict ripples were found to be near peak-forcing wavelengths after rapidly decaying storm events, and still present after months of sub-critical flow conditions.

  14. A Non-Unity Torque Sharing Function for Torque Ripple Minimization of Switched Reluctance Generators in Wind Power Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Ung Shin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new torque ripple minimization method for a Switched Reluctance Generator (SRG. Although, the SRG has many advantages including simple and robust construction, and high power density as a generator, it has not been widely employed in the industry. One of the major drawbacks of the SRG is its high torque ripple that results in high noise operation of the generator. In this paper, a non-unity Torque Sharing Function (TSF is proposed to minimize the torque ripple over a wide speed range of operation. Simulations as well as experimental results are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed torque ripple minimization technique.

  15. Plasmonic and Mie scattering control of far-field interference for regular ripple formation on various material substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Go; Maeda, Naoki; Miyanishi, Tomoya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Nedyalkov, Nikolay N; Obara, Minoru

    2011-09-26

    We present experimental and theoretical results on plasmonic control of far-field interference for regular ripple formation on semiconductor and metal. Experimental observation of interference ripple pattern on Si substrate originating from the gold nanosphere irradiated by femtosecond laser is presented. Gold nanosphere is found to be an origin for ripple formation. Arbitrary intensity ripple patterns are theoretically controllable by depositing desired plasmonic and Mie scattering far-field pattern generators. The plasmonic far-field generation is demonstrated not only by metallic nanostructures but also by the controlled surface structures such as ridge and trench structures on various material substrates.

  16. In situ characterization of projectile penetration into sand targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, John P.; Sable, Peter; Sandusky, Harold; Felts, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the results from dynamic penetration experiments in which long rod projectiles were launched into Ottawa sand at velocities ranging from 90 m/s to 350 m/s. A unique aspect of these experiments was that the sand targets were visually accessible, which allowed for the penetration event recorded using high-speed digital photography. The images were processed using two different correlation methods. In addition, stress measurements of the transmitted waveforms were simultaneously collected from a piezoelectric load cell that was buried in the sand at various locations relative to the shot line. The results indicate that impact results in two waves: one similar to a detached bow shock and one near the projectile that forms force chains. Grains are damaged and broken by the force chains which allows the projectile to penetrate the target.

  17. Theoretical analysis of transient heat conduction in sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁新刚; 过增元; 徐云生

    1996-01-01

    A simplified two-phase system model, with the heat transfer between phases considered, is presented and applied to the transient heat conduction in sand. The analytical results show that the one-dimensional Fourier’s law is not applicable to the transient heat conduction at very short time and there is no thermal wave described by C-V equation in sand. The two-phase system model correlates with experimental data well. Each ?phase responds to heating at different speeds in composite material, and consequently results in a temperature difference between phases. This difference will cause heat transfer between phases, which can be regarded as a heat source or sink to other phase. It is certain that Fourier’s law cannot describe the transient heat conduction in sand if a one-dimensional problem with equivalent thermal diffusivity is assumed.

  18. AE Test of Calcareous Sands with Particle Rushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Fengyi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The particle of calcareous sands was forced to crush, then the energy from the crushing was released by the form of sound waves. Therefore the AE technique was used to detect the calcareous sands AE signal when it crushed. by to study the AE characteristics, the mechanics of calcareous sands was studied. Study showed that: (1 there was the AE activities on the low confining pressure condition at the beginnig of test, (2 there was more and more AE activities with the continuing of test until to the end, (3 the calcareous sands’ AE activities was on the whole testing, (4 the calcareous sands’ particle crushing and mutual friction played different roles for its AE activities. Then the AE model based on the calcarous sands’ particle crushing was discussed.

  19. Linear sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ziyin; JIN Xianglong; LI Jiabiao; ZHENG Yulong; WANG Xiaobo

    2005-01-01

    Based on the latest full-coverage high-resolu- tion multi-beam sounding data, the distribution of the linear sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea (ECS) is studied with quantitative statistical analysis. The study area can be divided into the northeastern part and the southwestern part. Sand ridges in the northeastern area, trending 116°N, show obvious linear character and shrink to the inner shelf. Sand ridges in the southwestern area, trending 120°N-146°N, tend to have net form. Sand ridges gradually become sand sheets in the center part of study area. Sand ridges are distributed landward to the isobath of 60m, distributed seaward to the water depth of 120 m in the northeast and 150 m in the southwest. Immature sand ridges are observed at water depth of 130-180 m in the southwestern depressions. The acoustic reflection properties of the internal high-angle inclined beddings of the sand ridges are analyzed based on the typical seismic profiles close to the research area. Lithological analysis and dating of 4 boreholes and 12 cores indicate that the widely distributed transgressive sand layer with high content of shell debris which was formed in the early-middle Holocene is the main composition of the linear sand ridges on the outer shelf of the ECS. The dominating factor in formation, developing and burying of the sand ridges is the variation of water depth caused by sea- level change and the rate of sediment supply. In 12400 aBP the cotidal lines of the M2 tidal component were closely perpendicular to the strike-directions of the sand ridges in the study area, and the tidal wave system during 12000-8000 aBP might play a key role in the formation of the linear sand ridges which are widely distributed on the outer shelf of the ECS.

  20. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  1. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  2. Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R.; Griffith, A.

    2009-04-01

    For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of beach (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of beach sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of beach have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by beach sand mining include: destruction of natural beaches and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a

  3. Pitch strength and pitch dominance of iterated rippled noises in hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, M R; Summers, V

    2001-06-01

    Reports using a variety of psychophysical tasks indicate that pitch perception by hearing-impaired listeners may be abnormal, contributing to difficulties in understanding speech and enjoying music. Pitches of complex sounds may be weaker and more indistinct in the presence of cochlear damage, especially when frequency regions are affected that form the strongest basis for pitch perception in normal-hearing listeners. In this study, the strength of the complex pitch generated by iterated rippled noise was assessed in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. Pitch strength was measured for broadband noises with spectral ripples generated by iteratively delaying a copy of a given noise and adding it back into the original. Octave-band-pass versions of these noises also were evaluated to assess frequency dominance regions for rippled-noise pitch. Hearing-impaired listeners demonstrated consistently weaker pitches in response to the rippled noises relative to pitch strength in normal-hearing listeners. However, in most cases, the frequency regions of pitch dominance, i.e., strongest pitch, were similar to those observed in normal-hearing listeners. Except where there exists a substantial sensitivity loss, contributions from normal pitch dominance regions associated with the strongest pitches may not be directly related to impaired spectral processing. It is suggested that the reduced strength of rippled-noise pitch in listeners with hearing loss results from impaired frequency resolution and possibly an associated deficit in temporal processing.

  4. Adhesion modification of neural stem cells induced by nanoscale ripple patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraz, P.; Casado, S.; Rodriguez, V.; Giordano, M. C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Ayuso-Sacido, A.; Gnecco, E.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the influence of anisotropic nanopatterns (ripples) on the adhesion and morphology of mouse neural stem cells (C17.2) on glass substrates using cell viability assay, optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The ripples were produced by defocused ion beam sputtering with inert Ar ions, which physically remove atoms from the surface at the energy of 800 eV. The ripple periodicity (∼200 nm) is comparable to the thickness of the cytoplasmatic microspikes (filopodia) which link the stem cells to the substrate. All methods show that the cell adhesion is significantly lowered compared to the same type of cells on flat glass surfaces. Furthermore, the AFM analysis reveals that the filopodia tend to be trapped parallel or perpendicular to the ripples, which limits the spreading of the stem cell on the rippled substrate. This opens the perspective of controlling the micro-adhesion of stem cells and the orientation of their filopodia by tuning the anisotropic substrate morphology without chemical reactions occurring at the surface.

  5. Diversity of sharp-wave–ripple LFP signatures reveals differentiated brain-wide dynamical events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Villegas, Juan F.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Besserve, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Sharp-wave–ripple (SPW-R) complexes are believed to mediate memory reactivation, transfer, and consolidation. However, their underlying neuronal dynamics at multiple scales remains poorly understood. Using concurrent hippocampal local field potential (LFP) recordings and functional MRI (fMRI), we study local changes in neuronal activity during SPW-R episodes and their brain-wide correlates. Analysis of the temporal alignment between SPW and ripple components reveals well-differentiated SPW-R subtypes in the CA1 LFP. SPW-R–triggered fMRI maps show that ripples aligned to the positive peak of their SPWs have enhanced neocortical metabolic up-regulation. In contrast, ripples occurring at the trough of their SPWs relate to weaker neocortical up-regulation and absent subcortical down-regulation, indicating differentiated involvement of neuromodulatory pathways in the ripple phenomenon mediated by long-range interactions. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for the existence of SPW-R subtypes with differentiated CA1 activity and metabolic correlates in related brain areas, possibly serving different memory functions. PMID:26540729

  6. A ripple-spreading genetic algorithm for the aircraft sequencing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Bing; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A

    2011-01-01

    When genetic algorithms (GAs) are applied to combinatorial problems, permutation representations are usually adopted. As a result, such GAs are often confronted with feasibility and memory-efficiency problems. With the aircraft sequencing problem (ASP) as a study case, this paper reports on a novel binary-representation-based GA scheme for combinatorial problems. Unlike existing GAs for the ASP, which typically use permutation representations based on aircraft landing order, the new GA introduces a novel ripple-spreading model which transforms the original landing-order-based ASP solutions into value-based ones. In the new scheme, arriving aircraft are projected as points into an artificial space. A deterministic method inspired by the natural phenomenon of ripple-spreading on liquid surfaces is developed, which uses a few parameters as input to connect points on this space to form a landing sequence. A traditional GA, free of feasibility and memory-efficiency problems, can then be used to evolve the ripple-spreading related parameters in order to find an optimal sequence. Since the ripple-spreading model is the centerpiece of the new algorithm, it is called the ripple-spreading GA (RSGA). The advantages of the proposed RSGA are illustrated by extensive comparative studies for the case of the ASP.

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of a Nigerian standard sand: Igbokoda sand

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojuri, OO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the Middle Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone near Ottawa, Illinois, had been picked by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as the reference sand to employ in testing cement and strength of concrete [9]. To the best of our knowledge... and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques due to its importance in cement, geotechnical/geo-environmental research in Nigeria. This should halt importation of standard silica sand for mortar and concrete testing...

  8. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  9. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  10. Patch behaviour and predictability properties of modelled finite-amplitude sand ridges on the inner shelf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis-star, N.C.; de Swart, H.E.; Calvete, D.

    2008-01-01

    The long-term evolution of shoreface-connected sand ridges is investigated with a nonlinear spectral model which governs the dynamics of waves, currents, sediment transport and the bed level on the inner shelf. Wave variables are calculated with a shoaling-refraction model instead of using a paramet

  11. Influence of Slow Oscillation on Hippocampal Activity and Ripples Through Cortico-Hippocampal Synaptic Interactions, Analyzed by a Cortical-CA3-CA1 Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiannis eTaxidis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal sharp wave-ripple complexes (SWRs involve the synchronous discharge of thousands of cells throughout the CA3-CA1-subiculum-entorhinal cortex axis. Their strong transient output affects cortical targets, rendering SWRs a possible means for memory transfer from the hippocampus to the neocortex for long-term storage. Neurophysiological observations of hippocampal activity modulation by the cortical slow oscillation (SO during deep sleep and anesthesia, and correlations between ripples and UP states, support the role of SWRs in memory consolidation through a cortico-hippocampal feedback loop. We couple a cortical network exhibiting SO with a hippocampal CA3-CA1 computational network model exhibiting SWRs, in order to model such cortico-hippocampal correlations and uncover important parameters and coupling mechanisms controlling them. The cortical oscillatory output entrains the CA3 network via connections representing the mossy fiber input, and the CA1 network via the temporoammonic pathway. The spiking activity in CA3 and CA1 is shown to depend on the excitation-to-inhibition ratio, induced by combining the two hippocampal inputs, with mossy fiber input controlling the UP-state correlation of CA3 population bursts and corresponding SWRs, whereas the temporoammonic input affects the overall CA1 spiking activity. Ripple characteristics and pyramidal spiking participation to SWRs are shaped by the strength of the Schaffer collateral drive. A set of in vivo recordings from the rat hippocampus confirms a model-predicted segregation of pyramidal cells into subgroups according to the SO state where they preferentially fire and their response to SWRs. These groups can potentially play distinct functional roles in the replay of spike sequences.

  12. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  13. On the cascade mechanism of short surface wave modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Charnotskii

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of short surface ripples by long surface or internal waves by a cascade mechanism is considered. At the first stage, the orbital velocity of the long wave (LW adiabatically modulates an intermediate length nonlinear gravity wave (GW, which generates a bound (parasitic capillary wave (CW near its crest in a wide spatial frequency band. Due to strong dependence of the CW amplitude on that of the GW, the resulting ripple modulation by LW can be strong. Adiabatic modulation at the first stage is calculated for an arbitrarily strong LW current. The CWs are calculated based on the Lonquet-Higgins theory, in the framework of a steady periodic solution, which proves to be sufficient for the cases considered. Theoretical results are compared with data from laboratory experiments. A discussion of related sea clutter data is given in the conclusion.

  14. Analysis of Commutation Torque Ripple Minimization for Brushless DC Motor Based on SEPIC Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Jogarao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Brushless DC Motors (BLDCM are widely used in automated industrial applications like Computer Numerical Control (CNC machinery, aerospace applications and in the field of robotics.But it still suffers from commutation torque which mainly depends on speed and transient line commutation interval. BLDC MOTOR torque ripple causes increased acoustic noise and undesirable speed fluctuation. This paper presents a new circuit topology and dc link voltage current in the control strategy to keep incoming and outgoing phase currents changing at the same rate during commutation. In this paper dc-dc single ended primary inductor converter (SEPIC a switch selection circuit are employed in front of inverter. In order to obtain the desired commutation voltage resulting in reduced commutation torque ripple. Compared with simulation result conventional system and proposed method can obtain desired voltage much faster and minimize commutation torque ripple more efficiently.

  15. Efficient and ripple-mitigating dc-dc converter for residential fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yong [Danfoss Solar Inverters, Hardware, Jyllandsgade 28, 6400 Soenderborg (Denmark); Choi, Seeyoung [Digital Appliance Division, Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., Maetan-3Dong, Suwon, Gyeonggi (Korea); Lee, Eunchul [Willings Co. Ltd., SK Ventium, 522 Dangjung-Dong, Gunpo-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea)

    2009-01-15

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) systems for residential application require efficient and ripple-mitigating power conditioning system (PCS). The key point to reach it, is the design and control of the dc-dc converter. Based on the theoretical and experimental analysis of the traditional converter, this paper proposes a novel parallel-series full bridge (P-SFB) dc-dc converter, and improves its phase shifting scheme. This paper also proposes a novel controller for low frequency ripple current suppressing applied on the converter. The experimental results verify that, the dc-dc converter achieves a peak efficiency of 95.5%. Therefore PCS's maximum efficiency reaches 92.9%. And the input current ripple is reduced significantly with the new controller. (author)

  16. A Zero Input Current Ripple ZVS/ZCS Boost Converter with Boundary-Mode Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ming Lai

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, in order to achieve zero ripple conditions, the use of a ripple mirror (RM circuit for the boost converter is proposed. The operation modes are studied and steady-state analyses performed to show the merits of the proposed converter. It is found that the proposed RM circuit technique can provide much better flexibility than the two-phase interleaved boost converter for locating the zero ripple operating point in the design stage. In addition, the choice of using a boundary-mode control is mainly based on the consideration of achieving both ZVS (zero voltage switching/ZCS (zero current switching soft-switching and constant on-time control for the converter. To verify the performance of the proposed converter, a 48 V input and 200 W/200 V output prototype is constructed. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed converter.

  17. Dithering Digital Ripple Correlation Control for Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, C; Pilawa-Podgurski, RCN

    2015-08-01

    This study demonstrates a new method for rapid and precise maximum power point tracking in photovoltaic (PV) applications using dithered PWM control. Constraints imposed by efficiency, cost, and component size limit the available PWM resolution of a power converter, and may in turn limit the MPP tracking efficiency of the PV system. In these scenarios, PWM dithering can be used to improve average PWM resolution. In this study, we present a control technique that uses ripple correlation control (RCC) on the dithering ripple, thereby achieving simultaneous fast tracking speed and high tracking accuracy. Moreover, the proposed method solves some of the practical challenges that have to date limited the effectiveness of RCC in solar PV applications. We present a theoretical derivation of the principles behind dithering digital ripple correlation control, as well as experimental results that show excellent tracking speed and accuracy with basic hardware requirements.

  18. High Ripples Reduction in DTC of Induction Motor by Using a New Reduced Switching Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Bachir; Benkhoris, Mohamed F.

    2016-05-01

    The direct torque and flux control (DTC) of electrical motors is characterized by ripples of torque and flux. Among the many solutions proposed to reduce them is to use modified switching tables which is very advantageous; because its implementation is easy and requires no additional cost compared to other solutions. This paper proposes a new reduced switching table (RST) to improve the DTC by reducing harmful ripples of torque and flux. This new switching table is smaller than the conventional one (CST) and depends principally at the flux error. This solution is studied by simulation under Matlab/Simulink and experimentally validated on a testbed with DSPACE1103. The results obtained of a DTC with RST applied to a three-phase induction motor (IM) show a good improvement and an effectiveness of proposed solution, the torque ripple decreases about 47% and 3% for the stator flux compared with a basic DTC.

  19. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-09-01

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  20. An Analysis of Ripple and Error Fields Induced by a Blanket in the CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guanying; Liu, Xufeng; Liu, Songlin

    2016-10-01

    The Chinese Fusion Engineering Tokamak Reactor (CFETR) is an important intermediate device between ITER and DEMO. The Water Cooled Ceramic Breeder (WCCB) blanket whose structural material is mainly made of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel, is one of the candidate conceptual blanket design. An analysis of ripple and error field induced by RAFM steel in WCCB is evaluated with the method of static magnetic analysis in the ANSYS code. Significant additional magnetic field is produced by blanket and it leads to an increased ripple field. Maximum ripple along the separatrix line reaches 0.53% which is higher than 0.5% of the acceptable design value. Simultaneously, one blanket module is taken out for heating purpose and the resulting error field is calculated to be seriously against the requirement. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11175207) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Program of China (No. 2013GB108004)

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced subwavelength ripples formed by asymmetrical grating splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pin; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Zhang, Kaihu; Shi, Xuesong; Li, Bo; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-05-01

    The formation process and mechanism of subwavelength ripples were studied upon irradiation of ZnO by a femtosecond laser (800 nm, 50 fs, 1 kHz). An abnormally asymmetrical grating-splitting phenomenon was discovered. At relatively high laser fluences (F = 0.51-0.63 J/cm2), near-wavelength ripples were split asymmetrically to create subwavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with dual gaps (˜230 nm and ˜430 nm) on the primary grooves. At relatively low laser fluences (F = 0.4-0.45 J/cm2), near-wavelength ripples were split symmetrically, leading to the formation of uniform subwavelength structures with a period of ˜340 nm. The splitting phenomena are related to the varying laser beam dose induced by the overlapping during line scanning. The two grating-splitting types further imply that the dominated mechanism for LIPSS formation may be changed under different processing conditions.

  2. DTC Based Induction Motor Speed Control Using 10-Sector Methodology for Torque Ripple Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavithra, S.; Dinesh Krishna, A. S.; Shridharan, S.

    2014-09-01

    A direct torque control (DTC) drive allows direct and independent control of flux linkage and electromagnetic torque by the selection of optimum inverter switching modes. It is a simple method of signal processing which gives excellent dynamic performance. Also transformation of coordinates and voltage decoupling are not required. However, the possible discrete inverter switching vectors cannot always generate exact stator voltage required, to obtain the demanded electromagnetic torque and flux linkages. This results in the production of ripples in the torque as well as flux waveforms. In the present paper a torque ripple reduction methodology is proposed. In this method the circular locus of flux phasor is divided into 10 sector as compared to six sector divisions in conventional DTC method. The basic DTC scheme and the 10-sector method are simulated and compared for their performance. An analysis is done with sector increment so that finally the torque ripple varies slightly as the sector is increased.

  3. Energy-separated sequential irradiation for ripple pattern tailoring on silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Tanuj; Kumar, Manish; Panchal, Vandana; Sahoo, P. K.; Kanjilal, D.

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscale ripples on semiconductor surfaces have potential application in biosensing and optoelectronics, but suffer from uncontrolled surface-amorphization when prepared by conventional ion-irradiation methods. A two-step, energy-separated sequential-irradiation enables simultaneous control of surface-amorphization and ripple-dimensions on Si(1 0 0). The evolution of ripples using 100 keV Ar+ bombardment and further tuning of the patterns using a sequential-irradiation by 60 keV Ar+ at different fluences are demonstrated. The advantage of this approach as opposed to increased fluence at the same energy is clarified by atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy investigations. The explanation of our findings is presented through DAMAGE simulation.

  4. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  5. Stress vs sputtering effects in the propagation of surface ripples produced by ion-beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Barrado, A. [Instituto de Investigación Tecnológica (IIT) and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Castro, M. [GISC and Grupo de Dinámica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería (ICAI), Universidad Pontificia Comillas, E-28015 Madrid (Spain); Muñoz-García, J. [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain); Cuerno, R., E-mail: cuerno@math.uc3m.es [Departamento de Matemáticas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Under low energy ion irradiation, periodic features (ripples) can develop on the surfaces of semiconductor materials, with typical sizes in the nanometric range. Recently, a theory of pattern formation has been able to account for the variability with the ion/target combination of the critical angle value separating conditions on ion incidence that induce the presence or the absence of ripples. Such a theory is based in the accumulation of stress in the damaged irradiated layer and its relaxation via surface-confined viscous flow. Here we explore the role of stress, and its competition with purely erosive mechanisms, to determine the sign of the velocity with which the ripple pattern moves across the target plane. Based on this theory, we discuss different situations and make specific testable predictions for the change of sign in that velocity.

  6. Hierarchical nesting of slow oscillations, spindles and ripples in the human hippocampus during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staresina, Bernhard P; Bergmann, Til Ole; Bonnefond, Mathilde; van der Meij, Roemer; Jensen, Ole; Deuker, Lorena; Elger, Christian E; Axmacher, Nikolai; Fell, Juergen

    2015-11-01

    During systems-level consolidation, mnemonic representations initially reliant on the hippocampus are thought to migrate to neocortical sites for more permanent storage, with an eminent role of sleep for facilitating this information transfer. Mechanistically, consolidation processes have been hypothesized to rely on systematic interactions between the three cardinal neuronal oscillations characterizing non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Under global control of de- and hyperpolarizing slow oscillations (SOs), sleep spindles may cluster hippocampal ripples for a precisely timed transfer of local information to the neocortex. We used direct intracranial electroencephalogram recordings from human epilepsy patients during natural sleep to test the assumption that SOs, spindles and ripples are functionally coupled in the hippocampus. Employing cross-frequency phase-amplitude coupling analyses, we found that spindles were modulated by the up-state of SOs. Notably, spindles were found to in turn cluster ripples in their troughs, providing fine-tuned temporal frames for the hypothesized transfer of hippocampal memory traces.

  7. Heterogeneous Nucleation Induced by Capillary Wave During Acoustic Levitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕勇军; 解文军; 魏炳波

    2003-01-01

    The rapid solidification of acoustically levitated drops of Pb-61.9 wt. %Sn eutectic alloy is accomplished. A surface morphology of spreading ripples is observed on a sample undercooled by 15 K. The ripples originate from the centre of sample surface, which is also the heterogeneous nucleation site for eutectic growth. The Faraday instability excited by forced surface vibration has brought about these ripples. They are retained in the solidified sample if the sound pressure level exceeds the threshold pressure required for the appearance of capillary waves.Theoretical calculations indicate that both the pressure and displacement maxima exist in the central part of a levitated drop. The pressure near the sample centre can promote heterogeneous nucleation, which is in agreement qualitatively with the experimental results.

  8. Simple Design Approach for Low Torque Ripple and High Output Torque Synchronous Reluctance Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Nabil Fathy Ibrahim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The rotor design of Synchronous Reluctance Motors (SynRMs has a large effect on their efficiency, torque density and torque ripple. In order to achieve a good compromise between these three goals, an optimized rotor geometry is necessary. A finite element method (FEM is a good tool for the optimization. However, the computation time is an obstacle as there are many geometrical parameters to be optimized. The flux-barrier widths and angles are the two most crucial parameters for the SynRM output torque and torque ripple. This paper proposes an easy-to-use set of parametrized equations to select appropriate values for these two rotor parameters. With these equations, the reader can design a SynRM of distributed windings with a low torque ripple and with a better average torque. The methodology is valid for a wide range of SynRMs. To check the validity of the proposed equations, the sensitivity analysis for the variation of these two parameters on the SynRM torque and torque ripple is carried out. In addition, the analysis in this paper gives insight into the behavior of the machine as a function of these two parameters. Furthermore, the torque and torque ripple of SynRMs having a rotor with three, four and five flux-barriers are compared with three literature approaches. The comparison shows that the proposed equations are effective in choosing the flux-barrier angles and widths for low torque ripple and better average torque. Experimental results have been obtained to confirm the FEM results and to validate the methodology for choosing the rotor parameters.

  9. The hydraulic jump and ripples in liquid helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolley, E. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, associe au CNRS et aux Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)]. E-mail: rolley@lps.ens.fr; Guthmann, C. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l' ENS, associe au CNRS et aux Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Pettersen, M.S. [Washington and Jefferson College, 60 S. Lincoln St., Washington, PA 15301 (United States)

    2007-05-01

    We have studied the characteristics of the circular hydraulic jump using liquid helium. Surprisingly, the radius of the jump does not change at the superfluid transition. We think that the flow is still dissipative below the lambda point because the velocity exceeds the critical one. The jump radius R{sub j} is compared with various models. In our parameter range, we find that the jump can be treated as a shock, and that capillary effects are important. Below the superfluid transition, we observed a standing capillary wave between the impact of the jet and the jump. Assuming that the superfluid flow can be described with an effective viscosity, we calculate the wave vector and thus obtain the value of the liquid thickness, which is in reasonable agreement with predictions. However, the spatial variation of the wave amplitude depends much more strongly on temperature than we calculate.

  10. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Lenz, Olaf; Meinhardt, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model.

  11. Reduction of torque ripple in DTC induction motor drive with discrete voltage vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosić Marko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents а practical implementation of direct torque control (DTC of an induction machine on MSK2812 DSP platform, and the analysis of possibilities for reduction of torque ripple. Basic theoretical background relating the DTC was primarily set and the obtained experimental results have been given. It is shown that the torque ripple can be reduced by adjusting the intensity of voltage vectors and by modification of hysteresis comparator, while the simplicity of the basic DTC algorithm has been maintained. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33016

  12. Bandgap engineering of rippled MoS2 monolayer under external electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jingshan; Li, Xiao; Qian, Xiaofeng; Feng, Ji

    2013-04-01

    In this letter we propose a universal strategy combining external electric field with the ripple of membrane to tune the bandgap of semiconducting atomic monolayer. By first-principles calculations we show that the bandgap of rippled MoS2 monolayer can be tuned in a large range by vertical external electric field, which is expected to have little effect on MoS2 monolayer. This phenomenon can be explained from charge redistribution under external electric field by a simple model. This may open an avenue of optimizing monolayer MoS2 for electronic and optoelectronic applications by surface patterning.

  13. Torque Ripple Suppression Integrated Starter/Generator Control Strategy for Brushless Wound-Field Synchronous Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆光照; 张围围; 杨南方; 马鹏; 刘卫国

    2012-01-01

    A flux linkage compensation field oriented control (FOC) method was proposed to suppress the speed and torque ripples of a hrusbless wound-fleld synchronous motor in its starting process. The starting process was analyzed and the model of wound-field synchronous electric machine was established. The change of field current of the electric machine was described mathematically for simplified exciter and rotate rectifier. Based on the traditional field control, the flux linkage compensation was introduced in d-axis current to counteract the flux ripple. Some simulation and preliminary experiments were implemented. The results show that the proposed method is feasible and effective.

  14. A measurement of ripple current in the by-pass resistor of synchrotron magnets: new method for mode separation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Takashi; Nishikigouri, Kazuto; Gushiken, Tsutomu; Sano, Yoshinobu; Togashi, Tomohito [Accelerator Engineering Corp. Konakadai, Chiba (Japan); Kumada, Masayuki; Takada, Eiichi; Noda, Koji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka

    1997-12-31

    We report a result of the ripple measurement in the by-pass resistor circuit of HIMAC synchrotron main magnet coils. The result shows clear separation of common- and normal- mode components in the frequency domain. An interpretation of the data and relevant characteristic of the method such as ripple sensitivity are discussed. (author)

  15. Higher-order paraxial theory of the propagation of ring rippled laser beam in plasma: Relativistic ponderomotive regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purohit, Gunjan, E-mail: gunjan75@gmail.com; Rawat, Priyanka [Department of Physics, Laser-Plasma Computational Laboratory, DAV PG College, Dehradun, Uttarakhand (India); Chauhan, Prashant [Department of Physics and Material Science and Engineering, Jaypee Institute of Information Technology, Uttar Pradesh (India); Mahmoud, Saleh T. [Department of Physics, College of Science, UAE University, PO Box 17551 Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-05-15

    This article presents higher-order paraxial theory (non-paraxial theory) for the ring ripple formation on an intense Gaussian laser beam and its propagation in plasma, taking into account the relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity. The intensity dependent dielectric constant of the plasma has been determined for the main laser beam and ring ripple superimposed on the main laser beam. The dielectric constant of the plasma is modified due to the contribution of the electric field vector of ring ripple. Nonlinear differential equations have been formulated to examine the growth of ring ripple in plasma, self focusing of main laser beam, and ring rippled laser beam in plasma using higher-order paraxial theory. These equations have been solved numerically for different laser intensities and plasma frequencies. The well established experimental laser and plasma parameters are used in numerical calculation. It is observed that the focusing of the laser beams (main and ring rippled) becomes fast in the nonparaxial region by expanding the eikonal and other relevant quantities up to the fourth power of r. The splitted profile of laser beam in the plasma is observed due to uneven focusing/defocusing of the axial and off-axial rays. The growths of ring ripple increase when the laser beam intensity increases. Furthermore, the intensity profile of ring rippled laser beam gets modified due to the contribution of growth rate.

  16. The Ripples and Waves of Educational Effectiveness Research: Some Comments to "Getting Lost in Translation"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerens, Jaap

    2013-01-01

    The article "Getting lost in translation" by Harris, Chapman, Muijs and Reynolds addresses the engagement of policy-makers and educational practitioners with (the results of) educational effectiveness and improvement research. In this commentary the article is discussed from the perspectives of research utilisation, the solidity of the educational…

  17. Application of Microwaves for Binder Content Assessment in Moulding Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak D.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of preliminary examinations on possibility of determining binder content in traditional moulding sands with the microwave method. The presented measurements were carried-out using a special stand, the so-called slot line. Binder content in the sandmix was determined by measurements of absorption damping Ad and insertion losses IL of electromagnetic wave. One of main advantages of the suggested new method of binder content measurement is short measuring time.

  18. Estimating hydrodynamic roughness in a wave-dominated environment with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, J.R.; Sherwood, C.R.; Wilson, D.J.; Chisholm, T.A.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrodynamic roughness is a critical parameter for characterizing bottom drag in boundary layers, and it varies both spatially and temporally due to variation in grain size, bedforms, and saltating sediment. In this paper we investigate temporal variability in hydrodynamic roughness using velocity profiles in the bottom boundary layer measured with a high-resolution acoustic Doppler profiler (PCADP). The data were collected on the ebb-tidal delta off Grays Harbor, Washington, in a mean water depth of 9 m. Significant wave height ranged from 0.5 to 3 m. Bottom roughness has rarely been determined from hydrodynamic measurements under conditions such as these, where energetic waves and medium-to-fine sand produce small bedforms. Friction velocity due to current u*c and apparent bottom roughness z0a were determined from the PCADP burst mean velocity profiles using the law of the wall. Bottom roughness kB was estimated by applying the Grant-Madsen model for wave-current interaction iteratively until the model u*c converged with values determined from the data. The resulting kB values ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (10-1 to 10-4 m) and varied inversely with wave orbital diameter. This range of kB influences predicted bottom shear stress considerably, suggesting that the use of time-varying bottom roughness could significantly improve the accuracy of sediment transport models. Bedform height was estimated from kB and is consistent with both ripple heights predicted by empirical models and bedforms in sonar images collected during the experiment. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Effect of Initial Principal Stress Direction on the Dynamic Characteristics of Carbonate Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Haizhen; Zhao Wenguang; Wang Ren; Li Jianguo; He Yang

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of carbonate sand under wave loads are very important for constructions on the ocean floor. The initial principal stress direction has been known to exert some influence on the dynamic characteristics of sand during cyclic loading. In an effort to investigate this aspect of the problem, several series of cyclic undrained tests were carried out on a saturated and loose sample of carbonate sand using a geotechnical static and dynamic universal triaxial shear apparatus. In this test apparatus, a hollow cylindrical sand specimen is subjected to a simultaneous application of both triaxial and torsional modes of shear stresses, which brings about the continuous rotation of principal stress axes. The test results indicated that the initial principal stress direction has a considerable influence on the dynamic strength of loose carbonate sand and with the increase of initial orientation of principal stress, dynamic strength will be reduced, the cyclic pore pressure increased, but the residual pore pressure reduced.

  20. Numerical modelling of the erosion and deposition of sand inside a filter layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; van Gent, Marcel R. A.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    prediction method to assure that the amount of erosion remains within acceptable limits. This work presents a numerical model that is capable of describing the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter of rock on top of sand. The hydraulic loading is that of incident irregular waves...... additional data sets on the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter. A few cases are defined to study the effect of the sinking of the filter into the erosion hole. The numerical model is also applied to several application cases. The response of the core material (sand) to changes......This paper treats the numerical modelling of the behaviour of a sand core covered by rocks and exposed to waves. The associated displacement of the rock is also studied. A design that allows for erosion and deposition of the sand core beneath a rock layer in a coastal structure requires an accurate...

  1. Water quality, weather and environmental factors associated with fecal indicator organism density in beach sand at two recreational marine beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Christopher D.; Exum, Natalie G.; Dufour, Alfred P.; Brenner, Kristen P.; Haugland, Richard A.; Chern, Eunice; Schwab, Kellogg J.; Love, David C.; Serre, Marc L.; Noble, Rachel; Wade, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showing an association between fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) in sand and gastrointestinal (GI) illness among beachgoers with sand contact have important public health implications because of the large numbers of people who recreate at beaches and engage in sand contact activities. Yet, factors that influence fecal pollution in beach sand remain unclear. During the 2007 National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational (NEEAR) Water Study, sand samples were collected at three locations (60 m apart) on weekend days (Sat, Sun) and holidays between June and September at two marine beaches — Fairhope Beach, AL and Goddard Beach, RI — with nearby publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs) outfalls. F+ coliphage, enterococci, Bacteroidales, fecal Bacteroides spp., and Clostridium spp. were measured in sand using culture and qPCR-based calibrator-cell equivalent methods. Water samples were also collected on the same days, times and transects as the 144 sand samples and were assayed using the same FIO measurements. Weather and environmental data were collected at the time of sample collection. Mean FIO concentrations in sand varied over time, but not space. Enterococci CFU and CCE densities in sand were not correlated, although other FIOs in sand were. The strongest correlation between FIO density in sand and water was fecal Bacteroides CCE, followed by enterococci CFU, Clostridium spp. CCE, and Bacteroidales CCE. Overall, the factors associated with FIO concentrations in sand were related to the sand–water interface (i.e., sand-wetting) and included daily average densities of FIOs in water, rainfall, and wave height. Targeted monitoring that focuses on daily trends of sand FIO variability, combined with information about specific water quality, weather, and environmental factors may inform beach monitoring and management decisions to reduce microbial burdens in beach sand. The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors

  2. Waves in the seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    or change. If ini- tially, only a thin layer of air close to the water surface matters in the mo- mentum transfer from wind to water, afterwards with strong winds, a layer of air upto say 15 to 30 metres comes Small sand waves formed on a seashore due... it breaks with a heading wind or on a beach). Consider an open sea of say 1000 square kilometres wherein billions of 'pushes' and 'pulls' happen over tens of hours, causing uncountable number of waves and wave groups of various types moving in different...

  3. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  4. Coastal geology and recent origins for Sand Point, Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Krantz, David E.; Castaneda, Mario R.; Loope, Walter L.; Jol, Harry M.; Goble, Ronald J.; Higley, Melinda C.; DeWald, Samantha; Hansen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sand Point is a small cuspate foreland located along the southeastern shore of Lake Superior within Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near Munising, Michigan. Park managers’ concerns for the integrity of historic buildings at the northern periphery of the point during the rising lake levels in the mid-1980s greatly elevated the priority of research into the geomorphic history and age of Sand Point. To pursue this priority, we recovered sediment cores from four ponds on Sand Point, assessed subsurface stratigraphy onshore and offshore using geophysical techniques, and interpreted the chronology of events using radiocarbon and luminescence dating. Sand Point formed at the southwest edge of a subaqueous platform whose base is probably constructed of glacial diamicton and outwash. During the post-glacial Nipissing Transgression, the base was mantled with sand derived from erosion of adjacent sandstone cliffs. An aerial photograph time sequence, 1939–present, shows that the periphery of the platform has evolved considerably during historical time, infl uenced by transport of sediment into adjacent South Bay. Shallow seismic refl ections suggest slump blocks along the leading edge of the platform. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and shallow seismic refl ections to the northwest of the platform reveal large sand waves within a deep (12 m) channel produced by currents fl owing episodically to the northeast into Lake Superior. Ground-penetrating radar profi les show transport and deposition of sand across the upper surface of the platform. Basal radiocarbon dates from ponds between subaerial beach ridges range in age from 540 to 910 cal yr B.P., suggesting that Sand Point became emergent during the last ~1000 years, upon the separation of Lake Superior from Lakes Huron and Michigan. However, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from the beach ridges were two to three times as old as the radiocarbon ages, implying that emergence of Sand Point may have begun

  5. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  6. 电流型多相永磁同步电动机调速系统的换相转矩脉动%Commutation Torque Ripple Analysis of Current-Type Multiphase Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Speed Control System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周羽; 李槐树; 苏广东

    2013-01-01

    为了研究多相梯形波永磁同步电动机(以下简称TPMSM)的换流转矩脉动,基于Y-Y移30°电角度的六相TPMSM建立电流型调速系统的数学模型,给出了换流重叠角的计算公式,并利用仿真分析了换相超前角和换流重叠角之间的关系以及换相超前角和转矩脉动之间的关系.结果表明,减小换相超前角有利于减小转矩脉动,但是会增加换流重叠角,甚至导致换流失败.%In order to study the commutation torque ripple of multiphase trapezia-wave permanent magnet synchronous motor (TPMSM) ,the mathematical model of current-type speed control system was established based on the six-phase TPMSM with Y-Y winding shifting 30° electric-degree. The calculating formula of commutating angular overlap was given. And the relationship of commutating angle and commutating angular overlap and relationship of commutating angular overlap and torque ripple were analyzed. The results show that reducing commutating angle is beneficial to reducing torque ripple, but it will increase commutating angular overlap,even bring on the failure of commutation.

  7. Analysis of Ripple Effects on Frequency Response Characteristics of Switching Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Eiji; Nakahara, Masatoshi

    In this paper we clarify for the boost and the buck-boost converter that the ripple effect is not ignorable for the frequency response, and reveal that it causes the unexpected characteristics where either the phase lag or the phase lead appears depending on the shape of waveform of the ramp generator in the PWM circuit. Eventually the phase margin for the stability drastically changes depending on the slope direction (normal or reverse) of the sawtooth waveform of the ramp generator even in the same circuit configuration. For the ripple effects we propose the general analysis model and analyze them of the boost and the buck-boost converters. As the result we identify that the ripple effects are caused mainly by the variation of the slope and the average of the ripple, and reveal that the both converters have the asymmetric characteristics for the slope direction of the sawtooth waveform of the ramp generator and there is more advantage for the stability in case of the reverse slope direction than in case of the normal one. It also clarified that the effect of ESR of the output capacitor of the converter on the frequency response is different according to the shape of the sawtooth waveforms. The proposed analysis method is validated by the experiments and simulations.

  8. Deterministic Agent-Based Path Optimization by Mimicking the Spreading of Ripples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Bing; Wang, Ming; Leeson, Mark S; Di Paolo, Ezequiel A; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Inspirations from nature have contributed fundamentally to the development of evolutionary computation. Learning from the natural ripple-spreading phenomenon, this article proposes a novel ripple-spreading algorithm (RSA) for the path optimization problem (POP). In nature, a ripple spreads at a constant speed in all directions, and the node closest to the source is the first to be reached. This very simple principle forms the foundation of the proposed RSA. In contrast to most deterministic top-down centralized path optimization methods, such as Dijkstra's algorithm, the RSA is a bottom-up decentralized agent-based simulation model. Moreover, it is distinguished from other agent-based algorithms, such as genetic algorithms and ant colony optimization, by being a deterministic method that can always guarantee the global optimal solution with very good scalability. Here, the RSA is specifically applied to four different POPs. The comparative simulation results illustrate the advantages of the RSA in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. Thanks to the agent-based and deterministic features, the RSA opens new opportunities to attack some problems, such as calculating the exact complete Pareto front in multiobjective optimization and determining the kth shortest project time in project management, which are very difficult, if not impossible, for existing methods to resolve. The ripple-spreading optimization principle and the new distinguishing features and capacities of the RSA enrich the theoretical foundations of evolutionary computation.

  9. Observing trans-Planckian ripples in the primordial power spectrum with future large scale structure probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth, Martin Snoager;

    2008-01-01

    -Planckian ripples can be made even if the amplitude is as low as 10^-4. Data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the proposed future 21 cm survey with the Fast Fourier Transform Telescope (FFTT) will be particularly useful in this regard. If the scale of inflation is close to its present upper bound...

  10. The "Ripple Effect" of a University Sponsored Death and Dying Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alicia S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Conducted a follow-up study of a three-week, university sponsored death and dying symposium to measure attitudes of nonattendees. The findings showed a declining taboo regarding death education and a "ripple effect" in which individuals are affected by a death education program even though they do not attend it. (JAC)

  11. Restrictions on TWT Helix Voltage Ripple for Acceptable Notch Filter Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyslop, B.

    1984-12-01

    An ac ripple on the helix voltage of the 1-2 GHz TWT's creates FM sidebands that cause amplitude and phase modulation of the microwave TWT output signal. A limit of 16 volts peak-to-peak is required for acceptable superconducting notch filter performance.

  12. Torque ripple minimization in a doubly salient permanent magnet motors by skewing the rotor teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, N. K.; Sekharbabu, A. R. C.; Rajagopal, K. R.

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents the effects of skewing the rotor teeth on the performance of an 8/6 doubly salient permanent magnet motor using a simple method, which utilizes the results obtained from the 2-D FE analysis. The optimum skewing angle is obtained as 12-15° for the least ripple torque without much reduction in the back-emf.

  13. The fluence threshold of femtosecond laser blackening of metals: The effect of laser-induced ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Zhigui; Huang, Min; Zhao, Fuli

    2016-05-01

    With the primary controlling factor of the laser fluence, we have investigated femtosecond laser blackening of stainless steel, brass, and aluminum in visible light range. In general, low reflectance about 5% can be achieved in appropriate ranges of laser fluences for all the treated metal surfaces. Significantly, towards stainless steel and brass a fluence threshold of blackening emerges unusually: a dramatic reflectance decline occurs in a specific, narrow fluence range. In contrast, towards aluminum the reflectance declines steadily over a wide fluence range instead of the threshold-like behavior from steel and brass. The morphological characteristics and corresponding reflectance spectra of the treated surfaces indicates that the blackening threshold of stainless steel and brass corresponds to the fluence threshold of laser-induced subwavelength ripples. Such periodic ripples growing rapidly near ablation threshold absorb visible light efficiently through grating coupling and cavity trapping promoted by surface plasmon polaritons. Whereas, for aluminum, with fluence increasing the looming ripples are greatly suppressed by re-deposited nanoparticle aggregates that present intrinsic colors other than black, and until the formation of large scale "ravines" provided with strong light-trapping, sufficient blackening is achieved. In short, there are different fluence dependencies for femtosecond laser blackening of metals, and the specific blackening fluence threshold for certain metals in the visible range originates in the definite fluence threshold of femtosecond laser-induced ripples.

  14. Relationship between channel interaction and spectral-ripple discrimination in cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gary L; Won, Jong Ho; Drennan, Ward R; Rubinstein, Jay T

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) users can achieve remarkable speech understanding, but there is great variability in outcomes that is only partially accounted for by age, residual hearing, and duration of deafness. Results might be improved with the use of psychophysical tests to predict which sound processing strategies offer the best potential outcomes. In particular, the spectral-ripple discrimination test offers a time-efficient, nonlinguistic measure that is correlated with perception of both speech and music by CI users. Features that make this "one-point" test time-efficient, and thus potentially clinically useful, are also connected to controversy within the CI field about what the test measures. The current work examined the relationship between thresholds in the one-point spectral-ripple test, in which stimuli are presented acoustically, and interaction indices measured under the controlled conditions afforded by direct stimulation with a research processor. Results of these studies include the following: (1) within individual subjects there were large variations in the interaction index along the electrode array, (2) interaction indices generally decreased with increasing electrode separation, and (3) spectral-ripple discrimination improved with decreasing mean interaction index at electrode separations of one, three, and five electrodes. These results indicate that spectral-ripple discrimination thresholds can provide a useful metric of the spectral resolution of CI users.

  15. Decifering mega-ripple variability in an anthropogenically steered environment: implications for mine burial studies

    OpenAIRE

    Papili, S.; Baeye, M.; Van Lancker, V.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007 the Ministery of Defence, in collaboration with Ghent University, developed a project on the understanding of mega-ripple variability in view of improving mine burial prediction models in sandbank areas. Results will assist in the monitoring of sea-mines, heritage of two World Wars, nowadays partially or totally buried by sandy bedforms.

  16. Density ripples in expanding low-dimensional gases as a probe of correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imambekov, A.; Mazets, I. E.; Petrov, D. S.

    2009-01-01

    fluctuations. For the case of free ballistic expansion relevant to current experiments, we present simple analytical relations between the spectrum of "density ripples" and the correlation functions of the original confined systems. We analyze several physical regimes, including weakly and strongly interacting...

  17. On the limits of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy tuning by a ripple surface pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arranz, Miguel A. [Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Avda. Camilo J. Cela 10, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Colino, Jose M., E-mail: josemiguel.colino@uclm.es [Instituto de Nanociencia, Nanotecnología y Materiales Moleculares, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Campus de la Fábrica de Armas, 45071 Toledo (Spain); Palomares, Francisco J. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, c/ Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-05-14

    Ion beam patterning of a nanoscale ripple surface has emerged as a versatile method of imprinting uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) on a desired in-plane direction in magnetic films. In the case of ripple patterned thick films, dipolar interactions around the top and/or bottom interfaces are generally assumed to drive this effect following Schlömann's calculations for demagnetizing fields of an ideally sinusoidal surface [E. Schlömann, J. Appl. Phys. 41, 1617 (1970)]. We have explored the validity of his predictions and the limits of ion beam sputtering to induce UMA in a ferromagnetic system where other relevant sources of magnetic anisotropy are neglected: ripple films not displaying any evidence of volume uniaxial anisotropy and where magnetocrystalline contributions average out in a fine grain polycrystal structure. To this purpose, the surface of 100 nm cobalt films grown on flat substrates has been irradiated at fixed ion energy, fixed ion fluency but different ion densities to make the ripple pattern at the top surface with wavelength Λ and selected, large amplitudes (ω) up to 20 nm so that stray dipolar fields are enhanced, while the residual film thickness t = 35–50 nm is sufficiently large to preserve the continuous morphology in most cases. The film-substrate interface has been studied with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy depth profiles and is found that there is a graded silicon-rich cobalt silicide, presumably formed during the film growth. This graded interface is of uncertain small thickness but the range of compositions clearly makes it a magnetically dead layer. On the other hand, the ripple surface rules both the magnetic coercivity and the uniaxial anisotropy as these are found to correlate with the pattern dimensions. Remarkably, the saturation fields in the hard axis of uniaxial continuous films are measured up to values as high as 0.80 kG and obey a linear dependence on the parameter ω{sup 2}/Λ/t in quantitative

  18. Deep-water bedforms induced by refracting Internal Solitary Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcini, Federico; Droghei, Riccardo; Casalbore, Daniele; Martorelli, Eleonora; Mosetti, Renzo; Sannino, Gianmaria; Santoleri, Rosalia; Latino Chiocci, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Subaqueous bedforms (or sand waves) are typically observed in those environments that are exposed to strong currents, characterized by a dominant unidirectional flow. However, sand-wave fields may be also observed in marine environments where no such current exists; the physical processes driving their formation are enigmatic or not well understood. We propose that internal solitary waves (ISWs), induced by tides, can produce an effective, unidirectional boundary flow filed that forms asymmetric sand waves. We test this idea by examining a sand-wave field off the Messina Strait, where we hypothesize that ISWs formed at the interface between intermediate and surface waters are refracted by topography. Hence, we argue that the deflected pattern (i.e., the depth-dependent orientation) of the sand-wave field is due to refraction of such ISWs. Combining field observations and numerical modelling, we show that ISWs can account for three key features: ISWs produce fluid velocities capable of mobilizing bottom sediments; the predicted refraction pattern resulting from the interaction of ISWs with bottom topography matches the observed deflection of the sand waves; and predicted migration rates of sand waves match empirical estimates. This work shows how ISWs may contribute to sculpting the structure of continental margins and it represents a promising link between the geological and oceanographic communities.

  19. High frequency vibration characteristics of electric wheel system under in-wheel motor torque ripple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yu; Zuo, Shuguang; Wu, Xudong; Duan, Xianglei

    2017-07-01

    With the introduction of in-wheel motor, the electric wheel system encounters new vibration problems brought by motor torque ripple excitation. In order to analyze new vibration characteristics of electric wheel system, torque ripple of in-wheel motor based on motor module and vector control system is primarily analyzed, and frequency/order features of the torque ripple are discussed. Then quarter vehicle-electric wheel system (QV-EWS) dynamics model based on the rigid ring tire assumption is established and the main parameters of the model are identified according to tire free modal test. Modal characteristics of the model are further analyzed. The analysis indicates that torque excitation of in-wheel motor is prone to arouse horizontal vibration, in which in-phase rotational, anti-phase rotational and horizontal translational modes of electric wheel system mainly participate. Based on the model, vibration responses of the QV-EWS under torque ripple are simulated. The results show that unlike vertical low frequency (lower than 20 Hz) vibration excited by road roughness, broadband torque ripple will arouse horizontal high frequency (50-100 Hz) vibration of electric wheel system due to participation of the three aforementioned modes. To verify the theoretical analysis, the bench experiment of electric wheel system is conducted and vibration responses are acquired. The experiment demonstrates the high frequency vibration phenomenon of electric wheel system and the measured order features as well as main resonant frequencies agree with simulation results. Through theoretical modeling, analysis and experiments this paper reveals and explains the high frequency vibration characteristics of electric wheel system, providing references for the dynamic analysis, optimal design of QV-EWS.

  20. Automated detection of epileptic ripples in MEG using beamformer-based virtual sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorelli, Carolina; Alonso, Joan F.; Romero, Sergio; Nowak, Rafał; Russi, Antonio; Mañanas, Miguel A.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. In epilepsy, high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) are expressively linked to the seizure onset zone (SOZ). The detection of HFOs in the noninvasive signals from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) is still a challenging task. The aim of this study was to automate the detection of ripples in MEG signals by reducing the high-frequency noise using beamformer-based virtual sensors (VSs) and applying an automatic procedure for exploring the time-frequency content of the detected events. Approach. Two-hundred seconds of MEG signal and simultaneous iEEG were selected from nine patients with refractory epilepsy. A two-stage algorithm was implemented. Firstly, beamforming was applied to the whole head to delimitate the region of interest (ROI) within a coarse grid of MEG-VS. Secondly, a beamformer using a finer grid in the ROI was computed. The automatic detection of ripples was performed using the time-frequency response provided by the Stockwell transform. Performance was evaluated through comparisons with simultaneous iEEG signals. Main results. ROIs were located within the seizure-generating lobes in the nine subjects. Precision and sensitivity values were 79.18% and 68.88%, respectively, by considering iEEG-detected events as benchmarks. A higher number of ripples were detected inside the ROI compared to the same region in the contralateral lobe. Significance. The evaluation of interictal ripples using non-invasive techniques can help in the delimitation of the epileptogenic zone and guide placement of intracranial electrodes. This is the first study that automatically detects ripples in MEG in the time domain located within the clinically expected epileptic area taking into account the time-frequency characteristics of the events through the whole signal spectrum. The algorithm was tested against intracranial recordings, the current gold standard. Further studies should explore this approach to enable the localization of

  1. Analysis and Minimization of Output Current Ripple for Discontinuous Pulse-Width Modulation Techniques in Three-Phase Inverters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Grandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the complete analysis of the output current ripple in three-phase voltage source inverters considering the different discontinuous pulse-width modulation (DPWM strategies. In particular, peak-to-peak current ripple amplitude is analytically evaluated over the fundamental period and compared among the most used DPWMs, including positive and negative clamped (DPWM+ and DPWM−, and the four possible combinations between them, usually named as DPWM0, DPWM1, DPWM2, and DPWM3. The maximum and the average values of peak-to-peak current ripple are estimated, and a simple method to correlate the ripple envelope with the ripple rms is proposed and verified. Furthermore, all the results obtained by DPWMs are compared to the centered pulse-width modulation (CPWM, equivalent to the space vector modulation to identify the optimal pulse-width modulation (PWM strategy as a function of the modulation index, taking into account the different average switching frequency. In this way, the PWM technique providing for the minimum output current ripple is identified over the whole modulation range. The analytical developments and the main results are experimentally verified by current ripple measurements with a three-phase PWM inverter prototype supplying an induction motor load.

  2. Aeolian sedimentation in the middle buntsandstein in the eifel north-south depression zone: Summary of the variability of sedimentary processes in a buntsandstein erg as a base for evaluation of the mutual relationships between aeolian sand seas and fluvial river systems in the mid-european buntsandstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Detlef

    The spectrum of aeolian depositional subenvironments in the upper Middle Buntsandstein Karlstal-Schichten sequence in the Eifel North-South-zone at the western margin of the Mid-European Triassic Basin comprises trains of larger and higher narrowly-spaced dunes in sand seas, isolated smaller and lower widely-spaced dunes in floodplains and interdune playas, dry interdune sheet sands, damp interdune adhesive sandflats, wet interdune playa lakes, rainfall runoff watercourses and ephemeral channels cutting through the dune belt, and deflation gravel lag veneers. Distinction of aeolian and fluvial sediments within the succession of closely intertonguing wind- and water-laid deposits is possible by independent analysis of the conventional criteria and the more modern stratification styles. Thick cross-bedded aeolian sand sequences originate as barchanoid-type dunes which accumulate and migrate in the regime of narrow to wide unimodal southeasterly to southwesterly trade winds in low northern palaeolatitude in summer when the intertropical convergence zone is shifted to the north. The predominantly transverse-ridge dunes accrete mainly by grainfall and subcritical climbing of wind ripples, subordinately also by grainflow interfingering with grainfall. Horizontal-laminated aeolian sands form as sand sheets in dry interdune playas by subcritical migration of wind ripple trains, rarely also by plane bed accretion. Thin cross-bedded dune sands or horizontal-laminated aeolian sands capping fluvial cyclothems originate by deflation of emerged alluvial bar sands during low-water stages and subsequent accumulation of the winnowed sand as widely-spaced dunelets or chains of wind ripples in desiccated parts of the adjoining floodplain. The aeolian sand layers at the base of lacustrine cyclothems record migration of isolated little dunes across the dry playa floor at the beginning of a wetting-upwards cyclothem, with the sand deriving from deflation of fluvial incursions or

  3. Gravity's shadow the search for gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2004-01-01

    According to the theory of relativity, we are constantly bathed in gravitational radiation. When stars explode or collide, a portion of their mass becomes energy that disturbs the very fabric of the space-time continuum like ripples in a pond. But proving the existence of these waves has been difficult; the cosmic shudders are so weak that only the most sensitive instruments can be expected to observe them directly. Fifteen times during the last thirty years scientists have claimed to have detected gravitational waves, but so far none of those claims have survived the scrutiny of the scie

  4. Study of frequency pattern of coherent turbulent flow over ripples using image processing with implication in river restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keshavarzi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available River channel change and bed scourings are source of major environmental problem for fish and aquatic habitat. The bed form such as ripples and dunes is the result of an interaction between turbulent flow structure and sediment particles at the bed. The structure of turbulent flow over ripples is important to understand initiation of sediment entrainment and its transport. The focus of this study is the measurement and analysis of the dominant bursting events and the flow structure over ripples in the bed of a channel. Two types of ripples with sinusoidal and triangular forms were tested in this study. The velocities of flow over the ripples were measured in three dimensions using an Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter with a sampling rate of 50 Hz. These velocities were measured at different points within the flow depth from the bed and at different longitudinal positions along the flume. A CCD camera was used to capture 1500 sequential images from the bed and to monitor sediment movement at different positions along the bed. Application of image processing technique enabled us to compute the number of entrained and deposited particles over the ripples. From a quadrant decomposition of instantaneous velocity fluctuations close to the bed, it was found that bursting events downstream of the second ripple, in Quadrants 1 and 3, were dominant whereas upstream of the ripple, Quadrants 2 and 4 were dominant. More importantly consideration of these results indicates that the normalized occurrence probabilities of sweep events are in phase with the bed forms whereas those of ejection event are out of phase with the bed form. Therefore entrainment would be expected to occur upstream and deposition occurs downstream of the ripple. These expectations were confirmed by measurement of entrained and deposited sediment particles from the bed. These above information can be used in practical application for rivers where restoration is required.

  5. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  6. Characteristics of Mesospheric Gravity Waves Observed in the Central Region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max; Messias Almeida, Lazaro; Abalde Guede, Jose Ricardo; Valentin Bageston, José; Pillat, Valdir G.; Lima, Washington L. C.

    Gravity waves observations were carried out at Palmas (10.16o S, 48.26o W) Brazil, between September 2007 and December 2008, using an all-sky airglow imager to measure the OH emis-sion. The gravity waves were divided in two groups following they morphology as band and ripples type waves. The main characteristics of the band type waves are: horizontal wavelength between 10-35 km; observed period raging from 5 to 25 minutes; observed phase speed between 5-60 m/s. Preferential propagation directions of the bands are northward and southward, show-ing a clear anisotropy. For the ripples the main wave parameters are: horizontal wavelength ranging between 5 and 15 km; observed period mainly distributed between 5 and 15 minutes and horizontal phase velocity from 5 to 30 m/s. The ripples showed the same anisotropy as in the preferential propagation direction as the band type waves. The gravity wave characteristics observed at Palmas were compared with other observations carried out in Brazil, showing simi-lar features. In order to explain the seasonal variation of the wave propagation direction, maps of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (ORL) were used to locate regions with intense deep con-vection (OLR < 220 W.m-2 ) in the lower atmosphere. During summer and autumn the wave sources regions are well correlated with deep convection areas located at west and northwest of Palmas.

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of ripple formation by sputtering: Effects of multiple defects and Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Yohei; Chan, Wai Lun; Chason, Eric

    2012-02-01

    Periodic structures known as sputter ripples have been produced on many surfaces but many aspects of their formation are not understood. We have developed Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations to model ripple formation based on the same sputtering and diffusion processes found in a widely-used continuum model. In the current work, we extend the simulations to include the effects of multiple defect production and barriers to interlayer diffusion to determine if these can account for experimental measurements which find more rapid ripple growth than predicted theoretically.

  8. Ripple-Free Graphene Sheets on Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers Provided from Unzipped Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Hyunmo; Lee, Nam-Suk; Shin, Hoon-Kyu; Noh, Jaegeun; Majima, Yutaka; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-02-01

    Octanethiol (C8S, CH3(CH2)7SH) self-assembled monolayers/Au(111) were utilized as an inert surface to provide ripple-free graphene oxide layers provided from chemically unzipped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The resulting graphene oxide monolayers were characterized with atomic resolution by UHV-STM. The honeycomb structure for the graphene monolayer and "three-for-six" triangular pattern for the multi-layer graphene sheets on C8S SAMs were clearly observed without ripples by the high-resolution UHV-STM. These results provide new insight into the preparation of ripple-free graphene monolayers.

  9. Numerical and experimental verification of a theoretical model of ripple formation in ice growth under supercooled water film flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K; Farzaneh, M [NSERC/Hydro-Quebec/UQAC Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment (CIGELE) and Canada Research Chair on Engineering of Power Network Atmospheric Icing (INGIVRE), Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555 Boulevard de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Yamaguchi, S [Snow and Ice Research Center, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention, Nagaoka, 940-0821 (Japan); Tsuji, H [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan)], E-mail: kazuto.ueno@uqac.ca

    2010-04-15

    Little is known about morphological instability of a solidification front during the crystal growth of a thin film of flowing supercooled liquid with a free surface: for example, the ring-like ripples on the surface of icicles. The length scale of the ripples is nearly 1 cm. Two theoretical models for the ripple formation mechanism have been proposed. However, these models lead to quite different results because of differences in the boundary conditions at the solid-liquid interface and liquid-air surface. The validity of the assumption used in the two models is numerically investigated and some of the theoretical predictions are compared with experiments.

  10. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  11. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  12. Impact on sand and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, R.P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the impact of a body on sand and water. When a body impacts a free surface in the inertial regime the series of events is the following: On impact material is blown away in all directions and an impact cavity forms. Due to the hydrostatic pressure from the sides the cav

  13. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  14. A new hypothesis and exploratory model for the formation of large-scale inner-shelf sediment sorting and ``rippled scour depressions''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A. Brad; Thieler, E. Robert

    2004-02-01

    Recent observations of inner continental shelves in many regions show numerous collections of relatively coarse sediment, which extend kilometers in the cross-shore direction and are on the order of 100 m wide. These "rippled scour depressions" have been interpreted to indicate concentrated cross-shelf currents. However, recent observations strongly suggest that they are associated with sediment transport along-shore rather than cross-shore. A new hypothesis for the origin of these features involves the large wave-generated ripples that form in the coarse material. Wave motions interacting with these large roughness elements generate near-bed turbulence that is greatly enhanced relative to that in other areas. This enhances entrainment and inhibits settling of fine material in an area dominated by coarse sediment. The fine sediment is then carried by mean currents past the coarse accumulations, and deposited where the bed is finer. We hypothesize that these interactions constitute a feedback tending to produce accumulations of fine material separated by self-perpetuating patches of coarse sediments. As with many types of self-organized bedforms, small features would interact as they migrate, leading to a better-organized, larger-scale pattern. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we use a numerical model treating the transport of coarse and fine sediment fractions, treated as functions of the local bed composition—a proxy for the presence of large roughness elements in coarse areas. Large-scale sorted patterns exhibiting the main characteristics of the natural features result robustly in the model, indicating that this new hypothesis offers a plausible explanation for the phenomena.

  15. experimental studies of sand production from unconsolidated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    Production of sand during oil and gas exploration causes severe operational prob- ... duction such as risk of well failure, erosion of pipelines and surface facilities, sand separa- tion and disposal ... ment, theoretical and numerical analysis have.

  16. UK silica sand resources for fracking

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2013-01-01

    UK silica sand resources for fracking Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG Email: Silica sand is high purity quartz sand that is mainly used for glass production, as foundry sand, in horticulture, leisure and other industrial uses. One specialist use is as a ‘proppant’ to enhance oil and gas recovery. This presentation will focus on this application, particularly for shale gas recovery where it is mo...

  17. Active toroidal field ripple compensation and MHD feedback control coils in FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramogida, G., E-mail: giuseppe.ramogida@enea.it [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Calabrò, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Crescenzi, F.; Crisanti, F.; Cucchiaro, A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Fresa, R. [Università della Basilicata, Via Nazario Sauro 85, I-85100 Potenza (Italy); Fusco, V. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Martin, P. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Mastrostefano, S. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – DIEI Università di Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Mozzillo, R. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Nuzzolese, F. [Università della Basilicata, Via Nazario Sauro 85, I-85100 Potenza (Italy); Renno, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Rita, C. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Villone, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – DIEI Università di Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Vlad, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Active Ripple Compensating System (ARCS) consists of 18 off-centre poloidal coils between plasma and Toroidal Field Coils. ► The current in ARCS, adjustable and opposite to that in TFC, reduces the toroidal ripple below 0.2% at any toroidal fields. ► Feedback Active Control System (FACS) consists of two arrays of 9 in-vessel saddle coils fed by an MHD feedback controller. ► FACS allows robust feedback stabilization of low toroidal number MHD modes enabling plasma operations at low safety factor. ► ARCS and FACS are included in the whole FAST model and first engineering assessments show their feasibility and capability. -- Abstract: The Fusion Advanced Study Torus (FAST) has been proposed as a high magnetic field, compact size tokamak providing a flexible integrated environment to study physics and technology issues in ITER and DEMO relevant conditions. FAST has a quite large natural toroidal field ripple (around 1.5%) due to its compactness and to the number of access ports: this ripple must be lowered to an acceptable level to allow safe operations and a good confinement quality. An Active Ripple Compensating System (ARCS) has been designed, based on a set of poloidal coils placed between the plasma chamber and the Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs). These ARCS coils will be fed with adjustable currents, opposite in direction respect to the TFC currents, and will allow lowering the ripple up to zero and beyond. The CAD model of FAST including the ARCS coils has been completed and preliminary electromagnetic and thermal analyses have been carried out. Moreover, a Feedback Active Control System (FACS) composed of two arrays of in-vessel saddle coils has been designed to allow safe high plasma current, low safety factor operation and to mitigate possibly large ELMs effects in FAST. These FACS coils will be fed by a feedback system to control MHD modes: a first engineering assessment of the current requirements has been carried out.

  18. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  19. Stiffness Evolution in Frozen Sands Subjected to Stress Changes

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Sheng

    2017-04-21

    Sampling affects all soils, including frozen soils and hydrate-bearing sediments. The authors monitor the stiffness evolution of frozen sands subjected to various temperature and stress conditions using an oedometer cell instrumented with P-wave transducers. Experimental results show the stress-dependent stiffness of freshly remolded sands, the dominant stiffening effect of ice, creep after unloading, and the associated exponential decrease in stiffness with time. The characteristic time for stiffness loss during creep is of the order of tens of minutes; therefore it is inevitable that frozen soils experience sampling disturbances attributable to unloading. Slow unloading minimizes stiffness loss; conversely, fast unloading causes a pronounced reduction in stiffness probably attributable to the brittle failure of ice or ice-mineral bonding.

  20. Light wave interference during laser drilling of polymer coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pargellis, A. N.; Au, D. T. W.; Kestenbaum, A.

    1988-12-01

    A CO2 laser has been used to drill holes in a 150-μm-thick, UV-curable, modified acrylate, polymer coating a copper substrate. A typical hole is 100-150 μm in diameter. The holes in this study were each made with a single laser pulse of 10.6-μm wavelength, duration 100 or 200 μs, and 4-20 mJ energy. Two superimposed sets of periodic ripples have been observed on the hole walls. The shorter wavelength varies from 4.0 μm at the top of the hole to 5.3 μm at the bottom of the hole. The longer wavelength appears to be 13.2 μm and is attenuated as the wave propagates towards the copper substrate. The experimental data are compared with values calculated using a model that considers the interference of a standing wave inside the hole with radiation propagating through the dielectric surrounding the hole. The amplitude (trough-to-peak distance) of the waves in the hole wall is about half the wavelength of the standing waves. The long-wavelength waves (13.2 μm) yield ripples in the wall of 6.5-μm amplitude. These ripples give 13.0 μm (0.5 mils) as an ultimate lower limit for laser drilling holes using the 10.6-μm wavelengths obtained with a CO2 laser. Chemical etching of the polymer causes all of the holes to have thin rims surrounding the top of the hole. This is due to accelerated etching of the less cured polymer material inside the hole. A chemical etching process etches away some of the ripple pattern, particularly near the top of the hole.