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Sample records for sand substrate electronic

  1. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  2. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  3. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  4. [Rearing immature horse flies (Diptera: Tabanidae) by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ruth L M; Rafael, José A

    2006-01-01

    A new method for rearing immature horse flies by using a substrate of bryophytes and sand is described and the advantages of such substrate for maintenance of species with long development periods are discussed.

  5. Printed electronic on flexible and glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futera, Konrad; Jakubowska, Małgorzata; Kozioł, Grażyna

    2010-09-01

    Organic electronics is a platform technology that enables multiple applications based on organic electronics but varied in specifications. Organic electronics is based on the combination of new materials and cost-effective, large area production processes that provide new fields of application. Organic electronic by its size, weight, flexibility and environmental friendliness electronics enables low cost production of numerous electrical components and provides for such promising fields of application as: intelligent packaging, low cost RFID, flexible solar cells, disposable diagnostic devices or games, and printed batteries [1]. The paper presents results of inkjetted electronics elements on flexible and glass substrates. The investigations was target on characterizing shape, surface and geometry of printed structures. Variety of substrates were investigated, within some, low cost, non specialized substrate, design for other purposes than organic electronic.

  6. Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-28

    By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170 000 cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

  7. Advanced organics for electronic substrates and packages

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, Andrew E

    1992-01-01

    Advanced Organics for Electronic Substrates and Packages provides information on packaging, which is one of the most technologically intensive activities in the electronics industry. The electronics packaging community has realized that while semiconductor devices continue to be improved upon for performance, cost, and reliability, it is the interconnection or packaging of these devices that will limit the performance of the systems. Technology must develop packaging for transistor chips, with high levels of performance and integration providing cooling, power, and interconnection, and yet pre

  8. Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, R.; Ayers, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2008-12-23

    The goal of the Direct-Cooled Power Electronics Substrate project is to reduce the size and weight of the heat sink for power electronics used in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The concept proposed in this project was to develop an innovative power electronics mounting structure, model it, and perform both thermal and mechanical finite-element analysis (FEA). This concept involved integrating cooling channels within the direct-bonded copper (DBC) substrate and strategically locating these channels underneath the power electronic devices. This arrangement would then be directly cooled by water-ethylene glycol (WEG), essentially eliminating the conventional heat sink and associated heat flow path. The concept was evaluated to determine its manufacturability, its compatibility with WEG, and the potential to reduce size and weight while directly cooling the DBC and associated electronics with a coolant temperature of 105 C. This concept does not provide direct cooling to the electronics, only direct cooling inside the DBC substrate itself. These designs will take into account issues such as containment of the fluid (separation from the electronics) and synergy with the whole power inverter design architecture. In FY 2008, mechanical modeling of substrate and inverter core designs as well as thermal and mechanical stress FEA modeling of the substrate designs was performed, along with research into manufacturing capabilities and methods that will support the substrate designs. In FY 2009, a preferred design(s) will be fabricated and laboratory validation testing will be completed. In FY 2010, based on the previous years laboratory testing, the mechanical design will be modified and the next generation will be built and tested in an operating inverter prototype.

  9. Wave-induced ripple development in mixed clay-sand substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuxu; Parsons, Daniel; Baas, Jaco H.; Mouazé, Dominique; McLelland, Stuart; Amoudry, Laurent; Eggenhuisen, Jorris; Cartigny, Matthieu; Ruessink, Gerben

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on a series of experiments that aim to provide a fuller understanding of ripple development within clay-sand mixture substrates under oscillatory flow conditions. The work was conducted in the Total Environment Simulator at the University of Hull and constituted 6 separate runs, in which 5 runs were conducted under identical sets of regular waves (an additional run was conducted under irregular waves, but is not discussed in present paper). The bed content was systematically varied in its composition ranging from a pure sand bed through to a bed comprising 7.4% clay. A series of state-of-the-art measurements were employed to quantify interactions of near-bed hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and turbulence over rippled beds formed by wave action, during and after, each run. The experimental results demonstrate the significant influence of the amount of cohesive clay materials in the substrate on ripple evolution under waves. Most importantly, addition of clay in the bed dramatically slowed down the rate of ripple development and evolution. The equilibrium time of each run increased exponentially from 30 minutes under the control conditions of a pure sand bed, rising to ~350 minutes for the bed with the highest fraction of clay. The paper discusses the slower ripple growth rates with higher cohesive fractions, via an influence on critical shear, but highlights that the end equilibrium size of ripples is found to be independent of increasing substrate clay fraction. The suspended particles mass (SPM) concentration indicates that clay particles were suspended and winnowed by wave action. Additionally, laser granulometry of the final substrates verified that ripple crests were composed of pure sand layers that were absent at ripple troughs, reflecting a relatively higher winnowing efficiency at wave ripples crest. The winnowing process and its efficiency is inexorably linked to wave ripple development and evolution. The implications of the results

  10. Microbial Diversity in Soil, Sand Dune and Rock Substrates of the Thar Monsoon Desert, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Subramanya; Chan, Yuki; Bugler-Lacap, Donnabella C; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Bhatnagar, Monica; Pointing, Stephen B

    2016-03-01

    A culture-independent diversity assessment of archaea, bacteria and fungi in the Thar Desert in India was made. Six locations in Ajmer, Jaisalmer, Jaipur and Jodhupur included semi-arid soils, arid soils, arid sand dunes, plus arid cryptoendolithic substrates. A real-time quantitative PCR approach revealed that bacteria dominated soils and cryptoendoliths, whilst fungi dominated sand dunes. The archaea formed a minor component of all communities. Comparison of rRNA-defined community structure revealed that substrate and climate rather than location were the most parsimonious predictors. Sequence-based identification of 1240 phylotypes revealed that most taxa were common desert microorganisms. Semi-arid soils were dominated by actinobacteria and alpha proteobacteria, arid soils by chloroflexi and alpha proteobacteria, sand dunes by ascomycete fungi and cryptoendoliths by cyanobacteria. Climatic variables that best explained this distribution were mean annual rainfall and maximum annual temperature. Substrate variables that contributed most to observed diversity patterns were conductivity, soluble salts, Ca(2+) and pH. This represents an important addition to the inventory of desert microbiota, novel insight into the abiotic drivers of community assembly, and the first report of biodiversity in a monsoon desert system.

  11. Large submarine sand waves and gravel lag substrates on Georges Bank off Atlantic Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, B.J.; Valentine, Page C.; Harris, Peter T; Baker, E.K.

    2012-01-01

    Georges Bank is a large, shallow, continental shelf feature offshore of New England and Atlantic Canada. The bank is mantled with a veneer of glacial debris transported during the late Pleistocene from continental areas lying to the north. These sediments were reworked by marine processes during postglacial sea-level transgression and continue to be modified by the modern oceanic regime. The surficial geology of the Canadian portion of the bank is a widespread gravel lag overlain in places by well sorted sand occurring as bedforms. The most widespread bedforms are large, mobile, asymmetrical sand waves up to 19 m in height formed through sediment transport by strong tidal-driven and possibly storm-driven currents. Well-defined curvilinear bedform crests up to 15 km long form a complex bifurcating pattern having an overall southwest–northeast strike, which is normal to the direction of the major axis of the semidiurnal tidal current ellipse. Minor fields of immobile, symmetrical sand waves are situated in bathymetric lows. Rare mobile, asymmetrical barchan dunes are lying on the gravel lag in areas of low sand supply. On Georges Bank, the management of resources and habitats requires an understanding of the distribution of substrate types, their surface dynamics and susceptibility to movement, and their associated fauna.

  12. Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes for lighting applications by sand-blasting substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing

    2010-01-04

    Light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by scattering the light is one of the effective methods for large-area lighting applications. In this paper, we present a very simple and cost-effective method to rough the substrates and hence to scatter the light. By simply sand-blasting the edges and back-side surface of the glass substrates, a 20% improvement of forward efficiency has been demonstrated. Moreover, due to scattering effect, a constant color over all viewing angles and uniform light pattern with Lambertian distribution has been obtained. This simple and cost-effective method may be suitable for mass production of large-area OLEDs for lighting applications.

  13. Graphene-on-semiconductor substrates for analog electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max G.; Cavallo, Francesca; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2016-04-26

    Electrically conductive material structures, analog electronic devices incorporating the structures and methods for making the structures are provided. The structures include a layer of graphene on a semiconductor substrate. The graphene layer and the substrate are separated by an interfacial region that promotes transfer of charge carriers from the surface of the substrate to the graphene.

  14. Printed electronic switch on flexible substrates using printed microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, A.T. ten; Gaspar, C.H.; Virtanen, H.L.K.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Olkkonen, J.T.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Smolander, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics, the manufacturing of electronic components on large, flexible, and low-cost substrates by printing techniques, can facilitate widespread, very low-cost electronics for consumer applications and disposable devices. New technologies are needed to create functional components in th

  15. Printed electronic switch on flexible substrates using printed microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, A.T. ten; Gaspar, C.H.; Virtanen, H.L.K.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Olkkonen, J.T.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Smolander, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics, the manufacturing of electronic components on large, flexible, and low-cost substrates by printing techniques, can facilitate widespread, very low-cost electronics for consumer applications and disposable devices. New technologies are needed to create functional components in

  16. Mechanical properties of sand modified resins used for bonding CFRP to concrete substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz. I. Abdulla

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is an experimental investigation into the properties of adhesive before and after mixing with fine sand, and its behavior on reinforced concrete beams strengthened by CFRP to show the effects of modified adhesive on load-carrying capacity, ductility, stiffness and failure mode of the reinforced concrete beams. Compressive strength, flexural strength and the effect of high temperature on these properties were the focus of the current study in order to prove the efficiency of adding fine sand to improve adhesive properties and reduce cost. Based on the compressive and flexural tests, results indicated that the addition of sand to the adhesive improved its mechanical properties when sand is 50% of the total weight of the adhesive. However, its effect on the modulus of elasticity is minimal. Using adhesive with fine sand increased the ultimate load bearing capacity, ductility, stiffness and toughness of the reinforced concrete beams strengthened by CFRP. The ratio of the fine sand to the adhesive equal to 1 is considered the best in terms of the cost reduction, maintaining workability, as well as maintaining the mechanical properties. Lastly, the use of fine sand with adhesive ensured a significant reduction in the cost of the adhesive and increased the adhesive resistance to temperature.

  17. Substrate temperature and electron fluence effects on metallic films created by electron beam induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, S.G.; Landheer, K.; Hagen, C.W.; Fairbrother, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Using three different precursors [MeCpPtMe3, Pt(PF3)4, and W(CO)6], an ultra-high vacuum surface science approach has been used to identify and rationalize the effects of substrate temperature and electron fluence on the chemical composition and bonding in films created by electron beam induced

  18. Hygroscopic and thermal micro deformations of plastic substrates for flexible electronics using digital image correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, D. van den; Barink, M.; Giesen, P.; Meinders, E.R.; Yakimets, I.

    2010-01-01

    Thin polymer substrates are promising materials for flexible electronics with many advantages. However, the dimensional stability of polymer substrates is low. Nowadays, this is overcome by laminating polymer substrates onto a rigid carrier. Nevertheless, carrier-less processing will be a foreseen n

  19. Hygroscopic and thermal micro deformations of plastic substrates for flexible electronics using digital image correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, D. van den; Barink, M.; Giesen, P.; Meinders, E.R.; Yakimets, I.

    2011-01-01

    Thin polymer substrates are promising materials for flexible electronics with many advantages. However, the dimensional stability of polymer substrates is low. Nowadays, this is overcome by laminating polymer substrates onto a rigid carrier. Nevertheless, carrier-less processing will be a foreseen n

  20. Substrate and head group modifications for enhanced stability in molecular electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrato, Michael-Anthony

    Poor Self-Assembled Monolayer (SAM) stability is a barrier which impedes the incorporation of molecular layers as functional components in electronic device architectures. Here we investigate the molecular electronic characteristics of two well established approaches to enhancing SAM stability. In Chapter 2 we investigate the electrochemical modification of Au substrates by the underpotential deposition of silver monolayers (AgUPD). In Chapter 3 we study chelating dithiophosphinic acid (DTPA) head groups to anchor SAM molecules to substrates. Based on molecular electronic characterization using EGaIn Tip testbeds, we observed that AgUPD substrates maintained the inherent electronic character of n-alkanethiolate SAMs, but reduced charge transport by almost 1 order of magnitude as compared with the same SAMs on bulk Au substrates. Similar molecular electronic characterization of (diphenyl)dithiophosphinic acid SAMs on Au substrates revealed that the DTPA head group induced a ~3 order of magnitude drop in charge transport as compared with analogous thiophenol SAMs.

  1. Posterior spiracles of fourth instar larvae of four species of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae under scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessoa Felipe Arley Costa

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, posterior spiracles of laboratory-reared fourth instar larvae of Lutzomyia longipalpis, L. migonei, L. lenti, and L. whitmani (Diptera: Psychodidae of the State of Ceará, Brazil, were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The number of papillae of spiracles examined varied according to the species examined, but no intraspecific differences were found. The importance of this structure to sand fly larva identification and phylogeny is commented.

  2. Ground Based Free Electron Laser Technology Integration Experiment, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    would preclude interference with televisions , radios and computer equipment operated in the area around WSMR. Warning signs will be posted at the...canadensis mexicana ); (2) black-tailed prairie dog (Cynonmys ludovicianus); (3) Colorado chipmunk (Eutamias quadrivittatus australis); (4) White Sands pupfish...by GBFEL TIE equipment, it could disturb local television and radio receivers. Since the GBFEL TIE will be located on White Sands Missile Range (WSMR

  3. Mechanical Characterization of Flexible and Stretchable Electronic Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional IC packages form a rigid shell around silicon IC dies. Their purpose is to provide environmental protection, electrical interconnect and heat dissipation. Despite the fact that majority of current silicon IC′s are realized in a very thin top layer of the silicon substrate (<10µm), the t

  4. Mechanical Characterization of Flexible and Stretchable Electronic Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Conventional IC packages form a rigid shell around silicon IC dies. Their purpose is to provide environmental protection, electrical interconnect and heat dissipation. Despite the fact that majority of current silicon IC′s are realized in a very thin top layer of the silicon substrate (<10µm), the t

  5. Wide Temperature Cycling Tolerant Electronic Packaging Substrates Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Planetary exploration missions require electronics packaging that can withstand extreme temperatures and numerous temperature cycles (-230C to +350C). The present...

  6. High-temperature behavior of supported graphene: Electron-phonon coupling and substrate-induced doping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulstrup, Søren; Bianchi, Marco; Guan, Dandan

    2012-01-01

    The temperature-dependent electronic structure and electron-phonon coupling of weakly doped supported graphene is studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The electron-phonon coupling is found to be extremely weak, reaching the lowest value...... ever reported for any material. However, the temperature-dependent dynamic interaction with the substrate leads to a complex and dramatic change in the carrier density and type in graphene. These changes in the electronic structure are mainly caused by fluctuations in the graphene-substrate distance....

  7. Small signal modeling of high electron mobility transistors on silicon and silicon carbide substrate with consideration of substrate loss mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, A. K.; Subramani, N. K.; Nallatamby, J. C.; Sylvain, L.; Loyez, C.; Quere, R.; Medjdoub, F.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative study on small-signal modeling of AlN/GaN/AlGaN double hetero-structure high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) grown on silicon (Si) and silicon carbide (SiC) substrate. The traditional small signal equivalent circuit model is modified to take into account the transmission loss mechanism of coplanar waveguide (CPW) line which cannot be neglected at high frequencies. CPWs and HEMTs-on-AlN/GaN/AlGaN epitaxial layers are fabricated on both the Si and SiC substrates. S-parameter measurements at room temperature are performed over the frequency range from 0.5 GHz to 40 GHz. Transmission loss of CPW lines are modeled with a distributed transmission line (TL) network and an equivalent circuit model is included in the small-signal transistor model topology. Measurements and simulations are compared and found to be in good agreement.

  8. The electronic properties of graphene on metal modified SiO2 substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, L.; Jiang, F.; Xiao, M.; Zhang, R.; Yu, M. X.; Miao, L; Jiang, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Based on first principles calculation, the electronic properties of graphene on metal (Ti, Ca, Ni, Mn, Co, Fe, Cr, K) modified SiO2 substrate have been studied. The results of binding energies supported graphene indicate that the metal atoms are adsorbed more stably on O surface than on Si surface of SiO2 substrate, and graphene is adsorbed very stably on metal modified substrate. The band structures of supported graphene are similar with that of suspending graphene when deposited on Co modif...

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW Fabrication and characterization of nanostructures on insulator substrates by electron-beam-induced deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Song and Kazuo Furuya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication, characterization, and decoration with metallic nanoparticles of nanostructures such as nanowhiskers, nanodendrites, and fractal-like nanotrees on insulator substrates by electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID are reviewed. Nanostructures with different morphologies of whiskers, dendrites, or trees are fabricated on insulator (Al2O3 or SiO2 substrates by EBID in transmission electron microscopes by controlling the irradiation conditions such as the electron beam intensity. The growth of the nanostructure is related to the accumulation of charges on the surface of a substrate during electron-beam irradiation. A high concentration of the target metallic element and nanocrystal grains of the element are contained in the fabricated nanostructures. The process of growth of the nanostructures is explained qualitatively on the basis of mechanisms in which the formation of the nanostructures is considered to be related to the nanoscaled unevenness of the charge distribution on the surface of the substrate, the movement of the charges to the convex surface of the substrate, and the accumulation of charges at the tip of the grown nanostructure. Novel composite structures of Pt nanoparticle/tungsten (W nanodendrite or Au nanoparticle/W nanodendrite are fabricated by the decoration of W nanodendrites with metallic elements. Because they have superior features, such as a large specific surface area, a freestanding structure on substrates, a typical size of several nanometers of the tip or the branch, and high purity, the nanostructures may have applications in technologies such as catalysts, sensors, and electron emitters. However, there are still some subjects that should be further studied before their application.

  10. Multifunctional Electronics Core Substrate Configurable Electronics Functionality with Stacked Silicon and Multi-Chip Modules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A custom multifunctional core substrate scheme comprised of next generation polyimide, ceramic and/or silicon materials will be designed to integrate new 2.5D and...

  11. Anaerobic Degradation of Tetrachloroethylene Using Different Co-substrates as Electron Donors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the biodegradation of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by acclimated anaerobic sludge using different co-substrates, I.e., glucose, acetate, and lactate as electron donors. Methods HP-6890 gas chromatograph (GC) in combination with auto-sampler was used to analyze the concentration of PCE and its intermediates. Results PCE could be degraded by reductive dechlorination and the degradation reaction conformed to the first-order kinetic equation. The rate constants are k1actate>kglucose>kacetate. The PCE degradation rate was the highest in the presence of lactate as an electron donor.Conclusion Lactate is the most suitable electron donor for PCE degradation and the electron donors supplied by co-metabolic substrates are not the limiting factors for PCE degradation.

  12. A protocol for amide bond formation with electron deficient amines and sterically hindered substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Maria E; Pandey, Sunil K; Christiansen, Elisabeth;

    2016-01-01

    A protocol for amide coupling by in situ formation of acyl fluorides and reaction with amines at elevated temperature has been developed and found to be efficient for coupling of sterically hindered substrates and electron deficient amines where standard methods failed....

  13. Electron Emission from Cross-Sectional Surface of Porous Si on Glass Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuya Higa,

    2010-02-01

    The measurement of electron emission from the cross-sectional surface of porous Si layer on a glass substrate is demonstrated. The porous Si is formed by anodization, and subsequently bonded on a glass substrate with an Al electrode by anodic bonding. The electron emission device structure is composed of a Au electrode, a porous Si layer, and a glass substrate with an Al electrode. This structure is cut into two pieces during the formation of the cross-sectional surface of porous Si. The measurement of electron emission is carried out using a diode configuration in a vacuum chamber. A collector is placed close to the cross-sectional surface of porous Si. The negative voltages are applied at the Au electrode and electron emission from the cross-sectional surface of porous Si layer occurs. The characteristics of emission current are measured using the variation of applied negative voltage, the stability of electron emission, and the change in location of the Au electrode at the edge of the cross section of porous Si layer.

  14. Electronic and Vibrational Properties of meso -Tetraphenylporphyrin on Silver Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Honkala, Karoliina; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-09-18

    The electronic and vibrational properties of meso-tetraphenylporphyrin (mtpp) on silver substrates are investigated using UV–vis and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectroscopy. Whereas the vibrational signatures associated with the tetrapyrrole backbone exhibit minor variations throughout sequences of consecutively recorded SERRS spectra, the C=C stretching vibrational modes localized on the meso-phenyl moieties of mtpp exhibit noticeable intensity fluctuations, masked in the average SERRS response. Finally, we attribute the observed vibrational-state-specific blinking events to conformational changes in mtpp, namely, torsional flexibility which mediates the coupling between the π-framework of the meso-phenyls and the underlying metal substrate.

  15. Fabrication of nanowire electronics on nonconventional substrates by water-assisted transfer printing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chi Hwan; Kim, Dong Rip; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2015-06-01

    We report a simple, versatile, and wafer-scale water-assisted transfer printing method (WTP) that enables the transfer of nanowire devices onto diverse nonconventional substrates that were not easily accessible before, such as paper, plastics, tapes, glass, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), aluminum foil, and ultrathin polymer substrates. The WTP method relies on the phenomenon of water penetrating into the interface between Ni and SiO2. The transfer yield is nearly 100%, and the transferred devices, including NW resistors, diodes, and field effect transistors, maintain their original geometries and electronic properties with high fidelity.

  16. In Tube Integrated Electronic Nose System on a Flexible Polymer Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Tröster

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication of electronic devices, such as gas sensors on flexible polymer substrates, enables the use of electronics in applications where conventional devices on stiff substrates could not be used. We demonstrate the development of a new intra-tube electronic-nose (e-nose gas sensor device with multiple sensors fabricated and integrated on a flexible substrate. For this purpose, we developed a new method of fabricating a sensor array of four gas sensors on a flexible polymer substrate. The method allowed the use of lithography techniques to pattern different polymers with a broad range of solubility parameters. Conductive polymer composites were used as a gas sensitive layer due to the high stretchability of the material. Each of the 30 e-nose devices on one substrate was designed to fit on a polymer strip with a width of 2 mm. A single e-nose strip was successfully integrated into the inlet tube of a gas-measurement apparatus with an inner-tube diameter of 3 mm. Using the e-nose, we were able to differentiate between four different volatile solvent vapors. The tube-integrated e-nose outperformed a chamber-integrated e-nose of the same type in terms of response time and flow-rate influences. The sensor array inside the tube showed a faster response time and detected short pulses of analyte exposure compared to the same sensor array outside of the tube. We measured gas flow rates from 1,000 to 30 sccm without significant changes in sensor performance using this intra-tube e-nose prototype. The tube could be bent to radii < 15 mm with a sensor performance similar to an unbent sensor.

  17. In tube integrated electronic nose system on a flexible polymer substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkeldei, Thomas; Zysset, Christoph; Münzenrieder, Niko; Petti, Luisa; Tröster, Gerhard

    2012-10-12

    The fabrication of electronic devices, such as gas sensors on flexible polymer substrates, enables the use of electronics in applications where conventional devices on stiff substrates could not be used. We demonstrate the development of a new intra-tube electronic-nose (e-nose) gas sensor device with multiple sensors fabricated and integrated on a flexible substrate. For this purpose, we developed a new method of fabricating a sensor array of four gas sensors on a flexible polymer substrate. The method allowed the use of lithography techniques to pattern different polymers with a broad range of solubility parameters. Conductive polymer composites were used as a gas sensitive layer due to the high stretchability of the material. Each of the 30 e-nose devices on one substrate was designed to fit on a polymer strip with a width of 2 mm. A single e-nose strip was successfully integrated into the inlet tube of a gas-measurement apparatus with an inner-tube diameter of 3 mm. Using the e-nose, we were able to differentiate between four different volatile solvent vapors. The tube-integrated e-nose outperformed a chamber-integrated e-nose of the same type in terms of response time and flow-rate influences. The sensor array inside the tube showed a faster response time and detected short pulses of analyte exposure compared to the same sensor array outside of the tube. We measured gas flow rates from 1,000 to 30 sccm without significant changes in sensor performance using this intra-tube e-nose prototype. The tube could be bent to radii sensor performance similar to an unbent sensor.

  18. Substrate pre-treatment of flexible material for printed electronics with carbon nanotube based ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneulin, Aurore; Bras, Julien; Blayo, Anne; Neuman, Charles

    2011-02-01

    In this work, an innovative solution was developed in order to make paper-based material, used traditionally in the packaging and labelling industries, compatible with the printing of functional conductive inks. In order to avoid the deterioration of the ink functionalities due to different paper properties, a UV-curing inkjettable primer layer was developed. This pre-treatment enables homogeneous surface properties such as smoothness, absorption capacity and surface energy to be obtained, for almost all the examined substrates. To confirm the positive impact of such pre-treatment, conductivity has been measured when using a new conductive ink, combining the processability of the PEDOT-PSS conductive polymer with the high electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Significant improvement has been measured for all paper materials and similar conductivity (close to reference PET film) has been obtained whatever the substrate involved. This pre-treatment now makes it possible to consider paper-based material as a potential substrate for printed electronics. In this case, the substrate adaptation technique offers an innovative solution to produce low-cost and flexible electronics.

  19. Substrate pre-treatment of flexible material for printed electronics with carbon nanotube based ink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denneulin, Aurore, E-mail: Aurore@polypore.fr [Polypore - 27, bd Louise Michel, F-92230 Gennevilliers (France); Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2) (UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG), Grenoble Institute of Technology, INP Grenoble - PAGORA, 461 Rue de la Papeterie, BP 65, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Bras, Julien, E-mail: Julien.Bras@grenoble-inp.fr [Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2) (UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG), Grenoble Institute of Technology, INP Grenoble - PAGORA, 461 Rue de la Papeterie, BP 65, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Blayo, Anne, E-mail: Anne.Blayo@grenoble-inp.fr [Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Science and Graphic Arts (LGP2), UMR 5518 CNRS-CTP-INPG, Grenoble Institute of Technology (INP Grenoble - PAGORA), 461 Rue de la Papeterie, BP 65, 38402 St Martin d' Heres Cedex (France); Neuman, Charles [Polypore - 27, bd Louise Michel, F-92230 Gennevilliers (France)

    2011-02-01

    In this work, an innovative solution was developed in order to make paper-based material, used traditionally in the packaging and labelling industries, compatible with the printing of functional conductive inks. In order to avoid the deterioration of the ink functionalities due to different paper properties, a UV-curing inkjettable primer layer was developed. This pre-treatment enables homogeneous surface properties such as smoothness, absorption capacity and surface energy to be obtained, for almost all the examined substrates. To confirm the positive impact of such pre-treatment, conductivity has been measured when using a new conductive ink, combining the processability of the PEDOT-PSS conductive polymer with the high electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Significant improvement has been measured for all paper materials and similar conductivity (close to reference PET film) has been obtained whatever the substrate involved. This pre-treatment now makes it possible to consider paper-based material as a potential substrate for printed electronics. In this case, the substrate adaptation technique offers an innovative solution to produce low-cost and flexible electronics.

  20. Thickness dependent electronic structure and morphology of rubrene thin films on metal, semiconductor, and dielectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumona; Mukherjee, M.

    2013-08-01

    The evolution of the electronic structure and morphology of rubrene thin films on noble-metal, semiconductor and dielectric substrates have been investigated as a function of thickness of deposited films by using photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The clean polycrystalline Au and Ag were used as noble-metals, whereas, H passivated and SiO2 coated Si (100) were used as semiconductors and dielectric substrates. Discussion and comparison on interface dipole, energy level alignment, and surface morphology for the four cases are presented. The formation of dipole at metallic interfaces is found to occur due to push back effect. S parameter obtained from the variation of barrier height with the change of work function of the contacting metal indicates moderately weak interaction between rubrene and the metal substrates. The thickness dependent energy level alignment of the physisorbed rubrene films on different substrates is explained by a dielectric model in terms of electrostatic screening of photo-holes or photoemission final state relaxation energy. Films on all the substrates are found to grow following Stranski-Krastnov type growth mode and are more ordered at higher coverage.

  1. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  2. Electronic inhomogeneities in graphene: the role of the substrate interaction and chemical doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rubio-Bollinger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We probe the local inhomogeneities of the electronicproperties of graphene at the nanoscale usingscanning probe microscopy techniques. First, wefocus on the study of the electronic inhomogeneitiescaused by the graphene-substrate interaction ingraphene samples exfoliated on silicon oxide. Wefind that charged impurities, present in the graphenesubstrateinterface, perturb the carrier densitysignificantly and alter the electronic properties ofgraphene. This finding helps to understand theobserved device-to-device variation typically observedin graphene-based electronic devices. Second, weprobe the effect of chemical modification in theelectronic properties of graphene, grown by chemicalvapour deposition on nickel. We find that both thechemisorption of hydrogen and the physisorption ofporphyrin molecules strongly depress theconductance at low bias indicating the opening of abandgap in graphene, paving the way towards thechemical engineering of the electronic properties ofgraphene.

  3. High Electron Mobility Transistor Structures on Sapphire Substrates Using CMOS Compatible Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Carl; Alterovitz, Samuel; Croke, Edward; Ponchak, George

    2004-01-01

    System-on-a-chip (SOC) processes are under intense development for high-speed, high frequency transceiver circuitry. As frequencies, data rates, and circuit complexity increases, the need for substrates that enable high-speed analog operation, low-power digital circuitry, and excellent isolation between devices becomes increasingly critical. SiGe/Si modulation doped field effect transistors (MODFETs) with high carrier mobilities are currently under development to meet the active RF device needs. However, as the substrate normally used is Si, the low-to-modest substrate resistivity causes large losses in the passive elements required for a complete high frequency circuit. These losses are projected to become increasingly troublesome as device frequencies progress to the Ku-band (12 - 18 GHz) and beyond. Sapphire is an excellent substrate for high frequency SOC designs because it supports excellent both active and passive RF device performance, as well as low-power digital operations. We are developing high electron mobility SiGe/Si transistor structures on r-plane sapphire, using either in-situ grown n-MODFET structures or ion-implanted high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures. Advantages of the MODFET structures include high electron mobilities at all temperatures (relative to ion-implanted HEMT structures), with mobility continuously improving to cryogenic temperatures. We have measured electron mobilities over 1,200 and 13,000 sq cm/V-sec at room temperature and 0.25 K, respectively in MODFET structures. The electron carrier densities were 1.6 and 1.33 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm at room and liquid helium temperature, respectively, denoting excellent carrier confinement. Using this technique, we have observed electron mobilities as high as 900 sq cm/V-sec at room temperature at a carrier density of 1.3 x 10(exp 12)/sq cm. The temperature dependence of mobility for both the MODFET and HEMT structures provides insights into the mechanisms that allow for enhanced

  4. Substrate-dependent electronic structure and film formation of MAPbI3 perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthof, Selina; Meerholz, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We present investigations on the interface formation between the hybrid perovskite MAPbI3 and various substrates, covering a wide range of work functions. The perovskite films are incrementally evaporated in situ while the electronic structure is evaluated using photoelectron spectroscopy. Our results show that there is an induction period in the growth of the perovskite during which volatile compounds are formed, catalyzed by the substrate. The duration of the induction period depends strongly on the nature of the substrate material, and it can take up to 20–30 nm of formal precursor deposition before the surface is passivated and the perovskite film starts forming. The stoichiometry of the 2–3 nm thin passivation layer deviates from the expected perovskite stoichiometry, being rich in decomposition products of the organic cation. During the regular growth of the perovskite, our measurements show a deviation from the commonly assumed flat band condition, i.e., dipole formation and band bending dominate the interface. Overall, the nature of the substrate not only changes the energetic alignment of the perovskite, it can introduce gap states and influence the film formation and morphology. The possible impact on device performance is discussed.

  5. Substrate-dependent electronic structure and film formation of MAPbI3 perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olthof, Selina; Meerholz, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We present investigations on the interface formation between the hybrid perovskite MAPbI3 and various substrates, covering a wide range of work functions. The perovskite films are incrementally evaporated in situ while the electronic structure is evaluated using photoelectron spectroscopy. Our results show that there is an induction period in the growth of the perovskite during which volatile compounds are formed, catalyzed by the substrate. The duration of the induction period depends strongly on the nature of the substrate material, and it can take up to 20–30 nm of formal precursor deposition before the surface is passivated and the perovskite film starts forming. The stoichiometry of the 2–3 nm thin passivation layer deviates from the expected perovskite stoichiometry, being rich in decomposition products of the organic cation. During the regular growth of the perovskite, our measurements show a deviation from the commonly assumed flat band condition, i.e., dipole formation and band bending dominate the interface. Overall, the nature of the substrate not only changes the energetic alignment of the perovskite, it can introduce gap states and influence the film formation and morphology. The possible impact on device performance is discussed. PMID:28084313

  6. The use of process plasmas for cleaning PCB substrates for fluxless soldering of electronic assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philpott, J.D

    1999-12-01

    In this thesis the ability of single and multiple gas plasmas to improve the solderability of PCB substrates, and hence allow the removal of flux from the soldering process for electronic assemblies has been investigated. It has been shown that asymmetric electrode plasma chambers allow the use of single gas plasmas for this purpose due to their greater efficiency compared to symmetric systems. It has also been shown that the use of triple gas plasmas results in improved cleaning ability when using symmetric electrode systems. Dynamic contact angle (DCA) analysis was the primary analytical technique used in this work. This technique produces two contact angles, advancing and receding. The advancing contact angle determines the surface energy of a solid. It has been shown using Auger analysis that contact angles of approximately 48 deg indicate low levels of hydrocarbon contamination. It has also been shown that plasma cleaning processes giving advancing contact angles of this magnitude result in the ability to solder Hot Air Solder Leveled (HASL) PCB substrates without the use of flux. In addition it has been shown that, whilst it is possible to reduce the advancing contact angle of copper substrates considerably, the reduction is not as great as for HASL substrates. Analytical models of RF plasma chambers have also been reviewed, and these adapted for the plasma chambers used in this work. The experimental work carried out in this research also shows that these models hold true. (author)

  7. Transparent electronics based on transfer printed aligned carbon nanotubes on rigid and flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumiaki N; Chang, Hsiao-Kang; Ryu, Koungmin; Chen, Po-Chiang; Badmaev, Alexander; Gomez De Arco, Lewis; Shen, Guozhen; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-01-27

    We report high-performance fully transparent thin-film transistors (TTFTs) on both rigid and flexible substrates with transfer printed aligned nanotubes as the active channel and indium-tin oxide as the source, drain, and gate electrodes. Such transistors have been fabricated through low-temperature processing, which allowed device fabrication even on flexible substrates. Transparent transistors with high effective mobilities (approximately 1300 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) were first demonstrated on glass substrates via engineering of the source and drain contacts, and high on/off ratio (3 x 10(4)) was achieved using electrical breakdown. In addition, flexible TTFTs with good transparency were also fabricated and successfully operated under bending up to 120 degrees . All of the devices showed good transparency (approximately 80% on average). The transparent transistors were further utilized to construct a fully transparent and flexible logic inverter on a plastic substrate and also used to control commercial GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with light intensity modulation of 10(3). Our results suggest that aligned nanotubes have great potential to work as building blocks for future transparent electronics.

  8. A silver-free, reflective substrate electrode for electron extraction in top-illuminated organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Martin S; Hutter, Oliver S; Walker, Marc; Hatton, Ross A

    2015-04-27

    The choice of metals suitable as the reflective substrate electrode for top-illuminated organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is extremely limited. Herein, we report a novel substrate electrode for this class of OPV architecture based on an Al | Cu | AlOx triple-layer structure, which offers a reflectivity comparable to that of Al over the wavelength range 400-900 nm, a work function suitable for efficient electron extraction in OPVs and high stability towards oxidation. In addition to demonstrating the advantage of this composite electrode over Al in model top-illuminated OPVs, we also present the results of a photoelectron spectroscopy study, which show that an oxidised 0.8 nm Al layer deposited by thermal evaporation onto an Al | Cu reflective substrate electrode is sufficient to block oxidation of the underlying Cu by air or during deposition of a ZnO1-x electron-transport layer. This is remarkable given that the self-limiting oxide thickness on Al metal is greater than 2 nm.

  9. Electronic coupling between a FeSe monolayer film and SrTiO3 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. N.; Pickett, W. E.

    2017-04-01

    Several experimental groups have reported superconductivity in single unit cell layers of FeSe on SrTiO3 and a few other substrates, with critical temperature Tc reports ranging up to 100 K, and a variety of theoretical work has been done. Here we examine more closely the interaction of a single FeSe layer with a TiO2 terminated SrTiO3(001) (STO) substrate. Several situations are analyzed: the underlying ideal interface, the effect of z -polarized longitudinal optic [LO ( z ̂ )] phonons in STO, electron doping of the STO substrate, substitution of Se by the bordering chalcogenides S and Te, and doping by adsorption of K on the FeSe surface. These results complement earlier studies of O and Se vacancies. The O py,py surface band of STO persists at the interface, and by sharing holes with the hole pocket of FeSe it plays a part in the behavior around the interface, initially by determining the Fe Fermi level lineup with the STO band gap. The LO (z ̂) mode causes strong band shifts around the interface but the strength of coupling to the Fe bands cannot be obtained with our methods. Adsorption of 25% K (one K per four Fe) fills the small O interface hole pocket and donates the rest of the electrons to the Fe hole pockets, filling them.

  10. Effects of Surface Electron Doping and Substrate on the Superconductivity of Epitaxial FeSe Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W H; Liu, X; Wen, C H P; Peng, R; Tan, S Y; Xie, B P; Zhang, T; Feng, D L

    2016-03-09

    Superconductivity in FeSe is greatly enhanced in films grown on SrTiO3 substrates, although the mechanism behind remains unclear. Recently, surface potassium (K) doping has also proven able to enhance the superconductivity of FeSe. Here, by using scanning tunneling microscopy, we compare the K doping dependence of the superconductivity in FeSe films grown on two substrates: SrTiO3 (001) and graphitized SiC (0001). For thick films (20 unit cells (UC)), the optimized superconducting (SC) gaps are of similar size (∼9 meV) regardless of the substrate. However, when the thickness is reduced to a few UC, the optimized SC gap is increased up to ∼15 meV for films on SrTiO3, whereas it remains unchanged for films on SiC. This clearly indicates that the FeSe/SrTiO3 interface can further enhance the superconductivity, beyond merely doping electrons. Intriguingly, we found that this interface enhancement decays exponentially as the thickness increases, with a decay length of 2.4 UC, which is much shorter than the length scale for relaxation of the lattice strain, pointing to interfacial electron-phonon coupling as the likely origin.

  11. Active vacuum brazing of CNT films to metal substrates for superior electron field emission performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtin, Rémi; Sanchez-Valencia, Juan Ramon; Shorubalko, Ivan; Furrer, Roman; Hack, Erwin; Elsener, Hansrudolf; Gröning, Oliver; Greenwood, Paul; Rupesinghe, Nalin; Teo, Kenneth; Leinenbach, Christian; Gröning, Pierangelo

    2015-02-01

    The joining of macroscopic films of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to titanium substrates is demonstrated by active vacuum brazing at 820 °C with a Ag-Cu-Ti alloy and at 880 °C with a Cu-Sn-Ti-Zr alloy. The brazing methodology was elaborated in order to enable the production of highly electrically and thermally conductive CNT/metal substrate contacts. The interfacial electrical resistances of the joints were measured to be as low as 0.35 Ω. The improved interfacial transport properties in the brazed films lead to superior electron field-emission properties when compared to the as-grown films. An emission current of 150 μA was drawn from the brazed nanotubes at an applied electric field of 0.6 V μm-1. The improvement in electron field-emission is mainly attributed to the reduction of the contact resistance between the nanotubes and the substrate. The joints have high re-melting temperatures up to the solidus temperatures of the alloys; far greater than what is achievable with standard solders, thus expanding the application potential of CNT films to high-current and high-power applications where substantial frictional or resistive heating is expected.

  12. Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers on Silicon-on-Insulator Substrates for Terahertz Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalare, Anders; Stern, Jeffrey; Bumble, Bruce; Maiwald, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A terahertz Hot-Electron Bolometer (HEB) mixer design using device substrates based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology is described. This substrate technology allows very thin chips (6 pm) with almost arbitrary shape to be manufactured, so that they can be tightly fitted into a waveguide structure and operated at very high frequencies with only low risk for power leakages and resonance modes. The NbTiN-based bolometers are contacted by gold beam-leads, while other beamleads are used to hold the chip in place in the waveguide test fixture. The initial tests yielded an equivalent receiver noise temperature of 3460 K double-sideband at a local oscillator frequency of 1.462 THz and an intermediate frequency of 1.4 GHz.

  13. Building a house on shifting sand: methodological considerations when evaluating the implementation and adoption of national electronic health record systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takian Amirhossein

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A commitment to Electronic Health Record (EHR systems now constitutes a core part of many governments’ healthcare reform strategies. The resulting politically-initiated large-scale or national EHR endeavors are challenging because of their ambitious agendas of change, the scale of resources needed to make them work, the (relatively short timescales set, and the large number of stakeholders involved, all of whom pursue somewhat different interests. These initiatives need to be evaluated to establish if they improve care and represent value for money. Methods Critical reflections on these complexities in the light of experience of undertaking the first national, longitudinal, and sociotechnical evaluation of the implementation and adoption of England’s National Health Service’s Care Records Service (NHS CRS. Results/discussion We advance two key arguments. First, national programs for EHR implementations are likely to take place in the shifting sands of evolving sociopolitical and sociotechnical and contexts, which are likely to shape them in significant ways. This poses challenges to conventional evaluation approaches which draw on a model of baseline operations → intervention → changed operations (outcome. Second, evaluation of such programs must account for this changing context by adapting to it. This requires careful and creative choice of ontological, epistemological and methodological assumptions. Summary New and significant challenges are faced in evaluating national EHR implementation endeavors. Based on experiences from this national evaluation of the implementation and adoption of the NHS CRS in England, we argue for an approach to these evaluations which moves away from seeing EHR systems as Information and Communication Technologies (ICT projects requiring an essentially outcome-centred assessment towards a more interpretive approach that reflects the situated and evolving nature of EHR seen within

  14. Suppressed superconductivity in substrate-supported β 12 borophene by tensile strain and electron doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Cai; Sun, Jia-Tao; Liu, Hang; Fu, Hui-Xia; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Meng, Sheng

    2017-06-01

    Planar borophene, the truly 2D monolayer boron, has been independently successfully grown on Ag(1 1 1) by two groups (2016 Nat. Chem. 8 563 and 2015 Science 350 1513), which has received widespreading attentions. The superconducting property has not been unambiguously observed, which is unexpected because light element boron should have strong electron-phonon coupling. To resolve this puzzle, we show that the superconducting transition temperature T c of β 12 borophene is effectively suppressed by the substrate-induced tensile strain and electron doping via first principles calculations. The biaxial tensile strain of 2% induced by Ag(1 1 1) significantly reduces T c from 14 K to 2.95 K electron doping of 0.1 e- per boron atom further shrinks T c to 0.09 K. We also predict that the superconducting transition temperature in β 12 can be enhanced to 22.82 K with proper compressive strain (-1%) and 18.97 K with hole doping (0.1 h+ per boron). Further studies indicate that the variation of T c is closely related to the density of states of σ bands near the Fermi surface. Our results help to explain the challenges to experimentally probe superconductivity in substrate-supported borophene.

  15. The substrate effect in electron energy-loss spectroscopy of localized surface plasmons in gold and silver nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Christensen, Thomas; Beleggia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    , as in optical measurements, the substrate material can modify the acquired signal. Here, we have investigated how the EELS signal recorded from supported silver and gold spheroidal nanoparticles at different electron beam impact parameter positions is affected by the choice of a dielectric substrate material...

  16. A comparison of different silver inks for printing of conductive tracks on paper substrates for rapid prototyping of electronic circuits

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bezuidenhout, PH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available of the selection process of different conductive inks for printing onto paper substrates. These results can be utilized in the development process for fully printable rapidly prototyped electronic systems, which can range from environmental sensing solutions...

  17. Lithographically defined few-electron silicon quantum dots based on a silicon-on-insulator substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horibe, Kosuke; Oda, Shunri [Department of Physical Electronics and Quantum Nanoelectronics Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Kodera, Tetsuo, E-mail: kodera.t.ac@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Electronics and Quantum Nanoelectronics Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Institute for Nano Quantum Information Electronics, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Silicon quantum dot (QD) devices with a proximal single-electron transistor (SET) charge sensor have been fabricated in a metal-oxide-semiconductor structure based on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. The charge state of the QDs was clearly read out using the charge sensor via the SET current. The lithographically defined small QDs enabled clear observation of the few-electron regime of a single QD and a double QD by charge sensing. Tunnel coupling on tunnel barriers of the QDs can be controlled by tuning the top-gate voltages, which can be used for manipulation of the spin quantum bit via exchange interaction between tunnel-coupled QDs. The lithographically defined silicon QD device reported here is technologically simple and does not require electrical gates to create QD confinement potentials, which is advantageous for the integration of complicated constructs such as multiple QD structures with SET charge sensors for the purpose of spin-based quantum computing.

  18. Focus Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy Characterization of Osteoclastic Resorption of Calcium Phosphate Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Escudero, Anna; Espanol, Montserrat; Montufar, Edgar B; Di Pompo, Gemma; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Baldini, Nicola; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2017-02-01

    This article presents the application of dual focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) imaging for preclinical testing of calcium phosphates with osteoclast precursor cells and how this high-resolution imaging technique is able to reveal microstructural changes at a level of detail previously not possible. Calcium phosphate substrates, having similar compositions but different microstructures, were produced using low- and high-temperature processes (biomimetic calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite [CDHA] and stoichiometric sintered hydroxyapatite, respectively). Human osteoclast precursor cells were cultured for 21 days before evaluating their resorptive potential on varying microstructural features. Alternative to classical morphological evaluation of osteoclasts (OC), FIB-SEM was used to observe the subjacent microstructure by transversally sectioning cells and observing both the cells and the substrates. Resorption pits, indicating OC activity, were visible on the smoother surface of high-temperature sintered hydroxyapatite. FIB-SEM analysis revealed signs of acidic degradation on the grain surface under the cells, as well as intergranular dissolution. No resorption pits were evident on the surface of the rough CDHA substrates. However, whereas no degradation was detected by FIB sections in the material underlying some of the cells, early stages of OC-mediated acidic degradation were observed under cells with more spread morphology. Collectively, these results highlight the potential of FIB to evaluate the resorptive activity of OC, even in rough, irregular, or coarse surfaces where degradation pits are otherwise difficult to visualize.

  19. Electronic, structural, and substrate effect properties of single-layer covalent organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Liangbo; Zhu, Pan [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Meunier, Vincent, E-mail: meuniv@rpi.edu [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Recently synthesized two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (COFs) exhibit high surface area, large pore size, and unique structural architectures, making them promising materials for various energy applications. Here, a total of nine COFs structures, including two deposited on a hexagonal boron nitride substrate, are investigated using density functional theory, quasi-particle many-body theory within the GW approximation, and an image charge model. The structures considered belong to two major families (thiophene-based COF-n (T-COF-n) and tetrakis (4-aminophenyl) porphyrin-x (TAPP-x)) differing from the presence of B—O or C=N linkers. While T-COF-n structures are shown to constitute planar networks, TAPP-x systems can display non-negligible corrugation due to the out-of-plane rotation of phenyl rings. We find that the electronic properties do not differ significantly when altering the chain molecules within each family. Many-body effects are shown to lead to large band-gap increase while the presence of the substrate yields appreciable reductions of the gaps, due to substrate polarization effects.

  20. Chemical Vapour Deposition of Graphene with Re-useable Pt and Cu substrates for Flexible Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamat, Shumaila; Sonusen, Selda; Celik, Umit; Uysalli, Yigit; Oral, Ahmet

    2015-03-01

    Graphene has gained the attention of scientific world due to its outstanding physical properties. The future demand of flexible electronics such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, photo-detectors and touch screen technology requires more exploration of graphene properties on flexible substrates. The most interesting application of graphene is in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) where efforts are in progress to replace brittle indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode with a flexible graphene electrode because ITO raw materials are becoming increasingly expensive, and its brittle nature makes it unsuitable for flexible devices. In this work, we grow graphene on Pt and Cu substrates using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and transferred it to a polymer material (PVA) using lamination technique. We used hydrogen bubbling method for separating graphene from Pt and Cu catalyst to reuse the substrates many times. After successful transfer of graphene on polymer samples, we checked the resistivity values of the graphene sheet which varies with growth conditions. Furthermore, Raman, atomic force microscopy (AFM), I-V and Force-displacement measurements will be presented for these samples.

  1. Role of substrate induced electron-phonon interactions in biased graphitic bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, A. R.; Hague, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Bilayers of graphitic materials have potential applications in field effect transistors (FETs). A potential difference applied between certain ionic bilayers made from insulating graphitic materials such as BN, ZnO and AlN could reduce gap sizes, turning them into useful semiconductors. On the other hand, opening of a small semiconducting gap occurs in graphene bilayers under applied field. The aim here is to investigate to what extent substrate induced electron-phonon interactions (EPIs) modify this gap change. We examine EPIs in several lattice configurations of graphitic bilayers, using a perturbative approach. The typical effect of EPIs on the ionic bilayers is an undesirable gap widening. The size of this gap change varies considerably with lattice structure and the magnitude of the bias. When bias is larger than the non-interacting gap size, EPIs have the smallest effect on the bandgap, especially in configurations with A{{A}\\prime} and AB structures. Thus careful selection of substrate, lattice configuration and bias strength to minimise the effects of EPIs could be important for optimising the properties of electronic devices. We use parameters related to BN in this article. In practice, the results presented here are broadly applicable to other graphitic bilayers, and are likely to be qualitatively similar in metal dichalcogenide bilayers such as MoS2, which are already of high interest for their use in FETs.

  2. Catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of substrates with water as an oxygen source using manganese porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Mizuno, Takuya; Ojiri, Tetsuya

    2012-12-03

    Manganese(V)-oxo-porphyrins are produced by the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins with tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(III) ([Ru(bpy)(3)](3+); 2 equiv) in acetonitrile (CH(3)CN) containing water. The rate constants of the electron-transfer oxidation of manganese-porphyrins have been determined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer. Addition of [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to a solution of olefins (styrene and cyclohexene) in CH(3)CN containing water in the presence of a catalytic amount of manganese-porphyrins afforded epoxides, diols, and aldehydes efficiently. Epoxides were converted to the corresponding diols by hydrolysis, and were further oxidized to the corresponding aldehydes. The turnover numbers vary significantly depending on the type of manganese-porphyrin used owing to the difference in their oxidation potentials and the steric bulkiness of the ligand. Ethylbenzene was also oxidized to 1-phenylethanol using manganese-porphyrins as electron-transfer catalysts. The oxygen source in the substrate oxygenation was confirmed to be water by using (18)O-labeled water. The rate constant of the reaction of the manganese(V)-oxo species with cyclohexene was determined directly under single-turnover conditions by monitoring the increase in absorbance attributable to the manganese(III) species produced in the reaction with cyclohexene. It has been shown that the rate-determining step in the catalytic electron-transfer oxygenation of cyclohexene is electron transfer from [Ru(bpy)(3)](3+) to the manganese-porphyrins.

  3. Using copper substrate to enhance electron field emission properties of carbon nanotube/diamond double-layered structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lezhi; Sujith Kumar, C. S.; Li, Yuan-shi; Niakan, Hamid; Zhang, Chunzi; Hirose, Akira; Aravind, Suresh; Yang, Qiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT)/diamond double-layered structure was synthesized on copper (Cu) substrate by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. The structure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the diamond layer has good adhesion to the Cu substrate and the CNTs have direct contact with the diamond layer. Field electron emission measurement shows that the double-layered structure on copper has very good emission stability and a much lower turn-on field than that on silicon (Si).

  4. Nanoscale “Quantum” Islands on Metal Substrates: Microscopy Studies and Electronic Structure Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Jiang Liu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Confinement of electrons can occur in metal islands or in continuous films grown heteroepitaxially upon a substrate of a different metal or on a metallic alloy. Associated quantum size effects (QSE can produce a significant height-dependence of the surface free energy for nanoscale thicknesses of up to 10–20 layers. This may suffice to induce height selection during film growth. Scanning STM analysis has revealed remarkable flat-topped or mesa-like island and film morphologies in various systems. We discuss in detail observations of QSE and associated film growth behavior for Pb/Cu(111, Ag/Fe(100, and Cu/fcc-Fe/Cu(100 [A/B or A/B/A], and for Ag/NiAl(110 with brief comments offered for Fe/Cu3Au(001 [A/BC binary alloys]. We also describe these issues for Ag/5-fold i-Al-Pd-Mn and Bi/5-fold i-Al-Cu-Fe [A/BCD ternary icosohedral quasicrystals]. Electronic structure theory analysis, either at the level of simple free electron gas models or more sophisticated Density Functional Theory calculations, can provide insight into the QSE-mediated thermodynamic driving force underlying height selection.

  5. Tensile characteristics of metal nanoparticle films on flexible polymer substrates for printed electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyeok; Won, Sejeong; Sim, Gi-Dong; Park, Inkyu; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2013-03-01

    Metal nanoparticle solutions are widely used for the fabrication of printed electronic devices. The mechanical properties of the solution-processed metal nanoparticle thin films are very important for the robust and reliable operation of printed electronic devices. In this paper, we report the tensile characteristics of silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin films on flexible polymer substrates by observing the microstructures and measuring the electrical resistance under tensile strain. The effects of the annealing temperatures and periods of Ag NP thin films on their failure strains are explained with a microstructural investigation. The maximum failure strain for Ag NP thin film was 6.6% after initial sintering at 150 °C for 30 min. Thermal annealing at higher temperatures for longer periods resulted in a reduction of the maximum failure strain, presumably due to higher porosity and larger pore size. We also found that solution-processed Ag NP thin films have lower failure strains than those of electron beam evaporated Ag thin films due to their highly porous film morphologies.

  6. Tensile characteristics of metal nanoparticle films on flexible polymer substrates for printed electronics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyeok; Won, Sejeong; Sim, Gi-Dong; Park, Inkyu; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2013-03-01

    Metal nanoparticle solutions are widely used for the fabrication of printed electronic devices. The mechanical properties of the solution-processed metal nanoparticle thin films are very important for the robust and reliable operation of printed electronic devices. In this paper, we report the tensile characteristics of silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) thin films on flexible polymer substrates by observing the microstructures and measuring the electrical resistance under tensile strain. The effects of the annealing temperatures and periods of Ag NP thin films on their failure strains are explained with a microstructural investigation. The maximum failure strain for Ag NP thin film was 6.6% after initial sintering at 150 °C for 30 min. Thermal annealing at higher temperatures for longer periods resulted in a reduction of the maximum failure strain, presumably due to higher porosity and larger pore size. We also found that solution-processed Ag NP thin films have lower failure strains than those of electron beam evaporated Ag thin films due to their highly porous film morphologies.

  7. Small Particle Impact Damage on Different Glass Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, R.; Guven, I.; Gray, P.

    2017-01-01

    Impact experiments using sand particles were performed on four distinct glass substrates. The sand particles were characterized using the X-Ray micro-CT technique; 3-D reconstruction of the particles was followed by further size and shape analyses. High-speed video footage from impact tests was used to calculate the incoming and rebound velocities of the individual sand impact events, as well as particle volume. Further, video analysis was used in conjunction with optical and scanning electron microscopy to relate the incoming velocity and shape of the particles to subsequent fractures, including both radial and lateral cracks. Analysis was performed using peridynamic simulations.

  8. Deformation of nanotubes in peeling contact with flat substrate: An in situ electron microscopy nanomechanical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoming; Zheng, Meng; Wei, Qing; Signetti, Stefano; Pugno, Nicola M.; Ke, Changhong

    2016-04-01

    Peeling of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures from flat substrates is an essential technique in studying their adhesion properties. The mechanical deformation of the nanostructure in the peeling experiment is critical to the understanding of the peeling process and the interpretation of the peeling measurements, but it is challenging to measure directly and quantitatively at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate the peeling deformation of a bundled carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber by using an in situ scanning electron microscopy nanomechanical peeling technique. A pre-calibrated atomic force microscopy cantilever is utilized as the peeling force sensor, and its back surface acts as the peeling contact substrate. The nanomechanical peeling scheme enables a quantitative characterization of the deformational behaviors of the CNT fiber in both positive and negative peeling configurations with sub-10 nm spatial and sub-nN force resolutions. Nonlinear continuum mechanics models and finite element simulations are employed to interpret the peeling measurements. The measurements and analysis reveal that the structural imperfections in the CNT fiber may have a substantial influence on its peeling deformations and the corresponding peeling forces. The research findings reported in this work are useful to the study of mechanical and adhesion properties of 1D nanostructures by using nanomechanical peeling techniques.

  9. Influence of electron beam irradiation on growth of Phytophthora cinnamomi and its control in substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    MigdaŁ, Wojciech; Orlikowski, Leszek B.; Ptaszek, Magdalena; Gryczka, Urszula

    2012-08-01

    Very extensive production procedure, especially in plants growing under covering, require methods, which would allow quick elimination or substantial reduction of populations of specific pathogens without affecting the growth and development of the cultivated plants. Among soil-borne pathogens, the Phytophthora species are especially dangerous for horticultural plants. In this study, irradiation with electron beam was applied to control Phytophthora cinnamomi. The influence of irradiation dose on the reduction of in vitro growth and the population density of the pathogen in treated peat and its mixture with composted pine bark (1:1), as well as the health of Chamaecyparis lawsoniana and Lavandula angustifolia plants were evaluated. Application of irradiation at a dose of 1.5 kGy completely inhibited the in vitro development of P. cinnamomi. This irradiation effect was connected with the disintegration of the hyphae and spores of the species. Irradiation of peat and its mixture with composted pine bark with 10 kGy resulted in the inhibition of stem base rot development in Ch. lawsoniana. Symptoms of the disease were not observed when the substrates were treated with 15 kGy. In the case of L. angustifolia, stem root rot was not observed on cuttings transplanted to infected peat irradiated at a dose of 10 kGy. Irradiation of the horticultural substrates did not affect plant growth.

  10. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-12-10

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements.

  11. Monopole quasi-Yagi antenna on polyimide substrate for flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianying; Dai, Fang; Zhang, Yichen; Yu, Xin; Cai, Lulu; Zuo, Panpan; Wang, Mengjun

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a flexible monopole quasi-Yagi antenna printed on 50um thick polyimide substrate is designed for integration within modern flexible electronic devices. The antenna has a wide working band (5.22-6.6 GHz) that covers WLAN 5.8GHz (5.725-5.825GHz). Parameters changes of proposed modeling are analyzed to achieve desired impedance matching and resonant frequency. The reflection coefficient, gain and radiation efficiency are indicated to be still robust when the proposed antenna is under various bending directions. It is worth noting that radiation patterns have an effect when antenna is bent in the y-axis direction. The antenna prototype is fabricated and tested where the simulated results agree with measured ones.

  12. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahir, M. [PSE Division, KAUST, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100 (Pakistan); Sabeeh, K. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Shaukat, A. [Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100 (Pakistan); Schwingenschlögl, U., E-mail: Udo.Schwingenschlogl@kaust.edu.sa [PSE Division, KAUST, Thuwal 23955-6900 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-12-14

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements.

  13. Method of producing an electronic unit having a polydimethylsiloxane substrate and circuit lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, James Courtney (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Hamilton, Julie K. (Tracy, CA); Tovar, Armando R. (San Antonio, TX)

    2012-06-19

    A system of metalization in an integrated polymer microsystem. A flexible polymer substrate is provided and conductive ink is applied to the substrate. In one embodiment the flexible polymer substrate is silicone. In another embodiment the flexible polymer substrate comprises poly(dimethylsiloxane).

  14. Bond selectivity in electron-induced reaction due to directed recoil on an anisotropic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggara, Kelvin; Huang, Kai; Leung, Lydie; Chatterjee, Avisek; Cheng, Fang; Polanyi, John C.

    2016-12-01

    Bond-selective reaction is central to heterogeneous catalysis. In heterogeneous catalysis, selectivity is found to depend on the chemical nature and morphology of the substrate. Here, however, we show a high degree of bond selectivity dependent only on adsorbate bond alignment. The system studied is the electron-induced reaction of meta-diiodobenzene physisorbed on Cu(110). Of the adsorbate's C-I bonds, C-I aligned `Along' the copper row dissociates in 99.3% of the cases giving surface reaction, whereas C-I bond aligned `Across' the rows dissociates in only 0.7% of the cases. A two-electronic-state molecular dynamics model attributes reaction to an initial transition to a repulsive state of an Along C-I, followed by directed recoil of C towards a Cu atom of the same row, forming C-Cu. A similar impulse on an Across C-I gives directed C that, moving across rows, does not encounter a Cu atom and hence exhibits markedly less reaction.

  15. Nano-enabled sensors, electronics and energy source on polymer, paper and thread substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafalu, Pooria

    Over the past decades, design and development of portable devices for monitoring of biomarkers especially for at risk patients is receiving considerable attention. These devices are either single use diagnostic platforms, wearable on body or on fabric, or they are implanted close to the tissue and organ that it monitors and cures. Sensors, energy sources, and data acquisition devices are the main components of a such monitoring platform. Sensors collect the information using bio-recognition tools such as enzymes and antibodies. Then, the transducers (electrodes, fluorophore, etc) convert it to the appropriate format, for instance electrical and optical signals. After that, data acquisition system amplifies and digitizes the signal and transfers the data to the recording instruments for further processing. Moreover, energy sources are necessary for powering the sensors and electronics. In wearable and implantable applications, these devices need to be flexible, light weight and biocompatible, and their performance should be similar to their rigid counterparts. In this dissertation we address these requirement for wearable and implantable devices. We showed integrated sensors, electronics, and energy sources on flexible polymers, paper, and thread. These devices provide many advantages for monitoring of the physiological condition of a patient and treatment accordingly. Real-time capability of the platform was enabled using wireless telemetry. One of the major innovations of this dissertation is the use of thread as a substrate for making medical diagnostic devices. While conventional substrates (glass, silicon, polyimide, PDMS etc) hold great promise for making wearable and implantable devices, their overall structure and form has remained essentially two dimensional, limiting their function to tissue surfaces such as skin. However, the ability to integrate functional components such as sensors, actuators, and electronics in a way that they penetrate multiple layers

  16. External morphology of sensory structures of fourth instar larvae of neotropical species of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae under scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessoa Felipe Arley Costa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, some morphological structures of antennae, maxillary palps and caudal setae of fourth instar larvae of laboratory-reared phlebotomine sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis, L. migonei, L. evandroi, L. lenti, L. sericea, L. whitmani and L. intermedia of the State of Ceará, Brazil, were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The antennal structures exhibited considerable variation in the morphology and position. A prominent digitiform distal segment has been observed only on the antenna of species of the subgenus Nyssomyia. The taxonomic relevance of this and other antennal structure is discussed. The papiliform structures found in the maxillae and the porous structures of the caudal setae of all species examined may have chemosensory function. Further studies with transmission electron microscopy are needed to better understand the physiological function of these external structures.

  17. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M.; Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D.; Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P.; Zergioti, I.

    2016-06-01

    To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm2. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications.

  18. Laser Direct Write micro-fabrication of large area electronics on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharatos, F.; Makrygianni, M. [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece); Geremia, R.; Biver, E.; Karnakis, D. [Oxford Lasers Ltd, Unit 8 Moorbrook Park, Oxfordshire OX11 7HP (United Kingdom); Leyder, S.; Puerto, D.; Delaporte, P. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 – UMR 7341, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Zergioti, I., E-mail: zergioti@central.ntua.gr [National Technical University of Athens, Physics Department, Zografou Campus, 15780 (Greece)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Laser Direct Writing of metallic patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm. • Selective Laser Ablation of 50 nm thick metal films on flexible substrates. • Selective Laser sintering resulting in an electrical resistivity of 9 μΩ cm. • Laser fabrication of interdigitated electrodes for sensor applications. - Abstract: To date, Laser Direct Write (LDW) techniques, such as Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT), selective laser ablation and selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticle (NP) ink layers are receiving growing attention for the printing of uniform and well-defined conductive patterns with resolution down to 10 μm. For flexible substrates in particular, selective laser sintering of such NP patterns has been widely applied, as a low temperature and high resolution process compatible with large area electronics. In this work, LDW of silver NP inks has been carried out on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET), polyethylene-naphthalate (PEN) and polyimide (PI) substrates to achieve low electrical resistivity electrodes. In more detail, high speed short pulsed (picosecond and nanosecond) lasers with repetition rates up to 1 MHz were used to print (LIFT) metal NP inks. We thus achieved uniform and continuous patterns with a minimum feature size of 1 μm and a total footprint larger than 1 cm{sup 2}. Next, the printed patterns were laser sintered with ns pulses at 532 nm over a wide laser fluence window, resulting in an electrical resistivity of 10 μΩ cm. We carried out spatial beam shaping experiments to achieve a top-hat laser intensity profile and employed selective laser ablation of thin films (thickness on the order of 100 nm) to produce silver micro-electrodes with a resolution on the order of 10 μm and a low line edge roughness. Laser sintering was combined with laser ablation to constitute a fully autonomous micro-patterning technique of metallic micro-features, with a 10 μm resolution and geometrical characteristics tuned for

  19. Investigation of the electron-surface phonon interaction effects in graphene on a substrate made of polar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdouani, M.

    2017-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron- surface phonon interaction in mono-layer graphene (1LG) on polar substrates such as SiO2,HfO2, SiC and hexagonal BN . Thus we have used the eigen energies derived from the tight-binding Hamiltonian in mono-layer graphene. Our results indicate that the electron-surface phonon interaction depends on the polar substrate. Such polar substrates allow for the existence of polar optical phonons localized near the graphene-substrate interface which could be an important scattering source for graphene carriers through the long-range Fröhlich coupling. Likewise, we have investigated the effect of various dielectrics on the SO phonon-limited mobility, the SO phonon-limited resistivity, the SO phonon-limited conductivity and the scattering rate in single layer graphene by considering the effects of the SO optical phonon scattering arising from the polar substrates and by varying the temperature, the charge carrier density and the physical separation between graphene and interface of dielectric substrate.

  20. All-printed carbon nanotube finFETs on plastic substrates for high-performance flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingsheng; Guo, Chun Xian; Chan-Park, Mary B; Li, Chang Ming

    2012-01-17

    The performance of all-printed flexible electronics is still much lower than silicon devices and significantly limits their commercially viable production. All-printed flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) fin field-effect transistors (FETs) with dielectric-wrapped CNT network are demonstrated with remarkable performance, making it possible to mass-produce high-performance, all-printed flexible electronics on large-area substrates. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Electronic confinement in graphene quantum rings due to substrate-induced mass radial kink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, L. J. P.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Pereira, J. M., Jr.; Farias, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate localized states of a quantum ring confinement in monolayer graphene defined by a circular mass-related potential, which can be induced e.g. by interaction with a substrate that breaks the sublattice symmetry, where a circular line defect provides a change in the sign of the induced mass term along the radial direction. Electronic properties are calculated analytically within the Dirac-Weyl approximation in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical results are also compared with those obtained by the tight-binding approach. Regardless of its sign, a mass term Δ is expected to open a gap for low-energy electrons in Dirac cones in graphene. Both approaches confirm the existence of confined states with energies inside the gap, even when the width of the kink modelling the mass sign transition is infinitely thin. We observe that such energy levels are inversely proportional to the defect line ring radius and independent on the mass kink height. An external magnetic field is demonstrated to lift the valley degeneracy in this system and easily tune the valley index of the ground state in this system, which can be polarized on either K or {{K}\\prime} valleys of the Brillouin zone, depending on the magnetic field intensity. Geometrical changes in the defect line shape are considered by assuming an elliptic line with different eccentricities. Our results suggest that any defect line that is closed in a loop, with any geometry, would produce the same qualitative results as the circular ones, as a manifestation of the topologically protected nature of the ring-like states investigated here.

  2. Formation of the surface alloys by high-intensity pulsed electron beam irradiation of the coating/substrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu F.; Petrikova, E. A.; Teresov, A. D.; Krysina, O. V.; Rygina, M. E.

    2015-04-01

    The results of the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of aluminum A7 subjected to alloying by the intense pulsed electron beam melting of the film / substrate system. Fold increase in strength and tribological properties of the modified surface layer due to the formation of submicro - nanoscale multiphase structure have been revealed.

  3. Dark-field image contrast in transmission scanning electron microscopy: Effects of substrate thickness and detector collection angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woehl, Taylor; Keller, Robert

    2016-12-01

    An annular dark field (ADF) detector was placed beneath a specimen in a field emission scanning electron microscope operated at 30kV to calibrate detector response to incident beam current, and to create transmission images of gold nanoparticles on silicon nitride (SiN) substrates of various thicknesses. Based on the linear response of the ADF detector diodes to beam current, we developed a method that allowed for direct determination of the percentage of that beam current forward scattered to the ADF detector from the sample, i.e. the transmitted electron (TE) yield. Collection angles for the ADF detector region were defined using a masking aperture above the detector and were systematically varied by changing the sample to detector distance. We found the contrast of the nanoparticles, relative to the SiN substrate, decreased monotonically with decreasing inner exclusion angle and increasing substrate thickness. We also performed Monte Carlo electron scattering simulations, which showed quantitative agreement with experimental contrast associated with the nanoparticles. Together, the experiments and Monte Carlo simulations revealed that the decrease in contrast with decreasing inner exclusion angle was due to a rapid increase in the TE yield of the low atomic number substrate. Nanoparticles imaged at low inner exclusion angles (50nm) showed low image contrast in their centers surrounded by a bright high-contrast halo on their edges. This complex image contrast was predicted by Monte Carlo simulations, which we interpreted in terms of mixing of the nominally bright field (BF) and ADF electron signals. Our systematic investigation of inner exclusion angle and substrate thickness effects on ADF t-SEM imaging provides fundamental understanding of the contrast mechanisms for image formation, which in turn suggest practical limitations and optimal imaging conditions for different substrate thicknesses.

  4. Atomized spraying of liquid metal droplets on desired substrate surfaces as a generalized way for ubiquitous printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Gao, Yunxia; Liu, Jing

    2014-09-01

    A direct electronics printing technique through atomized spraying for patterning room-temperature liquid metal droplets on desired substrate surfaces is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for the first time. This method is highly flexible and capable of fabricating electronic components on various target objects, with either flat or rough surfaces, made of different materials, or having different orientations from 2D to 3D geometrical configurations. With a pre-designed mask, the liquid metal ink can be directly deposited on the substrate to form various specific patterns which lead to the rapid prototyping of electronic devices. Further, extended printing strategies were also suggested to illustrate the adaptability of the method. For example, it can be used for making transparent conductive film with an optical transmittance of 47 % and a sheet resistance of 5.167Ω/□ due to natural porous structure. Different from the former direct writing technology where large surface tension and poor adhesion between the liquid metal and the substrate often impede the flexible printing process, the liquid metal here no longer needs to be pre-oxidized to guarantee its applicability on target substrates. One critical mechanism was that the atomized liquid metal microdroplets can be quickly oxidized in the air due to its large specific surface area, resulting in a significant increase of the adhesion capacity and thus firm deposition of the ink to the substrate. This study paved a generalized way for pervasively and directly printing electronics on various substrates which are expected to be significant in a wide spectrum of electrical engineering areas.

  5. Strain at a semiconductor nanowire-substrate interface studied using geometric phase analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction and nanobeam diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been studied using electron microscopy since the early days of nanowire growth, e.g. [1]. A common approach for analysing nanowires using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) involves removing them from their substrate and subsequently transferring them onto carbon...... films. This sample preparation method is fast and usually results in little structural change in the nanowires [2]. However, it does not provide information about the interface between the nanowires and the substrate, who’s physical and electrical properties are important for many modern applications...... of nanowires. In particular, strain and crystallographic defects can have a major influence on the electronic structure of the material. In improved method for the characterization of such interfaces would be valuable for optimizing and understanding the transport properties of devices based on nanowires. Here...

  6. The Role of Interfacial Electronic Properties on Phonon Transport in Two-Dimensional MoS2 on Metal Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhequan; Chen, Liang; Yoon, Mina; Kumar, Satish

    2016-12-07

    We investigate the role of interfacial electronic properties on the phonon transport in two-dimensional MoS2 adsorbed on metal substrates (Au and Sc) using first-principles density functional theory and the atomistic Green's function method. Our study reveals that the different degree of orbital hybridization and electronic charge distribution between MoS2 and metal substrates play a significant role in determining the overall phonon-phonon coupling and phonon transmission. The charge transfer caused by the adsorption of MoS2 on Sc substrate can significantly weaken the Mo-S bond strength and change the phonon properties of MoS2, which result in a significant change in thermal boundary conductance (TBC) from one lattice-stacking configuration to another for same metallic substrate. In a lattice-stacking configuration of MoS2/Sc, weakening of the Mo-S bond strength due to charge redistribution results in decrease in the force constant between Mo and S atoms and substantial redistribution of phonon density of states to low-frequency region which affects overall phonon transmission leading to 60% decrease in TBC compared to another configuration of MoS2/Sc. Strong chemical coupling between MoS2 and the Sc substrate leads to a significantly (∼19 times) higher TBC than that of the weakly bound MoS2/Au system. Our findings demonstrate the inherent connection among the interfacial electronic structure, the phonon distribution, and TBC, which helps us understand the mechanism of phonon transport at the MoS2/metal interfaces. The results provide insights for the future design of MoS2-based electronics and a way of enhancing heat dissipation at the interfaces of MoS2-based nanoelectronic devices.

  7. A method to restrain the charging effect on an insulating substrate in high energy electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingyan, Yu; Shirui, Zhao; Yupeng, Jing; Yunbo, Shi; Baoqin, Chen

    2014-12-01

    Pattern distortions caused by the charging effect should be reduced while using the electron beam lithography process on an insulating substrate. We have developed a novel process by using the SX AR-PC 5000/90.1 solution as a spin-coated conductive layer, to help to fabricate nanoscale patterns of poly-methyl-methacrylate polymer resist on glass for phased array device application. This method can restrain the influence of the charging effect on the insulating substrate effectively. Experimental results show that the novel process can solve the problems of the distortion of resist patterns and electron beam main field stitching error, thus ensuring the accuracy of the stitching and overlay of the electron beam lithography system. The main characteristic of the novel process is that it is compatible to the multi-layer semiconductor process inside a clean room, and is a green process, quite simple, fast, and low cost. It can also provide a broad scope in the device development on insulating the substrate, such as high density biochips, flexible electronics and liquid crystal display screens.

  8. Measurement of electron transfer through cytochrome P450 protein on nanopillars and the effect of bound substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jett, John E; Lederman, David; Wollenberg, Lance A; Li, Debin; Flora, Darcy R; Bostick, Christopher D; Tracy, Timothy S; Gannett, Peter M

    2013-03-13

    Electron transfer in cytochrome P450 enzymes is a fundamental process for activity. It is difficult to measure electron transfer in these enzymes because under the conditions typically used they exist in a variety of states. Using nanotechnology-based techniques, gold conducting nanopillars were constructed in an indexed array. The P450 enzyme CYP2C9 was attached to each of these nanopillars, and conductivity measurements made using conducting probe atomic force microscopy under constant force conditions. The conductivity measurements were made on CYP2C9 alone and with bound substrates, a bound substrate-effector pair, and a bound inhibitor. Fitting of the data with the Poole-Frenkel model indicates a correlation between the barrier height for electron transfer and the ease of CYP2C9-mediated metabolism of the bound substrates, though the spin state of iron is not well correlated. The approach described here should have broad application to the measurement of electron transfer in P450 enzymes and other metalloenzymes.

  9. Solution processable colloidal nanoplates as building blocks for high-performance electronic thin films on flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyang; Chen, Yu; Yin, Anxiang; He, Qiyuan; Huang, Xiaoqing; Xu, Yuxi; Liu, Yuan; Zhong, Xing; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2014-11-12

    Low-temperature solution-processed electronic materials on plastic substrates are of considerable interest for flexible electronics. Solution dispersible inorganic nanostructures (e.g., zero-dimensional (0D) quantum dots or one-dimensional (1D) nanowires) have emerged as interesting ink materials for low-temperature solution processing of electronic thin films on flexible substrates, but usually with limited performance due to the large number of grain boundaries (0D) or incomplete surface coverage (1D). Here, we report two-dimensional (2D) colloidal nanoplates of layered materials as a new ink material for solution assembly of high-performance electronic thin films. The 2D colloidal nanoplates exhibit few dangling bonds and represent an ideal geometry for the assembly of highly uniform continuous thin films with greatly reduced grain boundaries dictated by large-area conformal plane-plane contact with atomically flat/clean interfaces. It can therefore promise efficient charge transport across neighboring nanoplates and throughout the entire thin film to enable unprecedented electronic performance. We show that Bi2Se3 and Bi2Te3 nanoplates can be synthesized with well-controlled thickness (6-15 nm) and lateral dimension (0.5-3 μm) and can be used for the assembly of highly uniform continuous thin films with a full surface coverage and an excellent room temperature carrier mobility >100 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1), approaching that of chemical vapor deposition grown materials. Our study demonstrates a general strategy to using 2D nanoplates as a unique building block for the construction of high-performance electronic thin films on plastic substrates for future flexible electronics and optoelectronics.

  10. High‐Volume Processed, ITO‐Free Superstrates and Substrates for Roll‐to‐Roll Development of Organic Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hösel, Markus; Angmo, Dechan; Søndergaard, Roar R.;

    2014-01-01

    The fabrication of substrates and superstrates prepared by scalable roll-to-roll methods is reviewed. The substrates and superstrates that act as the flexible carrier for the processing of functional organic electronic devices are an essential component, and proposals are made about how the general...... availability of various forms of these materials is needed to accelerate the development of the field of organic electronics. The initial development of the replacement of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) for the flexible carrier materials is described and a description of how roll-to-roll processing development led...... to simplification from an initially complex make-up to higher performing materials through a more simple process is also presented. This process intensification through process simplification is viewed as a central strategy for upscaling, increasing throughput, performance, and cost reduction....

  11. Application of NiMoNb adhesion layer on plasma-treated polyimide substrate for flexible electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, S.-H.; Kim, K.-K.; Jung, H.-Y.; Kim, T.-H.; Jeon, S.-H. [Metal and Material Technology Group, R and D Center, LS Mtron Ltd., Gyeonggi 431-080 (Korea, Republic of); Seol, Jae-Bok, E-mail: zptkfm20@hanmail.net [Max-Planck-Insititut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-05-02

    A thin film, NiMoNb, was introduced as an adhesion layer between the Cu metal and the insulator polyimide substrate in a flexible Cu-clad laminated structure. Using 90° peel test, we evaluated the peel strength of the system as a function of the thickness of the adhesion layer. An increase in the NiMoNb thickness from 7 to 40 nm enhanced the peel strength of the deposited systems. After plasma treatment by the roll-to-roll method, the multilayer structure showed an outstanding peel strength of ∼ 529 N/m, even after thermal annealing at 150 °C for 168 h. We also studied the role of plasma treatment of the polyimide substrate on the adhesion strength and microstructure of a flexible Cu-clad laminated structure by peel strength, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. These experimental observations showed that the plasma-treated polyimide substrate with the deposition of NiMoNb showed the enhanced adhesion of ∼ 656 N/m, because of the change of functional groups, which affected the bonding force and crystallinity of the thin films deposited on polyimide, rather than an increase in the surface roughness. - Highlights: • NiMoNb film on polyimide substrate was employed for higher peel strength. • Plasma-treated substrate enhances the peel strength of multilayer. • Even when annealed at 150 °C, plasma-treated films showed enhanced peel strength.

  12. Radiation Hard and Self Healing Substrate Agnostic Nanocrystalline ZnO Thin Film Electronics (Per5 E)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    of the proposed project is to advance the fundamental understanding of radiation induced changes in the electronic properties of metal-oxide (M-O...T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-16-9 Radiation-Hard and Self-Healing Substrate-Agnostic Nanocrystalline ZnO Thin Film Electronics (Per5-E...From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT

  13. Electron Beam Evaporated TiO2 Layer for High Efficiency Planar Perovskite Solar Cells on Flexible Polyethylene Terephthalate Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Weiming

    2015-09-30

    The TiO2 layer made by electron beam (e-beam) induced evaporation is demonstrated as electron transport layer (ETL) in high efficiency planar junction perovskite solar cells. The temperature of the substrate and the thickness of the TiO2 layer can be easily controlled with this e-beam induced evaporation method, which enables the usage of different types of substrates. Here, Perovskite solar cells based on CH3NH3PbI3-xClx achieve power conversion efficiencies of 14.6% on glass and 13.5% on flexible plastic substrates. The relationship between the TiO2 layer thickness and the perovskite morphology is studied with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Our results indicate that pinholes in thin TiO2 layer lead to pinholes in the perovskite layer. By optimizing the TiO2 thickness, perovskite layers with substantially increased surface coverage and reduced pinhole areas are fabricated, increasing overall device performance.

  14. Intramolecular electron transfer versus substrate oxidation in lactoperoxidase: investigation of radical intermediates by stopped-flow absorption spectrophotometry and (9-285 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J; Singh, Rahul; Boscolo, Barbara; Loewen, Peter C; Ghibaudi, Elena M; Ivancich, Anabella

    2008-09-16

    We have combined the information obtained from rapid-scan electronic absorption spectrophotometry and multifrequency (9-295 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to unequivocally determine the electronic nature of the intermediates in milk lactoperoxidase as a function of pH and to monitor their reactivity with organic substrates selected by their different accessibilities to the heme site. The aim was to address the question of the putative catalytic role of the protein-based radicals. This experimental approach allowed us to discriminate between the protein-based radical intermediates and [Fe(IV)=O] species, as well as to directly detect the oxidation products by EPR. The advantageous resolution of the g anisotropy of the Tyr (*) EPR spectrum at high fields showed that the tyrosine of the [Fe(IV)=O Tyr (*)] intermediate has an electropositive and pH-dependent microenvironment [g(x) value of 2.0077(0) at pH >or= 8.0 and 2.0066(2) at 4.0 substrates) allowed us to distinguish different mechanisms for substrate oxidation. [Fe(IV)=O Por (*+)] is the oxidizing species of benzohydroxamic acid, o-dianisidine, and o-anisidine via a heme-edge reaction and of mitoxantrone via a long-range electron transfer (favored at pH 8) not involving the tyrosyl radical, the formation of which competed with the substrate oxidation at pH 5. In contrast, the very efficient reaction with ABTS at pH 5 is consistent with [Fe(IV)=O Tyr (*)] being the oxidizing species. Accordingly, the identification of the ABTS binding site by X-ray crystallography may be a valuable tool in rational drug design.

  15. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  16. Comparison of quartz sand, anthracite, shale and biological ceramsite for adsorptive removal of phosphorus from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng; Jia, Liyue; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang; Kirumba, George

    2014-02-01

    The choice of substrates with high phosphorus adsorption capacity is vital for sustainable phosphorus removal from waste water in constructed wetlands. In this study, four substrates were used: quartz sand, anthracite, shale and biological ceramsite. These substrate samples were characterized by Xray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy studies for their mineral components (chemical components) and surface characteristics. The dynamic experimental results revealed the following ranking order for total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency: anthracite > biological ceramsite > shale > quartz sand. The adsorptive removal capacities for TP using anthracite, biological ceramsite, shale and quartz sand were 85.87, 81.44, 59.65, and 55.98 mg/kg, respectively. Phosphorus desorption was also studied to analyze the substrates' adsorption efficiency in wastewater treatment as well as the substrates' ability to be reused for treatment. It was noted that the removal performance for the different forms of phosphorus was dependent on the nature of the substrate and the adsorption mechanism. A comparative analysis showed that the removal of particulate phosphorus was much easier using shale. Whereas anthracite had the highest soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) adsorptive capacity, biological ceramsite had the highest dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) removal capacity. Phosphorus removal by shale and biological ceramsite was mainly through chemical adsorption, precipitation or biological adsorption. On the other hand, phosphorus removal through physical adsorption (electrostatic attraction or ion exchange) was dominant in anthracite and quartz sand.

  17. Ultrahigh resolution focused electron beam induced processing : the effect of substrate thickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, W. F.; Lazic, I.; Beyer, A.; Goelzhaeuser, A.; Wagner, J. B.; Hansen, T. W.; Hagen, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    It is often suggested that the growth in focused electron beam induced processing (FEBIP) is caused not only by primary electrons, but also (and even predominantly) by secondary electrons (SEs). If that is true, the growth rate for FEBIP can be changed by modifying the SE yield. Results from our Mon

  18. The role of substrate electrons in the wetting of a metal surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Takahashi, O.; Andersson, Klas Jerker;

    2010-01-01

    We address how the electronic and geometric structures of metal surfaces determine water-metal bonding by affecting the balance between Pauli repulsion and electrostatic attraction. We show how the rigid d-electrons and the softer s-electrons utilize different mechanisms for the redistribution of...

  19. Mineral processing of heavy mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1992-01-01

    Processing of heavy mineral sands involves many techniques including gravity, magnetic and electrostatic separation. As part of a laboratory programme to develop effective mineral processing techniques, two mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia were processed using the standard techniques, with emphasis placed on the Carpco electrostatic separator. These sands were initially characterised mineralogically by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA...

  20. A systematic investigation of the charging effect in scanning electron microscopy for metal nanostructures on insulating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatabø, R; Coste, A; Greve, M M

    2017-03-01

    Scanning electron microscopy is perhaps the most important method for investigating and characterizing nanostructures. A well-known challenge in scanning electron microscopy is the investigation of insulating materials. As insulating materials do not provide a path to ground they accumulate charge, evident as image drift and image distortions. In previous work, we have seen that sample charging in arrays of metal nanoparticles on glass substrates leads to a shrinkage effect, resulting in a measurement error in the nanoparticle dimension of up to 15% at 10 kV and a probe current of 80 ± 10 pA. In order to investigate this effect in detail, we have fabricated metal nanostructures on insulating borosilicate glass using electron beam lithography. Electron beam lithography allows us to tailor the design of our metal nanostructures and the area coverage. The measurements are carried out using two commonly available secondary electron detectors in scanning electron microscopes, namely, an InLens- and an Everhart-Thornley detector. We identify and discriminate several contributions to the effect by varying microscope settings, including the size of the aperture, the beam current, the working distance and the acceleration voltage. We image metal nanostructures of various sizes and geometries, investigating the influence of scan-direction of the electron beam and secondary electron detector used for imaging. The relative measurement error, which we measure as high as 20% for some settings, is found to depend on the acceleration voltage and the type of secondary electron detector used for imaging. In particular, the Everhart-Thornley detectors lower sensitivity to SE1 electrons increase the magnitude of the shrinkage of up to 10% relative to the InLens measurements. Finally, a method for estimating charge balance in insulating samples is presented.

  1. Epitaxial Growth of Molecular Crystals on van der Waals Substrates for High-Performance Organic Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    quality rubrene fi lms with large single-crystalline domains were grown on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layers with an in-plane crystallographic...atomically fl at and clean substrate without much of damage or contamination . During the growth, the chamber was under vacuum (ca. 1 Torr), with fl

  2. The Role of Substrate Electrons in the Wetting of a Metal Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiros, T.; Takahashi, O.; Andersson, K.J.; Ostrom, H.; Pettersson, L.G.M.; Nilsson, A.; Ogasawara, H.; /SLAC

    2012-04-18

    We address how the electronic and geometric structures of metal surfaces determine water-metal bonding by affecting the balance between Pauli repulsion and electrostatic attraction. We show how the rigid d-electrons and the softer s-electrons utilize different mechanisms for the redistribution of charge that enables surface wetting. On open d-shell Pt(111), the ligand field of water alters the distribution of metal d-electrons to reduce the repulsion. The closed-shell Cu d{sup 10} configuration of isostructural Cu(111), however, does not afford this mechanism, resulting in a hydrophobic surface and three-dimensional ice cluster formation. On the geometrically corrugated Cu(110) surface, however, charge depletion involving the mobile sp-electrons at atomic rows reduces the exchange repulsion sufficiently such that formation of a two-dimensional wetting layer is still favored in spite of the d{sup 10} electronic configuration.

  3. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Menard, Etienne

    2016-12-06

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  4. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A [Champaign, IL; Khang, Dahl-Young [Seoul, KR; Sun, Yugang [Naperville, IL; Menard, Etienne [Durham, NC

    2012-06-12

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  5. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Khang, Dahl -Young; Sun, Yugang; Menard, Etienne

    2015-08-11

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  6. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Illinois (Urbana, IL)

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  7. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, John A.; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Menard, Etienne

    2014-06-17

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  8. Stretchable form of single crystal silicon for high performance electronics on rubber substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Illinois

    2009-04-21

    The present invention provides stretchable, and optionally printable, semiconductors and electronic circuits capable of providing good performance when stretched, compressed, flexed or otherwise deformed. Stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention preferred for some applications are flexible, in addition to being stretchable, and thus are capable of significant elongation, flexing, bending or other deformation along one or more axes. Further, stretchable semiconductors and electronic circuits of the present invention may be adapted to a wide range of device configurations to provide fully flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  10. Optical properties of VO{sub 2} films at the phase transition: Influence of substrate and electronic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterseim, Tobias; Dressel, Martin [1. Physikalisches Institut, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Dietrich, Marc; Polity, Angelika [I. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig Universität Gießen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, 35392 Gießen (Germany)

    2016-08-21

    Thin films of VO{sub 2} on different substrates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}/Si, have been prepared and characterized from room temperature up to 360 K. From the band structure in the rutile metallic phase and in the monoclinic insulating phase, the optical properties are calculated and compared with reflection measurements performed as a function of temperatures. Various interband transitions can be assigned and compared with previous speculations. We extract the parameters of the metallic charge carriers that evolve upon crossing the insulator-to-metal phase transition and find effects by the substrate. The influence of electronic correlations becomes obvious at the phase transition.

  11. Investigation of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on 3C–SiC(100/Si(100 substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogneau N

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Noelle Gogneau,1 Amira Ben Gouider Trabelsi,2 Mathieu G Silly,3 Mohamed Ridene,1 Marc Portail,4 Adrien Michon,4 Mehrezi Oueslati,2 Rachid Belkhou,3 Fausto Sirotti,3 Abdelkarim Ouerghi1 1Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marcoussis, France; 2Unité des Nanomatériaux et Photonique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar Campus Universitaire, Tunis, Tunisia; 3Synchrotron-SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin, BP48, F91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France; 4Centre de Recherche sur l'HétéroEpitaxie et Ses Application, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Valbonne, France Abstract: Graphene has been intensively studied in recent years in order to take advantage of its unique properties. Its synthesis on SiC substrates by solid-state graphitization appears a suitable option for graphene-based electronics. However, before developing devices based on epitaxial graphene, it is desirable to understand and finely control the synthesis of material with the most promising properties. To achieve these prerequisites, many studies are being conducted on various SiC substrates. Here, we review 3C–SiC(100 epilayers grown by chemical vapor deposition on Si(100 substrates for producing graphene by solid state graphitization under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Based on various characterization techniques, the structural and electrical properties of epitaxial graphene layer grown on 3C–SiC(100/Si(100 are discussed. We establish that epitaxial graphene presents properties similar to those obtained using hexagonal SiC substrates, with the advantage of being compatible with current Si-processing technology. Keywords: epitaxial graphene, electronic properties, structural properties, silicon carbide 

  12. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  13. Thermal characterization methodology of packages and substrates intended for power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratolojanahary, Faniry Emilson

    1993-12-01

    An analytical method, which will assist in thermal design problems, and whose formalism is analogous to that of two port network theory, is presented. This method addresses the frequent case of the heating elements being cooled by conduction toward a heat sink through a plane multilayered substrate (for example hybrid power technologies). The method permits thermal characterization of the packaging elements, as well as the formulation of the laws that govern the matching of materials and the evaluation of the package's thermal performance, with reduced computational means. The developed theory also indicates the means needed to measure the thermal parameters of the materials, packages, substrates, coolers, etc., as required by temperature computation. Thus a thermal characterization and measuring set up which is more particularly suited for the power hybrid devices is presented.

  14. Mask-assisted electron radiation grafting for localized through-volume modification of porous substrates: influence of electron energy on spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forner-Cuenca, A.; Manzi-Orezzoli, V.; Kristiansen, P. M.; Gubler, L.; Schmidt, T. J.; Boillat, P.

    2017-06-01

    The spatial resolution aspects of the local modification of porous materials by electron induced graft-polymerization were studied by a combination of experiments and numerical simulations. Using blocking masks, only selected regions of the material were exposed to radiation and subsequently grafted. The main focus of this study is the application to gas diffusion layers, a carbonaceous 200 μm thick porous substrate widely used in fuel cells, with the goal of improving water management by locally tuning the wettability. The comparison of experiments performed with different electron energies and corresponding simulations shows good agreement, identifying the energy threshold necessary to graft through the material to be approximately 150 keV. The impact of electron energy on spatial resolution was studied, showing that the blurring effects due to electron scattering reach a maximum at around 200 keV and are reduced at higher electron energies. Finally, the numerical simulations were used to define the conditions necessary to selectively graft only parts of bi-layer fuel cell materials.

  15. Room-temperature bonding method for polymer substrate of flexible electronics by surface activation using nano-adhesion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumae, Takashi; Fujino, Masahisa; Suga, Tadatomo

    2015-10-01

    A sealing method for polymer substrates to be used in flexible electronics is studied. For this application, a low-temperature sealing method that achieves flexible bonding of inorganic bonding material is required, but no conventional technique satisfies these requirements simultaneously. In this study, a new polymer bonding method using thin Si and Fe layers and the surface activated bonding (SAB) method are applied to bond poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) films to each other. PEN films can be bonded via the proposed method without voids at room temperature, and the bonded samples are bendable. The adhesion strength of the bonded samples is so strong that fracture occurs in the polymer bulk rather than at the bond interface. Investigations of the bonded samples by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) reveal that bonding is achieved by chemical interactions between the polymer surface and deposited atoms.

  16. Rugged and breathable forms of stretchable electronics with adherent composite substrates for transcutaneous monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Kyung-In; Han, Sang Youn; Xu, Sheng; Mathewson, Kyle E; Zhang, Yihui; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Webb, R Chad; Lee, Jung Woo; Dawidczyk, Thomas J; Kim, Rak Hwan; Song, Young Min; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Kim, Stanley; Cheng, Huanyu; Rhee, Sang Il; Chung, Jeahoon; Kim, Byunggik; Chung, Ha Uk; Lee, Dongjun; Yang, Yiyuan; Cho, Moongee; Gaspar, John G; Carbonari, Ronald; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-09-03

    Research in stretchable electronics involves fundamental scientific topics relevant to applications with importance in human healthcare. Despite significant progress in active components, routes to mechanically robust construction are lacking. Here, we introduce materials and composite designs for thin, breathable, soft electronics that can adhere strongly to the skin, with the ability to be applied and removed hundreds of times without damaging the devices or the skin, even in regions with substantial topography and coverage of hair. The approach combines thin, ultralow modulus, cellular silicone materials with elastic, strain-limiting fabrics, to yield a compliant but rugged platform for stretchable electronics. Theoretical and experimental studies highlight the mechanics of adhesion and elastic deformation. Demonstrations include cutaneous optical, electrical and radio frequency sensors for measuring hydration state, electrophysiological activity, pulse and cerebral oximetry. Multipoint monitoring of a subject in an advanced driving simulator provides a practical example.

  17. Near-interface Si substrate 3d metal contamination during atomic layer deposition processing detected by electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, A. P. D.; Stesmans, A.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2012-06-01

    A K- and Q-band electron spin resonance (ESR) study has been carried out on (100)Si/SiO2 entities manufactured by low temperature (150 °C) atomic layer deposition (ALD) of a high-quality SiO2 layer on Si using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, H2O, and ozone in a three-step process. Whereas previous work has demonstrated the high quality of the deposited SiO2 layer, the current ESR analysis reports on the tracing of growth-related contamination of near interface Si substrate layers by two transition metals. This includes, first, detection of the signal of interstitial Cr+ (S = 5/2) impurities in c-Si, characterized by an isotropic central g value of 1.9980 ± 0.0002, an isotropic 53Cr (I = 3/2) hyperfine interaction of splitting Aiso = 11.8 G, and cubic crystal field splitting parameter a = +32.2 G, well in agreement with the known bulk c-Si case; A small anisotropic contribution to the hyperfine interaction has additionally been revealed. The total Cr+ defect density is inferred as ˜5 × 1011 cm-2. Second, a single signal is observed at isotropic g = 2.070 ± 0.001, corresponding to interstitial Fe impurities (Fei)0 (S = 1) positioned in a c-Si matrix. Defect density depth profiling reveals the impurities to be confined to a few μm thick Si substrate top layer, the density decaying exponential-like from the Si/SiO2 interface inward the Si substrate. The total of the results points to a contamination of reactor-environment origin, connected with the layer deposition process. It concerns a weak contamination, in which detection the ESR technique emerges as a powerful technique able to unveil very low levels of contamination of near-surface Si substrate layers.

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Sample Preparation of Si(1-x)Gex in c-Plane Sapphire Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sang H.; Bae, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-invented X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, including the total defect density measurement method and the spatial wafer mapping method, have confirmed super hetero epitaxy growth for rhombohedral single crystalline silicon germanium (Si1-xGex) on a c-plane sapphire substrate. However, the XRD method cannot observe the surface morphology or roughness because of the method s limited resolution. Therefore the authors used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with samples prepared in two ways, the focused ion beam (FIB) method and the tripod method to study the structure between Si1-xGex and sapphire substrate and Si1?xGex itself. The sample preparation for TEM should be as fast as possible so that the sample should contain few or no artifacts induced by the preparation. The standard sample preparation method of mechanical polishing often requires a relatively long ion milling time (several hours), which increases the probability of inducing defects into the sample. The TEM sampling of the Si1-xGex on sapphire is also difficult because of the sapphire s high hardness and mechanical instability. The FIB method and the tripod method eliminate both problems when performing a cross-section TEM sampling of Si1-xGex on c-plane sapphire, which shows the surface morphology, the interface between film and substrate, and the crystal structure of the film. This paper explains the FIB sampling method and the tripod sampling method, and why sampling Si1-xGex, on a sapphire substrate with TEM, is necessary.

  19. Nanohole and dot patterning processes on quartz substrate by R-θ electron beam lithography and nanoimprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Taniguchi, Kazutake; Suzuki, Kouta; Iyama, Hiromasa; Kishimoto, Shuji; Sato, Takashi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Fine hole and dot patterns with bit pitches (bp’s) of less than 40 nm were fabricated in the circular band area of a quartz substrate by R-θ electron beam lithography (EBL), reactive ion etching (RIE), and nanoimprinting. These patterning processes were studied to obtain minimum pitch sizes of hole and dot patterns without pattern collapse. The patterning on the circular band was aimed to apply these patterning processes to future high-density bit-patterned media (BPM) for hard disk drive (HDD) and permanent memory for the long life archiving of digital data. In hole patterning, a minimum-22-nm-bp and 8.2-nm-diameter pattern (1.3 Tbit/in.2) was obtained on a quartz substrate by optimizing the R-θ EBL and RIE processes. Dot patterns were replicated on another quartz substrate by nanoimprinting using a hole-patterned quartz substrate as a master mold followed by RIE. In dot patterning, a minimum-30-nm-bp and 18.5-nm-diameter pattern (0.7 Tbit/in.2) was obtained by introducing new descum conditions. It was observed that the minimum bp of successful patterning increased as the fabrication process proceeded, i.e., from 20 nm bp in the first EBL process to 30 nm bp in the last quartz dot patterning process. From the measured diameters of the patterns, it was revealed that pattern collapse was apt to occur when the value of average diameter plus 3 sigma of diameter was close to the bp. It was suggested that multiple fabrication processes caused the degradation of pattern quality; therefore, hole patterning is more suitable than dot patterning for future applications owing to the lower quality degradation by its simple fabrication process.

  20. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  1. Epitaxial Fe3Si films on GaAs(100) substrates by means of electron beam evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J.; Schumann, J.; Vinzelberg, H.; Arushanov, E.; Engelhard, R.; Schmidt, O. G.; Gemming, T.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents results on the preparation, structural, electrical and magnetic properties of Fe3Si films as a representative for a Heusler alloy-like compound which are known as half-metallic materials with ferromagnetic behaviour. The films have been prepared by means of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) electron beam evaporation with the aim of achieving epitaxial growth on GaAs(100) substrates. The main focus of this work is the structural characterization of the Fe3Si films grown on GaAs by means of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to confirm the epitaxial growth. For Fe3Si with a composition in the vicinity of stoichiometry an almost lattice-matched growth on GaAs(001) has been observed characterized by a high crystalline quality and a good interface perfection. Besides the studies on cross-sectional samples by TEM data from reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were also included into the discussion. The electrical and magnetic parameters of the films studied are found to be in good agreement with data reported for the best Fe3Si molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) layers. As evidenced by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, resistivity and magnetic measurements, we find an optimum growth temperature of 280-350 °C to obtain ferromagnetic layers with high crystal and interface perfection as well as a high degree of atomic ordering.

  2. Thickness-dependent electronic structure modulation of ferromagnetic films on shape memory alloy substrates based on a pure strain effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chun; Hu, Di; Gong, Kui; Jiang, Xumin; Yin, Jianjuan; Cao, Yi; Tang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Zhongfu; Yu, Guanghua; Andrew Evans, D.

    2016-11-01

    Pure strain-induced electronic structure modulation in ferromagnetic films is critical for developing reliable strain-assisted spintronic devices with low power consumption. For the conventional electricity-controlled strain engineering, it is difficult to reveal the pure strain effect on electronic structure tunability due to the inseparability of pure strain effect and surface charge effect. Here, a non-electrically controlled NiTi shape memory alloy was utilized as a strain output substrate to induce a pure strain on attached Fe films through a thermally controlled shape memory effect. The pure strain induced electronic structure evolution was revealed by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and correlated with first-principles calculations and magnetic anisotropy measurements. A compressive strain enhances the shielding effect for core electrons and significantly tunes their binding energy. Meanwhile, the strain modifies the partial density of states of outer d orbits, which may affect spin-orbit coupling strength and related magnetic anisotropy. This work helps for clarifying the physical nature of the pure strain effect and developing the pure-strain-assisted spintronic devices.

  3. Electron beam irradiation of dimethyl-(acetylacetonate) gold(III) adsorbed onto solid substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wnuk, J.D.; Gorham, J.M.; Rosenberg, S.G.; Van Dorp, W.F.; Madey, T.E.; Hagen, C.W.; Fairbrother, D.H.

    2010-01-01

    Electron beam induced deposition of organometallic precursors has emerged as an effective and versatile method for creating two-dimensional and three-dimensional metal-containing nanostructures. However, to improve the properties and optimize the chemical composition of nanostructures deposited in t

  4. Method For Making Electronic Circuits Having Nial And Ni3al Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2001-01-30

    A method for making electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises steps of providing NiAl and/or Ni.sub.3 Al, and forming an alumina layer thereupon prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.

  5. Electronic circuits having NiAl and Ni.sub.3 Al substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises NiAl and/or Ni.sub.3 Al, upon which an alumina layer is formed prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.

  6. Electronic circuits having NiAl and Ni{sub 3}Al substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deevi, S.C.; Sikka, V.K.

    1999-10-12

    An electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises NiAl and/or Ni{sub 3}Al, upon which an alumina layer is formed prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.

  7. Electronic circuits having NiAl and Ni.sub.3 Al substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deevi, Seetharama C.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1999-01-01

    An electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises NiAl and/or Ni.sub.3 Al, upon which an alumina layer is formed prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.

  8. Improvement in luminance efficiency of organic light emitting diodes by suppression of secondary electron bombardment of substrate during sputter deposition of top electrode films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Daichi; Kobayashi, Shin-ichi; Uchida, Takayuki; Sawada, Yutaka; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the degradation mechanisms of the luminance performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) when their top electrode films were deposited by sputter deposition process. During the sputter deposition of the top electrode films, the suppression of the incidence of high-energy electrons on the substrate was attempted using various methods. As a result, we found that during electrode deposition, the incidence of the high-energy secondary electrons, which were emitted from the target surface, on the substrate was the main cause of the significant degradation of the luminance performance. It was also found that the application of a magnetic field by setting permanent magnets near the substrate holder and the insertion of a shield plate near the target cathode were effective in suppressing the incidence of secondary electrons on the substrate.

  9. Ultrastable gold substrates: Properties of a support for high-resolution electron cryomicroscopy of biological specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Christopher J.; Passmore, Lori A.

    2016-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) allows structure determination of a wide range of biological molecules and specimens. All-gold supports improve cryo-EM images by reducing radiation-induced motion and image blurring. Here we compare the mechanical and electrical properties of all-gold supports to amorphous carbon foils. Gold supports are more conductive, and have suspended foils that are not compressed by differential contraction when cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These measurement...

  10. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of Ag nanoparticles grown on an ionic liquid substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2010-07-01

    We report a novel method of growing silver nanostructures by cathodic sputtering onto an ionic liquid (IL) and our visualization by transmission cryo-electron microscopy to avoid beam-induced motion of the nanoparticles. By freezing the IL suspension and controlling electron dose, we can assess properties of particle size, morphology, crystallinity, and aggregation in situ and at high detail. We observed round silver nanoparticles with a well-defined diameter of 7.0 ± 1.5 nm that are faceted with crystalline cubic structures and ∼80% of the particles have multiply twinned faults. We also applied cryo-electron tomography to investigate the structure of the nanoparticles and to directly visualize the IL wetting around them. In addition to particles, we observed nanorods that appear to have assembled from individual nanoparticles. Reexamination of the samples after 4-5 days from initial preparation showed significant changes in morphology, and potential mechanisms for this are discussed. © 2010 Materials Research Society.

  11. Fabrication Procedure for Rugged and Breathable Forms of Stretchable Electronics with Adherent and Composite Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Kyung-In Jang, Sang Youn Han, Sheng Xu, Kyle E. Mathewson, Yihui Zhang, Jae-Woong Jeong, Gwang-Tae Kim, R. Chad Webb, Jung Woo Lee, Thomas J. Dawidczyk, Rak Hwan Kim, Young Min Song, Woon-Hong Yeo, Stanley Kim, Huanyu Cheng, Sang Il Rhee, Jeahoon Chung, Byunggik Kim, Ha Uk Chung, Dongjun Lee, Yiyuan Yang, Moongee Cho, John G. Gaspar, Ronald Carbonari, Monica Fabiani et al. ### Abstract We introduce materials and composite designs for thin, breathable, soft electronics that ca...

  12. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  13. Analysis of adhesion of radiation curable compositions to polyester substrate. [. gamma. rays or electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, W.K.; Barbery, J.; Gupta, B.S.

    1977-07-01

    Properties of bonds produced by radiation curing of adhesives on polyester film were studied. Investigation of bonding in polyester non-wovens had revealed that adhesion of binders to fibers was weak, which resulted in interfacial failures, judged from electron micrographs. If a binder droplet surrounds a cluster of fibers, tearing of binder took place but fibers still peeled out of droplets with interfacial separation. In order to understand the failure mechanism, a study was carried out on Mylar film bonded with adhesives cured by electron beam or gamma-rays from /sup 60/Co. Mixtures of isodecyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate were copolymerized between Mylar films to produce adhesives with a wide range of glass transition temperatures. Hexanediol diacrylate was added in various amounts to produce different degrees of cross-linking. Small amounts of fumed silica (Cab-O-Sil) were added to thicken the monomers used in the /sup 60/Co experiments. By varying rheological properties in this fashion, a maximum peel force of 3.5 lb/in. was obtained. This value is in line with peel strengths from polyester using commercial, prepolymerized adhesives with solubility parameters similar to those used here delta = 8.3 to 9.3). These results show that the primary reason for the poor adhesion of radiation curable adhesives to polyester is their high degree of cross-linking and that radiation curable adhesives are not basically different from other types, except in cases where their unique properties could be utilized with advantage.

  14. Flux pinning properties of MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tape substrates deposited by electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonekura, K., E-mail: kenji@st.cs.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Fujiyoshi, T.; Sueyoshi, T. [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1, Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Doi, T.; Nishikawa, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Kagoshima University, 1-21-40, Koorimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    MgB{sub 2} thin films were deposited on Al tape substrates by EBE. The MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tapes show much higher J{sub c} values compared to those of MgB{sub 2} wires fabricated by PIT method. The MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tapes have c-axis correlated pinning centers. The scaling analysis of macroscopic pinning force indicates that a main pinning center is grain boundary. Flux pinning properties have been investigated in two kinds of MgB{sub 2} thin films deposited on Al tapes by electron beam evaporation: One is a stoichiometric composition and the other is a slightly B-rich composition. The values of critical current density J{sub c} in both MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tape substrates at 10 K in the magnetic field parallel to the c-axis are higher than those in MgB{sub 2} thin films on Si and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates prepared by the same method. Both the MgB{sub 2} thin films on Al tapes show the large peaks for a magnetic field, B//c in the field-angular dependence of J{sub c}. This result indicates that the MgB{sub 2} thin films have the c-axis correlated pinning centers. Scaling analysis in the reduced macroscopic pinning force density versus the reduced magnetic field at 20 K implies that a main pinning center in both the MgB{sub 2} thin films is grain boundaries. In addition, it was suggested that a nonstoichiometric MgB{sub 2} thin film has additional pinning centers which act effectively in a high magnetic field.

  15. Surface morphology and impurity distribution of electron beam recrystallized silicon films on low cost substrates for solar cell absorber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Li; GROMBALL F; MüLLER J

    2006-01-01

    A line shaped electron beam recrystallised polycrystalline silicon film on the low cost substrate was investigated for the use of the solar cell absorber. The applied EB energy density strongly influences the surface morphology of the film system. Lower EB energy density results in droplet morphology and the rougher SiO2 capping layer due to the low fluidity. With the energy increasing, thecapping layer becomes smooth and continuous and less and small pinholes form in the silicon film. Tungstendisilicide (WSi2) is formed at the interface tungsten/silicon but also at the grain boundaries of the silicon. Because of the fast melting and cooling of the silicon film, the eutectic of silicon and tungstendisilicide mainly forms at the grain boundary of the primary silicon dendrites. The SEM-EDX analysis shows that there are no chlorine and hydrogen in the area surrounding a pinhole after recrystallization because of outgassing during the solidification.

  16. Solution-Processed Self-Assembled Nanodielectrics on Template-Stripped Metal Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Julian J; Walker, Amanda R; Sangwan, Vinod K; Jariwala, Deep; Hoffman, Emily; Everaerts, Ken; Facchetti, Antonio; Hersam, Mark C; Marks, Tobin J

    2015-12-01

    The coupling of hybrid organic-inorganic gate dielectrics with emergent unconventional semiconductors has yielded transistor devices exhibiting record-setting transport properties. However, extensive electronic transport measurements on these high-capacitance systems are often convoluted with the electronic response of the semiconducting silicon substrate. In this report, we demonstrate the growth of solution-processed zirconia self-assembled nanodielectrics (Zr-SAND) on template-stripped aluminum substrates. The resulting Zr-SAND on Al structures leverage the ultrasmooth (r.m.s. roughness <0.4 nm), chemically uniform nature of template-stripped metal substrates to demonstrate the same exceptional electronic uniformity (capacitance ∼700 nF cm(-2), leakage current <1 μA cm(-2) at -2 MV cm(-1)) and multilayer growth of Zr-SAND on Si, while exhibiting superior temperature and voltage capacitance responses. These results are important to conduct detailed transport measurements in emergent transistor technologies featuring SAND as well as for future applications in integrated circuits or flexible electronics.

  17. Application of Thermal Network Model to Transient Thermal Analysis of Power Electronic Package Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Ishizuka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there is a growing demand to have smaller and lighter electronic circuits which have greater complexity, multifunctionality, and reliability. High-density multichip packaging technology has been used in order to meet these requirements. The higher the density scale is, the larger the power dissipation per unit area becomes. Therefore, in the designing process, it has become very important to carry out the thermal analysis. However, the heat transport model in multichip modules is very complex, and its treatment is tedious and time consuming. This paper describes an application of the thermal network method to the transient thermal analysis of multichip modules and proposes a simple model for the thermal analysis of multichip modules as a preliminary thermal design tool. On the basis of the result of transient thermal analysis, the validity of the thermal network method and the simple thermal analysis model is confirmed.

  18. XANES and IR spectroscopy study of the electronic structure and chemical composition of porous silicon on n- and p-type substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenshin, A. S., E-mail: lenshinas@phys.vsu.ru; Kashkarov, V. M.; Seredin, P. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Spivak, Yu. M.; Moshnikov, V. A. [LETI St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    The differences in the electronic structure and composition of porous silicon samples obtained under identical conditions of electrochemical etching on the most commonly used n- and p-type substrates with different conductivities are demonstrated by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR) methods. It is shown that significantly higher oxidation and saturation with hydrogen is observed for the porous layer on n-type substrates.

  19. Trapping the M sub 1 and M sub 2 substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  20. Effect of Substrate Temperature on Structural and Optical Properties of Nanocrystalline CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Electron Beam Evaporation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Rigana Begam; N. Madhusudhana Rao; S. Kaleemulla; M. Shobana; N. Sai Krishna; M. Kuppan

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin films were deposited onto glass substrates using electron beam evaporation technique. The effect of substrate temperature on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdTe thin films has been investigated. All the CdTe films exhibited zinc blende structure with (111) preferential orientation. The crystallite size of the films increased from 35 nm to 116 nm with the increase of substrate temperature and the band gap of the films decre...

  1. Effect of Substrate Temperature on Structural and Optical Properties of Nanocrystalline CdTe Thin Films Deposited by Electron Beam Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rigana Begam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride (CdTe thin films were deposited onto glass substrates using electron beam evaporation technique. The effect of substrate temperature on the structural, morphological and optical properties of CdTe thin films has been investigated. All the CdTe films exhibited zinc blende structure with (111 preferential orientation. The crystallite size of the films increased from 35 nm to 116 nm with the increase of substrate temperature and the band gap of the films decreased from 2.87 eV to 2.05 eV with the increase of the crystallite size.

  2. Substrate Dependent Ad-Atom Migration on Graphene and the Impact on Electron-Beam Sculpting Functional Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Kevin J; Goyal, Gaurav; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Min Jun

    2017-05-10

    The use of atomically thin graphene for molecular sensing has attracted tremendous attention over the years and, in some instances, could displace the use of classical thin films. For nanopore sensing, graphene must be suspended over an aperture so that a single pore can be formed in the free-standing region. Nanopores are typically drilled using an electron beam (e-beam) which is tightly focused until a desired pore size is obtained. E-beam sculpting of graphene however is not just dependent on the ability to displace atoms but also the ability to hinder the migration of ad-atoms on the surface of graphene. Using relatively lower e-beam fluxes from a thermionic electron source, the C-atom knockout rate seems to be comparable to the rate of carbon ad-atom attraction and accumulation at the e-beam/graphene interface (i.e., Rknockout ≈ Raccumulation). Working at this unique regime has allowed the study of carbon ad-atom migration as well as the influence of various substrate materials on e-beam sculpting of graphene. We also show that this information was pivotal to fabricating functional graphene nanopores for studying DNA with increased spatial resolution which is attributed to atomically thin membranes.

  3. The erosive potential of soft drinks on enamel surface substrate: an in vitro scanning electron microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Barry M; Kitchens, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Using scanning electron and light microscopy, this study qualitatively evaluated the erosive potential of carbonated cola beverages as well as sports and high-energy drinks on enamel surface substrate. Beverages used in this study included: Coca Cola Classic, Diet Coke, Gatorade sports drink, Red Bull high-energy drink, and tap water (control). Extracted human permanent molars free of hypocalcification and/or caries were used in this study. The coronal portion of each tooth was removed and sectioned longitudinally from the buccal to the lingual surface. The crown sections were embedded in acrylic resin, leaving the enamel surfaces exposed. Following finishing and polishing of all surfaces, one side was covered with red nail varnish while the remaining side was exposed to individual beverage immersion for 14 days, 24 hours per day, at 37 degrees C. The specimens were evaluated for enamel surface changes using scanning electron and light microscopy. Enamel specimens exhibited visual surface changes following immersion in the test beverages with Red Bull and Gatorade revealing the most striking surface morphological changes. Specimens subjected to Coca Cola Classic and Diet Coke immersion also displayed irregular post-treatment surface morphology. As verified by microscopic evaluation, all test beverages displayed enamel dissolution in the following order: Red Bull>Gatorade>Coca-Cola Classic>Diet Coke.

  4. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Špirutová; J. Beňo; V. Bednářová; J. Kříž; M. Kandrnál

    2012-01-01

    Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron) are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this co...

  5. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  6. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  7. Structural and electronic properties of ZnO nanoparticles grown on p-Si and Al2O3 substrates by using spin coating and thermal treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    No, Young Soo; Son, Dong Ick; Leem, Jae Hyeon; Kim, Su Youn; Oh, Do Hyun; Kim, Tae Whan

    2008-10-01

    ZnO nanoparticles were formed on p-Si and Al2O3 substrates by using spin coating and thermal treatment method. Scanning electron microscopy images and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry profiles showed that ZnO nanoparticles were formed on p-Si and Al2O3 substrates. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that ZnO nanoparticles formed on the p-Si substrates had polycrystalline hexagonal wurtzite structures and that those formed on the Al2O3 substrates had a c-axis preferential orientation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy profiles showed that the O 1s and the Zn 2p peaks corresponding to the ZnO nanoparticles were observed.

  8. Enhanced electron mobility in epitaxial (Ba,La)SnO3 films on BaSnO3(001) substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woong-Jhae; Kim, Hyung Joon; Sohn, Egon; Kim, Tai Hoon; Park, Ju-Young; Park, Woanseo; Jeong, Hyunhak; Lee, Takhee; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Choi, Ki-Young; Kim, Kee Hoon

    2016-02-01

    We report the growth of Ba1-xLaxSnO3 (x = 0.00, 0.005, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.04) thin films on the insulating BaSnO3(001) substrate by pulsed laser deposition. The insulating BaSnO3 substrates were grown by the Cu2O-CuO flux, in which the molar fraction of KClO4 was systematically increased to reduce electron carriers and thus induce a doping induced metal-insulator transition, exhibiting a resistivity increase from ˜10-3 to ˜1012 Ω cm at room temperature. We find that all the Ba1-xLaxSnO3 films are epitaxial, showing good in-plane lattice matching with the substrate as confirmed by X-ray reciprocal space mappings and transmission electron microscopy studies. The Ba1-xLaxSnO3 (x = 0.005-0.04) films showed degenerate semiconducting behavior, and the electron mobility at room temperature reached 100 and 85 cm2 V-1 s-1 at doping levels 1.3 × 1020 and 6.8 × 1019 cm-3, respectively. This work demonstrates that thin perovskite stannate films of high quality can be grown on the BaSnO3(001) substrates for potential applications in transparent electronic devices.

  9. A comparative study of via drilling and scribing on PEN and PET substrates for flexible electronic applications using excimer and Nd:YAG laser sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandamparambil, R.; Fledderus, H.; Brand, J. van den; Saalmink, M.; Kusters, R.; Podprocky, T.; Steenberge, G. van; Baets, J. de; Dietzel, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    A study on via drilling and channel scribing on PEN and PET substrates for flexible electronic application is discussed in this paper. For the experiments, both KIF excimer laser (248 nm) and frequency tripled Nd:YAG (355 nm) laser are used. Different measurement techniques like optical microscopy,

  10. The role of electronic coupling between substrate and 2D MoS2 nanosheets in electrocatalytic production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiry, Damien; Fullon, Raymond; Yang, Jieun; de Carvalho Castro E Silva, Cecilia; Kappera, Rajesh; Bozkurt, Ibrahim; Kaplan, Daniel; Lagos, Maureen J.; Batson, Philip E.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.; Dong, Liang; Er, Dequan; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Asefa, Tewodros; Chhowalla, Manish

    2016-09-01

    The excellent catalytic activity of metallic MoS2 edges for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) has led to substantial efforts towards increasing the edge concentration. The 2H basal plane is less active for the HER because it is less conducting and therefore possesses less efficient charge transfer kinetics. Here we show that the activity of the 2H basal planes of monolayer MoS2 nanosheets can be made comparable to state-of-the-art catalytic properties of metallic edges and the 1T phase by improving the electrical coupling between the substrate and the catalyst so that electron injection from the electrode and transport to the catalyst active site is facilitated. Phase-engineered low-resistance contacts on monolayer 2H-phase MoS2 basal plane lead to higher efficiency of charge injection in the nanosheets so that its intrinsic activity towards the HER can be measured. We demonstrate that onset potentials and Tafel slopes of ~-0.1 V and ~50 mV per decade can be achieved from 2H-phase catalysts where only the basal plane is exposed. We show that efficient charge injection and the presence of naturally occurring sulfur vacancies are responsible for the observed increase in catalytic activity of the 2H basal plane. Our results provide new insights into the role of contact resistance and charge transport on the performance of two-dimensional MoS2 nanosheet catalysts for the HER.

  11. A multienzyme complex channels substrates and electrons through acetyl-CoA and methane biosynthesis pathways in Methanosarcina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillon J Lieber

    Full Text Available Multienzyme complexes catalyze important metabolic reactions in many organisms, but little is known about the complexes involved in biological methane production (methanogenesis. A crosslinking-mass spectrometry (XL-MS strategy was employed to identify proteins associated with coenzyme M-coenzyme B heterodisulfide reductase (Hdr, an essential enzyme in all methane-producing archaea (methanogens. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, Hdr forms a multienzyme complex with acetyl-CoA decarbonylase synthase (ACDS, and F420-dependent methylene-H4MPT reductase (Mer. ACDS is essential for production of acetyl-CoA during growth on methanol, or for methanogenesis from acetate, whereas Mer is essential for methanogenesis from all substrates. Existence of a Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex is consistent with growth phenotypes of ACDS and Mer mutant strains in which the complex samples the redox status of electron carriers and directs carbon flux to acetyl-CoA or methanogenesis. We propose the Hdr:ACDS:Mer complex comprises a special class of multienzyme redox complex which functions as a "biological router" that physically links methanogenesis and acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathways.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of phase separation in GaInAsSb films grown on GaSb substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczeszek, P; Amariei, A; Schöne, J; Zoulis, G; Vouroutzis, N; Polychroniadis, E K; Stróz, D

    2006-10-01

    The GaSb-based quaternary alloys are a good choice for thermophotovoltaic applications. The thermophotovoltaic cell converts infrared radiation to electricity, using the same principles as photovoltaic devices. The aim of the present work was the microstructural study of such an alloy, namely Ga(0.84)In(0.16)As(0.12)Sb(0.88). A thin film of the material was grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy on a (100)alpha-->[111]B (alpha = 2 degrees, 4 degrees, 6 degrees) GaSb substrate. The GaInAsSb alloy has an appropriate band gap, but suffers from a phase separation consisting of GaAs-rich and InSb-rich regions that is disadvantageous for cell efficiency. In this work, we employed a morphological approach to phase separation, with the use of conventional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The phase separation occurs in two different orientations: parallel to the growth direction (vertical) and inclined (lateral). After application of fast Fourier transformation filtering, the vertical periodicity was found to be lambda = 5 nm for the pair (black and white) of layers independently of the cut-off angle, whereas the lateral periodicity was related to it.

  13. Use of organic substrates as electron donors for biological sulfate reduction in gypsiferous mine soils from Nakhon Si Thammarat (Thailand).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-04-01

    Soils in some mining areas contain a high gypsum content, which can give adverse effects to the environment and may cause many cultivation problems, such as a low water retention capacity and low fertility. The quality of such mine soils can be improved by reducing the soil's gypsum content. This study aims to develop an appropriate in situ bioremediation technology for abbreviating the gypsum content of mine soils by using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The technology was applied to a mine soil from a gypsum mine in the southern part of Thailand which contains a high sulfate content (150 g kg(-1)). Cheap organic substrates with low or no cost, such as rice husk, pig farm wastewater treatment sludge and coconut husk chips were mixed (60:20:20 by volume) and supplied to the soil as electron donors for the SRB. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 59% was achieved in the soil mixed with 40% organic mixture, corresponding to a reduction of the soil gypsum content from 25% to 7.5%. For economic gains, this treated soil can be further used for agriculture and the produced sulfide can be recovered as the fertilizer elemental sulfur.

  14. Produção de mudas de alface, pepino e pimentão em substratos combinando areia, solo e Plantmax® Production of lettuce, cucumber and sweet pepper seedlings in substrate with different combinations of sand, soil and Plantmax®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar José Smiderle

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available O efeito do substrato comercial Plantmax®; e sua combinação com solo e areia, foi avaliado de acordo com a resposta biológica de três culturas olerícolas (alface, pepino e pimentão, sendo o experimento conduzido em casa de vegetação na ESALQ/USP em Piracicaba de abril a junho de 1996. Os tratamentos consistiram do substrato comercial Plantmax®; e da mistura deste com areia, com solo, na proporção 1:1 em volume, e mistura dos três, proporção 1:1:1. O substrato Plantmax®; propiciou menor velocidade de emergência para alface e pepino e maior para pimentão. Resultou, também, em maior altura de plântulas nas três diferentes culturas. O menor comprimento de raízes das três olerícolas foi obtido com o substrato Plantmax®; + solo + areia. A maior produção de matéria seca de plântulas e raízes de alface e de pimentão foram obtidas com o substrato Plantmax®;. Por outro lado, a menor produção de matéria seca foi obtida com a mistura dos três componentes para a cultura do pepino. O desempenho obtido nas misturas de Plantmax®; com solo ou com areia, indicam ser uma alternativa técnica viável ao uso de substratos comerciaisThe effect of commercial substrate Plantmax®; and it's combination with soil and sand, was evaluated according to the biological response of three vegetable crops (lettuce, cucumber and sweet pepper. The experiment was carried out in plastic tunnels, at ESALQ/USP, Piracicaba-SP, from April to June, 1996. The treatments consisted of the commercial substrate Plantmax®;, the mixture of Plantmax®; with sand, Plantmax®;with soil and the mixture of Plantmax®;with both soil and sand. Lower lettuce and cucumber seedlings emergence and faster sweet pepper seedlings emergence were observed with Plantmax®; substrate. It also resulted in bigger size of seedlings of these three different plant species. Smaller roots of these three species were observed with the mixture of Plantmax®; plus soil plus sand

  15. Polymer opto-chemical-electronic based module as a detection system for volatile analytes on a foil substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Indranil; Ohlander, Anna; Stich, Matthias I. J.; Kiesl, Christian; Hemmetzberger, Dieter; Klink, Gerhard; Trupp, Sabine; Bock, Karlheinz

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we report on a novel device that addresses the needs for an efficient, field deployable and disposable system in the field of bio-chemical sensors using organic semiconductors. The Fraunhofer Institute has enabled a complete roll-to-roll manufactured polymer-opto-chemical-electronic module on a foil substrate, wherein an electroluminescent light source has been hetero-integrated together with an organic TFT, working as a photo detector. A chemically sensitive, colour changing film is sandwiched in between the two elements to form an optical detection system for volatile analytes such as amines. The setup, henceforth referred to as the "PolyOpto" module, comprises of a dye coated layer that can detect specific chemical reactions by colour change inserted in between the EL light source and the OTFT photo-detector. A hole is laser cut through the system to allow the sensor layer to come in contact with the gases, which then through a chemical reaction, changes colour and initiates a different response in the output of the organic transistor. Hence, this allows for a disposable chemo-analytical system that can be used in various application fields. As compared to conventional systems, the advantage here lies in the direct integration of the different functionalities without any advanced assembly steps, simultaneous use of coatings for both components (transparent electrode and wiring layer) and roll-to-roll compatibility, thus rendering a disposable system. We believe that it aptly demonstrates the capabilities of polytronics in functional integration for low-cost bio-sensor manufacturing.

  16. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  17. Electron Traps in GaAs Grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy on On-axis (100 and Off-axis Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sarmiento

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS was used to characterize the electron traps present in the bulkGaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE on on-axis (100 and off-axis (4° towards the (111 Adirection substrates. Two electron traps were obtained for each sample having identical correspondingpeak locations in the DLTS spectra. The layer grown on the on-axis substrate has electron traps withactivation energies of EC–0.454 eV and EC–0.643 eV and capture cross-sections of 1.205 x 10-14 cm2 and3.88 x 10-15 cm2, respectively. The layer grown on the off-axis substrate has traps with activation energiesof EC–0.454 eV and EC–0.723 eV and capture cross-sections of 2.060 x 10-14 cm2 and 4.40 x 10-14 cm2.The electron traps are possibly the M4 (or EL3 and EL2 (or EB4 traps commonly found in GaAs layers.Due to the high trap concentrations obtained and to the non-uniform trap concentration profile, Asdesorption may be considerable during growth.

  18. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  19. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  20. Locomotory transition from water to sand and its effects on undulatory kinematics in sand lances (Ammodytidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidmark, Nicholas J; Strother, James A; Horton, Jaquan M; Summers, Adam P; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2011-02-15

    Sand lances, fishes in the genus Ammodytes, exhibit a peculiar burrowing behavior in which they appear to swim rapidly into the substrate. They use posteriorly propagated undulations of the body to move in both water, a Newtonian fluid, and in sand, a non-Newtonian, granular substrate. In typical aquatic limbless locomotion, undulations of the body push against water, which flows because it is incapable of supporting the static stresses exerted by the animal, thus the undulations move in world space (slipping wave locomotion). In typical terrestrial limbless locomotion, these undulations push against substrate irregularities and move relatively little in world space (non-slipping wave locomotion). We used standard and X-ray video to determine the roles of slipping wave and non-slipping wave locomotion during burrowing in sand lances. We find that sand lances in water use slipping wave locomotion, similar to most aquatic undulators, but switch to non-slipping waves once they burrow. We identify a progression of three stages in the burrowing process: first, aquatic undulations similar to typical anguilliform locomotion (but without head yaw) push the head into the sand; second, more pronounced undulations of the aquatic portion of the body push most of the animal below ground; third, the remaining above-ground portion of the body ceases undulation and the subterranean portion takes over, transitioning to non-slipping wave locomotion. We find no evidence that sand lances use their body motions to fluidize the sand. Instead, as soon as enough of the body is underground, they undergo a kinematic shift and locomote like terrestrial limbless vertebrates.

  1. Transparent anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays on plastic substrates for disposable biosensors and flexible electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsinezhad, Samira; Mohammadpour, Arash; Dalrymple, Ashley N; Geisinger, Jared; Kar, Piyush; Brett, Michael J; Shankar, Karthik

    2013-04-01

    Exploitation of anodically formed self-organized TiO2 nanotube arrays in mass-manufactured, disposable biosensors, rollable electrochromic displays and flexible large-area solar cells would greatly benefit from integration with transparent and flexible polymeric substrates. Such integration requires the vacuum deposition of a thin film of titanium on the desired substrate, which is then anodized in suitable media to generate TiO2 nanotube arrays. However the challenges associated with control of Ti film morphology, nanotube array synthesis conditions, and film adhesion and transparency, have necessitated the use of substrate heating during deposition to temperatures of at least 300 degrees C and as high as 500 degrees C to generate highly ordered open-pore nanotube arrays, thus preventing the use of polymeric substrates. We report on a film growth technique that exploits atomic peening to achieve high quality transparent TiO2 nanotube arrays with lengths up to 5.1 microm at room temperature on polyimide substrates without the need for substrate heating or substrate biasing or a Kauffman ion source. The superior optical quality and uniformity of the nanotube arrays was evidenced by the high specular reflectivity and the smooth pattern of periodic interferometric fringes in the transmission spectra of the nanotube arrays, from which the wavelength-dependent effective refractive index was extracted for the air-TiO2 composite medium. A fluorescent immunoassay biosensor constructed using 5.1 microm-long transparent titania nanotube arrays (TTNAs) grown on Kapton substrates detected human cardiac troponin I at a concentration of 0.1 microg ml(-1).

  2. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  3. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  4. Substrate deposit effect on the characteristic of an intertidal macroalgal community

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Imchen, T.

    Present study consists the effect of substrate deposit (silt, clay, sand, gravel and shards of shells) on the characteristic of an intertidal rocky shore macroalgae Macroalgal assemblage was segregated from substrate deposit in two stages Substrate...

  5. Vestled - Hvide Sande

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten; Hesselbjerg, Marianne; Schønherr, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side......Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side...

  6. Experimental and first-principles study of the electronic transport properties of strained Bi2Te3 thin films on a flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamoto, Takuya; Takashiri, Masayuki

    2016-09-01

    On the basis of an experimental and first-principles study, strain effects on the thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) thin films were investigated. Bi2Te3 thin films were deposited on flexible polyimide substrates using a radio frequency magnetron sputtering method at a substrate temperature of 200 °C. Prior to deposition, various compressive and tensile bending strains were applied to the films by changing the bending radii of the flexible substrates. The structural and thermoelectric properties of the completed samples were analyzed. It was found that the lattice parameters of all samples exhibited smaller values compared to that of standard data for Bi2Te3 (JCPDS 15-0863) because the substrates might have shrunk during the film deposition, indicated by the fact that all the samples presented various compressive lattice strains. A theoretical analysis was performed using the first-principles study based on density functional theory. We calculated the electronic band structures for Bi2Te3 with the different lattice strains and predicted the thermoelectric properties based on the semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation in the rigid band approximation. The lowest conduction band edge in the Bi2Te3 band structure narrowed as the compressive lattice strain increased, indicating that the effective mass became smaller. Finally, the experimentally measured thermoelectric properties were compared with those obtained by the calculation. It was found that the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Investigation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures on 200-mm silicon (111) substrates employing different buffer layer configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-P.; Perozek, J.; Rosario, L. D.; Bayram, C.

    2016-11-01

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures are grown on 200-mm diameter Si(111) substrates by using three different buffer layer configurations: (a) Thick-GaN/3 × {AlxGa1‑xN}/AlN, (b) Thin-GaN/3 × {AlxGa1‑xN}/AlN, and (c) Thin-GaN/AlN, so as to have crack-free and low-bow (electrical properties of these AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures. The effects of buffer layer stacks (i.e. thickness and content) on defectivity, stress, and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility and 2DEG concentration are reported. It is shown that 2DEG characteristics are heavily affected by the employed buffer layers between AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures and Si(111) substrates. Particularly, we report that in-plane stress in the GaN layer affects the 2DEG mobility and 2DEG carrier concentration significantly. Buffer layer engineering is shown to be essential for achieving high 2DEG mobility (>1800 cm2/V•s) and 2DEG carrier concentration (>1.0 × 1013 cm‑2) on Si(111) substrates.

  8. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  9. Superconductivity in the two-dimensional electron gas induced by high-energy optical phonon mode and large polarization of the SrTiO3 substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Shapiro, B. Ya.; Shapiro, I.; Li, Dingping

    2016-07-01

    Pairing in one-atomic-layer-thick two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) by a single flat band of high-energy longitudinal optical phonons is considered. The polar dielectric SrTiO3 (STO) exhibits such an energetic phonon mode and the 2DEG is created both when one unit cell FeSe layer is grown on its (100 ) surface and on the interface with another dielectric like LaAlO3 (LAO). We obtain a quantitative description of both systems solving the gap equation for Tc for arbitrary Fermi energy ɛF, electron-phonon coupling λ , and the phonon frequency Ω , and direct (random-phase approximation) electron-electron repulsion strength α . The focus is on the intermediate region between the adiabatic, ɛF>>Ω , and the nonadiabatic, ɛF<<Ω , regimes. The high-temperature superconductivity in single-unit-cell FeSe/STO is possible due to a combination of three factors: high-longitudinal-optical phonon frequency, large electron-phonon coupling λ ˜0.5 , and huge dielectric constant of the substrate suppression the Coulomb repulsion. It is shown that very low density electron gas in the interfaces is still capable of generating superconductivity of the order of 0.1 K in LAO/STO.

  10. Chemical and electronic interface structure of spray pyrolysis deposited undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films on a commercial Cz-Si solar cell substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabas, M.; Ramos-Barrado, J.R. [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada I, Lab. de Materiales y Superficies, Universidad de Malaga 29071 Malaga (Spain); Barrett, N.T. [CEA DSM/IRAMIS/SPCSI, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Gota, S. [Laboratoire Leon Brillouin, UMR 012 CEA-CNRS CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Rojas, T.C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Lopez-Escalante, M.C. [Isofoton S.A., Parque Tecnologico de Andalucia, Severo Ochoa, 50, 29590 Malaga (Spain)

    2009-08-15

    We have studied differences in the interface between undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films deposited on commercial Si solar cell substrates. The undoped ZnO film is significantly thicker than the Al-doped film for the same deposition time. An extended silicate-like interface is present in both samples. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) probe the presence of a zinc silicate and several Si oxides in both cases. Although Al doping improves the conductivity of ZnO, we present evidence for Al segregation at the interface during deposition on the Si substrate and suggest the presence of considerable fixed charge near the oxidized Si interface layer. The induced distortion in the valence band, compared to that of undoped ZnO, could be responsible for considerable reduction in the solar cell performance. (author)

  11. Suppression of self-heating effect in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors by substrate-transfer technology using h-BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroki, Masanobu, E-mail: hiroki.masanobu@lab.ntt.co.jp; Kumakura, Kazuhide; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Akasaka, Tetsuya; Makimoto, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Hideki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi-shi 243-0198 (Japan)

    2014-11-10

    We fabricated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on h-BN/sapphire substrates and transferred them from the host substrates to copper plates using h-BN as a release layer. In current–voltage characteristics, the saturation drain current decreased by about 30% under a high-bias condition before release by self-heating effect. In contrast, after transfer, the current decrement was as small as 8% owing to improved heat dissipation: the device temperature increased to 50 °C in the as-prepared HEMT, but only by several degrees in the transferred HEMT. An effective way to improve AlGaN/GaN HEMT performance by a suppression of self-heating effect has been demonstrated.

  12. AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor with distributed gate grown on stripe-patterned Si(111) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jyun-Hao; Huang, Shyh-Jer; Lai, Chao-Hsing; Su, Yan-Kuin

    2016-01-01

    We have successfully fabricated an AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor with a distributed gate (DG-HEMT) on a stripe-patterned Si substrate. With the help of the stripe pattern, GaN film with low defect density could be deposited by two-step growth. The striped AlGaN/GaN structure could be obtained naturally by stopping the epitaxy process before coalescence. The DG-HEMT fabricated on the striped pattern layout shows good performance. The output characteristics were enhanced from 297 to 337 mA/mm, because the high quality of GaN grown on the patterned substrate can reduce the number of defects. In addition, the drain current was not decreased because the heat problem was reduced in the DG structure.

  13. All-inkjet-printed flexible electronics fabrication on a polymer substrate by low-temperature high-resolution selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seung H.; Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Luscombe, Christine K.; Fréchet, Jean M. J.; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-08-01

    All-printed electronics is the key technology to ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. As a critical step in this direction, we demonstrate that laser sintering of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning to overcome the resolution limitation of the current inkjet direct writing processes. To demonstrate this process combined with the implementation of air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophenes, high-resolution organic transistors were fabricated in ambient pressure and room temperature without utilizing any photolithographic steps or requiring a vacuum deposition process. Local thermal control of the laser sintering process could minimize the heat-affected zone and the thermal damage to the substrate and further enhance the resolution of the process. This local nanoparticle deposition and energy coupling enable an environmentally friendly and cost-effective process as well as a low-temperature manufacturing sequence to realize large-area, flexible electronics on polymer substrates.

  14. All-inkjet-printed flexible electronics fabrication on a polymer substrate by low-temperature high-resolution selective laser sintering of metal nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Seung H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Pan Heng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Grigoropoulos, Costas P [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, 6177 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740 (United States); Luscombe, Christine K [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Frechet, Jean M J [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1460 (United States); Poulikakos, Dimos [Laboratory of Thermodynamics in Emerging Technologies, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-08-29

    All-printed electronics is the key technology to ultra-low-cost, large-area electronics. As a critical step in this direction, we demonstrate that laser sintering of inkjet-printed metal nanoparticles enables low-temperature metal deposition as well as high-resolution patterning to overcome the resolution limitation of the current inkjet direct writing processes. To demonstrate this process combined with the implementation of air-stable carboxylate-functionalized polythiophenes, high-resolution organic transistors were fabricated in ambient pressure and room temperature without utilizing any photolithographic steps or requiring a vacuum deposition process. Local thermal control of the laser sintering process could minimize the heat-affected zone and the thermal damage to the substrate and further enhance the resolution of the process. This local nanoparticle deposition and energy coupling enable an environmentally friendly and cost-effective process as well as a low-temperature manufacturing sequence to realize large-area, flexible electronics on polymer substrates.

  15. Environmental scanning electron microscopy study of the fine structure of the triple line and cassie-wenzel wetting transition for sessile drops deposited on rough polymer substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Stein, Tamir; Whyman, Gene; Pogreb, Roman; Barkay, Zahava

    2007-04-10

    The wetting of rough honeycomb micrometrically scaled polymer substrates was studied. A very strong dependence of the apparent contact angle on the drop volume has been established experimentally. The environmental scanning electron microscopy study of the fine structure of the triple line is reported first. The triple line is not smooth and prefers grasping the polymer matrix over air holes. The precursor rim surrounding the drop has been observed. The revealed dependence of the apparent contact angle on the drop volume is explained by the transition between the pure Cassie and combined Wenzel-Cassie wetting regimes, which is induced by capillarity penetration of water into the holes of relief.

  16. Reliability of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors on low dislocation density bulk GaN substrate: Implications of surface step edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killat, N., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Montes Bajo, M.; Kuball, M., E-mail: Nicole.Killat@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paskova, T. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Evans, K. R. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Leach, J. [Kyma Technologies, Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Li, X.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H. [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Chabak, K. D.; Crespo, A.; Gillespie, J. K.; Fitch, R.; Kossler, M.; Walker, D. E.; Trejo, M.; Via, G. D.; Blevins, J. D. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    To enable gaining insight into degradation mechanisms of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors, devices grown on a low-dislocation-density bulk-GaN substrate were studied. Gate leakage current and electroluminescence (EL) monitoring revealed a progressive appearance of EL spots during off-state stress which signify the generation of gate current leakage paths. Atomic force microscopy evidenced the formation of semiconductor surface pits at the failure location, which corresponds to the interaction region of the gate contact edge and the edges of surface steps.

  17. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs.

  18. Combinação entre turfa vermelha e areia na obtenção de substrato-inóculo do fungo micorrízico arbuscular Glomus clarum Combination of red peat and sand for obtaining substrate-inoculum of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus clarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Velho da Silveira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo com o presente estudo foi verificar a influência de diferentes proporções de turfa vermelha e areia na composição do substrato sobre a colonização radicular por fungos micorríozicos arbusculares (FMA e no desenvolvimento vegetativo de aveia branca. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação e os tratamentos foram constituídos a partir de combinações de turfa vermelha (T e areia (A: 100%A; 25%T+75%A; 50%T+50%A; 75%T+25%A; 100%T. Dez sementes de aveia foram semeadas por vaso plástico preto (350ml de volume, contendo 5 gramas de inóculo de Glomus clarum. Quarenta e três dias após a semeadura da aveia, foram realizadas avaliações de desenvolvimento vegetativo e colonização micorrízica do sistema radicular das plantas, através da presença de estruturas, como hifas, arbúsculos e vesículas. Substratos com maior quantidade de turfa induziram maior desenvolvimento da parte aérea e maior qualidade de raízes (QR, em termos de volume de raízes. Entretanto, a presença da turfa acima de 50% no substrato diminuiu a percentagem de colonização micorrízica da aveia. A similaridade verificada entre as curvas de regressões de percentagem de colonização e Água Facilmente Disponível, com mesmo ponto de máximo, sugerem que a quantidade de mesoporos resultante da combinação turfa/areia influencia na resposta dos FMA, a melhor resposta é obtida em mistura com 32,5% de turfa vermelha.The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different proportions of red peat and sand in the substrate on root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and the consequent growth of white oats. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse and the treatments consisted of combinations of read peat (T and sand (A: 100%A; 25%T+75%A; 50%T+50%A; 75%T+25%A; 100%T. Ten oat seeds were sown per container (350ml volume containing 5 grams of Glomus clarum inoculum. Forty-three days after sowing, vegetative development

  19. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  20. One-dimensional InGaZnO field-effect transistor on a polyimide wire substrate for an electronic textile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Tae-Hee; Sang, Byoung-In; Hwang, Do Kyung

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous InGaZnO (IGZO) is a promising semiconducting material to replace amorphous and polycrystalline Si. IGZO-based field-effect transistors (FET) can be versatile platforms for various electronic or optoelectronic applications. Here, we report on a one-dimensional (1-D) IGZO FET fabricated on a flexible polyimide wire substrate for electronic textiles (e-textiles). This flexible 1-D IGZO FET shows a high mobility of 18.18 cm2/Vs with a relatively good on/off current ratio of 104 at operating voltages below 5 V. Furthermore, a resistive-load inverter is implemented by connecting the 1-D IGZO FET to an external load resistor. Such an inverter exhibits obvious voltage switching characteristics, verifying the potential it is being a basic building block for an e-textile circuit system.

  1. Multienergy gold ion implantation for enhancing the field electron emission characteristics of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Manoharan, D.; Sundaravel, B.; Lin, I. N.

    2016-09-01

    Multienergy Au-ion implantation enhanced the electrical conductivity of heterogranular structured diamond films grown on Au-coated Si substrates to a high level of 5076.0 (Ω cm)-1 and improved the field electron emission (FEE) characteristics of the films to low turn-on field of 1.6 V/μm, high current density of 5.4 mA/cm2 (@ 2.65 V/μm), and high lifetime stability of 1825 min. The catalytic induction of nanographitic phases in the films due to Au-ion implantation and the formation of diamond-to-Si eutectic interface layer due to Au-coating on Si together encouraged the efficient conducting channels for electron transport, thereby improved the FEE characteristics of the films.

  2. Study of radiation damage and substrate resistivity effects from beam test of silicon microstrip detectors using LHC readout electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Angarano, Matteo Maria; Brunetti, Maria Teresa; Civinini, Carlo; Coughlan, John A; De Palma, Mauro; Drouhin, Frédéric; French, Marcus; Fürtjes, A; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Checcucci, Bruno; Creanza, Donato; Fano, Livio; Fiore, Luigi; Giorgi, Marco; Lariccia, Paolo; Maggi, Giorgio; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Messina, Giulia; My, Salvatore; Papi, Andrea; Radicci, Valeria; Santinelli, Roberto; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Servoli, Leonello; Silvestris, Lucia; Brunetti, Maria Teresa; Tempesta, Paolo; De Palma, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    We present the beam test results of single-sided silicon microstrip detectors, with different substrate resistivities. The effects of radiation damage are studied for a detector irradiated to a fluence of 2.4 multiplied by 10**1**4 n/cm**2. The detectors are read out with the APV6 chip, which is compatible with the 40 MHz LHC clock. The performance of different detectors and readout modes are studied in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and efficiency.

  3. Controlled modulation of electronic properties of graphene by self-assembled monolayers on SiO2 substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zheng; Sun, Zhengzong; Lu, Wei; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Yu; Tour, James M

    2011-02-22

    In this study, with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of aminopropyl-, ammoniumpropyl-, butyl-, and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilanes deposited in-between graphene and the SiO(2) substrate, a controlled doping of graphene was realized with a threshold voltage ranging from -18 to 30 V. In addition, the SAMs are covalently bonded to the SiO(2) surface rather than the graphene surface, thereby producing minimal effects on the mobility of the graphene. Finally, it is more stable than conventional noncovalent dopants.

  4. Production of BiPbSrCaCuO thin films on MgO and Ag/MgO substrates by electron beam deposition techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Varilci, A; Gorur, O; Celebi, S; Karaca, I

    2002-01-01

    Superconducting BiPbSrCaCuO thin films were prepared on MgO(001) and Ag/MgO substrates using an electron beam (e-beam) evaporation technique. The effects of annealing temperature and Ag diffusion on the crystalline structure and some superconducting properties, respectively, were investigated by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and by measurements of the critical temperature and the critical current density. It was shown that an annealing of both types of films at 845 or 860 C resulted in the formation of mixed Bi-2223 and Bi-2212 phases with a high degree of preferential orientation with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrates. The slight increase of the critical temperature from 103 K to 105 K, the enhancement of the critical current density from 2 x 10 sup 3 to 6 x 10 sup 4 A/cm sup 2 , and the improved surface smoothness are due to a possible silver doping from the substrate. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Reuse of sand, crushed sugarcane and peanut hull-based substrates for cherry tomato cultivation Reutilização de substratos compostos por areia, bagaço de cana-de-açúcar e casca de amendoim no cultivo do tomateiro do grupo cereja

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Fernandes

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The reuse of substrates for more than one growing season is an alternative to reduce production costs. The objective of this work was to evaluate the yield and quality fruits of the cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum grown in reused substrates. The experimental design was a complete randomized block, with a factorial array of 7 × 2 (seven substrates and two growth periods, with four replications. The seven substrates consisted of different combinations of sand (S, crushed sugarcane (CS and peanut hull (PH. The substrates used were: S1 = S; S2 = [(2/3 S + (1/3 CS]; S3 = [(2/3 S + (1/3 PH]; S4 = [(2/3 S + (1/6 CS + (1/6 PH]; S5 = [(1/2 S + (1/2 CS]; S6 = [(1/2 S + (1/2 PH] and S7 = [(1/3 S + (1/3 CS + (1/3 PH]. These substrates were tested as new (one growth season, and reused (two sequentially growth seasons. The cherry tomato average yield was 9.07 kg m-2 when growth on the new substrates, and 8.44 kg m-2 when growth on the reused ones. The fruit quality was not affected by the reutilization of the substrates. The average values were 6.5 ºBrix for total soluble solids; 0.6 g for citric acid per 100 g for total titratable acidity and 4.2 for pH. A substrate consisting of equal parts of the three components can be recommended as a good growth medium for cherry tomato. All the substrates tested can be efficiently reused, at least once.A reutilização de substratos por mais de um cultivo é uma alternativa para reduzir os custos de produção. Objetivou-se assim avaliar a produtividade e a qualidade dos frutos do tomateiro (Lycopersicon esculentum do grupo cereja cultivado em substratos reutilizados. O delineamento experimental adotado foi o de blocos casualizados, com esquema fatorial 7 × 2 (sete substratos e duas utilizações dos substratos, em quatro repetições. Os substratos resultaram da combinação de diferentes proporções volumétricas de areia (A, bagaço de cana-de-açúcar (BC e casca de amendoim (CA. Testou-se: S1 = A; S2

  6. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  7. Spin-Resolved Electronic Structure of Ultrathin Epitaxial Fe Films on Vicinal and Singular GaAs(100) Substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, S A; Waddill, G D; Spangenberg, M; Seddon, E A; Neal, J; Shen, T; Tobin, J G

    2003-03-10

    Recently there has been considerable interest in the study of spin injection at ferromagnetic semiconductor heterojunctions and ferromagnetic metal--semiconductor contacts. Studies of ntype semiconductors have demonstrated spin-coherent transport over large distances5 and the persistence of spin coherence over a sizeable time scale. Clearly such investigations have been stimulated by the potential of the development of ''spintronics'', electronic devices utilizing the information of the electron spin states. To understand and improve the magnetic properties of ultrathin Fe films on GaAs has been the aim of many research groups over recent years. The interest in this system has both technological and fundamental scientific motivations. Technologically, Fe on GaAs may serve to realize spin electronic devices. From a fundamental science point of view, Fe on GaAs serves as a prototype for studies of the interplay between the crystalline structure and morphology of an ultrathin film, its electronic structure and the long range magnetic order it exhibits. Furthermore, it is well known that an oxidized Cs layer on GaAs substantially alters the work-function of the GaAs surface, which plays a very important role in the application of GaAs as a spin polarized electron source.

  8. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, K. J.; Sundaravel, B.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm)-1, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm2 (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  9. Improvement on electrical conductivity and electron field emission properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond films by using Au-Si eutectic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankaran, K. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu Taiwan 300, Taiwan (China); Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Sundaravel, B. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Tai, N. H., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu Taiwan 300, Taiwan (China); Lin, I. N., E-mail: nhtai@mx.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: inanlin@mail.tku.edu.tw [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui, Taiwan 251, Taiwan (China)

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, Au-Si eutectic layer was used to enhance the electrical conductivity/electron field emission (EFE) properties of Au-ion implanted ultrananocrystalline diamond (Au-UNCD) films grown on Si substrates. The electrical conductivity was improved to a value of 230 (Ω cm){sup −1}, and the EFE properties was enhanced reporting a low turn-on field of 2.1 V/μm with high EFE current density of 5.3 mA/cm{sup 2} (at an applied field of 4.9 V/μm) for the Au-UNCD films. The formation of SiC phase circumvents the formation of amorphous carbon prior to the nucleation of diamond on Si substrates. Consequently, the electron transport efficiency of the UNCD-to-Si interface increases, thereby improving the conductivity as well as the EFE properties. Moreover, the salient feature of these processes is that the sputtering deposition of Au-coating for preparing the Au-Si interlayer, the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process for growing the UNCD films, and the Au-ion implantation process for inducing the nanographitic phases are standard thin film preparation techniques, which are simple, robust, and easily scalable. The availability of these highly conducting UNCD films with superior EFE characteristics may open up a pathway for the development of high-definition flat panel displays and plasma devices.

  10. Theoretical analyses of the elastic and electronic properties of InAs QDs and QD-in-WELL structures grown on GaAs high index substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennour, M., E-mail: mnbnnr@gmail.com [Micro-Optoelectronic and Nanostructures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Monastir University, Environment Street, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Bouzaiene, L.; Saidi, F. [Micro-Optoelectronic and Nanostructures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Monastir University, Environment Street, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Sfaxi, L. [Micro-Optoelectronic and Nanostructures Laboratory, Sousse University (Tunisia); Maaref, H. [Micro-Optoelectronic and Nanostructures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Monastir University, Environment Street, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2015-10-25

    We report a theoretical study of the wetting layer thickness, In{sub x}Ga{sub (1−x)}As quantum-well thickness and Indium composition effects on the physical properties of InAs quantum dots (QDs) and quantum dots-in-well (QD-in-WELL) grown on GaAs high index substrates. Finite element method is used to calculate the strain, piezoelectric field distributions and the electronic structure. Coulomb interaction has been taken as a perturbation in the interband transition energy. The ground–state transition energy is influenced by the wetting layer thickness (WL) and the substrate orientation; however, it is not affected by the InGaAs quantum-well thickness. We have found that the tensile strain at the interface is the main factor responsible for the difficulty of self-assembled InAs QDs formation on GaAs(111) substrate. On the other hand, the stability of the relaxed strain into QD–IN–WELL depended on the Indium composition and the quantum-well thickness as well as the orientation substrate. The appropriate Indium composition in the InGaAs quantum-well is found to be 0.3 for the QD–IN–WELL grown on GaAs(111) and 0.2 for the QD–IN–WELL grown on GaAs(119). This work can be helpful to controlling the wavelength of QD–IN–WELL grown on high index substrates by changing the In composition or the quantum well-thickness. - Graphical abstract: The piezoelectric field was found to be more important in large QD than that of small QD which contribute to a little blue shift between small and large QD, when the substrate disorientation increased from (119) to (111). - Highlights: • Finite element method used to calculate strain, piezoelectric field and energy gap. • Physical properties of InAs/GaAs(11n) QDs and InGaAs/InAs/InGaAs/GaAs(11n) QD-in Well. • Stability of relaxed strain into quantum dots and quantum dots-in-well was discussed. • Tensile strain interface is responsible of difficulty self-assembled InAs/GaAs(111)QD.

  11. Strain in epitaxial Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} grown on GaN and graphene substrates: A reflection high-energy electron diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bin; Guo, Xin; Ho, Wingkin; Xie, Maohai, E-mail: mhxie@hku.hk [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2015-08-24

    Topological insulator (TI) has been one of the focus research themes in condensed matter physics in recent years. Due to the relatively large energy bandgap, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has been identified as one of the most promising three-dimensional TIs with application potentials. Epitaxial Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} by molecular-beam epitaxy has been reported by many groups using different substrates. A common feature is that Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} grows readily along the c-axis direction irrespective of the type and condition of the substrate. Because of the weak van der Waals interaction between Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} quintuple layers, the grown films are reported to be strain-free, taking the lattice constant of the bulk crystal. At the very initial stage of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} deposition, however, strain may still exist depending on the substrate. Strain may bring some drastic effects to the properties of the TIs and so achieving strained TIs can be of great fundamental interests as well as practical relevance. In this work, we employ reflection high-energy electron diffraction to follow the lattice constant evolution of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} during initial stage depositions on GaN and graphene, two very different substrates. We reveal that epitaxial Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is tensile strained on GaN but strain-free on graphene. Strain relaxation on GaN is gradual.

  12. Interactions between microbial activity and distribution and mineral coatings on sand grains from rapid sand filters treating groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Tatari, Karolina; Musovic, Sanin

    Rapid sand filtration is a traditional and widespread technology for drinking water purification which combines biological, chemical and physical processes together. Granular media, especially sand, is a common filter material that allows several oxidized compounds to accumulate on its surface....... Preliminarily, we detected a strong relation between the amount of DNA and mineral coating mass. We hypothesized that the accumulated mineral coatings have a positive effect on amount of bacterial biomass, its spatial distribution and substrate removal rates. In this study, we combined molecular, microscopic...... and abundance indicated that attached minerals are an important factor controlling bacterial colonization, growth, distribution and substrate utilization in these systems....

  13. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  14. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  15. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  16. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  17. Virksomhedens sande ansigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholt, Marianne Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Er modhistorier en byrde eller en styrke i forandringsprocesser? Hvad stiller vi op, når adgangen til organisationens sande identitet går gennem medarbejdernes modhistorier? Når vi sammenholder denne erkendelse med vores viden om, at medarbejdere helt naturligt afholder sig fra at videregive disse...

  18. Sand (CSW4)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  19. Sand supply to beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2017-04-01

    In most cases, beaches and dunes are built by sand that has been transported onshore from the shoreface. While this has been known for a long time, we are still not able to quantitatively predict onshore sediment transport and sand supply to beaches. Sediment transport processes operating during brief, high-energy stormy conditions - when beaches erode and sand moves offshore - are fairly well known and they can be modelled with a reasonable degree of confidence. However, the slower onshore sand transport leading to beach recovery under low-to-moderate energy conditions - and the reason why beaches and dunes exist in the first place - is not yet well understood. This severely limits our capability to understand and predict coastal behaviour on long time scales, for example in response to changing sea level or wave conditions. This paper will discuss issues and recent developments in sediment transport measurement and prediction on the lower and upper shoreface and into the swash zone. The focus will be on the integration and upscaling of small-scale deterministic process measurements into parametric models that may increase modelling capabilities of coastal behaviour on larger temporal and spatial scales.

  20. Computational modeling analysis of mitochondrial superoxide production under varying substrate conditions and upon inhibition of different segments of the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markevich, Nikolai I; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-01

    A computational mechanistic model of superoxide (O2•-) formation in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) was developed to facilitate the quantitative analysis of factors controlling mitochondrial O2•- production and assist in the interpretation of experimental studies. The model takes into account all individual electron transfer reactions in Complexes I and III. The model accounts for multiple, often seemingly contradictory observations on the effects of ΔΨ and ΔpH, and for the effects of multiple substrate and inhibitor conditions, including differential effects of Complex III inhibitors antimycin A, myxothiazol and stigmatellin. Simulation results confirm that, in addition to O2•- formation in Complex III and at the flavin site of Complex I, the quinone binding site of Complex I is an additional superoxide generating site that accounts for experimental observations on O2•- production during reverse electron transfer. However, our simulation results predict that, when cytochrome c oxidase is inhibited during oxidation of succinate, ROS production at this site is eliminated and almost all superoxide in Complex I is generated by reduced FMN, even when the redox pressure for reverse electron transfer from succinate is strong. In addition, the model indicates that conflicting literature data on the kinetics of electron transfer in Complex III involving the iron-sulfur protein-cytochrome bL complex can be resolved in favor of a dissociation of the protein only after electron transfer to cytochrome bH. The model predictions can be helpful in understanding factors driving mitochondrial superoxide formation in intact cells and tissues.

  1. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  2. Impact of polyethylene glycol on porosity and microstructure of sand-lime product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostrzewa Paulina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoclaved sand-lime products are environment-friendly building materials in the form of bricks and blocks. Due to great interest in silicate products, there have been numerous studies and modifications aimed at improving the properties of the material. The article presents the most important characteristics of sand-lime products, both traditional as well as modified with polyethylene glycol. The purpose of described research was to estimate porosity (determine the type, size and pores distribution and to analyze the microstructure of aforementioned samples. From the practical point of view, these characteristics are particularly important in the construction materials. The following tests have been carried out: bulk density using the hydrostatic method, capillarity, water absorption and mercury porosimetry of samples containing polyethylene glycol. The samples were also subjected to observation of the microstructure under the scanning electron microscope. Preliminary research findings clearly show the positive influence of the used substrate on the basic properties of modified sand-lime product. In comparison to the reference sample, modified products showed a decrease in water absorption and reduced capillarity. The confrontation of the measurements made using a mercury porosimeter with observation of the microstructure, showed differences in the distribution of pores and their size. Besides the additive, the production process itself has a huge impact on the properties of silicates (mixing process, time and temperature of autoclaving.

  3. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  4. Cell abundance and microbial community composition along a complete oil sand mining and reclamation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappé, M.; Schneider, B.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    (~0.37 mmol/L), whereas in the MFTs nitrate concentrations are much lower (~0.04 mmol/L). In some MFT samples sulphate appears to be the most abundant electron acceptor (up to 94 mmol/L) but no hydrogen sulphide could be detected. High cell counts in root-bearing layers might be related to a supply with otherwise unavailable nutrients, especially phosphorus. Another plausible explanation is that the cells are brought in the sand with the peat-mineral mix, because it seems that the mix contains a significant amount of roots. Samples with low amounts or no roots showed lower cell abundances. Sand and MFTs also differ in the microbial community composition. Molecular analysis of bacterial isolates of samples with different oil content show that β-Proteobacteria dominate the cultivable bacterial population in substrates with a high residual content of oil, whereas in the low oil content sand they play a minor role. The data of corresponding metagenomic analyses confirm these results. In MFTs β-Proteobacteria make up about 80% of the total bacterial population. The surprisingly stable cell abundance indicates that microbial processes take place throughout the entire production process. Rising cell numbers in root-bearing horizons show that a plant cover fosters microbial abundance and diversity, helping to restore full ecosystem functionality.

  5. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shervin, Shahab; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Bulashevich, Kirill; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  6. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shervin, Shahab; Asadirad, Mojtaba [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Kim, Seung-Hwan; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Bulashevich, Kirill [STR Group, Inc., Engels av. 27, P.O. Box 89, 194156, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  7. Edge effect enhanced electron field emission in top assembled reduced graphene oxide assisted by amorphous CNT-coated carbon cloth substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarshi Roy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a hybrid structure assembly of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs -reduced graphene oxide (RGO has been fabricated on carbon cloth/PET substrates for enhanced edge effect assisted flexible field emission device application. The carbon nanostructures prepared by chemical processes were finally deposited one over the other by a simple electrophoretic deposition (EPD method on carbon cloth (CC fabric. The thin films were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. Field assisted electron emission measurement was performed on this hybrid structure. It was observed that the hybrid carbon nanostructure showed exceptional field emission properties with outstanding low turn-on and threshold field (Eto∼ 0.26 Vμm−1, Eth ∼ 0.55 Vμm1. These observed results are far better compared to standalone and plasma etched edge enhanced RGO systems due to the bottom layer a-CNTs bed which assisted in significant enhancement of edge effect in RGO sheets.

  8. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report.

  9. PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

  10. Formation of Ti-Ta-based surface alloy on TiNi SMA substrate from thin films by pulsed electron-beam melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, L. L.; Markov, A. B.; Ozur, G. E.; Rotshtein, V. P.; Yakovlev, E. V.; Meisner, S. N.; Poletika, T. M.; Girsova, S. L.; Semin, V. O.; Mironov, Yu P.

    2017-05-01

    TiNi shape memory alloys (SMAs) are unique metallic biomaterials due to combination of superelastisity and high corrosion resistance. Important factors limiting biomedical applications of TiNi SMAs are a danger of toxic Ni release into the adjacent tissues, as well as insufficient level of X-ray visibility. In this paper, the method for fabrication of protective Ni-free surface alloy of thickness ∼1 μm of near Ti70Ta30 composition on TiNi SMA substrate has been successfully realized. The method is based on multiple alternation of magnetron co-deposition of Ti70Ta30 thin (50 nm) films and their liquid-phase mixing with the TiNi substrate by microsecond low-energy, high current electron beam (≤15 keV, ∼2 J/cm2) using setup RITM-SP (Microsplav, Russia). It was found by AES, XRD, SEM/EDS and HRTEM/EDS examinations, that Ti-Ta surface alloy has an increased X-ray visibility and gradient multiphase amorphous-nanocrystalline structure containing nanopores.

  11. Electronic structure of antimonene grown on Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} (111) and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Tao; Liu, Chen; Zhao, Jia-Li; Li, Jin-Mei; Wang, Jia-Ou; Wu, Rui; Qian, Hai-Jie; Ibrahim, Kurash, E-mail: kurash@ihep.ac.cn [Institute of High Energy of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Ya-Ping; Wang, Hui-Qiong [Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361995, Fujian (China)

    2016-01-07

    We explore the formation of single bilayer Sb(111) ultrathin film (Antimonene) on Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} substrates for the first time, which is theoretically predicated to be a robust trivial semiconductor but can be tuned to a 2D TI by reducing the buckling height. From angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements, the antimonene can be well grown on the two surfaces and shows clear band dispersion. The electronic structure of the antimonene shows similar character on the two surfaces, but due to the interfacial strain effect, the bands of antimonene on Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are flatter than on Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, which attributes to Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} substrate lattice constants lager than Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. At the same time, the charge transfer effect is also observed through core level shift, which influences the band dispersion simultaneously.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence characterization of InGaAs strained quantum wires on GaAs vicinal (110) substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Shim, B R; Ota, T; Kobayashi, K; Maehashi, K; Nakashima, H; Lee, S Y

    1999-01-01

    We have used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) to study InGaAs/AlGaAs strained quantum wires (QWRs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs vicinal (110) substrates. The cross-sectional TEM image reveals that InGaAs QWRs structures are naturally formed on AlGaAs giant steps. In the plan-view TEM images, the fringe pattern in the giant-step region is observed for In sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As layers with x<= 0.4 We measured the separation of the fringe in the plan-view TEM images and compared the result with the calculated fringe separation. From this result, we conclude that the fringes observed in the plan-view TEM images are moire fringes. PL spectra of the InGaAs QWRs samples reveal 80-meV shifts to lower energy with respect to the spectrum of a quantum well (QWL) grown on a (001) substrate under the same conditions. We also measured the polarization anisotropy of the PL spectra from the QWRs. The PL peak shifts systematically toward higher energy with decreasing...

  13. Chemical bath deposited (CBD) CuO thin films on n-silicon substrate for electronic and optical applications: Impact of growth time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Jenifar; Paul, Somdatta; Karmakar, Anupam; Yi, Ren; Dalapati, Goutam Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Sanatan

    2017-10-01

    Thin film of p-type cupric oxide (p-CuO) is grown on silicon (n-Si) substrate by using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique and a precise control of thickness from 60 nm to 178 nm has been achieved. The structural properties and stoichiometric composition of the grown films are observed to depend significantly on the growth time. The chemical composition, optical properties, and structural quality are investigated in detail by employing XRD, ellipsometric measurements and SEM images. Also, the elemental composition and the oxidation states of Cu and O in the grown samples have been studied in detail by XPS measurements. Thin film of 110 nm thicknesses exhibited the best performance in terms of crystal quality, refractive index, dielectric constant, band-gap, and optical properties. The study suggests synthesis route for developing high quality CuO thin film using CBD method for electronic and optical applications.

  14. Impact of barrier thickness on transistor performance in AlN/GaN high electron mobility transistors grown on free-standing GaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deen, David A., E-mail: david.deen@alumni.nd.edu; Storm, David F.; Meyer, David J.; Bass, Robert; Binari, Steven C. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5347 (United States); Gougousi, Theodosia [Physics Department, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Evans, Keith R. [Kyma Technologies, Raleigh, North Carolina 27617 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A series of six ultrathin AlN/GaN heterostructures with varied AlN thicknesses from 1.5–6 nm have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy on free-standing hydride vapor phase epitaxy GaN substrates. High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were fabricated from the set in order to assess the impact of barrier thickness and homo-epitaxial growth on transistor performance. Room temperature Hall characteristics revealed mobility of 1700 cm{sup 2}/V s and sheet resistance of 130 Ω/□ for a 3 nm thick barrier, ranking amongst the lowest room-temperature sheet resistance values reported for a polarization-doped single heterostructure in the III-Nitride family. DC and small signal HEMT electrical characteristics from submicron gate length HEMTs further elucidated the effect of the AlN barrier thickness on device performance.

  15. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  16. Observation and simulation of microdroplet shapes on surface-energy-patterned substrates: Contact line engineering for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yuki; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Minemawari, Hiromi; Yamada, Toshikazu; Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2013-07-01

    Equilibrium microdroplet shapes on hydrophilic/hydrophobic patterned surfaces were investigated both by experimental observation using an inkjet printing technique and by computer simulation. We demonstrated that the hybrid energy minimization simulation can accurately reproduce the equilibrium shapes of observed microdroplets, including the droplet contact line in the vicinity of a sharp corner in the hydrophilic region. We found that the relative ratio of nonwetting areas by the droplets around a rectangular corner can be used as a useful index to check the reliability of the simulation as well as to estimate the surface-energy distribution within the hydrophilic region. Based on the estimation of the additional local force acting on the contact lines, we discuss the design rules for printed electronics circuits, such as the shapes of the integrated electrode to realize the ideal spreading.

  17. 'Sharks Teeth' -- Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sometimes, pictures received from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are 'just plain pretty.' This image, taken in early September 2000, shows a group of sand dunes at the edge of a much larger field of dark-toned dunes in Proctor Crater. Located at 47.9oS, 330.4oW, in the 170 km (106 mile) diameter crater named for 19th Century British astronomer Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), the dunes shown here are created by winds blowing largely from the east/northeast. A plethora of smaller, brighter ripples covers the substrate between the dunes. Sunlight illuminates them from the upper left.

  18. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  19. The chemoenzymatic synthesis of clofarabine and related 2′-deoxyfluoroarabinosyl nucleosides: the electronic and stereochemical factors determining substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilja V. Fateev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Two approaches to the synthesis of 2-chloro-9-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-β-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (1, clofarabine were studied. The first approach consists in the chemical synthesis of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (12a, 2FAra-1P via three step conversion of 1,3,5-tri-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose (9 into the phosphate 12a without isolation of intermediary products. Condensation of 12a with 2-chloroadenine catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP resulted in the formation of clofarabine in 67% yield. The reaction was also studied with a number of purine bases (2-aminoadenine and hypoxanthine, their analogues (5-aza-7-deazaguanine and 8-aza-7-deazahypoxanthine and thymine. The results were compared with those of a similar reaction with α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (13a, Ara-1P. Differences of the reactivity of various substrates were analyzed by ab initio calculations in terms of the electronic structure (natural purines vs analogues and stereochemical features (2FAra-1P vs Ara-1P of the studied compounds to determine the substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases. The second approach starts with the cascade one-pot enzymatic transformation of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a, followed by its condensation with 2-chloroadenine thereby affording clofarabine in ca. 48% yield in 24 h. The following recombinant E. coli enzymes catalyze the sequential conversion of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a: ribokinase (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinofuranose-5-phosphate, phosphopentomutase (PPN; no 1,6-diphosphates of D-hexoses as co-factors required (12a, and finally PNP. The substrate activities of D-arabinose, D-ribose and D-xylose in the similar cascade syntheses of the relevant 2-chloroadenine nucleosides were studied and compared with the activities of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose. As expected, D-ribose exhibited the best substrate

  20. Evaluation of freestanding boron-doped diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition as substrates for vertical power electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Issaoui, R.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.; Silva, F.; Gicquel, A. [LSPM-CNRS (formerly LIMHP), Universite Paris 13, 99, Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clement, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Bisaro, R.; Servet, B.; Garry, G. [Thales Research and Technology France, Campus de Polytechnique, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Barjon, J. [GEMaC-CNRS, Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin Batiment Fermat, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France)

    2012-03-19

    In this study, 4 x 4 mm{sup 2} freestanding boron-doped diamond single crystals with thickness up to 260 {mu}m have been fabricated by plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition. The boron concentrations measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy were 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} which is in a good agreement with the values calculated from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, thus indicating that almost all incorporated boron is electrically active. The dependence of lattice parameters and crystal mosaicity on boron concentrations have also been extracted from high resolution x-ray diffraction experiments on (004) planes. The widths of x-ray rocking curves have globally shown the high quality of the material despite a substantial broadening of the peak, indicating a decrease of structural quality with increasing boron doping levels. Finally, the suitability of these crystals for the development of vertical power electronic devices has been confirmed by four-point probe measurements from which electrical resistivities as low as 0.26 {Omega} cm have been obtained.

  1. Trapping the M{sub 1} and M{sub 2} substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  2. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  3. Site-specific forest-assembly of single-wall carbon nanotubes on electron-beam patterned SiO{sub x}/Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Haoyan [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Kim, Sang Nyon; Kim, Sejong [Nanomaterials Optoelectronics Laboratory, Polymer Program, Institute of Materials Science, Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Huey, Bryan D. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios [Nanomaterials Optoelectronics Laboratory, Polymer Program, Institute of Materials Science, Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Marcus, Harris L. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Department of Chemical, Materials and Biomolecular Engineering, Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)], E-mail: hmarcus@ims.uconn.edu

    2008-12-01

    Based on electron-beam direct writing on the SiO{sub x}/Si substrates, favorable absorption sites for ferric cations (Fe{sup 3+} ions) were created on the surface oxide layer. This allowed Fe{sup 3+}-assisted self-assembled arrays of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) probes to be produced. Auger investigation indicated that the incident energetic electrons depleted oxygen, creating more dangling bonds around Si atoms at the surface of the SiO{sub x} layer. This resulted in a distinct difference in the friction forces from unexposed regions as measured by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) affirmed that the irradiated domains absorbed considerably more Fe{sup 3+} ions upon immersion into pH 2.2 aqueous FeCl{sub 3} solution. This rendered a greater yield of FeO(OH)/FeOCl precipitates, primarily FeO(OH), upon subsequent washing with lightly basic dimethylformamide (DMF) solution. Such selective metal-functionalization established the basis for the subsequent patterned forest-assembly of SWNTs as demonstrated by resonance Raman spectroscopy.

  4. Explanation of threshold voltage scaling in enhancement-mode InAlN/AlN-GaN metal oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexewicz, A., E-mail: alexander.alexewicz@tuwien.ac.at [Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Ostermaier, C.; Henkel, C.; Bethge, O. [Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Carlin, J.-F.; Lugani, L.; Grandjean, N. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 3, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bertagnolli, E.; Pogany, D.; Strasser, G. [Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, 1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-31

    We present enhancement-mode GaN high electron mobility transistors on Si substrates with ZrO{sub 2} gate dielectrics of thicknesses t{sub ox} between 10 and 24 nm. The oxide interlayers between the InAlN/AlN barrier and gate metal allow raising the device threshold voltage up to + 2.3 V and reduce gate leakage current to less than 100 nA/mm with a high drain current on/off ratio of 4 orders of magnitude. We use a model that explains the observed linear dependence of the threshold voltage on t{sub ox} and allows determining fixed charges at the oxide/barrier interface. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement-mode InAlN/AlN-GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal oxide semiconductor HEMT with ZrO{sub 2} gate oxide Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear decrease of threshold voltage with increasing gate oxide thickness Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A model explaining that dependence is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This model allows determining fixed charges at the InAlN/ZrO{sub 2} interface.

  5. A fluorescent redox dye. Influence of several substrates and electron carriers on the tetrazolium salt-formazan reaction of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellmach, J; Severin, E

    1987-01-01

    This study was performed to elaborate the best conditions for measuring the redox activity of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells by using a new tetrazolium salt, cyantolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC). This tetrazolium salt forms a fluorescent water-insoluble formazan on reduction on the surface of intact vital cells. The influences of fixation and of various substrates and electron carriers on the cellular reduction of CTC were investigated quantitatively using an elution technique. The amount of formazan obtained after incubating vital cells with Meldola Blue as electron carrier was greater than that obtained with Methylene Blue, menadione, 2,6-dichloroindophenol, 1-methoxyphenazine methosulphate or phenazine methosulphate. Using flow cytometry, the formazan production per cell and, after staining the nuclear DNA, the distribution of the redox activity in the cell population can be visualized with satisfactory resolution. We conclude from our findings that dehydrogenases are only partially involved in the reduction of tetrazolium salts by intact cells and that a redox activity, probably related to a cell membrane-bound NAD(P)H-oxidase system, is mainly measured.

  6. Additional heat treatment of non-porous coatings obtained on medium carbon steel substrates by electron beam cladding of a Ti-Mo-C powder composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, D. O.; Drobyaz, E. A.; Zimoglyadova, T. A.; Bataev, V. A.; Lazurenko, D. V.; Shevtsova, L. I.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and microhardness of surface layers, obtained by non-vacuum electron beam cladding of Ti-Mo-C powder mixture on a steel substrate after different types of heat treatment, were investigated. After cladding samples were heat treated in a furnace at 200...500 °C, as well as quenched at 860 ° C and then underwent high-temperature tempering. Heat treatment of cladded coatings induced tempering of martensite and precipitation of cementite particles (Fe3C). Transmission electron microscopy of the samples after heating and holding at 300 ° C revealed precipitation of nanosized cubical TiC particles. The formation of hard nanosized particles led to the surface layer microhardness growth. The highest level of microhardness (which was 1.2...1.5-fold higher in comparison with coating microhardness after heat treatment) was achieved after heating of the claded material at 300 °C and 400 °C Additional quenching of samples at 860 °C did not increase the microhardness level.

  7. Oil sands to the rescue: oil sand microbial communities can degrade recalcitrant alkyl phenyl alkanoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Corinne [University of Essex (Canada)], email: cwhitby@essex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Almost half of all global oil reserves are found as biodegraded heavy oils found in vast tar sand deposits located in North and South America and these account for 47% of Canadian oil production. Oil sand extraction generates large amounts of toxic waste water, known as oil sand process waters (OSPW), that are stored in large tailing ponds that contain toxic compounds like naphthenic acids (NAs). The presence of NAs creates problems like toxicity, corrosion, and the formation of calcium napthenate deposits which block pipelines and other infrastructure and need to be removed. This paper presents oil sand microbial communities that can degrade these NAs. The approach is to apply new aliphatic and aromatic NAs as substrates to supplement and identify NA degrading microbes and also to identify the metabolites produced and explain NA degradation pathways and the functional genes involved. The chemistry and the processes involved are explained. From the results, it is suggested that pure cultures of P. putida KT2440 be used against NAs.

  8. Simple stochastic cellular automaton model for starved beds and implications about formation of sand topographic features in terms of sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Noritaka

    2016-12-01

    A simple stochastic cellular automaton model is proposed for simulating bedload transport, especially for cases with a low transport rate and where available sediments are very sparse on substrates in a subaqueous system. Numerical simulations show that the bed type changes from sheet flow through sand patches to ripples as the amount of sand increases; this is consistent with observations in flume experiments and in the field. Without changes in external conditions, the sand flux calculated for a given amount of sand decreases over time as bedforms develop from a flat bed. This appears to be inconsistent with the general understanding that sand flux remains unchanged under the constant-fluid condition, but it is consistent with the previous experimental data. For areas of low sand abundance, the sand flux versus sand amount (flux-density relation) in the simulation shows a single peak with an abrupt decrease, followed by a long tail; this is very similar to the flux-density relation seen in automobile traffic flow. This pattern (the relation between segments of the curve and the corresponding bed states) suggests that sand sheets, sand patches, and sand ripples correspond respectively to the free-flow phase, congested phase, and jam phase of traffic flows. This implies that sand topographic features on starved beds are determined by the degree of interference between sand particles. Although the present study deals with simple cases only, this can provide a simplified but effective modeling of the more complicated sediment transport processes controlled by interference due to contact between grains, such as the pulsatory migration of grain-size bimodal mixtures with repetition of clustering and scattering.

  9. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  10. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  11. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  12. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  13. A family of sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We study some dynamical properties of a family of two-dimensional cellular automata: those that arise from an underlying one dimensional sand automaton whose local rule is obtained using a latin square. We identify a simple sand automaton G whose local rule is algebraic, and classify this automaton as having equicontinuity points, but not being equicontinuous. We also show it is not surjective. We generalise some of these results to a wider class of sand automata.

  14. Dilatometric Characterization of Foundry Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Břuska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this contribution is summary of physical – chemistry properties of usually used foundry silica and no – silica sands in Czech foundries. With the help of dilatometry analysis theoretical assumptions of influence of grain shape and size on dilatation value of sands were confirmed. Determined was the possibility of dilatometry analysis employment for preparing special (hybrid sands with lower and/or more linear character of dilatation.

  15. Model experiments on growth modes and interface electronics of CuInS{sub 2}: Ultrathin epitaxial films on GaAs(100) substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, Wolfram [Institute for Heterogeneous Materials Systems, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109, Berlin (Germany); Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim [Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA, 91101 (United States); Pettenkofer, Christian [Institute Silicon Photovoltaics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Kekulestrasse 5, 12489, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The heterojunction formation between GaAs(100) and CuInS{sub 2} is investigated using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin layers of CuInS{sub 2} films were deposited in a step-by-step process on wet chemically pre-treated GaAs(100) surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) with a total upper thickness limit of the films of 60 nm. The film growth starts from a sulfur-rich GaAs(100) surface. XPS core level analysis of the substrate and film reveals initially a transitory growth regime with the formation of a Ga containing chalcopyrite phase. With increasing film thickness, a change in stoichiometry from Cu-poor to Cu-rich composition is observed. The evaluation of the LEED data shows the occurrence of a recrystallization process where the film orientation follows that of the substrate with the epitaxial relation GaAs{100} parallel CuInS{sub 2}{001}. On the completed junction with a CuInS{sub 2} film thickness of 60 nm, the band discontinuities of the GaAs(100)/CuInS{sub 2} structure measured with XPS and UPS were determined as ΔE{sub V} = 0.1 ± 0.1 eV and ΔE{sub C} = 0.0 ± 0.1 eV, thus showing a type II band alignment. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

  17. Solution NMR characterization of magnetic/electronic properties of azide and cyanide-inhibited substrate complexes of human heme oxygenase: implications for steric ligand tilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Dungeng; Ogura, Hiroshi; Ma, Li-Hua; Evans, John P; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz; La Mar, Gerd N

    2013-04-01

    Solution 2D (1)H NMR was carried out on the azide-ligated substrate complex of human heme oxygenase, hHO, to provide information on the active site molecular structure, chromophore electronic/magnetic properties, and the distal H-bond network linked to the exogenous ligand by catalytically relevant oriented water molecules. While 2D NMR exhibited very similar patterns of two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser spectroscopy cross peaks of residues with substrate and among residues as the previously characterized cyanide complex, significant, broadly distributed chemical shift differences were observed for both labile and non-labile protons. The anisotropy and orientation of the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor, χ, were determined for both the azide and cyanide complexes. The most significant difference observed is the tilt of the major magnetic axes from the heme normal, which is only half as large for the azide than cyanide ligand, with each ligand tilted toward the catalytically cleaved α-meso position. The difference in chemical shifts is quantitatively correlated with differences in dipolar shifts in the respective complexes for all but the distal helix. The necessity of considering dipolar shifts, and hence determination of the orientation/anisotropy of χ, in comparing chemical shifts involving paramagnetic complexes, is emphasized. The analysis shows that the H-bond network cannot detect significant differences in H-bond acceptor properties of cyanide versus azide ligands. Lastly, significant retardation of distal helix labile proton exchange upon replacing cyanide with azide indicates that the dynamic stability of the distal helix is increased upon decreasing the steric interaction of the ligand with the distal helix. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Final report on LDRD project: Low-cost Pd-catalyzed metallization technology for rapid prototyping of electronic substrates and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.S.; Morgan, W.P.; Zich, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    A low-cost, thermally-activated, palladium-catalyzed metallization process was developed for rapid prototyping of polymeric electronic substrates and devices. The process was successfully applied in producing adhesiveless copper/polyimide laminates with high peel strengths and thick copper coating; copper/polyimide laminates are widely used in fabricating interconnects such as printed wiring boards (PWBs) and flexible circuits. Also successfully metallized using this low-cost metallization process were: (1) scaled-down models of radar-and-communication antenna and waveguide; (2) scaled-down model of pulsed-power-accelerator electrode; (3) three-dimensional micro-porous, open-cell vitreous carbon foams. Moreover, additive patterned metallization was successfully achieved by selectively printing or plotting the catalyst ink only on areas where metallization is desired, and by uniform thermal activation. Additive patterned metallization eliminates the time-consuming, costly and environmentally-unfriendly etching process that is routinely carried out in conventional subtractive patterned metallization. A metallization process via ultraviolet (UV) irradiation activation was also demonstrated. In this process palladium-catalyst solution is first uniformly coated onto the substrate. A masking pattern is used to cover the areas where metallization is not wanted. UV irradiation is applied uniformly to activate the palladium catalyst and to cure the polymer carrier in areas that are not covered by the mask. Metal is then deposited by electroless plating only or by a combination of electroless and electrolytic plating. This UV-activation technique is particularly useful in additive fine-line patterned metallization. Lastly, computer models for electrolytic and electroless plating processes were developed to provide guidance in plating-process design.

  19. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note that the tes......The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...... that the testing procedure and the data processing were carried out according to the specifications of ETCS-F1.97....

  20. Isotropic Compression Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Cemented Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibre-reinforced cemented sands have many applications in improving the response of soils. In this paper, an experimental investigation for the analysis of fiber-reinforced cemented sand in the framework of isotropic compression is presented. The experimental investigations were carried out using a high pressure triaxial apparatus having the capacity of 64 MPa of confining pressure. Tests have been conducted on Portaway sand specimens reinforced with randomly oriented discrete polypropylene fibers with different percentages of fiber and cement contents. Results are presented in the form of e-logp` curves as well as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs. The effects of the addition of fibre in sand and cemented sand for different initial void ratios were investigated. The results demonstrate that the influence of fibre is not significant in both cemented and uncemented sand during the isotropic compression stage. Moreover, from the SEM micrographs it could be seen that there is breakage of sand particles and cement bonds. The fiber threads were seen pinched and found rarely broken in the specimen exhumed after isotropic compression.

  1. Waste foundry sand: Environmental implication and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Penkaitis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of analyses using Scanning Electron Microscopy in field samples of waste foundry sand, as well as the results of granulometric, chemical and groundwater analyses. Field data allowed to characterize waste foundry sand and showed that there are elevated concentrations of metals in the groundwater (iron, manganese, boron and selenium, in addition to other potentially toxic elements (chromium, copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc, aluminum, iron, manganese, which are present in the waste and are considered not hazardous by current standards. Even if these elements are not considered hazardous, their concentrations above the permissible limit compromise the environmental quality of the site, posing risks to the local population, since they work in agriculture and use groundwater. Two different types of waste foundry sands were identified using granulometric analyses. Electron microscopy showed features related to morphological, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of grains that make up the waste. Quartz was the dominant mineral. Waste foundry sand is composed of two types of grains: a rounded grain with almost no incrustations formed during alloy production, and a second type of grain, which is not rounded, has incrustations, and always has several metals derived from alloys and associated with these incrustations. Chemical elements detected in groundwater with concentrations above the limits established by the regulatory bodies were found in wells located in the landfill area. Most of these elements show higher concentrations downstream, some of them with concentrations above the regulatory limit, and others show an increase in concentration upstream, indicating that the landfill may be impacting the local environment.

  2. Construction of 3-D electronic sand table system for flood control and ice-jam flood prevention in Ningxia%宁夏防汛防凌三维电子沙盘系统建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄国峰; 范希民; 刘媛媛

    2011-01-01

    本文介绍了宁夏防汛防凌三维电子沙盘系统建设背景和需求,并在系统分析宁夏防汛防凌工作的基础上,提出了该系统建设的框架体系和功能结构.在该系统建设中,利用地理信息系统、遥感、海量数据管理、数据库等技术建立了宁夏回族自治区三维空间数字地图,再现了全区的三维地形、地貌场景,在三维场景中实现了防洪防凌工程信息查询,汛情和凌情信息的实时监控与管理,为宁夏防汛防凌工作提供了一个三维的基础数字化平台.%The background and demand of the construction of the 3-D electronic sand table system for flood control and ice-jam flood prevention in Ningxia are introduced herein, and then the framework and the function of the system are put forward on the basis of the analysis systematically made on the flood control and ice-jam flood prevention in Ningxia. During the construction, the 3-D digital map of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region is established with the techniques of GIS, remote sensing, mass data management, database, etc. , and then the 3-D landform and topographic features of the whole region are represented and the information inquiry, real-time monitoring and management of the relevant flood control and ice-jam flood prevention projects therein are realized within a 3-D scene; which can provide a 3-D fundamental digitized platform for the flood control and ice-jam flood prevention in Ningxia

  3. Hard and soft x-ray study of the correlation between substrate quality and multilayer performance for Co/C coating produced by electron beam evaporation using ion polishing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, S.; Christensen, Finn Erland; Spiller, E.;

    1995-01-01

    Polished silicon crystals, lacquered aluminum foil, and float glass substrates with respect to surface roughness. Co/C multilayers were then deposited by electron-beam evaporation with in situ monitoring x-ray signal and ion polishing (Kr+) for the metal layer. The specular as well...

  4. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  5. Regeneration of dredged sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Knaapen, Michiel; Scholl, Olaf; Scholl, O.; Trenteseaux., A.; Garlan, T.

    2000-01-01

    Sand waves form a wavy pattern in the offshore sandy seabed. Since their crests reduce the navigability, it is important to know their evolution. A simple model is presented to estimate the recovery of sand wave amplitudes. This model is partially based on the similarity with sea ripples and

  6. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  7. Morphology and electronic transport of polycrystalline silicon films deposited by SiF sub 4 /H sub 2 at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, S; Ray, S

    2002-01-01

    Undoped and phosphorous doped polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) films were deposited using a SiF sub 4 /H sub 2 gas mixture at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (rf-PECVD). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments reveal that the present poly-Si films are equivalent to the poly-Si films deposited at high temperature (>600 deg. C). XRD and scanning electron microscope observations show that the crystalline quality of slightly P-doped film is better compared to that of undoped poly-Si films. Phosphorus atom concentration in the slightly P-doped poly-Si film is 5.0x10 sup 1 sup 6 atoms/cm sup 3. Association of a few phosphorous atoms in the silicon matrix enhances crystallization as eutectic-forming metals do. Dark conductivity of slightly P-doped film is 4 orders of magnitude higher, although mobility-lifetime product (eta mu tau) is 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of undoped film. The presence o...

  8. Mechanism of leakage of ion-implantation isolated AlGaN/GaN MIS-high electron mobility transistors on Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhili; Song, Liang; Li, Weiyi; Fu, Kai; Yu, Guohao; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fan, Yaming; Deng, Xuguang; Li, Shuiming; Sun, Shichuang; Li, Xiajun; Yuan, Jie; Sun, Qian; Dong, Zhihua; Cai, Yong; Zhang, Baoshun

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we systematically investigated the leakage mechanism of the ion-implantation isolated AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator-semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MIS-HEMTs) on Si substrate. By means of combined DC tests at different temperatures and electric field dependence, we demonstrated the following original results: (1) It is proved that gate leakage is the main contribution to OFF-state leakage of ion-implantation isolated AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMTs, and the gate leakage path is a series connection of the gate dielectric Si3N4 and Si3N4-GaN interface. (2) The dominant mechanisms of the leakage current through LPCVD-Si3N4 gate dielectric and Si3N4-GaN interface are identified to be Frenkel-Poole emission and two-dimensional variable range hopping (2D-VRH), respectively. (3) A certain temperature annealing could reduce the density of the interface state that produced by ion implantation, and consequently suppress the interface leakage transport, which results in a decrease in OFF-state leakage current of ion-implantation isolated AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMTs.

  9. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  10. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  11. Towards explaining excess CO2 production in wetlands - the roles of solid and dissolved organic matter as electron acceptors and of substrate quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Gao, Chuanyu; Agethen, Svenja; Sander, Michael

    2017-04-01

    To understand carbon storage in water logged, anaerobic peatlands, factors controlling mineralization have been studied for decades. Temperature, substrate quality, water table position and the availability of electron acceptors for oxidation of organic carbon have been identified as major factors. However, many studies reported an excess carbon dioxide (CO2) production over methane (CH4) that cannot be explained by available electron acceptors, and peat soils did not reach strictly methanogenic conditions (i.e., a stoichiometric formation ratio of 1:1 of CO2 to CH4). It has been hypothesized that peat organic matter (OM) provides a previously unrecognized electron acceptor for microbial respiration, elevating CO2 to CH4 ratios. Microbial reduction of dissolved OM has been shown in the mid 90's, but only recently mediated electrochemical techniques opened the possibility to access stocks and changes in electron accepting capacities (EAC) of OM in dissolved and solid form. While it was shown that the EAC of OM follows redox cycles of microbial reduction and O2 reoxidation, changes in the EAC of OM were so far not related quantitatively to CO2 production. We therefore tested if CO2 production in anoxic peat incubations is balanced by the consumption of electron acceptors if EAC of OM is included. We set up anoxic incubations with peat and monitored production of CO2 and CH4, and changes in EAC of OM in the dissolved and solid phase over time. Interestingly, in all incubations, the EAC of dissolved OM was poorly related to CO2 and CH4 production. Instead, dissolved OM was rapidly reduced at the onset of the incubations and thereafter remained in reduced form. In contrast, the decrease in the EAC of particulate (i.e. non-dissolved) OM was closely linked to the observed production of non-methanogenic CO2. Thereby, the total EAC of the solid OM pool by far exceeded the EAC of the dissolved OM pool. Over the course of eight week incubations, measured decreases in the EAC

  12. Effect of streambed substrate on macroinvertebrate biodiversity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuehua DUAN; Zhaoyin WANG; Shimin TIAN

    2008-01-01

    Macroinvertebrates are important components of stream ecosystems, and are often used as indicator spe-cies for the assessment of river ecology. Numerous studies have shown that substrate is the primary physical envir-onmental variable affecting the taxa richness and density of macroinvertebrates. The aim of this work is to study the effects of the characteristics of streambed substrate, such as grain size, shape, and roughness, on the composition and biodiversity of macroinvertebrates. A field experi-ment was done on the Juma River, a second-order moun-tain stream in northern China. Substrata of cobbles, hewn stones, pebbles, coarse sand, and fine sand were used to replace the original gravel and sand bed in a stretch of 30 m in length. The sampling results indicated that the macroinvertebrate assemblage is significantly affected by the grain size, porosity and interstitial dimension of the substrate, while it is rarely affected by the shape and the surface roughness of the experimental substrata. Macroinvertebrate compositions in cobbles and hewn stones were stable and changed least over time. The taxa richness and density of individuals in the substrata of cobbles, hewn stones, and pebbles are much higher than in those of the coarse sand and fine sand.

  13. Sand harm in taklimakan Desert highway and sand control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANZhiwen; WANGTao; SUNQingwei; DONGZhibao; WANGXunming

    2003-01-01

    Reputed as a wonderful achievement of the world’s highway construction history,the Taklimakan Desert highway is nor facing serious sand drift encroachment problems due to its 447-km-long passage of sand sea consisting of crescent dunes,barchan chains,compound transverse dune ridges and complex megadunes.To solve some technical problems in the protection of the highway from sang drift encroachment,desert experts have been conducting the theoretical and applied studies on sand movement laws;causes,severities and time-space differentiation of sand drift damages;and control ways including mechanical,chemical and biological measures.In this paper the authors give an overall summry on the research contents and recent progress in the control of sand drift damages in China and hold that the theoretical researc results and practices in the prevention of sand drift encroachment on the cross-desert highway represnt a breakthrough and has an cpoch-making significance.Since the construction of protective forest along the cross-desert highway requires large amount of ground water,what will be its environmental consequence and whether it can effectively halt sand drift encroachment on the highway forever are the questions to be studied urgently.

  14. Use of an integrated approach to characterize the physicochemical properties of foundry green sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnin, Raquel L.P. [Tupy S.A., Rua Albano Schmidt 3.400, Joinville, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Folgueras, Marilena Valadares; Luvizao, Rubia Raquel; Correia, Sivaldo Leite [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Rua Paulo Malschitzki, s/numero - Campus Universitario Prof. Avelino Marcante, Bairro Zona Industrial Norte, Joinville, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Cunha, Carlos Jorge da [Universidade Federal do Parana, Centro Politecnico, Jardim das Americas, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Dungan, Robert S., E-mail: robert.dungan@ars.usda.gov [USDA-ARS, Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research Laboratory, 3793 North 3600 East, Kimberly, ID 83341 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physicochemical properties of fresh, spent, and landfilled foundry green sands were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A phase composition model was postulated for each material based on thermogravimetric results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sand from the landfill was determined to be composed of almost pure silica sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weathering is likely responsible for removing the coating materials from the green sands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilled sands may be suitable for reuse within the foundry or beneficial use applications. - Abstract: A fresh green sand, spent green sand, and a weathered spent green sand (wSGS) from a foundry landfill were analyzed using diffractometry, electron microscopy, fluorometry, granulometry, spectrometry, and thermogravimetry (TG). Our objective was to understand how the physicochemical properties of the foundry green sands change from their original form after being subjected to the casting process, then after weathering at the landfill. A quantitative phase composition model was also postulated for each material based on the TG results and it was found to be the most reliable and informative quantitative data for this type of residue. The weathered sample, that remained in a landfill for two years, was found to be composed of almost pure sand. Because of the weathering process, it may be possible to use the wSGS as a virgin sand replacement in the regeneration system or in geotechnical applications where bentonite would affect the properties of the final product.

  15. Growth of white tabebuia seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marichel Canazza de Macedo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the white tabebuia (Tabebuia roseo-alba (Ridl. Sandwith seedlings emergence and growth in the beds according to different substrates. Two independent experiments were conducted. The emergence study was carried out in six substrates: 1- Plantmax®; 2- vermiculite; 3- sand; 4- soil + sand (1:1; 5- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 6- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (2:1:1 (v/v, and the experiment was set up according to a three-replicate randomized complete-block design. The growth study of seedlings was carried out according to a five-replicate randomized complete-block design with five substrates: 1- soil + sand (1:1; 2- soil + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1; 3- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 4- soil + sand + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1:1; 5- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (1:1:1 (v/v. The height results of seedling emergence, emergence speed index and the stem height were observed with Plantmax®, vermiculite, soil + carbonized rice husk and soil + sand + carbonized rice husk. The best results of seedling height, stem diameter, chlorophyll index, leaf area, root length and the stem dry mass weight and root were observed in the substrates with semi decomposed chicken manure. It is recommended the use of P, V, SC or SAC for seedling germination and emergence and SACF or SCF for seedling growth of white tabebuia.

  16. Effect of surface passivation by SiN/SiO{sub 2} of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors on Si substrate by deep level transient spectroscopy method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassoumi, Malek, E-mail: malek.gassoumi@fsm.rnu.tn; Mosbahi, Hana; Zaidi, Mohamed Ali [Universite deMonastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoelectroniques et Nanostructures, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia); Gaquiere, Christophe [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Institut d' Electronique de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie IEMN, Departement hyperfrequences et Semiconducteurs (France); Maaref, Hassen [Universite deMonastir, Laboratoire de Micro-Optoelectroniques et Nanostructures, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir (Tunisia)

    2013-07-15

    Device performance and defects in AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors have been correlated. The effect of SiN/SiO{sub 2} passivation of the surface of AlGaN/GaN high-electron mobility transistors on Si substrates is reported on DC characteristics. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements were performed on the device after the passivation by a (50/100 nm) SiN/SiO{sub 2} film. The DLTS spectra from these measurements showed the existence of the same electron trap on the surface of the device.

  17. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  18. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  19. Spectroscopic characterization of a Nigerian standard sand: Igbokoda sand

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojuri, OO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the Middle Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone near Ottawa, Illinois, had been picked by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as the reference sand to employ in testing cement and strength of concrete [9]. To the best of our knowledge... and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques due to its importance in cement, geotechnical/geo-environmental research in Nigeria. This should halt importation of standard silica sand for mortar and concrete testing...

  20. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  1. Rooting of Mugo pine (Pinus mugo) cuttings as affected by IBA, NAA and planting substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedaghathoor, S.; Kayghobadi, S.; Tajva, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Aim of the study. The effect of planting substrate and concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (Ia) and naphthaleneacetic acid (Naca) hormones was studied on the rooting of mugo pine cuttings. Area of study: The research was carried out in Rasht city, Guilan province, Iran. Material and Methods: Both hormones (IBA and NAA) were applied at four concentrations of 0, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/l. Planting substrates included sand, perlite, cocopeat, sand + perlite, and sand + cocopeat (1:1). Main results: The highest rooting percentage (55%) was obtained under the trilateral treatment a2b4c1 (sand × 4000 mg/l NAA × 1000 mg/l IBA). Sand + cocopeat was found to be the best rooting substrate. Research highlights: It is recommended to apply sand with 4000 mg/l and 1000mg/l concentration of experimental hormones (NAA and IBA, respectively). (Author)

  2. Rooting of Mugo pine (Pinus mugo cuttings as affected by IBA, NAA and planting substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Sedaghathoor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The effect of planting substrate and concentrations of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA and naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA hormones was studied on the rooting of mugo pine cuttings. Area of study: The research was carried out in Rasht city, Guilan province, Iran. Material and Methods: Both hormones (IBA and NAA were applied at four concentrations of 0, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/l. Planting substrates included sand, perlite, cocopeat, sand + perlite, and sand + cocopeat (1:1. Main results: The highest rooting percentage (55% was obtained under the trilateral treatment a2b4c1 (sand × 4000 mg/l NAA × 1000 mg/l IBA. Sand + cocopeat was found to be the best rooting substrate. Research highlights: It is recommended to apply sand with 4000 mg/l and 1000mg/l concentration of experimental hormones (NAA and IBA, respectively. Keywords: auxin; rooting; Pinus mugo; vegetative propagation.

  3. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  4. Effects of artificial sand fixing on community characteristics of a rare desert shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiliang; Tao, Ye; Qiu, Dong; Zhang, Daoyuan; Zhang, Yongkuan

    2013-10-01

    Eremosparton songoricum (Fabaceae) is a rare, native, clonal small shrub of the deserts of central Asia. Although human activities have greatly fragmented the distribution of E. songoricum, it occurs in areas where artificial sand fixing (AS) has been implemented. We sought to explore whether AS promotes survival and growth of E. songoricum. In the Gurbantunggut Desert of northwestern China in June 2010, we established 10 plots in an area where sand fixing occurred (5-10 years previously) and 11 plots on original sand substrate on which some plants had settled without fixing sand. Sand fixing changed soil properties and biological characteristics in sand-fixed plots. The soil surface where sand fixing occurred was covered by algal crusts and some lichen, but not bare sand (BS). Soil nutrients; water content of deep soil (30-150 cm); overall plant and herbaceous species richness, diversity, abundance, and cover; above- and belowground biomass; and cover, biomass, and height of E. songoricum in the sand-fixed plots were significantly greater than in plots of BS. However, distribution of E. songoricum individuals in the 2 types of plots did not differ. Our results indicate AS may enhance survival of E. songoricum and increase the overall diversity and stability of the desert plant community. We suggest AS as a way to protect this rare desert plant in situ. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway II: solid phase biogeochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq eSiddique

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Consolidation of clay particles in aqueous tailings suspensions is a major obstacle to effective management of oil sands tailings ponds in northern Alberta, Canada. We have observed that microorganisms indigenous to the tailings ponds accelerate consolidation of mature fine tailings (MFT during active metabolism by using two biogeochemical pathways. In Pathway I, microbes alter porewater chemistry to indirectly increase consolidation of MFT. Here, we describe Pathway II comprising significant, direct and complementary biogeochemical reactions with MFT mineral surfaces. An anaerobic microbial community comprising Bacteria (predominantly Clostridiales, Synergistaceae and Desulfobulbaceae and Archaea (Methanolinea/Methanoregula and Methanosaeta transformed FeIII minerals in MFT to amorphous FeII minerals during methanogenic metabolism of an added organic substrate. Synchrotron analyses suggested that ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3. 9H2O and goethite (α-FeOOH were the dominant FeIII minerals in MFT. The formation of amorphous iron sulfide (FeS and possibly green rust entrapped and masked electronegative clay surfaces in amended MFT. Both Pathways I and II reduced the surface charge potential (repulsive forces of the clay particles in MFT, which aided aggregation of clays and formation of networks of pores, as visualized using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. These reactions facilitated the egress of porewater from MFT and increased consolidation of tailings solids. These results have large-scale implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds, a burgeoning environmental issue for the public and government regulators.

  6. Microbially-accelerated consolidation of oil sands tailings. Pathway II: solid phase biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, Tariq; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Li, Carmen; Young, Rozlyn; Arocena, Joselito M; Foght, Julia M

    2014-01-01

    Consolidation of clay particles in aqueous tailings suspensions is a major obstacle to effective management of oil sands tailings ponds in northern Alberta, Canada. We have observed that microorganisms indigenous to the tailings ponds accelerate consolidation of mature fine tailings (MFT) during active metabolism by using two biogeochemical pathways. In Pathway I, microbes alter porewater chemistry to indirectly increase consolidation of MFT. Here, we describe Pathway II comprising significant, direct and complementary biogeochemical reactions with MFT mineral surfaces. An anaerobic microbial community comprising Bacteria (predominantly Clostridiales, Synergistaceae, and Desulfobulbaceae) and Archaea (Methanolinea/Methanoregula and Methanosaeta) transformed Fe(III) minerals in MFT to amorphous Fe(II) minerals during methanogenic metabolism of an added organic substrate. Synchrotron analyses suggested that ferrihydrite (5Fe2O3. 9H2O) and goethite (α-FeOOH) were the dominant Fe(III) minerals in MFT. The formation of amorphous iron sulfide (FeS) and possibly green rust entrapped and masked electronegative clay surfaces in amended MFT. Both Pathways I and II reduced the surface charge potential (repulsive forces) of the clay particles in MFT, which aided aggregation of clays and formation of networks of pores, as visualized using cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These reactions facilitated the egress of porewater from MFT and increased consolidation of tailings solids. These results have large-scale implications for management and reclamation of oil sands tailings ponds, a burgeoning environmental issue for the public and government regulators.

  7. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  8. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  9. Adsorption of a dye on clay and sand. Use of cyclodextrins as solubility-enhancement agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisi, Rosario; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefania; Muratore, Nicola

    2007-11-01

    Laboratory-scale studies were aimed at elucidating the physico-chemical aspects on the removal process of crystal violet (CV) from waters and solid substrates. The laponite clay (RD) and sand were chosen for the double aim at investigating them as CV adsorbents for water treatment and as substrates which mime the soil components. Sand is very effective in removing CV from waters. The cyclodextrins (CDs) were exploited as solubility-enhancement agents to remove CV from the solid substrates. They are powerful solvent media because they extract the CV from sand forming water-soluble CV/CD inclusion complexes and do not show affinity for sand. Optimum performance was shown by the modified CDs (i.e. hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin). A linear correlation between the logarithm of the equilibrium constant for the CV/CD inclusion complexes formation (K(cpx)) and the maximum amount of CV extracted from sand in the columns experiments at a flow rate of 1.5 ml min(-1) was drawn. This relationship predicts that CDs with K(cpx)<180 M(-1) are not suitable for CV removal from sand. CDs failed to displace CV from RD because they generate the formation of RD clusters where CV remains entrapped.

  10. Study physico-chemical of the sand of the western ERG (Western South Algeria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, M.; Tafraoui, A. [Faculty of sciences and technology, University of Bechar (Algeria)], email: allammessaouda@yahoo.fr

    2011-07-01

    Silica is gaining increasing importance as it is the base for the production of pure silicon, for which several applications are under development in the electronic and solar energy sectors. The aim of this study is to characterize the sand taken from the Western Erg of Algeria to determine the percentage of silicon it contains. Characterization was done through physical analysis to determine the granulometry of the sand. A chemical analysis was next performed, using diffraction of X-rays and a scanning electron microscope to determine the chemical composition of the sand. Results showed that the sand is mainly made of quartz in the form of rounded and subbarrondis grains and that silicon is prevalent, accounting for 98% of the composition. This study demonstrated that sand from the Western Erg of Algeria is rich in silicon and could be used for silicon production.

  11. Paper electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobjörk, Daniel; Österbacka, Ronald

    2011-05-03

    Paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and a truly low-cost substrate. The use of paper substrates could be extended even further, if electronic applications would be applied next to or below the printed graphics. However, applying electronics on paper is challenging. The paper surface is not only very rough compared to plastics, but is also porous. While this is detrimental for most electronic devices manufactured directly onto paper substrates, there are also approaches that are compatible with the rough and absorptive paper surface. In this review, recent advances and possibilities of these approaches are evaluated and the limitations of paper electronics are discussed.

  12. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  13. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  14. The gravel sand transition in a disturbed catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, A. David

    1999-03-01

    More than 40 million cubic metres of mining waste were supplied to the Ringarooma River between 1875 and 1984, leading to successive phases of aggradation and degradation. The natural bed material is gravel but, given the volume of introduced load and the fact that much of the input was less than 5 mm in diameter, the size composition of the bed changed from gravel to sand during the phase of downstream progressive aggradation. A very sharp gravel-sand transition developed in which median grain size decreased from over 30 mm to under 3 mm in less than 500 m. With upstream supplies of mining debris becoming depleted first, degradation followed the same downstream progressive pattern as aggradation, causing the transition to migrate downstream. By 1984, the river could be regarded as a series of zones, each characterized by a particular bed condition: a natural cobble-gravel bed, unaffected by mining inputs (0-32 km); pre-disturbance bed re-exposed by degradation over 35-40 years (32-53 km); sandy substrate with a gravel armour produced by differential transport during degradation (53-65 km); sand dominated but with developing surface patches of coarser material (65-75 km); sandy bed reflecting the size composition of the original mining input (75-118 km). Although the gravel-sand transition itself is sharp, the transitional zone is lengthy (53-75 km). As degradation continues, the gravel-sand transition is expected to progress downstream but it has remained in a stable position for 12 years. Indeed, two major floods during the period released large quantities of sand from the sub-armour layer and newly-formed banks of mine tailings, causing fining both above and below the transition. Surface grain size is an adjustable component in the transitional zone as the river strives to recover from a major anthropogenic disturbance.

  15. Investigation of growth, structural and electronic properties of V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on selected substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nateprov, Alexei

    2006-08-15

    The present work is devoted to the experimental study of the MI transition in V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films, grown on different substrates. The main goal of the work was to develop a technology of growth of V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films on substrates with different electrical and structural properties (diamond and LiNbO{sub 3}), designed for specific applications. The structural and electrical properties of the obtained films were characterized in detail with a special focus on their potential applications. The MIT of V{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated by SAW using first directly deposited V{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film onto a LiNbO{sub 3} substrate. (orig.)

  16. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  17. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  18. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  19. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  20. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  1. Microstructural characterization of a Canadian oil sand

    CERN Document Server

    Dinh, Hong Doan; Nauroy, Jean-François; Tang, Anh-Minh; Souhail, Youssef; 10.1139/T2012-072

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure of oil sand samples extracted at a depth of 75 m from the estuarine Middle McMurray formation (Alberta, Canada) has been investigated by using high resolution 3D X-Ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) and Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy (CryoSEM). $\\mu$CT images evidenced some dense areas composed of highly angular grains surrounded by fluids that are separated by larger pores full of gas. 3D Image analysis provided in dense areas porosity values compatible with in-situ log data and macroscopic laboratory determinations, showing that they are representative of intact states. $\\mu$CT hence provided some information on the morphology of the cracks and disturbance created by gas expansion. The CryoSEM technique, in which the sample is freeze fractured within the SEM chamber prior to observation, provided pictures in which the (frozen) bitumen clearly appears between the sand grains. No evidence of the existence of a thin connate water layer between grains and the bitumen, frequently mentioned in th...

  2. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  3. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  4. Impact on sand and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, R.P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the impact of a body on sand and water. When a body impacts a free surface in the inertial regime the series of events is the following: On impact material is blown away in all directions and an impact cavity forms. Due to the hydrostatic pressure from the sides the cav

  5. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  6. ERP沙盘模拟在电子商务教学中的应用初探%On the application of the ERP sand table simulation in Electronic Commerce Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妮妮

    2014-01-01

    ERP沙盘模拟经营是一门集知识性、互动性、对抗性和趣味性于一体的企业管理技能训练课程,涉及会计、营销、物流、管理等多个方面,强调演练与实践,使学生所学知识相互渗透,既培养了学生的动手、动脑能力,又培养了学生团队协作精神,ERP沙盘企业经营课程的开设,在一定程度上解决了我校电子商务专业学生的实践能力培养的问题,提高了学生的实践能力、动手能力和就业竞争能力,为学生的就业和未来成才构建了平台,搭建了一座从学校到企业的桥梁。%ERP sand table simulation of the operation is a set of knowledge, interactive, antagonism and interest in the enterprise management skills training courses, involving manyaspects of accounting, marketing, logistics, management,emphasize drills and practice, so that students learnknowledge, can cultivate the students hands-on, minds and students' ability, team spirit, open management course ERP sand table of the enterprise, to a certain extent solved theelectronic commerce specialty in our college students ability of practice problems, improve the ability and the employmentcompetitive ability, practical ability of students, for the students employment and future talent to build a platform,built a from the school to the enterprise bridge.

  7. experimental studies of sand production from unconsolidated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    Production of sand during oil and gas exploration causes severe operational prob- ... duction such as risk of well failure, erosion of pipelines and surface facilities, sand separa- tion and disposal ... ment, theoretical and numerical analysis have.

  8. A signal-substrate match in the substrate-borne component of a multimodal courtship display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian O. ELIAS, Andrew C. MASON, Eileen A. HEBETS

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The environment can impose strong limitations on the efficacy of signal transmission. In particular, for vibratory communication, the signaling environment is often extremely heterogeneous at very small scales. Nevertheless, natural selection is expected to select for signals well-suited to effective transmission. Here, we test for substrate-dependent signal efficacy in the wolf spider Schizocosa stridulans Stratton 1991. We first explore the transmission characteristics of this important signaling modality by playing recorded substrate-borne signals through three different substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and red clay and measuring the propagated signal. We found that the substrate-borne signal of S. stridulans attenuates the least on leaf litter, the substrate upon which the species is naturally found. Next, by assessing mating success with artificially muted and non-muted males across different signaling substrates (leaf litter, pine litter, and sand, we explored the relationship between substrate-borne signaling and substrate for mating success. We found that muted males were unsuccessful in obtaining copulations regardless of substrate, while mating success was dependent on the signaling substrate for non-muted males. For non-muted males, more males copulated on leaf litter than any other substrate. Taken together, these results confirm the importance of substrate-borne signaling in S. stridulans and suggest a match between signal properties and signal efficacy – leaf litter transmits the signal most effectively and males are most successful in obtaining copulations on leaf litter [Current Zoology 56 (3: 370–378, 2010].

  9. UK silica sand resources for fracking

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2013-01-01

    UK silica sand resources for fracking Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG Email: Silica sand is high purity quartz sand that is mainly used for glass production, as foundry sand, in horticulture, leisure and other industrial uses. One specialist use is as a ‘proppant’ to enhance oil and gas recovery. This presentation will focus on this application, particularly for shale gas recovery where it is mo...

  10. One step spray-coated TiO2 electron-transport layers for decent perovskite solar cells on large and flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aibin; Zhu, Jingting; Zhou, Yijie; Yu, Yu; Liu, Yan; Yang, Songwang; Ji, Shidong; Lei, Lei; Jin, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Spray-coating as a facile and quantitative method was introduced to prepare thin and continuous TiO2 compact layers on different substrates for perovskite solar cells. The as-prepared film is highly transparent and smooth, which is of significance in perovskite solar cells to decrease incident light loss and facilitate the film cast and electric contact. The compact TiO2 layer shows excellent performance when coated with perovskite and assembled into a device. Since it provides unlimited substrate size, patterning function and the TiO2 used for spray-coating is well crystallized, this method has huge potential for mass production and great adaptability for a variety of applications.

  11. One step spray-coated TiO2 electron-transport layers for decent perovskite solar cells on large and flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Aibin; Zhu, Jingting; Zhou, Yijie; Yu, Yu; Liu, Yan; Yang, Songwang; Ji, Shidong; Lei, Lei; Jin, Ping

    2017-01-06

    Spray-coating as a facile and quantitative method was introduced to prepare thin and continuous TiO2 compact layers on different substrates for perovskite solar cells. The as-prepared film is highly transparent and smooth, which is of significance in perovskite solar cells to decrease incident light loss and facilitate the film cast and electric contact. The compact TiO2 layer shows excellent performance when coated with perovskite and assembled into a device. Since it provides unlimited substrate size, patterning function and the TiO2 used for spray-coating is well crystallized, this method has huge potential for mass production and great adaptability for a variety of applications.

  12. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. A Hybrid Multi-gate Model of a Gallium Nitride (GaN) High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) Device Incorporating GaN-substrate Thermal Boundary Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    coordinates and elliptical cylinder coordinates (8, 9). Douglas et al. studied the effects of several HEMT design parameters, including substrate thermal...Determination of Thermal Resistance of FETs. IEEE Transaction on Microwave Theory and Techniques 2005, 53 (1), 306‒313. 10. Douglas , E. A.; Ren, F...Physics Letters 2010, 97, 232107‒1-3. 29. Taking, S.; Banerjee, A.; Zhou, H.; Li, X.; Khokhar, A. Z.; Oxland, R.; McGregor , I.; Bentley, S.; Rahman, F

  14. Electron transfer study on graphene modified glassy carbon substrate via electrochemical reduction and the application for tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) electrochemiluminescence sensor fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanhong; Cao, Mengmei; Liu, Huihui; Zong, Xidan; Kong, Na; Zhang, Jizhen; Liu, Jingquan

    2015-07-01

    In this study, electron transfer behavior of the graphene nanosheets attachment on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) via direct electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO) is investigated for the first time. The graphene modified electrode was achieved by simply dipping the GCE in GO suspension, followed by cyclic voltammetric scanning in the potential window from 0V to -1.5V. Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) [Ru(bpy)3(2+)] was immobilized on the graphene modified electrode and used as the redox probe to evaluate the electron transfer behavior. The electron transfer rate constant (Ks) was calculated to be 61.9±5.8s(-1), which is much faster than that of tiled graphene modified GCE (7.1±0.6s(-1)). The enhanced electron transfer property observed with the GCE modified by reductively deposited graphene is probably due to its standing configuration, which is beneficial to the electron transfer comparing with the tiled one. Because the abundant oxygen-containing groups are mainly located at the edges of GO, which should be much easier for the reduction to start from, the reduced GO should tend to stand on the electrode surface as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy analysis. In addition, due to the favored electron transfer and standing configuration, the Ru(bpy)3(2+) electrochemiluminescence sensor fabricated with standing graphene modified GCE provided much higher and more stable efficiency than that fabricated with tiled graphene.

  15. Sand Waves. Report 1. Sand Wave Shoaling in Navigation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    heights range from 0.8 m in the Minas Basin, Bay of Fundy (Dalrymple 1984) to 6.0 m in the Bahia Blanca Estuary, Argentina (Aliotta and Perillo 1987...26 PART IV: SITE-SPECIFIC SAND WAVE SHOALING PROBLEMS .. ........ 30 Columbia River Navigation Channel ........ ............... .. 30 Panama ...problem location discussed in this report is at St. Andrew Bay near Panama City, Florida. A relatively short section of the jettied inlet channel requires

  16. Reuse of waste foundry sand through interaction with sodium silicate binder; Reutilizacao da areia descartada da fundicao, a partir da sua interacao com agente ligante silicato de sodio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, J.C.; Chinelatto, A.S.A.; Chinelatto, A.L., E-mail: josi3souza@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa (UEPG), PR (Brazil); Oliveira, I.L. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Green sand molds are used in metal casting process. However, after heating, activated bentonite present in green sand lose the binding properties, and part of the foundry sand has to be discarded from the process. The ABNT NBR 15.984/2011 establishes the management of waste foundry sand (WFS) avoiding disposal in landfills. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility of reusing the WFS from the study of their interaction with sodium silicate binder. Studies with silica sand and new green sand was performed to compare the results obtained with the WFS. The characterizations of the samples were performed by measures the compressive strength, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that there is interaction of the sodium silicate with the WFS as well as with the silica sand and green sand. (author)

  17. METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, M.A.; Smutz, M.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for recovering thorium, uranium, and rare earth values from monazite sand. The monazite sand is first digested with sulfuric acid and the resulting "monazite sulfate" solution is adjusted to a pH of between 0.4 and 3.0, and oxalate anions are added causing precipitation of the thorium and the rare earths as the oxalates. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the uranium containing supernatant solution, and is dried and calcined to the oxides. The thorium and rare earth oxides are then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is contacted with tribntyl phosphate whereby an organic extract phase containing the cerium and thorium values is obtained, together with an aqueous raffinate containing the other rare earth values. The organic phase is then separated from the aqueous raffinate and the cerium and thorium are back extracted with an aqueous medium.

  18. Corrosion Resistance of a Sand Particle-Modified Enamel Coating Applied to Smooth Steel Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujian Tang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The protective performance of a sand particle-modified enamel coating on reinforcing steel bars was evaluated in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Seven percentages of sand particles by weight were investigated: 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50% and 70%. The phase composition of the enamel coating and sand particles were determined with the X-ray diffraction (XRD technique. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies of the sand particle-modified enamel coating were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. XRD tests revealed three phases of sand particles: SiO2, CaCO3 and MgCO3. SEM images demonstrated that the enamel coating wetted well with the sand particles. However, a weak enamel coating zone was formed around the sand particles due to concentrated air bubbles, leading to micro-cracks as hydrogen gas pressure builds up and exceeds the tensile strength of the weak zone. As a result, the addition of sand particles into the enamel coating reduced both the coating and corrosion resistances.

  19. Characterization of sand lenses embedded in tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, K.E.S.; Nilsson, B.

    2012-01-01

    of the various types of sand lenses is discussed, primarily in relation to the depositional and glaciotectonic processes they underwent. Detailed characterization of sand lenses facilitates such interpretations. Finally, the observations are linked to a more general overview of the distribution of sand lenses......Tills dominate large parts of the superficial sediments on the Northern hemisphere. These glacial diamictons are extremely heterogeneous and riddled with fractures and lenses of sand or gravel. The frequency and geometry of sand lenses within tills are strongly linked to glaciodynamic processes...... occurring in various glacial environments. This study specifically focuses on the appearance and spatial distribution of sand lenses in tills. It introduces a methodology on how to measure and characterize sand lenses in the field with regard to size, shape and degree of deformation. A set of geometric...

  20. A compact topology for sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Dennunzio, Alberto; Masson, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we exhibit a strong relation between the sand automata configuration space and the cellular automata configuration space. This relation induces a compact topology for sand automata, and a new context in which sand automata are homeomorphic to cellular automata acting on a specific subshift. We show that the existing topological results for sand automata, including the Hedlund-like representation theorem, still hold. In this context, we give a characterization of the cellular automata which are sand automata, and study some dynamical behaviors such as equicontinuity. Furthermore, we deal with the nilpotency. We show that the classical definition is not meaningful for sand automata. Then, we introduce a suitable new notion of nilpotency for sand automata. Finally, we prove that this simple dynamical behavior is undecidable.

  1. Rheological Characterization of Green Sand Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hovad, Emil

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to characterize experimentally the flow behaviour of the green sand that is used for casting of sand moulds. After the sand casting process is performed, the sand moulds are used for metal castings. The rheological properties of the green sand is important to quantify...... module for characterizing granular materials. The new module enables viscosity measurements of the green sand as function of the shear rate at different flow rates, i.e. 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 15 L/min. The results show generally that the viscosity decreases with both the shear- and flow rate....... In addition, the measurements show that the green sand flow follows a shear-thinning behaviour even after the full fluidization point....

  2. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...... as well as the flow pattern during discharge of the silo. During discharge a mixed flow pattern has been identified...

  3. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17.

  4. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  5. Thermal Properties of oil sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, Y.; Lee, H.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Injection or Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are the effective methods for producing heavy oil or bitumen. In any thermal recovery methods, thermal properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity) are closely related to the formation and expansion of steam chamber within a reservoir, which is key factors to control efficiency of thermal recovery. However, thermal properties of heavy oil or bitumen have not been well-studied despite their importance in thermal recovery methods. We measured thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity of 43 oil sand samples from Athabasca, Canada, using a transient thermal property measurement instrument. Thermal conductivity of 43 oil sand samples varies from 0.74 W/mK to 1.57 W/mK with the mean thermal conductivity of 1.09 W/mK. The mean thermal diffusivity is 5.7×10-7 m2/s with the minimum value of 4.2×10-7 m2/s and the maximum value of 8.0×10-7 m2/s. Volumetric heat capacity varies from 1.5×106 J/m3K to 2.11×106 J/m3K with the mean volumetric heat capacity of 1.91×106 J/m3K. In addition, physical and chemical properties (e.g., bitumen content, electric resistivity, porosity, gamma ray and so on) of oil sand samples have been measured by geophysical logging and in the laboratory. We are now proceeding to investigate the relationship between thermal properties and physical/chemical properties of oil sand.

  6. Natural and human controls of the Holocene evolution of the beach, aeolian sand and dunes of Caesarea (Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, J.; Sivan, D.; Shtienberg, G.; Roskin, E.; Porat, N.; Bookman, R.

    2015-12-01

    The study focuses on the Holocene appearance, chronology and drivers of beach sand deposition and inland aeolian sand transport around the Roman-Byzantine ruins of Caesarea, Israel. Beach sand, sand sheets, nebkha, linear and transverse dunes as well as parabolic and transverse interdunes along two transects were sampled in the current study down to their substrate. Sixteen new optically stimulated luminescence ages cluster at ∼5.9-3.3 ka, ∼1.2-1.1 ka (800-900 AD) and ∼190-120 years ago (1825-1895 AD) indicating times of middle and late Holocene sand sheet depositions and historical dune stabilization. The first age cluster indicates that beach sand accumulated when rates of global sea level rise declined around 6-5 ka. Until ∼4 ka sand sheets encroached up to 2.5 km inland. Historical and archaeological evidence points to sand mobilization since the first century AD. Sand sheets dating to 1.2-1.1 ka, coevally found throughout the dunefield represent sand stabilization due to vegetation reestablishment attributed to gradual and fluctuating decline in human activity from the middle Early Islamic period until the 10th century. Historical and chronological evidence of the existence of transverse and coppice dunes from the 19th century suggest that dunes only formed in the last few centuries. The study illustrates the initial role of natural processes, in this case decline in global sea level rise and the primary and later role of fluctuating human activity upon coastal sand mobility. The study distinguishes between sand sheets and dunes and portrays them as sensors of environmental changes.

  7. Erosion/corrosion testing of materials for oil sands applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, G.; Wolodko, J.; Alemaskin, K.; Been, J.; Danysh, M. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Erosion and corrosion are common wear mechanisms for components used in oil sands processing facilities. This paper described a slurry jet test apparatus designed to evaluate and assess materials for oil sands service conditions. The jet testing apparatus was designed to mimic the wet erosion phenomena typically found in oil sands applications. Wear- and corrosion-resistant materials tested by the apparatus included carbon steel, tungsten carbide metal matrix composite (WC-MMC) overlays, and a range of polymer and rubber liner materials. Polymeric materials included hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR); polyurethane elastomer; and high density polyethylene (HDPE). Material losses were determined by measuring the mass of the samples before and after testing. Normalized rates of abrasion were calculated by dividing total mass lost in the specimens by the total mass of sand impinged on the sample surface. Samples were also visually assessed and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to determine failure modes. Tests were conducted for a 2-hour period at an impingement angle of 90 degrees. Results of the study showed that the average abrasion rates of the polymeric samples are lower than rates seen with the carbon steel and overlay materials. Future work on the apparatus will include testing the materials under varying slurry jet parameters. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 10 figs.

  8. Evaluation of Durability Parameters of Concrete with Manufacture Sand and River Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangoju, Bhaskar; Ramesh, G.; Bharatkumar, B. H.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.

    2017-06-01

    Most of the states in our country have banned sand quarrying from the river beds, causing a scarcity of natural river sand for the construction sector. Manufacture sand (M-sand) is one of the alternate solutions to replace the river sand (R-sand) in concrete. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the durability parameters of concrete with M-sand when compared to that of concrete with R-sand. Corrosion of reinforcement is one of the main deteriorating mechanisms of reinforced concrete due to the ingress of chloride ions or carbon-di-oxide. For comparative evaluation of durability parameters, accelerated tests such as Rapid Chloride Permeability Test, Rapid Chloride Migration Test and accelerated carbonation test were carried out on specimens of R-sand and M-sand. All tests were carried out after 90 days of casting. Test results reveal that the durability parameters of the concrete with M-sand in chloride induced environment is relatively better than that of concrete with R-sand and hence is recommended to use M-sand as a replacement to R-sand.

  9. Sand deposit-detecting method and its application in model test of sand flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎伟; 房营光; 莫海鸿; 谷任国; 陈俊生

    2013-01-01

    Against the background of the sand-flow foundation treatment engineering of Guangzhou Zhoutouzui variable cross-section immersed tunnel, a kind of sand deposit-detecting method was devised on the basis of full-scale model test of sand-flow method. The real-time data of sand-deposit height and radius were obtained by the self-developed sand-deposit detectors. The test results show that the detecting method is simple and has high precision. In the use of sand-flow method, the sand-carrying capability of fluid is limited, and sand particles are all transported to the sand-deposit periphery through crater, gap and chutes after the sand deposit formed. The diffusion range of the particles outside the sand-deposit does not exceed 2.0 m. Severe sorting of sand particles is not observed because of the unique oblique-layered depositing process. The temporal and spatial distributions of gap and chutes directly affect the sand-deposit expansion, and the expansion trend of the average sand-deposit radius accords with quadratic time-history curve.

  10. Investigation of structural, optical, and electrical characteristics of an AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure across a 200 mm Si(1 1 1) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perozek, J.; Lee, H.-P.; Krishnan, B.; Paranjpe, A.; Reuter, K. B.; Sadana, D. K.; Bayram, C.

    2017-02-01

    An AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure is grown on a 200 mm Si(1 1 1) substrate. The AlGaN/AlN/GaN heterostructure atop, which forms the 2D electron gas, is studied via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning tunneling microscopy, and TEM chemical analysis. To quantify the uniformity of structural, optical, and electrical properties of these AlGaN/GaN HEMT structures, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, x-ray diffraction (ω/2θ scan and reciprocal space mapping) and Hall effect measurements are employed across the center, middle, and edge of the 200 mm wafer. Small thickness (planar electrical isolation, and a seven orders of magnitude decrease in leakage current is achieved when an optimum Ar dose of 1013 cm-2 is used. The feasibility of scaling AlGaN/GaN HEMTs on a 200 mm Si(1 1 1) platform is discussed.

  11. SAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Grete

    Der er udført et konsolideringsforsøg med bakkesand fra Lunds grusgrav, Lund no. O. forsøget er udført i samme konsolideringsapparat, som er anvendt til måling af deformationsegenskaberne af mange forskellige danske jordarter. Forsøgsresultaterne er søgt tolket som ved forsøg med andre jordarter....

  12. Effect of silty sand in formation water on CO{sub 2} corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei, E-mail: weiliu@ustb.edu.cn; Dou, Juanjuan; Lu, Songle; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Qinghe

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: Silty sand (SiO{sub 2}) promoted the rapid heterogeneous nucleation of corrosion product (FeCO{sub 3}) and simultaneously decreased its grains growth. Silty sand mixed with corrosion product to form the outer layer of corrosion scale with high compactness, blocking the transport of ferrous ions and leading to the formation of the inner layer of corrosion scale without silty sand. The corrosion rate of carbon steel was obviously reduced due to the existence of silty sand in the outer layer by inhibiting anodic and cathodic currents. - Highlights: • CO{sub 2} corrosion rate of carbon steel was obviously reduced due to the existence of silty sand. • The corrosion scale containing silty sand inhibited anodic and cathodic currents, contributing to low corrosion rate. • A development mechanism of corrosion scale in silty sand containing CO{sub 2} environment was proposed. - Abstract: Corrosion behavior of carbon steel in CO{sub 2} aqueous environment containing silty sand was investigated using corrosion mass loss method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy diffraction spectrum (EDS), and various electrochemical measurements. The results show that the corrosion rate of carbon steel was obviously reduced due to the existence of silty sand. Silty sand promoted the rapid heterogeneous nucleation of corrosion product FeCO{sub 3} and simultaneously decreased its grains growth. Silty sand mixed with corrosion product to form the outer layer of corrosion scale with high compactness, blocking the transport of ferrous ions and leading to the formation of the inner layer of corrosion scale without silty sand. The existence of silty sand in the outer layer of corrosion scale inhibited anodic and cathodic currents.

  13. Liquefaction of Sand under Low Confining Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shaoli; Rolf Sandven; Lars Grande

    2003-01-01

    Undrained behaviour of sand under low cell pressure was studied in static and cyclic triaxial tests. It was found that very loose sand liquefies under static loading with the relative density being a key parameter for the undrained behaviour of sand. In cyclic triaxial tests, pore water pressures built up during the cyclic loading and exceeded the confining cell pressure. This process was accompanied by a large sudden increase in axial deformation. The necessary number of cycles to obtain liquefaction was related to the confining cell pressure, the amplitude of cyclic loading and the relative density of sand.In addition, the patterns of pore water pressure response are different from those of sand samples with different relative densities. The test results are very useful for expounding scour mechanism around coastal structures since they relate to the low stress behaviour of the sand.

  14. Creep Behavior of Frozen Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    temperature and stress range. There was a 2strong stress dependance to S (r =0.95) for saturated Manchester Fine Sand which does not agree with RPT. The...Curves at High Stress 161 Ratio D/Du = 0.505 for Frozen HF’S at w=10% IV-20 Minimum Strain Rate Dependance on Stress 162 Ratio for Frozen MFS IV-21 Minimum...Strain Rate Dependance on Relative 163 Density for Frozen MFS IV-22 Temperature Stage Test on Frozen Saturated 164 MFS under a Load of D=9.24MPa Fig

  15. Evaluation of fly ash as a component of potting substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzies, N.W.; Aitken, R.L. [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld. (Australia). Dept. of Agriculture

    1996-11-01

    A series of laboratory and glasshouse experiments were undertaken to assess the potential for incorporating fly ash in soilless potting substrates. Since fly ash is available at low cost and can be successfully substituted for a considerable portion of the expensive peat component in the peat:sand mix, its use at low application rates in potting substrates may be desirable from an economic viewpoint.

  16. Removal of arsenic from aqueous solution by iron-coated sand and manganese-coated sand having different mineral types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yoon-Young; Song, Ki-Hoon; Yu, Mok-Ryun; Yang, Jae-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the coating temperature during the preparation of manganese-coated sand (MCS) and iron-coated sand (ICS) on the removals of As(III) and As(V) were evaluated. The mineral type of manganese oxide on MCS-150, prepared at 150 °C, was identified as a mixture of pyrolusite and ramsdellite, which changed to high crystalline pyrolusite above 300 °C. The mineral type of ICS-150, prepared at 150 °C, was a mixture of goethite and hematite, which changed to high crystalline goethite above 300 °C. The adsorption efficiency was determined according to the mineral type which depended on the coating temperature. The As(III) oxidation efficiency of MCS-150 and As(V) adsorption efficiency of ICS-150 were approximately 77 and 70% higher compared with those of MCS-600 and ICS-600, respectively, prepared at 600 °C. Regardless of the coating temperature, the amounts of manganese and iron coated on the sand substrates were similar.

  17. Substrate Temperature Effect on Charge Transport Performance of ZnO Electron Transport Layer Prepared by a Facile Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis in Polymer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel ultrasonic spray pyrolysis for high-quality ZnO films based on zinc-ammonia solution was achieved in air. To investigate the structural and optical properties as well as the performance of polymer solar cells (PSCs, ZnO films at different substrate temperatures and thicknesses were prepared. The performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene:[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM based PSC was found to be improved due to the ZnO films. The crystal structure and roughness of the ZnO films fabricated at different temperatures were found to affect the performance of PSCs. The optimized power conversion efficiency was found to be maximum for PSCs with ZnO films prepared at 200°C. The growth process of these ZnO films is very simple, cost-effective, and compatible for larger-scale PSC preparation. The precursor used for spray pyrolysis is environmentally friendly and helps to achieve ZnO film preparation at a relative low temperature.

  18. Plantar pressure distribution of ostrich during locomotion on loose sand and solid ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Han, Dianlei; Ma, Songsong; Luo, Gang; Ji, Qiaoli; Xue, Shuliang; Yang, Mingming; Li, Jianqiao

    2017-01-01

    The ostrich is a cursorial bird with extraordinary speed and endurance, especially in the desert, and thus is an ideal large-scale animal model for mechanic study of locomotion on granular substrate. The plantar pressure distributions of ostriches walking/running on loose sand/solid ground were recorded using a dynamic pressure plate. The center of pressure (COP) on loose sand mostly originated from the middle of the 3rd toe, which differed from the J-shaped COP trajectory on solid ground. At mid-stance, a high-pressure region was observed in the middle of the 3rd toe on loose sand, but three high-pressure regions were found on solid ground. The gait mode significantly affected the peak pressures of the 3rd and 4th toes (p = 1.5 × 10(-6) and 2.39 × 10(-8), respectively), but not that of the claw (p = 0.041). The effects of substrate were similar to those of the gait mode. Ground reaction force trials of each functional part showed the 3rd toe bore more body loads and the 4th toe undertook less loads. The pressure distributions suggest balance maintenance on loose sand was provided by the 3rd and 4th toes and the angle between their length axes. On loose sand, the middle of the 3rd toe was the first to touch the sand with a smaller attack angle to maximize the ground reaction force, but on solid ground, the lateral part was the first to touch the ground to minimize the transient loading. At push-off, the ostrich used solidification properties of granular sand under the compression of the 3rd toe to generate sufficient traction.

  19. Recent advances in waterglass sand technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chun-xi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports some new understandings and advances in waterglass sand technologies. The multiple chemical modification process can increase the binding strength of the waterglass sand by up to 50%-70%.Therefore, the additions of the modified waterglass can be decreased to 3.0%-4.0% for CO2 process and to 2.0%-2.5% for organic ester hardening process, and greatly improve the collapsibility and reclaimability of the sand. Based on the new understandings and experimental results reported in this paper, several original ideas, such as nano modification, have been proposed to promote advances of waterglass sand technologies,

  20. PROSPECTS FIXATION DRIFT SANDS PHYSICOCHEMICAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maujuda MUZAFFAROVA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the theoretical foundations of secure mobile sand being considered for reducing the negative impact of one of the manifestations of exogenous plains on such an important natural-technical system as a railroad. It suggests practical measures to build a system of design protection against sand drifts. The article also suggests ways to conserve resources and rational use of machinery and performers as well as the consolidation of mobile sand wet with water soluble waste of local production of waste dextrin. Consolidation is exposed on dry and wet sand.

  1. Innovative developments in sand reclamation technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dañko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper sand management and efficient sand reclamation system are two main factors influencing economical and ecological side of modern foundry plant. It is well known fact that the production of 1 metric ton of casting from ferrous alloys generates circa 1 metric ton of waste [1], which due to containing certain amounts of harmful and dangerous compounds should undergo a reclamation – at least of the main component, which means a silica sand grains. The paper present problems of scientific and development research concerning the innovative reclamation technologies of used foundry sands such as: mechanical-cryogenic reclamation and innovative thermal reclamation.

  2. Mg-compensation effect in GaN buffer layer for AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistors grown on 4H-SiC substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kwangse; Lee, Kyeongjae; So, Byeongchan; Heo, Cheon; Lee, Kyungbae; Kwak, Taemyung; Han, Sang-Woo; Cha, Ho-Young; Nam, Okhyun

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the Mg doping effect in the gallium nitride (GaN) buffer layers (BLs) of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) structures grown on semi-insulating 4H-SiC substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. When the Mg concentration was increased from 3 × 1017 to 8 × 1018 cm-3, the crystal quality slightly deteriorated, whereas electrical properties were significantly changed. The buffer leakage increased approximately 50 times from 0.77 to 39.2 nA at -50 V with the Mg doping concentration. The Mg-compensation effect and electron trapping effect were observed at Mg concentration of 3 × 1017 and 8 × 1018 cm-3, respectively, which were confirmed by an isolation leakage current test and low-temperature photoluminescence. When the BL was compensated, the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility and sheet carrier concentration of the HEMTs were 1560 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 5.06 × 1012 cm-2, respectively. As a result, Mg-doped GaN BLs were demonstrated as a candidates of semi-insulating BLs for AlGaN/GaN HEMT.

  3. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  4. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday Isehunwa,; Andrew Farotade

    2010-01-01

    Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field ...

  5. How is the water molecule activated on metalloporphyrins? Oxygenation of substrates induced through one-photon/two-electron conversion in artificial photosynthesis by visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tetsuya; Kumagai, Akihiro; Funyu, Shigeaki; Takagi, Shinsuke; Masui, Dai; Nabetani, Yu; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Tryk, Donald A; Inoue, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    The reaction mechanism of the highly efficient (phi = 0.60), selective photochemical epoxidation of alkenes sensitized by CO-coordinated tetra(2,4,6-trimethyl)phenylporphyrinatoruthenium(II) (Ru(II)TMP(CO)), with water acting both as an electron and oxygen atom donor, was investigated. The steady-state light irradiation of the reaction mixture indicated the formation of the Ru(II)TMP (CO) cation radical under neutral conditions, which was effectively trapped by an hydroxide ion to regenerate the starting sensitizer. By means of a laser flash photolysis experiment, the formation of the cation radical as the primary process from the triplet excited state of Ru(II)TMP(CO) was clearly observed. Four kinds of transients were detected in completely different ranges of the delay time: the excited triplet state of Ru(II)TMP(CO) [delay time region reaction mechanism was revealed that involves RuTMP(CO) cation radical formation from the triplet excited state of the sensitizer, followed by attack of an hydroxide ion to form an hydroxyl-coordinated Ru-porphyrin (Intermediate [I]) and subsequent reaction with cyclohexene to form Intermediate [II]. The kinetics for each step of the successive processes was carefully analyzed and their rate constants were determined. The two-electron oxidation of water by one-photon irradiation, as revealed in the photochemical epoxidation, is proposed to be one of the more promising candidates to get through the bottleneck of water oxidation in artificial photosynthesis.

  6. Constitutive Response of Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitation Cemented Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai

    In the last decade, microbial induced calcite precipitation (MICP) emerged as a novel technique for implementing soil improvement in an environmentally-friendly and economically beneficial manner. However, the mechanical behavior and constitutive response of these materials are still not fully explored by researchers. In this dissertation, the characteristics of MICP cemented sands are investigated through numerical modelling and experimental tests, including macro and micro tests under both static and dynamic loading. In the first part, the mechanical behavior of MICP cemented sands were probed using monotonic load testing and the existence of calcite precipitation was verified by scanning electron microscopy, with this behavior compared to traditionally cemented soil and naturally cemented soil. Both MICP cementation and traditional cementation were verified to be effective in the increase of stiffness and strength, and unique characteristic of MICP cemented soil was highlighted.

  7. Effect of wet-chemical substrate pretreatment on electronic interface properties and recombination losses of a -Si:H/c -Si and a -SiN{sub x}:H/c -Si hetero-interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angermann, Heike; Conrad, Erhard; Korte, Lars; Schmidt, Manfred [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut fuer Silizium-Photovoltaik, Berlin (Germany); Wuensch, Frank; Kunst, Marinus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institut Solare Brennstoffe und Energiespeichermaterialien, Berlin (Germany); Laades, Abdelazize; Stuerzebecher, Uta [CiS Institut fuer Mikrosensorik GmbH, SolarZentrum Erfurt (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Surface charge, surface state density and interface recombination behavior on polished float zone (FZ) solar cell substrates were investigated after various wet-chemical pre-cleaning procedures and deposition of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H). Applying surface photo voltage (SPV), microwave detected photo conductance decay ({mu}W-PCD) and transient microwave conduction (TRMC) measurements, electronic interface properties were monitored repeatedly during the preparation processes. As shown for an inverted a-Si:H/c-Si hetero-junction structure, with front side passivation by a-SiN{sub x}:H and a p-type a-Si:H emitter on the rear side, the effect of optimised wet-chemical pre-treatment can be preserved during the subsequent soft plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of a-Si:H or a-SiN{sub x}:H. This leads to hetero-interfaces with low interface recombination velocities. These results were compared to previously reported findings, obtained on textured Czochralski (CZ) single crystalline substrates. a-SiN{sub x}:H is known to result in a field effect passivation. Nevertheless a strong influence of wet-chemical treatments on surface charge and recombination losses was observed on both flat and textured a-SiN{sub x}:H/c-Si interfaces. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Analysis of reaction between c+a and -c+a dislocations in GaN layer grown on 4-inch Si(111 substrate with AlGaN/AlN strained layer superlattice by transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Sugawara

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of dislocations in a GaN layer grown on a 4-inch Si(111 substrate with an AlGaN/AlN strained layer superlattice using horizontal metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Cross-sectional observation indicated that a drastic decrease in the dislocation density occurred in the GaN layer. The reaction of a dislocation (b=1/3[-211-3] and anothor dislocation (b =1/3[-2113] to form one dislocation (b =2/3[-2110] in the GaN layer was clarified by plan-view observation using weak-beam dark-field and large-angle convergent-beam diffraction methods.

  9. Analysis of reaction between c+a and -c+a dislocations in GaN layer grown on 4-inch Si(111) substrate with AlGaN/AlN strained layer superlattice by transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Yukari, E-mail: yukari@jfcc.or.jp [Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Atsuta, Nagoya, 456-8587 (Japan); Watanabe, Arata [Research Center for Nano Devices and Advanced Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, 466-8555 (Japan); Miyoshi, Makoto; Egawa, Takashi [Research Center for Nano Devices and Advanced Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, 466-8555 (Japan); Innovation Center for Multi-Business of Nitride Semiconductors, Nagoya Institute of Technoloy, Nagoya, 466-8555 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    The behavior of dislocations in a GaN layer grown on a 4-inch Si(111) substrate with an AlGaN/AlN strained layer superlattice using horizontal metal-organic chemical vapor deposition was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Cross-sectional observation indicated that a drastic decrease in the dislocation density occurred in the GaN layer. The reaction of a dislocation (b=1/3[-211-3]) and anothor dislocation (b =1/3[-2113]) to form one dislocation (b =2/3[-2110]) in the GaN layer was clarified by plan-view observation using weak-beam dark-field and large-angle convergent-beam diffraction methods.

  10. Heteroepitaxial growth of In0.30Ga0.70As high-electron mobility transistor on 200 mm silicon substrate using metamorphic graded buffer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kohen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report on the growth of an In0.30Ga0.70As channel high-electron mobility transistor (HEMT on a 200 mm silicon wafer by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. By using a 3 μm thick buffer comprising a Ge layer, a GaAs layer and an InAlAs compositionally graded strain relaxing buffer, we achieve threading dislocation density of (1.0 ± 0.3 × 107 cm−2 with a surface roughness of 10 nm RMS. No phase separation was observed during the InAlAs compositionally graded buffer layer growth. 1.4 μm long channel length transistors are fabricated from the wafer with IDS of 70 μA/μm and gm of above 60 μS/μm, demonstrating the high quality of the grown materials.

  11. Neurobiological Substrates of Tourette's Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.; Smith, Megan E.; Larabi, Daouia; Hampson, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews the available scientific literature concerning the neurobiological substrates of Tourette's disorder (TD). Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies using relevant search terms. Results: Neuropathologic

  12. Application of microwave energy for curing of molding sands containing oil binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stachowicz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This works presents the results of studies concerning possibility of application of microwave heating in the curing process of molding sands containing oil binders. Molding sands prepared with three kinds of binders, that is oils C, DL and Retanol, have been subject to experiments. The sands have been dried with two methods: in a microwave chamber of 750W power and, for comparison, with classical method at the temperature of 200°C for 120 minutes. Tensile and bending strength of the samples have been determined after cooling down. It has been found that microwave drying in the low-power device used for experiments is effective only in case of molding sand prepared with addition of DL binder. The temperature of heated, even up to 32 minutes in a microwave chamber, blocks prepared from the remaining two masses, was insufficient to initiate binding process. The undertaken attempts of binder modification and introduction of additives intensifying microwave heating process allowed for achievement of satisfactory results. It has been found that power of the heating device is the main factor determining efficiency of microwave curing of molding sands containing oil binders. An additional experiment has been conducted on a laboratory workstation allowing for microwave heating of small mass samples with a high output power of magnetron concentrated in a small substrate volume. It has been observed that microwave drying process of molding sands was of dynamic character over a short period of time, not exceeding 120 seconds, thus assuring efficient curing of the sands containing the used oil binders. Therefore, application of devices of properly high microwave output power allows for efficient drying of oil molding sands, while simultaneously assuring the possibility to reduce time and energy consumption necessary for production of foundry cores of proper functional characteristics.

  13. Evaluation of the chemical, electronic and optoelectronic properties of {gamma}-CuCl thin films and their fabrication on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas, F O [Nanomaterials Processing Laboratory, Research Institute for Networks and Communications Engineering (RINCE), School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Mitra, A [Nanomaterials Processing Laboratory, Research Institute for Networks and Communications Engineering (RINCE), School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); McNally, P J [Nanomaterials Processing Laboratory, Research Institute for Networks and Communications Engineering (RINCE), School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Daniels, S [Nanomaterials Processing Laboratory, Research Institute for Networks and Communications Engineering (RINCE), School of Electronic Engineering, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Bradley, A L [Semiconductor Photonics Group, Physics Department, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Taylor, D M [Polymer Electronics Research Group, School of Electronic Engineering, University of Wales, Bangor, Gwynedd, LL57 1UT (United Kingdom); Proskuryakov, Y Y [Durham Centre for Renewable Energy, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Durose, K [Durham Centre for Renewable Energy, Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Cameron, D C [Advanced Surface Technology Research Laboratory (ASTRaL), Lappeenranta University of Technology, PO Box 181, Mikkeli 50101 (Finland)

    2007-06-07

    CuCl is a I-VII semiconductor material with a direct band gap of {approx}3.4 eV. It exhibits a zincblende structure ({gamma}-phase) at low temperatures, up to {approx}680 K. Unlike GaN, ZnO and related materials, CuCl has a relatively low lattice mismatch with Si (<0.4%) and a large excitonic binding energy ({approx}190 meV). This suggests the possibility of the fabrication of excitonic-based blue/UV optoelectronic devices on Si with relatively low threading dislocation densities. In this study, CuCl has been deposited and examined as a candidate material for the fabrication of these devices. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements confirmed that the deposited films were preferentially oriented in the (1 1 1) plane. Room temperature photoluminescence measurements reveal a strong Z{sub 3} free exciton peak (3.232 eV). Both steady state dc and ac impedance spectroscopy experiments suggested that the deposited CuCl is a mixed ionic-electronic semiconductor material. An electronic conductivity of the order of 2.3 x 10{sup -7} S cm{sup -1} was deduced to be in coexistence with Cu{sup +} ionic conductivity using irreversible electrodes (Au), while a total conductivity of the order of 6.5 x 10{sup -7} S cm{sup -1} was obtained using reversible electrodes (Cu) at room temperature. Further to this, we have identified some of the challenges in fabricating an optoelectronic device based on a CuCl/Si hybrid platform and propose some possible solutions.

  14. Long term geological record of a global deep subsurface microbial habitat in sand injection complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Boyce, Adrian J; Hurst, Andrew; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett; Ponicka, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    There is extensive evidence from drilling into continental margins for microbial colonization of a deep biosphere. However it is difficult to prove deep biosphere activity in the geological record, where evidence for life is dominated by the remains of organic matter buried after deposition at the surface. Nevertheless we propose that natural injections of sand into muddy strata at continental margins represent an excellent habitat opportunity for deep microbial activity down to several kilometres' present day depth. Sulphur isotope data for iron sulphides precipitated soon after injection indicate consistent microbial sulphate reduction through the geological record. The complexes are favourable sites for colonization, because high permeability and extensive sand/mud interface allow ready availability of electron donors and nutrients. The measured examples of iron sulphide in injected sands extend back to the Proterozoic, and show that injected sand complexes have been a long-term environment for deep subsurface microbial colonization.

  15. Pattern formation - Instabilities in sand ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. L.; v. Hecke, M.; Haaning, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sand ripples are seen below shallow wavy water and are formed whenever water oscillates over a bed of sand. Here we analyse the instabilities that can upset this perfect patterning when the ripples are subjected to large changes in driving amplitude or frequency, causing them to deform both...

  16. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  17. Silica sand resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Westerhoff, W.E.; Menkovic, A.; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Maljers, D.

    2009-01-01

    Silica sand, (almost) pure quartz sand, is a valuable and scarce mineral resource within the shallow Dutch subsurface. High-grade deposits are exploited in the southeastemmost part of the country, as raw material for the glass, ceramic, chemical and other process industries. Dutch land-use policy re

  18. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  19. Understanding Colombian Amazonian white sand forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peñuela-Mora, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Although progress has been made in studies on white sand forests in the Amazon, there is still a considerable gap in our knowledge of the unique species composition of white sand forests and their structure and dynamics, especially in Western Amazon. This thesis aims to fill this gap by addressing t

  20. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  1. Choosing an optimum sand control method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Khamehchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation sand control is always one of the main concerns of production engineers. There are some different methods to prevent sand production. Choosing a method for preventing formation sand production depends on different reservoir parameters and politic and economic conditions. Sometimes, economic and politic conditions are more effective to choose an optimum than reservoir parameters. Often, simultaneous investigation of politic and economic conditions with reservoir parameters has different results with what is expected. So, choosing the best sand control method is the result of thorough study. Global oil price, duration of sand control project and costs of necessary equipment for each method as economic and politic conditions and well productivity index as reservoir parameter are the main parameters studied in this paper.

  2. Altitude of the top of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand in three areas of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Westerfield, Paul W.; Gonthier, Gerard; Poynter, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand form the second most productive aquifer in Arkansas. The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand range in thick- ness from 0 to 900 feet, consisting of fine- to medium-grained sands interbedded with layers of silt, clay, shale, and minor amounts of lignite. Within the three areas of interest, the top surface of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand dips regionally east and southeast towards the axis of the Mississippi Embayment syncline and Desha Basin. Local variations in the top surface may be attributed to a combination of continued development of structural features, differential compaction, localized faulting, and erosion of the surface prior to subsequent inundation and deposition of younger sediments.

  3. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Isehunwa,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field were evaluated. Sand failure mechanisms and contributing parameters were identified and compared with published profiles. The results showed that cohesive stress is the predominant sand failure mechanism. Water cut, bean size and gas oil ratio (GOR impact sand production in the Niger Delta.

  4. Substrate in the emergence and initial growth of seedlings of Caesalpinia pulcherrima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnólia Martins Alves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Caesalpinia pulcherrima is an exotic species belongs to the Fabaceae family commonly known as flamboyant-mirim, and widely used for urban forestry. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different substrates on the emergence and early seedlings growth of C. pulcherrima . The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse belonging to the Centro de Ciências Agrárias, Universidade Federal da Paraíba. The experimental design was completely randomized and treatments had 14 substrates: sand, vegetable soil, vermiculite, wood dust, carbonized rice straw, vegetable soil + sand 1:1, sand + wood dust 1:1, sand + carbonized rice straw 1:1, earth + wood dust 1:1, vegetable soil + carbonized rice straw 1:1, vermiculite + sand 1:1, vermiculite + wood dust 1:1, vermiculite + earth 1:1 and vermiculite + carbonized rice straw 1:1. Evaluation of the effect of the treatments was through the following determinations: percentage of emergency, first count, index of germination speed, length and dry weight of roots and shoots. The vermiculite, vegetable soil + sand 1:1, vermiculite + sand 1:1, vermiculite + saw dust 1:1, are suitable for emergence and early growth of seedlings of Caesalpinia pulcherrima . Substrates saw dust and carbonized rice straw were responsible for the worst performers on emergence and seedling development.

  5. Experiments on the Evolution of Sand Bed Forms for Varying Degrees of Supply Limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langendoen, E. J.; Wren, D. G.; Kuhnle, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The advanced age and impending decommissioning of many dams have brought increased attention to the fate of sediments stored in reservoirs. In many cases, fine sediments are reintroduced to coarse substrates that have large volumes of pore space available for storage after having sediments removed by years of sediment-starved flow. Recent research has found that the fine sediment elevation relative to the coarse substrate significantly alters bed surface roughness, turbulence characteristics, the mobility of the fine sediment, and consequently sediment transport rates and sediment bed forms that move over and through these coarse substrates. The roughness of the bed surface is an important parameter for the prediction of bulk flow and sediment transport rates. In order to calculate sediment transport rates, bed shear stresses are typically adjusted for drag exerted by the flow on macro roughness elements, which are related here to the protrusion of coarse substrate particles and sediment bed forms. Also, the partial mobility (or supply limitation) of sediment yields bed forms that differ from those observed for uniform bed material. Hence, a proper understanding of the interactions between near-bed flow structure, sediment transport rates, and bed surface elevation is needed to adequately determine the downstream impact of fine sediment releases from reservoirs. Recent experiments at the USDA-ARS-National Sedimentation Laboratory in a sediment-recirculating flume (15 m long, 0.36 m wide, and 0.45 m deep) were carried out to elucidate turbulence and sand transport over and through coarse gravel substrates. The median diameter of the sand was 0.3 mm, and that of the gravel was 35 mm. This paper presents results on the change in bed form types with increasing sand elevation relative to the coarse gravel substrate and for Froude numbers ranging from about 0.1 to 0.6. The mean sand elevation was varied between 5 cm below the top of the gravel and the top of the gravel

  6. Analysis of main parameters affecting substrate/mortar contact area through tridimensional laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Carina M; Masuero, Angela B

    2015-10-01

    This study assesses the influence of the granulometric composition of sand, application energy and the superficial tension of substrates on the contact area of rendering mortars. Three substrates with distinct wetting behaviors were selected and mortars were prepared with different sand compositions. Characterization tests were performed on fresh and hardened mortars, as well as the rheological characterization. Mortars were applied to substrates with two different energies. The interfacial area was then digitized with 3D scanner. Results show that variables are all of influence on the interfacial contact in the development area. Furthermore, 3D laser scanning proved to be a good method to contact area measurement.

  7. Flexible Electronics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Flexible Electronics Research Facility designs, synthesizes, tests, and fabricates materials and devices compatible with flexible substrates for Army information...

  8. Global sand trade is paving the way for a tragedy of the sand commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A.; Brandt, J.; Lear, K.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the first 40 years of the 21st century, planet Earth is highly likely to experience more urban land expansion than in all of history, an increase in transportation infrastructure by more than a third, and a great variety of land reclamation projects. While scientists are beginning to quantify the deep imprint of human infrastructure on biodiversity at large scales, its off-site impacts and linkages to sand mining and trade have been largely ignored. Sand is the most widely used building material in the world. With an ever-increasing demand for this resource, sand is being extracted at rates that far exceed its replenishment, and is becoming increasingly scarce. This has already led to conflicts around the world and will likely lead to a "tragedy of the sand commons" if sustainable sand mining and trade cannot be achieved. We investigate the environmental and socioeconomic interactions over large distances (telecouplings) of infrastructure development and sand mining and trade across diverse systems through transdisciplinary research and the recently proposed telecoupling framework. Our research is generating a thorough understanding of the telecouplings driven by an increasing demand for sand. In particular, we address three main research questions: 1) Where are the conflicts related to sand mining occurring?; 2) What are the major "sending" and "receiving" systems of sand?; and 3) What are the main components (e.g. causes, effects, agents, etc.) of telecoupled systems involving sand mining and trade? Our results highlight the role of global sand trade as a driver of environmental degradation that threatens the integrity of natural systems and their capacity to deliver key ecosystem services. In addition, infrastructure development and sand mining and trade have important implications for other sustainability challenges such as over-fishing and global warming. This knowledge will help to identify opportunities and tools to better promote a more sustainable use

  9. Analysis by high-resolution electron microscopy of elastic strain in thick InAs layers embedded in Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As buffers on InP(0 0 1) substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatel, C., E-mail: gatel@cemes.fr [CNRS, CEMES (Centre d' Elaboration des Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales), BP 94347, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)] [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 31055 Toulouse (France); Tang, H.; Crestou, C.; Ponchet, A. [CNRS, CEMES (Centre d' Elaboration des Materiaux et d' Etudes Structurales), BP 94347, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)] [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 31055 Toulouse (France); Bertru, N.; Dore, F.; Folliot, H. [FOTON-LENS-INSA, 20 av. des Buttes de Coesmes, CS 14315, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2010-05-15

    Elastic strain has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy in nanometric InAs layers grown on Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As/InP(0 0 1) by molecular beam epitaxy using a residual Sb flux. Deposits of 10 and 15 monolayers of InAs (3 and 4.5 nm) remain elastically stressed with a two-dimensional growth mode. The out-of-plane strain in the layers is analyzed by cross-sectional high-resolution electron microscopy. A distortion of the substrate below and on top of the InAs layers is detected and is attributed to a significant surface relaxation effect due to thinning. Surface relaxation is modeled by three-dimensional finite element modeling. An additional relaxation effect is obtained when the sample is not infinite along the direction perpendicular to the thinning. This effect enhances the buffer distortion of the buffers below and on top of the strained layers. Taking into account thin foil effects, the experimental out-of-plane strain is in excellent agreement with the theoretical value calculated for a pure InAs layer (i.e. 0.035), demonstrating the high level of strain and stress in the layers.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of electron doped La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} thin film grown on LaAlO{sub 3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Irshad, E-mail: bhat.amu85@gmail.com; Husain, Shahid [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aliagrh-202002 (India); Patil, S. I. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind-411007, Pune (India); Khan, Wasi; Ali, S. Asad [Department of Applied Physics, Z. H. College of Engg. & Tech. Aligarh Muslim University, Aliagrh-202002 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We report the structural, morphological and magneto-transport properties of electron doped La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} (LTMO) thin film grown on (001) LaAlO{sub 3} single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirm that the film has good crystalline quality, single phase, and c-axis orientation. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) results have revealed that the film consists of grains with the average size in a range of 20–30 nm and root-mean square (rms) roughness of 0.27nm. The resistivity versus temperature measurement exhibits an insulator to metal transition (MIT). We have noticed a huge value of magnetoresistance (∼93%) close to MIT in presence of 8T field. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy confirms the electron doping and suggests that Te ions could be in the Te{sup 4+} state, while the Mn ions stay in the Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} valence state.

  11. Sand box experiments with bioclogging of porous media: Hydraulic conductivity reductions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seifert, Dorte; Engesgaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Tracer experiments during clogging and de-clogging experiments in a 2D sand box were via an image analysis used to establish a data set on the relation between changes in hydraulic conductivity (K) and relative porosity (β). Clogging appears to create a finger-like tracer transport, which could...... and closer to the substrate source during the experiments suggesting that the zone of clogging moved upstream. Three clogging models, K(β), from the literature were tested for their ability to describe the temporal changes in clogging at the scale of the sand box; the model of Clement et al. (1996......) that makes no assumption on biomass distribution, the plug formation model of Thullner et al. (2002a), and the biofilm-plug formation model of Vandevivere (1995). The plug formation and biofilm-plug formation models both match the observed changes between the hydraulic conductivity of the sand box...

  12. Effects of dynamic operating conditions on nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Musovic, Sanin

    2014-01-01

    Biological rapid sand filters are often used to remove ammonium from groundwater for drinking water supply. They often operate under dynamic substrate and hydraulic loading conditions, which can lead to increased levels of ammonium and nitrite in the effluent. To determine the maximum nitrification...... operating conditions. The ammonium removal rate of the filter was determined by the ammonium loading rate, but was independent of both the flow and influent ammonium concentration individually. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea were almost equally abundant in the filter. Both ammonium removal...... rates and safe operating windows of rapid sand filters, a pilot scale rapid sand filter was used to test short-term increased ammonium loads, set by varying either influent ammonium concentrations or hydraulic loading rates. Ammonium and iron (flock) removal were consistent between the pilot...

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of substrate-borne polyacrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianhang; Wu, Laosheng

    2002-08-28

    Polyacrylamides (PAMs) have wide application in many industries and in agriculture. Scientific research and industrial applications manifested a need for a method that can quantify substrate-borne PAM. The N-bromination method (a PAM analytical technique based on N-bromination of amide groups and spectrophotometric determination of the formed starch-triiodide complex), which was originally developed for determining PAM in aqueous solutions, was modified to quantify substrate-borne PAM. In the modified method, the quantity of substrate-borne PAM was converted to a concentration of starch-triiodide complex in aqueous solution that was then measured by spectrophotometry. The method sensitivity varied with substrates due to sorption of reagents and reaction intermediates on the substrates. Therefore, separate calibration for each substrate was required. Results from PAM samples in sand, cellulose, organic matter burnt soils, and clay minerals showed that this method had good accuracy and reproducibility. The PAM recoveries ranged from 95.8% to 103.7%, and the relative standard deviations (n = 4) were <7.5% in all cases. The optimum range of PAM in each sample is 10-80 microg. The technique can serve as an effective tool in improving PAM application and facilitating PAM-related research.

  14. Buffer layers on biaxially textured metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoup, Shara S.; Paranthamam, Mariappan; Beach, David B.; Kroeger, Donald M.; Goyal, Amit

    2001-01-01

    A method is disclosed for forming a biaxially textured buffer layer on a biaxially oriented metal substrate by using a sol-gel coating technique followed by pyrolyzing/annealing in a reducing atmosphere. This method is advantageous for providing substrates for depositing electronically active materials thereon.

  15. Cementation of Loose Sand Particles based on Bio-cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Hui; QIAN Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Loose sand particles could be cemented to sandstone by bio-cement (microbial induced magnesium carbonate). The bio-sandstone was firstly prepared, and then the compressive strength and the porosity of the sandstone cemented by microbial induced magnesium carbonate were tested to characterize the cementation effectiveness. In addition, the formed mineral composition and the microstructure of bio-sandstone were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results show that the feasibility of binding loose sand particles using microbial induced magnesium carbonate precipitation is available and the acquired compressive strength of bio-sandstone can be excellent at certain ages. Moreover, the compressive strength and the porosity could be improved with the increase of microbial induced magnesium carbonate content. XRD results indicate that the morphology of magnesium carbonate induced by microbe appears as needles and SEM results show that the cementation of loose sand particles to sandstone mainly relies on the microbial induced formation of magnesium carbonate precipitation around individual particles and at particle-particle contacts.

  16. Morphology and magneto-transport properties of electron doped La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} thin film deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Irshad [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, (U.P) (India); Husain, Shahid, E-mail: s.husain@lycos.com [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, (U.P) (India); Patil, S.I. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Resistivity versus temperature plots of La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} thin film under the applied magnetic field of 0 T, 5 T and 8 T. - Highlights: • La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} manganite thin film is deposited on LaAlO{sub 3} using PLD technique. • Film is deposited at 750 °C, and is highly crystalline, single phase and c-axis oriented. • The film consists of grains with an average diameter of 60 nm. • Resistivity plots display double insulator-metal transitions. • XPS results confirm the electron doped (n-type) nature of the film. - Abstract: We report the structural, electronic transport and X-ray photoemission spectroscopic study of 100 nm thin film of La{sub 0.85}Te{sub 0.15}MnO{sub 3} grown on (0 0 1) LaAlO{sub 3} single crystal substrate by pulsed laser deposition. XRD results confirm that the film has good crystalline quality, single phase, and has a c-axis orientation. The atomic force microscopic (AFM) results showed that the film consists of grains with an average diameter of 60 nm. The resistivity measurement showed double insulator-metal transitions in absence and as well as in presence of the magnetic field. The resistivity peaks are ascribed to the intrinsic contribution of LTMO film and the tunnelling of spin-polarized electrons at grain boundaries. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements suggest that Te ions are in the Te{sup 4+} state, while the Mn ions are forced to stay in the Mn{sup 2+} and Mn{sup 3+} valence state.

  17. Reefs, sand and reef-like sand: A comparison of the benthic biodiversity of habitats in the Dutch Borkum Reef Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Joop W. P.; Bos, Oscar G.; Glorius, Sander; Lengkeek, Wouter; Cuperus, Joël; van der Weide, Babeth; Agüera, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Reefs play an important role in the distribution of species associated with hard substrates and are of value for biodiversity conservation. High densities of the habitat building annelid Lanice conchilega also increase local biodiversity. This study describes the benthic biodiversity of a rocky reef and its surrounding sand bottom with dense L. conchilega beds in the Borkum Reef Grounds, north of the island of Schiermonnikoog in the Dutch North Sea. A side-scan sonar survey revealed distinct seabed areas with high acoustic reflections, indicating the presence of hard substrate on the sandy seafloor. To ground truth the side-scan sonar data and make an inventory of the biodiversity of the observed habitats, a multi-method sampling approach (box corer, SCUBA airlift sampler and visual transects, drop-down camera) was used. This revealed (1) rocky reefs: a combination of gravel, stones and rocks; (2) individual rocks in a sandy environment; (3) sand with dense L. conchilega beds (> 1500 ind·m- 2) and (4) sand bottom habitat. A total of 193 taxa were found with many unique species per habitat. Species richness was significantly higher on sand when compared to the rocky reef (NB-GLM; p = 0.006), caused by the presence of dense L. conchilega beds (Poisson GLM; p 1500 ind·m- 2 to be 74 km2. Further research should focus on the possible function of L. conchilega as an ecosystem engineer creating intermediate sand-reef systems. For mapping these L. conchilega beds, we advise using side-scan sonar imaging combined with ground truthing by drop-down cameras.

  18. Microstrip antenna on tunable substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K. A.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Varadan, Vasundara V.; Mohanan, P.

    1995-05-01

    The tunable patch antenna configurations are becoming popular and attractive in many aspects. This was mainly due to the advent of ferrite thin film technology and tunable substrate materials. The integration of monolithic microwave circuits and antennas are becoming easy today. In the development of magnetic tuning of microstrip patch on ferrite substrate is presented by Rainville and Harackewiez. Radiation characteristics of such antennas are presented by Pozer. Band width and radiation characteristics of such tunable antennas are measured and compared. Usually the substrate losses are considered in the analysis and metallization losses are assumed to be ideal. The analysis of magnetic tunable radiator including metallization and ferrite substrate losses are presented. However, all such tuning and integration of circuits and antennas are mainly on ferrite substrate due to magnetic tuning. Recently, Varadan et al. established that the BaxSr1-xTiO3 series ferroelectric materials such as Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) are well suited for microwave phase shifter applications. It could be possible to change the dielectric constant of these materials more than 50% depending on the BST composition, by changing the applied bias voltage. Also, the porosity of BST can be controlled during processing to produce dielectric constants in the range of 15 to 1500, with some trade off in tunability. In this paper, we are presenting the possibility of designing a microstrip patch antenna on such tunable substrate. Such antennas are having the major advantage of electronic tunability and compact size.

  19. Adsorption of dyes on Sahara desert sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlikli, Canan; Bekiari, Vlasoula; Kus, Mahmut; Boduroglu, Numan; Oner, Ilker; Lianos, Panagiotis; Lyberatos, Gerasimos; Icli, Siddik

    2009-10-15

    Sahara desert sand (SaDeS) was employed as a mineral sorbent for retaining organic dyes from aqueous solutions. Natural sand has demonstrated a strong affinity for organic dyes but significantly lost its adsorption capacity when it was washed with water. Therefore, characterization of both natural and water washed sand was performed by XRD, BET, SEM and FTIR techniques. It was found that water-soluble kyanite, which is detected in natural sand, is the dominant factor affecting adsorbance of cationic dyes. The sand adsorbs over 75% of cationic dyes but less than 21% for anionic ones. Among the dyes studied, Methylene Blue (MB) demonstrated the strongest affinity for Sahara desert sand (Q(e)=11.98 mg/g, for initial dye solution concentration 3.5 x 10(-5)mol/L). The effects of initial dye concentration, the amount of the adsorbent, the temperature and the pH of the solution on adsorption capacity were tested by using Methylene Blue as model dye. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were applied. It was concluded that adsorption of Methylene Blue on Sahara desert sand followed pseudo-second order kinetics. Gibbs free energy, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and found -6411 J/mol, -30360 J/mol and -76.58 J/mol K, respectively. These values indicate that the adsorption is an exothermic process and has a spontaneous nature at low temperatures.

  20. Critical state of sand matrix soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, λ, and Γ. The range of the value of M, λ, and Γ is 0.803-0.998, 0.144-0.248, and 1.727-2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated.

  1. Sand Flies and Their Control Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Hüseyin; Özbel, Yusuf

    2017-06-01

    The main aim of managing arthropod vectors that carry the disease agents is interrupting the infection cycle. Therefore, the management of the disease implies that all precautions related to all elements (i.e., human, arthropod vector, and reservoir) in the infection cycle need to be taken. There are important points that need to be considered while dealing with sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae), which in many regions worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical areas, are vectors of diseases such as leishmaniasis and sand fly fever and are the arthropods of the infection cycle. Because the larval control of the sand flies is very difficult and almost impossible, the management is mainly conducted for the adults. The most effective strategy for reducing both sand fly fever and leishmaniasis is managing sand flies, particularly in areas where humans are located. In this review, the morphology, biology, and taxonomy of sand flies; the integrated fighting and management methods such as insecticide-impregnated bed nets and use of curtains, zooprophylaxis, indoor and outdoor residual applications, larvicides, repellents, and insecticide-impregnated dog collars; and data regarding many issues such as insecticide resistance in sand flies have been emphasized on in the review.

  2. Critical State of Sand Matrix Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminaton Marto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, λ, and Γ. The range of the value of M, λ, and Γ is 0.803–0.998, 0.144–0.248, and 1.727–2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated.

  3. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee Dae

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic

  4. Divergent evolution of feeding substrate preferences in a phylogenetically young species flock of pupfish ( Cyprinodon spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, Joachim; Plath, Martin

    2008-12-01

    A fundamental question in sympatric speciation is how trophic divergence is achieved. We used an extremely young (Mexico to examine divergent evolution of preferences for different feeding substrates. In a test aquarium, we presented four feeding substrates (sand, gravel, a plastic plant, and blank bottom), but no actual food was offered. The four feeding substrates were chosen to mirror the most common substrate types in Laguna Chichancanab. Previous studies demonstrated that benthic food items prevail in the diet of most Cyprinodon species. C. beltrani preferred sand, whereas C. labiosus preferred gravel. F1 hybrids of both species showed intermediate preferences. C. maya searched for food equally at all substrates. As the test fish were reared under identical laboratory conditions (i.e., in the absence of feeding substrates), the species-specific preferences appear to be genetically fixed, suggesting rapid divergent evolution of feeding behaviors.

  5. Snap-Through Instability of Graphene on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Teng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We determine the graphene morphology regulated by substrates with herringbone and checkerboard surface corrugations. As the graphene–substrate interfacial bonding energy and the substrate surface roughness vary, the graphene morphology snaps between two distinct states: (1 closely conforming to the substrate and (2 remaining nearly flat on the substrate. Since the graphene morphology is strongly tied to the electronic properties of graphene, such a snap-through instability of graphene morphology can lead to desirable graphene electronic properties that could potentially enable graphene-based functional electronic components (e.g. nano-switches.

  6. Improved Measurement of Ejection Velocities From Craters Formed in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Byers, Terry; Cardenas, Francisco; Montes, Roland; Potter, Elliot E.

    2014-01-01

    A typical impact crater is formed by two major processes: compression of the target (essentially equivalent to a footprint in soil) and ejection of material. The Ejection-Velocity Measurement System (EVMS) in the Experimental Impact Laboratory has been used to study ejection velocities from impact craters formed in sand since the late 1990s. The original system used an early-generation Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera; custom-written software; and a complex, multicomponent optical system to direct laser light for illumination. Unfortunately, the electronic equipment was overtaken by age, and the software became obsolete in light of improved computer hardware.

  7. Formation mechanism of cracks in saturated sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobing Lu; Zhemin Zheng; Yongren Wu

    2006-01-01

    The formation mechanism of "water film" (or crack) in saturated sand is analyzed theoretically and numerically.The theoretical analysis shows that there will be no stable "water film" in the saturated sand if the strength of the skeleton is zero and no positions are choked.It is shown by numerical simulation that stable water films initiate and grow if the choking state keeps unchanged once the fluid velocities decrease to zero in the liquefied sand column.The developments of "water film" based on the model presented in this paper are compared with experimental results.

  8. Lund Sand No 0:part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    1996-01-01

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. T...

  9. Lund Sand No 0:part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    1996-01-01

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. T...

  10. Biodegradable materials as foundry moulding sands binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Major - Gabryś

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show the possibility of using biodegradable materials as part of the composition of foundry moulding and core sand binders. Research shows that moulding sands with biodegradable materials selected as binders are not only less toxic but are also better suited to mechanical reclamation than moulding sands with phenol-furfuryl resin. The use of biodegradable materials as additives to typical synthetic resins can result in their decreased toxicity and improved ability to reclamation as well as in accelerated biodegradation of binding material leftovers of mechanical reclamation.

  11. Sand box experiments with bioclogging of porous media: hydraulic conductivity reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Dorte; Engesgaard, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Tracer experiments during clogging and de-clogging experiments in a 2D sand box were via an image analysis used to establish a data set on the relation between changes in hydraulic conductivity (K) and relative porosity (β). Clogging appears to create a finger-like tracer transport, which could be caused by an initial heterogeneous distribution of biomass in the sand box. De-clogging occurs at a slower rate possibly due to the presence of inert biomass that is not affected by the starvation conditions by sudden removal of the substrate source. The tracer front was observed to get disturbed closer and closer to the substrate source during the experiments suggesting that the zone of clogging moved upstream. Three clogging models, K(β), from the literature were tested for their ability to describe the temporal changes in clogging at the scale of the sand box; the model of Clement et al. (1996) that makes no assumption on biomass distribution, the plug formation model of Thullner et al. (2002a), and the biofilm-plug formation model of Vandevivere (1995). The plug formation and biofilm-plug formation models both match the observed changes between the hydraulic conductivity of the sand box and the relative porosity. Unfortunately our experiments did not reach low relative porosities where the two models predict different behaviors. The model by Clement et al. (1996) underestimates clogging.

  12. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  13. Effect of Chromite-Silica Sands Characteristics on Performance of Ladle Filler Sands for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Free opening rate is mainly determined by the performance of the ladle filler sand. High free opening rates of ladles are required in steel making to improve steel quality. Chromite ladle filler sands are one of the most widely used ladle filler sand. Several operative variables and materials characteristics affect the performance of the sands. Three sets of chromite ladle filler sands were selected and researches were focused on the sintering hehaviour and per- formance of the sands under operative conditions. The effect of particle size distribution on sintering, microstruc- ture, flowability, and permeability were presented. In all cases, the particle size varies from 0.1 to 1.5 mm corre- sponding to free flowing powders. One of the samples has higher permeability factor in comparison with others due to low particle size distribution. The other sample presents very good free opening due to its very good flowability and permeability factor.

  14. Enhanced two dimensional electron gas transport characteristics in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlInN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistors on Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedsman, J. J., E-mail: freedy54@gmail.com; Watanabe, A.; Urayama, Y. [Research Center for Nano-Devices and Advanced Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 8555 (Japan); Egawa, T., E-mail: egawa.takashi@nitech.ac.jp [Research Center for Nano-Devices and Advanced Materials, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 8555 (Japan); Innovation Center for Multi-Business of Nitride Semiconductors, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466 8555 (Japan)

    2015-09-07

    The authors report on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 0.85}In{sub 0.15}N/GaN Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor High-Electron-Mobility Transistor (MOS-HEMT) on Si fabricated by using atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as gate insulator and passivation layer. The MOS-HEMT with the gate length of 2 μm exhibits excellent direct-current (dc) characteristics with a drain current maximum of 1270 mA/mm at a gate bias of 3 V and an off-state breakdown voltage of 180 V for a gate-drain spacing of 4 μm. Also, the 1 μm-gate MOS-HEMT shows good radio-frequency (rf) response such as current gain and maximum oscillation cut-off frequencies of 10 and 34 GHz, respectively. The capacitance-voltage characteristics at 1 MHz revealed significant increase in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density for the MOS-HEMT compared to conventional Schottky barrier HEMTs. Analyses using drain-source conductivity measurements showed improvements in 2DEG transport characteristics for the MOS-HEMT. The enhancements in dc and rf performances of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 0.85}In{sub 0.15}N/GaN MOS-HEMT are attributed to the improvements in 2DEG characteristics.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Dilation Mechanisms of Land-Facies Karamay Oil Sand Reservoirs under Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Botao; Jin, Yan; Pang, Huiwen; Cerato, Amy B.

    2016-04-01

    The success of steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is strongly dependent on the formation of a homogeneous and highly permeable zone in the land-facies Karamay oil sand reservoirs. To accomplish this, hydraulic fracturing is applied through controlled water injection to a pair of horizontal wells to create a dilation zone between the dual wells. The mechanical response of the reservoirs during this injection process, however, has remained unclear for the land-facies oil sand that has a loosely packed structure. This research conducted triaxial, permeability and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests on the field-collected oil sand samples. The tests evaluated the influences of the field temperature, confining stress and injection pressure on the dilation mechanisms as shear dilation and tensile parting during injection. To account for petrophysical heterogeneity, five reservoir rocks including regular oil sand, mud-rich oil sand, bitumen-rich oil sand, mudstone and sandstone were investigated. It was found that the permeability evolution in the oil sand samples subjected to shear dilation closely followed the porosity and microcrack evolutions in the shear bands. In contrast, the mudstone and sandstone samples developed distinct shear planes, which formed preferred permeation paths. Tensile parting expanded the pore space and increased the permeability of all the samples in various degrees. Based on this analysis, it is concluded that the range of injection propagation in the pay zone determines the overall quality of hydraulic fracturing, while the injection pressure must be carefully controlled. A region in a reservoir has little dilation upon injection if it remains unsaturated. Moreover, a cooling of the injected water can strengthen the dilation potential of a reservoir. Finally, it is suggested that the numerical modeling of water injection in the Karamay oil sand reservoirs must take into account the volumetric plastic strain in hydrostatic loading.

  16. 8-band and 14-band kp modeling of electronic band structure and material gain in Ga(In)AsBi quantum wells grown on GaAs and InP substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S. [Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kudrawiec, R. [Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2015-08-07

    The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) with various bismuth concentrations (Bi ≤ 15%) within the 8-band and 14-band kp models. The 14-band kp model was obtained by extending the standard 8-band kp Hamiltonian by the valence band anticrossing (VBAC) Hamiltonian, which is widely used to describe Bi-related changes in the electronic band structure of dilute bismides. It has been shown that in the range of low carrier concentrations n < 5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, material gain spectra calculated within 8- and 14-band kp Hamiltonians are similar. It means that the 8-band kp model can be used to calculate material gain in dilute bismides QWs. Therefore, it can be applied to analyze QWs containing new dilute bismides for which the VBAC parameters are unknown. Thus, the energy gap and electron effective mass for Bi-containing materials are used instead of VBAC parameters. The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for 8 nm wide GaInAsBi QWs on GaAs and InP substrates with various compositions. In these QWs, Bi concentration was varied from 0% to 5% and indium concentration was tuned in order to keep the same compressive strain (ε = 2%) in QW region. For GaInAsBi/GaAs QW with 5% Bi, gain peak was determined to be at about 1.5 μm. It means that it can be possible to achieve emission at telecommunication windows (i.e., 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm) for GaAs-based lasers containing GaInAsBi/GaAs QWs. For GaInAsBi/Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As/InP QWs with 5% Bi, gain peak is predicted to be at about 4.0 μm, i.e., at the wavelengths that are not available in current InP-based lasers.

  17. Sand Lake WMD vegetation mapping project update

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final report on the vegetation mapping project at Sand Lake Wetland Management District. This project is being completed by the use of SPRING software and ground...

  18. Bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus

    Global applications of pesticides in agricultural production have led to the detection of trace amounts of pesticides in groundwater resources in levels exceeding the EU threshold limit for drinking water of 0.1 µg L-1. Pesticide-polluted groundwater may be remediated by inoculating waterworks sand...... for degradation performances in flow-through sand columns, with the aim of identifying a suitable inoculant strain for future environmental applications. Another aim was to identify a suitable genetic marker to monitor phenoxy acid degradation in strain Sphingobium sp. PM2. We were not able to link motility...... and biofilm formation to the strains´ ability to adhere to sand. Nevertheless, a correlation was found between cell surface hydrophobicity and adhesion and overall degradation performances in flow-through sand columns. We identified S phingobium sp. PM2 as a promising inoculant strain, displaying efficient...

  19. Petrophysical Analysis of Oil Sand in Athabasca

    Science.gov (United States)

    cheong, S.; Lee, H.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands are the major unconventional energy sources which have great reserves in Alberta, Canada. Recovery techniques such as CSS (Cyclic Steam Stimulation) and SAGD (Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage) enabled to develop deeper bitumen about several hundred meter depth. Before applying CSS and SAGD, reservoir heterogeneity of mud barriers or shale breccias should be clarified to establish injection and production wells successfully. We conducted the integrated petro-physical analysis for oil sands deposits in Athabasca by correlating well logs with seismic data. From 33 well logs and 3D seismic, we have made P-wave impedance by recursive inversion. Target formations of our analysis were the top of Wabiskaw member. Using inverted impedance and multi-attributes, porosity volume was derived at a target depth. Porosity of time slice 375 ms ranged 20 ~ 40 % stretching porous sand body from NE to SW direction. Characteristics of porosity distribution may be useful to design optimum oil sands recovery in Athabasca.

  20. Carbon cycle: New pathways in the sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Organic carbon decomposition in anoxic marine sediments was thought to be dominated by bacteria, but experimental data and microbial culture studies now show that microalgae buried in coastal sands may also play an important role in carbon turnover.

  1. CRADE OF SAND AND DUST STORM WEATHER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Ruoyun; Tian Cuiying; Bi Baogui; Yang Keming; Wang Youheng; Tuo Ya; Ding Haifang; Zhang Tairen

    2011-01-01

    Background Sand and dust storm,as one of the main disastrous weathers that affect northern China,not only affect the people health and normal life,but cause the short-term climatic changes due to the direct and indirect radiation of the earth-atmosphere system through the dust floating in the sky.The sand end dust weather and its potential harm on the national economy,ecological environment,social activities and other aspects have aroused worldwide concern.

  2. Laboratory evaluation of selected tar sand asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.W.; Epps, J.A.; Gallaway, B.M.

    1980-12-01

    Three tar sand asphalts of similar grades prepared from one syncrude by three different refining methods were characterized by tests commonly used to specify paving asphalts together with certain special tests. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures were prepared using these asphalts and tested in the laboratory to determine strength stiffness stability, tensile properties, temperature effects and water susceptibility. Comparison of the tar sand asphalt properties to conventional petroleum asphalt properties reveal no striking differences.

  3. Response to Oil Sands Products Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Tailings ponds are an operating facility common to all types of surface mining. For oil sands, tailings consisting of water , sand, clay, and residual ...oil, are pumped to these basins—or ponds— where settling occurs and water is recycled for reuse in the process. When the ponds are no longer required...of crude oil transported by tank vessel in Washington waters . In a 2013 Bloomburg Business news article , Dan Murtaugh states, “The dock probably

  4. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  5. Pragmatics of reclaimed sand quality assessment recovered nowadays from various used sand systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the reclamation degree of used sands is not a simple, clearly defined issue. The great variety of technologies ofmoulding and core sands, based on the organic and inorganic binders does not allow the use of a single, universal index assessing thedegree of reclamation. The article presents the problems of research relating to selection of proper criteria for assessing the degree ofreclamation process of used moulding and core sands deriving from different technologies. The most often applied in practice types ofused sands and the most adequate in practice methods of assessing the degrees of their reclamation were characterized.

  6. Sand Dune Encroachment and Desertification Processes of the Rigboland Sand Sea, Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam; McQueen, Kenneth G; Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Naseri, Hamidreza

    2017-05-08

    Early studies on sand dune movement and desertification in Iran have not always been convincingly demonstrated because of problems with the field-based measurements. In some areas where various land uses have been engulfed by aeolian sand dunes, desertification is clear, but in other less settled areas, it may not be so obvious. The objective of this study is to demonstrate encroachments of the Rigboland sand sea, central Iran, in its different directions and variable magnitude rates. Determining the rate and direction of the sand sea movements is critical for specifying which lands should be prioritized and quickly protected. The study has trialed a change detection technique which uses a Cross-Tabulation module to compare two available LandsatTM images over the Rigboland sand sea. This indicates that within a ten-year span (from 1988 to 1998) more than 200 ha/yr were added to the Rigboland sand sea, from the alluvial fan landforms in the eastern upstream, outer margins of the Rigboland sand sea. Coupled with GIS techniques, this type of analysis of the remote sensing (RS) images provides an effective tool for the monitoring and prognostication of sand dune movement and sand sea change.

  7. Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Li Bo; Xiao-Jing Zheng; Shao-Zhen Duan; Yi-Rui Liang

    2013-01-01

    In the research of windblown sand movement,the lift-off and incident velocities of saltating sand particles play a significant role in bridging the spatial and temporal scales from single sand particle's motion to windblown sand flux.In this paper,we achieved wind tunnel measurements of the movement of sand particles near sand bed through improving the wind tunnel experimental scheme of paticle image velocimetry (PIV) and data processing method.And then the influence of observation height on the probability distributions of lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles was analyzed.The results demonstrate that the observation height has no obvious influence on the distribution pattern of the lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles,i.e.,the probability distribution of horizontal and vertical velocities of lift-off and incident sand particles follow a Gaussian distribution and a negative exponential distribution,respectively.However,it influences the center of the Gaussian distribution,the decay constant and the amplitude of the negative exponential distribution.

  8. Recent Sand Avalanching on Rabe Crater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Dark streaks on the steep, down-wind slopes of sand dunes in Rabe Crater are seen at several locations in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. These streaks indicate relatively recent (i.e., in the past few years or less) movement of sand down these slopes.Sand dunes move forward by the combined action of wind that drives sand up the shallow slope on the windward side of the dune (in this case, the slopes that face toward the lower right) and the avalanching of this sand down the steeper, lee-side slope. The steep slope is also known as the slip face. The dark streaks indicated by arrows are evidence for sand avalanches that occurred within a few months or years of the time when the picture was taken in March 1999. Other streaks which are seen criss-crossing the dunes may be the result of passing dust devils. This image is illuminated from the upper left and located in Rabe Crater of the Hellespontus-Noachis region near 44.2oS, 325.6oW.

  9. Discrete particle simulation of mixed sand transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengjun Xiao; Liejin Guo; Debiao Li; Yueshe Wang

    2012-01-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian numerical simulation is performed on mixed sand transport.Volume averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate gas motion,and particle motion is calculated using Newton's equation,involving a hard sphere model to describe particle-to-particle and particle-to-wall collisions.The influence of wall characteristics,size distribution of sand particles and boundary layer depth on vertical distribution of sand mass flux and particle mean horizontal velocity is analyzed,suggesting that all these three factors affect sand transport at different levels.In all cases,for small size groups,sand mass flux first increases with height and then decreases while for large size groups,it decreases exponentially with height and for middle size groups the behavior is in-between.The mean horizontal velocity for all size groups well fits experimental data,that is,increasing logarithmically with height in the middle height region.Wall characteristics greatly affects particle to wall collision and makes the flat bed similar to a Gobi surface and the rough bed similar to a sandy surface.Particle size distribution largely affects the sand mass flux and the highest heights they can reach especially for larger particles.

  10. Predicting the occurrence of sand banks in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Henriët H.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sand banks have a wavelength between 1 and 10 km, and they are up to several tens of meters high. Also, sand banks may have an impact on large-scale human activities that take place in the North Sea like sand mining, shipping, offshore wind farms, etc. Therefore, it is important to know where sand b

  11. Layers, Landslides, and Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 27 October 2003This image shows the northern rim of one of the Valles Marineris canyons. Careful inspection shows many interesting features here. Note that the spurs and gullies in the canyon wall disappear some distance below the top of the canyon wall, indicating the presence of some smooth material here that weathers differently from the underlying rocks. On the floor of the canyon, there are remains from a landslide that came hurtling down the canyon wall between two spurs. Riding over the topography of the canyon floor are many large sand dunes, migrating generally from the lower right to upper left.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14.1, Longitude 306.7 East (53.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Identification and Spatial Distribution of Remotely Sensed Sand on Fringing Reefs of Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, C. L.; Fletcher, C. H.; Hochberg, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    What surficial spatial patterns predominate among sand accumulations on fringing reefs? Do these patterns provide clues to transport mechanisms and factors governing deposition? Understanding of these spatial characteristics is integral for studying sand as a resource, a benthic habitat, and a mobile geologic unit on the sea floor. Using Quickbird imagery of fringing reefs on Oahu, Hawaii, we tested multiple data processing techniques with a linear classifier that utilized a fixed set of training groups and a truth image. Results show the Lyzenga method provided the best quantitative results, and analyst review finds this method to be the best qualitative spatial display as well. Highly accurate spatial data produced from the classified image, combined with bathymetry data from Shoals LIDAR were then utilized to begin identifying spatial distribution of the sandy substrate across the sea floor. Using basic geomorphologic reef descriptions and general spatial characteristics of the sandy substrate is the first step in identifying patterns of distribution within and juxtaposition to the reef. These results, when compiled from several sites, may begin to provide better understanding of sand's role in the reef geomorphology, though current results are not yet sufficient for predicting sandy substrate characteristics from remotely sensed data.

  13. Space radiation studies at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delapaz, A.

    1972-01-01

    The operation of the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor is discussed. Space radiation studies in radiobiology, dosimetry, and transient radiation effects on electronic systems and components are described. Proposed modifications to increase the capability of the facility are discussed.

  14. Learning Design at White Sands Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotewiel, Shane

    2010-01-01

    During the Fall of 2010, I spent my time at NASA White Sands Test Facility in Las Cruces, NM as an Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP) Intern. During that time, I was given three projects to work on: Large Altitude Simulation System (LASS) basket strainer, log books, and the design of a case for touch screen monitors used for simulations. I spent most of my time on the LASS basket strainer. The LASS system has a water feed line with a basket strainer that filters out rust. In 2009, there were three misfires which cost approximately $27,000 and about 8% of the allotted time. The strainer was getting a large change in pressure that would result in a shutdown of the system. I have designed a new basket that will eliminate the large pressure change and it can be used with the old basket strainer housing. The LASS system has three steam generators (modules). Documents pertaining to these modules are stored electronically, and the majority of the documents are not able to be searched with keywords, so they have to be gone through one by one. I have come up with an idea on how to organize these files so that the Propulsion Department may efficiently search through the documents needed. Propulsion also has a LASS simulator that incorporates two touch screen monitors. Currently these monitors are in six foot by two foot metal cabinet on wheels. During simulation these monitors are used in the block house and need to be taken out of the block house when not in use. I have designed different options for hand held cases for storing and transporting the monitors in and out of the block house. The three projects previously mentioned demonstrate my contributions to the Propulsion Department and have taught me real world experience that is essential in becoming a productive engineer.

  15. Development of the Gran Desierto sand sea, northwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Grady; Lancaster, Nicholas

    1990-08-01

    Three major eolian sand populations can be recognized in the Gran Desierto sand sea of northwestern Mexico by using spectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper in conjunction with textural and mineralogical studies of surface sands. Each sand population has distinct textural, mineralogic, and spectral properties that can be related to sand-dune morphology and position with reference to source areas and transport paths of the sands. The oldest eolian sediment in the sand sea was derived from the early to middle Pleistocene Colorado River that flowed through the area of the western Gran Desierto. Subsequent inputs of eolian sands came from the area of the present Colorado River valley and the coast south of the sand sea. The spatial and temporal pattern of eolian deposition in the region has been controlled by Quaternary tectonic and climatic changes, resulting in the episodic input and deposition of sand.

  16. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions.

  17. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice-age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  18. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  19. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand

  20. Vanadium Geochemistry of Oil Sands Fluid Petroleum Coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jake A; Lindsay, Matthew B J

    2017-03-07

    Vanadium has previously been linked to elevated toxicity of leachates derived from oil sands petroleum coke. However, geochemical controls on V mobility within coke deposits remain poorly constrained. Detailed examinations of porewater and solid-phase V geochemistry were therefore performed on oil sands fluid petroleum coke deposits in Alberta, Canada. Sample collection focused on both active and reclaimed deposits, which contained more than 3 × 10(7) m(3) of fluid petroleum coke. Dissolved V concentrations were highest (up to 3.0 mg L(-1)) immediately below the water table but decreased rapidly with increasing depth. This trend corresponded to a transition from mildly acidic (pH 6-7) and oxic conditions to mildly alkaline (pH 7-8.5) and anoxic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping revealed coke particles exhibited an internal structure characterized by successive concentric layers. The outer margins of these layers were characterized by elevated V, Fe, Si, and Al concentrations, indicating the presence of inorganic phases. Micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy revealed that V speciation was dominated by V(IV) porphyrins except at outer margins of layers, where octahedrally coordinated V(III) was a major component. Minor to trace V(V) was also detected within fluid petroleum coke particles.

  1. Bright sand/dark dust: The identification of active sand surfaces on the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, H. G., II; Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Arvidson, R.

    1987-05-01

    Field studies and analysis of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data in the Gran Desierto, Mexico may shed light on a technique to distinguish active from inactive (relict) sand surfaces. Active sand bodies in the study area are consistently brighter (by an average of 20%) at visual and near infrared wavelengths and darker at thermal infrared wavelengths than compositionally similar inactive sands. The reasons for the albedo difference between active and inactive sands are reviewed and the mixing model of Johnson et al. is examined for tracing the provenance of sands based on albedo and spectral variations. Portions of the wavelengths covered by the Mars Orbiter correspond to the Thematic Mapper data. The identification of active sands on Earth, with a priori knowledge of bulk composition and grain size distribution, may allow the remote mapping of active sand surfaces on Mars. In conjuction with thermal infrared remote sensing for composition, it may also provide a method for the remote determination of grain size distributions within sand/silt mixtures.

  2. Simulating and understanding sand wave variation: A case study of the Golden Gate sand waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterlini, F.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Hanes, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed comparison between measured features of the Golden Gate sand wave field and the results of a nonlinear sand wave model. Because the Golden Gate sand waves exhibit large variation in their characteristics and in their environmental physics, this area gives us the opportunity to study sand wave variation between locations, within one well-measured, large area. The nonlinear model used in this paper is presently the only tool that provides information on the nonlinear evolution of large-amplitude sand waves. The model is used to increase our understanding of the coupling between the variability in environmental conditions and the sand wave characteristics. Results show that the model is able to describe the variation in the Golden Gate sand waves well when both the local oscillating tidal current and the residual current are taken into account. Current and water depth seem to be the most important factors influencing sand wave characteristics. The simulation results give further confidence in the underlying model hypothesis and assumptions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SAND FRACTION IN A SAND GRAIN IMAGE CAPTURE SYSTEM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Arruda Viana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Morphology studies assume significant importance in analysis of phenomena of granular systems packaging, in particular with a view to the use of the technique of soil stabilization named particle size correction in forest roads. In this context, this study aimed to develop and operationalize a Sand Grain Image Capture System and, hereby, determine the morphological indices of the sand fractions of two sandy soils called João Pinheiro (JP and Cachoeira da Prata (CP. Soil samples, air-dried, were sieved (2.0 mm nominal mesh size for removal of gravels. The materials that passed through the sieve were subjected to dispersion, washing in 0.053 mm nominal mesh size sieve, removal of organic matter and iron oxides to obtain the clean sand fractions. Subsequently, each soil sample was sieved for separation into twelve classes, between the diameters of 0.149 mm and 1.190 mm, using a Rotap shaker. Next, tests were carried out to characterize the morphometric attributes of the twelve classes of sand fractions of the soils studied. For validation of the performance of the Sand Grain Image Capture System, the results were compared to those obtained using a standard procedure for image analysis. The analysis of the results led to the following conclusions: (i the sand fraction of the JP soil presented higher values for the morphometric indices roundness, elongation and compactness compared to sand fraction of the CP soil; and (ii the Sand Grain Image Capture System worked properly, with practicality.

  4. Probability of rebound and eject of sand particles in wind-blown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xie; Xiaojing Zheng

    2007-01-01

    When incident particles impact into a sand bed in wind-blown sand movement, rebound of the incident particles and eject of the sand particles by the incident particles affect directly the development of wind sand flux. In order to obtain rebound and eject lift-off probability of the sand particles, we apply the particle-bed stochastic collision model presented in our pervious works to derive analytic solutions of velocities of the incident and impacted particles in the postcollision bed. In order to describe randomness inherent in the real particle-bed collision, we take the incident angle, theimpact position and the direction of resultant action of sand particles in sand bed on the impacted sand particle as random variables, and calculate the rebound and eject velocities,angles and coefficients (ratio of rebound and eject velocity to incident velocity). Numerical results are found in accordance with current experimental results. The rebound and eject lift-off probabilities versus the incident and creeping velocities are predicted.

  5. Pretreatment of turkey fat-containing wastewater in coarse sand and gravel/coarse sand bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Rashmi Singh; Cai, Ling; Tuovinen, Olli H; Mancl, Karen M

    2010-02-01

    Fat, oil and grease in wastewater can be difficult to treat because of their slow decomposition. Traditional pretreatment facilities to remove fat, oil and grease from wastewater are increasingly costly. The hypothesis in this study was that pretreatment of animal fat-containing wastewater in sand and sand/gravel filters facilitates the conversion of slowly degradable organic matter measured as the difference between chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) for subsequent biological treatment. The pretreatment was evaluated using simulated turkey-processing wastewater and coarse sand and sand/gravel filters at a constant hydraulic loading rate of 132L/m(2)/day. Two types of fixed media reactors were employed: (i) one set with a varying depth of coarse sand, and (ii) the second was similar but with an additional pea gravel cap. The results indicated that the relative removal of COD was slightly improved in the sand bioreactors with a pea gravel cap irrespective of the depth of coarse sand, but partial conversion to BOD(5) was not consistently demonstrated. Pea gravel may act as a sieve to entrap organic matter including fat globules from the wastewater. Multiple dosing at the same daily loading rate slightly improved the treatment efficiency of the sand bioreactors. The ratios of influent-COD/effluent-COD were always greater than 1.0 following a change in the dosing frequency after a rest period, suggesting that organic matter, specifically fat globules in this case, was retained by the column matrix.

  6. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz Gustavo; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo

    2014-03-01

    We explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate present processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications of CVD graphene can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  7. Experimental and numerical study of spread and sorption of VX sessile droplets into medium grain-size sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Terrence G; Navaz, Homayun K; Markicevic, Bojan; Mantooth, Brent A; Sumpter, Kenneth B

    2010-03-02

    The experimental measurement and modeling of liquid chemical agent spread and sorption on a porous substrate are described. Experimental results with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX) demonstrate that the wetted imprint volume increases, even after the sessile drop volume is exhausted. This indicates the wetted imprint is only partially saturated, and a multiphase flow problem formulation is needed to predict the VX fate in porous substrates. Three characteristics and their changes in time: (i) sessile volume remaining, (ii) wetted imprint area on the sand surface where the droplet is deposited, and (iii) VX penetration depth into sand, are computed numerically and compared to experimentally measured values. A very good qualitative and quantitative agreement was found between the numerical and experimental results. These numerical and experimental methods can be used to determine the spread and sorption of hazardous materials into a variety of substrates.

  8. Capturing phosphates with iron enhanced sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Andrew J; Gulliver, John S; Weiss, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Most treatment practices for urban runoff capture pollutants such as phosphorus by either settling or filtration while dissolved phosphorus, typically as phosphates, is untreated. Dissolved phosphorus, however, represents an average 45% of total phosphorus in stormwater runoff and can be more than 95%. In this study, a new stormwater treatment technology to capture phosphate, called the Minnesota Filter, is introduced. The filter comprises iron filings mixed with sand and is tested for phosphate removal from synthetic stormwater. Results indicate that sand mixed with 5% iron filings captures an average of 88% phosphate for at least 200 m of treated depth, which is significantly greater than a sand filter without iron filings. Neither incorporation of iron filings into a sand filter nor capture of phosphates onto iron filings in column experiments had a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the filter at mixtures of 5% or less iron by weight. Field applications with up to 10.7% iron were operated over 1 year without detrimental effects upon hydraulic conductivity. A model is applied and fit to column studies to predict the field performance of iron-enhanced sand filters. The model predictions are verified through the predicted performance of the filters in removing phosphates in field applications. Practical applications of the technology, both existing and proposed, are presented so stormwater managers can begin implementation.

  9. Cleaning oil sands drilling waste in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikic, N.; Nilsen, C.; Markabi, M. [Mi SWACO, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The waste generated from steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) wells is brought to the surface and separated by shale shakers. The waste can include drilling fluids and sand contaminated with bitumen. This paper described a new technology developed to treat waste using the addition of hot water and various mixing and separation technologies to reduce the viscosity of the bitumen and separate it from the sand. The bitumen-contaminated drill cuttings were mixed with hot water to form a slurry that was then separated through the G-force created by a hydrocyclone. A secondary separation was then conducted in an elutriation column to remove residual contaminants from the sand. The flow rate of the process was controlled by the fine solids composition of the cuttings, the temperature of the cleaning process, and the performance of the individual components. Laboratory tests conducted to tests the method showed that the sand particles produced using the method were clean enough to be safely disposed in the environment. A pilot study will be conducted to test the sand cleaning technology at a commercial scale. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Mitigating in situ oil sands carbon costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theriault, D.J.; Peterson, J. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Heinrichs, H. [Canadian Chemical Technology Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a complex problem with a variety of dimensions that need to be considered. The political, social, and regulatory pressures are forcing carbon costs on the oil sands industry in an effort to reduce the carbon footprint of oil sands operations. This paper reviewed the political, social, and regulatory pressures and obligations for the in-situ oil sands industry. It presented the views and insights of Laricina Energy on the carbon challenge. It also described the initiatives that Laricina Energy is taking to manage these imperatives and outlined the challenges the industry is facing. The purpose of the paper was to encourage dialogue and collaboration by the oil sands industry. The paper also described the dimensions of the carbon problem and how the industry can contribute to a solution. Last, the paper reviewed the parameters of carbon dioxide or greenhouse gas containment and storage issues. It was concluded that the regulatory and policy requirements need to be clarified so that industry understands the new business landscape as well as the requirements that influence the economics of in-situ oil sands development. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Proceedings of the CEMA reclamation workshop on creating wetlands in the oil sands : final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, L. (comp.)

    2006-08-15

    The Creating Wetlands in the Oil Sands Reclamation workshop was held to solicit expert views from leading authorities in a number of disciplines related to the creation and study of wetlands, as well as to investigate challenges in the creation of wetlands in reclaimed oil sands landscapes. This document provided a detailed transcript of each presentation and all discussions that followed. The workshop was divided into 5 sessions: (1) wetlands background information; (2) groundwater conditions and boreal wetlands; (3) creating wetland types; (4) wildlife in boreal wetlands and traditional environmental knowledge; and (5) treatment wetlands. An expert panel overview provided presentations on post-mining restoration of boreal landscapes in oil sands regions; the creation of fens, marshes and shallow water wetlands at oil sands sites and the restoration of damaged peatlands. A outline of the physical scale of the oil sands mining disturbances was provided during the first session, as well a review of regulatory requirements for reclamation. A general overview of the chemical and biological properties of the process-affected waters from oil sands mining was provided. First Nations groups present at the workshop advised that research on muskeg should be a priority. Requirements for wetland development were reviewed. It was noted that climate, substrate and position on the landscape are important factors in the development of engineered wetlands. It was concluded that recent research activities have contributed to greater overall confidence that wetlands creation will become a successful reclamation strategy. While there are many variables beyond the control of reclamation management capabilities, important factors such as water chemistry, water level fluctuation and the amounts of nutrients within a wetlands system can be successfully managed in restoration scenarios. A total of 16 papers were presented.

  12. A Physical Taxonomy of Martian Sand and Dust Grainsat the Phoenix Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, John; Stoker, Carol

    2014-11-01

    A quantitative taxonomy of martian sand and dust grains for soil samples at the Phoenix lander site has been developed from the mission’s optical microscope data with a resolution of 4 μm per pixel. Approx. 3-4000 grains were analyzed for color, hue, size, shape, surface texture, aspect ratio, and optical properties. At least 26 types of sand and dust grains have been identified. Grain colors include black, brown, orange, red, white, and clear. Most grains are opaque, but many are translucent or transparent. Grain shapes range from botryoidal, blackberry-like, bead-like and rounded, to subrounded, elongate, angular, and highly irregular forms. Surface textures range from knobbly, rough, and multifaceted to smooth and polished. Surface reflectivity varied from dull to shiny to specularly reflective. Materials may include augite, pyroxenes, olivine, volcanic glass, hematite, other iron oxides, and salts. Grain size of the sand has a modal value of ~90 μm, but there is no gradation into dust sizes, indicating a bimodal distribution of the samples. The dust was probably imported into the region from aeolian dust storms. This accords with a mineralogical dissimilarity between the sand and dust grain populations. The sand is dominated by black and brown grains; the dust is dominated by orange grains. The Phoenix site also has centimeter and larger stones in abundance that again have no apparent gradation into the sand size material. Thus, the Phoenix landing site soil appears multimodal. The soil appears to be magnetically susceptible, but it is unclear what the source of magnetism might be. Specific magnetic minerals were not identified in the samples with the possible exception of paramagnetic microbotryoidal hematite. The soil was nevertheless adhesive to the substrates and internally cohesive (forming spherical aggregates) owing to van der Waals forces and possibly salt/moisture bonding.

  13. Physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas development on methanogenesis in deep sand aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Taiki; Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Muramoto, Yoshiyuki; Usami, Jun; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sakata, Susumu

    2015-02-01

    The Minami-Kanto gas field, where gases are dissolved in formation water, is a potential analogue for a marine gas hydrate area because both areas are characterized by the accumulation of microbial methane in marine turbidite sand layers interbedded with mud layers. This study examined the physicochemical impacts associated with natural gas production and well drilling on the methanogenic activity and composition in this gas field. Twenty-four gas-associated formation water samples were collected from confined sand aquifers through production wells. The stable isotopic compositions of methane in the gases indicated their origin to be biogenic via the carbonate reduction pathway. Consistent with this classification, methanogenic activity measurements using radiotracers, culturing experiments and molecular analysis of formation water samples indicated the predominance of hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The cultivation of water samples amended only with methanogenic substrates resulted in significant increases in microbial cells along with high-yield methane production, indicating the restricted availability of substrates in the aquifers. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenic activity increased with increasing natural gas production from the corresponding wells, suggesting that the flux of substrates from organic-rich mudstones to adjacent sand aquifers is enhanced by the decrease in fluid pressure in sand layers associated with natural gas/water production. The transient predominance of methylotrophic methanogens, observed for a few years after well drilling, also suggested the stimulation of the methanogens by the exposure of unutilized organic matter through well drilling. These results provide an insight into the physicochemical impacts on the methanogenic activity in biogenic gas deposits including marine gas hydrates.

  14. Wear and Adhesive Failure of Al2O3 Powder Coating Sprayed onto AISI H13 Tool Steel Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanov, Auezhan; Pyun, Young-Sik

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an alumina (Al2O3) ceramic powder was sprayed onto an AISI H13 hot-work tool steel substrate that was subjected to sanding and ultrasonic nanocrystalline surface modification (UNSM) treatment processes. The significance of the UNSM technique on the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating and on the hardness of the substrate was investigated. The adhesive failure of the coating sprayed onto sanded and UNSM-treated substrates was investigated by a micro-scratch tester at an incremental load. It was found, based on the obtained results, that the coating sprayed onto the UNSM-treated substrate exhibited a better resistance to adhesive failure in comparison with that of the coating sprayed onto the sanded substrate. Dry friction and wear property of the coatings sprayed onto the sanded and UNSM-treated substrates were assessed by means of a ball-on-disk tribometer against an AISI 52100 steel ball. It was demonstrated that the UNSM technique controllably improved the adhesive failure of the Al2O3 coating, where the critical load was improved by about 31%. Thus, it is expected that the application of the UNSM technique to an AISI H13 tool steel substrate prior to coating may delay the adhesive failure and improve the sticking between the coating and the substrate thanks to the modified and hardened surface.

  15. Osteoblast response on Ti- and Zr-based bulk metallic glass surfaces after sand blasting modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H F; Wang, Y B; Zheng, Y F; Lin, J P

    2012-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the osteoblast response on Ti- and Zr-based BMG surfaces sand blasted with different grit corundums for implant application, with mechanically polished disks before sand blasting as control groups. The surface properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), contact angle, and roughness measurements. Further evaluation of the surface bioactivity was conducted by MG63 cell attachment, proliferation, morphology, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity on the sample surfaces. It was found that corundum sand blasting surfaces significantly increased the surface wettability and MG63 cell attachment, cell proliferation, and ALP activity in comparison with the control group surfaces. Besides, the sample surface treated by large grit corundum is more favorable for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation than samples treated by small grit corundum, indicating that it might be effective for improving implant osseointegration in vivo.

  16. Substrate use and selection in sympatric intertidal hermit crab species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TURRA

    Full Text Available Coexisting hermit crabs may competitively interact for shells and microhabitats, mainly when shell availability is habitat-related. Three species of Clibanarius (C. antillensis, C. sclopetarius, and C. vittatus coexist in the intertidal region of Pernambuco Islet, Araçá Region, São Sebastião Channel, southeastern Brazil. This study evaluated crab preferences for four substrate types used by these species in nature (rocky shore, pebbles, sand, and mud in allopatric (single species and sympatric (three species treatments in simulations of high tide and low tide. The substrate preference of the three hermit crabs did not vary between low and high tide situations. At low tide the crabs either moved into holes in the highly complex rocky substrate or buried themselves in mud. Substrate selection may explain the patterns of substrate use in nature only for C. vittatus. Clibanarius antillensis and C. sclopetarius showed closer similarities in the pattern of substrate selection in the sympatric treatment with the substrate use in nature than in allopatric treatment, indicating a positive influence (dependence of the presence of one species on the presence of another. Use of sub-optimal substrates, mainly by C. antillensis, may be caused by other factors such as its low desiccation tolerances. If competition for space takes place among these species, it would be more intense between C. sclopetarius and C. vittatus given their higher overlap in substrate preference than between them and C. antillensis.

  17. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends on the charact......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...... on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between...... void ratio and permeability is established....

  18. Sand Dunes Fixation in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out at Sand Dunes Stabilization Researches Station in Baiji district (230 ln north of Baghdad, Iraq) to evaluate the effects of local soil conditioners manufactured from oil derivatives and plant residuals on sand dunes fixation as the first step for sand dunes stabilization. The results indicate that the fuel oil has the first place in improving wind erosion parameters in the study area, such as increasing mean weight diameter, dry aggregates percentage, the needed time for complete disaggregation by dry sieving, and decreasing the disaggregation rates. Bitumen emulsion occupies the second place, while the plant residuals occupies the third place and has slight effects on the studied parameters. Effects of conditioners on natural vegetation cover are negative in oil derivatives treatments,while positive in plants residuals treatments.

  19. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of Descalvado sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M.I.; Caldas, L.V.E

    2006-07-01

    Sand samples proceeding from Descalvado, Sao Paulo, were studied with regard to their dosimetric properties using the thermoluminescence technique (TL) for high doses. These sand samples present steady physical and chemical characteristics to the end items, and they are used in the glass industry and for casting. The TL curves of the samples were obtained after an irradiation at the Gamma-Cell system ({sup 60} Co), of IPEN. The glow curves present two peaks at 80 C and 220 C approximately. Calibration curves were obtained for doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy. The results indicate that the sand samples can be used for high-doses dosimetry in several areas of applications of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  20. Development tendencies of moulding and core sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw M. Dobosz1

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Further development of the technology for making moulding and core sands will be strictly limited by tough requirements due to protection of the natural environment. These tendencies are becoming more and more tense, so that we will reach a point when even processes, that from technological point of view fulfill high requirements of the foundry industry, must be replaced by more ecologically-friendly solutions. Hence, technologies using synthetic resins as binding materials will be limited. This paper presents some predictable development tendencies of moulding and core sands. The increasing role of inorganic substances will be noticed, including silicate binders with significantly improved properties, such as improved knock-out property or higher reclamation strength. Other interesting solutions might also be moulding sands bonded by geo-polymers and phosphate binders or salts and also binders based on degradable biopolymers. These tendencies and the usefulness of these binders are put forward in this paper.

  1. Planet-wide sand motion on mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.T.; Bourke, M.C.; Geissler, P.E.; Banks, M.E.; Colon, C.; Diniega, S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hansen, C.J.; Mattson, S.; McEwen, A.S.; Mellon, M.T.; Stantzos, N.; Thomson, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data, images of Mars showed no direct evidence for dune and ripple motion. This was consistent with climate models and lander measurements indicating that winds of sufficient intensity to mobilize sand were rare in the low-density atmosphere. We show that many sand ripples and dunes across Mars exhibit movement of as much as a few meters per year, demonstrating that Martian sand migrates under current conditions in diverse areas of the planet. Most motion is probably driven by wind gusts that are not resolved in global circulation models. A past climate with a thicker atmosphere is only required to move large ripples that contain coarse grains. ?? 2012 Geological Society of America.

  2. Ground resistance influences lizard burial in dry and wet sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Sarah; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Many terrestrial animals move within soil in which water content can vary, and little is known about how water content affects locomotor performance. To investigate the effect of water content on burial, we created controlled dry and wet substrates. We used 0.3 mm glass particles and varied water content W, the mass of water to mass of dry loosely packed sand. Drag force on a submerged 1.6 cm diameter rod increased by a factor of 4 as W increased from 0 to 0.03, after which force increases were small. Drag force in wet media periodically fluctuated with time and corresponded with surface fracturing. We characterized how W affected burial performance and strategy of a generalist burrower, the ocellated skink lizard (Chalcides ocellatus). High speed x-ray imaging was used to measure head, body and limb kinematics in substrates with W= 0 and W= 0.03. In both states during burial the body was maintained in a curved posture and the animal moved using a start-stop motion. During movement, the head oscillated and the forelimb on the convex side of the body was used to push the animal forward. Both speed and angular excursion of the head oscillation decreased in the W= 0.03 state. The differences in locomotion were attributed to the changing resistance force within the media.

  3. Nemesia Root Hair Response to Paper Pulp Substrate for Micropropagation

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Labrousse; David Delmail; Raphaël Decou; Michel Carlué; Sabine Lhernould; Pierre Krausz,

    2012-01-01

    Agar substrates for in vitro culture are well adapted to plant micropropagation, but not to plant rooting and acclimatization. Conversely, paper-pulp-based substrates appear as potentially well adapted for in vitro culture and functional root production. To reinforce this hypothesis, this study compares in vitro development of nemesia on several substrates. Strong differences between nemesia roots growing in agar or in paper-pulp substrates were evidenced through scanning electron microscopy....

  4. Undrained Cyclic Behaviour of Dense Frederikshavn Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Sørensen, Kris Wessel

    2013-01-01

    A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series of undra......A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series...

  5. Sand control systems used in completing wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Wittenberger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Expandable Tubular Technology is transforming the face of well completion and construction. This technology provides: a substantially higher hydrocarbon production rates from the reservoir, a reduced well drilling and construction costs, new possibilities for previously unreachable or uneconomic reservoirs, and step a change towards the single diameter well. ESS (Expandable Sand Screen has an unrivalled performance worldwide for delivering a reliable sand control in a wide range of applications. Well costs typically cut by over 20 %, and the productivity increases up to 70 %.

  6. On the Size Distribution of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    -distribution, by taking into account that individual grains do not have the same travel time from the source to the deposit. The travel time is assumed to be random so that the wear on the individual grains vary randomly. The model provides an interpretation of the parameters of the NIG-distribution, and relates the mean......A model is presented of the development of the size distribution of sand while it is transported from a source to a deposit. The model provides a possible explanation of the log-hyperbolic shape that is frequently found in unimodal grain size distributions in natural sand deposits, as pointed out...

  7. George Sand [Reseña

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Belinda; Thomas, Florence

    2002-01-01

    Belinda Jack nos cuenta en ese libro la vida de George Sand (de su verdadero nombre Aurora Dupin), esa mujer libertaria del siglo XIX, lo años de su nacimiento, su infancia, su adolescencia y su vida adulta. Una vida tan llena tanto por sus luchas interiores -Sand es una mujer que desde su adolescencia tratará de romper los fatalismos ligados a la condición de mujer del siglo XIX, un siglo profundamente familista y maternalista- como por su inmensa obra literaria que cuenta más de cincuenta n...

  8. Investigation of Sand-Cement Grouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-09-01

    the sianAS. Ho-4, VVers thia 𔃽pacification ,Jlowi -inI r.ver,4 e ofl 3 :*- cen~t to be retain(v,- on1 the NO,. 1E6 sieve. 3y * :.Oviiq- (1),, sc...325 material as does the traprock or silica sand. This j J: i3 -robably the reason for the difference in the quantity of sand founud pmrnable. The three...deficient in material assing th.e ±,e h DOsieve, Ath the addition of percentages of fŕ. ash was test-ilwped. in the other to-ts in this phase, tne

  9. TURBULENT COHERENT STRUCTURES IN CHANNELS WITH SAND WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sand wave bed is one of the typical shape of complicated boundaries in hydraulics and river dynamics, and sand wave motion is the main form of the bed load motion in-rivers, thence the study of turbulent structures over sand waves is of importance both in theory and practice. In this paper turbulent coherent structures over single-and multi-sand waves were studied experimentally, the formulae for the separation length and vortex shedding period of the turbulent flow over single-sand wave were suggested, and the characteristics of turbulent coherent structures over multi-sand waves were also given.

  10. Characterizing Electronic Inhomogeneities of Nanoscale Materials for Printable Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitz, Ruth Anne S.

    Inhomogeneities in the electronic properties of boron-doped silicon nanowires and self-assembled nanodielectrics were characterized quantitatively. For silicon nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, radial and axial gradients in boron concentration due to preferentially-doped vapor-solid (VS) deposition on the nanowire side wall lead to significant intra- and inter- nanowire variability. Devices fabricated along the length of a single nanowire transition from behavior dominated by Schottky barriers at the Ni2Si source and drain contacts to linear behavior as the thickness of the VS material increases. For self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs), Weibull analysis demonstrates that a high degree of uniformity is achievable with molecular self-assembly. The dielectric breakdown voltage distribution for metal-insulator-semiconductor parallel-plate capacitors containing two types of SAND, Type III and Zr-SAND, were characterized. These devices exhibit a high degree of uniformity (beta ≥ 16 for some samples), and annealing at ≥ 300 °C does not degrade SAND properties. SANDs are also demonstrated to be compatible with electron-beam lithography, and attempts to fabricate Si nanowire SAND field-effect transistors are discussed. Finally, a simple strain platform for one-dimensional nanostructures is presented, and shifts in the Raman peaks of vanadium dioxide nanobeams under varying amounts of uniaxial tension are observed.

  11. Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.-P.; Newman, C. E.; Richardson, M. I.; Lucas, A.; Leprince, S.; Bridges, N. T.

    2014-09-01

    Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1-100 km scale) of τs=0.01±0.0015 N m-2.

  12. Paleoecological interpretation of a Holocene sand body in the coastal area of Phetchaburi, Gulf of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Robba

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Faunal examination is made of 4 samples, 2 from the Recent Ban Laem Phak Bia sand spit, and 2 from the Holocene sand body of Ban Bang Ket. Fossil and modern assemblages are compared on the basis of overall composition, taxa abundances, and of autoecological investigation on life habit, substrate preference, feeding type, depth range and ecological meaning of the identified species. The Holocene assemblage of Ban Bang Ket, compared to the Recent one of Ban Laem Phak Bia, 1 exhibits generally similar overall composition and ecological structure, 2 contains much of the dominant species characterizing the modern assemblage, and 3includes all taxa that are members of the living molluscan community. On this basis, the molluscan assemblage of Ban Bang Ket results to be the Holocene counterpart of the modern one of Ban Laem Phak Bia, and reflects the same environmental conditions recorded for the latter. Thus, the sand body near Ban Bang Ket is interpreted as a Holocene equivalent of the sand spit of Ban Laem Phak Bia.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  14. MouldingSandDB – a modern database storing moulding sands properties research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jakubski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of foundry processes requires the use of modern, advanced IT tools for optimization, storage and analysis of t echnicaldata. Properties of moulding and core sands that are collected in research laboratories, manufacturers, and finally in the foundries, are not in use later on. It seems important to create a database that will allow to use the results stored, along with the possibility of searching according to set criteria, adjusted to casting practice. This paper presents part of the database named „MouldingSandDB”, which allows to collect and search data for synthetic moulding sands.

  15. Real-Time Simulation of Aeolian Sand Movement and Sand Ripple Evolution: A Method Based on the Physics of Blown Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Bao-Gang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Simulation and visualization of aeolian sand movement and sand ripple evolution are a challenging subject.In this paper,we propose a physically based modeling and simulating method that can be used to synthesize sandy terrain in various patterns.Our method is based on the mechanical behavior of individual sand grains,which are widely studied in the physics of blown sand.We accounted significant mechanisms of sand transportation into the sand model,such as saltation,successive saltation and collapsing,while simplified the vegetation model and wind field model to make the simulation feasible and affordable.We implemented the proposed method on the programming graphics processing unit (GPU) to get real-time simulation and rendering.Finally,we proved that our method can reflect many characteristics of sand ripple evolution through several demonstrations.We also gave several synthesized desert scenes made from the simulated height field to display its significance on application.

  16. Simulation of aeolian sand saltation with rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Wang, Cong; Pan, Xiying

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model based on the distribution functions of initial liftoff velocity and angular velocity of sand grains to describe a sand saltation process in which both wind field-sand grain coupling and the Magnus force experienced by saltating sand grains have been incorporated. The computation results showed that the Magnus force had significant effects on sand grain saltation. In particular, when the Magnus force was incorporated, the calculated sand transport fluxes and sand transport rate per unit width were closer to the experimental value than when this force was excluded. The sand transport flux is enhanced because the Magnus force owing to particle rotation causes the particles to have higher and longer trajectories, so the particles can get more speed and energy from the wind, which leads to a larger sand transport flux. In addition, it was found that when taking the Magnus force into account, the probability density of the impact velocity and angular velocity of saltating sand grains followed an exponential distribution and a unimodal asymmetric distribution, respectively. Moreover, the sand energy flux increased with the height above the sand surface until the energy flux reached its maximum and then decreased. Furthermore, the energy flux near the ground surface decreased as the grain diameter increased, but beyond a specific height the energy flux increased with the grain diameter. Finally, for the same sand grain diameter, the energy flux increased with the friction velocity.

  17. Virtual substrate method for nanomaterials characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    da, Bo; Liu, Jiangwei; Yamamoto, Mahito; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Cuong, Nguyen Thanh; Li, Songlin; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Iwai, Hideo; Tanuma, Shigeo; Guo, Hongxuan; Gao, Zhaoshun; Sun, Xia; Ding, Zejun

    2017-05-01

    Characterization techniques available for bulk or thin-film solid-state materials have been extended to substrate-supported nanomaterials, but generally non-quantitatively. This is because the nanomaterial signals are inevitably buried in the signals from the underlying substrate in common reflection-configuration techniques. Here, we propose a virtual substrate method, inspired by the four-point probe technique for resistance measurement as well as the chop-nod method in infrared astronomy, to characterize nanomaterials without the influence of underlying substrate signals from four interrelated measurements. By implementing this method in secondary electron (SE) microscopy, a SE spectrum (white electrons) associated with the reflectivity difference between two different substrates can be tracked and controlled. The SE spectrum is used to quantitatively investigate the covering nanomaterial based on subtle changes in the transmission of the nanomaterial with high efficiency rivalling that of conventional core-level electrons. The virtual substrate method represents a benchmark for surface analysis to provide `free-standing' information about supported nanomaterials.

  18. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  19. Implantable biomedical devices on bioresorbable substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, John A; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan; Huang, Yonggang; Amsden, Jason

    2014-03-04

    Provided herein are implantable biomedical devices, methods of administering implantable biomedical devices, methods of making implantable biomedical devices, and methods of using implantable biomedical devices to actuate a target tissue or sense a parameter associated with the target tissue in a biological environment. Each implantable biomedical device comprises a bioresorbable substrate, an electronic device having a plurality of inorganic semiconductor components supported by the bioresorbable substrate, and a barrier layer encapsulating at least a portion of the inorganic semiconductor components. Upon contact with a biological environment the bioresorbable substrate is at least partially resorbed, thereby establishing conformal contact between the implantable biomedical device and the target tissue in the biological environment.

  20. The impact of raindrops on sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Rianne

    2017-01-01

    When a raindrop hits a sand bed, it leaves behind a small crater with a mixture of liquid and grains located at the center. This event is frequently observed in nature, but when absent, sprinklers may artificially produce these impacting drops to facilitate irrigation. Also in industry, the interact

  1. Cumulative environmental management and the oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    In response to concerns regarding the cumulative environmental impacts of oil sands development within the Athabasca oil sands deposit, the government of Alberta established a Regional Sustainable Development Strategy (RSDS) to balance development with environmental protection. The environmental issues identified through the RSDS were addressed by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). CEMA's boundary is the Wood Buffalo region of northeastern Alberta. It identifies existing and future environmental effects in the region and proposes recommendations to regulatory bodies for reducing environmental impacts associated with oil sands development. This presentation outlined some of the 55 stakeholder representatives of CEMA, including Alberta government departments associated with resource development, oil sand developers within the region, and Aboriginal communities and First Nations. These stakeholders provide input on sector priorities and agree on environmental thresholds. Established working groups also address technical and scientific research issues identified in the RSDS such as sustainable ecosystems; surface waters; trace metals and air contaminants; nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxides; and land reclamation. To date, CEMA has submitted more than 50 reports and has made 4 major environmental recommendations for trace metal management, ecosystem management tools, a framework for acid deposition management, and a landscape design checklist. tabs., figs.

  2. LEARNING ABOUT THE OCEANS FROM SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    As a young geophysicist in the 1980s, Rob Holman attended a conference in San Francisco that included a field trip to a beach. Dr Holman, who grew up inland, stared at the ocean, assessing the strengths of the waves. But when he looked around, everyone else was studying the sand.

  3. Displacement pile installation effects in sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijer-Lundberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Installation effects govern the post-installation behaviour of displacement piles in sand. These effects are currently not completely understood. Suitable experimental techniques to model these installation effects include field, laboratory and experimental models. In the current thesis a small-scal

  4. Cyclic Triaxial Loading of Cohesionless Silty Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2015-01-01

    To engineer efficient structures offshore, we need to extend our knowledge of soil response. Cyclic loading and high water pressure encountered offshore greatly influence cohesionless soil performance. Silty sand from Frederikshavn wind turbine farm was tested using single diameter height samples...

  5. Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    68 Figure 28. Jetty segment used for computation of aeolian sand transport. Background photograph 22 May 2012...113 Figure 68 . Total shoreline change after 50 years for 500,000 yd3 placed every 2 years in different locations...The berm at Ft. Myers, FL, was constructed with dredged material from Matanzas Pass. The dredged material contained greater than 10% fines, which

  6. Building Whales in Sand and Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Carolyn

    1980-01-01

    Describes two-week summer workshops on evolution, adaptation, and behavior of whales, conducted for children by Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum (New York), and culminating in creation of life-size sand sculptures of whales. Provides selected list of periodicals, teaching materials, identification guides, records, and societies devoted to whales…

  7. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate and impac......The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  8. Sand Waves along the Dutch Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Sand waves, defined as longshore wave-like movements of the shoreline, measured in a horizontal plane, are described along several stretches of the shoreline of The Netherlands. They have a celerity in the order of 50-200 m/yr, a period of 50- 150 years and an amplitude of 30- 500 m. They are found

  9. Building Whales in Sand and Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Carolyn

    1980-01-01

    Describes two-week summer workshops on evolution, adaptation, and behavior of whales, conducted for children by Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum (New York), and culminating in creation of life-size sand sculptures of whales. Provides selected list of periodicals, teaching materials, identification guides, records, and societies devoted to whales…

  10. Sand and Stone%沙与石

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄川; 孙静

    2006-01-01

    @@ Astory tells that two friends were walking through the desert. During some point of the journey they had an argument, and one friend slapped the other one in the face1. The one who got slapped was hurt, but without saying anything, he wrote in the sand: "TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SLAPPED ME IN THE FACE."

  11. Dark grains of sand: a geological storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Maresca, Magda

    2017-04-01

    In the secondary Italian school the Earth science learning begins at first year, in synergy with other natural science subjects such as Astronomy, Chemistry and Biology. Italian teachers have to focus on the landscape geomorphological aspects and often Earth processes are difficult to display since they are related to certain phenomena happened during the past and often far from the involved country. In order to better understand the environment surrounding us, very simple and poor materials, like sands, allow the teachers to create attractive lab experiences. According to the IBSE (Inquiry Based Science Education) approach, a learning unit has been implemented starting from a walking along the light carbonate beaches of the Adriatic sea: a smart look to the sands ("engage step"), stroke the students fantasy pushing them to explore some strange black grains on the sands. Dirty sands? Or rock landscape, soil degradation and Ofanto river and coastal processes (erosion, transportation and deposition)? This was the teaching challenge. Due to the youngest age, a third level, guided inquiry, was adopted so the teacher is the "guide of inquiry" encouraging the students using the research question ("Why is the sand dark?", "Do all sands look the same?", "Where does it come from?") and driving the students around their investigation plans ("How can I measure grain size?"). A procedure to answer the above questions and validate the results and explanations has been implemented to allow the students to be proactive in their study. During the learning activities will be the students to ask for field trip to elaborate their new knowledge, verify and visualize the speculated processes. The teaching skills allow to address several geosciences domains such as mineralogy, petrology, regional geology and geodynamics as well as other scientific disciplines such as mathematics (more specifically statistics), forensic science and even life sciences (the presence of bioclasts might

  12. Assessing environmental impacts of inland sand mining in parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessing environmental impacts of inland sand mining in parts of Ogun State, Nigeria. ... Sand is a valuable resource for construction and other purposes, however ... Natural resources particularly, land, water quality and quantity, air quality, ...

  13. Fiber-reinforced sand strength and dilation characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham M. Eldesouky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Randomly distributed fiber reinforcement is used to provide an isotropic increase in the sand shear strength. The previous studies were not consistent regarding the fibers effect on the volumetric change behavior of fiber-reinforced sand. In this paper, direct shear tests are conducted on 108 specimens to investigate the effects of the fibers content, relative density, normal stress and moisture content on the shear strength and volumetric change behaviors of fiber-reinforced sand. The study investigates also the possibility of using dry fiber-reinforced sand as an alternative to heavily compacted unreinforced moist sand. The results indicate that the fibers inclusion increases the shear strength and dilation of sand. Moisture suppresses the fibers effect on the peak and post-peak shear strengths, and dilation. Dry loose fiber-reinforced sand achieves the same shear strength of heavily compacted unreinforced moist sand, yet at more than double the horizontal displacement.

  14. Gating Technology for Vertically Parted Green Sand Moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per

    Gating technology for vertically parted green sand moulds. Literature study of different ways of designing gating systems.......Gating technology for vertically parted green sand moulds. Literature study of different ways of designing gating systems....

  15. Expandable sand screens: from novel concept to proven sand control technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Paul; Jones, Colin; Ballard, Tracey; Beare, Steve; Hillis, Dave [Weatherford International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Expandable Sand Screens (ESS) have proved a viable alternative to gravel packing for sand control. With over 300 installations worldwide, analysis of their use has confirmed that ESS offers excellent production performance and sand control reliability in Open hole. This paper presents details of a global survey on ESS performance that gives accurate information on production performance, sand exclusion reliability and cost effectiveness in Open hole and cased hole application scenarios. This paper also discusses the role and effect of compliant expansion in observed productivity performance and skin values. The rock mechanical, reservoir characterization and metallurgical requirements of ESS systems are also investigated. Finally, the latest advances of the technology for use within the reservoir are explained. This paper demonstrates how the combination of ESS and Expandable Zonal Isolation devices can offer cased hole functionality (in terms of zonal isolation) in combination with Open hole levels of production performance (from the ESS). (author)

  16. Water management in the oil sands industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauls, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Water management issues at Alberta's 4 oil sand deposits were discussed. The 4 deposits include the Peace River, Athabasca, Wabasca and Cold Lake deposits, with the Athabasca deposit being the largest and the only surface-mineable deposit. Large quantities of water are needed to extract bitumen from oil sands. This paper addressed water volume withdrawal from the Athabasca River, the primary source of water for the surface-mining oil sands industry. It also addressed Muskeg River watershed integrity, quality of water withdrawn from reclaimed landscapes, groundwater contamination, and ecological viability of end-pit lakes. Currently, half of Syncrude's oil sand is transported from mine to extraction plant by conveyor belts. The other half is pipelined as a warm water slurry. By 2005, all transport will be by pipeline. The oil sand is mixed with hot water, steam and surfactants to condition it for extraction. Seventy-nine per cent of the water used by Syncrude is recycled water and the remainder comes from the Athabasca River. Syncrude diverts 2.5 to 3 barrels of water from the Athabasca River for every barrel of oil produced. This paper discussed the in-stream flow needs of the Athabasca River based on protection of aquatic ecosystems. Flow needs are addressed by the Cumulative Effects Management Association (CEMA). The paper states that the proportion of annual flow withdrawn from the Athabasca River is too low to have a significant impact on aquatic systems, but the main concern lies in water use during low flow periods, typically during the winter months. Developers will likely come under pressure to develop off-site reservoirs to store water for use during these low-flow periods. tabs., figs.

  17. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  18. Incipient Motion of Sand and Oil Agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T. R.; Dalyander, S.; Jenkins, R. L., III; Penko, A.; Long, J.; Frank, D. P.; Braithwaite, E. F., III; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Weathered oil mixed with sediment in the surf zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, forming large mats of sand and oil. Wave action fragmented the mats into sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) with diameters of about 1 to 10 cm. These SOAs were transported by waves and currents along the Gulf Coast, and have been observed on beaches for years following the spill. SOAs are composed of 70%-95% sand by mass, with an approximate density of 2107 kg/m³. To measure the incipient motion of SOAs, experiments using artificial SOAs were conducted in the Small-Oscillatory Flow Tunnel at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory under a range of hydrodynamic forcing. Spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs ranging in size from 0.5 to 10 cm were deployed on a fixed flat bed, a fixed rippled bed, and a movable sand bed. In the case of the movable sand bed, SOAs were placed both proud and partially buried. Motion was tracked with high-definition video and with inertial measurement units embedded in some of the SOAs. Shear stress and horizontal pressure gradients, estimated from velocity measurements made with a Nortek Vectrino Profiler, were compared with observed mobility to assess formulations for incipient motion. For SOAs smaller than 1 cm in diameter, incipient motion of spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs was consistent with predicted critical stress values. The measured shear stress at incipient motion of larger, spherical SOAs was lower than predicted, indicating an increased dependence on the horizontal pressure gradient. In contrast, the measured shear stress required to move ellipsoidal SOAs was higher than predicted, even compared to values modified for larger particles in mixed-grain riverine environments. The laboratory observations will be used to improve the prediction of incipient motion, transport, and seafloor interaction of SOAs.

  19. Photosynthetic metabolism and quality of Eugenia pyriformis Cambess. seedlings on substrate function and water levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SILVANA P.Q. SCALON

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the quality and photosynthetic metabolism of “uvaia” seedlings (Eugenia pyriformis Cambess. on different substrates and water regimes. The seeds were sown in tubes of 50 x 190 mm in the following substrates: Sand (S, Latosol + Sand (L + S (1:1, Latosol + Sand + Semi Decomposed Poultry Litter (L + S1 + PL ( 1:1:0.5, Latosol + Sand + Semi Decomposed Poultry Litter (L + S2 + PL (1:2:0.5, Latosol + Bioplant® (L + B (1:1, and the water levels assessed were 50, 75 and 100% of water retention capacity. At 60, 90, 120 and 150 days the seedlings were evaluated according to their chlorophyll index, leaf area (cm2 and Dickson Quality Index (DQI and at 150 days their internal concentration of carbon (mol m–2 s–1, stomatal conductance (mol m–2 s–1, transpiration rate (mmol m–2 s–1, photosynthesis (µmol m–2 s–1 and efficiency of water use (µmol de CO2 / mmol de H2O. Until their 150th days, the seedlings had higher quality and photosynthetic metabolism when cultured with substrates containing latosol + sand + poultry litter on the two variations assessed and water retention capacity of 50%.

  20. Optical and radiocarbon ages of stacked paleosols and dune sands in the Nebraska Sand Hills, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, R. J.; Mason, Joseph A.; Loope, David B.; Swinehart, James B.

    2004-05-01

    Optical ages for eolian sands from the Nebraska Sand Hills indicate periods of extensive eolian activity at ca 115±25, 840±70, 2300±240, and 3560±340 a. Activity was also noted at single sampling locations at ca 6180±370, 8430±510 and 13110±800 a. Many of these ages are similar to those noted by earlier authors. Optical ages from samples collected within paleosols indicate shorter and possibly less extensive periods of eolian activity at approximately 1220±150, 1590±110, and possibly 1950±150 a, during which the paleosol sands accumulated. What was originally interpreted as a single 1.2 m thick paleosol is shown by optical dating to consist of three or more welded soils developed within eolian sands with optical ages of ca 3800±240, 2740±240, 1560±110, and possibly 1930±140 a, each of which match eolian pulses recognized elsewhere. Scatter in some optical ages is attributable to intersection of sand-filled rodent burrows extending in outcrop 1.5 m below the contact between paleosol and overlying topset beds. A 5310±360 a optical age for one probable intersected burrow provides evidence for upward or lateral transport of older sands.

  1. Evaluate of head loss, sediment value and copper removal in sand media (rapid sand filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshi Navab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with the technology development and increasing consumption of water resources, we are experiencing low qualities in the mentioned resources. Copper brings about serious environment al pollution, threatening human health and ecosystem. This metal found variously in water resources and industrial activities. Therefore, it needs to treat the water resources from these excessive amounts. Different methods have used for this reason but the most used method during recent years has been the absorption by economic absorbers such as sand. Rapid sand filters usually used in water and wastewater treatment plants for water clarification. In this research, a single layer gravity rapid sand filter has used to reduce different concentrations of copper. sediment value and head loss arising in filter media is simulated by using combination of Carman-Kozeny, Rose and Gregory models in different discharges of rapid sand filter. Results have shown that with increasing in discharge and decreasing in input copper concentration, arriving time to given head loss, is increasing. In addition, results demonstrated that with increasing in copper concentration in influent, removal efficiency is decreasing somewhat. Results of this research can applied in an appropriate design of rapid sand filter to copper removal, a prediction of rapid sand filter ability to copper removal and an estimation of arising head loss during filter work thus evaluating of time interval backwash. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10641 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 276-286

  2. Yield of a Choctawhatchee Sand Pine Plantation at Age 28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell M. Burns; R.H. Brendemuehl

    1969-01-01

    A little-known tree, Choctawhatchee sand pine (Pinus clausa [Chapm.] Vasey), seems well adapted to the infertile, droughty soils common to the sandhills of Florida which now produce little value. Published yield data based on plantation-grown Choctawhatchee sand pine are not available. One 28-year-old plantation of this race of sand pine, growing...

  3. Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Oude Essink, G.H.P.; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The anticipation of sea-level rise and increases in extreme weather conditions has led to the initiation of an innovative coastal management project called the Sand Engine. In this pilot project a large volume of sand (21.5 million m3) – also called sand replenishment or nourishment – was placed on

  4. 77 FR 75007 - Importation of Sand Pears From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 319 RIN 0579-AD42 Importation of Sand Pears From China AGENCY... and vegetables regulations to allow the importation of sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) from China into the United States. As a condition of entry, sand pears from areas in China in which the Oriental...

  5. Design and management of conventional fluidized-sand biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluidized sand biofilters (FSBs) are relatively compact, efficient, and cost-competitive biofilters, especially in recirculating systems that require maintaining consistently low levels of ammonia and nitrite. Filter sand is low cost (often $70-200/m3 of sand delivered) and has a high specific surf...

  6. Influence of wet activation of used inorganic binder on cyclically refreshed water glass moulding sands hardened by microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Stachowicz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the research results of using an innovative method to reclaim the waste moulding sands containing water glass. Two of the examined processes are connected with "dry" or "wet" activation of inorganic binder in waste moulding sand mixtures physically hardened by microwave radiation. The sand mixtures consisting of high-silica sand and water-glass with average molar module 2.5, were subjected to the following cyclical process: mixing the components, compacting, microwave heating, cooling-down, thermally loading the mould to 800 °C, cooling-down to ambient temperature, and knocking-out. After being knocked-out, the waste moulding sands were subjected to either dry or wet activation of the binder. To activate thermally treated inorganic binder, each of the examined processes employed the surface phenomenon usually associated to mechanical reclamation. The study also covered possible use of some elements of wet reclamation to rehydrate waste binder. To evaluate the effectiveness of the two proposed methods of waste binder activation, selected strength and technological parameters were measured. After each subsequent processing cycle, the permeability, tensile strength and bending strength were determined. In addition, the surface of activated sand grains was examined with a scanning electron microscope. Analysis of the results indicates that it is possible to re-activate the used binder such as sodium silicate, and to stabilize the strength parameters in both activation processes. Permeability of the refreshed moulding sands strongly depends on the surface condition of high-silica grains. The wet activation process by wetting and buffering knocked-out moulding sands in closed humid environment makes it possible to reduce the content of refreshing additive in water-glass. The moulding sands cyclically prepared in both processes do not require the addition of fresh high-silica sand. The relatively high quality achieved in the

  7. Substrate-free gas-phase synthesis of graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Albert; Radmilovic, Velimir; Lee, Zonghoon; Phillips, Jonathan; Frenklach, Michael

    2008-07-01

    We present a novel method for synthesizing graphene sheets in the gas phase using a substrate-free, atmospheric-pressure microwave plasma reactor. Graphene sheets were synthesized by passing liquid ethanol droplets into an argon plasma. The graphene sheets were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electron diffraction. We prove that graphene can be created without three-dimensional materials or substrates and demonstrate a possible avenue to the large-scale synthesis of graphene.

  8. The jammed-to-mobile transition in frozen sand under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W. B.; Pathare, A.; Stern, L. A.; Lenferink, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    We conducted laboratory deformation experiments on sand-rich mixtures of sand + ice under sufficient confinement to inhibit macroscopic dilation. Dry sand packs constrained not to dilate when they are under a shearing load reach an immobile or “jammed” state, as load-supporting “force chains” of sand particles form after a small amount of strain and cannot be broken without volume expansion. Our research objective here was to find the minimum volume fraction of ice required to overcome the jammed state. The result surprised us: the required volume fraction is not a fixed number, but depends on the packing characteristics of the sand in question. Experiments were carried out in a triaxial gas deformation rig at confining pressures (60 - 200 MPa) always at least twice the level of differential stresses (11 - 50 MPa) in order to suppress dilatancy. Run temperatures were 223 - 243 K. We used two kinds of quartz sand, one well-sorted, with a maximum dry packing density (MDPD) of about 0.68 sand by volume, and the other a mixture of two sizes, having a higher MDPD of 0.75. Ice volume fraction ranged from well below saturation (where unfilled porosity necessarily remained) to slightly greater than the value of porosity at MDPD. We tested these frozen sands in compression under constant applied differential stress (creep). Strain rates were very low at these conditions, and runs took days or weeks to complete. The amount of strain required to reach the jammed state in ice-undersaturated samples was approximately 0.04, and did not show an obvious dependence on ice content. For both sands, the onset of mobility occurred at approximately 5% above the value of pore volume at MDPD. Furthermore, viscosity of mobile frozen sand near the transition point was extremely sensitive to ice fraction, which implies that at geologic strain rates, far slower than we can reach in the lab, the ice fraction at transition may lie closer to that at MDPD. Cryogenic scanning electron

  9. Effects Of Evaporation Rate of Some Common Organic Contaminants on Hydraulic Conductivity of Aquifer Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saud, Q. J.; Hasan, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    As part of a larger study to investigate potential effects of hydrocarbons on the geotechnical properties of aquifer solids, a series of laboratory experiments were carried out to ascertain the influence of evaporation rate of some common and widespread organic contaminants on the hydraulic conductivity of aquifer sand. Gasoline and its constituent chemicals-benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX), isooctane- and trichloroethylene (TCE) were used to contaminate sand samples collected from the aquifer and vadose zone, at varying concentrations for extended periods of time. The goal was to study any change in the chemical makeup of the contaminants and its control on hydraulic conductivity of the sand. It was found that: (a) gasoline breaks down into constituent compounds when subjected to evaporation, e.g. during oil spills and leaks; and (b) lighter compounds volatilize faster and in the following order: TCE> benzene > isooctane > toluene > gasoline> ethylbenzene > xylene. In addition, these contaminants also caused a decrease in hydraulic conductivity of sand by up to 60% as compared to the uncontaminated sand. The inherent differences in the chemical structure of contaminating chemicals influenced hydraulic conductivity such that the observed decrease was greater for aliphatic than aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The presentation includes details of the experimental set up; evaporation rate, and geotechnical tests; X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope studies; and data analyses and interpretation. Rate of evaporation test indicates that residual LNAPLs will occupy a certain portion of the pores in the soil either as liquid or vapor phase in the vadose zone, and will create a coating on the adjacent solid mineral grains in the aquifer. Replacement of air by the LNAPLs along with grain coatings and the intramolecular forces would impede groundwater movement, thus affecting overall permeability of contaminated aquifers. Keywords: aquifer

  10. The Rheology of Acoustically Fluidized Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, J. W.; Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The collapse of large craters and the formation of central peaks and peak rings is well modeled by numerical computer codes that incorporate the acoustic fluidization mechanism to temporarily allow the fluid-like flow of rock debris immediately after crater excavation. Furthermore, long runout landslides require a similar mechanism to explain their almost frictionless movement, which is probably also a consequence of their granular composition coupled with internal vibrations. Many different investigators have now confirmed the ability of vibrations to fluidize granular materials. Yet it still remains to fully describe the rheology of vibrated sand as a function of stress, frequency and amplitude of the vibrations in the sand itself. We constructed a rotational viscometer to quantitatively investigate the relation between the stress and strain rate in a horizontal bed of strongly vibrated sand. In addition to the macroscopic stain rate, the amplitude and frequency of the vibrations produced by a pair of pneumatic vibrators were also measured with the aid of miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometers (B&K 4393) whose output was recorded on a digital storage oscilloscope. The initial gathering of the experimental data was difficult due to granular memory, but by having the sand compacted vibrationally for 8 minutes before each run the scatter of data was reduced and we were able to obtain consistent results. Nevertheless, our major source of uncertainty was variations in strain rate from run to run. We find that vibrated sand flows like a highly non-Newtonian fluid, in which the shear strain rate is proportional to stress to a power much greater than one, where the precise power depends on the amplitude and frequency of the applied vibrations. Rapid flow occurs at stresses less than half of the static yield stress (that is, the yield stress when no vibration is applied) when strong vibrations are present. For a Newtonian fluid, such as water, the relation between

  11. Laboratory Study of the Influence of Substrate Type and Temperature on the Exploratory Tunneling by Formosan Subterranean Termite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal K. Gautam

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Using two-dimensional foraging arenas, laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effect of soil type, soil moisture level and ambient temperature on the exploratory tunneling by Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki. In choice arenas consisting of two substrate types having two moisture levels each, and conducted at a constant temperature of 22 °C, a significantly greater proportion of termites aggregated in sand than in sandy loam. Similarly, the length of excavated tunnels was also increased in sand. In a given substrate, termite aggregation or tunnel length did not differ between 5% and 15% moisture levels. In no-choice tests, where three different substrates (sand, sandy loam and silt loam were tested at two temperatures (22 °C and 28 °C, excavations were significantly greater in sand than either sandy loam or silt loam at 22 °C. Fewer primary tunnels were constructed in sandy loam than in sand and fewer branched tunnels than either in sand or silt loam. No significant difference in either tunnel length or number of primary or branched tunnels was found between these two temperatures.

  12. [Effect of different substrates on photosynthetic characteristics of Iris pseudacorus L. and the capacity of purify wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, De-Fu; Li, Ying-Xue; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Fang, Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Li

    2011-09-01

    The effect of the different substrates on the photosynthetic characteristics, transpiration rate and SPAD value, and capacity of purify wastewater was investigated by pot experiment, based on five ordinary substrates (soil, sand, mixture of soil and sand, mixture of sand and organic matter, and mixture sand, soil and organic matter). Results showed that the photosynthetic characteristics and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. were influenced by different substrates. The order of the photosynthetic and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. in soil was high, and that of Iris pseudacorus L. in sand was the lowest. The value of photosynthetic characteristics and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. in soil were 11.67 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 9.18 mmol x (m2 x s) (-1) respectively, and that of Iris pseudacorus L. in sand were 8.38 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 4.55 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively. The photosynthetic characteristics and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. were significantly correlated with the removal rate of permanganate index, NH4(+) -N and NO3(-) -N (p photosynthetic characteristics, transpiration rate, NH(+) -N was also found (p rate of nitrogen in constructed wetland.

  13. Longshore sediment transport at Golden Sands (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Nikolov

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the qualitative and quantitative features of the littoral drift at Golden Sands (Bulgaria, carried out jointly by Polish and Bulgarian researchers. The mathematical modelling of physical coastal processes took wave transformation (wave diffraction and refraction; the effects of shoaling and wave breaking and longshore sediment transport into account. The computations were carried out for the mean statistical annual wave climate, determined on the basis of IO BAS wave data, simulated using the WAM method from long-term Black Sea wind data. The results of sediment transport computations clearly show that its direction off the Golden Sands shore is from north to south.

  14. Post-liquefaction reconsolidation of sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamidis, O; Madabhushi, G S P

    2016-02-01

    Loosely packed sand that is saturated with water can liquefy during an earthquake, potentially causing significant damage. Once the shaking is over, the excess pore water pressures that developed during the earthquake gradually dissipate, while the surface of the soil settles, in a process called post-liquefaction reconsolidation. When examining reconsolidation, the soil is typically divided in liquefied and solidified parts, which are modelled separately. The aim of this paper is to show that this fragmentation is not necessary. By assuming that the hydraulic conductivity and the one-dimensional stiffness of liquefied sand have real, positive values, the equation of consolidation can be numerically solved throughout a reconsolidating layer. Predictions made in this manner show good agreement with geotechnical centrifuge experiments. It is shown that the variation of one-dimensional stiffness with effective stress and void ratio is the most crucial parameter in accurately capturing reconsolidation.

  15. Three dimensional fabric evolution of sheared sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Alsidqi; Alshibli, Khalid (UWA)

    2012-10-24

    Granular particles undergo translation and rolling when they are sheared. This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) experimental assessment of fabric evolution of sheared sand at the particle level. F-75 Ottawa sand specimen was tested under an axisymmetric triaxial loading condition. It measured 9.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. The quantitative evaluation was conducted by analyzing 3D high-resolution x-ray synchrotron micro-tomography images of the specimen at eight axial strain levels. The analyses included visualization of particle translation and rotation, and quantification of fabric orientation as shearing continued. Representative individual particles were successfully tracked and visualized to assess the mode of interaction between them. This paper discusses fabric evolution and compares the evolution of particles within and outside the shear band as shearing continues. Changes in particle orientation distributions are presented using fabric histograms and fabric tensor.

  16. Rational approach to anisotropy of sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    1998-11-01

    The paper presents a constitutive model for the three-dimensional deformation-strength behaviour of inherently anisotropic sand. Based on non-linear tensorial functions, the model is developed without recourse to the concepts in plasticity theory such as yield surface and plastic potential. Benefited from the fact that no decomposition of strain into elastic and plastic parts is assumed, a unified treatment of anisotropic behaviour of deformation and strength is achieved. Anisotropy is characterized by a vector normal to the bedding plane. The extension of the constitutive model is furnished by incorporating the vector under consideration of the principle of objectivity and the condition of material symmetry. Distinct features of the model are its elegant formulation and its simple structure involving few material parameters. Model performance and comparison with experiments show that the model is capable of capturing the salient behaviour of anisotropic sand.

  17. Bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus

    Global applications of pesticides in agricultural production have led to the detection of trace amounts of pesticides in groundwater resources in levels exceeding the EU threshold limit for drinking water of 0.1 µg L-1. Pesticide-polluted groundwater may be remediated by inoculating waterworks sand...... filters with specific degrading bacteria. However, degradation efficiency is often hampered by poor adhesion and a lack of sustained catabolic activity of the introduced bacteria. The overall objective of this thesis was to investigate the significance of selected bacterial surface properties...... coincided with efficient mineralisation/degradation, and proposed the tfdC gene as a suitable marker for monitoring phenoxy acid degradation in strain PM2. Furthermore, when testing strain PM2s degradation performance in flow-through sand columns, we found that strain PM2 was able to sustain induced...

  18. Analysis of Wind-blown Sand Movement over Transverse Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

    2014-12-01

    Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification.

  19. Preparation and characterization of poly(acrylic acid)—corn starch blend for use as chemical sand-fixing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xugang; Chen, Hui; Shan, Zhihua

    2017-07-01

    One chemical sand-fixing materials based on poly(acrylic acid)-corn starch (PACS) blend was studied in this work. The PACS blend was prepared by solution mixing method between PA and CS. In order to prepare sand-fixing materials for environmental applications using the well-established method of spraying evenly PACS blend solution on the surfaces of fine sand. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) revealed the existence of the intermolecular interactions between the blend components. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed a continuous phase of blend, and it also showed the good sand-fixing capacity. The test results of hygroscopicity and water retention experiments indicated that the blends had excellent water-absorbing and water-retention capacity. The results of contact angle measurements between the PACS solutions and fine sand showed that the PACS blend has a satisfactory effect on fine sand wetting. And the PACS, as a sand-fixation material, has excellent sand-fixation rate up to 99.5%.

  20. Field Measurements of Influence of Sand Transport Rate on Structure of Wind-sand Flow over Coastal Transverse Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yuxiang; S L NAMIKAS; P A HESP; MA Jun

    2008-01-01

    The structure of wind-sand flow under different total sand transport rates was measured with field vertical anemometer and sand trap on the crest of typical coastal transverse ridge in Changli Gold Coast of Hebei Province,which is one of the most typical coastal aeolian distribution regions in China and famous for the tall and typical coastal transverse ridges.The measurement results show that,on the conditions of approximate wind velocities and same surface materials and environments,some changes happen to the structure of wind-sand flow with the increase of total sand transport rate on the crest of coastal transverse ridge.First,the sand transport rates of layers at different heights in the wind-sand flow increase,with the maximum increase at the height layer of 4-8cm.Second,the ratios of sand transport rates of layers at different heights to total sand transport rate decrease at the low height layer (0-4cm),but increase at the high height layer (4-60cm).Third,the distribution of the sand transport rate in the wind-sand flow can be expressed by an exponential function at the height layer of 0-40cm,but it changes fi'om power function model to exponential function model in the whole height layer (0-60cm) and changes into polynomial function model at the height layer of 40-60cm with the increase of total sand transport rate.Those changes have a close relationship with the limit of sand grain size of wind flow transporting and composition of sand grain size in the wind-sand flow.

  1. Probing the acceptor substrate binding site of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase with systematically modified substrates and glycoside libraries† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the ketone and amine components of the thiogalactoside library. See DOI: 10.1039/c0ob00826e Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jennifer A.; Kartha, K. P. Ravindranathan; Fournier, Eric J. L.; Lowary, Todd L.; Malet, Carles; Nilsson, Ulf J.; Hindsgaul, Ole; Schenkman, Sergio; Naismith, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Systematically modified octyl galactosides and octyl N-acetyllactosamines were assessed as inhibitors of, and substrates for, T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TcTS) in the context of exploring its acceptor substrate binding site. These studies show that TcTS, which catalyses the α-(2→3)-sialylation of non-reducing terminal β-galactose residues, is largely intolerant of substitution of the galactose 2 and 4 positions whereas substitution of the galactose 6 position is well tolerated. Further studies show that even the addition of a bulky sugar residue (glucose, galactose) does not impact negatively on TcTS binding and turnover, which highlights the potential of ‘internal’ 6-substituted galactose residues to serve as TcTS acceptor substrates. Results from screening a 93-membered thiogalactoside library highlight a number of structural features (notably imidazoles and indoles) that are worthy of further investigation in the context of TcTS inhibitor development. PMID:21253654

  2. Study of the anti-sand sucker rod pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hangxin; Lv, Bingxin; Xi, Wenkui; Yi, Peng

    2017-06-01

    In order to solve the problem of sand stuck in the sucker rod pump, an anti-sand sucker rod pump is designed. The anti-sand sucker rod pump includes the conventional sucker rod pump and the swirl flow device. The sand particles can be separated from the oil in the swirl flow device, so the plunger of the sucker rod pump cannot be stuck. The motion equation of the sand particles in oil is deduced. The virtual model of the swirl flow device is built in GAMBIT software. And simulation of solid-liquid two phase flow is simulated in software FLUENT. The simulation results show that the swirl flow device can realize the sand particles separation from the oil completely. So the pump can have the effect of anti-sands.

  3. Strength and sintering effects at ejection of explosively driven sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Weckert, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    A description of the response of sand to extreme loads is very important for the evaluation of the sand ejecta impact effects on various targets. Sand is a complex material to simulate because of its porosity where the inter-phase equilibrium is hard to achieve under transient shock wave loading. A previously developed two-phase model with strength has been implemented in CTH and applied to sand. The shock response of the sand, including the Hugoniot abnormality known from the literature for highly porous silica, is adequately described with the material model. The sand unloading effects appearing as the ejecta are observed in the present work using dynamic flash X-ray of an aluminium target plate loaded by limestone sand ejecta from the detonation of a buried high explosive charge. The CTH modelling results compared with the flash X-ray images have demonstrated good agreement, particularly, in the description of momentum transfer to the target.

  4. A transport-rate model of wind-blown sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Sand transport by wind plays an important role in environmental problems.Formulating the sand-transport rate model has been of continuing significance,because the majority of the existing models relate sand-transport rate to the wind-shear velocity.However,the wind-shear velocity readapted to blown sand is difficult to determine from the measured wind profiles when sand movement occurs,especially at high wind velocity.Detailed wind tunnel tests were carried out to reformulate the sand-transport rate model,followed by attempts to relate sand-transport rate to parameters of wind velocity,threshold shear-velocity,and grain size.Finally,we validated the model based on the data from field observations.

  5. Athabasca oil sands development : lessening the footprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R. [Alberta Environment, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This presentation provided an overview of the oil sands development footprint from the perspectives of industry, environmental associations and regulatory agencies. A map of regional oil sands developments was presented along with details of land disturbance to date. Industry strategies for lessening the impact of land disturbance include compact space-efficient mining operations; good planning; and effective, progressive reclamation. A closure and reclamation model was presented, along with key reclamation challenges such as overburden. Issues concerning tailings sands were examined. Details of Syncrude's closure vision were presented, including details of the Mildred Lake site. Details of the Fort McMurray Environmental Association were presented as well as various regional multi-stakeholder initiatives. A background of Syncrude and Suncor operations was presented as well as development projection forecasts. Impacts to the Boreal region were examined. Details of land reclamation by Syncrude were provided, as well as a chart of cumulative disturbances. It was noted that recent applications have indicated numerous reclamation uncertainties, including long-term performance of landforms and the feasibility of developing trafficable tailings landforms. It was suggested that the ecosystem dynamics of the Boreal are poorly understood. Exacerbating factors include the degraded state of soils; viability of end pit lakes; and climate change. It was suggested that operators are proposing to deal with landscape and technology uncertainty using adaptive management strategies. Government responses to the oil sand development footprint include the encouragement of more research into tailings technologies, end pit lake viability and reclamation; and the identification of regional landscape ecological thresholds by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). It was concluded that uncertainty needs to be addressed via a variety of policy and management options

  6. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21-31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18-75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  7. Kirsten Sand. Arkitekt for sin tid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Seip

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Towards the end of World War II the retreating Germans burnt down nearly all buildings and other constructions in the counties of Finnmark and the northern parts of Troms in North Norway. The population evacuated but many returned as soon as possible, only to find themselves homeless. At this very demanding point Kirsten Sand decided to travel north, and do whatever she could as an architect to help. The pre-war housing situation was generally difficult. Low building standards and lack of money forced families in the cities to live under bad conditions. Kirsten Sand studied these conditions and took part in the efforts to better the situation. This knowledge provided a good starting point for the work she undertook after the war, in particular her profound understanding of the situation of women, their working conditions and positions in the household and society. Houses designed by Sand and her helpmates are simple but adequate, taking into account these women’s point of view. Ingebjørg Hage has thrown light on the work of Kirsten Sand in Finnmark and Troms in several ways. This article aims at describing Sand’s background as an architect before she left Oslo to travel north. It describes how housing and housing policy since long had been central to architects, especially so within the group she belonged to. In pre-war Oslo she had been engaged in planning and designing hospitals. During a period as inspector for the health authorities she learned a lot about the living conditions of people in general. After establishing her own architect’s office she mostly designed family houses, and during the war she engaged in research that further deepened her knowledge in the field. Thus she was particularly well equipped for the demanding tasks she undertook in the summer of 1945.

  8. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Nazir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21–31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18–75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  9. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, T.K. [ed.

    1996-04-01

    This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

  12. Sorption of Arsenite onto Mackinawite Coated Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, T. J.; Hayes, K. F.; Abriola, L. M.

    2004-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem affecting aquifers in the United States as well as abroad. Recent strengthening of the US EPA MCL for arsenic has prompted the need for technology capable of removing both arsenite and arsenate from solution. Arsenite, the more toxic form of arsenic, is more difficult to remove from anoxic zones in the subsurface. Studies by others have demonstrated the affinity of some types of iron sulfides for arsenite, such as troilite, pyrite, amorphous iron sulfide and mackinawite. However, these studies have not provided a comprehensive investigation of the macroscopic behavior of arsenite in the presence of crystalline mackinawite in a form that can be readily applied to real-world treatment technologies. This study examines the behavior of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sand. PH edge results demonstrate that arsenite sorption onto mackinawite coated sand increases with increasing pH, reaching maximum removal at pH 10. Arsenite removal, albeit slight, occurring below pH 5 is independent of pH indicative of a different removal mechanism. Isotherm studies show that at low concentrations, removal is Langmuirian in nature. Arsenite sorption abruptly converts to linear behavior at high concentrations, possibly attributed to the saturation of the monolayer. Ionic strength effects were assessed by comparing pH edge data developed for three different concentrations of NaCl background electrolyte solution. Increases in ionic strength enhance the removal of arsenite from solution, suggesting possible inner-sphere surface complexation removal mechanisms. Information gathered in this study can be used to further develop surface complexation models to describe and predict reactivity of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sands in anoxic regions. Mackinawite coated sands investigated here may provide a feasible reactive medium for implementation in above-ground sorption reactors or subsurface

  13. PHYSICAL MODELING OF ODOMETRIC COMPRESSION OF SAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyashenko P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The odometric compression of sand with constant rate of loading (CRL or constant rate of deformation (CRD and continuous registration of the corresponding reaction allows to identify the effect of stepwise changes of deformation (at the CRL and the power reaction (at the CRD. Physical modeling of compression on the sandy model showed the same effect. The physical model was made of fine sand with marks, mimicking large inclusions. Compression of the soil at the CRD was uneven, stepwise, and the strain rate of the upper boundary of the sandy model changed cyclically. Maximum amplitudes of cycles passed through a maximum. Inside of the sand model, the uneven strain resulted in the mutual displacement of the adjacent parts located at the same depth. The growth of external pressure, the marks showed an increase or decrease in displacement and even move opposite to the direction of movement (settlement the upper boundary of the model ‒ "floating" of marks. Marks, at different depths, got at the same time different movements, including mutually contradictory. The mark settlements sudden growth when the sufficiently large pressure. These increments in settlements remained until the end of loading decreasing with depth. They were a confirmation of the hypothesis about the total destruction of the soil sample at a pressure of "structural strength". The hypothesis of the "floating" reason based on the obvious assumption that the marks are moved together with the surrounding sand. The explanation of the effect of "floating" is supported by the fact that the value of "floating" the more, the greater the depth

  14. Sand Ripple Dynamics on the Inner Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sand Ripple Dynamics on the Inner Shelf Donald N. Slinn Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611...Florida,Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering,Gainesville,FL,32611-6590 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...2002. 452: p. 1-24. Acrivos, A., Shear-Induced Particle Diffusion in Concentrated Suspensions of Noncolloidal Particles. Journal of Rheology , 1995

  15. Drawing a Line in the Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An Inner Mongolian woman takes on the desert and converts extensive arid regions into arable land by Ni Yanshuo CONVERTING vast tracks of desert into arable land is no easy task, even using the most advanced technology.Yet a woman who hails from north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region met this challenge head on.Using the helping hands of other determined women,she has made remarkable progress in pushing back the sands of time.

  16. Drained Triaxial Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praastrup, U.; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    In the process of understanding and developing models for geomaterials, the stress-strain behaviour is commonly studied by performing triaxial tests. In the present study static triaxial tests have been performed to gain knowledge of the stress-strain behaviour of frictional materials during...... monotonic loading. The tests reported herein are all drained tests, starting from different initial states of stress and following various stress paths. AIl the tests are performed on reconstituted medium dense specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand....

  17. American Las Vegas Sands Corp. Visiting Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yinghong; Liu Jinliang

    2006-01-01

    @@ On August 29, Wan Jifei, Chairman of CCPIT, meets the visiting delegation led by Sheldon G. Adelson,Chairman of the Board and principal owner of Las Vegas Sands Corp. in CCPIT. Zhao Zhenge, Vice Director of International Connection Department of CCPIT, Luo Guoxiong from Beijing China Exhibition Investment Company, Xu Jingyi, Assistant Director of American and Oceanian Affairs Division of CCPIT, also attended the meeting.

  18. Oil sands mining water use and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Long, D.; Fitch, M. [Golder Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    There are currently 4 bitumen mining operations operating along the Athabasca River in northern Alberta. This paper presented details of the water licences, historical water use, present water use, and future plans for water management in relation to oil sands mining operations. The study was based on work currently conducted for the Oil Sands Developers Group (OSDG) and Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), as well as on mine site water balance analyses for proposed mines in the region. Typical mine site water balances were discussed, and water use rates for the mining operations were reviewed. The new Athabasca River water management framework may require that mines provide additional water storage or delayed reclamation of mine areas in order to offset water losses during winter low-flow periods. New regulations may also reduce the requirement for make-up water. The study also noted that release criteria are still being developed for on-site water within closed-loop mine operations. The oil sands industry will need to balance various factors related to water use in the future. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  19. DYNAMIC EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRENGTH OF SATURATED SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵生俊; 谢定义

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic effective shear strength of saturated sand under cyclic loading is discussed in this paper. The discussion includes the transient time dependency behaviors based on the analysis of the results obtained in conventional cyclic triaxial tests and cyclic torsional shear triaxial tests. It has been found that the dynamic effective shear strength is composed of effective frictional resistance and viscous resistance, which are characterized by the strain rate dependent feature of strength magnitude, the coupling of consolidation stress with cyclic stress and the dependency of time needed to make the soil strength suffciently mobilized, and can also be expressed by the extended Mohr-Coulomb's law. The two strength parameters of the dynamic effective internal frictional angle φd and the dynamic viscosity coefficient η are determined. The former is unvaried for different number of cyclic loading, dynamic stress form and consolidation stress ratio. And the later is unvaried for the different dynamic shear strain rate γt developed during the sand liquefaction, but increases with the increase of initial density of sand. The generalization of dynamic effective stress strength criterion in the 3-dimensional effective stress space is studied in detail for the purpose of its practical use.

  20. Collaborative production management for oil sands operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Andrew [Matrikon (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the collaborative production management of oil sands operations. Some characteristics of oil sands operations include oil treatment, hydro treating, diluent addition, logistics, and environmental impact assessments. Some of the business challenges include regulatory uncertainty, a fluid workforce and a technology still in the process of being developed. Improvement is only possible when process is assessed and measured; hence, production data management is very important. Production data measurements encompass such areas as planning, documentation and transactions. Regulatory data reporting is represented using a flow chart. The concepts of business application architecture and functional reference modeling are also explained. Benchmarking plays a vital role, some aspects of which would be technology, automation and integration. Certain advantages of timely assessment are increased production, equity, and goodwill as well as reduction in costs, risk, and capital requirements. The relevance and importance of collaboration, awareness of web technology and aggregate information are also explained. From the study, it can be concluded that the key to overall improvement in the oil sands industry will be improved production management.