WorldWideScience

Sample records for sand sheet deposits

  1. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  2. Ganges Chasma Landing Site: Access to Sand Sheets, Wall Rock and Layered Mesa Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James W., Jr.

    1999-06-01

    The floor of Ganges Chasma offers an ideal landing site for the MSP 2001 lander. This site is exquisite both in terms of engineering constraints and science objectives. The floor of Ganges Chasma is mantled with an extensive sand sheet. Sand sheets develop in conditions which are unfavorable for dune formation. These may include a high water table, periodic flooding, surface cementation, and coarse grained sands. The most extensive sand sheets on Earth are located in the eastern Sahara. These sheets have a relief of less than 1 m over wide areas and total thickness ranges from a few cm to 10 m. The surfaces of sand sheets are composed of granule to pebbly lag deposits. Sand sheets provide an extremely safe landing site and have very low relief. The safety concerns regarding slopes, rocks, and dust would be alleviated by the sand sheet. Furthermore, this vast sand sheet would allow the Marie Curie Rover to cover great distances. Rover navigability would be very easily compared to the tedious rock avoidance maneuvers that Sojourner had to accomplish. This exercise would be an important precursor test for the more capable Athena Rover which will execute longer traverses. Moreover, the Rover has already been "field tested" on sand at the JPL Mars sandbox. Dust should not be a problem: Thermal inertia is 7.7 to 8.9 cgs units. This site satisfies all engineering constraints.

  3. Intermontane eolian sand sheet development, Upper Tulum Valley, central-western Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Francisco Fuhr Dal' Bó

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe intermontane Upper Tulum eolian sand sheet covers an area of ca. 125 km² at north of the San Juan Province, central-western Argentina. The sand sheet is currently an aggrading system where vegetation cover, surface cementation and periodic flooding withhold the development of dunes with slipfaces. The sand sheet surface is divided into three parts according to the distribution of sedimentary features, which reflects the variation in sediment budget, water table level and periodic flooding. The central sand sheet part is the main area of eolian deposition and is largely stabilized by vegetation. The sedimentary succession is 4 m thick and records the vertical interbedding of eolian and subaqueous deposits, which have been deposited for at least 3.6 ky with sedimentation rates of 86.1 cm/ky. The construction of the sand sheet is associated with deflation of the sand-graded debris sourced by San Juan alluvial fan, which is available mainly in drier fall-winter months where water table is lower and wind speeds are periodically above the threshold velocity for sand transport. The accumulation of sedimentary bodies occurs in a stabilized eolian system where vegetation cover, thin mud veneers and surface cementation are the main agents in promoting accumulation. The preservation of the sand sheet accumulations is enabled by the progressive creation of the accommodation space in a tectonically active basin and the continuous burial of geological bodies favored by high rates of sedimentation.

  4. OSL age and stratigraphy of the Strauss sand sheet in New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stephen A.; Goble, Ronald J.

    2015-07-01

    The Strauss sand sheet occurs in south-central New Mexico, USA, and northern Chihuahua, Mexico, covering an area of about 4740 km2. Its chronology is determined by 19 OSL ages. The sand sheet formed primarily during three phases of eolian deflation and deposition, each phase with a separate sand source and under different climatic and environmental circumstances. The first phase of eolian sedimentation occurred 45 to 15 ka with the deposition of unit 1. The sand source for the first phase was beach-related features along the eastern shoreline of pluvial Lake Palomas in Mexico. The glacial-age climate was cool, wet, and windy because of the southern path of the jet stream at that time. After 15 ka, with the onset of warmer conditions of the Bølling-Allerød, the shutting down of the Palomas sand source, and wet conditions of the Younger Dryas, the sand sheet stabilized with weak soil development in unit 1. By 11 ka, the climate shifted to Holocene drying conditions and the second phase of sand accumulation began, forming unit 2; the sand source was the local deflation of the previously deposited unit 1 sand. The sand sheet stabilized again by 1.9 ka with slightly wetter late Holocene climate; a weak soil formed in unit 2 sand. About A.D. 1500 and extending to about A.D. 1850 or later, an A horizon formed on the sand sheet, probably in response to a desert grassland vegetation during the period of wet climate of the Little Ice Age. In an anthropogenic third phase of eolian activity, after A.D. 1850, the vegetation was likely disturbed by overgrazing; and the unit 2 and A horizon (unit 3) sands were deflated, resulting in the deposition of a thin layer of massive eolian sand (unit 4) across the sand sheet. By about A.D. 1900 mesquite shrubs had increased in abundance; and deflated sand, largely from unit 2, began to accumulate around the shrubs, forming coppice dunes (unit 5). Mesquite coppice dunes continued to increase in number and volume during the twentieth

  5. Sand transport in oscillatory sheet-flow; a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    This literature review is part of the ongoing research on sand transport in oscillatory sheet-flow, as taking place at the coast during storms. Because sheet-flow corresponds to conditions of high shear stress, large amounts of sand are transported. Therefore it is an important part of the total san

  6. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels. Howeve

  7. Sand deposit-detecting method and its application in model test of sand flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎伟; 房营光; 莫海鸿; 谷任国; 陈俊生

    2013-01-01

    Against the background of the sand-flow foundation treatment engineering of Guangzhou Zhoutouzui variable cross-section immersed tunnel, a kind of sand deposit-detecting method was devised on the basis of full-scale model test of sand-flow method. The real-time data of sand-deposit height and radius were obtained by the self-developed sand-deposit detectors. The test results show that the detecting method is simple and has high precision. In the use of sand-flow method, the sand-carrying capability of fluid is limited, and sand particles are all transported to the sand-deposit periphery through crater, gap and chutes after the sand deposit formed. The diffusion range of the particles outside the sand-deposit does not exceed 2.0 m. Severe sorting of sand particles is not observed because of the unique oblique-layered depositing process. The temporal and spatial distributions of gap and chutes directly affect the sand-deposit expansion, and the expansion trend of the average sand-deposit radius accords with quadratic time-history curve.

  8. Large-scale, low-amplitude bedforms (chevrons) in the selima sand sheet, egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T A; Haynes, C V

    1989-03-03

    Landsat images of the Selima sand sheet in southwestern Egypt display alternating light and dark chevron-shaped patterns that occur downwind from low scarps and major dune fields. Images acquired between 1972 and 1988 indicate that these features move as discrete bedforms at a rate of up to 500 meters per year. Extremely long-wavelength (130 to 1200 meters), low-amplitude (10 to 30 centimeters) bedforms were measured in the field; the light chevrons seen in the orbital data may be thin accumulations of active sand sheet deposits in the lee of these bedforms. Dark chevrons contain an admixture of coarse-granule lag deposits that are continually winnowed by aeolian erosion on the windward sides of the large bedforms. Sediment transport budgets derived from orbital and field analyses suggest net movement of up to 83,000 cubic meters per year for a single light chevron; such measurements can be used as a check on similar calculations from dunes and other smaller scale features to determine sand transport budgets for large areas of the eastern Sahara.

  9. Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet Christopher Martens Dept. of Marine Sciences CB...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...was noted that there was substantially higher organic material in the shallow troughs of the sand ripples than on the crests. Most of this appears

  10. Production of oil from Intermountain West tar sands deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassett, J.M.; Glassett, J.A.

    1976-03-01

    Six tar sand deposits in the Intermountain West, each containing more than one billion barrels of oil in place, are identified. All of these deposits are in eastern Utah and contain a total of twenty-eight billion barrels of oil. The names of the six deposits arranged in descending order of desirability for large-scale surface-mining oil recovery operations are as follows: Sunnyside, Tar Sand Triangle, Asphalt Ridge, P.R. Spring, Circle Cliffs, and Hill Creek. An overview of each deposit is presented including geology, surface-mining variables, chemical processing variables, environmental aspects, and economics. A comparison of Utah tar sands and Athabasca, Alberta, Canada tar sands is also presented.

  11. Features of Sand-dust Deposits in Harbin City, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yuanyun; ZHANG Yan; HE Kui; ZHOU Jia; KANG Chunguo

    2006-01-01

    From the sedimentologic view, this paper analyses the grain-size distribution and the chemical composition of the deposits from sand-dust storm, occurring in Harbin on March 20, 2002. The result indicates that there exist plentiful coarse matters in the sand-dust deposits in Harbin, and the sand-dust composition presents obvious three peak distribution characteristics, indicating that the sand-dust in Harbin is composed of multi-origin components. The grain-size composition consists of silt (4-8Φ), accounting for 71.18% of the total, sand (>4Φ), 21.70%, and clay (<8Φ), only 7.13%. The average grain size (Mz) is 5.14Φ. The chemical elements of the deposits are mainly SiO2 and Al2O3 and Fe2O3, totally occupying 77.8%. The enrichment factors (EF) of Mg, K, Si, Fe, Mn, P, Ti, Co, Ni and V elements are all about 1, which mainly come from lithosphere source, while parts ofCu, Pb, Zn, Cr and Se elements are from pollution sources out of lithosphere source, and As, Cd and Sb elements are mainly from pollution sources. Based on the comprehensive analysis of grain-size, chemical composition, enrichment factor (EF), discriminant function (DF) and matter source index (PI), this paper points out that the grain-size distribution and element composition of the sand-dust deposits in Harbin are evidently different from the loess and sand-dust in Lanzhou, and that matter source of the sand-dust in Harbin is different from the loess in Northwest China and the sand-dust in Lanzhou. The sand-dust deposits in Harbin are an admixture of coarse grains transmitted in short distance and fine grains transported in long distance. The plentiful coarse grains of the sand-dust deposits in Harbin origin from sand of local spot, and are the near-source deposits transported by low altitude airflow.

  12. Aeolian sand transport and aeolian deposits on Venus: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsly, Mikhail A.; Bondarenko, Nataliya V.

    2017-06-01

    We review the current state of knowledge about aeolian sand transport and aeolian bedforms on planet Venus. This knowledge is limited by lack of observational data. Among the four planetary bodies of the Solar System with sufficient atmospheres in contact with solid surfaces, Venus has the densest atmosphere; the conditions there are transitional between those for terrestrial subaerial and subaqueous transport. The dense atmosphere causes low saltation threshold and short characteristic saltation length, and short scale length of the incipient dunes. A few lines of evidence indicate that the typical wind speeds exceed the saltation threshold; therefore, sand transport would be pervasive, if sand capable of saltation is available. Sand production on Venus is probably much slower than on the Earth; the major terrestrial sand sinks are also absent, however, lithification of sand through sintering is expected to be effective under Venus' conditions. Active transport is not detectable with the data available. Aeolian bedforms (transverse dunes) resolved in the currently available radar images occupy a tiny area on the planet; however, indirect observations suggest that small-scale unresolved aeolian bedforms are ubiquitous. Aeolian transport is probably limited by sand lithification causing shortage of saltation-capable material. Large impact events likely cause regional short-term spikes in aeolian transport by supplying a large amount of sand-size particles, as well as disintegration and activation of older indurated sand deposits. The data available are insufficient to understand whether the global aeolian sand transport occurs or not. More robust knowledge about aeolian transport on Venus is essential for future scientific exploration of the planet, in particular, for implementation and interpretation of geochemical studies of surface materials. High-resolution orbital radar imaging with local to regional coverage and desirable interferometric capabilities is the

  13. Modelling of sand transport under wave-generated sheet flows with a RANS diffusion model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2010-01-01

    A 1DV-RANS diffusion model is used to study sand transport processes in oscillatory flat-bed/sheet flow conditions. The central aim is the verification of the model with laboratory data and to identify processes controlling the magnitude and direction (‘onshore’/‘offshore’) of the net time-averaged

  14. Characterization of Platinum Nanoparticles Deposited on Functionalized Graphene Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Chiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its special electronic and ballistic transport properties, graphene has attracted much interest from researchers. In this study, platinum (Pt nanoparticles were deposited on oxidized graphene sheets (cG. The graphene sheets were applied to overcome the corrosion problems of carbon black at operating conditions of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To enhance the interfacial interactions between the graphene sheets and the Pt nanoparticles, the oxygen-containing functional groups were introduced onto the surface of graphene sheets. The results showed the Pt nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed on the surface of graphene sheets with a mean Pt particle size of 2.08 nm. The Pt nanoparticles deposited on graphene sheets exhibited better crystallinity and higher oxygen resistance. The metal Pt was the predominant Pt chemical state on Pt/cG (60.4%. The results from the cyclic voltammetry analysis showed the value of the electrochemical surface area (ECSA was 88 m2/g (Pt/cG, much higher than that of Pt/C (46 m2/g. The long-term test illustrated the degradation in ECSA exhibited the order of Pt/C (33% > Pt/cG (7%. The values of the utilization efficiency were calculated to be 64% for Pt/cG and 32% for Pt/C.

  15. Origins of late- Pleistocene coastal dune sheets, Magdalena and Guerrero Negro, from continental shelf low-stand supply (70-20 ka), under conditions of southeast littoral- and eolian-sand transport, in Baja California Sur, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Curt D.; Murillo-Jiménez, Janette M.; Stock, Errol; Price, David M.; Hostetler, Steve W.; Percy, David

    2017-10-01

    Shallow morpho-stratigraphic sections (n = 11) in each of two large coastal dune sheets including the Magdalena (7000 km2) and Guerrero Negro (8000 km2) dune sheets, from the Pacific Ocean side of Baja California Sur, Mexico, have been analyzed for dune deposit age. The shallow morpho-stratigraphic sections (∼2-10 m depth) include 11 new TL and 14C ages, and paleosol chronosequences, that differentiate cemented late Pleistocene dune deposits (20.7 ± 2.1 to 99.8 ± 9.4 ka) from uncemented Holocene dune deposits (0.7 ± 0.05 to at least 3.2 ± 0.3 ka). Large linear dune ridges (5-10 m in height) in the dune sheet interiors trend southeast and are generally of late Pleistocene age (∼70-20 ka). The late Pleistocene dune deposits reflect eolian transport of marine sand across the emerged continental shelf (30-50 km southeast distance) from low-stand paleo-shorelines (-100 ± 25 m elevation), which were locally oriented nearly orthogonal to modeled deep-water wave directions (∼300° TN). During the Holocene marine transgression, onshore and alongshore wave transport delivered remobilized shelf-sand deposits to the nearshore areas of the large dune sheets, building extensive barrier islands and sand spits. Submerged back-barrier lagoons generally precluded marine sand supply to dune sheet interiors in middle to late Holocene time, though exceptions occur along some ocean and lagoon shorelines. Reactivation of the late Pleistocene dune deposits in the dune sheet interiors lead to generally thin (1-3 m thickness), but widespread, covers of Holocene dune deposits (0.41 ± 0.05 to 10.5 ± 1.6 ka). Mechanical drilling will be required to penetrate indurated subsoil caliche layers to reach basal Pleistocene dune deposits.

  16. Preparation of pyrite-coated sand grains for research on roll-type uranium deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Carol A.

    1977-01-01

    Ordinary quartz sand grains can be coated with pyrite for use in laboratory experiments on the genetic geochemistry of roll-type uranium deposits. The sand is first added to a ferric chloride solution. The slow addition of sodium hydroxide to the mixture gives the sand grains an iron oxide coating. This coating is then converted to pyrite by reaction with hydrogen sulfide, thus yielding a product suitable for experimental use.

  17. Sedimentary Characteristics of Buried Sand Layers Deposited in a Coastal Swamp in West Aceh, Indonesia, in the Early 15th Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, T.; Monecke, K.; Meilianda, E.; Pilarczyk, J.; Rusydy, I.; Moena, A.; Muzhaffat, H.; Rais, A.; Yolanda, I. P.

    2016-12-01

    Sediment cores from the coastal region of West Aceh, Indonesia, an area largely affected by the December 2004 Sumatra Andaman earthquake and resulting Indian Ocean tsunami, preserve evidence of two buried sand layers of possible tsunamigenic origin deposited in the early 15th century. The study site is dominated by beach ridge morphology with an alternation of beach ridges and swales characteristic of long-term coastal progradation. We targeted a low-lying area landward of a prominent beach ridge that is thought to have formed in the aftermath of the last predecessor of the 2004 event, and marks the position of the coastline in the late 14th and early 15th century. Using a hand auger and plastic tubes, 80 core samples up to 2.5 m in depth were recovered. Sand samples were analyzed using a laser diffraction particle size analyzer and prepared for microfossil analysis. The swale deposits are mostly composed of peat and overlie shallow marine sands forming the base of the beach ridge plain. Within the uppermost centimeters, a number of cores show a <1 cm thick sand layer possibly deposited during tsunami inundation in 2004. Intercalated within the peat deposits we found two buried sand layers at a depth of 70-100 cm below the surface. The lower sand layer is 1-6 cm thick and could only be traced in a handful of cores; the upper layer is more widespread and consistently thicker, measuring 11-17 cm, with 5-14 cm of peat in between the two sand sheets. The sand layers consist of massive to normally graded fine to medium sand and show sharp upper and lower boundaries indicating abrupt depositional events. Grain size distributions of the 2004 tsunami sand as well as of buried sand layers match shoreface sediment samples retrieved in 10 m water depth, suggesting a predominantly offshore source. Based on initial radiocarbon ages and estimates of sedimentation rates, the two buried sand layers were deposited in the early 15th century and are separated by only a few decades.

  18. Numerical modelling of the erosion and deposition of sand inside a filter layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Gjøl; van Gent, Marcel R. A.; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    prediction method to assure that the amount of erosion remains within acceptable limits. This work presents a numerical model that is capable of describing the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter of rock on top of sand. The hydraulic loading is that of incident irregular waves...... additional data sets on the erosion and deposition patterns inside of an open filter. A few cases are defined to study the effect of the sinking of the filter into the erosion hole. The numerical model is also applied to several application cases. The response of the core material (sand) to changes......This paper treats the numerical modelling of the behaviour of a sand core covered by rocks and exposed to waves. The associated displacement of the rock is also studied. A design that allows for erosion and deposition of the sand core beneath a rock layer in a coastal structure requires an accurate...

  19. Tuning the mechanical properties of vertical graphene sheets through atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davami, Keivan; Jiang, Yijie; Cortes, John; Lin, Chen; Shaygan, Mehrdad; Turner, Kevin T; Bargatin, Igor

    2016-04-15

    We report the fabrication and characterization of graphene nanostructures with mechanical properties that are tuned by conformal deposition of alumina. Vertical graphene (VG) sheets, also called carbon nanowalls (CNWs), were grown on copper foil substrates using a radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique and conformally coated with different thicknesses of alumina (Al2O3) using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Nanoindentation was used to characterize the mechanical properties of pristine and alumina-coated VG sheets. Results show a significant increase in the effective Young's modulus of the VG sheets with increasing thickness of deposited alumina. Deposition of only a 5 nm thick alumina layer on the VG sheets nearly triples the effective Young's modulus of the VG structures. Both energy absorption and strain recovery were lower in VG sheets coated with alumina than in pure VG sheets (for the same peak force). This may be attributed to the increase in bending stiffness of the VG sheets and the creation of connections between the sheets after ALD deposition. These results demonstrate that the mechanical properties of VG sheets can be tuned over a wide range through conformal atomic layer deposition, facilitating the use of VG sheets in applications where specific mechanical properties are needed.

  20. Invasiveness of Campylopus introflexus in drift sands depends on nitrogen deposition and soil organic matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparrius, L.B.; Kooijman, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Question: Does the neophyte moss Campylopus introflexus invade more often in drift sand pioneer vegetations under high nitrogen (N) deposition? Location: Fourteen inland dune reserves in The Netherlands over a gradient of atmospheric N deposition. Methods: A transect study, dispersal experiment and

  1. Deposit model for heavy-mineral sands in coastal environments: Chapter L in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Fey, David L.; Shah, Anjana K.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    This report provides a descriptive model of heavy-mineral sands, which are sedimentary deposits of dense minerals that accumulate with sand, silt, and clay in coastal environments, locally forming economic concentrations of the heavy minerals. This deposit type is the main source of titanium feedstock for the titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigments industry, through recovery of the minerals ilmenite (Fe2+TiO3), rutile (TiO2), and leucoxene (an alteration product of ilmenite). Heavy-mineral sands are also the principal source of zircon (ZrSiO4) and its zirconium oxide; zircon is often recovered as a coproduct. Other heavy minerals produced as coproducts from some deposits are sillimanite/kyanite, staurolite, monazite, and garnet. Monazite [(Ce,La,Nd,Th)PO4] is a source of rare earth elements as well as thorium, which is used in thorium-based nuclear power under development in India and elsewhere.

  2. Self-Boring Pressuremeter in Pluvially Deposited Sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    The corresponding values of GURo and GRUo are given in Tables 6 through 10. The same tables also show the values of maximum dynamic shear modulus...the GURO and GO values it is necessary to consider other factors influencing the deformation characteristics of sand. Among them, the most relevant

  3. Influence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on the Transport and Deposition Behaviors of Bacteria in Quartz Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-03-01

    The significance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria (Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis) in quartz sand is examined in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at pH 5.6 by comparing both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with PFOA in solutions versus those without PFOA. All test conditions are found to be highly unfavorable for cell deposition regardless of the presence of PFOA; however, 7%-46% cell deposition is observed depending on the conditions. The cell deposition may be attributed to micro- or nanoscale roughness and/or to chemical heterogeneity of the sand surface. The results show that, under all examined conditions, PFOA in suspensions increases cell transport and decreases cell deposition in porous media regardless of cell type, presence or absence of extracellular polymeric substances, ionic strength, and ion valence. We find that the additional repulsion between bacteria and quartz sand caused by both acid-base interaction and steric repulsion as well as the competition for deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces by PFOA are responsible for the enhanced transport and decreased deposition of bacteria with PFOA in solutions.

  4. POSSIBILITY OF BENEFICIATION OF SILICA SAND FROM THE CROATIAN DEPOSITS USING ATTRITION SCRUBBING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Sobota

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To meet high quality requirements defined for specific industrial applications, the raw sand often has to be subjected to extensive physical and chemical processing. The possibility of achieving silica sand concentrate of required quality depends mostly on raw sand properties, primarily mineral impurity types and contents, and features of applied beneficiation methods. When the impurities occur in the form of oxide coatings on the surfaces of the single sand grains, attriton scrubbing is applied. By reducing the proportion of oxide coatings on the grains, the quality of sand can be improved. With the aim to determine the possibilities of the beneficiation of silica sand from significant Croatian deposits (“Vrtlinska”, “Štefanac” and “Španovica” and achieve concentrate grade complying with the requirements of domestic industry, laboratory tests were conducted on three raw sand samples with different SiO2 and impurity contents. Grain size distribution, chemical and mineral composition of raw sand samples, and the possibility of their quality improvement by applying the washing, classification and attrition scrubbing were defined by analysis of test results (the paper is published in Croatian.

  5. Deposition of carbonate mud beds within high-energy subtidal sand Dunes, Bahamas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dill, R.F.; Steinen, R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Laminated, carbonate mud beds are being deposited in the interisland channels of the Exuma Cays in the Bahamas. They are associated with stromatolites and interbedded with ooid sands that form large migrating subtidal dunes on flood tidal deltas and bars. Currents up to 3 knots sweep in and out of the 4-8 m deep channels 3 hours out of every 6 hours, creating a high-energy bank margin environment not usually considered to be the site of mud-sized particle deposition. Mud deposits reach thicknesses of 1 m and have individual beds 2-5 cm thick. When exposed to flowing seawater, bed surfaces become encrusted with carbonate cement and algal mats. The white interior of mud beds between the crusts appears homogeneous, is soft, and has the consistency of ''tooth paste.'' Loose uncemented ooid sand is found above and below the mud beds, showing that both are occupying the same depositional environment. Rip-up clasts of the crusted mud beds, formed by scour of underlying sands, are carried throughout the channels and accumulate as a lag deposit within the troughs of migrating dunes. Some clasts are colonized by algal mats that trap ooid and skeletal sands forming stromatolite structures that can grow up to 2 m high.

  6. Influence of Bisphenol A on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria in quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; He, Lei; Sun, Ruonan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2017-09-15

    The influence of Bisphenol A (BPA) on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria in quartz sand was examined in both NaCl (10 and 25 mM) and CaCl2 solutions (1.2 and 5 mM) by comparing the breakthrough curves and retained profiles of cell with BPA in suspensions versus those without BPA. Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis were employed as model cells in the present study. The extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek interaction energy calculation revealed that the presence of BPA in cell suspensions led to a lower repulsive interaction between the cells and the quartz sand. This suggests that, theoretically, increased cell deposition on quartz sand would be expected in the presence of BPA. However, under all examined solution conditions, the presence of BPA in cell suspensions increased transport and decreased deposition of bacteria in porous media regardless of cell type, ionic strength, ion valence, the presence or absence of extracellular polymeric substances. We found that competition by BPA through hydrophobicity for deposition sites on the quartz sand surfaces was the sole contributor to the enhanced transport and decreased deposition of bacteria in the presence of BPA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Eolian depositional phases during the past 50 ka and inferred climate variability for the Pampean Sand Sea, western Pampas, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripaldi, Alfonsina; Forman, Steven L.

    2016-05-01

    The Pampean Sand Sea, which occurs from the Argentinian Pampas to the eastern Andean piedmont, hosts presently stabilized dune fields spanning the late Quaternary. This study integrates previous results and presents new geomorphic, stratigraphic, sedimentological, and chronologic data for nineteen >2 m-thick eolian successions for the San Luis paleo-dune field, western Pampas, to better constrain the depositional history. Six eolian depositional phases are identified spanning the past 50 ka, interposed with paleosols and/or bounded by erosive surfaces. Age control was from 61 OSL ages of small aliquots of quartz grains from eolian stratigraphic units. The inferred timing of eolian phases are at ca. 70 ± 10 yr, 190 ± 20 yr, 12 to 1 ka, 22 to 17 ka, 29 to 24 ka, and 40 to 32 ka. A maximum span for periods of pedogenesis at ca. 12 to 17 ka, 22 to 24 ka, and 29 to 32 ka was provided by bounding OSL ages, which broadly overlap with high stands of pluvial lakes and glacier advances in the central Andes. We infer that the added precipitation may reflect expansion of the Southern Hemisphere monsoon, associated with Northern Hemisphere Heinrich events, leading to episodes of significantly wetter conditions (>350 mm MAP) to at least 35° S. Most of the Holocene (12 ka to 0.8 ka) was characterized by sand sheet deposit under drier than present conditions (100-450 mm MAP), associated with Monte-type vegetation (shrub steppe). The latest two eolian depositional phases, occurred at ca. 190 and 70 yr ago, during the historic period with European settlement and are related to anthropogenic landscape disturbance, though the youngest phase was concomitant with 1930s drought. Wet conditions dominated since ca. AD 1970 with new lakes and rivers forming across this eolian terrain; an incongruous environmental response in reference to drier conditions for most of the Holocene.

  8. Bovine serum albumin adsorption to iron-oxide coated sands can change microsphere deposition mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Raymond M; Yang, Xinyao; Hofmann, Thilo; von der Kammer, Frank

    2012-03-06

    Particulate colloids often occur together with proteins in sewage-impacted water. Using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a surrogate for protein in sewage, column experiments investigating the capacity of iron-oxide coated sands to remove latex microspheres from water revealed that microsphere attenuation mechanisms depended on antecedent BSA coverage. Dual pulse experiment (DPE) results suggested that where all BSA was adsorbed, subsequent multiple pore volume microsphere breakthrough curves reflected progressively reduced colloid deposition rates with increasing adsorbed BSA content. Modeling colloid responses suggested adsorption of 1 μg BSA generated the same response as blockage by between 7.1 × 10(8) and 2.3 × 10(9) deposited microspheres. By contrast, microsphere responses in DPEs where BSA coverage of the deposition sites approached/reached saturation revealed the coated sand maintained a finite capacity to attenuate microspheres, even when incapable of further BSA adsorption. Subsequent microsphere breakthrough curves demonstrated the matrix's colloid attenuation capacity progressively increased with continued microsphere deposition. Experimental findings suggested BSA adsorption on the sand surface approaching/reaching saturation generated attractive deposition sites for colloids, which became progressively more attractive with further colloid deposition (filter ripening). Results demonstrate that adsorption of a single type of protein may either enhance or inhibit colloid mobility in saturated porous media.

  9. Comparison of sand-layer geometry on flat floors of 10 modern depositional basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilkey, O.H. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC); Locker, S.D.; Cleary, W.J.

    1980-06-01

    A comparative study of 10 deep turbidite basins indicates that sand-layer thickness, frequency, and continuity can be related to their basin geometries, tectonics, and source areas. This study is based on piston-core data from the flat floors of four oceanic-crust abyssal plains (Sohm, Hatteras, Blake-Bahama, and Silver), two Bahama-Plateau reentrant basins (Columbus basin and Tongue of the Ocean), three subduction zone-island arc basins (Hispaniola-Caicos, Navidad, and St. Croix basins), and one continental-borderland basin (Santa Monica basin). With increasing tectonic activity, sand layers on flat basin floors tend to be thinner and more frequent. Except in elongated narrow basins such as Navidad, source-area size is directly related to proximal sand-layer thickness. Continuity of individual sand layers is a function of drainage-basin size and depositional-basin shape. For example, on the Hatteras Abyssal Plan long-distance continuity (up to 500 km) of individual sand layers is achieved because most of the turbidites are large and are introduced only at the north upstream end. In the small horseshoe-shaped Columbus basin, sand-layer continuity is limited because flows are small and are introduced from three sides. In most basins, sands thin and the percentage of sand layers in the sediment column decreases away from source areas. However, in basins that are small relative to the typical turbidity-current size (e.g., Hispaniola-Caicos basin), the differences between basin-edge and basin-center sand layers are slight. 10 figures, 3 tables.

  10. REVIEW OF COASTAL CHARACTERISTICS OF IRON SAND DEPOSITS IN CILACAP CENTRAL JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hananto Kurnio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Mineable iron sand deposits in Cilacap – southern coastal area of Central Java have certain coastal characteristics that need to be studied in order to understand its depositional environment. With the knowledge of such environment, it can be applied to look for other places prospective of iron sand deposits that have the same characteristics especially recently when Cilacap’s deposits were almost depleted. Coastal characteristics of iron sand deposit in Cilacap is shown by successive sandy beach ridges separated by marshy valleys typical of prograded coasts and by dunes of sand elongated parallel to the shore line with elevation varies from 0 m to 15 m above sea level. The iron sand deposit was derived from denudation of andesite and “Old Andesite Formation” enriched in magnetite and ilmenite minerals in the steep elevated and deeply weathered rock hinterlands of Cilacap. High sediment loads of Serayu Basin in the hinterland (3,500-4,500 ton/km2/year; Citarum River basin only 800-1,200 ton/km2/year was causing extensive deposition of iron sand in the coastal zone. Key words: coast, characteristic, iron sand, Cilacap Endapan pasir besi yang dapat ditambang di Cilacap – pesisir selatan Jawa Tengah memiliki karakteristik pantai tertentu yang perlu dikaji agar dapat dipahami lingkungan pengendapannya. Dengan pengetahuan tentang lingkungan pengendapan tersebut, dapat diterapkan untuk mencari daerah-daerah lain prospek endapan pasir besi yang memiliki karakteristik yang sama terutama pada akhir-akhir ini ketika endapan Cilacap akan habis. Karakteristik pantai endapan pasir besi di Cilacap dicirikan oleh urutan pematang pantai berpasir yang dipisahkan oleh lembah-lembah berawa khas pantai maju dan oleh gumuk-gumuk pasir memanjang sejajar dengan garis pantai dengan ketinggian bervariasi dari 0 m hingga 15 m dari muka laut. Endapan pasir besi di daerah ini berasal dari proses denudasi andesit dan “Formasi Andesit

  11. Geostatistical stability analysis of co-depositional sand-thickened tailings embankments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkateb, T. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Chalaturnyk, R.; Robertson, P.K. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2003-07-01

    Co-deposition is a novel technique for the disposal of thickened tailings pockets. In co-deposition, tailings are randomly distributed within a bigger mass of sand. The oil sands industry of Alberta is currently considering using this technique. This paper describes the attempt that was made to assess the engineering behaviour of this tailing disposal system in a probabilistic analysis framework. Several realizations of co-depositional embankments were generated using geostatistical theories. In turn, the stability of the disposal system expressed in terms of factors of safety against shear failure and the associated vertical deformations was assessed using these realizations and FLAC software. A sensitivity to embankment characteristics was revealed by failure probabilities and vertical displacements, such as embankment height and side slopes, and undrained shear strength of thickened tailings. The authors proposed an allowable failure probability of 17 per cent for these embankments to avoid irreparable excessive deformations. 11 refs., 1 tab., 8 figs.

  12. Complexities within distal sheet turbidite deposits: case study 160,000ka Icod Turbidite, Moroccan Turbidite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James; Wynn, Russell

    2010-05-01

    coarse silt or (2) removal of previously deposited silt by erosion of a post-depositional mudflow associated with mudcap remobilisation. Further to the stacked subunit facies and grain-size breaks, there are additional complexities to the deposit. An omission of a typical Bouma Ta facies is observed, replaced with a thick well-developed banded Bouma Tb, representing density sorting and flow fractionation of dense basaltic clasts and >100μm foraminifera. Above developing ripple laminations associated with Bouma Tc development is a 0.2-0.5m thick convolute laminated sand. This convoluted sand represents increasing shear stress across developing ripples. Grain-size analysis and ITRAX x-radiographs highlighted an additional process within the mudcaps of the Icod turbidite within the Agadir Basin. The mudcap thickens towards the base of incline from the Agadir Basin to the Selvage Islands. Within the cores with an over-thickened mudcap, the mudcap contained silt contortions. X-radiographs using ITRAX further displayed these contorted silts in the mudcaps. Grain-size analysis was used to confirm the presence of silt and poor sorting through the regions of contortions. These contorted muds have a debritic fabric, and could represent post-depositional remobilisation of the accumulative suspended clay fraction as a mudflow, as it was settling on a gradient and destabilising. This presentation will show the complexities present in even distal sheet turbidites, and that detailed multidisciplinary studies are required to unravel the mechanisms at work during their deposition. Pearce, T.J., & Jarvis I. 1992. Composition and provenance of turbidite sands: Late Quaternary, Madeira Abyssal Plain. Rothwell, R.G., Pearce, I., & Weaver, P.P.E. 1992. Late Quaternary evolution of the Madeira Abyssal Plain, Canary Basin, NE Atlantic. Basin Research, vol.4, no.2, p.103-131. Watts, A.B., & Masson, D.G. 1995. A giant landslide on the north flank of Tenerife, Canary Islands. Journal of

  13. Quantification of annual sediment deposits for sustainable sand management in Aghanashini river estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, T V; Vinay, S; Subash Chandran, M D

    2017-08-11

    Sedimentation involving the process of silt transport also carries nutrients from upstream to downstream of a river/stream. Sand being one of the important fraction of these sediments is extracted in order to cater infrastructural/housing needs in the region. This communication is based on field research in the Aghanshini river basin, west coast of India. Silt yield in the river basin and the sedimentation rate assessed using empirical techniques supplemented with field quantifications using soundings (SONAR), show the sediment yield of 1105-1367 kilo cum per year and deposition of sediment of 61 (2016) to 71 (2015) cm. Quantifications of extractions at five locations, reveal of over exploitation of sand to an extent of 30% with damages to the breeding ground of fishes, reduced productivity of bivalves, etc., which has affected dependent people's livelihood. This study provides vital insights towards sustainable sand harvesting through stringent management practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of sands and mineral clays in channel and floodplain deposits of Portuguesa river, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando José González Clemente

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the main channel and floodplain of Portuguesa River were studied the mineralogical characteristics of sand and clay minerals respectively. The methodology consisted of X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, for both mineral fractions. The results indicated the presence of mainly of quartz sands with minor amounts of chlorite, muscovite, calcite and feldspar which are considered quartz sand mature. Its origin is related to the source area and rework of soils and sediments of the floodplain. The clay fraction is characterized by the presence of 13 mineral crystalline phases consisting mainly of quartz, muscovite and chlorite, and clay minerals such as kaolinite, vermiculite, montmorillonite and nontronita. Its detrital origin may be due to mineral neoformation and inheritance. Therefore both mineral fractions consist mainly of quartz and kaolinite, which are essential components of the source area as well as the Quaternary alluvial deposits and the soils that make up the region.

  15. A Study of the Adsorption of Molecular Deposition Filming Flooding Agent MD-1 on Quartz Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GaoManglai; LiuYong; MengXiuxia; WangJianshe

    2004-01-01

    Molecular deposition filming flooding (MDFF) is a novel oil recovery technique based on the thermopositive monolayer electrostatic adsorption of the MDFF agent on different interfaces within reservoir systems. In this paper, the adsorption property of the MDFF agent, MD-I, on quartz sand has been studied through adsorption experiments at different pH and temperatures. Experimental data are also analyzed kinetically and thermodynamically. The results show that the adsorption of MD-I on quartz sand takes place mainly because of electrostatic interactions, which corresponds to adsorption that increases with pH. Kinetic analyses show that at a higher pH the activation energy for adsorption gets lower and, therefore, the adsorption becomes quicker for MD-1 on quartz sand. Thermodynamic analyses show that pH plays an important role in the adsorption of MD-1 on quartz sand. At a higher pH, more negative surface charges result in the increase of electrostatic interactions between MD-1 and quartz sand. Therefore, the saturated adsorption amount increases and more adsorption heat will be released.

  16. Electrophoretic deposition of fluorescent Cu and Au sheets for light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiale; Wu, Zhennan; Li, Tingting; Zhou, Ding; Zhang, Kai; Sheng, Yu; Cui, Jianli; Zhang, Hao; Yang, Bai

    2015-12-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a conventional method for fabricating film materials from nanometer-sized building blocks, and exhibits the advantages of low-cost, high-efficiency, wide-range thickness adjustment, and uniform deposition. Inspired by the interest in the application of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, the EPD technique has been recently extended to building blocks with 2D features. However, the studies are mainly focused on simplex building blocks. The utilization of multiplex building blocks is rarely reported. In this work, we demonstrate a controlled EPD of Cu and Au sheets, which are 2D assemblies of luminescent Cu and Au nanoclusters. Systematic investigations reveal that both the deposition efficiency and the thickness are determined by the lateral size of the sheets. For Cu sheets with a large lateral size, a high ζ-potential and strong face-to-face van der Waals interactions facilitate the deposition with high efficiency. However, for Au sheets, the small lateral size and ζ-potential limit the formation of a thick film. To solve this problem, the deposition dynamics are controlled by increasing the concentration of the Au sheets and adding acetone. This understanding permits the fabrication of a binary EPD film by the stepwise deposition of Cu and Au sheets, thus producing a luminescent film with both Cu green emission and Au red emission. A white light-emitting diode prototype with color coordinates (x, y) = (0.31, 0.36) is fabricated by employing the EPD film as a color conversion layer on a 365 nm GaN clip and further tuning the amount of deposited Cu and Au sheets.Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a conventional method for fabricating film materials from nanometer-sized building blocks, and exhibits the advantages of low-cost, high-efficiency, wide-range thickness adjustment, and uniform deposition. Inspired by the interest in the application of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, the EPD technique has been recently extended to

  17. Eolian sand deposition during th Medieval Climatic Anomaly in Playa San Bartolo, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, B.; Schaaf, P. E.; Murray, A.; Caballero, M.; Lozano Garcia, S.; Ramirez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Records of past climatic changes in desert environments are scarce due to the poor preservation of biological proxies. To overcome this lack we consider the paleoenvironmental significance and age of a lunette dune in the eastern rim of the Playa San Bartolo (PSB) in Sonoran Desert (Mexico). Rock magnetism, mineralogical, and geochemical analysis (major, trace and REE) allow assessment of sediment provenance and changes in the composition of the PSB dune over time. Thermoluminiscence and optical stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) provide the chronology of lunette dune development. Dune sediments are composed by intercalated layers of sand beds and sandy silt strata. Variability in composition of dune sediments is attributed to changes in sediment sources. Mineralogical, geochemical and magnetic data show clear differences between the sand and the sandy silt of the PSB dune deposits, which suggest different sediment sources. Sand sized deposits, characterized by coarse magnetite grains, are mainly eroded from granitoids from nearby outcrops. Sandy silt deposits, rich in fine grained magnetite and evaporative minerals, resulted after the erosion of volcanic rocks and their soils from sierras at the NE of PSB during heavy rainfall episodes, the flooding of PSB and later deflation and accumulation in the dune of both detritic and authigenic components. The upper 6 m of dune accumulation occurred largely during AD 500 to 1200, a period that correlates with the Medieval climatic anomaly (AD 300 to 1300). These findings suggest that main dune accretion occurred during regionally extended drought conditions, disrupted by sporadic heavy rainfall.

  18. Transport and deposition of suspended soil colloids in saturated sand columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anu; Kawamoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per;

    2011-01-01

    Understanding colloid mobilization, transport and deposition in the subsurface is a prerequisite for predicting colloid‐facilitated transport of strongly adsorbing contaminants and further developing remedial activities. This study investigated the transport behavior of soil‐colloids extracted from...... a red‐yellow soil from Okinawa, Japan. Different concentrations of suspended‐soil colloids (with diameter ....21 mm) sands. The transport and retention of colloids were studied by analyzing colloid effluent breakthrough curves (BTCs), particle size distribution in the effluent, and colloid deposition profiles within the column. The results showed a significant influence of flow velocity: Low flow velocity...

  19. Atmospheric deposition of mercury and methylmercury to landscapes and waterbodies of the Athabasca oil sands region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jane L; Muir, Derek C G; Gleason, Amber; Wang, Xiaowa; Lawson, Greg; Frank, Richard A; Lehnherr, Igor; Wrona, Fred

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric deposition of metals originating from a variety of sources, including bitumen upgrading facilities and blowing dusts from landscape disturbances, is of concern in the Athabasca oil sands region of northern Alberta, Canada. Mercury (Hg) is of particular interest as methylmercury (MeHg), a neurotoxin which bioaccumulates through foodwebs, can reach levels in fish and wildlife that may pose health risks to human consumers. We used spring-time sampling of the accumulated snowpack at sites located varying distances from the major developments to estimate winter 2012 Hg loadings to a ∼20 000 km(2) area of the Athabasca oil sands region. Total Hg (THg; all forms of Hg in a sample) loads were predominantly particulate-bound (79 ± 12%) and increased with proximity to major developments, reaching up to 1000 ng m(-2). MeHg loads increased in a similar fashion, reaching up to 19 ng m(-2) and suggesting that oil sands developments are a direct source of MeHg to local landscapes and water bodies. Deposition maps, created by interpolation of measured Hg loads using geostatistical software, demonstrated that deposition resembled a bullseye pattern on the landscape, with areas of maximum THg and MeHg loadings located primarily between the Muskeg and Steepbank rivers. Snowpack concentrations of THg and MeHg were significantly correlated (r = 0.45-0.88, p < 0.01) with numerous parameters, including total suspended solids (TSS), metals known to be emitted in high quantities from the upgraders (vanadium, nickel, and zinc), and crustal elements (aluminum, iron, and lanthanum), which were also elevated in this region. Our results suggest that at snowmelt, a complex mixture of chemicals enters aquatic ecosystems that could impact biological communities of the oil sands region.

  20. Coastal deposits of heavy mineral sands; Global significance and US resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Bleiwas, Donald I.; Bedinger, George M.; Ellefsen, Karl J.; Shah, Anjana K.

    2016-01-01

    Ancient and modern coastal deposits of heavy mineral sands (HMS) are the principal source of several heavy industrial minerals, with mining and processing operations on every continent except Antarctica. For example, HMS deposits are the main source of titanium feedstock for the titanium dioxide (TiO2) pigments industry, obtained from the minerals ilmenite (Fe2+TiO3), rutile (TiO2) and leucoxene (an alteration product of ilmenite). HMS deposits are also the principal source of zircon (ZrSiO4), from which zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) is obtained for uses mostly in refractory products. Sometimes monazite [(Ce,La,Nd,Th)PO4] is recovered as a byproduct mineral, sought for its rare earth elements and thorium (Ault and others, 2016; Sengupta and Van Gosen, 2016; Van Gosen and Tulsidas, 2016). 

  1. Modeling Cape- and Ridge-Associated Marine Sand Deposits; A Focus on the U.S. Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, James D.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Bolm, Karen S.

    2009-01-01

    Cape- and ridge-associated marine sand deposits, which accumulate on storm-dominated continental shelves that are undergoing Holocene marine transgression, are particularly notable in a segment of the U.S. Atlantic Continental Shelf that extends southward from the east tip of Long Island, N.Y., and eastward from Cape May at the south end of the New Jersey shoreline. These sand deposits commonly contain sand suitable for shore protection in the form of beach nourishment. Increasing demand for marine sand raises questions about both short- and long-term potential supply and the sustainability of beach nourishment with the prospects of accelerating sea-level rise and increasing storm activity. To address these important issues, quantitative assessments of the volume of marine sand resources are needed. Currently, the U.S. Geological Survey is undertaking these assessments through its national Marine Aggregates and Resources Program (URL http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/aggregates/). In this chapter, we present a hypothetical example of a quantitative assessment of cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits in the study area, using proven tools of mineral-resource assessment. Applying these tools requires new models that summarize essential data on the quantity and quality of these deposits. Two representative types of model are descriptive models, which consist of a narrative that allows for a consistent recognition of cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits, and quantitative models, which consist of empirical statistical distributions that describe significant deposit characteristics, such as volume and grain-size distribution. Variables of the marine sand deposits considered for quantitative modeling in this study include area, thickness, mean grain size, grain sorting, volume, proportion of sand-dominated facies, and spatial density, of which spatial density is particularly helpful in estimating the number of undiscovered deposits within an

  2. Episodic Eolian Sand Deposition in the Past 4000 Years in Cape COD National Seashore, Massachusetts, USA in Response to Possible Hurricane/storm and Anthropogenic Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, Steven

    2015-02-01

    The eolian sand depositional record for a dune field within Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts is posit as a sensitive indicator of environmental disturbances in the late Holocene from a combination of factors such as hurricane/storm and forest fire occurrence, and anthropogenic activity. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic observations, particularly the burial of spodosol-like soils, and associated 14C and OSL ages that are concordant indicate at least six eolian depositional events at ca. 3750, 2500, 1800, 960, 430 and dune migration and sand sheet accretion. The timing of eolian deposition, particularly the initiation age, corresponds to documented periods of increased storminess/hurricane activity in the North Atlantic Ocean at ca. 2.0 to 1.6, and 1.0 ka and also a wetter coastal climate, which suppressed the occurrence of forest fire. Thus, local droughts are not associated with periods of dune movement in this mesic environment. Latest eolian activity on outer Cape Cod commenced in the past 300 to 500 years and may reflect multiple factors including broad-scale landscape disturbance with European colonization, an increased incidence of forest fires and heightened storminess. Eolian systems of Cape Cod appear to be sensitive to landscape disturbance and prior to European settlement may reflect predominantly hurricane/storm disturbance, despite generally mesic conditions in past 4 ka.

  3. Aerolian erosion, transport, and deposition of volcaniclastic sands among the shifting sand dunes, Christmas Lake Valley, Oregon: TIMS image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ramsey, Michael S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing is a tool that, in the context of aeolian studies, offers a synoptic view of a dune field, sand sea, or entire desert region. Blount et al. (1990) presented one of the first studies demonstrating the power of multispectral images for interpreting the dynamic history of an aeolian sand sea. Blount's work on the Gran Desierto of Mexico used a Landsat TM scene and a linear spectral mixing model to show where different sand populations occur and along what paths these sands may have traveled before becoming incorporated into dunes. Interpretation of sand transport paths and sources in the Gran Desierto led to an improved understanding of the origin and Holocene history of the dunes. With the anticipated advent of the EOS-A platform and ASTER thermal infrared capability in 1998, it will become possible to look at continental sand seas and map sand transport paths using 8-12 mu m bands that are well-suited to tracking silicate sediments. A logical extension of Blount's work is to attempt a similar study using thermal infrared images. One such study has already begun by looking at feldspar, quartz, magnetite, and clay distributions in the Kelso Dunes of southern California. This paper describes the geology and application of TIMS image analysis of a less-well known Holocene dune field in south central Oregon using TIMS data obtained in 1991.

  4. Oil sands development and its impact on atmospheric wet deposition of air pollutants to the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Mary M; Dvonch, J Timothy; Barres, James A; Morishita, Masako; Legge, Allan; Percy, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of air pollutant deposition resulting from Athabasca oil sands development is necessary to assess risk to humans and the environment. To investigate this we collected event-based wet deposition during a pilot study in 2010-2012 at the AMS 6 site 30 km from the nearest upgrading facility in Fort McMurray, AB, Canada. Sulfate, nitrate and ammonium deposition was (kg/ha) 1.96, 1.60 and 1.03, respectively. Trace element pollutant deposition ranged from 2 × 10(-5) - 0.79 and exhibited the trend Hg < Se < As < Cd < Pb < Cu < Zn < S. Crustal element deposition ranged from 1.4 × 10(-4) - 0.46 and had the trend: La < Ce < Sr < Mn < Al < Fe < Mg. S, Se and Hg demonstrated highest median enrichment factors (130-2020) suggesting emissions from oil sands development, urban activities and forest fires were deposited. High deposition of the elements Sr, Mn, Fe and Mg which are tracers for soil and crustal dust implies land-clearing, mining and hauling emissions greatly impacted surrounding human settlements and ecosystems.

  5. The Carolina Sandhills: Quaternary eolian sand sheets and dunes along the updip margin of the Atlantic Coastal Plain province, southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Christopher; Fitzwater, Bradley A.; Whittecar, G. Richard; Mahan, Shannon; Garrity, Christopher P.; Aleman Gonzalez, Wilma B.; Dobbs, Kerby M.

    2016-01-01

    The Carolina Sandhills is a physiographic region of the Atlantic Coastal Plain province in the southeastern United States. In Chesterfield County (South Carolina), the surficial sand of this region is the Pinehurst Formation, which is interpreted as eolian sand derived from the underlying Cretaceous Middendorf Formation. This sand has yielded three clusters of optically stimulated luminescence ages: (1) 75 to 37 thousand years ago (ka), coincident with growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet; (2) 28 to 18 ka, coincident with the last glacial maximum (LGM); and (3) 12 to 6 ka, mostly coincident with the Younger Dryas through final collapse of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Relict dune morphologies are consistent with winds from the west or northwest, coincident with modern and inferred LGM January wind directions. Sand sheets are more common than dunes because of effects of coarse grain size (mean range: 0.35–0.59 mm) and vegetation. The coarse grain size would have required LGM wind velocities of at least 4–6 m/sec, accounting for effects of colder air temperatures on eolian sand transport. The eolian interpretation of the Carolina Sandhills is consistent with other evidence for eolian activity in the southeastern United States during the last glaciation.

  6. Vertical ground motion and its effects on liquefaction resistance of fully saturated sand deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaparli, Vasiliki; Kontoe, Stavroula; Taborda, David M G; Potts, David M

    2016-08-01

    Soil liquefaction has been extensively investigated over the years with the aim to understand its fundamental mechanism and successfully remediate it. Despite the multi-directional nature of earthquakes, the vertical seismic component is largely neglected, as it is traditionally considered to be of much lower amplitude than the components in the horizontal plane. The 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence in New Zealand is a prime example that vertical accelerations can be of significant magnitude, with peak amplitudes well exceeding their horizontal counterparts. As research on this topic is very limited, there is an emerging need for a more thorough investigation of the vertical motion and its effect on soil liquefaction. As such, throughout this study, uni- and bidirectional finite-element analyses are carried out focusing on the influence of the input vertical motion on sand liquefaction. The effects of the frequency content of the input motion, of the depth of the deposit and of the hydraulic regime, using variable permeability, are investigated and exhaustively discussed. The results indicate that the usual assumption of linear elastic response when compressional waves propagate in a fully saturated sand deposit does not always hold true. Most importantly post-liquefaction settlements appear to be increased when the vertical component is included in the analysis.

  7. Estimating the sensitivity of forest soils to acid deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian AHERNE

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Athabasca Oil Sands Region of northern Alberta is home to the largest source of S emissions in Canada, and some of the surrounding upland forests are located on acid-sensitive soils. The relative sensitivity of these ecosystems to acidic deposition is largely dependent upon the mineral weathering rate. Weathering rates were evaluated across a range of soils (n = 43 typical of the region using a soil texture approximation (STA and the PROFILE model. The STA was recalibrated for use in the region, and the weathering rates calculated with this method were used to calculate steady-state critical loads of acidity at 333 sites using the Simple Mass Balance (SMB Model and a critical chemical criterion for molar base cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ to aluminium ratio of 10. Soils are dominated by quartz, with small quantities of slowly weatherable minerals, and consequently weathering rates are among the lowest in Canada (median = 11.5 meq m–2 y–1, resulting in very low critical loads. Atmospheric acid (S and N deposition varies considerably across the region, but in general is much lower than impacted areas of central Canada. Under conditions of complete N retention, 34% of the sites receive acid deposition in excess of their critical load; if all N deposition is leached, 62% of the sites are currently exceeded. Acid-sensitive soils in the region are at risk of acidifying due to pressures from industrialization associated with extraction of fossil fuels.

  8. Physical and numerical modelling of earth pressure on anchored sheet pile walls in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Fuglsang, Leif D

    2006-01-01

    The influence of wall flexibility on earth pressure, bending moments and failure modes is studied. Numerical models are compared to results from model tests carried out in a geotechnical centrifuge. The back-fill is dry sand and failure is introduced by allowing the wall to rotate around the anchor...... level. The Finite element program PLAXIS is used and two material models are evaluated, the Mohr-Coulomb model and the Hardening Soil model. The differences between the two concern the deformation properties. Generally good agreement was observed between physical and numerical models. The HS-model...... showed the right behaviour in pre-failure as well as failure for both flexible and stiff walls, whereas the MC-model showed some shortcomings when stiff walls were modelled....

  9. Physical and numerical modelling of earth pressure on anchored sheet pile walls in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Fuglsang, Leif D

    The influence of wall flexibility on earth pressure, bending moments and failure modes is studied. Numerical models are compared to results from model tests carried out in a geotechnical centrifuge. The back-fill is dry sand and failure is introduced by allowing the wall to rotate around the anchor...... level. The Finite element program PLAXIS is used and two material models are evaluated, the Mohr-Coulomb model and the Hardening Soil model. The differences between the two concern the deformation properties. Generally good agreement was observed between physical and numerical models. The HS-model...... showed the right behaviour in pre-failure as well as failure for both flexible and stiff walls, whereas the MC-model showed some shortcomings when stiff walls were modelled....

  10. Enriching acid rock drainage related microbial communities from surface-deposited oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Courtney; Xiao, Yeyuan; Roberts, Deborah J

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the microbial communities native to surface-deposited pyritic oil sands tailings, an environment where acid rock drainage (ARD) could occur. The goal of this study was to enrich sulfur-oxidizing organisms from these tailings and determine whether different populations exist at pH levels 7, 4.5, and 2.5. Using growth-based methods provides model organisms for use in the future to predict potential activities and limitations of these organisms and to develop possible control methods. Thiosulfate-fed enrichment cultures were monitored for approximately 1 year. The results showed that the enrichments at pH 4.5 and 7 were established quicker than at pH 2.5. Different microbial community structures were found among the 3 pH environments. The sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms identified were most closely related to Halothiobacillus neapolitanus, Achromobacter spp., and Curtobacterium spp. While microorganisms related to Chitinophagaceae and Acidocella spp. were identified as the only possible iron-oxidizing and -reducing microbes. These results contribute to the general knowledge of the relatively understudied microbial communities that exist in pyritic oil sands tailings and indicate these communities may have a potential role in ARD generation, which may have implications for future tailings management.

  11. Could Poor Fens BE More Sensitive than Bogs to Elevated N Deposition in the Oil Sands Region of Northern Alberta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.; Scott, K. D.

    2015-12-01

    Bogs and fens cover 29% of the 140,000 km2 Oil Sands Administrative Area (OSAA) in northern Alberta, a region characterized by quite low background N deposition (1-2 kg/ha/yr). However, development of the oil sands resource has led to increasing emission of nitrogen oxides, which are then returned to regional ecosystems as elevated atmospheric N deposition. Given the nutrient deficient nature of bogs and poor fens, elevated N deposition from oil sands development could potentially affect peatland ecosystem structure and function. To evaluate the ecosystem-level effects of N deposition, since 2011, we have experimentally applied N to a bog and a poor fen near Mariana Lakes, Alberta, located far enough from the OSAA to be unaffected by oil sands emissions. Treatments include simulated rainfall equivalent to N deposition of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 kg/ha/yr, plus control plots receiving no added water (3 replicate plots per site per N treatment). Concentrations of NH4+-N, NO3- N, and DON at the top of the peatland water table did not increase with increasing N deposition, averaging 0.61, 0.09, and 1.07 mg/L, respectively, in the bog, and 0.53, 0.10, and 0.81 mg/L, respectively, in the poor fen. Ericaceous shrub abundance increased with increasing N deposition in both the bog and the poor fen, although plot-scale greenness (hand-held spectral measurement of the Normalized Difference Red Edge (NDRE) index) increased with N deposition in the poor fen, but not in the bog. Segmented regression indicated that in the poor fen, at N deposition above 14-16 kg/ha/yr, total microbial, bacterial, and fungal biomass in the top 5 cm of peat increased with N deposition, with no effect at lower N deposition. No effect of N deposition on microbial, bacterial, or fungal biomass was observed at 5-10 cm in the poor fen, or at either 0-5 or 5-10 cm in the bog. In the poor fen, microbial, bacterial, and fungal biomass increased with NDRE, but the effect was not significant in the bog

  12. Quantifying Black Carbon Deposition Over the Greenland Ice Sheet from Forest Fires in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J. L.; Polashenski, C. M.; Soja, Amber J.; Marelle, L.; Casey, K. A.; Choi, H. D.; Raut, J.-C.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Emmons, L. K.; Fast, J. D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) concentrations observed in 22 snowpits sampled in the northwest sector of the Greenland ice sheet in April 2014 have allowed us to identify a strong and widespread BC aerosol deposition event, which was dated to have accumulated in the pits from two snow storms between 27 July and 2 August 2013. This event comprises a significant portion (57 on average across all pits) of total BC deposition over 10 months (July 2013 to April 2014). Here we link this deposition event to forest fires burning in Canada during summer 2013 using modeling and remote sensing tools. Aerosols were detected by both the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (on board CALIPSO) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (Aqua) instruments during transport between Canada and Greenland. We use high-resolution regional chemical transport modeling (WRF-Chem) combined with high-resolution fire emissions (FINNv1.5) to study aerosol emissions, transport, and deposition during this event. The model captures the timing of the BC deposition event and shows that fires in Canada were the main source of deposited BC. However, the model underpredicts BC deposition compared to measurements at all sites by a factor of 2100. Underprediction of modeled BC deposition originates from uncertainties in fire emissions and model treatment of wet removal of aerosols. Improvements in model descriptions of precipitation scavenging and emissions from wildfires are needed to correctly predict deposition, which is critical for determining the climate impacts of aerosols that originate from fires.

  13. Deposition of low sheet resistance indium tin oxide directly onto functional small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Joseph B., E-mail: martyn.mclachlan@imperial.ac.uk; Fleet, Luke R.; Burgess, Claire H.; McLachlan, Martyn A.

    2014-11-03

    We outline a methodology for depositing tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) directly onto semiconducting organic small molecule films for use as a transparent conducting oxide top-electrode. ITO films were grown using pulsed laser deposition onto copper(II)phthalocyanine (CuPc):buckminsterfullerene (C{sub 60}) coated substrates. The ITO was deposited at a substrate temperature of 150 °C over a wide range of background oxygen pressures (P{sub d}) (0.67–10 Pa). Deposition at 0.67 ≤ P{sub d} ≤ 4.7 Pa led to delamination of the organic films owing to damage induced by the high energy ablated particles, at intermediate 4.7 ≤ P{sub d} < 6.7 Pa pressures macroscopic cracking is observed in the ITO. Increasing P{sub d} further, ≥ 6.7 Pa, supports the deposition of continuous, polycrystalline and highly transparent ITO films without damage to the CuPc:C{sub 60}. The free carrier concentration of ITO is strongly influenced by P{sub d}; hence growth at > 6.7 Pa induces a significant decrease in conductivity; with a minimum sheet resistance (R{sub s}) of 145 Ω/□ achieved for 300 nm thick ITO films. To reduce the R{sub s} a multi-pressure deposition was implemented, resulting in the formation of polycrystalline, highly transparent ITO with an R{sub s} of ∼ 20 Ω/□ whilst maintaining the inherent functionality and integrity of the small molecule substrate. - Highlights: • Indium tin oxide (ITO) deposited directly onto molecular semiconductor thin-films. • Oxygen is shown to influence ITO resistivity and multilayer morphology. • Damage was prevented by modifying pulsed laser deposition growth conditions. • Low sheet resistance, highly transparent ITO deposition was demonstrated.

  14. Highstand shelf fans: The role of buoyancy reversal in the deposition of a new type of shelf sand body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Elisabeth; Simms, Alexander R.; Warrick, Jonathan; Yokoyama, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Although sea-level highstands are typically associated with sediment-starved continental shelves, high sea level does not hinder major river floods. Turbidity currents generated by plunging of sediment-laden rivers at the fluvial-marine interface, known as hyperpycnal flows, allow for cross-shelf transport of suspended sand beyond the coastline. Hyperpycnal flows in southern California have deposited six subaqueous fans on the shelf of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in the Holocene. Using eight cores and nine grab samples, we describe the deposits, age, and stratigraphic architecture of two fans in the Santa Barbara Channel. Fan lobes have up to 3 m of relief and are composed of multiple hyperpycnite beds ∼5 cm to 40 cm thick. Deposit architecture and geometry suggest the hyperpycnal flows became positively buoyant and lifted off the seabed, resulting in well-sorted, structureless, elongate sand lobes. Contrary to conventional sequence stratigraphic models, the presence of these features on the continental shelf suggests that active-margin shelves may locally develop high-quality reservoir sand bodies during sea-level highstands, and that such shelves need not be solely the site of sediment bypass. These deposits may provide a Quaternary analogue to many well-sorted sand bodies in the rock record that are interpreted as turbidites but lack typical Bouma-type features.

  15. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Visible and Near-Infrared (VNIR) through Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) (0.4-2.5????m) AVIRIS data, along with laboratory spectral measurements and analyses of field samples, were used to characterize grain size variations in aeolian gypsum deposits across barchan-transverse, parabolic, and barchan dunes at White Sands, New Mexico, USA. All field samples contained a mineralogy of ?????100% gypsum. In order to document grain size variations at White Sands, surficial gypsum samples were collected along three Transects parallel to the prevailing downwind direction. Grain size analyses were carried out on the samples by sieving them into seven size fractions ranging from 45 to 621????m, which were subjected to spectral measurements. Absorption band depths of the size fractions were determined after applying an automated continuum-removal procedure to each spectrum. Then, the relationship between absorption band depth and gypsum size fraction was established using a linear regression. Three software processing steps were carried out to measure the grain size variations of gypsum in the Dune Area using AVIRIS data. AVIRIS mapping results, field work and laboratory analysis all show that the interdune areas have lower absorption band depth values and consist of finer grained gypsum deposits. In contrast, the dune crest areas have higher absorption band depth values and consist of coarser grained gypsum deposits. Based on laboratory estimates, a representative barchan-transverse dune (Transect 1) has a mean grain size of 1.16 ??{symbol} (449????m). The error bar results show that the error ranges from - 50 to + 50????m. Mean grain size for a representative parabolic dune (Transect 2) is 1.51 ??{symbol} (352????m), and 1.52 ??{symbol} (347????m) for a representative barchan dune (Transect 3). T-test results confirm that there are differences in the grain size distributions between barchan and parabolic dunes and between interdune and dune crest areas. The t-test results

  16. EPISODIC EOLIAN SAND DEPOSITION IN THE PAST 4000 YEARS IN CAPE COD NATIONAL SEASHORE, MASSACHUSETTS, USA IN RESPONSE TO POSSIBLE HURRICANE/STORM AND ANTHROPOGENIC DISTURBANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Forman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The eolian sand depositional record for a dune field within Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts is posit as a sensitive indicator of environmental disturbances in the late Holocene from a combination of factors such as hurricane/storm and forest fire occurrence, and anthropogenic activity. Stratigraphic and sedimentologic observations, particularly the burial of spodosol-like soils, and associated 14C and OSL ages that are concordant indicate at least six eolian depositional events at ca. 3750, 2500, 1800, 960, 430 and <250 years ago. The two oldest events are documented at just one locality and thus, the pervasiveness of this eolian activity is unknown. However, the four younger events are identified in three or more sites and show evidence for dune migration and sand sheet accretion. The timing of eolian deposition, particularly the initiation age, corresponds to documented periods of increased storminess/hurricane activity in the North Atlantic Ocean at ca. 2.0 to 1.6, and 1.0 ka and also a wetter coastal climate, which suppressed the occurrence of forest fire. Thus, local droughts are not associated with periods of dune movement in this mesic environment. Latest eolian activity on outer Cape Cod commenced in the past 300 to 500 years and may reflect multiple factors including broad-scale landscape disturbance with European colonization, an increased incidence of forest fires and heightened storminess. Eolian systems of Cape Cod appear to be sensitive to landscape disturbance and prior to European settlement may reflect predominantly hurricane/storm disturbance, despite generally mesic conditions in past 4 ka.

  17. Deposition of low sheet resistance indium tin oxide directly onto functional small molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Franklin, Joseph B.

    2014-11-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. We outline a methodology for depositing tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) directly onto semiconducting organic small molecule films for use as a transparent conducting oxide top-electrode. ITO films were grown using pulsed laser deposition onto copper(II)phthalocyanine (CuPc):buckminsterfullerene (C60) coated substrates. The ITO was deposited at a substrate temperature of 150 °C over a wide range of background oxygen pressures (Pd) (0.67-10 Pa). Deposition at 0.67 ≤ Pd ≤ 4.7 Pa led to delamination of the organic films owing to damage induced by the high energy ablated particles, at intermediate 4.7 ≤ Pd < 6.7 Pa pressures macroscopic cracking is observed in the ITO. Increasing Pd further, ≥ 6.7 Pa, supports the deposition of continuous, polycrystalline and highly transparent ITO films without damage to the CuPc:C60. The free carrier concentration of ITO is strongly influenced by Pd; hence growth at > 6.7 Pa induces a significant decrease in conductivity; with a minimum sheet resistance (Rs) of 145 /□ achieved for 300 nm thick ITO films. To reduce the Rs a multi-pressure deposition was implemented, resulting in the formation of polycrystalline, highly transparent ITO with an Rs of - 20/□ whilst maintaining the inherent functionality and integrity of the small molecule substrate.

  18. Retention in treated wastewater affects survival and deposition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in sand columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiuyi; Zhao, Xiaokang; Tian, Xiujun; Li, Jin; Sjollema, Jelmer; Wang, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    The fate and transport of pathogenic bacteria from wastewater treatment facilities in the Earth's subsurface have attracted extensive concern over recent decades, while the impact of treated-wastewater chemistry on bacterial viability and transport behavior remains unclear. The influence of retention time in effluent from a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant on the survival and deposition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains in sand columns was investigated in this paper. In comparison to the bacteria cultivated in nutrient-rich growth media, retention in treated wastewater significantly reduced the viability of all strains. Bacterial surface properties, e.g., zeta potential, hydrophobicity, and surface charges, varied dramatically in treated wastewater, though no universal trend was found for different strains. Retention in treated wastewater effluent resulted in changes in bacterial deposition in sand columns. Longer retention periods in treated wastewater decreased bacterial deposition rates for the strains evaluated and elevated the transport potential in sand columns. We suggest that the wastewater quality should be taken into account in estimating the fate of pathogenic bacteria discharged from wastewater treatment facilities and the risks they pose in the aquatic environment.

  19. Depositional models of sandy debrites and turbidites of Palaeogene reservoir sands in deep-lacustrine environments, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Chen, G.

    2013-12-01

    Two depositional models are proposed for deep-lacustrine petroleum reservior sands (Palaeogene) in the Fushan Sag, Beibuwan Basin, South China. This facies trend is used as a template for predicting the distribution of reservoir facies of the Fushan oilfield. Based on examination of 150m of conventional cores from 13 drilled wells, four depositional facies have been interpreted: (1) fine-grained massive sandstone with floating mudstone clasts and planar clast fabric (sandy debrite); (2) fine-grained sandstone and siltstone showing contorted bedding, sand injection, and ptygmatic folding (sandy slump), (3) fine-grained sandstone with thin layers of normal grading and flute casts (turbidite), and (4) mudstone with faint laminae (suspension fallout). Combined with multiple seismic attributes, two depositional models are characterized by (1) sublacustrine fan: thick turbidite units occur at the bottom of the western sag beneath a series of normal faults slope. (2) Thinner deposition of sandy debrites mainly distribute at the bottom of eastern sag far from sandy slump at the lake margin slope, which interpreted to be controlled by "two-step" flexure slope break. The transfer zone located in the centre area is confirmed to be the primary origin for such differential depositions. In our study area, sandy debrites constitute the producing petroleum reservoirs, but turbidites are non reservoirs. This dramatic understanding will well account for "eastern much more than western" distribution of proven petroleum reserves and be applicable to predicting reservoir distribution.

  20. The importance of atmospheric base cation deposition for preventing soil acidification in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Shaun A; Whitfield, Colin J; Fenn, Mark E

    2014-09-15

    Industrial activities in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada have resulted in greatly elevated emissions of SO2 and N (NO(x) and NH3) and there are concerns over possible widespread ecosystem acidification. Acid sensitive soils in the region are common and have very low base cation weathering rates: the median base cation weathering rate estimated for 63 sites using PROFILE was just 17 mmol cm(-2) yr(-1). Deposition of S and N in throughfall was approximately twice as high as deposition measured with open collectors and could be as high as 360 mmol cm(-2) yr(-1) within 20 km of the main industrial center, although deposition declined logarithmically with distance from the industrial activities. Base cation deposition however, mostly exceeded the combined inputs of S and N in bulk deposition and throughfall, particularly during the summer months. The potential for soil acidification at a site close (deposition at the site, soil base saturation and soil solution pH and molar Ca:Al ratio were predicted to increase in the future assuming acid and base cation deposition constant at current rates. This work shows that despite extremely low soil base cation weathering rates in the region, the risk of soil acidification is mitigated to a large extent by high base cation deposition, which in contrast to S emissions is derived from fugitive dust sources in the mines, and is poorly quantified for regional modeling studies.

  1. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Uinta-Piceance Province (020) Tar Sand Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Tar sands represent a significant source of hydrocarbons in the United States. Also known by several other names including bitumen-bearing rocks, natural asphalt,...

  2. Voxel modelling of sands and gravels of Pleistocene Rhine and Meuse deposits in Flanders (Belgium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haren, Tom; Dirix, Katrijn; De Koninck, Roel

    2017-04-01

    Voxel modelling or 3D volume modelling of Quaternary raw materials is VITO's next step in the geological layer modelling of the Flanders and Brussels Capital Region in Belgium (G3D - Matthijs et al., 2013). The aim is to schematise deposits as voxels ('volumetric pixels') that represent lithological information on a grid in three-dimensional space (25 x 25 x 0.5 m). A new voxel model on Pleistocene Meuse and Rhine sands and gravels will be illustrated succeeding a voxel model on loess resources (van Haren et al., 2016). The model methodology is based on a geological 'skeleton' extracted from the regional geological layer model of Flanders. This framework holds the 3D interpolated lithological information of 5.000 boreholes. First a check on quality and spatial location filtered out significant and usable lithological information. Subsequently a manual geological interpretation was performed to analyse stratigraphical arrangement and identify the raw materials of interest. Finally, a workflow was developed that automatically encodes and classifies the borehole descriptions in a standardized manner. This workflow was implemented by combining Microsoft Access® and ArcMap® and is able to convert borehole descriptions into specific geological parameters. An analysis of the conversed lithological data prior to interpolation improves the understanding of the spatial distribution, to fine tune the modelling process and to know the limitations of the data. The converted lithological data were 3D interpolated in Voxler using IDW and resulted in a model containing 52 million voxels. It gives an overview on the regional distribution and thickness variation of interesting Pleistocene aggregates of Meuse and Rhine. Much effort has been put in setting up a database structure in Microsoft Access® and Microsoft SQL Server® in order to arrange and analyse the lithological information, link the voxel model with the geological layer model and handle and analyse the resulting

  3. Heavy mineral sorting as a tool to distinguish depositional characteristics of “in situ” sands from their related injected sands in a Palaeogene submarine Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moatari Kazerouni, Afsoon; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan. B

    in the Paleocene Siri Canyon near the Danish Central Graben of the North Sea hydrocarbon province from borehole data. The emplacement of large-scale injection complexes has been commonly attributed in the geological literature to seismic activity and consequent sand liquefaction. However, due to very small...... and has been interpreted to represent the depositional sorting. This study demonstrates the detailed sorting pattern of heavy minerals in thin, injected sands and relates it to the flow patterns during injection. The sorting pattern is used to explain the large scale sorting pattern of the reservoir sands...... and to suggest a tool for petrographic/geochemical distinction between "in situ" sands and their related injected sands within a submarine canyon setting....

  4. Heavy mineral sorting as a tool to distinguish depositional characteristics of “in situ” sands from their related injected sands in a Palaeogene submarine Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moatari Kazerouni, Afsoon; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan. B

    Postdepositional remoblization and injection of sand are important processes in deep-water clastic systems. Subsurface mobilisation and injection of sand has been recently recognised as a significant control of deep-water sandstone geometry. Kilometre-scale injection complexes have been interpreted...... in the Paleocene Siri Canyon near the Danish Central Graben of the North Sea hydrocarbon province from borehole data. The emplacement of large-scale injection complexes has been commonly attributed in the geological literature to seismic activity and consequent sand liquefaction. However, due to very small...... differences in textural and compositional properties, and the lack of depositional structures of reservoir sands in the Siri Canyon, the distinction between "in situ" and injected or remobilised sands is difficult. Large scale heavy mineral sorting (in 10 m thick units) is observed in several reservoir units...

  5. Radon, radionuclides and the Cretaceous Folkestone Sands - gamma spectroscopy and geochemical analysis of silver sands and associated deposits in the SE of England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Al-Rafai, Yousef; Flowers, Alan

    2017-04-01

    Radon concentrations in a historic sand mine in Surrey, UK (Reigate Caves), have been measured by both real-time and time-averaged methods over a number of years. These mines are not identified as being in a 'Radon Affected Area' as defined by Public Health England, although concentrations show a summer level of 640 Bqm3 +-44 Bqm3. Average radon concentrations (September 2013 to January 2014) in Reigate caves were above the UK 200 Bqm3 domestic Action Level, above the UK domestic Target Level (of 100 Bqm3) but below the current workplace Action Level of 400 Bqm3. By way of a comparison radon has also been measured in nearby Dorking (South Street Caves). These enigmatic caves were not mined for sand for glass manufacture as Reigate Caves were and there is speculation on why the caves were created. Both are visited by tourists on a semi-regular basis. Dorking caves have a different morphology with radon concentrations in Autumn 2016 of up to 1940 +/- 230 Bqm3. The caves in Reigate are situated along Tunnel Road. These mines were also used as air raid shelters and wine stores. They consist of an East and West system and an older cave (Barons cave) which may have a medieval origin. As the Western Caves are now a shooting range our work has been carried out in the Eastern section at Reigate. Where Dorking is concerned the shops and houses in the town have extensive interconnected cellars and galleries cut into these sands. The caves probably date from the 17th century but were used quite extensively for wine storage in the 19th century due to their constant 140C air temperatures. Real-time measurements were taken with a Durridge Rad7 with time-averaged CR39 SSNTDs being placed throughout the cave systems to assess radon distribution and compare results with the real-time detector. Both caves contain marine shallow-water deposited locking (having tensile and compressive strength) silica sands of the Cretaceous Lower Greensand Group, Folkestone Formation, with little

  6. Geochemical studies of monazite sands of Chhatrapur beach placer deposit of Orissa, India by PIXE and EDXRF method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, A.K.; Das, S.K.; Vijayan, V.; Sengupta, D. E-mail: dsgg@gg.iitkgp.ernet.in; Saha, S.K

    2003-09-01

    Geochemical characteristics of monazite sands of Chhatrapur beach placer deposit were studied by proton induced X-ray emission and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence methods. The average concentrations of ThO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} are found to be 10.18 and 0.26 wt.%, respectively. The average rare-earth elements (REE) content is 56.75 wt.% and they are rich in La, Ce and Nd. The most characteristic feature common to all monazites is that the total REE content exceeds that of the actinides (U + Th). The chondrite-normalized REE distribution patterns of monazite grains shows uniformly enriched light rare-earth element, which could be due to the preferential incorporation of lighter lanthanides. These monazite sands are derived from the granulite facies of metamorphic rocks such as khondalites and charnockites from Eastern Ghats Group of rocks.

  7. Initiated chemical vapor deposition of thermoresponsive poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) thin films for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bora; Jiao, Alex; Yu, Seungjung; You, Jae Bem; Kim, Deok-Ho; Im, Sung Gap

    2013-08-01

    Poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) is a thermoresponsive polymer known to be nontoxic, water soluble and biocompatible. Here, PNVCL homopolymer was successfully synthesized for the first time by use of a one-step vapor-phase process, termed initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results showed that radical polymerization took place from N-vinylcaprolactam monomers without damaging the functional caprolactam ring. A sharp lower critical solution temperature transition was observed at 31°C from the iCVD poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) (PNVCL) film. The thermoresponsive PNVCL surface exhibited a hydrophilic/hydrophobic alteration with external temperature change, which enabled the thermally modulated attachment and detachment of cells. The conformal coverage of PNVCL film on various substrates with complex topography, including fabrics and nanopatterns, was successfully demonstrated, which can further be utilized to fabricate cell sheets with aligned cell morphology. The advantage of this system is that cells cultured on such thermoresponsive surfaces could be recovered as an intact cell sheet by simply lowering the temperature, eliminating the need for conventional enzymatic treatments.

  8. Nitrogen and sulphur deposition and the growth of Sphagnum fuscum in bogs of the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie A. VILE

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the consequences of ongoing development of the oil sands reserve in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada (56° 39' N, 111° 13' W is an increase in emissions of nitrogen (N and sulphur (S, with an attendant increases in regional atmospheric N and S deposition. Regional land cover across northeastern Alberta is a mixture of Boreal Mixedwood, Boreal Highlands, and Subarctic areas. Peatlands occupy between 22 and 66% of these natural regions, and the land cover of bogs varies between 6.7% in the Mixedwood Region to 46% in the Subarctic Region. Ombrotrophic bog ecosystems may be especially sensitive to atmospheric deposition of N and S. Across 10 ombrotrophic bog sites in the AOSR over four years (2005– 2008, we found no evidence of elevated deposition of NH4 +-N, NO3 –-N, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN; NH4 +-N plus NO3 –-N, or SO4 2–-S, with values measured using ion exchange resin collectors averaging 0.61 ± 04, 0.20 ± 0.01, 0.81 ± 0.04, and 1.14 ± 0.06 kg ha–1 y–1, respectively. Vertical growth and net primary production of Sphagnum fuscum, an indicator of elevated deposition, did not differ consistently across sites, averaging 11.8 ± 0.2 mm y–1 and 234 ± 3.3 g m–2 y–1, respectively, over the four years. Neither vertical growth nor net primary production of S. fuscum was correlated with growing season atmospheric N or S deposition. Our data provide a valuable benchmark of background values for monitoring purposes in anticipation of increasing N and S deposition over a broader geographic region within the AOSR.

  9. Mineral Resource Assessment of Marine Sand Resources in Cape- and Ridge-Associated Marine Sand Deposits in Three Tracts, New York and New Jersey, United States Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, James D.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Demand is growing in the United States and worldwide for information about the geology of offshore continental shelf regions, the character of the seafloor, and sediments comprising the seafloor and subbottom. Interest in locating sand bodies or high quality deposits that have potential as sources for beach nourishment and ecosystem restoration is especially great in some regions of the country. The Atlantic coast, particularly New York and New Jersey, has been the focus of these studies for the past 40 years with widely varying results. This study is the first attempt at applying probability statistics to modeling Holocene-age cape-and ridge-associated sand deposits and thus focuses on distinct sand body morphology. This modeling technique may have application for other continental shelf regions that have similar geologic character and late Quaternary sea-level transgression history. An estimated volume of 3.9 billion m3 of marine sand resources is predicted in the cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits in three representative regions or tracts on the continental shelf offshore of New York and New Jersey. These estimates are taken from probabilistic distributions of sand resources and are produced using deposit models and Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) techniques. The estimated sand resources presented here are for only three tracts as described below and for Holocene age sand resources contained in cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposit types within this area. Other areas may qualify as tracts for this deposit type and other deposit types and geologic ages (for example, paleo-stream channels, blanket and outwash deposits, ebb-tide shoals, and lower sea level-stand deltas), which are present on the New Jersey and New York continental shelf area but are not delineated and modeled in this initial evaluation. Admittedly, only a portion of these probable sand resources will ultimately be available and suitable for production, dependent largely on

  10. Effect of different-sized colloids on the transport and deposition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in quartz sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Peng, Shengnan; Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping

    2016-01-01

    Colloids (non-biological and biological) with different sizes are ubiquitous in natural environment. The investigations regarding the influence of different-sized colloids on the transport and deposition behaviors of engineered-nanoparticles in porous media yet are still largely lacking. This study investigated the effects of different-sized non-biological and biological colloids on the transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) in quartz sand under both electrostatically favorable and unfavorable conditions. Fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene latex microspheres (CML) with sizes of 0.2-2 μm were utilized as model non-biological colloids, while Gram-negative Escherichia coli (∼ 1 μm) and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis (∼ 2 μm) were employed as model biological colloids. Under the examined solution conditions, both breakthrough curves and retained profiles of nTiO2 with different-sized CML particles/bacteria were similar as those without colloids under favorable conditions, indicating that the copresence of model colloids in suspensions had negligible effects on the transport and deposition of nTiO2 under favorable conditions. In contrast, higher breakthrough curves and lower retained profiles of nTiO2 with CML particles/bacteria relative to those without copresent colloids were observed under unfavorable conditions. Clearly, the copresence of model colloids increased the transport and decreased the deposition of nTiO2 in quartz sand under unfavorable conditions (solution conditions examined in present study). Both competition of deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces and the enhanced stability/dispersion of nTiO2 induced by copresent colloids were found to be responsible for the increased nTiO2 transport with colloids under unfavorable conditions. Moreover, the smallest colloids had the highest coverage on sand surface and most significant dispersion effect on nTiO2, resulting in the greatest nTiO2 transport. Copyright © 2015. Published

  11. Size- and concentration-dependent deposition of fluorescent silica colloids in saturated sand columns: transport experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M F; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the size and concentration effects on the transport of silica colloids in columns of sandy aquifer material. Colloid transport experiments were performed with specifically developed fluorescent labeled silica colloids in columns of a repacked natural porous medium under hydro-geochemical conditions representative of sandy aquifers. Breakthrough curves and vertical deposition profiles of colloids were measured for various colloid concentrations and sizes. The results showed that for a given colloid concentration injected, deposition increased when increasing the size of the colloids. For a given colloid size, retention was also shown to be highly concentration-dependent with a non-monotonous pattern presenting low and high concentration specificities. Deposition increases when increasing both size and injected concentration, until a threshold concentration is reached, above which retention decreases, thus increasing colloid mobility. Results observed above the threshold concentration agree with a classical blocking mechanism typical of a high concentration regime. Results observed at lower colloid concentrations were not modeled with a classical blocking model and a depth- and time-dependent model with a second order kinetic law was necessary to correctly fit the experimental data in the entire range of colloid concentrations with a single set of parameters for each colloidal size. The colloid deposition mechanisms occuring at low concentrations were investigated through a pore structure analysis carried out with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and image analysis. The determined pore size distribution permitted estimation of the maximal retention capacity of the natural sand as well as some low flow zones. Altogether, these results stress the key role of the pore space geometry of the sand in controlling silica colloids deposition under hydro-geochemical conditions typical of sandy aquifers. Our results also showed originally that colloid

  12. Highly Efficient Fuel Cell Electrodes from Few-Layer Graphene Sheets and Electrochemically Deposited Palladium Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Höltig, Michael; Kipp, Tobias; Mews, Alf

    2016-01-01

    An extremely efficient ethanol fuel cell electrode is produced by combining the large surface area of vertically oriented and highly conductive few-layer graphene sheets with electrochemically deposited palladium nanoparticles. The electrodes show an extraordinary high catalyst activity of up to 7977 mA/(mg Pd) at low catalyst loadings of 0.64 $\\mu$g/cm$^2$ and a very high current density of up to 106 mA/cm$^2$ at high catalyst loadings of 83 $\\mu$g/cm$^2$. Moreover, the low onset potentials combined with a good poisoning resistance and long-term stability make these electrodes highly suitable for real applications. These features are achieved by using a newly developed electrochemical catalyst deposition process exploiting high voltages of up to 3.5 kV. This technique allows controlling the catalyst amount ranging from a homogeneous widespread distribution of small ($\\leq$ 10 nm) palladium nanoparticles to rather dense layers of particles, while every catalyst particle has electrical contact to the graphene ...

  13. Plasma proteome profiles of White Sucker (Catostomus commersonii) from the Athabasca River within the oil sands deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Denina B D; Sherry, James P

    2016-09-01

    There are questions about the potential for oil sands related chemicals to enter the Athabasca River, whether from tailing ponds, atmospheric deposition, precipitation, or transport of mining dust, at concentrations sufficient to negatively impact the health of biota. We applied shotgun proteomics to generate protein profiles of mature male and female White Sucker (Catostomus commersonii) that were collected from various sites along the main stem of the Athabasca River in 2011 and 2012. On average, 399±131 (standard deviation) proteins were identified in fish plasma from each location in both years. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software was used to determine the proteins' core functions and to compare the datasets by location, year, and sex. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine if variation in the number of proteins related to a core function among all male and female individuals from both sampling years was affected by location. The core biological functions of plasma proteins that were common to both sampling years for males and females from each location were also estimated separately (based on Ingenuity's Knowledge Base). PCA revealed site-specific differences in the functional characteristics of the plasma proteome from white sucker sampled from downstream of oil sands extraction facilities compared with fish from upstream. Plasma proteins that were unique to fish downstream of oil sands extraction were related to lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry, vitamin and mineral metabolism, endocrine system disorders, skeletal and muscular development and function, neoplasia, carcinomas, and gastrointestinal disease.

  14. Modelling Safety Factors of Slope Stability for Open-Pit Mining of Nigerian Tar-Sand Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Alao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Slope failure might lead to loss of lives and valuable equipment which would increase overall operational cost of running a mine. The need to have stable slopes in open-pit mining of Nigerian tar sand deposits of Dahomey Basin, Southwestern Nigeria is emphasized in this study. At Loda village, Southwestern Nigeria, samples of the laterite soil and alluvial sand which overlie the tar sand occurrence were subjected to geotechnical tests. Computer simulation of bench face angles was carried out using SLOPE/W Software to determine the bench face angle(s with the least susceptibility to failure. Unit weight (ö, cohesion (c and angle of internal friction (0 values for the laterite soil were 25 kN/m, 45 kPa and 41 respectively for laterite. The corresponding values for the laterite, soil were 18 kN/m3, 0kPa and 34°. These values were used to run the software programme to simulate different bench face angles that could be cut into the two lithologic units. Factors of safety values between 3.58 and 1.73 were obtained for bench face angles between 10° and 30° which are least susceptible to failure even when inundation is considered. This research results have enabled us to recommend the use of bench slope angles ranging from 10° and 30° coupled with adequate drainage conditions which should guaranty optimum output.

  15. Event sand layers suggesting the possibility of tsunami deposits identified in the upper Holocene sequence nearby the Kuwana fault, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Y.; Sugai, T.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Kuwana fault is located on coastal area situated on inner part of the Ise Bay, central Japan, which opens to the Nankai Trough. This reverse fault displaces a late Pleistocene terrace surface with 1 to 2 mm/yr of average vertical slip rate, and a topset of delta at several meters, respectively. And, this fault is estimated to have generated two historical earthquakes (the AD 745 Tempyo and the AD 1586 Tensho earthquakes). We identified two event sand layers from upper Holocene sequence on the upthrown side of the Kuwana fault. Upper Holocene deposits in this study area show prograding delta sequence; prodelta mud, delta front sandy silt to sand, and flood plain sand/mud, respectively, from lower to upper. Two sand layers intervene in delta front sandy silt layer, respectively. Lower sand layer (S1) shows upward-coarsening succession, whereas upper sand layer (S2) upward-fining succession. These sand layers contain sharp contact, rip-up crust, and shell fragment, indicating strong stream flow. Radiocarbon ages show that these strong stream flow events occurred between 3000 and 1600 years ago. Decreasing of salinity is estimated from decreasing trend of electrical conductivity (EC) across S1. Based on the possibility that decreasing of salinity can be occurred by shallowing of water depth caused by coseismic uplift, and that S1 can be correlated with previously known faulting event on the Kuwana fault, S1 is considered to be tsunami deposits caused by faulting on the Kuwana fault. On the other hand, S2, which cannot be correlated with previously known faulting events on the Kuwana fault, may be tsunami deposits by ocean-trench earthquake or storm deposits. In the presentation, we will discuss more detail correlation of these sand deposits not only in the upthrown side of the Kuwana fault, but also downthrown side of the fault.

  16. Acid fog Deposition of Crusts on Basaltic Tephra Deposits in the Sand Wash Region of Kilauea Volcano: A Possible Mechanism for Siliceous-Sulfatic Crusts on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R.; Marks, N.; Bishop, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Although the presence of sulfate minerals in martian outcrops may imply the prior existence of standing bodies of surface water, in terrestrial volcanic settings, sulfatic alteration may also occur above the water table within the vadose zone. On the summit of Kilauea volcano, sulfur dioxide, which is continuously emitted from Halemaumau crater and rapidly sequestered into sulfuric acid-rich aerosol entrained in the prevailing trade winds, is subsequently precipitated as acid-fog immediately downwind from the caldera in the Kau Desert. The characteristic pH of surface tephra deposits is < 4.0 in Sand Wash, a region of continuous, acidic aerosol fall-out immediately SW of the caldera. The upper portion of the Keanakakoi Ash tephra in Sand Wash, deposited in the late 18th century, has a ubiquitous, 0.1-0.2 mm-thick coating of amorphous silica. Conversely, vertical walls of unconsolidated tephra, exposed within small, dry gullies eroded into the ca. 3-4 m-thick Keanakakoi section at Sand Wash, are coated with ca. 0.5-1.0 mm-thick, mixed amorphous silica and jarosite-bearing crusts. Since these crusts are denuded from their outcrops during ephemeral, but probably annual flooding events in Sand Wash, we believe that they must accumulate rapidly. These crusts are apparently formed via an evaporative mechanism whereby acidic pore fluids, circulating in the upper few m's within the highly porous tephra, are wicked towards the walls of the gullies. Geochemical modeling of the crust-forming process implies that the sulfate formation via evaporation occurs subsequent to minimal interaction of acidic pore fluids with the basaltic tephra. This also suggests that the cycle from acid-fog fall-out to precipitation of the siliceous-sulfatic crusts must occur quite rapidly. Production of siliceous-sulfatic crusts via acid-fog alteration may also be occurring on Mars. The occurrence of evaporitic sulfate and silica at Sand Wash in Kilauea may serve as an example of how the jarosite

  17. Paleo-Environment and C-14 Dating: The Key to the Depositional Age of the Tha Chang and Related Sand Pits, Northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putthapiban, P.; Zolensky, M.; Jull, T.; Demartino, M.; Salyapongse, S.

    2012-01-01

    Tha Chang sand pits, Nakhon Ratchasima Province and many other sand pits in the area adjacent to the Mun River are characterized by their fluviatile environment in association with mass wasting deposits, along the paleo-river channel and the flood plain of the Mun River. Sediments of these deposits are characterized by clasts of various rock types especially the resistant ones with frequent big tree trunks, logs and wood fragments in different sizes and various stages of transformation from moldering stage to lignification and petrification. Widespread pyritization of the lower horizon suggests strongly reducing environment during burial. The Tha Chang deposits have been received much attention from geoscientists especially paleontologist communities, as they contain fragments of some distinct vertebrate species such as Stegadon sp., hominoid primate, rhinoceros Aceratherium and others. Based on the associated mammal fauna and hominoid fossils, the late Miocene ( 9 - 6 Ma) was given for the time of deposition of this sand and gravel unit. Some other reports believed that sediments and materials of these sand and gravel quarries (pits) were deposited by high-energy flood pulses contemporaneous with the tektites forming event during mid-Pleistocene at c. 0.8 Ma. Interpretation from Palynostratigraphical study suggested that the lower horizon of Tha Chang sand pit was deposited during Pliocene/Pleistocene period and the upper horizons are Pleistoncene/Holocene. It is crystal clear that all the fluviatile sediments including tektites and almost all fossil fragments being deposited in these sand pits were, likely a multiple times reworked materials. Only some old bamboo trees, some old crowling trees and fossils grasses observed on the old river bank are considered in situ. C-14 dating of 5 old wood specimens from Tha Chang Sand Pits, 15 old wood specimens from Chumpuang Sand Pits and one sample of old pottery from a Chumpuang Sand Pit were carried out in the NSF

  18. Early Pliocene Hiatus in Sand Output by the Colorado River: Evidence From Marine Deposits in the Salton Trough, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, R. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Early Pliocene deposits in the western Salton Trough preserve a high-fidelity record of sediment dispersal into the marine realm during initiation and early evolution of the Colorado River (CR). Grain-size fractionation, sediment routing, and transport dynamics of the early CR delta are recorded in sediments of the Fish Creek - Vallecito basin, which was located ~100 km south of Yuma along the transform plate boundary at 5 Ma. Early Pliocene delivery of CR sand to the basin took place in two distinct pulses: (1) deposition of sandy turbidites (Wind Caves Mbr of the Latrania Fm) in a restricted submarine canyon at Split Mt Gorge between ~5.3 and 5.1 Ma; and (2) progradation of a thick, widespread, coarsening-up deltaic sequence of marine mudstone, sandstone, and coquinas (Deguynos Fm) between ~4.8 and 4.2 Ma. Estimated flux of CR sediment during Wind Caves deposition was weak (~3-5 Mt/yr) compared to the long-term average (172±64 Mt/yr). The two pulses of CR sand input are separated by the Coyote Clay (CC, ~5.1-4.8 Ma), a regionally correlable, greenish-yellow-weathering marine claystone unit at the base of the Deguynos Fm. CC gradationally overlies Wind Caves turbidites in the area of the paleocanyon. In contrast, in the Coyote Mts 15-23 km to the south and SE, CC rests on coarse-grained locally-derived late Miocene sedimentary rocks, Alverson volcanics, and metamorphic basement rock along a regional unconformity. Identical claystone facies occur in the NW Indio Hills (restores to Yuma at the mouth of the CR at 5 Ma), and Sierra Cucapa in Mexico (~200 km south of Yuma at 5 Ma). Marine localities outside of the Wind Caves paleocanyon experienced slow to negligible sedimentation along a rugged rocky shoreline until abrupt arrival of CR-derived clay. CC accumulated in a sand-starved, pro-delta marine setting (Winker, 1987) over an inferred N-S distance of ~200 km. We therefore reject an alternate hypothesis that CC accumulated on the muddy slope of the prograding CR

  19. Effects of sand burial on dew deposition on moss soil crust in a revegetated area of the Tennger Desert, Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Rong-liang; Li, Xin-rong; Liu, Li-chao; Pan, Yan-xia; Gao, Yan-hong; Wei, Yong-ping

    2014-11-01

    Sand burial and dew deposition are two fundamental phenomena profoundly influencing biological soil crusts in desert areas. However, little information is available regarding the effects of sand burial on dew deposition on biological soil crusts in desert ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sand burial at depths of 0 (control), 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 mm on dew formation and evaporation of three dominant moss crusts in a revegetated area of the Tengger Desert (Northern China) in 2010. The results revealed that sand burial significantly decreased the amount of dew deposited on the three moss crust types by acting as a semi-insulator retarding the dew formation and evaporation rates. The changes in surface temperature cannot fully explain the variations of the formation and evaporation rates of dew by moss crusts buried by sand. The extension of dew retention time was reflected by the higher dew ratios (the ratio of dew amount at a certain time to the maximum value in a daily course) in the daytime, and may to some extent have acted as compensatory mechanisms that diminished the negative effects of the reduction of dew amount induced by sand burial of moss crusts. The resistances to reduction of dewfall caused by sand burial among the three moss crusts were also compared and it was found that Bryum argenteum crust showed the highest tolerance, followed by crusts dominated by Didymodon vinealis and Syntrichia caninervis. This sequence corresponds well with the successional order of the three moss crusts in the revegetated area, thereby suggesting that resistance to reduction of dewfall may act as one mechanism by which sand burial drives the succession of moss crusts in desert ecosystems. This side effect of dew reduction induced by sand burial on biological soil crusts should be considered in future ecosystem construction and management of desert area.

  20. Biomimetic deposition of hydroxyapatite on a synthetic polypeptide with beta sheet structure in a solution mimicking body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akari; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ogata, Shin-ichi; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Tanihara, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of a hydroxyapatite layer with similar structure to bone mineral is an attractive approach to the fabrication of bioactive coating layers to achieve direct bonding to living bone. To get successful coating of a hydroxyapatite layer on an organic polymer using a biomimetic solution, it is essential to find organic substrates that can effectively induce heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite after exposure to the body environment. Our previous study showed that sericin, a type of silk protein, has the ability to induce hydroxyapatite nucleation in a biomimetic solution when the sericin has a beta sheet structure. To confirm the effectiveness of the beta sheet structure in hydroxyapatite nucleation, we focused on investigating hydroxyapatite deposition on a synthetic polypeptide with a beta sheet structure in a biomimetic solution. The beta sheet forming polypeptides with and without carboxyl groups, poly(FE)(3)FG, poly(FQ)(3)FG, poly(LE)(3)LG and poly(LQ)(3)LG, were synthesized in this study. All the polypeptides had mainly beta sheet structure. After soaking the polypeptide films in 1.5SBF, which has 1.5 times the inorganic ion concentrations of human blood plasma, hydroxyapatite formed on the surfaces of the polypeptides with carboxyl groups, poly(FE)(3)FG and poly(LE)(3)LG, within 2 days, but not on those without carboxyl groups, poly(FQ)(3)FG and poly(LQ)(3)LG. We confirmed that the beta sheet structure was effective for hydroxyapatite nucleation even in the synthetic polypeptide. This finding is useful for the future design of organic polymers that can effectively induce nucleation of hydroxyapatite.

  1. Induced liquefaction experiment in relatively dense, clay-rich sand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzor, Yossef H.; Gvirtzman, Haim; Wainshtein, Ilia; Orian, Itay

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we report results from a controlled blast-induced liquefaction experiment at the field scale. The physical and mechanical properties of the materials at the subsurface are characterized by a suite of in situ and laboratory tests, including the Standard Penetration Test (SPT); downhole and cross-hole seismic velocity tests; density, porosity, and gradation tests; and direct shear tests. Since the blast experiment was performed above groundwater table, the subsurface was saturated by a sequence of controlled infiltration tests. A 50-kg TNT charge was detonated at a depth of 10 m, and seismic ground motions were recorded in a vertical geophone array positioned at a horizontal distance of 30 m from the blast borehole. Obtained liquefaction features include a water fountain that erupted from the blast borehole, prolonged bubbling of the water surface inside the infiltration trench (a process equivalent to "sand boils" typically observed at sites which have experienced liquefaction), lateral spreading, and surface settlement. We argue that in contrast to conventional predictions, liquefaction may be induced in relatively dense silty and clayey sands (shear wave velocity >300 m s-1; relative density = 63-89%) relatively rich in clays (fines content >30%) and that the driving mechanism should not necessarily be restricted to cyclic shear stress loading.

  2. Impacts of climate change on the formation and stability of late Quaternary sand sheets and falling dunes, Black Mesa region, southern Colorado Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwein, Amy L.; Mahan, Shannon; McFadden, Leslie D.

    2015-01-01

    Detailed geomorphic mapping and analysis of soil-stratigraphy and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of eolian sand dunes on Black Mesa, Arizona, reveal eolian sediment deposition occurred from 30 to 16 ka, followed by a period of widespread dune stabilization from 12 to 8 ka. Localized reactivation of the previously stabilized dune forms or local changes in sediment supply have occurred in the middle to late Holocene in this region. Cooler, wetter, and more variable climatic conditions during MIS 3 and 2 led to increased channel and floodplain sediment supply. Eolian sediment derived from these sources was transported up to 60 km. Deposition of this material has reduced regional topographic roughness by filling tributary canyon ‘traps’ oriented perpendicular to the dominant wind and sediment transport direction. Topographically controlled falling dunes and sand ramps in this region are preserved because of their geomorphic position and provide evidence of the paleoenvironmental state of the fluvial and eolian systems before, during, and immediately after the last glacial maximum on the southern Colorado Plateau.

  3. Temporal variation in the deposition of polycyclic aromatic compounds in snow in the Athabasca Oil Sands area of Alberta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Carlos A; Muir, Derek; Kirk, Jane; Teixeira, Camilla; Siu, May; Wang, Xiaowa; Charland, Jean-Pierre; Schindler, David; Kelly, Erin

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) via and onto snow, and their releasing during spring snowmelt has been a concern in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region of Alberta. This study was designed to evaluate the concentrations, loadings, and distribution of PACs in springtime snowpack and how they have changed since the first study in 2008. Snowpack samples were collected in late winters 2011-2014 at varying distances from the main developments. PAC concentration and deposition declined exponentially with distance, with pyrenes, chrysenes, and dibenzothiophenes dominating the distribution within the first 50 km. The distribution of PACs was different between sites located close to upgraders and others located close to mining facilities. Overall, PAC loadings were correlated with priority pollutant elements and water chemistry parameters, while wind direction and speed were not strong contributors to the variability observed. Total PAC mass deposition during winter months and within the first 50 km was initially estimated by integrating the exponential decay function fitted through the data using a limited number of sites from 2011 to 2014: 1236 kg (2011), 1800 kg (2012), 814 kg (2013), and 1367 (2014). Total loadings were estimated to have a twofold increase between 2008 and 2014, although the increase observed was not constant. Finally, kriging interpolation is presented as an alternative and more robust approach to estimate PAC mass deposition in the area. After a more intensive sampling campaign in 2014, the PAC mass deposition was estimated to be 1968 kg.

  4. Analysis and Interpretation of the Field and Laboratory Geophysical Measurements of Black-Sand Beach Deposits, East Rosetta, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. El-Sadek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the analysis and interpretation of the results of field geophysical survey and laboratory geophysical measurements. The study of the magnetic and electrical methods was selected because the beach sands contain many minerals that have magnetic and electric properties. Analysis and interpretation of the field and laboratory magnetic and geoelectric maps demonstrated that the investigated beach-alluvial deposits can be subdivided according to their magnetic and geoelectric properties into three main zones striking nearly parallel to the shoreline of the Mediterranean Sea at the study area. The northern zone is more enriched in black sands than the central or southern zones. Field and laboratory magnetic susceptibility measurements provided very useful maps for the concentration of heavy minerals. The deep-seated magnetic response was calculated at an average depth of 239.6 m, while the near-surface magnetic responses were computed at average depths of 9.1, 57.9, and 81.8 m, respectively. The correlation between the geophysical features, recorded on the total magnetic field intensity, the electric resistivity, the IP chargeability, and the calculated metal factor, was found to agree to a great extent. The heavymineral concentration was found to decrease with depth. However, the heavyminerals show parallel zones below the surface, suggesting similar sedimentation environments.

  5. Connective tissue and bacterial deposits on rubber dam sheet and ePTFE barrier membranes in guided periodontal tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apinhasmit, Wandee; Swasdison, Somporn; Tamsailom, Suphot; Suppipat, Nophadol

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the connective tissue and bacterial deposits on rubber dam sheets and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membranes used as barrier membranes in guided tissue regeneration for periodontal treatment. Twenty patients having intrabony defects and/or furcation defects were surgically treated by guided tissue regeneration employing either rubber dam sheets (10 patients) or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membranes (10 patients) as barrier membranes. Four to six weeks after the first operation, membranes were retrieved from the lesion sites and processed for scanning electron microscopy. The lesion-facing surfaces of membranes were examined for the presence of connective tissue and bacterial deposits. The differences between the numbers of fields and the distributions of connective tissue and bacteria on both types of membranes were analysed by the Chi-square test at the level of 0.05 significance. The results showed a lot of fibroblasts with their secreted extracellular matrices, known as components of the connective tissue on rubber dam sheets and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membranes. There was no significant difference in the total number of connective tissue on both types of membranes (P = 0.456). Many bacterial forms including cocci, bacilli, filaments and spirochetes with the interbacterial matrices were identified. The total number of bacteria on rubber dam sheets was statistically less than that on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene membranes (P tissue on both types of membranes suggests that the healing process under both types of membranes was also comparable. Therefore, the rubber dam sheet might be used as a barrier membrane in guided tissue regeneration.

  6. Natural and human controls of the Holocene evolution of the beach, aeolian sand and dunes of Caesarea (Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, J.; Sivan, D.; Shtienberg, G.; Roskin, E.; Porat, N.; Bookman, R.

    2015-12-01

    The study focuses on the Holocene appearance, chronology and drivers of beach sand deposition and inland aeolian sand transport around the Roman-Byzantine ruins of Caesarea, Israel. Beach sand, sand sheets, nebkha, linear and transverse dunes as well as parabolic and transverse interdunes along two transects were sampled in the current study down to their substrate. Sixteen new optically stimulated luminescence ages cluster at ∼5.9-3.3 ka, ∼1.2-1.1 ka (800-900 AD) and ∼190-120 years ago (1825-1895 AD) indicating times of middle and late Holocene sand sheet depositions and historical dune stabilization. The first age cluster indicates that beach sand accumulated when rates of global sea level rise declined around 6-5 ka. Until ∼4 ka sand sheets encroached up to 2.5 km inland. Historical and archaeological evidence points to sand mobilization since the first century AD. Sand sheets dating to 1.2-1.1 ka, coevally found throughout the dunefield represent sand stabilization due to vegetation reestablishment attributed to gradual and fluctuating decline in human activity from the middle Early Islamic period until the 10th century. Historical and chronological evidence of the existence of transverse and coppice dunes from the 19th century suggest that dunes only formed in the last few centuries. The study illustrates the initial role of natural processes, in this case decline in global sea level rise and the primary and later role of fluctuating human activity upon coastal sand mobility. The study distinguishes between sand sheets and dunes and portrays them as sensors of environmental changes.

  7. Wave-induced flow and its influence on ridge erosion and channel deposition in Lanshayang channel of radial sand ridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈可峰; 安翔; 陆培东; 张玮; 徐卓

    2014-01-01

    Very limited modeling studies were available of the wave-induced current under the complex hydrodynamic conditions in the South Yellow Sea Radial Sand Ridge area (SYSRSR). Partly it is due to the difficulties in estimating the influence of the wave-induced current in this area. In this study, a coupled 3-D storm-surge-wave model is built. In this model, the time-dependent varying Collins coefficient with the water level method (TCL) are used. The wave-flow environment in the Lanshayang Channel (LSYC) during the “Winnie” typhoon is successfully represented by this model. According to the modelling results, at a high water level (HWL), the wave-induced current similar to the long-shore current will emerge in the shallow area of the ridges, and has two different motion trends correlated with the morphological characteristics of the ridges. The wave-induced current velocity could be as strong as 1 m/s, which is at the same magnitude as the tidal current. This result is verified by the bathymetric changes in the LSYC during the “Matsa” typhoon. Thus, the wave-induced current may be one of the driven force of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR. These conclusions will help to further study the mechanism of the ridge erosion and channel deposition in the SYSRSR.

  8. Basin-Scale Sand Deposition in the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation of the Sichuan Basin, Southwest China: Sedimentary Framework and Conceptual Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiucheng Tan; Qingsong Xia; Jingshan Chen; Ling Li; Hong Liu; Bing Luo; Jiwen Xia; Jiajing Yang

    2013-01-01

    The Upper Triassic Xujiahe(须家河) Formation in the Sichuan (四川) Basin,Southwes China is distinctive for the basin-scale sand deposition.This relatively rare sedimentary phenomenon has not been well interpreted.Here we addressed this issue by discussing sedimentary framework and conceptual model.Analysis of sedimentary setting implied that the basin received transgression during the deposition.It had multiple provenance supplies and river networks,as being surrounded by oldlands in multiple directions including the north,east and south.Thus,the basin was generally characterized by coastal and widely open and shallow lacustrine deposition during the Late Triassic Xujiahe period.This is similar to the modern well-known Poyang(鄱阳) Lake.Therefore,we investigated the framework and conceptual model of the Sichuan Basin during the Xujiahe period with an analogue to the Poyang Lake.Results show that the conceptual model of the deposition can be divided into transgressive and regressive stages.The first,third and fifth members of the formation are in transgressive stage and the deposits are dominated by shore and shallow lacustrine mud.In contrast,the deposition is mainly of braided river channel sand deposits during the regressive stage,mainly including the second,fourth and sixth members of the formation.The sand deposited in almost the entire basin because of the lateral migration and forward moving of the cross networks of the braided rivers.The multiple alternations of short and rapid transgression and relatively long regression are beneficial to the basin-scale sand deposition.Thus,the main channel of the braided river and its extensional areas are favorable for the development of hydrocarbon reservoir.This provides practical significance to the reservoir evaluation and exploration.In addition,the results also justify the relatively distinctive sedimentary phenomenon in the study area and may also have implications for understanding the large

  9. Nitrogen-doped graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition: synthesis and influence of nitrogen impurities on carrier transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu-Fen; Lo, Shun-Tsung; Lin, Jheng-Cyuan; Zhang, Wenjing; Lu, Jing-Yu; Liu, Fan-Hung; Tseng, Chuan-Ming; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Liang, Chi-Te; Li, Lain-Jong

    2013-08-27

    A significant advance toward achieving practical applications of graphene as a two-dimensional material in nanoelectronics would be provided by successful synthesis of both n-type and p-type doped graphene. However, reliable doping and a thorough understanding of carrier transport in the presence of charged impurities governed by ionized donors or acceptors in the graphene lattice are still lacking. Here we report experimental realization of few-layer nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene sheets by chemical vapor deposition of organic molecule 1,3,5-triazine on Cu metal catalyst. When reducing the growth temperature, the atomic percentage of nitrogen doping is raised from 2.1% to 5.6%. With increasing doping concentration, N-doped graphene sheet exhibits a crossover from p-type to n-type behavior accompanied by a strong enhancement of electron-hole transport asymmetry, manifesting the influence of incorporated nitrogen impurities. In addition, by analyzing the data of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical measurements, we show that pyridinic and pyrrolic N impurities play an important role in determining the transport behavior of carriers in our N-doped graphene sheets.

  10. Quantifying black carbon deposition over the Greenland ice sheet from forest fires in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J. L.; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Soja, Amber J.; Marelle, L.; Casey, Kimberly A.; Choi, Hyundeok; Raut, Jean-Christophe; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Emmons, L.; Fast, Jerome D.; Pelon, J.; Law, K. S.; Flanner, M. G.; Dibb, Jack E.

    2017-06-19

    We identify an important Black Carbon (BC) aerosol deposition event that was observed in snow stratigraphy and dated to between 27 July 2013 – 2 August 2013. This event comprises a significant portion (∼60%) of total deposition over a 10 month period (July 2013 – April 2014). Here we link this event to forest fires burning in Canada during summer 2013 using modeling and remote sensing tools. Aerosols were detected by both the CALIOP and MODIS instruments during transport between Canada and Greenland, confirming that this event involved emissions from forest fires in Canada. We use high-resolution regional chemical transport mod-eling (WRF-Chem) combined with high-resolution fire emissions (FINNv1.5) to study aerosol emissions, transport, and deposition during this event. The model accurately captures the timing of the BC deposition event and shows that the major contribution to deposition during this event is emissions originating from fires in Canada. However, the model under-predicts aerosol deposition compared to measurements at all sites by a factor of 2–100. Under-prediction of modeled BC deposition originates from uncertainties in fire emissions combined with uncertainties in aerosol scavenging by clouds. This study suggests that it is possible to describe the transport of an exceptional smoke event on regional and continental scales. Improvements in model descriptions of precipitation scavenging and emissions from wildfires are needed to correctly predict deposition, which is critical for determining the climate impacts of aerosols that originate from fires.

  11. Plant Community and Nitrogen Deposition as Drivers of Alpha and Beta Diversities of Prokaryotes in Reconstructed Oil Sand Soils and Natural Boreal Forest Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Jacynthe; Prescott, Cindy E; Renaut, Sébastien; Terrat, Yves; Grayston, Sue J

    2017-05-01

    The Athabasca oil sand deposit is one of the largest single oil deposits in the world. Following surface mining, companies are required to restore soil-like profiles that can support the previous land capabilities. The objective of this study was to assess whether the soil prokaryotic alpha diversity (α-diversity) and β-diversity in oil sand soils reconstructed 20 to 30 years previously and planted to one of three vegetation types (coniferous or deciduous trees and grassland) were similar to those found in natural boreal forest soils subject to wildfire disturbance. Prokaryotic α-diversity and β-diversity were assessed using massively parallel sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The β-diversity, but not the α-diversity, differed between reconstructed and natural soils. Bacteria associated with an oligotrophic lifestyle were more abundant in natural forest soils, whereas bacteria associated with a copiotrophic lifestyle were more abundant in reconstructed soils. Ammonia-oxidizing archaea were most abundant in reconstructed soils planted with grasses. Plant species were the main factor influencing α-diversity in natural and in reconstructed soils. Nitrogen deposition, pH, and plant species were the main factors influencing the β-diversity of the prokaryotic communities in natural and reconstructed soils. The results highlight the importance of nitrogen deposition and aboveground-belowground relationships in shaping soil microbial communities in natural and reconstructed soils.IMPORTANCE Covering over 800 km(2), land disturbed by the exploitation of the oil sands in Canada has to be restored. Here, we take advantage of the proximity between these reconstructed ecosystems and the boreal forest surrounding the oil sand mining area to study soil microbial community structure and processes in both natural and nonnatural environments. By identifying key characteristics shaping the structure of soil microbial communities, this study improved our understanding of how

  12. Holocene beach buildup and coastal aeolian sand incursions off the Nile littoral cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Shtienberg, Gilad; Porat, Naomi; Bookman, Revital

    2017-04-01

    Israel's coastal plain is abundant with sand originating from the Nile littoral cell. The inland windblown loose sand has formed 3-6 km wide lobe-like sand and dune fields currently comprised of foredunes, linear and northeasterly facing transverse and parabolic dunes that are currently stabilized by vegetation. This study reviews the architecture and history of the these dune fields aiming to: (a) Date the timings of beach accretion, and sand and dune incursions. (b) Discriminate between natural and human-induced forcing factors of sand mobilization and stabilization in time and space. (c) Present a model of the dunescape development. (d) Assess scenarios of sand transport in the future charcaterized by intense human impact and climate change. Luminescence ages, radiocarbon dates and relative ages from previously published geological and archaeological reports, historical texts, together with new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages and stratigraphic and sedimentological data are analyzed. The deposition, mobilizations and preservation of the sand bodies, initially induced by the decline in sea level rise at 6-4 ka, were later controlled by historic land-use intensity and modern land-use/negligence practices. At 6 ka, beach sand buildup rapidly started. Where aeolianite ridges bordered the coast, pulses of sand with biogenic carbonate grains unconformably draped the ridges and rapidly consolidated into a distinct sandy calcarenite unit. Further east, sand sheets and low dunes partly pedogenized following their incursion, but did not cement. The water retention capacities of the sand sheets enabled the establishment of a sand-stabilizing vegetation cover that probably became an attractive environment for fuel and grazing. The growing Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine ( 2.4-1.3 ka) populations probably led to increased consumption and massive destruction of sand stabilizing vegetation, enabling sand erodibility and mobilization during winter storms. The sand

  13. Tsunami Deposit Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, B. H.; Wanink, M.

    2007-05-01

    A digital database has been established describing tsunami deposits around the world (3 phases; 15 months). The projects involved the review and tabulation of data derived from books, catalogs, journals, preprints, citations and abstracts (currently 1000 references), into a database designed to provide a comprehensive review of the types of tsunami deposits, their geographic distribution and location, sedimentary characteristics, fossil content, age, preservation, run-up, wave height and inundation observations, etc. (34 parameters). The tsunami occurrences can be divided into many subjects, e.g., Volcanogenic (N=375), Seismites (N=49), Co-seismic (N=258), K/T Boundary Impact-triggered debris flows (N=97), Landslides (N=43), etc. Numerous publications compare tsunami deposits to storm deposits (N=38), or analyze the origin of megaboulders (N=22). Tsunami deposits occur throughout geologic time (Pre-Cambrian to present day), and because of plate tectonics, they occur along plate margins (primarily subduction zones) as well as interior to plates. In addition, they occur in epi-continental seas, fjords, etc. Few publications describe depositional processes. Deposits generated by tsunamis occur in multiple environments such as the marine, fresh water, and subaerial. Common characteristics of tsunami deposits include: 1) Deposition of thin sand sheets (can be normal, massive, inversely graded, chaotic or bimodal). 2) Erosional: basal uncomformity, mud balls, rip-up clasts, reworked fossils produced by scouring. 3) Lithology: Stacks of couplets reflecting marine incursions (often sands) into fresh water or subaerial environments (mud, soil, peat). 4) Fossil: Couplets reflects marine fossils, fresh water fossils or a mixed assemblage. 5) Geomorphology: The sand sheets taper landward and can rise in elevation. 6) Deformation: syn-depositional (soft sediments) and intraformational (stiff sediments).

  14. 积沙沥青路面抗滑性能试验研究%Experimental Study on the Skid Resistance of Asphalt Pavement with Sand Depositing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王勇; 高丽

    2016-01-01

    基于沙漠公路路面长期积沙的事实,在室内利用自行研制的加速磨耗仪对积沙沥青路面试件进行加速磨耗试验,测定磨耗试件的抗滑性,研究分析路面结构类型、路面积沙程度对积沙路面抗滑性能的影响。试验分析表明,在同一路面工况下,当路面积沙达到1.0kg/m2后,路面抗滑性能快速衰减;路面积沙程度由1 kg/m2增加到1.5 kg/m2后,AC-13的构造深度减少45%,SMA-13的构造深度减少17.6%,SMA-13相比于AC-13具有更强的抗滑性能。研究结果对沙漠公路的设计工作具有较好的参考和借鉴意义。%Based on the fact that the pavement of desert highway has long-term sand depositing ,this research make an accelerated wear tester to test the Specimen of asphalt pavement with sand depositing .The effects of different pavement structure types and degree of sand depositing on the skid resistance were also tested .The results shows that under the same road condition ,when the degree of sand depositing reaches 1 .0 kg/m2 ,the skid resistance reduces rapidly ;while the degree of sand depositing increases from 1 kg/m2 to 1 .5 kg/m2 ,the texture depth of AC-13 reduced by 45% ,the texture depth of SMA-13 reduced by 16 .7% ,the skid resistance of SMA-13 is better than SAC-13 .The research results can provide valuable guidance for the design of highway in desert area .

  15. Coastal Sand Deposits 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The supplemental information lists the geology data files, by county, and the name of the ESRI shapefile used in the creation of this dataset. All data was projected...

  16. Novel spraying apparatus to investigate the lubricant deposition on metal sheets at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medea, Francesco; Ghiotti, Andrea; Bruschi, Stefania; Bellin, Marco

    2016-10-01

    The constant demand of increasing performances and safety in automotive industry has led significant innovations in the materials as well as in forming processes. In particular, lightweight aluminium alloys are knowing higher and higher importance, thanks to the development of new stamping processes at high temperatures capable to allow improved formability, low spring-back and accurate micro-structural control in the formed parts. However, the choice of proper process parameters, in terms of lubrication at the interfaces between the dies and the blank, still represents a critical point for the process feasibility. On this basis, the paper aims at presenting a novel spraying apparatus to investigate the deposition of lubricants in hot stamping. The equipment allows the accurate control of the quantity of the lubricant that is deposited on the specimen and of the deposition temperature to maximize the lubricant adhesion. The results show the capability of the new equipment and the good stability of the conditions during testing.

  17. Regional aeolian dynamics and sand mixing in the Gran Desierto - Evidence from Landsat Thematic Mapper images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Grady; Greeley, Ronald; Christensen, Phillip R.; Smith, Milton O.; Adams, John B.

    1990-01-01

    Mesoscale mapping of spatial variations in sand composition of the Gran Desierto (Sonora, Mexico) was carried out on multispectral Landsat TM images of this region, making it possible to examine the dynamic development of sand sheets and dunes. Compositions determined from remote imagery were found to agree well with samples from selected areas. The sand populations delineated were used to describe the sediment source areas, transport paths, and deposition sites. The image analysis revealed important compositional variations aver large areas that were not readily apparent in the field data.

  18. Technology assessment: environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

    1981-10-13

    The tar-sand resources of the US have the potential to yield as much as 36 billion barrels (bbls) of oil. The tar-sand petroleum-extraction technologies now being considered for commercialization in the United States include both surface (above ground) systems and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface systems currently receiving the most attention include: (1) thermal decomposition processes (retorting); (2) suspension methods (solvent extraction); and (3) washing techniques (water separation). Underground bitumen extraction techniques now being field tested are: (1) in situ combustion; and (2) in situ steam-injection procedures. At this time, any commercial tar-sand facility in the US will have to comply with at least 7 major federal regulations in addition to state regulations; building, electrical, and fire codes; and petroleum-industry construction standards. Pollution-control methods needed by tar-sand technologies to comply with regulatory standards and to protect air, land, and water quality will probably be similar to those already proposed for commercial oil-shale systems. The costs of these systems could range from about $1.20 to $2.45 per barrel of oil produced. Estimates of potential pollution-emisson levels affecting land, air, and water were calculated from available data related to current surface and in situ tar-sand field experiments in the US. These data were then extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial surface and in situ facilities producing 20,000 bbl/d. The likelihood-of-occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of ground-water transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental-control technologies was used to make this assessment.

  19. Technology assessment: environmental, health, and safety impacts associated with oil recovery from US tar-sand deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, J.I.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Ricker, Y.E.

    1981-10-13

    The tar-sand resources of the US have the potential to yield as much as 36 billion barrels (bbls) of oil. The tar-sand petroleum-extraction technologies now being considered for commercialization in the United States include both surface (above ground) systems and in situ (underground) procedures. The surface systems currently receiving the most attention include: (1) thermal decomposition processes (retorting); (2) suspension methods (solvent extraction); and (3) washing techniques (water separation). Underground bitumen extraction techniques now being field tested are: (1) in situ combustion; and (2) in situ steam-injection procedures. At this time, any commercial tar-sand facility in the US will have to comply with at least 7 major federal regulations in addition to state regulations; building, electrical, and fire codes; and petroleum-industry construction standards. Pollution-control methods needed by tar-sand technologies to comply with regulatory standards and to protect air, land, and water quality will probably be similar to those already proposed for commercial oil-shale systems. The costs of these systems could range from about $1.20 to $2.45 per barrel of oil produced. Estimates of potential pollution-emisson levels affecting land, air, and water were calculated from available data related to current surface and in situ tar-sand field experiments in the US. These data were then extrapolated to determine pollutant levels expected from conceptual commercial surface and in situ facilities producing 20,000 bbl/d. The likelihood-of-occurrence of these impacts was then assessed. Experience from other industries, including information concerning health and ecosystem damage from air pollutants, measurements of ground-water transport of organic pollutants, and the effectiveness of environmental-control technologies was used to make this assessment.

  20. Potential of natural gamma-ray spectrometry for mapping and environmental monitoring of black-sand beach deposits on the northern coast of Sinai, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkhair, Hatem; Zaaeimah, Mostafa

    2013-04-01

    The concentrations and distributions of naturally occurring radioactive materials were studied with the aim of detecting and mapping radioactive anomalies as well as monitoring the environment for black-sand beach deposits in Northern Sinai, Egypt. For this purpose, ground gamma-ray spectrometric surveys were conducted using a portable GS-512 spectrometer, with an NaI (Tl) detector, on an area 77.5 km(2) in surface area located between the cities of Rafah and Elareish on the Mediterranean Sea coast. The results revealed that the black-sand beach deposits could be differentiated according to their total-count (TC) radioactivity into five normally distributed interpreted radiometric lithologic (IRL) units denoted by U1, U2, U3, U4 and U5. The computed characteristic TC radiometric statistics of these five IRL units range from 4.67  to 9.96 Ur for their individual arithmetic means. The computed arithmetic means for the three radioelements K, eU and eTh reach 0.46 %, 2.25 and 6.17 ppm, respectively for the whole study area. Monitoring the environmental effects of radioelement concentrations on the study area showed that the mean natural equivalent radiation dose rate from the terrestrial gamma-radiation of the whole area attains 0.33 mSv y(-1). This average value remains on the safe side and within the maximum permissible safe radiation dose (radioactive dose generated mainly by monazite and zircon minerals, two of the main constituents of black sands.

  1. Clear cutting (10-13th century) and deep stable economy (18-19th century) as responsible interventions for sand drifting and plaggic deposition in cultural landscapes on aeolian sands (SE-Netherlands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Jan; Vera, Hein; Wallinga, Jakob

    2013-04-01

    The landscape in extensive areas in SE-Netherlands is underlain by coversand, deposited during the Late Glacial of the Weichselian. In the Preboreal, aeolian processes reduced soil formation. From the Preboreal to the Atlantic a deciduous climax forest developed. The geomorphology was a coversand landscape, composed of ridges (umbric podzols), coversand plains (gleyic podzols), coversand depressions (histic podzols) and small valleys (gleysols). The area was used by hunting people during the Late Paleolithic and Mesolithic. During the Bronze and Iron Ages the area was populated by people, living from forest grazing, shifting cultivation and trade. The natural deciduous forest gradually degraded into Calluna heath. The deforestation accelerated the soil acidification and affected the hydrology, which is reflected in drying out of ridges and wetting of depressions, promoting the development of histic podzols and even histosols. Aeolian erosion was during this period restricted to local, small scale sand drifting, related to natural hazards as forest fires and hurricanes and shifting cultivation. Sustainable crop productivity on chemically poor sandy substrates required application of organic fertilizers, composed of a mixture of organic litter and animal manure with a very low mineral compound, produced in shallow stables. At least since 1000 AD, heath management was regulated by a series of rules that aimed to protect the valuable heat lands against degradation. During the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries there was an increasing demand for wood and clear cutting transformed the majority of the forests in driftsand landscapes. The most important market was formed by the very wealthy Flemish cities. The exposed soil surface was subjected to wind erosion and sand drifting which endangered the Calluna heath, arable land and even farmhouses. As a consequence, umbric podzols, the natural climax soil under deciduous forests on coversand, degraded into larger scale driftsand

  2. Sponge fossils of Middle Dnieper River Upper Eocenian deposits (geological survey sheet area «Kobelyaki»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanska T.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For the first time sponge spicules of the Paleogene on the geological survey sheet area «Kobelyaki» were studied. Using artificial classification M.M. Ivanik (2003 45 taxa spicules were found in rocks. Morphological types spicules were defined. In the complexes following megascleres of «soft» Demospongiae are dominant: pro-, plagio-, ortho-, dicho-, anatriaenes, caltrops, smooth and echinated oxeas, subtylostyls, strongyls, ophioxeas. Diaenes, monenes, caltrops with reduced beam (olimtriaenes, are less common. Microscleres are numerous: sterrasters, sphaerasters, oxysphaerasters, oxyasters. Fragments of dyctional gratings without lychnisks and free spicules of hexactinellid sponges are frequent (pentactines, hexactines. Megascleres of lithistid sponges (phyllotriaenes, tetracrepid desmas, triders, megaclones, dicranoclones are relatively few. The palaeocenosis structure that existed in the Obukhov Sea on this area, it was found by morphological analysis of sponges spicules. In the Obukhov time following sponges dominated here: «soft» sponges with unrelated skeleton that belonged to the class Demospongiae (orders Poecilosclerida, Astrophorida and families Geodiidae, Pachastrellidae, Ancorinidae, Calthropellidae, Tethyidae, Crellidae and hexactinellids of class Hexactinellida (orders Hexactinosida and Lyssacinosida. А few sponges spicules (belonged to the subclass Lithistida, families Corallistidae, Theonellidae, Phymaraphiniidae, Chenendoporidae, Pleromidae and lack lithistid skeletal gratings fragments in the studied complexes may indicate a desmas transfer from neighboring, a shallow Obukhov stations, which were confined to the nearby slope of the Ukrainian Shield. On the base of sponge spicules studying the Late Eocene (Obukhov age of surrounding deposits is proved. spongе spicula, Upper Eocene, Obuchovian Suite, Middle Dnieper region.

  3. Dust deposits on Mars: The 'parna' analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Ronald; Williams, Steven H.

    1994-07-01

    Parna is an Australian aboriginal word meaning 'sandy dust'. It has been applied to deposits of clay, silt, and sand which were initially transported by the wind as aggregates, or pellets, of sand size. Parna is distinguished by its silt and clay content, which in some cases exceeds 85% of the total volume of the deposit. Much of the fine-grained playa silt and clay is incorporated into the parna as sand-sized aggregates, which greatly facilitate their transportation and reworking by the wind. Rain following aggregate emplacement can cause their disintegration, rendering the parna immobile by the wind, yet some pellets can survive several wetting/drying episodes. Parna deposits on Earth occur both as dune forms and as sheet deposits which mantle older terrains. In both cases the deposits are typically derived from lacustrine (lake) beds, such as playas. There is substantial evidence to suggest that bodies of water existed on Mars in the past. Thus, the potential is high for lacustrine deposits and the formation of parna on Mars. Although no parna dunes have been identified, it is suggested that the deposits derived from White Rock (-8 deg, 335 deg W), near Mamers Valles (34 deg, 343 deg W), and elsewhere on Mars may represent sheet parna. Data obtained from Mars-94/96 missions and potential landed spacecraft may provide additional evidence for the existence of parna on Mars.

  4. Low sheet resistance titanium nitride films by low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition using design of experiments methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Micheal, E-mail: micheal.burke@tyndall.ie; Blake, Alan; Povey, Ian M.; Schmidt, Michael; Petkov, Nikolay; Carolan, Patrick; Quinn, Aidan J., E-mail: aidan.quinn@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-05-15

    A design of experiments methodology was used to optimize the sheet resistance of titanium nitride (TiN) films produced by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) using a tetrakis(dimethylamino)titanium precursor in a N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} plasma at low temperature (250 °C). At fixed chamber pressure (300 mTorr) and plasma power (300 W), the plasma duration and N{sub 2} flow rate were the most significant factors. The lowest sheet resistance values (163 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film) were obtained using plasma durations ∼40 s, N{sub 2} flow rates >60 standard cubic centimeters per minute, and purge times ∼60 s. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy data revealed reduced levels of carbon contaminants in the TiN films with lowest sheet resistance (163 Ω/sq.), compared to films with higher sheet resistance (400–600 Ω/sq.) while transmission electron microscopy data showed a higher density of nanocrystallites in the low-resistance films. Further significant reductions in sheet resistance, from 163 Ω/sq. to 70 Ω/sq. for a 20 nm TiN film (corresponding resistivity ∼145 μΩ·cm), were achieved by addition of a postcycle Ar/N{sub 2} plasma step in the PE-ALD process.

  5. Preparation of Single- and Few-Layer Graphene Sheets Using Co Deposition on SiC Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cun Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Single- and few-layer graphene sheets were fabricated by selective chemical reactions between Co film and SiC substrate. A rapid cooling process was employed. The number of layers and crystallinity of graphene sheets were controlled by process parameters. The formation mechanism of graphene was highly sensitive to carbon diffusion. Free carbon precipitated and then moved across the product layer that was composed mainly of cobalt-silicides. The graphene layer formed homogeneously on the surface and then transferred to the other substrate. This could provide a method for high-quality fabrication of wafer-sized graphene sheets.

  6. Deposition of nano Fe3O4@mZrO2 onto exfoliated graphite oxide sheets and its application for removal of amaranth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hualin; Chen, Pinghua; Zhang, Weibo; Luo, Shenglian; Luo, Xubiao; Au, Chaktong (Peter); Li, Menglin

    2014-10-01

    Herein we report a novel method to exfoliate graphite to thin structure by depositing nanoparticles. Graphite was oxidated to graphite oxide (GO), and then nano Fe3O4@mZrO2 was loaded and inserted between GO sheets as GO being reduced to reduced graphite oxide (rGO) in one step by hydro-thermal co-precipitation. As-obtained nanocomposite Fe3O4@mZrO2/rGO was characterized by SEM, TEM, AFM, FT-IR, BET, XRD, VSM and EDX techniques. The microscopic studies show the thickness of Fe3O4@mZrO2/rGO sheet is significant thinner than that of rGO sheet. Evidences indicate the presence of nano Fe3O4@mZrO2 effectively preserves rGO sheets from stacking and forming thick structure. Amaranth was used as a model contamination to investigate the adsorption ability of the nanocomposite due to its hazardness. It shows effective adsorption ability. Based on all the evidence shown in studies, a possible mechanism for the adsorbent composing and its amaranth adsorption was postulated.

  7. 深水急流软弱砂层中超长钢板桩围堰施工技术%Super-long Steel Sheet Pile Cofferdam Construction Technology in Deep Water Jet Soft Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王西忠

    2014-01-01

    以兰永项目孔家寺黄河特大桥主桥深水承台基础的成功修建为背景,介绍了24m长钢板桩在深水急流软弱砂层条件下的施工工艺。该方法具有施工简单、快捷、成本较低等特点,可为同类施工环境下深水基础钢板桩围堰方案设计和施工提供借鉴。%Taking the successful construction of the main bridge deepwater pile caps foundation of Lanyong project Kongjiasi Yellow River grand bridge as the background, this paper introduces the construction technology of the 24m long steel sheet pile in deep water jet under the condition of weak sand. The method has features of simple construction, quickness, low cost and so on, which can provide reference for the design and construction of deepwater foundation steel sheet pile cofferdam scheme under similar construction environment.

  8. Simple fabrication of air-stable black phosphorus heterostructures with large-area hBN sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sapna; Takabayashi, Yuya; Shinohara, Hisanori; Kitaura, Ryo

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a facile and general method to passivate thin black phosphorus (BP) flakes with large-area high-quality monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) sheets grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. In spite of the one-atom-thick structure, the high-quality CVD-grown monolayer hBN has proven to be useful to prevent the degradation of thin BP flakes exfoliated on substrates. Mechanically exfoliated BP flakes prepared on a Si substrate are covered by the monolayer hBN sheet to preserve (otherwise unstable) atomic layered BP flakes from degradation. The present technique can generally be applied to fabricating BP-based electronic devices with much easiness.

  9. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  10. Influence of ionic strength and pH on the limitation of latex microsphere deposition sites on iron-oxide coated sand by humic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X. [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Flynn, R., E-mail: r.flynn@qub.ac.uk [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, David Keir Building, Stranmillis Road, Belfast BT9 5AG, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Kammer, F. von der, E-mail: frank.von.der.kammer@univie.ac.at [Department of Environmental Geosciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hofmann, T. [Department of Environmental Geosciences, University of Vienna, Althanstrasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-07-15

    This study, for the first time, investigates and quantifies the influence of slight changes in solution pH and ionic strength (IS) on colloidal microsphere deposition site coverage by Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) in a column matrix packed with saturated iron-oxide coated sand. Triple pulse experimental (TPE) results show adsorbed SRHA enhances microsphere mobility more at higher pH and lower IS and covers more sites than at higher IS and lower pH. Random sequential adsorption (RSA) modelling of experimental data suggests 1 {mu}g of adsorbed SRHA occupied 9.28 {+-} 0.03 x 10{sup 9} sites at pH7.6 and IS of 1.6 mMol but covered 2.75 {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 9} sites at pH6.3 and IS of 20 mMol. Experimental responses are suspected to arise from molecular conformation changes whereby SRHA extends more at higher pH and lower ionic strength but is more compact at lower pH and higher IS. Results suggest effects of pH and IS on regulating SRHA conformation were additive. - Highlights: > We quantified the coupled role of pH and IS and humic acid on colloid deposition. > Humic acid enhances microsphere mobility more at higher pH and lower IS. > pH and IS may control the behaviour of humic acid by regulating its conformation. > The effect of pH and IS on regulating humic acid conformation is additive. - This paper quantifies the impact of pH and ionic strength on the transient deposition behaviour of colloids in porous medium in the presence of humic acid.

  11. Feasibility of N2 Binding and Reduction to Ammonia on Fe-Deposited MoS2 2D Sheets: A DFT Study

    KAUST Repository

    Azofra Mesa, Luis

    2017-05-19

    Based on the structure of the nitrogenase FeMo cofactor (FeMoco), it is reported that Fe deposited on MoS2 2D sheets exhibits high selectivity towards the spontaneous fixation of N2 against chemisorption of CO2 and H2 O. DFT predictions also indicate the ability of this material to convert N2 into NH3 with a maximum energy input of 1.02 eV as an activation barrier for the first proton-electron pair transfer.

  12. Characterization of magnetic spherical fractions in sand deposits for interpretation of environmental change around the El- Zayyan temple, Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Makiko; Koizumi, Natsuko; Kato, Sayuri; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    Desertification in North Africa has rapidly advanced over the last 6,000 years. Such environmental changes began in the Early Dynastic Period of Egypt (4200 - 3150 BC), and the occupation of Achaemenid Persian and Roman cultures in Egypt occurred under even drier climates. Kharga is the largest oasis of the five oases, located in the western desert of Egypt that contains a treasure trove of archaeological resources. This oasis has been highlighted to promote resource exploration and development of archaeological tourism since the 1980's. The El-Zayyan temple is located 27 km south of the central Kharga oasis. Zayyan was once called 'Tchonemyris', which has connection with the means of 'huge well' in Greek. Although major portions of the temple were rebuilt in 140 AD during the rule of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, this temple is considered to be originally built in the Ptolemaic period (4c-1c BC). It is likely that the area had a sufficient water supply in the past as the El-Zayyan temple stands at the lowest point (-18 m a.s.l.) in the Kharga oasis. Furthermore, the El-Ghueita temple that stands on a hill top at 68.5 m a.s.l., 4 km northward from the El-Zayyan temple, has given name that means 'beautiful garden' in Greek. From these facts, we can imagine that the past landscape of this area contained green surroundings. The El-Ghueita temple was well known as a production centre of high quality wine since the mid-Dynastic age (2050 -1786 BC). As this area is currently arid, it is expected that there were irrigation facilities to maintain the vast farm land during the ancient period. To deepen our knowledge of how people developed their technologies and conducted their life within the natural environment of a drastic drying period, understanding the process of environmental change on a region scale is necessary. The aim of this study was to extract proxies from sand deposits in the western desert area to estimate the change in the environment. We examined the

  13. Provenance analysis of heavy minerals in beach sands (Falkland Islands/Islas Malvinas) - A view to mineral deposits and the geodynamics of the South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Harald G.; Skoda, Radek

    2017-10-01

    Beach sands are ideal traps to collect heavy minerals (HM) from different geodynamic settings and mineral deposits. The coastal sediments contain a mixture of HM derived from the submarine shelf and from source rocks in the hinterland. This is true in a transgressive periglacial regime, where drowned valleys and estuaries are instrumental in draining HM to the arenaceous beach sediments from more distal basement lithologies. A scenario like this can be found in the Falkland Islands/Islas Malvinas. The site under study is the missing link between South Africa and South America, the splitting-apart of which is mirrored by the HM distribution predominantly concentrated in the backshore and dune belt along the coast. The HM are subdivided into three HM associations reflecting the geodynamic evolution of the South Atlantic Ocean and of some of the prominent mineral deposits on the Gondwana Continent: (1) Gondwana cratons and Proterozoic orogens, with Cr and BIF deposits (rutile, zircon, ilmenite, tourmaline, garnet, Cr spinel), (2) rift-related and break-apart magmatic lithologies with mantle-derived pipe rocks such as kimberlites (zircon, pyroxene, spinel, Mg ilmenite), (3) Cordillera-type lithologies with polymetallic stratabound deposits (tourmaline, amphibole, chlorite, REE phosphates). The variation of the major HM from the stable craton (Kalahari-Kaapvaal Craton) in the East to the mobile fold belt (Andes) in the West follows the order of stability of HM. In addition to these 3 geodynamic HM groups, sporadic occurrences of HM originating from alteration (leucoxene, chlorite s.s.s. (= solid solution series)) are part of armored relics such as ;nigrine; which on transport disintegrated and thereby released these HM. The major ultrastable and stable HM zircon, rutile, tourmaline s.s.s., spinel s.s.s., and garnet s.s.s. are displayed in a synoptical x-y plot showing the mantle and crustal trends of fractionation and formation of cumulates by means of particular

  14. Treatment of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) using a membrane bioreactor with a submerged flat-sheet ceramic microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jinkai; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The release of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) into the environment is a concern because it contains persistent organic pollutants that are toxic to aquatic life. A modified Ludzack-Ettinger membrane bioreactor (MLE-MBR) with a submerged ceramic membrane was continuously operated for 425 days to evaluate its feasibility on OSPW treatment. A stabilized biomass concentration of 3730 mg mixed liquor volatile suspended solids per litre and a naphthenic acid (NA) removal of 24.7% were observed in the reactor after 361 days of operation. Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography/High Resolution Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed that the removal of individual NA species declined with increased ring numbers. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Betaproteobacteria were dominant in sludge samples from the MLE-MBR, with microorganisms such as Rhodocyclales and Sphingobacteriales capable of degrading hydrocarbon and aromatic compounds. During 425 days of continuous operation, no severe membrane fouling was observed as the transmembrane pressure (TMP) of the MLE-MBR never exceeded -20 kPa given that the manufacturer's suggested critical TMP for chemical cleaning is -35 kPa. Our results indicated that the proposed MLE-MBR has a good potential for removing recalcitrant organics in OSPW.

  15. Ice-sheet sourced juxtaposed turbidite systems in Labrador Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, R.; Klaucke, I.; Ryan, William B. F.; Piper, D.J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Ice-sheet sourced Pleistocene turbidite systems of the Labrador Sea are different from non-glacially influenced systems in their facies distribution and depositional processes. Two large-scale sediment dispersal systems are juxtaposed, one mud-dominated and associated with the Northwest Atlantic Mid-Ocean Channel (NAMOC), the other sand-dominated and forming a huge submarine braided sandplain. Co-existence of the two systems reflects grain-size separation of the coarse and fine fractions on an enormous scale, caused by sediment winnowing at the entrance points of meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) to the sea (Hudson Strait, fiords) and involves a complex interplay of depositional and redepositional processes. The mud-rich NAMOC system is multisourced and represents a basinwide converging system of tributary canyons and channels. It focusses its sand load to the central trunk channel in basin centre, in the fashion of a "reverse" deep-sea fan. The sand plain received its sediment from the Hudson Strait by turbidity currents that were generated either by failure of glacial prodelta slopes at the ice margin, or by direct meltwater discharges with high bedload concentration. We speculate that the latter might have been related to subglacial-lake outburst flooding through the Hudson Strait, possibly associated with ice-rafting (Heinrich) events.

  16. Microstructure Evolution of Electron Beam Physical Vapour Deposited Ni-23.5Cr-2.66Co-1.44Al Superalloy Sheet During Annealing at 600 °C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mingwei

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure evolution of electron beam physical vapour deposited (EB-PVD Ni‑23.5Cr‑2.66Co‑1.44Al superalloy sheet during annealing at 600 °C was investigated. The results showed that the as-deposited alloy was composed of only g phase. After annealing at 600 °C, the locations of diffraction peaks were still the same. The (220 diffraction peak of the deposition side increased with annealing time. The sheet on deposited side had a tendency toward forming (220 texture during post-annealing. No obvious texture was observed at as-deposited and annealed sheet at 600 °C in substrate side. The count and size of "voids" decreased with time. The size of grains increased obviously with annealing time. The ultimate tensile strength of EB-PVD Ni-23.5Cr-2.66Co-1.44Al alloy sheet increased from 641 MPa to 829 MPa after annealing at 600 °C for 30 hours.

  17. The Physics of Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassis, J. N.

    2008-01-01

    The great ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland are vast deposits of frozen freshwater that contain enough to raise sea level by approximately 70 m if they were to completely melt. Because of the potentially catastrophic impact that ice sheets can have, it is important that we understand how ice sheets have responded to past climate changes and…

  18. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs.

  19. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice-age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  20. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  1. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand

  2. Tidal current-induced formation——storm-induced change——tidal current-induced recovery——Interpretation of depositional dynamics of formation and evolution of radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张长宽; 张东生; 张君伦; 王震

    1999-01-01

    The results of simulated tidal current field, wave field and storm-induced current field are employed to interpret the depositional dynamic mechanism of formation and evolution of the radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor. The anticlockwise rotary tidal wave to the south of Shandong Peninsula meets the following progressive tidal wave from the South Yellow Sea, forming a radial current field outside Jianggang. This current field provides a necessary dynamic condition for the formation and existence of the radial sand ridges on the Yellow Sea seafloor. The results of simulated "old current field (holocene)" show that there existed a convergent-divergent tidal zone just outside the palaeo-Yangtze River estuary where a palaeo-underwater accumulation was developed. The calculated results from wave models indicate that the wave impact on the topography, under the condition of high water level and strong winds, is significant. The storm current induced by typhoons landing in the Yangtze River estuary

  3. Optimal Materials and Deposition Technique Lead to Cost-Effective Solar Cell with Best-Ever Conversion Efficiency (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes how the SJ3 solar cell was invented, explains how the technology works, and why it won an R&D 100 Award. Based on NREL and Solar Junction technology, the commercial SJ3 concentrator solar cell - with 43.5% conversion efficiency at 418 suns - uses a lattice-matched multijunction architecture that has near-term potential for cells with {approx}50% efficiency. Multijunction solar cells have higher conversion efficiencies than any other type of solar cell. But developers of utility-scale and space applications crave even better efficiencies at lower costs to be both cost-effective and able to meet the demand for power. The SJ3 multijunction cell, developed by Solar Junction with assistance from foundational technological advances by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has the highest efficiency to date - almost 2% absolute more than the current industry standard multijunction cell-yet at a comparable cost. So what did it take to create this cell having 43.5% efficiency at 418-sun concentration? A combination of materials with carefully designed properties, a manufacturing technique allowing precise control, and an optimized device design.

  4. Surface investigation and tribological mechanism of a sulfate-based lubricant deposited on zinc-coated steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timma, Christian; Lostak, Thomas; Janssen, Stella; Flock, Jörg; Mayer, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Phosphatation is a well-known technique to improve friction and wear behaviour of zinc coated steel, but has a variety of economic and ecologic limitations. In this study an alternative coating based on ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) is applied on skin-passed hot-dip galvanized steel sheets in order to investigate its surface chemical and tribological behaviour in a Pin-on-Disk Tribometer. Raman- and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results revealed a formation of ammonium zinc sulfate ((NH4)2Zn(SO4)2 * xH2O) on the surface, which is primarily located in the skin-passed areas of the steel material. Sulfate coated samples exhibited a superior friction behaviour in Pin-on-Disk Tests using squalane as a model substance for oil-like lubricated conditions and a formation of a thin lubrication film is obtained in the wear track. Squalane acts as a carrier substance for ammonium zinc sulfate, leading to an effective lubrication film in the wear track.

  5. The contribution of micrometeorites to the iron stocks of buried podzols, developed in Late-glacial aeolian sand deposits (Brabant, The Netherlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Jan; de Vet, Sebastiaan

    2015-04-01

    The surface geology of an extensive part of NW-Europe is dominated by coversands (Late-glacial chemical poor aeolian sand deposits). The geomorphology of coversand landscapes is dominated by ridges and planes. Podzolation is the dominant soil forming process in coversands under moderate humid climatic conditions. Umbric Podzols developed on the ridges under Quercetum-mixtum, Gleyic and Histic Podzols developed in the planes under Alnetum. Even in chemical poor coversands, iron will be released by hydrolysis from iron containing silicate minerals (such as feldspars). It is well known that the vertical iron distribution in Podzols is effected by translocation of active iron from eluvial to illuvial horizons and that iron is leaching to the aquifer. Iron stocks of Podzols, in contrasts, have not been widely studied for comparison purposes of individual soil horizons or between soils. We determined the stocks of active and immobile iron in the horizons of buried xeromorphic Podzols (soils that developed without any contact with groundwater). The results show that the total amount of iron exceeds the potential amount which can be released by hydrolysis from the parent material. Furthermore, to amount of iron that leached to the groundwater is unknown. It is evident that we must find an additional source to explain the total iron stocks in buried Podzols. It is known from analysis of ice cores that the earth atmosphere is subjected to a continuous influx of (iron rich) micrometeorites. The precipitation of micrometeorites (and other aerosols) on the earth surface is concentrated in humid climatic zones with (intensive) rain fall. We analyzed minerals, extracted from the ectorganic horizon of the Initial Podzols, developed in driftsand that stabilized around 1900 AD, overlying Palaeopodzols, buried around 1200 AD. Among blown in quartz grains, we could determine also micrometeorites, embedded in the organic skeleton of the fermentation horizon of the Initial Podzol

  6. Aeolian sedimentation in the middle buntsandstein in the eifel north-south depression zone: Summary of the variability of sedimentary processes in a buntsandstein erg as a base for evaluation of the mutual relationships between aeolian sand seas and fluvial river systems in the mid-european buntsandstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Detlef

    The spectrum of aeolian depositional subenvironments in the upper Middle Buntsandstein Karlstal-Schichten sequence in the Eifel North-South-zone at the western margin of the Mid-European Triassic Basin comprises trains of larger and higher narrowly-spaced dunes in sand seas, isolated smaller and lower widely-spaced dunes in floodplains and interdune playas, dry interdune sheet sands, damp interdune adhesive sandflats, wet interdune playa lakes, rainfall runoff watercourses and ephemeral channels cutting through the dune belt, and deflation gravel lag veneers. Distinction of aeolian and fluvial sediments within the succession of closely intertonguing wind- and water-laid deposits is possible by independent analysis of the conventional criteria and the more modern stratification styles. Thick cross-bedded aeolian sand sequences originate as barchanoid-type dunes which accumulate and migrate in the regime of narrow to wide unimodal southeasterly to southwesterly trade winds in low northern palaeolatitude in summer when the intertropical convergence zone is shifted to the north. The predominantly transverse-ridge dunes accrete mainly by grainfall and subcritical climbing of wind ripples, subordinately also by grainflow interfingering with grainfall. Horizontal-laminated aeolian sands form as sand sheets in dry interdune playas by subcritical migration of wind ripple trains, rarely also by plane bed accretion. Thin cross-bedded dune sands or horizontal-laminated aeolian sands capping fluvial cyclothems originate by deflation of emerged alluvial bar sands during low-water stages and subsequent accumulation of the winnowed sand as widely-spaced dunelets or chains of wind ripples in desiccated parts of the adjoining floodplain. The aeolian sand layers at the base of lacustrine cyclothems record migration of isolated little dunes across the dry playa floor at the beginning of a wetting-upwards cyclothem, with the sand deriving from deflation of fluvial incursions or

  7. Numerical Simulation of Sand Deposition in Gas-Liquid-Solid Flow within Oilfield Pipeline%输油管线内气液固三相流中沙粒沉积规律的数值模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张旭昀; 张正江; 徐子怡; 孙丽丽; 王勇

    2013-01-01

    Taking oilfield pipeline' s parameters as the object of study and basing on the mixed model for multi-phase flow,the Fluent was used to simulate deposition process of gas-liquid-solid flow within oilfield pipeline,including the study on the effect of flow velocity,sand concentration,moisture content,pressure and viscosity of crude oil on sand deposition.The results show that the sand deposition can be divided into inception deposition stage,transition stage and stable stage,and the average volume of sand deposition decreases with the increased flow velocity and moisture content and become increased with the sand concentration.The minimum value of 51.80% and 45.76% can be reached when the pressure and viscosity stays at 0.2MPa and 0.1Pa · s,respectively.The location of maximum sand deposition shifts right with the flow velocity and moisture content and does left with the sand concentration,and it has a critical value with the increase of the crude oil' s pressure and viscosity (0.2 MPa of 4.28m and 0.1Pa · s of 3.68m,respectively).The width of deposition transition stage has a critical value with the increase of flow velocity and pressure and has an extreme value with the increase of sand concentration,moisture content and viscosity of crude oil (8% of 22.56m,0.2MPa of 21.80m and 0.1Pa · s of 22.19m,respectively).The differential pressure of transition stage affects the width of transition stage directly.Both flow velocity and sand concentration affect the sand deposition greatly.%以苏丹油田Palouge油区的输油管线参数为研究对象,基于多相流混合模型,采用Fluent软件对输油管线内的气液固三相流中的沙粒沉积过程进行了数值模拟,研究了流速、含沙量、含水量、压力和原油粘度对沙粒沉积规律的影响.结果表明:沙粒在输油管线中的沉积分为起始沉积段、过渡段和稳定段.平均沉沙量随流速、含水量的增大而减小,随含沙量的增大而增加,压力为0.2MPa

  8. Record of a Mid-Pleistocene depositional anomaly in West Antarctic continental margin sediments: an indicator for ice-sheet collapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, C.-D.; Kuhn, G.; Frederichs, T.

    2009-06-01

    Modern global warming is likely to cause future melting of Earth's polar ice sheets that may result in dramatic sea-level rise. A possible collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) alone, which is considered highly vulnerable as it is mainly based below sea level, may raise global sea level by up to 5-6 m. Despite the importance of the WAIS for changes in global sea level, its response to the glacial-interglacial cycles of the Quaternary is poorly constrained. Moreover, the geological evidence for the disintegration of the WAIS at some time within the last ca. 750 kyr, possibly during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 11 (424-374 ka), is ambiguous. Here we present physical properties, palaeomagnetic, geochemical and clay mineralogical data from a glaciomarine sedimentary sequence that was recovered from the West Antarctic continental margin in the Amundsen Sea and spans more than the last 1 Myr. Within the sedimentary sequence, proxies for biological productivity (such as biogenic opal and the barium/aluminum ratio) and the supply of lithogenic detritus from the West Antarctic hinterland (such as ice-rafted debris and clay minerals) exhibit cyclic fluctuations in accordance with the glacial-interglacial cycles of the Quaternary. A prominent depositional anomaly spans MIS 15-MIS 13 (621-478 ka). The proxies for biological productivity and lithogenic sediment supply indicate that this interval has the characteristics of a single, prolonged interglacial period. Even though no proxy suggests environmental conditions much different from today, we conclude that, if the WAIS collapsed during the last 800 kyr, then MIS 15-MIS 13 was the most likely time period. Apparently, the duration rather than the strength of interglacial conditions was the crucial factor for the WAIS drawdown. A comparison with various marine and terrestrial climate archives from around the world corroborates that unusual environmental conditions prevailed throughout MIS 15-MIS 13. Some of these

  9. A persistent and dynamic East Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 7.5 million years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Paul R; Shakun, Jeremy D; Corbett, Lee B; Zimmerman, Susan R; Rood, Dylan H

    2016-12-07

    Climate models show that ice-sheet melt will dominate sea-level rise over the coming centuries, but our understanding of ice-sheet variations before the last interglacial 125,000 years ago remains fragmentary. This is because terrestrial deposits of ancient glacial and interglacial periods are overrun and eroded by more recent glacial advances, and are therefore usually rare, isolated and poorly dated. In contrast, material shed almost continuously from continents is preserved as marine sediment that can be analysed to infer the time-varying state of major ice sheets. Here we show that the East Greenland Ice Sheet existed over the past 7.5 million years, as indicated by beryllium and aluminium isotopes ((10)Be and (26)Al) in quartz sand removed by deep, ongoing glacial erosion on land and deposited offshore in the marine sedimentary record. During the early Pleistocene epoch, ice cover in East Greenland was dynamic; in contrast, East Greenland was mostly ice-covered during the mid-to-late Pleistocene. The isotope record we present is consistent with distinct signatures of changes in ice sheet behaviour coincident with major climate transitions. Although our data are continuous, they are from low-deposition-rate sites and sourced only from East Greenland. Consequently, the signal of extensive deglaciation during short, intense interglacials could be missed or blurred, and we cannot distinguish between a remnant ice sheet in the East Greenland highlands and a diminished continent-wide ice sheet. A clearer constraint on the behaviour of the ice sheet during past and, ultimately, future interglacial warmth could be produced by (10)Be and (26)Al records from a coring site with a higher deposition rate. Nonetheless, our analysis challenges the possibility of complete and extended deglaciation over the past several million years.

  10. A persistent and dynamic East Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 7.5 million years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Paul R.; Shakun, Jeremy D.; Corbett, Lee B.; Zimmerman, Susan R.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-12-01

    Climate models show that ice-sheet melt will dominate sea-level rise over the coming centuries, but our understanding of ice-sheet variations before the last interglacial 125,000 years ago remains fragmentary. This is because terrestrial deposits of ancient glacial and interglacial periods are overrun and eroded by more recent glacial advances, and are therefore usually rare, isolated and poorly dated. In contrast, material shed almost continuously from continents is preserved as marine sediment that can be analysed to infer the time-varying state of major ice sheets. Here we show that the East Greenland Ice Sheet existed over the past 7.5 million years, as indicated by beryllium and aluminium isotopes (10Be and 26Al) in quartz sand removed by deep, ongoing glacial erosion on land and deposited offshore in the marine sedimentary record. During the early Pleistocene epoch, ice cover in East Greenland was dynamic; in contrast, East Greenland was mostly ice-covered during the mid-to-late Pleistocene. The isotope record we present is consistent with distinct signatures of changes in ice sheet behaviour coincident with major climate transitions. Although our data are continuous, they are from low-deposition-rate sites and sourced only from East Greenland. Consequently, the signal of extensive deglaciation during short, intense interglacials could be missed or blurred, and we cannot distinguish between a remnant ice sheet in the East Greenland highlands and a diminished continent-wide ice sheet. A clearer constraint on the behaviour of the ice sheet during past and, ultimately, future interglacial warmth could be produced by 10Be and 26Al records from a coring site with a higher deposition rate. Nonetheless, our analysis challenges the possibility of complete and extended deglaciation over the past several million years.

  11. Development of the Gran Desierto sand sea, northwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Grady; Lancaster, Nicholas

    1990-08-01

    Three major eolian sand populations can be recognized in the Gran Desierto sand sea of northwestern Mexico by using spectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper in conjunction with textural and mineralogical studies of surface sands. Each sand population has distinct textural, mineralogic, and spectral properties that can be related to sand-dune morphology and position with reference to source areas and transport paths of the sands. The oldest eolian sediment in the sand sea was derived from the early to middle Pleistocene Colorado River that flowed through the area of the western Gran Desierto. Subsequent inputs of eolian sands came from the area of the present Colorado River valley and the coast south of the sand sea. The spatial and temporal pattern of eolian deposition in the region has been controlled by Quaternary tectonic and climatic changes, resulting in the episodic input and deposition of sand.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of monolayer WS2 nano- sheets on Au foils toward direct application in hydrogen evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanshuo Zhang[1; Jianping Shi[1; Gaofeng Han[3; Minjie Li[2; Qingqing Ji[2; Donglin Ma[2; Yu Zhang[1,2; Cong Li[1,2; Xingyou Lang[3; Yanfeng Zhang[1,2; Zhongfan Liu[2

    2015-01-01

    Monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS2), a typical member of the semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide family has drawn considerable interest because of its unique properties. Intriguingly the edge of WS2 exhibits an ideal hydrogen binding energy which makes WS2 a potential alternative to Pt-based electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Here, we demonstrate for the first time the successful synthesis of uniform monolayer WS2 nanosheets on centimeter- scale Au foils using a facile, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method. The edge lengths of the universally observed triangular WS2 nanosheets are tunable from -100 to N1,000 nm. The WS2 nanosheets on Au foils featuring abundant edges were then discovered to be efficient catalysts for the HER, exhibiting a rather high exchange current density of -30.20 μA/cm2 and a small onset potential of Nl10 mV. The effects of coverage and domain size (which correlate closely with the active edge density of WS2) on the electrocatalytic activity were investigated. This work not only provides a novel route toward the batch-production of monolayer WS2 via the introduction of metal foil substrates but also opens up its direct application for facile HER.

  13. Cell sheet engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Yamato

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed ‘cell sheet engineering’ in order to avoid the limitations of tissue reconstruction using biodegradable scaffolds or single cell suspension injection. Our concept is tissue reconstruction, not from single cells, but from cell sheets. Cell sheets are prepared using temperature-responsive culture dishes. Temperature-responsive polymers are covalently grafted onto the dishes, allowing various types of cells to adhere and proliferate at 37°C. The cells spontaneously detach when the temperature is reduced below 32°C without the need for proteolytic enzymes. The confluent cells are noninvasively harvested as single, contiguous cell sheets with intact cell-cell junctions and deposited extracellular matrix (ECM. We have used these harvested cell sheets for various tissue reconstructions, including ocular surfaces, periodontal ligaments, cardiac patches, and bladder augmentation.

  14. Characterization of sand lenses embedded in tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, K.E.S.; Nilsson, B.

    2012-01-01

    of the various types of sand lenses is discussed, primarily in relation to the depositional and glaciotectonic processes they underwent. Detailed characterization of sand lenses facilitates such interpretations. Finally, the observations are linked to a more general overview of the distribution of sand lenses......Tills dominate large parts of the superficial sediments on the Northern hemisphere. These glacial diamictons are extremely heterogeneous and riddled with fractures and lenses of sand or gravel. The frequency and geometry of sand lenses within tills are strongly linked to glaciodynamic processes...... occurring in various glacial environments. This study specifically focuses on the appearance and spatial distribution of sand lenses in tills. It introduces a methodology on how to measure and characterize sand lenses in the field with regard to size, shape and degree of deformation. A set of geometric...

  15. Depositional features of a late Weichselian outwash fan; central East Jylland, Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houmark-Nielsen, Michael

    1983-10-01

    Four major sedimentary facies are present in coarse-grained, ice-marginal deposits from central East Jylland, Denmark. Facies A and B are matrix-supported gravels deposited by subaerial sediment gravity flows as mudflows (facies A) and debris flows (facies B). Facies C consists of clast-supported, water-laid gravels and facies D are cross-bedded sand and granules. The facies can be grouped into three facies associations related to the supraglacial and proglacial environments: (1) the flow-till association is made up of alternating beds of remobilized glacial mixton (facies A) and well-sorted cross-bedded sand (facies D); (2) the outwash apron association resembles the sediments of alluvial fans in containing coarse-grained debris-flow deposits (facies B), water-laid gravel deposited by sheet floods (facies C) and cross-bedded sand and granules (facies D) from braided distributaries; (3) the valley sandur association comprises water-laid gravel (facies C) interpreted as sheet bars and longitudinal bars interbedded with cross-bedded sand and granules (facies D) deposited in channels between bars in a braided environment. The general coarsening-upward trend of the sedimentary sequences caused by the transition of bars and channel-dominated facies to debris-flow-dominated facies indicate an increasing proximality of the outwash deposits, picturing the advance and still stand of a large continental lowland ice-sheet. The depositional properties suggest that sedimentation was caused by melting along a relatively steep, active glacier margin as a first step towards the final vanishing of the Late Weichselian icesheet (the East Jylland ice) covering eastern Denmark.

  16. Silica sand resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Westerhoff, W.E.; Menkovic, A.; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Maljers, D.

    2009-01-01

    Silica sand, (almost) pure quartz sand, is a valuable and scarce mineral resource within the shallow Dutch subsurface. High-grade deposits are exploited in the southeastemmost part of the country, as raw material for the glass, ceramic, chemical and other process industries. Dutch land-use policy re

  17. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  18. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  19. Deposition of sandstorms in a vegetation-covered sand dune in Ejin Oasis and its characteristics%额济纳绿洲沙尘暴沉积特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温小浩; 李保生; 王为

    2006-01-01

    "Ejin Section" found in a typical vegetation-covered sand dune in Ejin Oasis was investigated. In this study, 263 samples were taken from the section for grain-size analysis, 25 for chemical analysis, 11 for 14C dating and 6 for scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results of the study indicate that 3 types of the sediments in the section can be identified, YS, LS and ST. YS, homogeneous yellow-brown dune sands, is equal to those of inland deserts, LS, loess-like sandy soils, is the same as the sandy loess in the middle Yellow River and modern falling dusts, and ST, sandy sediments interbeded with the deadwood and defoliation of Tamarix spp, represents the depositional process of the section interrupted by abrupt changes in climate. The Ejin Section has recorded the repeated dust-storms or sandstorms since 2500 yr BP and the peak periods of the dust-storms or sandstorms revealed by the section are consistent with the records of "dust rains" in historical literatures, indicating that the change of climate is a key factor to increase sandstorms or dust-storms, whereas, "artificial" factor may only be an accelerating one for desertification.

  20. Altitude of the top of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand in three areas of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Westerfield, Paul W.; Gonthier, Gerard; Poynter, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand form the second most productive aquifer in Arkansas. The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand range in thick- ness from 0 to 900 feet, consisting of fine- to medium-grained sands interbedded with layers of silt, clay, shale, and minor amounts of lignite. Within the three areas of interest, the top surface of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand dips regionally east and southeast towards the axis of the Mississippi Embayment syncline and Desha Basin. Local variations in the top surface may be attributed to a combination of continued development of structural features, differential compaction, localized faulting, and erosion of the surface prior to subsequent inundation and deposition of younger sediments.

  1. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  2. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  3. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  4. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  5. Formation mechanism and development pattern of aeolian sand landform in Yarlung Zangbo River valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李森; 董光荣; 申建友; 杨萍; 刘贤万; 王跃; 靳鹤龄; 王强

    1999-01-01

    Aeolian sand landforms in the Yarlung Zangbo River valley can be divided into 4 classes and 21 types. The river valley has favourable environment conditions for the development of aeolian sand landforms. Simulation of MM4 mid-scale climate model showed that the near-surface flow field and wind vector field during the winter half year in the fiver valley are generally favourable for the aeolian sand deposition and as a whole they also affect the distribution zones and sites of aeolian sand landforms. Sand dunes and sand dune groups in the fiver valley developed mainly in three ways, namely windward retarding deposition, leeward back flow deposition and bend circumfluence deposition. Through alternating positive-reverse processes of sand dune formation under wind actions and sand dune vanishing under water actions, sand dunes developed from primary zone through main-body zone then to vanishing zone where climbing dunes and falling dunes are declining and are even disappearing.

  6. An integrated model for dune morphology and sand fluxes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, K. D.; Bridges, N. T.; Ayoub, F.; Newman, C. E.; Quade, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    The transport and deposition of sand is the most prevalent agent of landscape modification on Mars today, with fluxes comparable to some sand dunes on Earth. Until now, the relationship between sand flux and dune field morphology has been poorly constrained. By tracking dune movement over ∼10 km-long dune fields in Herschel Crater and Nili Patera, representative of many dune fields on Mars, we find a downwind flux decrease that correlates with a sequence of changing morphology from barchans to barchanoids and seifs (longitudinal dunes) to isolated dome dunes and ending with sand sheets. We show empirical consistency with atmospheric Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) theory which can describe these broad flux and morphology changes in Martian dune fields. Deviations from IBL flux predictions are from wind streamline compressions up slopes, leading to a speedup effect. By establishing a dune field morphology type example and correlating it with measured and predicted flux changes, we provide an integrated morphology and flux model that can be applied to other areas of Mars and be used to infer paleo-environmental conditions from preserved sandstone.

  7. On the Size Distribution of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    -distribution, by taking into account that individual grains do not have the same travel time from the source to the deposit. The travel time is assumed to be random so that the wear on the individual grains vary randomly. The model provides an interpretation of the parameters of the NIG-distribution, and relates the mean......A model is presented of the development of the size distribution of sand while it is transported from a source to a deposit. The model provides a possible explanation of the log-hyperbolic shape that is frequently found in unimodal grain size distributions in natural sand deposits, as pointed out...

  8. Advanced testing and characterization of shear modulus and deformation characteristics of oil sand materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oil sands are natural deposits of sand materials that are rich in bitumen. Limited studies have been conducted to determine the dynamic behavior of oil sand materials. Recent difficulties encountered in oil sand mine fields in Canada substantiated...

  9. 超厚砂卵石层钢板桩围堰设计与施工%Design and Construction Technology of Steel Sheet Pile Cofferdam in Over-thick Sand Gravel Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琨; 钟启凯; 戴小松; 刘中涛

    2011-01-01

    Steel sheet pile cofferdam is applied widely in the construction field of the deep-water bridge foundation.However, the over-thick gravel layer causes great difficulty to the construction of steel sheet pile and the mud-suction at the bottom of the cofferdam underwater, which limits the scope of the adaptability of the steel sheet pile cofferdam.Based on the construction of the steel sheet pile cofferdam in the main pier of the Third Han River Bridge in Xiangfan, the above problems have been resolved by changing the sequence of the construction, processing the head of the steel sheet pile and making the special pore-leading equipment and the suction dredge, in addition that the construction period is reduced, and the construction risk and the cost is decreased.%钢板桩围堰在桥梁深水基础施工中应用广泛,但是超厚砂卵石层地质给钢板桩的插打和围堰基底的水下吸泥带来极大困难,从而限制了钢板桩围堰的使用范围.以襄樊汉江三桥主墩钢板桩围堰的施工作为依托,通过改变施工顺序、对钢板桩桩头进行处理和制作专用引孔设备和吸泥机,使上述问题迎刃而解,并且缩短工期,降低成本和施工风险.

  10. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  11. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  12. Horizontal electromagnetic casting of thin metal sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Lari, Robert J. (Aurora, IL); Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL); Turner, Larry R. (Naperville, IL)

    1987-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically suspending molten metal deposited within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled to form a solid metal sheet. Magnetic flux increases as the molten metal sheet moves downward and decreases as the molten metal sheet moves upward to stabilize the sheet and maintain it in equilibrium as it is linearly displaced and solidified by cooling gases. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet by means of either metal sheet engaging rollers or brushes on the solidified metal, and by means of an electrode in the vessel containing the molten metal thereby providing a return path for the eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the AC coil generated magnetic flux. Variation in the geometry of the conducting shield allows the magnetic flux between the metal sheet and the conducting shield to be varied and the thickness in surface quality of the metal sheet to be controlled. Side guards provide lateral containment for the molten metal sheet and stabilize and shape the magnetic field while a leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the metal sheet is used to start the casting process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the magnet and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The magnet may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of facing bedstead coils.

  13. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  14. Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact Sheets are available in both English and Spanish and can be downloaded for free. Currently available ... Antiviral Medications to Treat or Prevent Influenza (the Flu) PDF | Espanol PDF Apremilast (Otezla®) PDF | Espanol PDF ...

  15. Seasonal variations in heavy mineral placer sand from Kalbadevi Bay, Ratnagiri, Maharashtra

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.

    Heavy mineral sand from Kalbadevi Bay, Ratnagiri, Maharashtra is well known for ilmenite placer deposits. Study along the central profile of the Bay shows that the sand is major constituent followed by silt, and clay content is present in negligible...

  16. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Špirutová; J. Beňo; V. Bednářová; J. Kříž; M. Kandrnál

    2012-01-01

    Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron) are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this co...

  17. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  18. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  19. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  20. Possibilities of preparation asphalt concrete by oil sands of Kazakhstan

    OpenAIRE

    Erbol Tileuberdi; Yerdos Ongarbayev; F. Behrendt; Schneider, I.; Yerzhan Imanbayev; B. Tuleutayev; Yerlan Doszhanov; Zulkhair Mansurov

    2012-01-01

    In the paper physicochemical properties of oil sands of Munayli-Mola deposits and efficient ways to use them for preparing asphalt concrete were represented. For determination of organic part of oil sands the extraction methods were used in Soxhlet apparatus by variety of solvents. It has been established 16 wt.% content of natural bitumen in oil sands, which compared with results of ash content determination. According to results of experiment, the natural bitumen is heavy oil and its charac...

  1. Petrophysical Analysis of Oil Sand in Athabasca

    Science.gov (United States)

    cheong, S.; Lee, H.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands are the major unconventional energy sources which have great reserves in Alberta, Canada. Recovery techniques such as CSS (Cyclic Steam Stimulation) and SAGD (Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage) enabled to develop deeper bitumen about several hundred meter depth. Before applying CSS and SAGD, reservoir heterogeneity of mud barriers or shale breccias should be clarified to establish injection and production wells successfully. We conducted the integrated petro-physical analysis for oil sands deposits in Athabasca by correlating well logs with seismic data. From 33 well logs and 3D seismic, we have made P-wave impedance by recursive inversion. Target formations of our analysis were the top of Wabiskaw member. Using inverted impedance and multi-attributes, porosity volume was derived at a target depth. Porosity of time slice 375 ms ranged 20 ~ 40 % stretching porous sand body from NE to SW direction. Characteristics of porosity distribution may be useful to design optimum oil sands recovery in Athabasca.

  2. Investigation into the Origin and Character of Surficial Sedimentary Deposits at the Midshore Regional Solid Waste Facility near Easton, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, Joseph P.; Newell, Wayne L.; DeJong, Benjamin D.

    2009-01-01

    A temporary exposure at the Midshore Regional Solid Waste Facility near Easton, MD, provided an opportunity to document the characteristics of the complex assemblage of surficial facies in that area. This unusually large cross section allowed interpretation of the changing processes that shaped the landscape in response to climate change through the late Pleistocene. Eight stratigraphic units were recognized: (1) gray, fossiliferous, muddy silt of the marine Miocene Choptank Formation; (2) coarse, crossbedded conglomerate of the late Miocene to Pliocene fluvial Pensauken Formation; (3) bioturbated muddy conglomerate interpreted as deposits of small colluvial fans; (4) pebbly, quartzose sand overlying a planar erosional surface reflecting a marine transgression; (5) irregular pods and lenses of sand and gravel deformed into bowl-shaped folds and faulted, which are interpreted as wind deposits over a semipermanent snow cover (niveo-aeolian deposits); (6) crossbedded sand and conglomerate with abundant mud partings indicating tidal influences on sinuous stream channels; (7) heavily bioturbated silt and sand with abundant root casts and flattened vesicles interpreted as aeolian loess deposits in marshy fens; and (8) pebbly sand and mud with scattered boulders and cobbles that reflect modern infill of the excavation by the operators. Soils formed on units 3, 4, and 7. Superimposed on units 4, 5, and 7 is evidence of deep freezing and permafrost development and subsequent thermokarst development after thawing, which includes large, complexly filled wedge-shaped cracks, deformed bedding and faults, fluid-injection structures, and spherical blobs of sand and mud. Each of the stratigraphic units has irregular distributions and lateral changes. The results of this study provide a unique insight into the geometry of surficial deposits that will help facilitate mapping of units, interpretation of cored intervals, and understanding of ground-penetrating radar profiles. The

  3. Nanographene-constructed carbon nanofibers grown on graphene sheets by chemical vapor deposition: high-performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhuang-Jun; Yan, Jun; Wei, Tong; Ning, Guo-Qing; Zhi, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jin-Cheng; Cao, Dian-Xue; Wang, Gui-Ling; Wei, Fei

    2011-04-26

    We report on the fabrication of 3D carbonaceous material composed of 1D carbon nanofibers (CNF) grown on 2D graphene sheets (GNS) via a CVD approach in a fluidized bed reactor. Nanographene-constructed carbon nanofibers contain many cavities, open tips, and graphene platelets with edges exposed, providing more extra space for Li(+) storage. More interestingly, nanochannels consisting of graphene platelets arrange almost perpendicularly to the fiber axis, which is favorable for lithium ion diffusion from different orientations. In addition, 3D interconnected architectures facilitate the collection and transport of electrons during the cycling process. As a result, the CNF/GNS hybrid material shows high reversible capacity (667 mAh/g), high-rate performance, and cycling stability, which is superior to those of pure graphene, natural graphite, and carbon nanotubes. The simple CVD approach offers a new pathway for large-scale production of novel hybrid carbon materials for energy storage.

  4. Geologic and paleoecologic studies of the Nebraska Sand Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlbrandt, Thomas S.; Fryberger, S.G.; Hanley, John H.; Bradbury, J. Platt

    1980-01-01

    PART A: The Nebraska Sand Hills are an inactive, late Quaternary, most probably Holocene, dune field (covering 57,000 km 2 ) that have been eroded along streams and in blowouts, resulting in excellent lateral and vertical exposures of the stratification of dune and interdune sediments. This paper presents new data on the geometry, primary sedimentary structures, modification of sedimentary structures, direction of sand movement, and petrography of these eolian deposits. Eolian deposits of the Sand Hills occur as relatively thin (9-24 m) 'blanket' sands, composed of a complex of dune and discontinuous, diachronous interdune deposits unconformably overlying fluviolacustrine sediments. The internal stratification of large dunes in the Sand Hills (as high as 100 m), is similar to the internal stratification of smaller dunes of the same type in the Sand Hills, differing only in scale. Studies of laminae orientation in the Sand Hills indicate that transverse, barchan, and blowout dunes can be differentiated in rocks of eolian origin using both the mean dip angle of laminae and the mean angular deviation of dip direction. A variety of secondary structures modify or replace primary eolian stratification in the Sand Hills, the more common of which are dissipation structures and bioturbation. Dissipation structures in the Sand Hills may develop when infiltrating water deposits clay adjacent to less permeable layers in the sand, or along the upper margins of frozen layers that form in the sands during winter. Cross-bed measurements from dunes of the Nebraska Sand Hills necessitate a new interpretation of the past sand transport directions. The data from these measurements indicate a general northwest-to-southeast drift of sand, with a more southerly drift in the southeast part of the Sand Hills. A large area of small dunes Sand Hills was interpreted by him on the basis of morphology only. We interpret these as transverse-ridge dunes that were generally moving to the south

  5. experimental investigation of sand minimum transport velocity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    minimum transport velocity models in pipelines, the analytical and empirical methods. Because of the ... identified two niche areas of research such as sand transport in .... operational conditions the limit deposit velocity passes through a ...

  6. Water management in the oil sands industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauls, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Water management issues at Alberta's 4 oil sand deposits were discussed. The 4 deposits include the Peace River, Athabasca, Wabasca and Cold Lake deposits, with the Athabasca deposit being the largest and the only surface-mineable deposit. Large quantities of water are needed to extract bitumen from oil sands. This paper addressed water volume withdrawal from the Athabasca River, the primary source of water for the surface-mining oil sands industry. It also addressed Muskeg River watershed integrity, quality of water withdrawn from reclaimed landscapes, groundwater contamination, and ecological viability of end-pit lakes. Currently, half of Syncrude's oil sand is transported from mine to extraction plant by conveyor belts. The other half is pipelined as a warm water slurry. By 2005, all transport will be by pipeline. The oil sand is mixed with hot water, steam and surfactants to condition it for extraction. Seventy-nine per cent of the water used by Syncrude is recycled water and the remainder comes from the Athabasca River. Syncrude diverts 2.5 to 3 barrels of water from the Athabasca River for every barrel of oil produced. This paper discussed the in-stream flow needs of the Athabasca River based on protection of aquatic ecosystems. Flow needs are addressed by the Cumulative Effects Management Association (CEMA). The paper states that the proportion of annual flow withdrawn from the Athabasca River is too low to have a significant impact on aquatic systems, but the main concern lies in water use during low flow periods, typically during the winter months. Developers will likely come under pressure to develop off-site reservoirs to store water for use during these low-flow periods. tabs., figs.

  7. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Final report, July 1989--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    Research and development of surface extraction and upgrading processes of western tar sands are described. Research areas included modified hot water, fluidized bed, and rotary kiln pyrolysis of tar sands for extraction of bitumen. Bitumen upgrading included solvent extraction of bitumen, and catalytic hydrotreating of bitumen. Characterization of Utah tar sand deposits is also included.

  8. Sustainable use of oil sands for geotechnical construction and road building

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Oil sands are natural deposits of bituminous sand materials that are mined and processed for crude oil. They are routinely used in oil sand fields for building temporary and sometimes permanent roads serving mining and hauling activities. Although...

  9. Characterizing resilient behavior of naturally occurring bituminous sands for road construction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Anochie-Boateng, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Oil sand is a generic name given to natural deposits of bituminous sand materials that are mined for crude oil production. These materials are currently used as subgrade materials of temporary and permanent roads in oil sand fields for operating...

  10. Aggregate and Mineral Resources - SAND_GRAVEL_RESOURCES_IN: Sand and Gravel Resource Potential in Mapped Surficial Material in Indiana (Indiana Geological Survey, 1:500,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — SAND_GRAVEL_RESOURCES_IN is a polygon shapefile that identifies sand and gravel permissive tracts in the surficial unconsolidated deposits of Indiana. Permissive...

  11. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  12. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  13. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  14. Provenance of coastal dune sands along Red Sea, Egypt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samir M Zaid

    2017-06-01

    Texture, mineralogy, and major and trace element geochemistry of 26 coastal dune sand samples were studied to determine the provenance and tectonic environment of two dune fields close to the beaches of Safaga (SF) and Quseir (QS) at the Egyptian Red Sea coast. Onshore winds generate fine, moderate, moderately-well to well-sorted, coarse-skewed to near-symmetrical dune sands with mesokurtic distributions. Winds pick up and transport grains from nearby beach sands and alluvial deposits into a wide Red Sea coastal plain at the border of the beach. The mineralogical (Qt–Ft–Lt) and geochemical composition of the sands, indicate that SF and QS coastal dune sands are mature and influenced by quartz-rich sands. The average CIA values in SF and QS coastal dune sands are low relative to the range of the PAAS, suggesting an arid climate and a low intensity of chemical weathering. The SF and QS coastal dune sand samples are plotted in the recycled orogen and partly in craton interior fields suggesting recycled older sedimentary and partly metamorphic-plutonic sources. The high content of quartz with shell debris and carbonates in coastal dune sands support the recycled sedimentary beach and alluvial sand sources. The dominance of heavy minerals like amphiboles (hornblende) and biotite in the coastal dune sands also supports the effect of metamorphic-plutonic source rocks. The new tectonic discriminant-function diagrams suggest that the coastal dune sands were deposited in a passive margin of a synrift basin. The results provide a good evidence for the extension in the Red Sea rift system during Oligocene-post Pliocene, which is consistent with the general geology of Egypt.

  15. Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-09-01

    For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

  16. Sedimentology of Coastal Deposits in the Seychelles Islands—Evidence of the Indian Ocean Tsunami 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwig, Vanessa; Bahlburg, Heinrich; Monthy, Devis

    2015-03-01

    The Seychelles, an archipelago in the Indian Ocean at a distance of 4,500-5,000 km from the west coast of Sumatra, were severely affected by the December 26, 2004 tsunami with wave heights up to 4 m. Since the tsunami history of small islands often remains unclear due to a young historical record, it is important to study the geological traces of high energy events preserved along their coasts. We conducted a survey of the impact of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami on the inner Seychelles islands. In detail we studied onshore tsunami deposits in the mangrove forest at Old Turtle Pond in the Curieuse Marine National Park on the east coast of Curieuse Island. It is thus protected from anthropogenic interference. Towards the sea it was shielded until the tsunami in 2004 by a 500 m long and 1.5 m high causeway which was set up in 1909 as a sediment trap and assuring a low energetic hydrodynamic environment for the protection of the mangroves. The causeway was destroyed by the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. The tsunami caused a change of habitat by the sedimentation of sand lobes in the mangrove forest. The dark organic rich mangrove soil (1.9 Φ) was covered by bimodal fine to medium carbonate sand (1.7-2.2 Φ) containing coarser carbonate shell fragments and debris. Intertidal sediments and the mangrove soil acted as sources of the lobe deposits. The sand sheet deposited by the tsunami is organized into different lobes. They extend landwards to different inundation distances as a function of the morphology of the onshore area. The maximum extent of 180 m from the shoreline indicates the minimum inundation distance to the tsunami. The top parts of the sand lobes cover the pneumatophores of the mangroves. There is no landward fining trend along the sand lobes and normal grading of the deposits is rare, occurring only in 1 of 7 sites. The sand lobe deposits also lack sedimentary structures. On the surface of the sand lobes numerous mostly fragmented shells of bivalves and

  17. North American Oil Sands: History of Development, Prospects for the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-17

    mixture of sand, bitumen (a heavy crude that does not flow naturally), and water, can be mined or the oil can be extracted in-situ using thermal recovery...quartz sand, bitumen , and water that can either be mined or extracted in-situ5 using thermal recovery techniques. Typically, oil sands contain about...different technology for bitumen extraction than that used for Alberta’s water-wetted deposits. Oil sands are characterized as having a wet interface

  18. A Dual Role of Graphene Oxide Sheet Deposition on Titanate Nanowire Scaffolds for Osteo-implantation: Mechanical Hardener and Surface Activity Regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjun; Hou, Lijuan; Li, Tingting; Gong, Ziqiang; Huang, Huandi; Wang, Ge; Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Xiaoyun

    2015-12-01

    Scaffold biomaterials with open pores and channels are favourable for cell growth and tissue regeneration, however the inherent poor mechanical strength and low surface activity limit their applications as load-bearing bone grafts with satisfactory osseointegration. In this study, macro-porous graphene oxide (GO) modified titanate nanowire scaffolds with desirable surface chemistry and tunable mechanical properties were prepared through a simple hydrothermal process followed by electrochemical deposition of GO nanosheets. The interconnected and porous structure of the GO/titanate nanowire scaffolds provides a large surface area for cellular attachment and migration and displays a high compressive strength of approximately 81.1 MPa and a tunable Young’s modulus over the range of 12.4-41.0 GPa, which satisfies site-specific requirements for implantation. Surface chemistry of the scaffolds was modulated by the introduction of GO, which endows the scaffolds flexibility in attaching and patterning bioactive groups (such as -OH, -COOH and -NH2). In vitro cell culture tests suggest that the GO/titanate nanowire scaffolds act as a promising biomaterial candidate, in particular the one terminated with -OH groups, which demonstrates improved cell viability, and proliferation, differentiation and osteogenic activities.

  19. Influence of silicate on the transport of bacteria in quartz sand and iron mineral-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe; Yang, Haiyan; Wu, Dan; Ni, Jinren; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping

    2014-11-01

    The influence of silicate on the transport and deposition of bacteria (Escherichia coli) in packed porous media were examined at a constant 20 mM ionic strength with different silicate concentrations (from 0 to 1 mM) at pH 7. Transport experiments were performed in two types of representative porous media, both bare quartz sand and iron mineral-coated quartz sand. In bare quartz sand, the breakthrough plateaus in the presence of silicate in suspensions were lower and the corresponding retained profiles were higher than those without silicate ions, indicating that the presence of silicate in suspensions decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand. Moreover, the decrease of bacteria transport in quartz sand induced by silicate was more pronounced with increasing silicate concentrations from 0 to 1 mM. However, when EPS was removed from cell surfaces, the presence of silicate in cell suspensions (with different concentrations) did not affect the transport behavior of bacteria in quartz sand. The interaction of silicate with EPS on cell surfaces negatively decreased the zeta potentials of bacteria, resulting in the decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand when silicate was copresent in bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the presence of silicate in suspensions increased cell transport in iron mineral-coated sand. Silicate ions competed with bacteria for the adsorption sites on mineral-coated sand, contributing to the increased cell transport in mineral-coated sand with silicate present in cell suspensions.

  20. Local inundation distances and regional tsunami recurrence in the Indian Ocean inferred from luminescence dating of sandy deposits in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, D.; Klasen, N.; Jankaew, K.; Brückner, H.; Kelletat, D.; Scheffers, A.; Scheffers, S.

    2012-07-01

    The Holocene beach-ridge plain of Phra Thong Island (Ko Phra Thong, SW Thailand) provides sedimentary evidence of several palaeotsunamis, in addition to the deposit of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Due to poor preservation conditions, these palaeoevent layers are restricted to swales. Correlation across beach ridges, which is important e.g. to reconstruct inundation distances, remains a major challenge. A primary tool for establishing a precisely confined correlation of the sand sheets is the use of chronological data. Since the application of radiocarbon dating is limited by the scarcity of appropriate material, this study utilised optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of tsunamigenic quartz grains. Generally, the sediments showed favourable luminescence properties regarding signal intensity, dose recovery and thermal stability. Disturbances of the OSL signal due to partial bleaching were corrected using the minimum age model. At least three palaeoevents - being 490-550, 925-1035 and 1740-2000 yr old - were distinguished by dating the discontinuous sand sheets at four different sites. Besides this chronological framework, the OSL data provide the opportunity to correlate the discontinuous sand sheets between spatially separated sites within the same swale as well as across ridges. This allows for first estimates of inundation distances for the palaeotsunamis documented on Phra Thong Island. Furthermore, the two younger events overlap in age with contemporaneous tsunami and earthquake evidence from other coasts bordering the Indian Ocean.

  1. Local inundation distances and regional tsunami recurrence in the Indian Ocean inferred from luminescence dating of sandy deposits in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Brill

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Holocene beach-ridge plain of Phra Thong Island (Ko Phra Thong, SW Thailand provides sedimentary evidence of several palaeotsunamis, in addition to the deposit of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Due to poor preservation conditions, these palaeoevent layers are restricted to swales. Correlation across beach ridges, which is important e.g. to reconstruct inundation distances, remains a major challenge. A primary tool for establishing a precisely confined correlation of the sand sheets is the use of chronological data. Since the application of radiocarbon dating is limited by the scarcity of appropriate material, this study utilised optically stimulated luminescence (OSL dating of tsunamigenic quartz grains. Generally, the sediments showed favourable luminescence properties regarding signal intensity, dose recovery and thermal stability. Disturbances of the OSL signal due to partial bleaching were corrected using the minimum age model. At least three palaeoevents – being 490–550, 925–1035 and 1740–2000 yr old – were distinguished by dating the discontinuous sand sheets at four different sites. Besides this chronological framework, the OSL data provide the opportunity to correlate the discontinuous sand sheets between spatially separated sites within the same swale as well as across ridges. This allows for first estimates of inundation distances for the palaeotsunamis documented on Phra Thong Island. Furthermore, the two younger events overlap in age with contemporaneous tsunami and earthquake evidence from other coasts bordering the Indian Ocean.

  2. Simple stochastic cellular automaton model for starved beds and implications about formation of sand topographic features in terms of sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Noritaka

    2016-12-01

    A simple stochastic cellular automaton model is proposed for simulating bedload transport, especially for cases with a low transport rate and where available sediments are very sparse on substrates in a subaqueous system. Numerical simulations show that the bed type changes from sheet flow through sand patches to ripples as the amount of sand increases; this is consistent with observations in flume experiments and in the field. Without changes in external conditions, the sand flux calculated for a given amount of sand decreases over time as bedforms develop from a flat bed. This appears to be inconsistent with the general understanding that sand flux remains unchanged under the constant-fluid condition, but it is consistent with the previous experimental data. For areas of low sand abundance, the sand flux versus sand amount (flux-density relation) in the simulation shows a single peak with an abrupt decrease, followed by a long tail; this is very similar to the flux-density relation seen in automobile traffic flow. This pattern (the relation between segments of the curve and the corresponding bed states) suggests that sand sheets, sand patches, and sand ripples correspond respectively to the free-flow phase, congested phase, and jam phase of traffic flows. This implies that sand topographic features on starved beds are determined by the degree of interference between sand particles. Although the present study deals with simple cases only, this can provide a simplified but effective modeling of the more complicated sediment transport processes controlled by interference due to contact between grains, such as the pulsatory migration of grain-size bimodal mixtures with repetition of clustering and scattering.

  3. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area ​Other Fact Sheets What is structural biology? Structural biology is the study of how biological ...

  4. Cumulative environmental management and the oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    In response to concerns regarding the cumulative environmental impacts of oil sands development within the Athabasca oil sands deposit, the government of Alberta established a Regional Sustainable Development Strategy (RSDS) to balance development with environmental protection. The environmental issues identified through the RSDS were addressed by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). CEMA's boundary is the Wood Buffalo region of northeastern Alberta. It identifies existing and future environmental effects in the region and proposes recommendations to regulatory bodies for reducing environmental impacts associated with oil sands development. This presentation outlined some of the 55 stakeholder representatives of CEMA, including Alberta government departments associated with resource development, oil sand developers within the region, and Aboriginal communities and First Nations. These stakeholders provide input on sector priorities and agree on environmental thresholds. Established working groups also address technical and scientific research issues identified in the RSDS such as sustainable ecosystems; surface waters; trace metals and air contaminants; nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxides; and land reclamation. To date, CEMA has submitted more than 50 reports and has made 4 major environmental recommendations for trace metal management, ecosystem management tools, a framework for acid deposition management, and a landscape design checklist. tabs., figs.

  5. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  6. 47 CFR 32.4040 - Customers' deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.4040 Customers' deposits... for the payment for telecommunications service. (b) Advance payments made by prospective customers...

  7. Vestled - Hvide Sande

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten; Hesselbjerg, Marianne; Schønherr, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side......Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side...

  8. Sedimentary deposits study of the 2006 Java tsunami, in Pangandaran, West Java (preliminary result)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maemunah, Imun, E-mail: imun-m2001@yahoo.com [Geological Agency, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (Indonesia); Institute Technology of Bandung (Indonesia); Suparka, Emmy, E-mail: emmy@gc.itb.ac.id; Puspito, Nanang T, E-mail: nanang@staff.itb.ac.id [Institute Technology of Bandung (Indonesia); Hidayati, Sri, E-mail: shidayati@gmail.com [Geological Agency, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    The 2006 Java Earthquake (Mw 7.2) has generated a tsunami that reached Pangandaran coastal plain with 9.7 m above sea level height of wave. In 2014 we examined the tsunami deposit exposed in shallow trenches along a∼300 m at 5 transect from shoreline to inland on Karapyak and Madasari, Pangandaran. We documented stratigraphically and sedimentologically, the characteristics of Java Tsunami deposit on Karapyak and Madasari and compared both sediments. In local farmland a moderately-sorted, brown soil is buried by a poorly-sorted, grey, medium-grained sand-sheet. The tsunami deposit was distinguished from the underlying soil by a pronounced increase in grain size that becomes finner upwards and landwards. Decreasing concentration of coarse size particles with distance toward inland are in agreement with grain size analysis. The thickest tsunami deposit is about 25 cm found at 84 m from shoreline in Madasari and about 15 cm found at 80 m from shoreline in Karapyak. The thickness of tsunami deposits in some transect become thinner landward but in some other transect lack a consistent suggested strongly affected by local topography. Tsunami deposits at Karapyak and Madasari show many similarities. Both deposits consist of coarse sand that sharply overlies a finer sandy soil. The presence mud drapes and other sedimentary structure like graded bedding, massive beds, mud clasts in many locations shows a dynamics process of tsunami waves. The imbrication coarse and shell fragments of the 2006 Java, tsunami deposits also provide information about the curent direction, allowing us to distinguish run up deposits from backwash deposits.

  9. Sedimentary deposits study of the 2006 Java tsunami, in Pangandaran, West Java (preliminary result)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemunah, Imun; Suparka, Emmy; Puspito, Nanang T.; Hidayati, Sri

    2015-04-01

    The 2006 Java Earthquake (Mw 7.2) has generated a tsunami that reached Pangandaran coastal plain with 9.7 m above sea level height of wave. In 2014 we examined the tsunami deposit exposed in shallow trenches along a˜300 m at 5 transect from shoreline to inland on Karapyak and Madasari, Pangandaran. We documented stratigraphically and sedimentologically, the characteristics of Java Tsunami deposit on Karapyak and Madasari and compared both sediments. In local farmland a moderately-sorted, brown soil is buried by a poorly-sorted, grey, medium-grained sand-sheet. The tsunami deposit was distinguished from the underlying soil by a pronounced increase in grain size that becomes finner upwards and landwards. Decreasing concentration of coarse size particles with distance toward inland are in agreement with grain size analysis. The thickest tsunami deposit is about 25 cm found at 84 m from shoreline in Madasari and about 15 cm found at 80 m from shoreline in Karapyak. The thickness of tsunami deposits in some transect become thinner landward but in some other transect lack a consistent suggested strongly affected by local topography. Tsunami deposits at Karapyak and Madasari show many similarities. Both deposits consist of coarse sand that sharply overlies a finer sandy soil. The presence mud drapes and other sedimentary structure like graded bedding, massive beds, mud clasts in many locations shows a dynamics process of tsunami waves. The imbrication coarse and shell fragments of the 2006 Java, tsunami deposits also provide information about the curent direction, allowing us to distinguish run up deposits from backwash deposits.

  10. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  11. Sedimentation process of saturated sand under impact loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Junfeng; MENG; Xiangyue

    2005-01-01

    The initial small inhomogeneity of saturated sand could be amplified during the sedimentation process after liquefaction, and cracks could be observed in the sand column. Layers of fine sand could also be found at the exact place where cracks developed and disappeared. The phenomena and the whole process were experimentally shown by X-rays images. To account for the phenomena, a linearized stability analysis of the sedimentation of saturated sand was conducted; however, it did not produce a satisfactory result. A three-phase flow model describing the transportation of fine sand is presented in this paper. It is shown that such a kind of erosion/deposition model was qualitatively in good agreement with the experimental observation.

  12. Market Discipline and Deposit Insurance

    OpenAIRE

    Peresetsky,Anatoly

    2008-01-01

    The paper examines Russian banks’ household deposit interest rates for the transition period of setting up the deposit insurance system. Monthly observations of Russian banks’ interest rates and balance sheets are used in a fixed effects panel data model. It is shown market discipline has been significantly diminished after switching to the deposit insurance.

  13. Monitoring and characterisation of sand-mud sedimentation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Alan J. S.; Ibikunle, Olugbenga; McCarter, W. John; Starrs, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    Estuaries and tidal inlets are often characterised by the presence of both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. Knowledge of the sedimentation behaviour of sand-mud mixtures is therefore crucial to the understanding and prediction of the time-dependent structure (i.e. mixed or segregated), composition and erodibility of sediment bed deposits developing within these environments. In the current study, a series of settling column tests are conducted to investigate the hindered settling and initial bed consolidation phases of a range of sand-clay mixtures to determine the parametric conditions under which bed segregation occurs. A new, non-invasive, electrical resistivity measurement technique is employed to capture both temporal and spatial changes in the density, porosity and composition of the evolving sand-clay bed deposits, complimented by time-lapsed images of the sedimentation process within the column. The results show that the formation of segregated (sand-clay) bed layers with bed deposits is largely controlled by the initial fractional composition (i.e. relative sand and clay concentrations). Specifically, mixtures with low clay contents are shown to form well-defined (sand-clay) layer segregation within the resulting deposits, while higher clay contents result in more transitional segregation patterns or no layer segregation (for very high clay concentrations). The physical mechanisms under which these different segregation types can be generated are illustrated through predictions from an existing polydisperse hindered settling model. This model indicates that the degree of bed segregation, and time scale over which this occurs, correlates well with the difference in predicted hindered settling characteristics and upward displacements associated with the sand and clay fractions, respectively. In this regard, the new experimental dataset provides validation for the polydisperse model (for the first time), with the combined data and model predictions

  14. Lonestones as indicators of tsunami deposits in deep-sea sedimentary rocks of the Miocene Morozaki Group, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Toru

    2013-05-01

    Lonestones are isolated larger clasts enclosed in muddy fine-grained deposits, and are usually interpreted as iceberg-rafted dropstones. This interpretation implies the existence of glaciers (continental ice sheets) and, consequently, a cool climate. However, alternative interpretations are possible, as lonestones may also be deposited by non-glacial processes. Therefore, clarification of the depositional processes associated with lonestones is fundamental for studies based on lonestone-bearing deposits. A field survey of lonestone-bearing deposits from Early Miocene deep-sea sedimentary rocks found around the Chita Peninsula of central Japan suggests that tsunami-induced flows on the sea bottom may also form lonestones. These lonestones are associated with sandy to gravelly deposits, and were deposited by high-energy episodic currents. The main features of these deposits are the multiple stacking of normally graded units, and the laterally discontinuous distribution of coarse-grained clastic material (sands and gravels). Such features are consistent with deposition by tsunamis and suggest that lonestone-bearing depositional successions must be carefully interpreted, especially where lonestones are used as glacial indicators, as some lonestones were probably put in place by ancient tsunami events.

  15. Laminin-521 Promotes Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheet Formation on Light-Induced Cell Sheet Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell sheets (rBMSC sheets are attractive for cell-based tissue engineering. However, methods of culturing rBMSC sheets are critically limited. In order to obtain intact rBMSC sheets, a light-induced cell sheet method was used in this study. TiO2 nanodot films were coated with (TL or without (TN laminin-521. We investigated the effects of laminin-521 on rBMSCs during cell sheet culturing. The fabricated rBMSC sheets were subsequently assessed to study cell sheet viability, reattachment ability, cell sheet thickness, collagen type I deposition, and multilineage potential. The results showed that laminin-521 could promote the formation of rBMSC sheets with good viability under hyperconfluent conditions. Cell sheet thickness increased from an initial 26.7 ± 1.5 μm (day 5 up to 47.7 ± 3.0 μm (day 10. Moreover, rBMSC sheets maintained their potential of osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. This study provides a new strategy to obtain rBMSC sheets using light-induced cell sheet technology.

  16. Ice flow Modelling of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lisbeth Tangaa

    simulations of the Greenland ice sheet using ice sheet models offers the possibility of deriving reconstructions of past ice sheet topography, flow and extent, consistent with the dynamics of ice flow and the imposed climate forcing. The large-scale response of the ice sheet modelled by such approaches can...... core derived temperature and precipitation histories have a long history of being used in studies of the past evolution of the Greenland ice sheet, acting as climatic forcing of the ice sheet models. However, the conversion from the isotopic records to past temperatures remain challenging, owing...... to both uncertain processes and depositional histories. Using five different temperature reconstructions derived from isotope records of Greenlandic ice cores, the influence of the paleo records on the simulated ice sheet was investigated using a high-resolution, large-scale ice sheet model (PISM...

  17. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  18. Metals in the 0.25-0.05 mm sand fraction of forest soils in central European Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samonova, Olga; Aseyeva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the vertical and lateral geochemical differentiation of 0.25-0.05 mm sand fraction partitioned from uncontaminated forest soils on the central part of the Russian Plain. The vertical distribution of Fe, Ti, Mn, Zr, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb and Co was examined in 5 soil profiles: two podzoluvisols developing on sheet loam on interfluvial summits, two poorly differentiated soddy and soddy gleyic soils occupying slope and footslope positions, and one floodplain soil. The spatial variations of 0.25-0.05 mm fraction geochemistry were characterized using elemental data from the humus horizons of two soil catenas and the topsoil of an erosional landform (a gully system), typical for the study area. Analyses show the following median concentrations in the sand fraction: Fe - 3,2%, Ti - 3000 ppm, Mn - 500 ppm, Zr - 640 ppm, Zn, Cu, Cr - 50 ppm, and Ni, Pb and Co - 23, 18 and 8 ppm, respectively. Variation coefficients diminish in magnitude: Mn, Cu (70-80%) > Co, Zn, Ni, Fe (60-65%) >Zr, Ti (45%) > Cr, Pb (35%). The sand fraction content in the soils varied widely, from 0.4 to 56% depending on the lithological features of parent material and underlying strata. No even distribution of the fraction across soil profiles was registered. In soils on loamy deposits sand enrichment was observed in the upper horizons, in contrast to the lower horizons for soils underlain by sandy glacio-fluvial deposits. The higher contents of metals in the sand fraction in all soil profiles were found in the topsoil, characterized by more active humus accumulation, biogeochemical processes and sand grain weathering. However, Ti and Zr were distributed more evenly, implying their presence in a form of stable primary minerals. The spatial distribution of the metals in 0.25-0.05 mm particles revealed important soil-geochemical convergence processes in lateral direction along catenas. Fraction samples partitioned from soils in the lowermost positions on the two catenas

  19. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  20. Sand effects on thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael; Barnett, Blake; Ghoshal, Anindya; Murugan, Muthuvel; Swab, Jeffrey; Pepi, Marc; Hopkins, David; Gazonas, George; Kerner, Kevin

    Accumulation and infiltration of molten/ semi-molten sand and subsequent formation of calcia-magnesia-alumina-silicate (CMAS) deposits in gas turbine engines continues to be a significant problem for aviation assets. This complex problem is compounded by the large variations in the composition, size, and topology of natural sands, gas generator turbine temperatures, thermal barrier coating properties, and the incoming particulate's momentum. In order to simplify the materials testing process, significant time and resources have been spent in the development of synthetic sand mixtures. However, there is debate whether these mixtures accurately mimic the damage observed in field-returned engines. With this study, we provide a direct comparison of CMAS deposits from both natural and synthetic sands. Using spray deposition techniques, 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings are deposited onto bond-coated, Ni-superalloy discs. Each sample is coated with a sand slurry, either natural or synthetic, and exposed to a high temperature flame for 1 hour. Test samples are characterized before and after flame exposure. In addition, the test samples will be compared to field-returned equipment. This research was sponsored by the US Army Research Laboratory, and was accomplished under Cooperative Agreement # W911NF-12-2-0019.

  1. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains an executive summary and reports for five of these projects. 137 figs., 49 tabs.

  2. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1997-11-26

    The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

  3. Laboratory studies of dune sand for the use of construction industry in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva Jayawardena, Upali; Wijesuriya, Roshan; Abayaweera, Gayan; Viduranga, Tharaka

    2015-04-01

    With the increase of the annual sand demand for the construction industry the excessive excavation of river sand is becoming a serious environmental problem in Sri Lanka. Therefore, it is necessary to explore the possibility for an alternative to stop or at least to minimize river sand mining activities. Dune sand is one of the available alternative materials to be considered instead of river sand in the country. Large quantities of sand dunes occur mainly along the NW and SE coastal belt which belong to very low rainfall Dry Zone coasts. The height of dune deposits, vary from 1m to about 30 meters above sea level. The objective of this paper is to indicate some studies and facts on the dune sand deposits of Sri Lanka. Laboratory studies were carried out for visual observations and physical properties at the initial stage and then a number of tests were carried out according to ASTM standards to obtain the compressive strength of concrete cylinders and mortar cubes mixing dune sand and river sand in different percentages keeping a constant water cement ratio. Next the water cement ratio was changed for constant dune sand and river sand proportion. Microscopic analysis shows that the dune sand consist of 95 % of quartz and 5 % of garnet, feldspar, illmenite and other heavy minerals with clay, fine dust, fine shell fragments and organic matters. Grains are sub-rounded to angular and tabular shapes. The grain sizes vary from fine to medium size of sand with silt. The degree of sorting and particle size observed with dune sands are more suited with the requirement of fine aggregates in the construction industry. The test result indicates that dune sand could be effectively used in construction work without sieving and it is ideal for wall plastering due to its'-uniformity. It could also be effectively used in concrete and in mortars mixing with river sand. The best mixing ratio is 75% dune sand and 25% river sand as the fine aggregate of concrete. For mortar the mixing

  4. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  5. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  6. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  7. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  8. Virksomhedens sande ansigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholt, Marianne Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Er modhistorier en byrde eller en styrke i forandringsprocesser? Hvad stiller vi op, når adgangen til organisationens sande identitet går gennem medarbejdernes modhistorier? Når vi sammenholder denne erkendelse med vores viden om, at medarbejdere helt naturligt afholder sig fra at videregive disse...

  9. Sand (CSW4)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  10. Sand supply to beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2017-04-01

    In most cases, beaches and dunes are built by sand that has been transported onshore from the shoreface. While this has been known for a long time, we are still not able to quantitatively predict onshore sediment transport and sand supply to beaches. Sediment transport processes operating during brief, high-energy stormy conditions - when beaches erode and sand moves offshore - are fairly well known and they can be modelled with a reasonable degree of confidence. However, the slower onshore sand transport leading to beach recovery under low-to-moderate energy conditions - and the reason why beaches and dunes exist in the first place - is not yet well understood. This severely limits our capability to understand and predict coastal behaviour on long time scales, for example in response to changing sea level or wave conditions. This paper will discuss issues and recent developments in sediment transport measurement and prediction on the lower and upper shoreface and into the swash zone. The focus will be on the integration and upscaling of small-scale deterministic process measurements into parametric models that may increase modelling capabilities of coastal behaviour on larger temporal and spatial scales.

  11. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  12. Oil sands to the rescue: oil sand microbial communities can degrade recalcitrant alkyl phenyl alkanoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Corinne [University of Essex (Canada)], email: cwhitby@essex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Almost half of all global oil reserves are found as biodegraded heavy oils found in vast tar sand deposits located in North and South America and these account for 47% of Canadian oil production. Oil sand extraction generates large amounts of toxic waste water, known as oil sand process waters (OSPW), that are stored in large tailing ponds that contain toxic compounds like naphthenic acids (NAs). The presence of NAs creates problems like toxicity, corrosion, and the formation of calcium napthenate deposits which block pipelines and other infrastructure and need to be removed. This paper presents oil sand microbial communities that can degrade these NAs. The approach is to apply new aliphatic and aromatic NAs as substrates to supplement and identify NA degrading microbes and also to identify the metabolites produced and explain NA degradation pathways and the functional genes involved. The chemistry and the processes involved are explained. From the results, it is suggested that pure cultures of P. putida KT2440 be used against NAs.

  13. Sand Resources, Regional Geology, and Coastal Processes of the Chandeleur Islands Coastal System: an Evaluation of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Monkey Bayou at the southern end of the Chandeleur Islands. Numerical simulation of waves and sediment transport supports the geophysical results and indicates that vast areas of the lower shoreface are affected and are undergoing erosion during storm events, that there is little or no fair weather mechanism to rework material into the littoral system, and that as a result, there is a net loss of sediment from the system. Lidar surveys revealed that the island chain immediately after Hurricane Katrina lost about 84 percent of its area and about 92 percent of its prestorm volume. Marsh platforms that supported the islands' sand prior to the storm were reduced in width by more than one-half. Repeated lidar surveys document that in places the shoreline has retreated about 100 m under the relatively low-energy waves since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita; however, this retreat is nonuniform. Recent high-resolution geophysical surveys of the sea floor and subsurface within 5-6 km of the Chandeleur Islands during 2006 and 2007 show that, in addition to the sand that is rebuilding portions of the island chain, a large volume of sand is contained in Hewes Point, in an extensive subtidal spit platform that has formed at the northern end of the Chandeleur Islands. Hewes Point appears to be the depositional terminus of the alongshore transport system. In the southern Chandeleurs, sand is being deposited in a broad tabular deposit near Breton Island called the southern offshore sand sheet. These two depocenters account for approximately 70 percent of the estimated sediment volume located in potential borrow sites. An additional large potential source of sand for restoration lies in the St. Bernard Shoals, which are estimated to contain approximately 200 ? 106 m3 of sand. Successful restoration planning for the Breton National Wildlife Refuge should mimic the natural processes of early stages of barrier island evolution including lateral transport to the flanks of the island chain

  14. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  15. Thermoluminescence dating of the british coversand deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, M. D.

    Coversand deposits, thought to be of Lateglacial age are found in Britain in North Lincolnshire, South-West Lancashire and Central East Anglia. A comprehensive dating study of them, using thermoluminescence (TL) techniques, is currently underway in an attempt to link the British coversand deposits to the European coversand chronology. Initial results from four of the British coversand sites sampled are presented. The 26 TL dates from 14 samples show that in Lincolnshire aeolian deposition took place from 12.5 ka to I1 ka. Cessation of the initial sand deposition was synchronous with this in Lancashire, but sand deposition occurred significantly earlier in East Anglia. The upper layers of aeolian sand in Lancashire are much younger and are attributed to Holocene reworking. On the basis of these dates, Lincolnshire and Lancashire coversand deposition occurred at a similar time to the Younger Coversand II, whilst East Anglian coversand deposition coincided with the Younger Coversand I phase in the European coversand chronology.

  16. Dredging of sand from a creek adjacent to a sand-spit for reclamation: Its impact on spit stability and coastal zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajagopal, M.D.; Vethamony, P.; Ilangovan, D.; Jayakumar, S.; Sudheesh, K.; Murty, K.S.R.

    . Mangroves are not present in the study area; patches of casuarina and cashew trees are observed towards land as well as on the sand spit (Anonymous, 1999). September 8, 2007 5:43 RPS mtec07_new Dredging of Sand from a Creek Adjacent to a Sand...-Spit for Reclamation 465 3. Results and Discussion 3.1. Estimation of quantum of sand that can be obtained from zones-I and II The post-dredging bathymetry of 2000 (Fig. 1) when compared with the bathymetry of 2005 shows that the deposition is in the range of 0.4–1.2 m...

  17. Microbes in Beach Sands: Integrating Environment, Ecology and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Richard; Harwood, Valerie J; Edge, Thomas A; Nevers, Meredith; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Vijayavel, Kannappan; Brandão, João; Sadowsky, Michael J; Alm, Elizabeth Wheeler; Crowe, Allan; Ferguson, Donna; Ge, Zhongfu; Halliday, Elizabeth; Kinzelman, Julie; Kleinheinz, Greg; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Staley, Christopher; Staley, Zachery; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M

    2014-09-01

    Beach sand is a habitat that supports many microbes, including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa (micropsammon). The apparently inhospitable conditions of beach sand environments belie the thriving communities found there. Physical factors, such as water availability and protection from insolation; biological factors, such as competition, predation, and biofilm formation; and nutrient availability all contribute to the characteristics of the micropsammon. Sand microbial communities include autochthonous species/phylotypes indigenous to the environment. Allochthonous microbes, including fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and waterborne pathogens, are deposited via waves, runoff, air, or animals. The fate of these microbes ranges from death, to transient persistence and/or replication, to establishment of thriving populations (naturalization) and integration in the autochthonous community. Transport of the micropsammon within the habitat occurs both horizontally across the beach, and vertically from the sand surface and ground water table, as well as at various scales including interstitial flow within sand pores, sediment transport for particle-associated microbes, and the large-scale processes of wave action and terrestrial runoff. The concept of beach sand as a microbial habitat and reservoir of FIB and pathogens has begun to influence our thinking about human health effects associated with sand exposure and recreational water use. A variety of pathogens have been reported from beach sands, and recent epidemiology studies have found some evidence of health risks associated with sand exposure. Persistent or replicating populations of FIB and enteric pathogens have consequences for watershed/beach management strategies and regulatory standards for safe beaches. This review summarizes our understanding of the community structure, ecology, fate, transport, and public health implications of microbes in beach sand. It concludes with recommendations for future work in

  18. Dynamics of the late Plio-Pleistocene West Antarctic Ice Sheet documented in subglacial diamictites, AND-1B drill core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Ellen A.; Christoffersen, Poul; Powell, Ross D.; Talarico, Franco M.

    2014-08-01

    Geologic studies of sediment deposited by glaciers can provide crucial insights into the subglacial environment. We studied muddy diamictites in the ANtarctic geological DRILLing (ANDRILL) AND-1B drill core, acquired from beneath the Ross Ice Shelf in McMurdo Sound, with the aim of identifying paleo-ice stream activity in the Plio-Pleistocene. Glacial advances were identified from glacial surfaces of erosion (GSEs) and subglacial diamictites within three complete sequences were investigated using lithofacies associations, micromorphology, and quartz sand grain microtextures. Whereas conditions in the Late Pliocene resemble the modern Greenland Ice Sheet where fast flowing glaciers lubricated by surface meltwater terminate directly in the sea (interval 201-212 mbsl) conditions in the Late Pleistocene are similar to modern West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) ice streams (38-49 mbsl). We identify the latter from ductile deformation and high pore-water pressure, which resulted in pervasive rotation and formation of till pellets and low relief, rounded sand grains dominated by abrasion. In the transitional period during the Mid-Pleistocene (55-68 mbsf), a slow moving inland ice sheet deposited tills with brittle deformation, producing lineations and bi-masepic and unistrial plasma fabric, along with high relief, conchoidally fractured quartz grains. Changes in the provenance of gravel to cobble-size clasts support a distant source area of Byrd Glacier for fast-flowing paleo-ice streams and a proximal area between Darwin and Skelton Glaciers for the slow-moving inland ice sheet. This difference in till provenance documents a shift in direction of glacial flow at the core site, which indirectly reflects changes in the size and thickness of the WAIS. Hence, we found that fast ice streaming motion is a consequence of a thicker WAIS pushing flow lines to the west and introducing clasts from the Byrd Glacier source area to the drill site. The detailed analysis of diamictites in

  19. A Comparative Study on Sand Transport Modeling for Horizontal Multiphase Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Wai Choong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Presence of sand causes adverse effects on hydrocarbon production, pipeline erosion and problems at wellbore. If the problems persist, production may be stopped and delayed. This imposes workover cost. Hence, operating expenses increase and revenue reduces. There is no explicit calculation algorithm for sand transportation modeling readily available in flow simulators. Therefore, this study aims to develop an Excel-based spreadsheet on sand transportation to predict sand critical velocity and onset of sand deposition based on published literature. The authors reviewed nine sand transportation models in pipelines and made comparisons on the selected models based on various criteria. Four of which were then developed into a sand modeling spreadsheet. The four models are the Turian et al. (1987, Oudeman (1993, Stevenson et al. (2002b Model and Danielson (2007. The spreadsheet presently focuses on sand production prediction in horizontal two-phase flow. The Danielson model can predict sand hold up while the other models estimate grain size transportable and critical velocity of sand. Flowing pipeline properties, sand properties and results of simulations like using OLGA (for flow rate, velocity and superficial velocity of different phases are necessary inputs of the spreadsheet. A user selects any model based on different operating conditions or user preference. The spreadsheet was validated by comparing data extracted from the research papers. Sensitivity analyses can also be performed with the spreadsheet by manipulating the parameters such as grain size and flow rate. This review is useful for flow simulators’ development to include sand transport modeling.

  20. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of ...

  1. Trauma Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Physical Trauma Fact Sheet Physical Trauma Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area ... of physical trauma. Credit: iStock. What is physical trauma? Physical trauma is a serious injury to the ...

  2. Diabetes Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes by losing weight. Related information Fitness and nutrition Heart disease and stroke Obesity and weight loss fact sheet Physical activity fact sheet Pregnancy The javascript used in this widget is not ...

  3. Frac sand in the United States: a geological and industry overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Mary Ellen; Wilson, Anna B.; Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2015-01-01

    A new mineral rush is underway in the upper Midwest of the United States, especially in Wisconsin and Minnesota, for deposits of high-quality frac sand that the mining industry calls “Northern White” sand or “Ottawa” sand. Frac sand is a specialized type of sand that is added to fracking fluids that are injected into unconventional oil and gas wells during hydraulic fracturing (fracking or hydrofracking), a process that enhances petroleum extraction from tight (low permeability) reservoirs. Frac sand consists of natural sand grains with strict mineralogical and textural specifications that act as a proppant (keeping induced fractures open), extending the time of release and the flow rate of hydrocarbons from fractured rock surfaces in contact with the wellbore.

  4. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Quarterly report, April--June 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    Accomplishments are briefly described for the following tasks: environmental impact statement; coupled fluidized bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; water-based recovery of bitumen; rotary kiln process for recovery of bitumen and combustion of coke sand; recovery of bitumen from oil sands using fluidized bed reactors and combustion of spent sands in transport reactors; recovery of bitumen from oil sand and upgrading of bitumen by solvent extraction; catalytic and thermal upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids; evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high energy jet fuels and other specialty products; development of mathematical models for bitumen recovery and processing; completion of the cost examination study of the pilot plant restoration; development studies of equipment for three-product gravity separation of bitumen and sand; determine thickener requirements; and environmental studies of the North Salt Lake pilot plant rehabilitation and eventual operation and those environmental problems associated with eventual commercial products.

  5. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report.

  6. Anthropogenic initiation and acceleration of aeolian dune activity within the northern European Sand Belt and societal feedbacks over the last 2500 yrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungershausen, Uta; Larsen, Annegret; Bork, Hans-Rudolf; Duttmann, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    In North-Western Europe, Pleistocene sand sheets have been re-activated during phases of Holocene deforestation and agricultural land-use. Although there are temporal overlaps between anthropogenic activity and sand sheet re-activation, the root cause and subsequent feedbacks between aeolian activity and societal response remain largely unknown. Here, we seek to establish cause and effect by examining the detailed co-variation in both the timing and magnitude of aeolian and anthropogenic activity through the quantification of Holocene dune sediments in combination with archaeological and pollen records. These records indicate a series of complex phases of aeolian activity followed by landscape stabilization, which we attribute primarily to changing patterns of human impact. We find that a steady increase in dune deposition rates in the Medieval Period corresponds to an increase in settlement activity and deforestation ( 1000-1500 AD). At their peak, Medieval deposition rates were 3.4-times larger than during the late Pleistocene, which was the period experiencing the most favourable natural conditions for aeolian sediment transport in the past 11600 years. Prior to the Medieval Period, relative land-surface stability (depositional hiatus) persisted from the late Pleistocene until the Roman Iron Age Period (0-400 AD), in which deforestation to fuel iron production had a minor impact on aeolian activity, as indicated by the lowest recorded deposition rate (0.12 t/ha/a ± 0.02 t/ha/a). Following the Medieval Period peak in aeolian deposition rates, aeolian activity diminishes rapidly, and coincides with the abandonment of nearby human settlement. This can be interpreted as a direct positive feedback in which Medieval agricultural overexploitation crossed sufficient aeolian activity thresholds to render the landscape practically unworkable for cropping agriculture. Based on our findings and a comprehensive review of Northern European sand belt activity, we interpret a

  7. Application of fluid-rock reaction studies to in situ recovery from oil sand deposits, Alberta Canada. II. Mineral transformations during an experimental-statistical study of water-bitumen-shale reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boon, J.A.; Hitchon, B.

    1983-01-01

    During the experiment, calculations were made of the mud-mineral equilibrium and studies were made of the x-ray diffractogram of the solid phases. Data on deviations from equilibriums and intensity of the normalized x-ray diffraction peaks were processed by the method of dispersion analysis. It was established that in addition to dissolving the quartz, formation of montmorillonite occurs, probably by forming transitional illite-montmorillonite interstratified layered structures. The reactions promote high pH values of the aqueous medium. The solubility of siderite to a considerable degree is determined by the reaction time and mineralization of the aqueous phase, and also the ratios of pH/mineralization, time/mineralization and pH/temperature/time. Despite the limitations associated with laboratory nature of the experiment, one can draw the conclusion that during development of the bituminous sands by the in situ method, processes of dissolving minerals are widespread.

  8. PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

  9. Electromagnetic augmentation for casting of thin metal sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1989-01-01

    Thin metal sheets are cast by magnetically levitating molten metal deposited in a mold within a ferromagnetic yoke and between AC conducting coils and linearly displacing the magnetically levitated liquid metal while it is being cooled by the water-cooled walls of the mold to form a solid metal sheet. A conducting shield is electrically coupled to the molten metal sheet to provide a return path for eddy currents induced in the metal sheet by the current in the AC conducting coils. In another embodiment, a DC conducting coil is coupled to the metal sheet for providing a direct current therein which interacts with the magnetic field to levitate the moving metal sheet. Levitation of the metal sheet in both molten and solid forms reduces its contact pressure with the mold walls while maintaining sufficient engagement therebetween to permit efficient conductive cooling by the mold through which a coolant fluid may be circulated. The magnetic fields associated with the currents in the aforementioned coils levitate the molten metal sheet while the mold provides for its lateral and vertical confinement. A leader sheet having electromagnetic characteristics similar to those of the molten metal sheet is used to start the casing process and precedes the molten metal sheet through the yoke/coil arrangement and mold and forms a continuous sheet therewith. The yoke/coil arrangement may be either U-shaped with a single racetrack coil or may be rectangular with a pair of spaced, facing bedstead coils.

  10. Possibilities of preparation asphalt concrete by oil sands of Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbol Tileuberdi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper physicochemical properties of oil sands of Munayli-Mola deposits and efficient ways to use them for preparing asphalt concrete were represented. For determination of organic part of oil sands the extraction methods were used in Soxhlet apparatus by variety of solvents. It has been established 16 wt.% content of natural bitumen in oil sands, which compared with results of ash content determination. According to results of experiment, the natural bitumen is heavy oil and its characteristics close to characteristics of paving bitumen. The optimum content of oil sands in asphalt mix are 28 and 47 mass %, the mixes prepared under these conditions satisfy standard requirements of the Republic of Kazakhstan on the asphalt mixture ST RK 1225-2003.

  11. Aligned carbon nanotube-silicon sheets: a novel nano-architecture for flexible lithium ion battery electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Yildiz, Ozkan; Bhanushali, Hardik; Wang, Yongxin; Stano, Kelly; Xue, Leigang; Zhang, Xiangwu; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-09-25

    Aligned carbon nanotube sheets provide an engineered scaffold for the deposition of a silicon active material for lithium ion battery anodes. The sheets are low-density, allowing uniform deposition of silicon thin films while the alignment allows unconstrained volumetric expansion of the silicon, facilitating stable cycling performance. The flat sheet morphology is desirable for battery construction.

  12. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  13. Flexible Structural-Health-Monitoring Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xinlin; Kuo, Fuo

    2008-01-01

    A generic design for a type of flexible structural-health-monitoring sheet with multiple sensor/actuator types and a method of manufacturing such sheets has been developed. A sheet of this type contains an array of sensing and/or actuation elements, associated wires, and any other associated circuit elements incorporated into various flexible layers on a thin, flexible substrate. The sheet can be affixed to a structure so that the array of sensing and/or actuation elements can be used to analyze the structure in accordance with structural-health-monitoring techniques. Alternatively, the sheet can be designed to be incorporated into the body of the structure, especially if the structure is made of a composite material. Customarily, structural-health monitoring is accomplished by use of sensors and actuators arrayed at various locations on a structure. In contrast, a sheet of the present type can contain an entire sensor/actuator array, making it unnecessary to install each sensor and actuator individually on or in a structure. Sensors of different types such as piezoelectric and fiber-optic can be embedded in the sheet to form a hybrid sensor network. Similarly, the traces for electric communication can be deposited on one or two layers as required, and an entirely separate layer can be employed to shield the sensor elements and traces.

  14. Dark grains of sand: a geological storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Maresca, Magda

    2017-04-01

    In the secondary Italian school the Earth science learning begins at first year, in synergy with other natural science subjects such as Astronomy, Chemistry and Biology. Italian teachers have to focus on the landscape geomorphological aspects and often Earth processes are difficult to display since they are related to certain phenomena happened during the past and often far from the involved country. In order to better understand the environment surrounding us, very simple and poor materials, like sands, allow the teachers to create attractive lab experiences. According to the IBSE (Inquiry Based Science Education) approach, a learning unit has been implemented starting from a walking along the light carbonate beaches of the Adriatic sea: a smart look to the sands ("engage step"), stroke the students fantasy pushing them to explore some strange black grains on the sands. Dirty sands? Or rock landscape, soil degradation and Ofanto river and coastal processes (erosion, transportation and deposition)? This was the teaching challenge. Due to the youngest age, a third level, guided inquiry, was adopted so the teacher is the "guide of inquiry" encouraging the students using the research question ("Why is the sand dark?", "Do all sands look the same?", "Where does it come from?") and driving the students around their investigation plans ("How can I measure grain size?"). A procedure to answer the above questions and validate the results and explanations has been implemented to allow the students to be proactive in their study. During the learning activities will be the students to ask for field trip to elaborate their new knowledge, verify and visualize the speculated processes. The teaching skills allow to address several geosciences domains such as mineralogy, petrology, regional geology and geodynamics as well as other scientific disciplines such as mathematics (more specifically statistics), forensic science and even life sciences (the presence of bioclasts might

  15. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  16. A new depositional model for glacial sediments in Killiney Bay during the Late Devensian deglaciation - East Central Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerc, S.; Portier, E.; Buoncristiani, J. F.

    2009-04-01

    During the last glaciation in northwestern Europe, major studies are consistent with the hypothesis of an ice-stream flowing southward in the Irish Sea Basin, in connection with tributary flows on the eastern of the Irish Cap. During deglaciation, sediment deposition processes are predominant, leaving a record of glacially influenced environments. Evidence of such deposits still remains on the coast of the UK and Ireland today. Although these deposits have been studied for many decades, their depositional environment is still under debate and interpretations are evolving, together with new concepts. The present work focuses on the study of the Killiney Bay section, South Dublin, located in a topographic depression, expected to be a former subglacial tunnel valley in connection with an offshore canyon in the Irish Sea. Geometry and architecture have been approached by using panoramic photographs. In addition, fifteen detailed logs describe the stratigraphic succession, erosive surfaces and variations of small-scale sedimentary features. Seven Facies Associations were defined and used to reconstruct depositional environments. Although the section is affected by glaciotectonic deformation, primary sedimentological figures are well preserved. Within the section, a 600m long depression has been observed, in which a Gilbert-type delta has developed. Laterally, this delta evolves into prograding sheet-like structures interpreted as subaqueous fans. The corresponding facies association is composed of four main facies: -Matrix-supported coarse-grained facies (granules to cobbles) arranged in prograding sheet-like structures (dip angle 5-9° N160). -Massive sand to diffusely graded sand. -Coarse-to-medium sand facies with long wavelength ripples (1-2m), oriented N160. -Medium-to-coarse sand with climbing ripples and current ripples. These facies associations are characteristic of subaqueous (probably glaciolacustrine) environments. The transition from delta to fan delta has

  17. Stability of a sand spit due to dredging in an adjacent creek

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patgaonkar, R.S.; Ilangovan, D.; Vethamony, P.; Babu, M.T.; Jayakumar, S.; Rajagopal, M.D.

    , but maintaining the spit intact. For this, the stability of sand spit is studied with different criteria. The results confirm that the creek mouth is a near permanent zone of deposition. The model results obtained for various depth scenarios show...

  18. Linear sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ziyin; JIN Xianglong; LI Jiabiao; ZHENG Yulong; WANG Xiaobo

    2005-01-01

    Based on the latest full-coverage high-resolu- tion multi-beam sounding data, the distribution of the linear sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea (ECS) is studied with quantitative statistical analysis. The study area can be divided into the northeastern part and the southwestern part. Sand ridges in the northeastern area, trending 116°N, show obvious linear character and shrink to the inner shelf. Sand ridges in the southwestern area, trending 120°N-146°N, tend to have net form. Sand ridges gradually become sand sheets in the center part of study area. Sand ridges are distributed landward to the isobath of 60m, distributed seaward to the water depth of 120 m in the northeast and 150 m in the southwest. Immature sand ridges are observed at water depth of 130-180 m in the southwestern depressions. The acoustic reflection properties of the internal high-angle inclined beddings of the sand ridges are analyzed based on the typical seismic profiles close to the research area. Lithological analysis and dating of 4 boreholes and 12 cores indicate that the widely distributed transgressive sand layer with high content of shell debris which was formed in the early-middle Holocene is the main composition of the linear sand ridges on the outer shelf of the ECS. The dominating factor in formation, developing and burying of the sand ridges is the variation of water depth caused by sea- level change and the rate of sediment supply. In 12400 aBP the cotidal lines of the M2 tidal component were closely perpendicular to the strike-directions of the sand ridges in the study area, and the tidal wave system during 12000-8000 aBP might play a key role in the formation of the linear sand ridges which are widely distributed on the outer shelf of the ECS.

  19. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  20. Analysis of the environmental control technology for tar sand development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Nevers, N.; Glenne, B.; Bryner, C.

    1979-06-01

    The environmental technology for control of air pollution, water pollution, and for the disposal, stabilization, and vegetation of the waste tar sand were thoroughly investigated. Although some difficulties may be encountered in any of these undertakings, it seems clear that the air and water pollution problems can be solved to meet any applicable standard. Currently there are two large-scale plants producing liquid fuels from tar sands in Alberta, Canada which use similar technology involving surface mining, hot water extraction, and surface disposal of waste sand. These projects all meet the Canadian environmental control regulations in force at the time they began. The largest US deposits of tar sands are much smaller than the Canadian; 95 percent are located in the state of Utah. Their economics do not appear as attractive as the Canadian deposits. The environmental control costs are not large enough to make an otherwise economic project uneconomic. The most serious environmental conflict likely to occur over the recovery of liquid fuels from the US deposits of tar sands is that caused by the proximity of the deposits to national parks, national monuments, and a national recreation area in Utah. These areas have very stringent air pollution requirements; and even if the air pollution control requirements can be met, there may still be adequate opposition to large-scale mining ventures in these areas to prevent their commercial exploitation. Another environmental constraint may be water rights availability.Essentially all of the water running in the Colorado river basin is now legally allocated. Barring new interpretations of the legality of water rights purchase, Utah tar sands developments should be able to obtain water by purchasing existing irrigation water rights.

  1. Dew Measurements along a Longitudinal Sand Dune Transect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, A.F.G.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Berkowicz, S.

    2000-01-01

    In a desert environment dew can serve as an important source of moisture for plants, biological crusts, insects and small animals. A measurement programme was carried out within a sand dune belt situated in the northwestern Negev desert, Israel, to measure daily amounts of dew deposition as well as

  2. Geologic Controls of Sand Boil Formation at Buck Chute, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Geology ........................................................................................................................... 4 2.3 Description of...18 3.1 Geology of the Lower Mississippi River Valley...Hypothesis Sand boil formation at the Buck Chute site is the result of geology consisting of point bar and abandoned channel deposits with a thin

  3. Cluster analysis of radionuclide concentrations in beach sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, R.J.; James, I.; Jennings, P.J.; Keoyers, J.E.

    This paper presents a method in which natural radionuclide concentrations of beach sand minerals are traced along a stretch of coast by cluster analysis. This analysis yields two groups of mineral deposit with different origins. The method deviates from standard methods of following dispersal of

  4. In Vitro Cytotoxic Potential of Afghanistan Sand Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    including barium, strontium, copper, arsenic , nickel, iron, 13 potassium, manganese, and chromium (Table 1). Additional heavy metals (aluminum...2009). These particles, when inhaled, can be deposited deep into the lungs. Thus, if potentially toxic agents are bioavailable and diffuse into the...strontium, copper, arsenic , iron, potassium, nickel, manganese, and chromium were detected in the soluble extracts of Afghanistan sand sample (Table 1

  5. The high-level marine shell-bearing deposits of Clava, Inverness-shire, and their origin as glacial rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, J. W.

    The enigmatic high-level, till-covered, cold water marine shell-bearing deposits at Clava, Inverness-shire, are described systematically in the light of new observations made at sites documented in the literature. The marine deposits, named here as the Clava Shelly Formation, include three members, the unfossiliferous Clava sand, the underlying Clava shelly clay and a shelly diamicton known as the Clava shelly till. The first two members form a conformable coarsening-upwards sequence containing a shallow water, high-boreal to low-Arctic fauna and flora. The Clava shelly till is essentially glacially re-sedimented glaciomarine clay containing a sparse fauna, but its stratigraphic relationship and age are not absolutely clear. The shelly clay is ascribed to a Mid-Devensian interstadial episode on the basis of amino-acid dating. It is concluded that the Clava shelly clay, and several discrete masses of Clava sand and shelly till, are glacially transported allochthons derived from the Great Glen. The rafts were probably detached as a result of high pore water pressure building up in laterally restricted aquifers beneath a confined glacier that flowed north-eastwards across the Loch Ness basin. This glacier was deflected eastwards and upwards towards Clava by ice flowing from the northern Highlands along the Beauly Firth during the build-up of the last Scottish ice-sheet. The rafts were stacked at the ice margin when the glacier entered the Nairn Valley before being overriden by the expanding ice-sheet.

  6. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  7. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  8. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  9. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  10. Depositional environments of the subsurface Cretaceous deposits of southeastern North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, E. S., Jr.

    1981-02-01

    The subsurface Cretaceous deposits of southeastern North Carolina were analyzed. Six lithologic units were recognized. These are, in ascending stratigraphic order: an unnamed Lower Cretaceous unit, Cape Fear Formation, unnamed Upper Cretaceous unit, Middendorf Formation, Black Creek Formation, and Peedee Formation. The unnamed Lower Cretaceous unit contains interbedded fine to medium grained sands, calcareous sandstones, sandy limestones and clays which were deposited in environments ranging from nearshore to fluvial. The Cape Fear Formation consists of very fine to coarse tan sands interbedded with brown and reddish clays. The Upper Cretaceous unnamed unit is composed of tan and yellow medium to coarse sands interbedded with tan and red clays deposited in braided fluvial environments. The Black Creek Formation consists of lignitic dark clays and coarse to very fine sands. Formation is composed of dark green to greenish-gray, micaceous, glauconitic clays and sands interbedded with calcareous sandstones or sandy limestones.

  11. A family of sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We study some dynamical properties of a family of two-dimensional cellular automata: those that arise from an underlying one dimensional sand automaton whose local rule is obtained using a latin square. We identify a simple sand automaton G whose local rule is algebraic, and classify this automaton as having equicontinuity points, but not being equicontinuous. We also show it is not surjective. We generalise some of these results to a wider class of sand automata.

  12. Dilatometric Characterization of Foundry Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Břuska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this contribution is summary of physical – chemistry properties of usually used foundry silica and no – silica sands in Czech foundries. With the help of dilatometry analysis theoretical assumptions of influence of grain shape and size on dilatation value of sands were confirmed. Determined was the possibility of dilatometry analysis employment for preparing special (hybrid sands with lower and/or more linear character of dilatation.

  13. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note that the tes......The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...... that the testing procedure and the data processing were carried out according to the specifications of ETCS-F1.97....

  14. The use of stable isotopes to trace oil sands constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farwell, A.J.; Nero, V.; Dixon, D.G. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    2002-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the biological effects of oil sands mining operations on aquatic ecosystems. The study focused on the Athabasca oil sand deposit, the largest of 4 deposits in northern Alberta. In particular, the study examined the cycling of oil sand constituents in Benthic invertebrates collected from test pits at Syncrude Canada Ltd.. The invertebrates were similar in size, but different in the quantity of process-affected water or mature fine tailings containing residual bitumen. Dragonflies and damselflies in particular, showed trends of depletion for the carbon 13 isotope and enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope in pits where levels of process affected water was high. The depletion of carbon 13 isotope suggests that oil sand constituents assimilate into the benthic food chain. The greatest carbon 13 depletion, which was approximately 27 per cent, was found to be in test pits with high turbidity. This implies that oil sands constituents degrade microbially instead of by photosynthetic production. All benthic invertebrate group demonstrated an incremental enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope from the control pit to the pit with greatest levels of mature fine tailings.

  15. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  16. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  17. Provenances Analysis and Depositional Systems of upper Triassic Chang 63 Sand Set in Huanxian Region in Ordos Basin%鄂尔多斯盆地环县地区上三叠统长63物源分析及沉积体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵远; 文佳涛; 程文; 邱安南; 郭莉

    2012-01-01

    Through identifying and analysing the 120 pieces of rock slices, arranging and analysing the 60 measured heavy mineral data, calculationing and reaseaching the 40 grain size data, as the same time considering area sedimentary facies setup, and combining predecessors correlation data, provenance analysis of upper Triassic Chang 63 sand set in Huanxian region in Ordos Basin is maken. The result indicates that provenance of Huanxian region mainly lay to westen of the study area, secondly northeastern, a little northern. Builting up depositional systems of Chang 63 sand set in combination with regional geological characteristic analysis is presented.%通过120块岩石薄片的鉴定分析,对60个实测重矿物资料的整理和分析,对40个粒度分析资料的统计和研究,同时考虑区域沉积相格局,并结合前人有关资料,对鄂尔多斯盆地环县地区上三叠统延长组长63沉积期进行了物源分析.结果表明,环县地区的物源主要来源于研究区的西方,其次来源于研究区的东北方,少量来源于北方.结合区域地质特征分析,建立了研究区长63的沉积体系.

  18. Effects of plasma treatment and sanding process on surface roughness of wood veneers

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    An ideal veneer surface is crucial for good panel properties in plywood manufacturing. The aim of this study was to compare plasma treatments and sanding (mechanical) processes with respect to the surface roughness of veneers. Rotary-cut veneers with a thickness of 2 mm from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) logs were used as material. After rotary peeling, veneer sheets were dried at 110 °C in a veneer dryer. Veneer sheets were divided into 4 main groups. The surfaces of the control veneer sheet...

  19. Dynamics of impact cratering in shallow sand layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, J F; Amarouchene, Y; Kellay, H

    2006-04-21

    When a solid sphere impacts a shallow layer of sand deposited on a solid surface, a crater can be obtained. The dynamics of the opening of the crater can be followed accurately. During this opening, the radius of the crater can be conveniently modeled by an exponential saturation with a well-defined time constant. The crater then closes up partially once the opening phase is over as the sand avalanches down the slope of the crater. We here present a detailed study of the full dynamics of the crater formation as well as the dynamics of the corrola formed during this process. A simple model accounts for most of our observations.

  20. University of Utah Oil Sand Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the Oil Sand Research and Development Program at the University of Utah will be presented. It will include resource characterization of the Uinta Basin oils and deposits and bitumens and bitumen-derived liquid recovery and upgrading technology and product utilization. The characterization studies will include the Whiterocks and Asphalt Ridge oil sands. The discussion of recovery and upgrading technologies will include aqueous separation, thermal recovery processes; solvent extraction, and thermal and catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen-derived heavy oils. Product evaluation studies will include jet fuels, diesel fuel, asphalt and specialty chemicals. Plans for the future of the project will be discussed.

  1. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  2. Regeneration of dredged sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Knaapen, Michiel; Scholl, Olaf; Scholl, O.; Trenteseaux., A.; Garlan, T.

    2000-01-01

    Sand waves form a wavy pattern in the offshore sandy seabed. Since their crests reduce the navigability, it is important to know their evolution. A simple model is presented to estimate the recovery of sand wave amplitudes. This model is partially based on the similarity with sea ripples and

  3. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  4. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  5. Sand resources, regional geology, and coastal processes for shoreline restoration: case study of Barataria shoreline, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Kulp, Mark; Penland, Shea; Britsch, Louis D.

    2002-01-01

    The Louisiana barrier shoreline of Barataria Basin, which lies within the western Mississippi River delta, has undergone significant retreat during the past 100 years. The most practical restoration method to rebuild these shorelines is sand nourishment. Seismic and sonar interpretations verified with geologic samples (vibracores and borings) indicate that there are nine sand targets within the Barataria study area that meet or exceed the minimum criteria for potential resource sites. However, the near surface lithology in the basin is typically silts and clays. Locating suitable sand resources for shoreline restoration is challenging. The sand units are associated with geologic depositional systems such as ebb-tidal deltas, distributary mouth bars, and channel fill (undifferentiated fluvial or tidal inlet channels). The nine potential sand targets consist primarily of fine sand and can be delineated into three surficial and six buried features. The surficial features contain approximately 10% of the total sand resources identified. At least 90% of the sand resources need overburden sediment removed prior to use; almost 570 million yd3 (438.5 mil m3) of overburden will need to be removed if the entire resource is mined. In this study, we identified 396 to 532 mil yd3 (305.8 to 410.8 mil m3) of potential sand deposits for shoreline restoration. Previous studies using less dense survey methods greatly over-estimated sand resources available in this area. Many fluvial channels reported previously as sand-filled are mud-filled. Contrary to these previous studies, few fluvial subsystems in this region have abundant sand resources.

  6. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  7. Thermoforming of foam sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Remko; Pronk, Ruud M.

    1997-01-01

    Thermoforming is a widely used process for the manufacture of foam sheet products. Polystyrene foam food trays for instance can be produced by first heating the thermoplastic foam sheet, causing the gas contained to build up pressure and expand, after which a vacuum pressure can be applied to draw t

  8. Sand harm in taklimakan Desert highway and sand control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANZhiwen; WANGTao; SUNQingwei; DONGZhibao; WANGXunming

    2003-01-01

    Reputed as a wonderful achievement of the world’s highway construction history,the Taklimakan Desert highway is nor facing serious sand drift encroachment problems due to its 447-km-long passage of sand sea consisting of crescent dunes,barchan chains,compound transverse dune ridges and complex megadunes.To solve some technical problems in the protection of the highway from sang drift encroachment,desert experts have been conducting the theoretical and applied studies on sand movement laws;causes,severities and time-space differentiation of sand drift damages;and control ways including mechanical,chemical and biological measures.In this paper the authors give an overall summry on the research contents and recent progress in the control of sand drift damages in China and hold that the theoretical researc results and practices in the prevention of sand drift encroachment on the cross-desert highway represnt a breakthrough and has an cpoch-making significance.Since the construction of protective forest along the cross-desert highway requires large amount of ground water,what will be its environmental consequence and whether it can effectively halt sand drift encroachment on the highway forever are the questions to be studied urgently.

  9. Mechanics of Sheeting Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Physical breakdown of rock across a broad scale spectrum involves fracturing. In many areas large fractures develop near the topographic surface, with sheeting joints being among the most impressive. Sheeting joints share many geometric, textural, and kinematic features with other joints (opening-mode fractures) but differ in that they are (a) discernibly curved, (b) open near the topographic surface, and (c) form subparallel to the topographic surface. Where sheeting joints are geologically young, the surface-parallel compressive stresses are typically several MPa or greater. Sheeting joints are best developed beneath domes, ridges, and saddles; they also are reported, albeit rarely, beneath valleys or bowls. A mechanism that accounts for all these associations has been sought for more than a century: neither erosion of overburden nor high lateral compressive stresses alone suffices. Sheeting joints are not accounted for by Mohr-Coulomb shear failure criteria. Principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, together with the mechanical effect of a curved topographic surface, do provide a basis for understanding sheeting joint growth and the pattern sheeting joints form. Compressive stresses parallel to a singly or doubly convex topographic surface induce a tensile stress perpendicular to the surface at shallow depths; in some cases this alone could overcome the weight of overburden to open sheeting joints. If regional horizontal compressive stresses, augmented by thermal stresses, are an order of magnitude or so greater than a characteristic vertical stress that scales with topographic amplitude, then topographic stress perturbations can cause sheeting joints to open near the top of a ridge. This topographic effect can be augmented by pressure within sheeting joints arising from water, ice, or salt. Water pressure could be particularly important in helping drive sheeting joints downslope beneath valleys. Once sheeting joints have formed, the rock sheets between

  10. Bearing Capacity of High Density Polyethylene (HDPE Reinforced Sand Using Plate Load Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Er. Aly K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The work presented here is a study to examine the improvement in bearing capacity of coastal sand of Trivandrum, Kerala, India using high density polyethylene (HDPE /woven fabric as reinforcement in discrete layers. The bearing capacity was evaluated using plate load test. The effect of reinforcement configurations like sheet reinforcement (sanded with adhesive, with adhesive and sheet alone and strip reinforcement (single and grid pattern are investigated. The test parameters chosen for the present study are, depth of topmost layer of reinforcement layer below footing, compacted density and number of layers of reinforcement etc. From the tests, it has been observed that sheet reinforcement is more effective than sheet sanded with adhesive and strip reinforcements. It is found that the synthetic adhesive gives no binding action at the interface of the reinforcement and soil. But it is to be noted that the sheet with adhesive dried has a marked influence on the bearing capacity especially at lower densities. The strip reinforcements in single pattern is considered to be a favorable choice for minimum reinforcement. The strip reinforcement in single or grid pattern gives sufficient improvement in strength.

  11. Geologic map of Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madole, Richard F.; VanSistine, D. Paco; Romig, Joseph H.

    2016-10-20

    Geologic mapping was begun after a range fire swept the area of what is now the Great Sand Dunes National Park in April 2000. The park spans an area of 437 square kilometers (or about 169 square miles), of which 98 percent is blanketed by sediment of Quaternary age, the Holocene and Pleistocene Epochs; hence, this geologic map of the Great Sand Dunes National Park is essentially a surficial geologic map. These surficial deposits are diverse and include sediment of eolian (windblown), alluvial (stream and sheetwash), palustrine (wetlands and marshes), lacustrine (lake), and mass-wasting (landslides) origin. Sediment of middle and late Holocene age, from about 8,000 years ago to the present, covers about 80 percent of the park.Fluctuations in groundwater level during Holocene time caused wetlands on the nearby lowland that bounds the park on the west to alternately expand and contract. These fluctuations controlled the stability or instability of eolian sand deposits on the downwind (eastern) side of the lowland. When groundwater level rose, playas became lakes, and wet or marshy areas formed in many places. When the water table rose, spring-fed streams filled their channels and valley floors with sediment. Conversely, when groundwater level fell, spring-fed streams incised their valley floors, and lakes, ponds, and marshes dried up and became sources of windblown sand.Discharge in streams draining the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Range is controlled primarily by snowmelt and flow is perennial until it reaches the mountain front, beyond which streams begin losing water at a high rate as the water soaks into the creek beds. Even streams originating in the larger drainage basins, such as Sand and Medano Creeks, generally do not extend much more than 4 km (about 2.5 miles) beyond where they exit the mountains.The Great Sand Dunes contain the tallest dunes (maximum height about 750 feet, or 230 m) in North America. These dunes cover an area of 72 square kilometers

  12. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  13. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  14. Vertical structure and dominating factors of sand body during Late Triassic Chang 9 time of Yanchang Formation in Ordos Basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁熊; 陈景山; 谭秀成; 林丹; 赵子豪; 姚泾利; 邓秀芹; 李元昊

    2015-01-01

    Based on a synthetic geological study of drilling, well logging and core observations, two main genetic types of Chang 9 sand body in Odors Basin were recognized, which included two effects, that is, delta environment and tractive current effects that lead to the development of mouth bar, distal bar, sheet sand and other sand bodies of subaerial and subaqueous distributary channel, natural levee, flood fan and delta front, and shore-shallow lake environment and lake flow transformation effects that result in the development of sandy beach bar, sheet sand and other sand bodies. Chang 9 sand body mainly developed five basic vertical structures, namely box shape, campaniform, infundibuliform, finger and dentoid. The vertical stacking patterns of multilayer sand body was complex, and the common shapes included box shape + box shape, campaniform + campaniform, campaniform + box shape, infundibuliform+infundibuliform, campaniform+infundibuliform, box shape+campaniform, box shape+infundibuliform, and finger+finger. Based on the analysis on major dominating factors of vertical structure of sand body, sedimentary environment, sedimentary facies and rise, fall and cycle of base level are identified as the major geological factors that control the vertical structure of single sand body as well as vertical stacking patterns and distribution of multistory sand bodies.

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of a Nigerian standard sand: Igbokoda sand

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojuri, OO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the Middle Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone near Ottawa, Illinois, had been picked by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as the reference sand to employ in testing cement and strength of concrete [9]. To the best of our knowledge... and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques due to its importance in cement, geotechnical/geo-environmental research in Nigeria. This should halt importation of standard silica sand for mortar and concrete testing...

  16. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  17. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  18. Algebra task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 3-5, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the algebraic concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are opportunities for problem-solving, patterning, algebraic graphing, equations and determining averages. The combined task & drill sheets

  19. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  20. Interaction forces in bitumen extraction from oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianjun; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob

    2005-07-15

    Water-based extraction process (WBEP) has been successfully applied to bitumen recovery from Athabasca oil sand ore deposits in Alberta. In this process, two essential steps are involved. The bitumen first needs to be "liberated" from sand grains, followed by "aeration" with air bubbles. Bitumen "liberation" from the sand grains is controlled by the interaction between the bitumen and sand grains. Bitumen "aeration" is dependent, among other mechanical and hydrodynamic variables, on the hydrophobicity of the bitumen surface, which is controlled by water chemistry and interactions between bitumen and fine solids. In this paper, the interaction force measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) between bitumen-bitumen, bitumen-silica, bitumen-clays and bitumen-fines is summarized. The measured interaction force barrier coupled with the contacted adhesion force allows us to predict the coagulative state of colloidal systems. Zeta potential distribution measurements, in terms of heterocoagulation, confirmed the prediction of the measured force profiles using AFM. The results show that solution pH and calcium addition can significantly affect the colloidal interactions of various components in oil sand extraction systems. The strong attachment of fines from a poor processing ore on bitumen is responsible for the corresponding low bitumen flotation recovery. The identification of the dominant non-contact forces by fitting with the classical DLVO or extended DLVO theory provides guidance for controlling the interaction behavior of the oil sand components through monitoring the factors that could affect the non-contact forces. The findings provide insights into megascale industrial operations of oil sand extraction.

  1. Multi-dimensional rheology-based two-phase model for sediment transport and applications to sheet flow and pipeline scour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Hsien; Low, Ying Min; Chiew, Yee-Meng

    2016-05-01

    Sediment transport is fundamentally a two-phase phenomenon involving fluid and sediments; however, many existing numerical models are one-phase approaches, which are unable to capture the complex fluid-particle and inter-particle interactions. In the last decade, two-phase models have gained traction; however, there are still many limitations in these models. For example, several existing two-phase models are confined to one-dimensional problems; in addition, the existing two-dimensional models simulate only the region outside the sand bed. This paper develops a new three-dimensional two-phase model for simulating sediment transport in the sheet flow condition, incorporating recently published rheological characteristics of sediments. The enduring-contact, inertial, and fluid viscosity effects are considered in determining sediment pressure and stresses, enabling the model to be applicable to a wide range of particle Reynolds number. A k - ɛ turbulence model is adopted to compute the Reynolds stresses. In addition, a novel numerical scheme is proposed, thus avoiding numerical instability caused by high sediment concentration and allowing the sediment dynamics to be computed both within and outside the sand bed. The present model is applied to two classical problems, namely, sheet flow and scour under a pipeline with favorable results. For sheet flow, the computed velocity is consistent with measured data reported in the literature. For pipeline scour, the computed scour rate beneath the pipeline agrees with previous experimental observations. However, the present model is unable to capture vortex shedding; consequently, the sediment deposition behind the pipeline is overestimated. Sensitivity analyses reveal that model parameters associated with turbulence have strong influence on the computed results.

  2. Multi-dimensional rheology-based two-phase model for sediment transport and applications to sheet flow and pipeline scour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheng-Hsien [Centre for Offshore Research and Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Department of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, Tamkang University, New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Low, Ying Min, E-mail: ceelowym@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Offshore Research and Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, National University of Singapore, 1 Engineering Drive 2, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Chiew, Yee-Meng [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2016-05-15

    Sediment transport is fundamentally a two-phase phenomenon involving fluid and sediments; however, many existing numerical models are one-phase approaches, which are unable to capture the complex fluid-particle and inter-particle interactions. In the last decade, two-phase models have gained traction; however, there are still many limitations in these models. For example, several existing two-phase models are confined to one-dimensional problems; in addition, the existing two-dimensional models simulate only the region outside the sand bed. This paper develops a new three-dimensional two-phase model for simulating sediment transport in the sheet flow condition, incorporating recently published rheological characteristics of sediments. The enduring-contact, inertial, and fluid viscosity effects are considered in determining sediment pressure and stresses, enabling the model to be applicable to a wide range of particle Reynolds number. A k − ε turbulence model is adopted to compute the Reynolds stresses. In addition, a novel numerical scheme is proposed, thus avoiding numerical instability caused by high sediment concentration and allowing the sediment dynamics to be computed both within and outside the sand bed. The present model is applied to two classical problems, namely, sheet flow and scour under a pipeline with favorable results. For sheet flow, the computed velocity is consistent with measured data reported in the literature. For pipeline scour, the computed scour rate beneath the pipeline agrees with previous experimental observations. However, the present model is unable to capture vortex shedding; consequently, the sediment deposition behind the pipeline is overestimated. Sensitivity analyses reveal that model parameters associated with turbulence have strong influence on the computed results.

  3. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  4. Contrasting alluvial architecture of Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits along a 120-km transect from the central Po Plain (northern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Bruno; Amorosi, Alessandro; Bruno, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution investigation of a ~ 120-km-long transect along the course of the modern Po River, northern Italy, revealed marked changes in alluvial architecture across the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary. Along the whole transect, a 20- to 30-m thick sheet-like succession of Late Pleistocene fluvial sands is invariably overlain by silt and clay deposits, with isolated fluvial bodies of Holocene age (architecture: well-drained floodplain deposits are transitional at distal locations to increasingly organic, poorly drained floodplain to swamp facies associations. Thick paludal facies extend continuously up to 60 km landward of the Holocene maximum marine ingression, about 90 km from the modern shoreline. Based on 28 radiocarbon dates, the abrupt change in lithofacies and channel stacking pattern occurred at the transition from the last glacial period to the present interglacial, under conditions of rapid sea-level rise. The architectural change from amalgamated, Late Pleistocene sand bodies to overlying, mud-dominated Holocene units represent an example of chronologically well-constrained fluvial response to combined climate and relative sea-level change. The overall aggradational stacking pattern of individual channel-belt sand bodies indicates that high subsidence rates continuously created accommodation in the Po Basin, even during phases of falling sea level and lowstand.

  5. Depositional and erosional coastal processes during the late postglacial sea-level rise: An example from the central Tyrrhenian continental shelf (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortora, P. [Univ. degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza (Italy). Dept. di Scienze della Terra

    1996-03-01

    A transgressive systems tract (TST) deposit on the inner continental shelf of the south Tuscany region (central Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) formed during the last postglacial sea-level rise. Its small-scale stratigraphy has been detailed using high-resolution seismic profiles, gravity cores, and grab samples. The TST deposit overlies a lowstand unconformity, shows a tabular geometry, and comprises three internal architectures of beach facies. Because the lateral distribution of these vertical successions is not random, but parallel to the coast, each architecture represents an individual sedimentary stage during sea-level rise. However, all architectures were formed via shoreface retreat in response to the landward migration of a beach complex over the unconformity. During this migration the beach system was characterized by a source diastem located in the surf zone and by two sediment dispersal systems. One moved the eroded sand over the flat back-barrier palustrine area by storm washover, while the other transported part of this sand to the lower shoreface, forming a reworked sand sheet above the older and inactive source diastem (ravinement surface). The TST architectures originated from a transgressive succession of beach facies, differentiated according to the intensity of shoreface retreat. Architecture A represents a low preservation potential of the original beach complex, Architecture B relatively high preservation, and Architecture C no preservation. The intensity of erosion and the consequent preservation potential were totally controlled by antecedent topography.

  6. Deglacial to Holocene history of ice-sheet retreat and bottom current strength on the western Barents Sea shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantzsch, Hendrik; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Horry, Jan; Grave, Marina; Rebesco, Michele; Schwenk, Tilmann

    2017-10-01

    High-resolution sediment echosounder data combined with radiocarbon-dated sediment cores allowed us to reconstruct the Late Quaternary stratigraphic architecture of the Kveithola Trough and surrounding Spitsbergenbanken. The deposits display the successive deglacial retreat of the Svalbard-Barents Sea Ice Sheet. Basal subglacial till indicates that the grounded ice sheet covered both bank and trough during the Late Weichselian. A glaciomarine blanket inside the trough coinciding with laminated plumites on the bank formed during the initial ice-melting phase from at least 16.1 to 13.5 cal ka BP in close proximity to the ice margin. After the establishment of open-marine conditions at around 13.5 cal ka BP, a sediment drift developed in the confined setting of the Kveithola Trough, contemporary with crudely laminated mud, an overlying lag deposit, and modern bioclastic-rich sand on Spitsbergenbanken. The Kveithola Drift shows a remarkable grain-size coarsening from the moat towards the southern flank of the trough. This trend contradicts the concept of a separated drift (which would imply coarser grain sizes in proximity of the moat) and indicates that the southern bank is the main sediment source for the coarse material building up the Kveithola Drift. This depocenter represents, therefore, a yet undescribed combination of off-bank wedge and confined drift. Although the deposits inside Kveithola Trough and on Spitsbergenbanken display different depocenter geometries, time-equivalent grain-size changes imply a region-wide sediment-dynamic connection. We thus relate a phase of coarsest sediment supply (8.8-6.3 cal ka BP) to an increase in bottom current strength, which might be related to a stronger Atlantic Water inflow from the Southeast across the bank leading to winnowing and off-bank export of sandy sediments.

  7. CFD evaluation of erosion rate around a bridge near a sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Huang, Ning; Dun, Hongchao; Wang, Wenbo

    2017-04-01

    This study performs a series of simulations through solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the RNG k-ε turbulence model to investigate the wind erosion rates around a bridge in a desert area with sand dunes. The digital elevation model of sand dunes and the bridge model are obtained respectively from hypsographic map and construction drawings. Through combining them into the CFD software of Fluent the simulation zone was formed. The data of wind speed obtained from field observation is fitted into a logarithm format, which was imported into Fluent model as a inlet wind speed condition. Then, the effect of Dun-Go railway on wind-blown sand movement of the neighbouring environment is simulated. The results exhibit that affected by both the sand dune and bridge, the flow field is in a complex condition. It is also shown that the bridge in upstream of the sand dune will not increase the sand transport rate intensively, but change both wind velocity gradient and turbulence kinetic energy over surface of sand dune. On the other hand, when the bridge is built downstream the sand dune, simulation results show that sand deposition rate would be decreased in reference region downstream the pier.

  8. Characteristic and paleoenvironmental evolution of subaerial tidal sand body in Subei coastal plain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李从先; 张家强; 杨守业; 范代读

    1999-01-01

    The subaerial tidal sand area in the northern Jiangsu Province (Subei), stretching from Dongtai towards east with a fan shape, is an early developing stage of radial sand ridges distributed in the South Yellow Sea. Since 5 000—6 000 a BP, after the Holoeene transgression maximum in the northern Jiangsu Province, subaqueous tidal sand bodies were exposed and changed into land gradually. The environmental magnetism analysis shows that subaerial tidal sand strata are formed by the convergent-divergent palco-tidal current field. The sediment source of tidal sand strata came early from the Changjiang River and late from the Yellow River. Sea floor erosion by tidal currents also served as an important sand source. Drilling cores and ground-penetrating profile show that there exists no probability of sand supplying directly by a large river through the apical area of tidal sand ridges either on land or in the sea. Fluvial deposits supplied the tidal sand bodies by alongshore transportation, which corresponds

  9. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Quarterly report, July--September, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report cites task number followed by a brief statement of each task and the action taken this quarter. The tasks are: NEPA environmental information statement; coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; water-based recovery of bitumen; rotary kiln process for recovery of bitumen and combustion of coke sand; recovery of bitumen from oil sands using fluidized bed reactors and combustion of spent sands in transport reactors; recovery of bitumen from oil sand and upgrading of bitumen by solvent extraction; catalytic and thermal upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids; evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high energy jet fuels, and other specialty products; development of mathematical models for bitumen recovery and processing; completion of the cost estimation study of the pilot plant restoration; development studies of equipment for three-product gravity separation of bitumen and sand; development studies of disposal of sand by conveying or pumping of high solids concentration sand-water slurries; and environmental studies of the North Salt Lake pilot plant rehabilitation and eventual operation and those environmental problems associated with eventual commercial products.

  10. HRSA Data Fact Sheets

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Data Fact Sheets provide summary data about HRSA’s activities in each Congressional District, County, State,...

  11. Pharmacogenomics Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incorporate genomic results into medical care. Other NIGMS Fact Sheets Related Links Up to top This page last reviewed on September 28, 2017 Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook ...

  12. Respirator Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have expiration dates that should be checked before purchase. Also, over time your mask can get old ... Respirator Fact Sheet [PDF - 706 KB] Follow NIOSH Facebook Flickr Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A- ...

  13. BREAKTHROUGH INDEX AND SPECIFIC DEPOSIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awatif Soaded Al-Saqqar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The dual filter was tested in this study to improve the performance of the filtration process in water treatment plants. Porcelanite rocks were selected to be the dual media with sand in the experimental work. The work required installing a pilot filtration unit in the location of the filters in one of the water treatment plants. The pilot filtration consists of three plastic column filters, acting parallel and simultaneously. The first contains 70 cm sand, the second and third were dual filters (porcelanite with sand of different types. The dual media was tested at different filtration rates (5, 7.5, 10, and 15 m/hr. The results showed that the dual filters had better performance than sand filters and reduced the specific deposit (σ and the breakthrough index (BI. In the dual filters the specific deposit was about (16 to 65 % less than in sand filters and the breakthrough index (BI was specified weak for rates 5 and 7 m/hr, light at 10 m/hr, and medium at 15 m/hr.

  14. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  15. 2013 social balance sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Pierrette Heuse

    2014-01-01

    The transposition into national law of Directive 2013/34/EU on the annual financial statements of companies, expected by no later than July 2015, could alter the statistical obligations on small firms in connection with the filing of their annual accounts. In any case, the social balance sheet can no longer form an integral part of their accounts. Nevertheless, it contains original information whose usefulness is highlighted, on the basis of the social balance sheets for 2012, by examining th...

  16. Experimental study of surface texture and resonance mechanism of booming sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU; JianJun; ZHANG; KeCun; SUN; Bo; JIANG; ShengXiang; DONG; GuangRong; ZU; RuiPing; FANG; HaiYan

    2007-01-01

    The sound-producing mechanism of booming sand has long been a pending problem in the blown sand physics. Based on the earlier researches, the authors collected some silent sand samples from Tengger Desert, Australian Desert, Kuwait Desert, beaches of Hainan Island and Japanese coast as well as the soundless booming sand samples from the Mingsha Mountain in Dunhuang to make washing experiments. In the meantime the chemical corrosion experiment of glass micro-spheres, surface coating experiment and SEM examination were also conducted. The experimental results show that the sound production of booming sand seems to have nothing to do with the presence of SiO2 gel on the surface of sand grains and unrelated to the surface chemical composition of sand grains but is related to the resonance cavities formed by porous (pit-like) physical structure resulting from a number of factors such as wind erosion, water erosion, chemical corrosion and SiO2 gel deposition, etc. Its resonance mechanism is similar to that of Hemholz resonance cavity. Under the action of external forces, numerous spherical and sand grains with smooth surface and porous surface are set in motion and rub with each other to produce extremely weak vibration sound and then become audible sound by human ears through the magnification of surface cavity resonance. However the booming sands may lose their resonance mechanism and become silent sand due to the damping action caused by the invasion of finer particles such as dust and clay into surface holes of sand grains. Therefore, clearing away fine pollutants on the quartz grain surface is an effective way to make silent sand emit audible sound.

  17. Dynamics of unusual debris flows on Martian sand dunes

    OpenAIRE

    Bourke, Mary

    2004-01-01

    PUBLISHED Gullies that dissect sand dunes in Russell impact crater often display debris flow-like deposits in their distal reaches. The possible range of both the rheological properties and the flow rates are estimated using a numerical simulation code of a Bingham plastic flow to help explain the formation of these features. Our simulated results are best explained by a rapid debris flow. For example, a debris flow with the viscosity of 10 2 Pa s and the yiel...

  18. An Experimental Study on the Aging of Sands

    OpenAIRE

    Baxter, Christopher David Price

    1999-01-01

    There are numerous examples in the literature of time-dependent changes in the proper-ties of sands, or aging effects. Most of these aging effects are of increases in the cone penetration resistance. Time-dependent increases in penetration resistance have been measured in hydraulically placed fills and freshly densified deposits, with the largest in-creases following the use of ground modification techniques such as vibrocompaction, dynamic compaction, and blast densification. It is not kn...

  19. Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. M.; Keiser, K.; Graves, S. J.; Conover, H.; Ebersole, S.

    2009-12-01

    Since the year 2000, Eastern Louisiana, coastal Mississippi, Alabama, and the western Florida panhandle have been affected by 28 tropical storms, seven of which were hurricanes. These tropical cyclones have significantly altered normal coastal processes and characteristics in the Gulf region through sediment disturbance. Although tides, seasonality, and agricultural development influence suspended sediment and sediment deposition over periods of time, tropical storm activity has the capability of moving the largest sediment loads in the shortest periods of time for coastal areas. The importance of sediments upon water quality, coastal erosion, habitats and nutrients has made their study and monitoring vital to decision makers in the region. Currently agencies such as United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), NASA, and Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) are employing a variety of in-situ and airborne based measurements to assess and monitor sediment loading and deposition. These methods provide highly accurate information but are limited in geographic range, are not continuous over a region and, in the case of airborne LIDAR are expensive and do not recur on a regular basis. Multi-temporal and multi-spectral satellite imagery that shows tropical-storm-induced suspended sediment and storm-surge sediment deposits can provide decision makers with immediate and long-term information about the impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes. It can also be valuable for those conducting research and for projects related to coastal issues such as recovery, planning, management, and mitigation. The recently awarded Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support will generate decision support products using NASA satellite observations from MODIS, Landsat and SeaWiFS instruments to support resource management, planning, and decision making activities in the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, SANDS will generate decision support products that address the impacts of tropical storms

  20. Use of gravity drainage and quasi-homogenous dykes for containment of oil sands tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, L.; Czajewski, K. [Terracon Geotechnique Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    Solutions to the disposal of byproducts from oil sands processing into tailings ponds in Alberta were examined. Gravity drainage of composite tailings (CT) was used as a mechanism to facilitate the consolidation of CT in critical areas of the containment ponds through the use of internal sand layers within the body of the deposit. Critical areas were defined as the areas around the perimeters of the containment ponds. The aim of the solution was to provide long-term stability to the disposal area through the creation of stiff deposits around the perimeter and through the facilitation of reclamation efforts on the surface. It was concluded that use of the quasi-homogenous dykes is the only commercially proven method of reducing the fine tailings inventory of the oil sands industry. It was concluded that the use of gravity drainage and quasi-homogenous dykes for oil sands containment structures will assist the industry in reducing its environmental footprint.

  1. Hazard impact and genetic development of sand dunes west of Samalut, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Sayed Ahmed El Gammal

    2010-12-01

    These dunes have their source from Oligocene sand and gravel deposits to the north of the study area and from the substratum. While the sands are shiny and more rounded mat grains in the northern part of these dunes due to fluvial processes, the south sands become more markedly “aeolinized” by including less rounded and striated sand grains. They move and increase in size in the down wind direction. The initiation of linear dunes explanted here west of the Nile Valley where the eastern tails of the lee side of the barchan dunes are longer than the western ones and sometimes these tails are connected with each other forming longitudinal sand dunes. These dunes are in mature stage and the southern dune may be in the last modification stage.

  2. Connecting Brabant's cover sand landscapes through landscape history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskes, Erik; van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Harthoorn, Jaap; Maes, Bert; Leenders, Karel; de Jongh, Piet; Kluiving, Sjoerd; van den Oetelaar, Ger

    2015-04-01

    Noord-Brabant has the largest variety of cover sand landscapes in The Netherlands, and probably in Western Europe. During the Last Ice Age the area was not covered by land ice and a polar desert developed in which sand dunes buried the existing river landscapes. Some of these polar dune landscapes experienced a geomorphological and soil development that remained virtually untouched up to the present day, such as the low parabolic dunes of the Strabrechtse Heide or the later and higher dunes of the Oisterwijkse Vennen. As Noord-Brabant lies on the fringe of a tectonic basin, the thickness of cover sand deposits in the Centrale Slenk, part of a rift through Europe, amounts up to 20 metres. Cover sand deposits along the fault lines cause the special phenomenon of 'wijst' to develop, in which the higher grounds are wetter than the boarding lower grounds. Since 4000 BC humans settled in these cover sand landscapes and made use of its small-scale variety. An example are the prehistoric finds on the flanks and the historic towns on top of the 'donken' in northwest Noord-Brabant, where the cover sand landscapes are buried by river and marine deposits and only the peaks of the dunes protrude as donken. Or the church of Handel that is built beside a 'wijst' source and a site of pilgrimage since living memory. Or the 'essen' and plaggen agriculture that developed along the stream valleys of Noord-Brabant from 1300 AD onwards, giving rise to geomorphological features as 'randwallen' and plaggen soils of more than a metre thickness. Each region of Brabant each has its own approach in attracting tourists and has not yet used this common landscape history to connect, manage and promote their territories. We propose a landscape-historical approach to develop a national or European Geopark Brabants' cover sand landscapes, in which each region focuses on a specific part of the landscape history of Brabant, that stretches from the Late Weichselian polar desert when the dune

  3. Spatial correlation length of normalized cone data in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firouzianbandpey, Sarah; Griffiths, D. V.; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    2014-01-01

    it is rarely estimated during routine site investigations. Results from two different sites in the north of Denmark are reported in this paper, indicating quite strong anisotropy due to the depositional process, with significantly shorter spatial correlation lengths in the vertical direction. It is observed......The main topic of this study is to assess the anisotropic spatial correlation lengths of a sand layer deposit based on cone penetration testing with pore pressure measurement (CPTu) data. Spatial correlation length can be an important factor in reliability analysis of geotechnical systems, yet...... that the normalized cone resistance is a better estimator of spatial trends than the normalized friction ratio....

  4. Upslope deposition of extremely distal turbidites: an example from the Tiburon Rise, west-central Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, J.; Beck, C.; Ogawa, Y.

    1989-01-01

    These terrigenous silt and sand turbidities represent an unprecedented example of upslope turbidite deposition in an extremely distral setting. Flow thickness was the dominant control on deposition of these beds, rather than true upslope flow. -from Authors

  5. Substrate deposit effect on the characteristic of an intertidal macroalgal community

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Imchen, T.

    Present study consists the effect of substrate deposit (silt, clay, sand, gravel and shards of shells) on the characteristic of an intertidal rocky shore macroalgae Macroalgal assemblage was segregated from substrate deposit in two stages Substrate...

  6. Study of Sand Dunes and Their Effect on Desertification of Cultivated Lands in Shaanxi Province, China Using Remote Sensing Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    About half of the arid and semi-arid lands in the world are deserts that comprise various types of aeolian sand dunes deposits. In Shaanxi Province, aeolian sand dunes cover considerable areas of the Yulin desert and northern Jinbian. Sand dunes are moving in the main wind direction and converting some agricultural area to wasteland. Remote sensing of sand dunes helps in the understanding of aeolian process and desertification. Remote sensing data combined with field studies are valuable in studying sand dunes, regional aeolian depositional history. In particular, active and inactive sand dunes of the north Shaanxi Province were studied using remote sensing and geographic information system. In this study, we describe the Landsat thematic mapper (TM) images, covering north Shaanxi Province, which were used to study the distribution, shape, size, trends, density and movement of sand dunes and their effect on desertification of cultivated lands. Estimation was made depending on soil erodibility factor (Ⅰ) and local climatic factor (C) during the period (June to September). The result indicates that soil erosion caused sand drift of 8.957 5, 7.03 ton for Yulin and Jinbian, respectively. The mean sand dunes movement rate were 4.37, 3.11 m, whereas, monthly sand dune advance rate were 1.092 5, 0.777 5 m, for the two locations, respectively. The study reveals that cultivated lands extended obliquely to the direction of sand dune movement are extremely affected, while other segments that extend parallel to the direction of the movement are not affected. Accordingly the north Shaanxi Province was divided into areas of different classes of potential risk. Moreover, blown sands and sand movement from neighboring highlands also affect the area of western desert.

  7. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  8. Coastal geology and recent origins for Sand Point, Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Krantz, David E.; Castaneda, Mario R.; Loope, Walter L.; Jol, Harry M.; Goble, Ronald J.; Higley, Melinda C.; DeWald, Samantha; Hansen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sand Point is a small cuspate foreland located along the southeastern shore of Lake Superior within Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near Munising, Michigan. Park managers’ concerns for the integrity of historic buildings at the northern periphery of the point during the rising lake levels in the mid-1980s greatly elevated the priority of research into the geomorphic history and age of Sand Point. To pursue this priority, we recovered sediment cores from four ponds on Sand Point, assessed subsurface stratigraphy onshore and offshore using geophysical techniques, and interpreted the chronology of events using radiocarbon and luminescence dating. Sand Point formed at the southwest edge of a subaqueous platform whose base is probably constructed of glacial diamicton and outwash. During the post-glacial Nipissing Transgression, the base was mantled with sand derived from erosion of adjacent sandstone cliffs. An aerial photograph time sequence, 1939–present, shows that the periphery of the platform has evolved considerably during historical time, infl uenced by transport of sediment into adjacent South Bay. Shallow seismic refl ections suggest slump blocks along the leading edge of the platform. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and shallow seismic refl ections to the northwest of the platform reveal large sand waves within a deep (12 m) channel produced by currents fl owing episodically to the northeast into Lake Superior. Ground-penetrating radar profi les show transport and deposition of sand across the upper surface of the platform. Basal radiocarbon dates from ponds between subaerial beach ridges range in age from 540 to 910 cal yr B.P., suggesting that Sand Point became emergent during the last ~1000 years, upon the separation of Lake Superior from Lakes Huron and Michigan. However, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from the beach ridges were two to three times as old as the radiocarbon ages, implying that emergence of Sand Point may have begun

  9. Effect of the coastal conservation due to beach nourishment of Totori sand dune coast

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Shibutani; Matsubara, Y.; Kuroiwa, M.

    2013-01-01

    Tottori Sand Dune Coast located at western part of Japan is a sandy beach with a length about 8km facing Sea of Japan. The coast has been eroded starting around 1940s and the beach nourishment project has been carried out to restore the shoreline since 2005 at Tottori Sand Dune Coast. In the project, the deposition sands at port and river mouth were transported to the erosional area and injected in the region of the offshore erosional area and the backshore area and the total volumes of the s...

  10. The economics of oil definitions: the case of Canada's oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, D.B. [University of Alaska Fairbanks (United States). School of Management, Department of Economics

    2005-03-01

    Canada has chosen to define its 174 billion barrels of oil sand bitumen reserves as crude oil deposits, putting the country on a par with Saudi Arabia in potential oil production. However, the physical and economic definition of calling oil sand bitumen crude oil needs to be questioned. On the face of it, these definitions make Canada look as powerful as OPEC's leading producer, or Russia, on the world oil market. However, a fuller analysis shows that Canadian oil sand is quite different from crude oil and that Canada will have little if any effect on the global oil market, or on OPEC. (author)

  11. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  12. Timing and origin for sand dunes in the Green River Lowland of Illinois, upper Mississippi River Valley, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, X.; Hanson, P.R.; Wang, Hongfang; Young, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The recent increase in dune studies in North America has been heavily focused in the Great Plains, while less attention has historically been given to the dune fields east of the Mississippi River. Here we report ages and suggest a potential sediment source for sand dunes in the Green River Lowland, Illinois, which may provide a better understanding of the dynamic interactions between eolian, glacial, lacustrine and fluvial processes that shaped the landscapes of the upper Midwest. Seven coherent optically stimulated luminescence ages (OSL, or optical ages) obtained from four sites suggest that major dune construction in the Green River Lowland occurred within a narrow time window around 17,500 ago. This implies either an enhanced aridity or an episodic increase of sediment supply at 17,500 years ago, or combination of the both. Contrary to previous assertions that dune sand was sourced from the deflation of the underlying outwash sand deposited when the Lake Michigan Lobe retreated from the area, we propose that Green River Lowland dunes sand originated from the Green Bay Lobe through the Rock River. Specifically, sediment supply increased in the Rock River valley during drainage of Glacial Lake Scuppernong, which formed between ???18,000 and 17,000 years ago, when the Green Bay Lobe retreated from its terminal moraine. The lake drained catastrophically through the Rock River valley, providing glacial sediment and water to erode the preexisting sandy sediments. Throughout the remainder of the late Pleistocene, the Laurentide Ice Sheet drained into larger more northerly glacial lakes that in turn drained through other river valleys. Therefore, the dunes in the Green River Lowland formed only during the catastrophic drainage of Glacial Lake Scuppernong, but were stabilized through the remainder of the Pleistocene. This scenario explains the abrupt dune construction around 17,500 years ago, and explains the lack of later dune activity up to the Pleistocene

  13. Deposits, flow characteristics, and landscape change resulting from the September 2009 South Pacific tsunami in the Samoan islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Bruce M; Buckley, Mark; Etienne, Samuel; Chagué-Goff, Catherine; Clark, Kate; Goff, James; Dominey-Howes, Dale; Strotz, Luke

    2011-07-01

    The September 29th 2009 tsunami caused widespread coastal modification within the islands of Samoa and northern Tonga in the South Pacific. Preliminary measurements indicate maximum runup values of around 17 m (Okal et al., 2010) and shore-normal inundation distances of up to ~ 620 m (Jaffe et al., 2010). Geological field reconnaissance studies were conducted as part of an UNESCO-IOC International Tsunami Survey Team survey within three weeks of the event in order to document the erosion, transport, and deposition of sediment by the tsunami. Data collected included: a) general morphology and geological characteristics of the coast, b) evidence of tsunami flow (inundation, flow depth and direction, wave height and runup), c) surficial and subsurface sediment samples including deposit thickness and extent, d) topographic mapping, and e) boulder size and location measurements. Four main types of sedimentary deposits were identified: a) gravel fields consisting mostly of isolated cobbles and boulders, b) sand sheets from a few to ~ 25 cm thick, c) piles of organic (mostly vegetation) and man-made material forming debris ramparts, and d) surface mud deposits that settled from suspension from standing water in the tsunami aftermath. Tsunami deposits within the reef system were not widespread, however, surficial changes to the reefs were observed.

  14. 财政性存款对基础货币影响研究--基于中央银行资产负债表的实证分析%Study on the Influence of Fiscal Deposits on Monetary Base-Based on Empirical Analysis of the Central Bank’s Balance Sheet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周刚

    2014-01-01

    According to the central bank’s balance sheet, fiscal deposits are the liabilities of central banks and a deduction item of the monetary base. Thus, fiscal deposits, especially the treasury cash, have a reverse impact on the supply or withdrawal of the base money. This paper sets up dummy variables for the tax sharing reform and central-ized treasury payment reform respectively, and empirically analyzes the influence of fiscal deposits on the monetary base. The results show that,before 1994,the fiscal deposits had little influence on the monetary base,while after the tax-sharing reform the influence got much larger. However, after the centralized treasury reform in 2001, though the fiscal fund management got standardized and fund flow was accelerated, yet on the other hand the problem of PBC’s treasury and fiscal treasury coexisting was brought along,which caused the“deposit-taking”function of the fiscal de-posits on monetary base to decrease. Our conclusions are as follows. Firstly,under the coexistence of PBC’s manage-ment of treasury system and fiscal savings deposit system, fiscal deposits play the role of withdrawing monetary base. Secondly,Long-term system factors such as changes of the fiscal system make the fiscal deposits play a more obvious role in influencing monetary base. Thirdly, fiscal deposits are very sensitive indicators, which are of great signifi-cance for the current monetary policy.%根据中央银行资产负债表,财政性存款是中央银行的负债,是基础货币的减项,因此财政性存款特别是国库现金对基础货币的投放或者回笼具有反向影响。本文对分税制改革和国库集中收付改革分别设置虚拟变量,实证分析了财政性存款对基础货币的影响关系。实证结果表明,1994年前财政性存款对基础货币影响较小,分税制后影响大幅提高。但2001年国库集中收付制度改革后,虽然规范了财政资金管理、加快资金流动,但

  15. Data report for the geologic and scenic quality evaluation of selected sand and gravel sites on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William H.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Arbogast, Belinda; Lindsey, David A.

    2011-01-01

    In April 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field studies on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, to inventory and evaluate sand and gravel deposits underlying river terraces on tribal lands along the Wind River. This report contains the results for 12 sites of sand and gravel deposits evaluated for their potential use as aggregate in Portland cement concrete, asphalt, and base course. The report provides the results of: * The USGS geologic studies and engineering tests. * A conclusion and recommendation for the best use of sand and gravel materials. * Calculations of available sand and gravel materials. * A scenic quality landscape inventory and evaluation.

  16. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisited using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M.M.; McBride, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf ???5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  17. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisted using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci M.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf not, vert, ~5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  18. Safety advice sheets

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    You never know when you might be faced with questions such as: when/how should I dispose of a gas canister? Where can I find an inspection report? How should I handle/store/dispose of a chemical substance…?   The SI section of the DGS/SEE Group is primarily responsible for safety inspections, evaluating the safety conditions of equipment items, premises and facilities. On top of this core task, it also regularly issues “Safety Advice Sheets” on various topics, designed to be of assistance to users but also to recall and reinforce safety rules and procedures. These clear and concise sheets, complete with illustrations, are easy to display in the appropriate areas. The following safety advice sheets have been issued so far: Other sheets will be published shortly. Suggestions are welcome and should be sent to the SI section of the DGS/SEE Group. Please send enquiries to general-safety-visits.service@cern.ch.

  19. Sedimentary record of storm deposits from Hurricane Ike, Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, A. D.; Horton, B. P.

    2012-10-01

    Prehistoric records of land-falling tropical cyclones further our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of tropical cyclone activity and its relationship with global climatic changes. Here, we describe deposit stratigraphy and sedimentology resulting from overwash during Hurricane Ike, which made landfall on September 13th 2008, to provide a much needed modern analogue for paleo-hurricane deposits and evaluate the hurricane's influence on barrier stability. We compared the volume, grain size distribution, organic content and foraminiferal assemblages of washover deposits at three sites from Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas that were up to 50 km west of Ike's landfall. Storm surge heights varied between 3.7 and 2.7 m with inland inundation extents of 330 to 113 m. At each of the study sites, Hurricane Ike eroded the shoreline and re-deposited a landward-thinning sand sheet between 0.02 and 0.28 m thick over short-grass prairie/salt-marsh soil. Shoreline erosion estimates suggest that only between 10 and 30% of eroded beach sediment is deposited on land as washover (net gain to barrier elevation), while the remainder is re-deposited subtidally or offshore, a potential net loss to the coastal sediment budget. The washover sediment was readily identifiable by abrupt changes in grain size, organic content, and buried in situ grasses. Foraminiferal assemblages within washover and short-grass prairie/salt-marsh sediments (when present) have similar assemblages, which are dominated by Ammonia spp. and Elphidium spp. These species are common to bay and nearshore environments of the Gulf of Mexico. Foraminiferal species Bolivina subaenariensis, Quinqueloculina seminulum and planktonic species are restricted to the washover deposits, which may suggest sediment provenance from inner shelf environments.

  20. Energy information sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-02

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the general public. Written for the general public, the EIA publication Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption and capability. The information contained herein pertains to energy data as of December 1991. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other EIA publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  1. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known...... as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events would add to our knowledge of the climatic system and – hopefully – enable better forecasts. Likewise, to forecast possible future sea level rise it is crucial to correctly model the large ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. This project is divided into two parts...

  2. Modern changes of tidal troughs among the radial sand ridges in northern Jiangsu coastal zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Haijun; DU Tingqin; GAO Ang

    2009-01-01

    Using satellite images taken on different dates, GIS analysis of aerial photos, bathymetric maps and other field survey data, tidal troughs and major sand ridges in the northern Jiangsu coastal area were contrasted. The results show that there have been three types of movement or migration of tidal trough in this area: (1) Periodic and restricted, this type of trough usually developed along the beaches with immobile gully head as a result of the artificial dams and the swing range increased from gully head to the low reaches, so they have been obviously impacted by human activity and have longer swing periods; (2) Periodic and actively, this kind of trough, which swung with a fast rate and moved periodically on sand ridges, were mainly controlled by the swings of the host tidal troughs and hydrodynamic forces upon tidal sand ridge and influenced slightly by human constructions; (3) Steadily and slowly, they are the main tidal troughs with large scale and a steady orientation in this area and have slow lateral movement. The differences in migration mode of tidal trough shift result in different rates of migration and impact upon tidal sand ridges. Lateral accumulation on current tidal trough and deposition on abandoned tidal troughs are the two types of sedimentation of the tidal sand ridges formation. The whole radial sand ridge was generally prone to division and retreat although sand ridges fluctuated by the analysis of changes in talwegs of tidal troughs and shorelines of sand ridges.

  3. Seafloor geomorphology and glacimarine sedimentation associated with fast-flowing ice sheet outlet glaciers in Disko Bay, West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streuff, Katharina; Ó Cofaigh, Colm; Hogan, Kelly; Jennings, Anne; Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Noormets, Riko; Nielsen, Tove; Kuijpers, Antoon; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Weinrebe, Wilhelm

    2017-08-01

    Fast-flowing outlet glaciers currently drain the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS), delivering ice, meltwater and debris to the fjords around Greenland. Although such glaciers strongly affect the ice sheet's mass balance, their glacimarine processes and associated products are still poorly understood. This study provides a detailed analysis of lithological and geophysical data from Disko Bay and the Vaigat Strait in central West Greenland. Disko Bay is strongly influenced by Jakobshavn Isbræ, Greenland's fastest-flowing glacier, which currently drains ∼7% of the ice sheet. Streamlined glacial landforms record the former flow of an expanded Jakobshavn Isbræ and adjacent GIS outlets through Disko Bay and the Vaigat Strait towards the continental shelf. Thirteen vibrocores contain a complex set of lithofacies including diamict, stratified mud, interbedded mud and sand, and bioturbated mud deposited by (1) suspension settling from meltwater plumes and the water column, (2) sediment gravity flows, and (3) iceberg rafting and ploughing. The importance of meltwater-related processes to glacimarine sedimentation in West Greenland fjords and bays is emphasised by the abundance of mud preserved in the cores. Radiocarbon dates constrain the position of the ice margin during deglaciation, and suggest that Jakobshavn Isbræ had retreated into central Disko Bay before 10.6 cal ka BP and to beyond Isfjeldsbanken by 7.6-7.1 cal ka BP. Sediment accumulation rates were up to 1.7 cm a-1 for ice-proximal glacimarine mud, and ∼0.007-0.05 cm a-1 for overlying distal sediments. In addition to elucidating the deglacial retreat history of Jakobshavn Isbræ, our findings show that the glacimarine sedimentary processes in West Greenland are similar to those in East Greenland, and that variability in such processes is more a function of time and glacier proximity than of geographic location and associated climatic regime.

  4. Non-oriented electrical sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissonneau, Pierre

    1984-02-01

    After placing the economic and technological importance of non-oriented magnetic sheets on the same level as that of grain-oriented sheets, the recent stages in the history of non-oriented sheets are recalled. The progress made in the knowledge of the physics of magnetism now allows the functions of the principal properties of non-oriented sheets to be analyzed. Current production of non-oriented sheets is marked by an evolution towards a split of the market between top-grade sheets, which could still be improved significantly, and lower grades, for which the cost of production continues to be practically the only determining factor.

  5. Geological provenance of Quaternary deposits from the southeastern Brazilian coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, R.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Campus da Praia Vermelha, 24210-346, Niteroi, R.J. (Brazil)]. E-mail: meigikos@if.uff.br; Veiga, R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Campus da Praia Vermelha, 24210-346, Niteroi, R.J. (Brazil); Carvalho, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Campus da Praia Vermelha, 24210-346, Niteroi, R.J. (Brazil); Macario, K.D. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Campus da Praia Vermelha, 24210-346, Niteroi, R.J. (Brazil); Gomes, P.R.S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal. Milton Tavares de Souza s/n, Gragoata, Campus da Praia Vermelha, 24210-346, Niteroi, R.J. (Brazil)

    2007-05-01

    Natural gamma radiation measurements of beach sand deposits were performed with the aim of understanding the provenance and transport processes of sediments along the coastal zone of three Brazilian States. The method employs thorium, uranium and potassium as tracers of the mineralogical properties of beach sand minerals, which reflect the geological history of transport and sorting processes. A considerable positive correlation with the geological evolution of these Quaternary coastal deposits was observed.

  6. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  7. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  8. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  9. Production (information sheets)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2007-01-01

    Documentation sheets: Geo energy 2 Integrated System Approach Petroleum Production (ISAPP) The value of smartness 4 Reservoir permeability estimation from production data 6 Coupled modeling for reservoir application 8 Toward an integrated near-wellbore model 10 TNO conceptual framework for "E&P Unce

  10. Burns Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Answers page . Share Print E-mail House Image Highlight Header Learn More Highlight Body Other NIGMS Fact Sheets Related Links Up to top This page last reviewed on April 06, 2016 Social Media Links Bookmark & Share Free Subscriptions Twitter Facebook YouTube ...

  11. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  12. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  13. Pseudomonas - Fact Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2012-01-01

    Fact sheet on Pseudomonas, including:What is Pseudomonas?What infections does it cause?Who is susceptible to pseudomonas infection?How will I know if I have pseudomonas infection?How can Pseudomonas be prevented from spreading?How can I protect myself from Pseudomonas?How is Pseudomonas infection treated?

  14. Tar sands : dirty oil and the future of a continent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikiforuk, A.

    2008-07-01

    This book exposes the environmental, social and political costs of oil sands development in Alberta's Athabasca Deposit. It argues that the earth-destroying production methods of bitumen cost nearly 20 times more than conventional crude to produce and upgrade. Most of the tar sands lie in such deep formations that bitumen must be steamed out of the ground using an array of pumps, pipes and horizontal wells. Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD), which is the most popular in situ technology used to recover oil sands can have detrimental effects on the boreal forests, wildlife and their habitat. The book emphasized the high greenhouse gas emissions, high energy consumption and suspected health problems associated with oil sands development. It also highlighted the industry's poor record on reclamation. Although some industry players have taken measures to reduce water consumption, more will have to be done to treat and reuse water. The author advocates that changes must be made in order to ensure sustainable development. refs., figs.

  15. Performance monitoring of electric shovels digging oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patnayak, S. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Natural Resources Engineering Facility; Tannant, D.D. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). School of Mining and Petroleum Engineering; Parsons, I. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Edmonton Research Centre; Del Valle, V. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Some of the largest available mining equipment is used for oil sand mining operations. However, the performance of electric cable shovels varies with the diggability characteristics of the ground. In particular, oil sands diggability with cable shovels depends on structural geology, the depositional environment and geotechnical parameters. This paper described some of the key shovel performance indicators such as dig cycle time, digging energy and digging power. In winter, frost penetration can also affect oil sands diggability. The challenge of hard digging in oil sands is often addressed by blasting or ripping, which increases the cost of production and impedes productivity. The shovel performance is also influenced by other parameters such as operator skills, bucket and tooth design and shovel dipper trajectory. This paper demonstrated that hoist and crowd motor voltages and currents are useful in identifying the beginning and end of dig cycles. Performance indicators such as dig cycle time, hoist motor energy and power, and crowd motor energy and power were considered to assess material diggability. It was suggested that hoist power represents the ground diggability better than other performance indicators. 5 refs., 1 tab., 10 figs.

  16. Sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, N.; Greeley, R. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (USA))

    1990-07-10

    Data from studies of the cross-sectional area of terrestrial transverse dunes have been combined with maps of dune morphometry derived from Viking orbiter images to generate new estimates of sediment thickness and dune sediment volume in the north polar sand seas of Mars. A relationship between dune spacing and equivalent sediment thickness (EST) was developed from field data on Namibian and North American dunes and was applied to data on dune spacing and dune cover measured on Viking orbiter images to generate maps of dune sediment thickness for Martian north polar sand seas. There are four major sand seas in the north polar region of Mars, covering an area of 6.8 x 10{sup 5} km{sup 2}. Equivalent sediment thickness ranges between 0.5 and 6.1 m with a mean of 1.8 m. The sand seas contain a total of 1158 km{sup 3} of dune sediment, which may have been derived by erosion of polar layered deposits and concentrated in its present location by winds that change direction seasonally.

  17. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  18. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  19. Impact on sand and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, R.P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the impact of a body on sand and water. When a body impacts a free surface in the inertial regime the series of events is the following: On impact material is blown away in all directions and an impact cavity forms. Due to the hydrostatic pressure from the sides the cav

  20. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  1. Modelling aeolian sand transport using a dynamic mass balancing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Bailey, Richard M.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.; Weaver, Corinne M.

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. Whilst many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing field evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. At this scale of analysis, inertia in the saltation system causes changes in sediment transport to lag behind de/accelerations in flow. However, saltation inertia has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study, we present a new transport model that dynamically balances the sand mass being transported in the wind flow. The 'dynamic mass balance' (DMB) model we present accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) component of wind flow, as saltation is most strongly associated with the positive u component of the wind. The performance of the DMB model is tested by fitting it to two field-derived (Namibia's Skeleton Coast) datasets of wind velocity and sediment transport: (i) a 10-min (10 Hz measurement resolution) dataset; (ii) a 2-h (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset. The DMB model is shown to outperform two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (e.g. Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003), when predicting sand transport over the two experiments. For all measurement averaging intervals presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the DMB model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.48%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The DMB model also produced more realistic (less 'peaky') time series of sand flux than the other two models, and a more accurate distribution of sand flux data. The best predictions of total sand transport are achieved using

  2. Oolitic sandbody depositional models and geometries, Mississippian of southwest Britain: implications for petroleum exploration in carbonate ramp settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchette, Trevor P.; Paul Wright, V.; Faulkner, Tom J.

    1990-07-01

    A 1000 m thick early Mississippian carbonate supersequence, the "Carboniferous Limestone" of southwest Britain, consists of three third-order depositional sequences. These comprise parasequences in various configurations, and the whole forms a carbonate ramp stack. Within this framework five major oolitic carbonate sandbodies developed: (a) Castell Coch Limestone, (b) Stowe Oolite, (c) Brofiscin Oolite, (d) Gully Oolite, and (e) High Tor Limestone. The depositional regime was storm- and wave-dominated throughout and the major sandbodies represent a range of progradational carbonate beaches, barriers and detached subtidal shoals. Analysis of the three-dimensional shapes and distribution of these five examples shows that they evolved to produce three major carbonate sandbody geometries: (a) strings, (b) sheets, and (c) wedges. These geometries are characterised using the five field examples and offered as a template which may assist in the exploration and reservoir modelling of petroleum-rich high-energy ramp systems. Progradation, for up to 40 km, of barrier islands (Stowe Oolite) and beach-ridge plains (Gully Oolite Formation) generated strings, and "thick" sheets individually up to 10-20 m thick. "Thin" shoreface-retreat carbonate packstone/grainstone sheets up to 5 m thick (High Tor limestone) developed during transgressions as veneers across flooding surfaces. These are comparable with sheet sands developed in siliciclastic shelf depositional systems. Progradation, for up to 30 km, and vertical aggradation of shoreline-detached oolite shoals (Castell Coch limestone, Brofiscin Oolite), generated basinwards-expanding or thinning wedges up to 30 m thick. Tectonically controlled stacking of strandplain sheets produced a composite carbonate sandbody up to 80 m thick (Gully Oolite). The intrinsic (sedimentary) and extrinsic (eustacy, tectonism, climate) factors which controlled these sandbody geometries are addressed. Establishing the positions of the sandbodies

  3. experimental studies of sand production from unconsolidated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    Production of sand during oil and gas exploration causes severe operational prob- ... duction such as risk of well failure, erosion of pipelines and surface facilities, sand separa- tion and disposal ... ment, theoretical and numerical analysis have.

  4. Assessment of regional acidifying pollutants in the Athabasca oil sands area under different emission scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sunny; Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Spink, David; Jung, Jaegun; Morris, Ralph; Pauls, Ron

    2017-05-01

    Acid deposition is a potential environmental impact of oil sands development in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) in Northeastern Alberta. An acid deposition management framework has been established to manage this issue. This framework includes an acid deposition modelling and time-to-effect impact assessment component that was recently implemented for four acidifying emissions cases using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. Predicted gross Potential Acid Input (PAI) deposition in the AOSR increases from the historical to existing case with further increases predicted in two future cases due to the projected increase in NOx emissions. On average the total predicted PAI deposition in the AOSR is approximately 40% sulphur deposition and 60% nitrogen deposition. Sulphur deposition decreases by 7% from the historical to existing cases due to the reductions in SO2 emissions that have occurred in the AOSR but increases by 5% from the existing to future case 1 and by 8% from existing to future case 2 even though continued AOSR SO2 emission decreases were modelled. This is likely the result of the deposition reduction associated with a single large reduction in SO2 emissions from one facility's main stack being offset elsewhere in the AOSR by deposition increases due to small increases in SO2 emissions from several in situ sources with shorter stacks. Average nitrogen deposition over the AOSR increases by 10% from the historical to existing case and then further increases by 10.6% from the existing case to future case 1 and by 12.3% from the existing case to future case 2. The increasing relevance of NOx emissions over SO2 emissions in the AOSR suggests that a robust treatment of nitrogen chemistry such as in CMAQ is required for conducting deposition assessments in the region. The modelling results provide information that can be used to inform oil sands emission management priorities in the context of acid deposition and nitrogen eutrophication

  5. Fast Light-Sheet Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.

    1995-01-01

    Optomechanical apparatus maintains sheet of pulsed laser light perpendicular to reference axis while causing sheet of light to translate in oscillatory fashion along reference axis. Produces illumination for laser velocimeter in which submicrometer particles entrained in flow illuminated and imaged in parallel planes displaced from each other in rapid succession. Selected frequency of oscillation range upward from tens of hertz. Rotating window continuously shifts sheet of light laterally while maintaining sheet parallel to same plane.

  6. UK silica sand resources for fracking

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2013-01-01

    UK silica sand resources for fracking Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG Email: Silica sand is high purity quartz sand that is mainly used for glass production, as foundry sand, in horticulture, leisure and other industrial uses. One specialist use is as a ‘proppant’ to enhance oil and gas recovery. This presentation will focus on this application, particularly for shale gas recovery where it is mo...

  7. Low Back Pain Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low Back Pain Fact Sheet You are here Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Low Back Pain Fact Sheet What ... reduction among workers using lumbar support belts, many companies that have ... training and ergonomic awareness programs. The reported injury reduction ...

  8. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  9. Palaeoclimatic considerations of talus flatirons and aeolian deposits in Northern Fuerteventura volcanic island (Canary Islands, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Elorza, Mateo; Lucha, Pedro; Gracia, F.-Javier; Desir, Gloria; Marín, Cinta; Petit-Maire, Nicole

    2013-09-01

    Fuerteventura volcanic island has been subject to considerable aeolian activity since the Late Pleistocene. The aeolian record includes inactive aeolian deposits with interbedded entisols, whose age by OSL dating ranges between 46 and 26 ky BP. The Corralejo active dune field, where sand sheets, nebkhas, coppice dunes, blowouts, barchans and transverse dunes have been described, constitutes a more recent Aeolian deposit. Here the age is about 14 ky BP. On Fuerteventura Island aeolian dust has been deposited on valleys and slopes. This last type of accumulation has been affected by gully incision, producing talus flatirons. Samples taken on the apex of these palaeo-slopes indicate an OSL age of 30 and 50 ky BP. A palaeoclimatic succession has been interpreted during which a prevailing arid period took place in OIS 4, with the accumulation of aeolian dust. A humid period occurred in OIS 2, during which slopes were dissected and formed talus flatirons. An arid period about 14 ky BP gave rise to the Corralejo dune field, which has continued until present with slight climatic oscillations.

  10. On the origin and age of the Great Sand Dunes, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madole, Richard F.; Romig, Joe H.; Aleinikoff, John N.; VanSistine, D. Paco; Yacob, Ezra Y.

    2008-07-01

    Over the past 100 yr, several hypotheses have been proposed for the origin and age of the Great Sand Dunes. These hypotheses differ widely in the descriptions of dune morphometry, the immediate source of eolian sand, and when sand transport occurred. The primary purpose of this paper is to evaluate these hypotheses and, where warranted, to present new ideas about the origin and age of the Great Sand Dunes. To evaluate the previous hypotheses, we had to develop more detailed information about the surficial geology of the northern San Luis Valley. Thus, we mapped the surficial geology of an area extending several tens of kilometers north, south, and west of the Great Sand Dunes and examined subsurface stratigraphy in more than 200 wells and borings. In addition, we used relative-dating criteria and several radiocarbon and OSL ages to establish the chronology of surficial deposits, and we determined the U-Pb ages of detrital zircons to obtain information about the sources of the sand in the Great Sand Dunes. The first principal finding of this study is that the lower part of the closed basin north of the Rio Grande, referred to here as the sump, is the immediate source of the sand in the Great Sand Dunes, rather than the late Pleistocene flood plain of the Rio Grande (the most widely accepted hypothesis). A second principal finding is that the Great Sand Dunes are older than late Pleistocene. They postdate the draining of Lake Alamosa, which began ˜ 440 ka, and predate the time when streams draining the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains were deflected by incipient dunes that formed near the mountain front. Geomorphic and stratigraphic evidence indicate that this deflection occurred prior to the end of the next to last glaciation (Bull Lake), i.e., prior to ˜ 130 ka.

  11. Sand Waves. Report 1. Sand Wave Shoaling in Navigation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    heights range from 0.8 m in the Minas Basin, Bay of Fundy (Dalrymple 1984) to 6.0 m in the Bahia Blanca Estuary, Argentina (Aliotta and Perillo 1987...26 PART IV: SITE-SPECIFIC SAND WAVE SHOALING PROBLEMS .. ........ 30 Columbia River Navigation Channel ........ ............... .. 30 Panama ...problem location discussed in this report is at St. Andrew Bay near Panama City, Florida. A relatively short section of the jettied inlet channel requires

  12. Dynamics of Unusual Debris Flows on Martian Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Dohm, James M.; Baker, Victor R.; Beyer, Ross A.; Bourke, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Gullies that dissect sand dunes in Russell impact crater often display debris flow-like deposits in their distal reaches. The possible range of both the rheological properties and the flow rates are estimated using a numerical simulation code of a Bingham plastic flow to help explain the formation of these features. Our simulated results are best explained by a rapid debris flow. For example, a debris flow with the viscosity of 10(exp 2) Pa s and the yield strength of 10(exp 2) Pa can form the observed deposits with a flow rate of 0.5 cu m/s sustained over several minutes and total discharged water volume on the order of hundreds of cubic meters, which may be produced by melting a surface layer of interstitial ice within the dune deposits to several centimeters depth.

  13. Archaen to Recent aeolian sand systems and their sedimentary record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez-López, Juan Pedro; Clemmensen, Lars B; Lancaster, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The sedimentary record of aeolian sand systems extends from the Archean to the Quaternary, yet current understanding of aeolian sedimentary processes and product remains limited. Most preserved aeolian successions represent inland sand-sea or dunefield (erg) deposits, whereas coastal systems...... are primarily known from the Cenozoic. The complexity of aeolian sedimentary processes and facies variability are under-represented and excessively simplified in current facies models, which are not sufficiently refined to reliably account for the complexity inherent in bedform morphology and migratory...... behaviour, and therefore cannot be used to consistently account for and predict the nature of the preserved sedimentary record in terms of formative processes. Archean and Neoproterozoic aeolian successions remain poorly constrained. Palaeozoic ergs developed and accumulated in relation...

  14. Review of four major environmental effects monitoring programs in the oil sands region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lott, E.O.; Jones, R.K. [EO Consulting, BC (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    The lack of knowledge on current environmental effects monitoring programs for the mineable oil sands region generates a low public confidence in environment health monitoring and reporting programs for the oil sands operations. In 2010, the Oil Sands Research and Information Network (OSRIN) supervised a study reviewing the major environmental effects monitoring programs that are underway in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo. Four main environmental effects monitoring and reporting organizations existing in the oil sands area were engaged to describe their programs through this study: Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute (ABMI), Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA), Regional Aquatic Monitoring Program (RAMP), Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA). These different organizations have specific roles in providing information, data and understanding of ecosystem effects. A one page visual summary of environmental effects monitoring in the oil sands area resulted from the information received from these organizations and detailed fact sheets were presented for each one of the programs. The report of this study also presents seven other environmental monitoring initiatives or organizations such as Alberta Environment and Environment Canada environmental effects monitoring program. The main observation that emerged from the review was the lack of detailed understanding shown by the stakeholders regarding the monitoring activities performed in the oil sands area. There is a lack of communication of the different programs that are conducted in the region. The study also pointed out that no efforts were put in cross-linking the various programs to be assured that every concerns related to environmental effects associated with oil sands operations were addressed. A better understanding of environmental effects and an improvement in public confidence in the data and its interpretation would probably be observed with the establishment of a

  15. Possible Record of Neoproterozoic Ice Sheet Collapse: The Kapp Lyell Diamictite Sequence of southwest Spitsbergen, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornerud, M.

    2008-12-01

    appearance of ca. 500 m of unlayered, unsorted diamicite in beds 1-5 m thick, and some intervening graded layers of conglomerate to sandstone. The massive, unsorted "Heinrich"-type layers contain sand- to boulder-sized material and tend to be laterally discontinuous, while the graded beds are traceable for hundreds of meters. In the uppermost 1000 -1500 m of the sequence, such coarse graded beds become predominant, with only rare unsorted intervals. These beds are the highest preserved Neoproterozoic strata in the region. Overall, the transition from laminated, to unsorted, to graded diamictites may represent change from 1) a stable ice margin that released rare icebergs into a deep, quiet basin to 2) a collapsing ice sheet that unleashed flotillas of icebergs and large volumes of sediment to 3) submarine landslides that triggered turbidity flows from the rapidly deposited, gravitationally unstable sediments. No absolute ages are available for the Kapp Lyell sequence itself, but indirect evidence suggests that it records the ca. 635 Ma Marinoan stage of the "Snowball Earth" glaciations. In southernmost Spitsbergen, a unit correlative with the underlying Konglomeratfjellet Fm has yielded a metamorphic monazite age of 653 +/- 39 Ma (Majka et al 2007). Because there is no known stratigraphic discontinuity or metamorphic contrast between this older unit and the Kapp Lyell sequence, it seems most likely that the Kapp Lyell sequence and Konglomeratfjellet Fm. represent the Marinoan and Sturtian glaciations, respectively. If so, the sedimentary characteristics of the Kapp Lyell sequence suggest a catastrophic end to a Marinoan ice sheet, an ironic conclusion to be drawn from rocks named for the father of Uniformitarianism.

  16. Reducing slide sheet injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varcin-Coad, Lynn

    2008-12-01

    Slide sheets are often stated to be the cause of hand and forearm injuries. While there are many other possible reasons injuries to nursing staff, carer and client occur, the most important linking factors relating to musculoskeletal disorders and manual handling of people is the ongoing inappropriateness or lack of suitably designed and equipped work areas. As physiotherapist Lynn Varcin-Coad writes, staff are bearing the brunt of inefficiencies of design and lack of high order risk control.

  17. Porous media grain size distribution and hydrodynamic forces effects on transport and deposition of suspended particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahfir, Nasre-Dine; Hammadi, Ahmed; Alem, Abdellah; Wang, HuaQing; Le Bras, Gilbert; Ouahbi, Tariq

    2017-03-01

    The effects of porous media grain size distribution on the transport and deposition of polydisperse suspended particles under different flow velocities were investigated. Selected Kaolinite particles (2-30μm) and Fluorescein (dissolved tracer) were injected in the porous media by step input injection technique. Three sands filled columns were used: Fine sand, Coarse sand, and a third sand (Mixture) obtained by mixing the two last sands in equal weight proportion. The porous media performance on the particle removal was evaluated by analysing particles breakthrough curves, hydro-dispersive parameters determined using the analytical solution of convection-dispersion equation with a first order deposition kinetics, particles deposition profiles, and particle-size distribution of the recovered and the deposited particles. The deposition kinetics and the longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion coefficients are controlled by the porous media grain size distribution. Mixture sand is more dispersive than Fine and Coarse sands. More the uniformity coefficient of the porous medium is large, higher is the filtration efficiency. At low velocities, porous media capture all sizes of suspended particles injected with larger ones mainly captured at the entrance. A high flow velocity carries the particles deeper into the porous media, producing more gradual changes in the deposition profile. The median diameter of the deposited particles at different depth increases with flow velocity. The large grain size distribution leads to build narrow pores enhancing the deposition of the particles by straining. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands. Annual report, July 1991--July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-08-01

    The University of Utah tar sand research and development program is concerned with research and development on Utah is extensive oil sands deposits. The program has been intended to develop a scientific and technological base required for eventual commercial recovery of the heavy oils from oil sands and processing these oils to produce synthetic crude oil and other products such as asphalt. The overall program is based on mining the oil sand, processing the mined sand to recover the heavy oils and upgrading them to products. Multiple deposits are being investigated since it is believed that a large scale (approximately 20,000 bbl/day) plant would require the use of resources from more than one deposit. The tasks or projects in the program are organized according to the following classification: Recovery technologies which includes thermal recovery methods, water extraction methods, and solvent extraction methods; upgrading and processing technologies which covers hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and hydropyrolysis; solvent extraction; production of specialty products; and environmental aspects of the production and processing technologies. These tasks are covered in this report.

  19. METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, M.A.; Smutz, M.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for recovering thorium, uranium, and rare earth values from monazite sand. The monazite sand is first digested with sulfuric acid and the resulting "monazite sulfate" solution is adjusted to a pH of between 0.4 and 3.0, and oxalate anions are added causing precipitation of the thorium and the rare earths as the oxalates. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the uranium containing supernatant solution, and is dried and calcined to the oxides. The thorium and rare earth oxides are then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is contacted with tribntyl phosphate whereby an organic extract phase containing the cerium and thorium values is obtained, together with an aqueous raffinate containing the other rare earth values. The organic phase is then separated from the aqueous raffinate and the cerium and thorium are back extracted with an aqueous medium.

  20. Long term geological record of a global deep subsurface microbial habitat in sand injection complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Boyce, Adrian J; Hurst, Andrew; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett; Ponicka, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    There is extensive evidence from drilling into continental margins for microbial colonization of a deep biosphere. However it is difficult to prove deep biosphere activity in the geological record, where evidence for life is dominated by the remains of organic matter buried after deposition at the surface. Nevertheless we propose that natural injections of sand into muddy strata at continental margins represent an excellent habitat opportunity for deep microbial activity down to several kilometres' present day depth. Sulphur isotope data for iron sulphides precipitated soon after injection indicate consistent microbial sulphate reduction through the geological record. The complexes are favourable sites for colonization, because high permeability and extensive sand/mud interface allow ready availability of electron donors and nutrients. The measured examples of iron sulphide in injected sands extend back to the Proterozoic, and show that injected sand complexes have been a long-term environment for deep subsurface microbial colonization.

  1. A compact topology for sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Dennunzio, Alberto; Masson, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we exhibit a strong relation between the sand automata configuration space and the cellular automata configuration space. This relation induces a compact topology for sand automata, and a new context in which sand automata are homeomorphic to cellular automata acting on a specific subshift. We show that the existing topological results for sand automata, including the Hedlund-like representation theorem, still hold. In this context, we give a characterization of the cellular automata which are sand automata, and study some dynamical behaviors such as equicontinuity. Furthermore, we deal with the nilpotency. We show that the classical definition is not meaningful for sand automata. Then, we introduce a suitable new notion of nilpotency for sand automata. Finally, we prove that this simple dynamical behavior is undecidable.

  2. Rheological Characterization of Green Sand Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hovad, Emil

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to characterize experimentally the flow behaviour of the green sand that is used for casting of sand moulds. After the sand casting process is performed, the sand moulds are used for metal castings. The rheological properties of the green sand is important to quantify...... module for characterizing granular materials. The new module enables viscosity measurements of the green sand as function of the shear rate at different flow rates, i.e. 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 15 L/min. The results show generally that the viscosity decreases with both the shear- and flow rate....... In addition, the measurements show that the green sand flow follows a shear-thinning behaviour even after the full fluidization point....

  3. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...... as well as the flow pattern during discharge of the silo. During discharge a mixed flow pattern has been identified...

  4. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17.

  5. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  6. Thermal Properties of oil sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, Y.; Lee, H.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Injection or Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are the effective methods for producing heavy oil or bitumen. In any thermal recovery methods, thermal properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity) are closely related to the formation and expansion of steam chamber within a reservoir, which is key factors to control efficiency of thermal recovery. However, thermal properties of heavy oil or bitumen have not been well-studied despite their importance in thermal recovery methods. We measured thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity of 43 oil sand samples from Athabasca, Canada, using a transient thermal property measurement instrument. Thermal conductivity of 43 oil sand samples varies from 0.74 W/mK to 1.57 W/mK with the mean thermal conductivity of 1.09 W/mK. The mean thermal diffusivity is 5.7×10-7 m2/s with the minimum value of 4.2×10-7 m2/s and the maximum value of 8.0×10-7 m2/s. Volumetric heat capacity varies from 1.5×106 J/m3K to 2.11×106 J/m3K with the mean volumetric heat capacity of 1.91×106 J/m3K. In addition, physical and chemical properties (e.g., bitumen content, electric resistivity, porosity, gamma ray and so on) of oil sand samples have been measured by geophysical logging and in the laboratory. We are now proceeding to investigate the relationship between thermal properties and physical/chemical properties of oil sand.

  7. The age of the "old red sand" on the coasts of south Fujian and west Guangdong, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The sedimentary strata and deposition ages of the "old red sand" distributed along the coasts of south Fujian and west Guangdong are determined by lithostratigraphy, magnetic stratigraphy and earth chemistry combined with TL, ESR and 14C-dating techniques. The research shows that the "old red sand" was aeolian sediments deposited from 55 400 to 9 000 aBP, the last glacial period in the middle and later age of Late Pleistocene. Most of them deposited in two periods of 56-42 ka and 30-10 ka. The "old red sand" deposited in the period of 30-10 ka, the later Würm glacier substage (Q33), developed on the largest scale with the widest distribution.

  8. Assessment of industrial wastes in mortar layers deposited on stainless steel sheets of sinks Avaliação de resíduos industriais em camadas de argamassas depositadas sobre chapas de aço inoxidável de pias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gemelli

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the properties of alternative mortars destined to strengthen metal sheets of sinks. The performance of these mortars was compared to that of a basic mortar made of cement, sand, and water, named standard mortar (SM. One of these mortars, named alternative mortar 2 (AM2, and composed of cement, textile residue, polyurethane, polypropylene fibers and water, was developed recently to replace the current one, named alternative mortar 1 (AM1, composed of cement, sand, polystyrene, polypropylene fibers and water. These mortars were manufactured and aged in a room in atmospheric environment for 7, 14, 28, 60 and 90 days, either with or without initial drying in a furnace. After cure of 90 days the flexion strength stress of the SM, AM1 and AM2 mortars was 5.21, 3.84, and 1.42 MPa, respectively. The SM and AM1 mortars were constituted of C-S-H phases, Ca(OH2, SiO2, AFm and AFt (monossulphate/ettringite phases. The AM2 mortar presented, apart from the compounds mentioned above, CaCO3. This compound is from the textile residue that is composed essentially of CaCO3 and Ca(OH2. The reduction in flexion strength of AM1 mortar, compared to SM mortar, is caused by the polystyrene whereas the lowering mechanical strength of the AM2 is due to both polyurethane and textile residue. Even so, its mechanical strength is acceptable because the flexion strength stress required for the industrial application is 1.0 MPa.O objetivo desse trabalho foi estudar as propriedades de argamassas alternativas usadas para reforço de chapas metálicas de pias de cozinha. O desempenho dessas argamassas foi comparado com aquele de uma argamassa básica feita de cimento, areia e água, denominada argamassa padrão (SM. Uma dessas argamassas, denominada argamassa alternativa 2 (AM2, composta de cimento, resíduo, poliuretano, fibras de polipropileno e água, foi desenvolvida recentemente para substituir a atual, chamada argamassa alternativa 1 (AM1, composta de

  9. Vanadium Geochemistry of Oil Sands Fluid Petroleum Coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jake A; Lindsay, Matthew B J

    2017-03-07

    Vanadium has previously been linked to elevated toxicity of leachates derived from oil sands petroleum coke. However, geochemical controls on V mobility within coke deposits remain poorly constrained. Detailed examinations of porewater and solid-phase V geochemistry were therefore performed on oil sands fluid petroleum coke deposits in Alberta, Canada. Sample collection focused on both active and reclaimed deposits, which contained more than 3 × 10(7) m(3) of fluid petroleum coke. Dissolved V concentrations were highest (up to 3.0 mg L(-1)) immediately below the water table but decreased rapidly with increasing depth. This trend corresponded to a transition from mildly acidic (pH 6-7) and oxic conditions to mildly alkaline (pH 7-8.5) and anoxic conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping revealed coke particles exhibited an internal structure characterized by successive concentric layers. The outer margins of these layers were characterized by elevated V, Fe, Si, and Al concentrations, indicating the presence of inorganic phases. Micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy revealed that V speciation was dominated by V(IV) porphyrins except at outer margins of layers, where octahedrally coordinated V(III) was a major component. Minor to trace V(V) was also detected within fluid petroleum coke particles.

  10. Structural Control of Sand Bodies and Deep Exploration for Oil and Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Rihui; Lin Changsong; Zheng Herong

    2002-01-01

    The structural styles can be used to analyses and predict developments and distributions of sand bodies in a rift basin. The dynamic process of faulting and sedimentation can be expressed as follow: the basin topography controlled by fault activity can control water dynamics; which in turn affect the transport and sedimentation of sediments. The corresponding analysis between structural styles and sand depositional types includes the following aspects: (1) in section, the corresponding between development of fault terraces and sand depositional types; (2) in plane, the relationship between faults' association and distributions of sand bodies. There are four types of terrace styles to be identified. They are Steep Slope Single Fault Terrace (SSSFT), Steep Slope Multiple Fault Terrace (SSMFT), Gentle Slope (GS) and Gentle Slope Multiple Fault Terrace (GSMFT), which also can be divided into six subtypes by the timing of the faults activities and the directions of their activity migrations (basinward and landward or marginward). They correspond to the following sand depositions such as alluvial fan, fan delta and turbidite fan etc.. The analysis of structure-sedimentation is a discussion on the rank Ⅲ sequence evolution under the condition of pulsing or episodic fault activities. It has been recognized four plane fault associations such as the comb, the broom, the fork and the fault-fold association as well as the corresponding sand distributions. Structural-sedimentary models above mentioned are significant for the deep oil and gas exploration when lacking of the drill data. It may reduce multiple resolutions in the interpretation of seismic-sedimentary facies and promote sand predictions through the constraints of the structural styles of the basin units. The structural-sedimentary pattern can be used as a geological model in oil and gas exploration in the rift basins.

  11. Oil sands operations as a large source of secondary organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggio, John; Li, Shao-Meng; Hayden, Katherine; Taha, Youssef M.; Stroud, Craig; Darlington, Andrea; Drollette, Brian D.; Gordon, Mark; Lee, Patrick; Liu, Peter; Leithead, Amy; Moussa, Samar G.; Wang, Danny; O'Brien, Jason; Mittermeier, Richard L.; Brook, Jeffrey R.; Lu, Gang; Staebler, Ralf M.; Han, Yuemei; Tokarek, Travis W.; Osthoff, Hans D.; Makar, Paul A.; Zhang, Junhua; L. Plata, Desiree; Gentner, Drew R.

    2016-06-01

    Worldwide heavy oil and bitumen deposits amount to 9 trillion barrels of oil distributed in over 280 basins around the world, with Canada home to oil sands deposits of 1.7 trillion barrels. The global development of this resource and the increase in oil production from oil sands has caused environmental concerns over the presence of toxic compounds in nearby ecosystems and acid deposition. The contribution of oil sands exploration to secondary organic aerosol formation, an important component of atmospheric particulate matter that affects air quality and climate, remains poorly understood. Here we use data from airborne measurements over the Canadian oil sands, laboratory experiments and a box-model study to provide a quantitative assessment of the magnitude of secondary organic aerosol production from oil sands emissions. We find that the evaporation and atmospheric oxidation of low-volatility organic vapours from the mined oil sands material is directly responsible for the majority of the observed secondary organic aerosol mass. The resultant production rates of 45-84 tonnes per day make the oil sands one of the largest sources of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosols in North America. Heavy oil and bitumen account for over ten per cent of global oil production today, and this figure continues to grow. Our findings suggest that the production of the more viscous crude oils could be a large source of secondary organic aerosols in many production and refining regions worldwide, and that such production should be considered when assessing the environmental impacts of current and planned bitumen and heavy oil extraction projects globally.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Temperature Effects on Microparticle Sand Rebound Characteristics at Gas Turbine Representative Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Delimont, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    When a gas turbine operates in a particle laden environment, such as a desert, small solid particles are ingested into the engine. The ingested sand particles can cause damage to engine components and reduce the service life of the engine. Particle ingestion causes the erosion of metal blades and vanes, and, if the firing temperature is hot enough, deposition of molten particles in the hot sections of the engine. Both deposition and erosion phenomena can severely reduce overall engine perfo...

  13. Evaluation of Durability Parameters of Concrete with Manufacture Sand and River Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangoju, Bhaskar; Ramesh, G.; Bharatkumar, B. H.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.

    2017-06-01

    Most of the states in our country have banned sand quarrying from the river beds, causing a scarcity of natural river sand for the construction sector. Manufacture sand (M-sand) is one of the alternate solutions to replace the river sand (R-sand) in concrete. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the durability parameters of concrete with M-sand when compared to that of concrete with R-sand. Corrosion of reinforcement is one of the main deteriorating mechanisms of reinforced concrete due to the ingress of chloride ions or carbon-di-oxide. For comparative evaluation of durability parameters, accelerated tests such as Rapid Chloride Permeability Test, Rapid Chloride Migration Test and accelerated carbonation test were carried out on specimens of R-sand and M-sand. All tests were carried out after 90 days of casting. Test results reveal that the durability parameters of the concrete with M-sand in chloride induced environment is relatively better than that of concrete with R-sand and hence is recommended to use M-sand as a replacement to R-sand.

  14. Receptor Modeling of Epiphytic Lichens to Elucidate the Sources and SpatialDistribution of Inorganic Air Pollution in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contribution of inorganic air pollutant emissions to atmospheric deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of Alberta, Canada was investigated in the surrounding boreal forests, using a common epiphytic lichen bio-indicator species (Hypogymnia physodes) and applyi...

  15. Receptor Modeling of Epiphytic Lichens to Elucidate the Sources and SpatialDistribution of Inorganic Air Pollution in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    The contribution of inorganic air pollutant emissions to atmospheric deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of Alberta, Canada was investigated in the surrounding boreal forests, using a common epiphytic lichen bio-indicator species (Hypogymnia physodes) and applyi...

  16. An Integrated Rock Typing Approach for Unraveling the Reservoir Heterogeneity of Tight Sands in the Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin, Western Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilkhchi, Rahim Kadkhodaie; Rezaee, Reza; Harami, Reza Moussavi;

    2014-01-01

    Tight gas sands in Whicher Range Field of Perth Basin show large heterogeneity in reservoir characteristics and production behavior related to depositional and diagenetic features. Diagenetic events (compaction and cementation) have severely affected the pore system. In order to investigate...

  17. Morphological characteristics and sand volumes of different coastal dune types in Essaouira Province, Atlantic Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor-Blanco, Germán; Flor, Germán; Lharti, Saadia; Pando, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Altogether three coastal dune fields, one located north and two south of the city of Essaouira, Atlantic Morocco, have been investigated to establish the distribution and overall sand volumes of various dune types. The purpose of the study was to characterize and classify the aeolian landforms of the coastal dune belt, to estimate their sand volumes and to assess the effectiveness of coastal dune stabilization measures. The northern dune field is 9 km long and lined by a wide artificial foredune complex fixed by vegetation, fences and branches forming a rectangular grid. Active and ephemeral aklé dunes border the inner backshore, while some intrusive dunes have crossed the foredune belt and are migrating farther inland. The total sand volume of the northern dune belt amounts 13,910,255 m3. The central coastal sector comprises a much smaller dune field located just south of the city. It is only 1.2 km long and, with the exception of intrusive dunes, shows all other dune types. The overall sand volume of the central dune field amounts to about 172,463 m3. The southern dune field is characterized by a narrower foredune belt and overall lower dunes that, in addition, become progressively smaller towards the south. In this sector, embryonic dunes (coppice, shadow dunes), tongue-like and tabular dunes, and sand sheets intrude from the beach, the profile of which has a stepped appearance controlled by irregular outcrops of old aeolianite and beach rock. The total volume of the southern dune field amounts 1,446,389 m3. For the whole study area, i.e. for all three dune fields combined, a sand volume of about 15,529,389 m3 has been estimated. The sand of the dune fields is derived from coastal erosion and especially the Tensift River, which enters the sea at Souira Qedima some 70 km north of Essaouira. After entering the sea, the sand is transported southwards by littoral drift driven by the mainly north-westerly swell climate and the Trade Winds blowing from the NNE. This

  18. The last Scandinavian ice sheet in northwestern Russia: ice flow patterns and decay dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demidov, L.; Houmark-Nielsen, Michael; Kjær, Kurt Henrik

    2006-01-01

    the main ice sheet. During the Lateglacial warming, disintegration and melting took place in a 200-600 km wide zone along the northeastern rim of SIS associated with thick Quaternary accumulations. Deglaciation occurred through aerial downwasting within large fields of dead ice developed during......Advance of the Late Weichselian (Valdaian) Scandinavian Ice Sheet (SIS) in northwestern Russia took place after a period of periglacial conditions. Till of the last SIS, Bobrovo till, overlies glacial deposits from the previous Barents and Kara Sea ice sheets and marine deposits of the Last...... in Russia than previously outlined and the time of termination at 18-16 cal. kyr BP was almost 10 kyr delayed compared to the southwestern part of the ice sheet. We argue that the lithology of the ice sheets' substrate, and especially the location of former proglacial lake basins, influenced the dynamics...

  19. Curiosity at Gale Crater, Mars: Characterization and analysis of the rocknest sand shadow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blake, D.F.; Morris, R.V.; Kocurek, G.; Morrison, S.M.; Downs, R.T.; Bish, D.; Ming, D.W.; Edgett, K.S.; Rubin, D.; Goetz, W.; Madsen, M.B.; Sullivan, R.; Gellert, R.; Campbell, I.; Treiman, A.H.; McLennan, S.M.; Yen, A.S.; Grotzinger, J.; Vaniman, D.T.; Chipera, S.J.; Achilles, C.N.; Rampe, E.B.; Sumner, D.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Maurice, S.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Fisk, M.; Schmidt, M.; Mahaffy, P.; Leshin, L.A.; Glavin, D.; Steele, A.; Freissinet, C.; Navarro-González, R.; Yingst, R.A.; Kah, L.C.; Bridges, N.; Lewis, K.W.; Bristow, T.F.; Farmer, J.D.; Crisp, J.A.; Stolper, E.M.; Des Marais, D.J.; Sarrazin, P.; MSL Science Team, the

    2013-01-01

    The Rocknest aeolian deposit is similar to aeolian features analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) Spirit and Opportunity. The fraction of sand <150 micrometers in size contains ~55% crystalline material consistent with a basaltic heritage and ~45% x-ray amorphous material. The amorphous com

  20. Curiosity at Gale Crater, Mars: Characterization and analysis of the rocknest sand shadow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blake, D.F.; Morris, R.V.; Kocurek, G.; Morrison, S.M.; Downs, R.T.; Bish, D.; Ming, D.W.; Edgett, K.S.; Rubin, D.; Goetz, W.; Madsen, M.B.; Sullivan, R.; Gellert, R.; Campbell, I.; Treiman, A.H.; McLennan, S.M.; Yen, A.S.; Grotzinger, J.; Vaniman, D.T.; Chipera, S.J.; Achilles, C.N.; Rampe, E.B.; Sumner, D.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Maurice, S.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Fisk, M.; Schmidt, M.; Mahaffy, P.; Leshin, L.A.; Glavin, D.; Steele, A.; Freissinet, C.; Navarro-González, R.; Yingst, R.A.; Kah, L.C.; Bridges, N.; Lewis, K.W.; Bristow, T.F.; Farmer, J.D.; Crisp, J.A.; Stolper, E.M.; Des Marais, D.J.; Sarrazin, P.; MSL Science Team, the|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292012217

    2013-01-01

    The Rocknest aeolian deposit is similar to aeolian features analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) Spirit and Opportunity. The fraction of sand <150 micrometers in size contains ~55% crystalline material consistent with a basaltic heritage and ~45% x-ray amorphous material. The amorphous

  1. Black gold rush in Canada[Tar sand oil]; Svart gullrush i Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundersen, Ina

    2006-07-01

    In Alberta, Canada, oil companies are competing for licences to extract oil from the tar sand deposits. The occurrences cover an area equal to Belgium, and the total of recoverable oil is estimated to around 1700 million barrels. Descriptions of the recovery process and the competing companies are given.

  2. Sand Resources of Southern Lake Erie, Conneaut to Toledo, Ohio - A Seismic Reflection and Vibracore Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    calculated that about 102 million cubic meters of sand was present in the entire Lorain-Vermilion deposit within the Laited States. This figure seems...Stratigraphy - Application to Hydrocarbon Exploration," C.E. Payton, ed., Memoir 26, Tulsa, Okla., 1977. BARNS, B., et al., "Geologic Prediction

  3. Flashover Characteristics of Flat Plate Model Under DC Voltage in Wind-sand Condition%风沙条件下的平板模型直流沿面放电特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司马文霞; 马高权; 杨庆

    2008-01-01

    The influence of sand dust on discharge of external insulation has caused widespread concern. At present, the research results show wind-sand electricity has a remarkable effect on the discharge characteristics of insulator and has little influence on the discharge characteristics of air gap. The flashover of insulator strings occurs along the insulator surface and air gaps, and the sand dust deposited on the insulator surface may affect the flashover characteristics of insulator strings. This paper studies the flashover characteristics of flat plate model under DC voltage in wind-sand condition. The experimental results show that under positive polarity voltage, the flashover voltage of the flat plate model has a maximum value, while under negative polarity voltage, the flashover voltage of the flat plate model has a minimum value with a certain degree of sand dust deposition. The wind or sand in sand-dust weather has an important effect on the flashover characteristics of the flat plate model. In certain variation range of electric charge, electric charge of sand dust has little effect on the flashover voltage of flat plate model under DC voltage. The deposition of sand has significant influence on the flashover process of flat plate model, which is related to the deposition density and moisture content of sand particle.

  4. Regional aeolian dynamics and sand mixing in the Gran Desierto: Evidence from Landsat thematic mapper images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Grady; Smith, Milton O.; Adams, John B.; Greeley, Ronald; Christensen, Phillip R.

    1990-09-01

    Spatial variations in sand composition were mapped on a regional scale in a terrestrial sand sea, the Gran Desierto of Sonora, Mexico. Mesoscale mapping on a satellite image base allowed quantitative interpretation of the dynamic development of sand sheets and dunes. The results were used to interpret the Quaternary geologic history of the tectonically active region at the mouth of the Colorado River. Landsat thematic mapper multispectral images were used to predict the abundance of different mineralogies of sand grains in a mixed aeolian terrain. A spectral mixing model separated the effects of vegetation and topographically induced shading and shadow from the effects produced by different mineral and rock types. Compositions determined remotely agreed well with samples from selected areas within the spectral limitations of the thematic mapper. A simple discrimination capability for active versus inactive sand surfaces is demonstrated based upon differences in the percentage of low-albedo accessory grains occurring on dormant aeolian surfaces. A technique for discriminating between low-albedo materials and macroscopic shade is implemented by combining thermal images with the results of the spectral mixing model. The image analysis revealed important compositional variations over large areas that were not readily apparent in the field.

  5. SAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Grete

    Der er udført et konsolideringsforsøg med bakkesand fra Lunds grusgrav, Lund no. O. forsøget er udført i samme konsolideringsapparat, som er anvendt til måling af deformationsegenskaberne af mange forskellige danske jordarter. Forsøgsresultaterne er søgt tolket som ved forsøg med andre jordarter....

  6. Fine study on single sand body and measures for tapping the potential of residual oil during polymer flooding in Pubei reservoir of Daqing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Y. J.

    2016-08-01

    In order to effectively guide the narrow channel sand body oil fields to exploit, according to the sand body distribution characteristics and geological genesis of narrow channel sand body oil fields, the type of single sand body is clarified. By means of identification of logging curves and correlation of well-tie profile, the internal structure of single sand body is recognized. and then the remaining oil genesis, distribution characteristics and the potential areas for polymer flooding are clarified by combining numerical simulation technology and dynamic analysis technology, and the remaining oil potential tapping method is designed by taking into consideration various factors including the characteristics of the remaining oil, reservoir property and product dynamic character. The result shows that the single sand body is divided into five types including multiphase channel superposition, distributary channel, single channel, sheet sand and lenticular sand. Potential remaining oil mainly are distributed in thick oil layers of multiphase channel superposition type and distributary channel type in which channel sands were developed and sedimentary environment are stable inner front facies and lake regressive inner front facies. The remaining oil is developed by optimizing the parameters of polymer flooding and combining many different measures. The study provides technical support for the efficient exploration for polymer flooding.

  7. Effect of Fines on Liquefaction Resistance in Fine Sand and Silty Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meraj Ahmad Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is required to recognize the conditions that exist in a soil deposit before an earthquake in order to identify liquefaction. Soil is basically an assemblage of many soil particles which stay in contact with many neighboring soil. The contact forces produced by the weight of the overlying particles holds individual soil particle in its place and provide strength. Occurrence of liquefaction is the result of rapid load application and break down of the loose and saturated sand and the loosely-packed individual soil particles tries to move into a denser configuration. However, there is not enough time for the pore-water of the soil to be squeezed out in case of earthquake. Instead, the water is trapped and prevents the soil particles from moving closer together. Thus, there is an increase in water pressure which reduces the contact forces between the individual soil particles causing softening and weakening of soil deposit. In extreme conditions, the soil particles may lose contact with each other due to the increased pore-water pressure. In such cases, the soil will have very little strength, and will behave more like a liquid than a solid - hence, the name "liquefaction".

  8. Modelling the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke; Holm, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet is a major player in the Earth’s climate system and is by far the largest depository of fresh water on the planet. Ice stored in the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) contains enough water to raise sea level by about 58 m, and ice loss from Antarctica contributed significantly...... Science) Antarctic Ice Sheet (DAIS) model (Shaffer 2014) is forced by reconstructed time series of Antarctic temperature, global sea level and ocean subsurface temperature over the last two glacial cycles. In this talk a modelling work of the Antarctic ice sheet over most of the Cenozoic era using...

  9. Liquefaction of Sand under Low Confining Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shaoli; Rolf Sandven; Lars Grande

    2003-01-01

    Undrained behaviour of sand under low cell pressure was studied in static and cyclic triaxial tests. It was found that very loose sand liquefies under static loading with the relative density being a key parameter for the undrained behaviour of sand. In cyclic triaxial tests, pore water pressures built up during the cyclic loading and exceeded the confining cell pressure. This process was accompanied by a large sudden increase in axial deformation. The necessary number of cycles to obtain liquefaction was related to the confining cell pressure, the amplitude of cyclic loading and the relative density of sand.In addition, the patterns of pore water pressure response are different from those of sand samples with different relative densities. The test results are very useful for expounding scour mechanism around coastal structures since they relate to the low stress behaviour of the sand.

  10. Sequential Subterranean Transport of Excavated Sand and Foraged Seeds in Nests of the Harvester Ant, Pogonomyrmex badius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschinkel, Walter R; Rink, William J; Kwapich, Christina L

    2015-01-01

    During their approximately annual nest relocations, Florida harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex badius) excavate large and architecturally-distinct subterranean nests. Aspects of this process were studied by planting a harvester ant colony in the field in a soil column composed of layers of 12 different colors of sand. Quantifying the colors of excavated sand dumped on the surface by the ants revealed the progress of nest deepening to 2 m and enlargement to 8 L in volume. Most of the excavation was completed within about 2 weeks, but the nest was doubled in volume after a winter lull. After 7 months, we excavated the nest and mapped its structure, revealing colored sand deposited in non-host colored layers, especially in the upper 30 to 40 cm of the nest. In all, about 2.5% of the excavated sediment was deposited below ground, a fact of importance to sediment dating by optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL). Upward transport of excavated sand is carried out in stages, probably by different groups of ants, through deposition, re-transport, incorporation into the nest walls and floors and remobilization from these. This results in considerable mixing of sand from different depths, as indicated in the multiple sand colors even within single sand pellets brought to the surface. Just as sand is transported upward by stages, incoming seeds are transported downward to seed chambers. Foragers collect seeds and deposit them only in the topmost nest chambers from which a separate group of workers rapidly transports them downward in increments detectable as a "wave" of seeds that eventually ends in the seed chambers, 20 to 80 cm below the surface. The upward and downward transport is an example of task-partitioning in a series-parallel organization of work carried out by a highly redundant work force in which each worker usually completes only part of a multi-step process.

  11. Creep Behavior of Frozen Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    temperature and stress range. There was a 2strong stress dependance to S (r =0.95) for saturated Manchester Fine Sand which does not agree with RPT. The...Curves at High Stress 161 Ratio D/Du = 0.505 for Frozen HF’S at w=10% IV-20 Minimum Strain Rate Dependance on Stress 162 Ratio for Frozen MFS IV-21 Minimum...Strain Rate Dependance on Relative 163 Density for Frozen MFS IV-22 Temperature Stage Test on Frozen Saturated 164 MFS under a Load of D=9.24MPa Fig

  12. Insulation from basaltic stamp sand. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, F. D.

    1981-04-01

    A Midwest Appropriate Technology Grant was awarded to determine the technical and economic feasibility of producing mineral-fiber insulation directly from extensive deposits of basaltic sand produced during former mining and milling operations in the Keweenaw Peninsula region of Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The amounts of local basaltic sands available and representative chemical compositions were determined. The variation of viscosity with temperature and chemical composition was estimated. Samples were melted and either pulled or blown into fiber. In all cases fiber could be made with a reasonable tensile strength to ensure usefulness. It was concluded that it was technically feasible to produce fibers from basaltic stamp sands of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. A technical feasibility study using published data, a cost and design analysis of a basalt fiber production plant, a market survey of fiber needs, and an economic analysis for investing in a basalt fiber venture was undertaken. These studies concluded that the local production of basaltic insulation was both feasible and economically reasonable. It was suggested that the plant be located in a region of greater population density with lower utility costs. A representative one-third of these studies is included as appendices A, B, C, and D.

  13. METALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070291 Gong Ping (Northern Fujian Geological Party, Shaozou 354000) Discussion on Geological Characteristics and Control Factors of the Shimen Au-polymetallic Deposit in Zhenghe County, Fujian Province (Geology of Fujian, ISSN1001-3970, CN38-1080/P, 25(1), 2006, p.18-24, 2 illus., 2 tables, 1 ref.) Key words: gold deposits, polymetallic deposits, Fujian Province

  14. Recent advances in waterglass sand technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chun-xi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports some new understandings and advances in waterglass sand technologies. The multiple chemical modification process can increase the binding strength of the waterglass sand by up to 50%-70%.Therefore, the additions of the modified waterglass can be decreased to 3.0%-4.0% for CO2 process and to 2.0%-2.5% for organic ester hardening process, and greatly improve the collapsibility and reclaimability of the sand. Based on the new understandings and experimental results reported in this paper, several original ideas, such as nano modification, have been proposed to promote advances of waterglass sand technologies,

  15. PROSPECTS FIXATION DRIFT SANDS PHYSICOCHEMICAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maujuda MUZAFFAROVA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the theoretical foundations of secure mobile sand being considered for reducing the negative impact of one of the manifestations of exogenous plains on such an important natural-technical system as a railroad. It suggests practical measures to build a system of design protection against sand drifts. The article also suggests ways to conserve resources and rational use of machinery and performers as well as the consolidation of mobile sand wet with water soluble waste of local production of waste dextrin. Consolidation is exposed on dry and wet sand.

  16. Innovative developments in sand reclamation technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dañko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper sand management and efficient sand reclamation system are two main factors influencing economical and ecological side of modern foundry plant. It is well known fact that the production of 1 metric ton of casting from ferrous alloys generates circa 1 metric ton of waste [1], which due to containing certain amounts of harmful and dangerous compounds should undergo a reclamation – at least of the main component, which means a silica sand grains. The paper present problems of scientific and development research concerning the innovative reclamation technologies of used foundry sands such as: mechanical-cryogenic reclamation and innovative thermal reclamation.

  17. Debris flows on the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, Alaska: Implications for analogous processes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Donald M.; Dinwiddie, Cynthia L.

    2014-02-01

    We observed niveo-aeolian deposits, denivation features, and small meltwater-induced debris flows that had formed at the Great Kobuk Sand Dunes, northwestern interior Alaska in late March 2010. This high-latitude, cold-climate dune field is being studied as a planetary analog to improve our understanding of factors that may trigger debris flows on the lee slopes of martian aeolian dunes. Debris flows consisted of a sand and liquid water mixture that cascaded down the lee slopes of two barchanoid dunes on days when measured ground surface temperatures were below freezing. We hypothesize that relatively dark sand on snow caused local hot spots where solar radiation could be absorbed by the sand and conducted into the underlying snow, enabling meltwater to form and sand to be mobilized. This investigation provides insights into the interactions between niveo-aeolian deposition, slope aspect and insolation, thawing, and initiation of alluvial processes. These debris flows are morphologically similar to those associated with seasonal gullies or erosion tracks visible on the slopes of mid- to high-latitude dune fields in both martian hemispheres. Localized heating and thawing at scales too small for orbital sensors to identify may yield martian debris flows at current climate conditions.

  18. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday Isehunwa,; Andrew Farotade

    2010-01-01

    Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field ...

  19. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  20. Soft Costs Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-05-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the systems integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. Soft costs can vary significantly as a result of a fragmented energy marketplace. In the U.S., there are 18,000 jurisdictions and 3,000 utilities with different rules and regulations for how to go solar. The same solar equipment may vary widely in its final installation price due to process and market variations across jurisdictions, creating barriers to rapid industry growth. SunShot supports the development of innovative solutions that enable communities to build their local economies and establish clean energy initiatives that meet their needs, while at the same time creating sustainable solar market conditions.

  1. Systems Integration Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Systems Integration subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The Systems Integration subprogram enables the widespread deployment of safe, reliable, and cost-effective solar energy technologies by addressing the associated technical and non-technical challenges. These include timely and cost-effective interconnection procedures, optimal system planning, accurate prediction of solar resources, monitoring and control of solar power, maintaining grid reliability and stability, and many more. To address the challenges associated with interconnecting and integrating hundreds of gigawatts of solar power onto the electricity grid, the Systems Integration program funds research, development, and demonstration projects in four broad, interrelated focus areas: grid performance and reliability, dispatchability, power electronics, and communications.

  2. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

    CERN Document Server

    Lalley, J

    About 250.000 Material Safety Data sheets from the U.S. Government Department of Defense MSDS database, a mirror of data from siri.uvm.edu, MSDS sheets maintained by Cornell University Environmental Health and Safety and other Cornell departments.

  3. Skill Sheets for Agricultural Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This set of 21 skill sheets for agricultural machinery was developed for use in high school and vocational school agricultural mechanics programs. Each sheet covers a single operational procedure for a piece of agricultural machinery, and includes: (1) a diagram, (2) a step-by-step operational procedure, (3) abilities or understandings taught, (4)…

  4. Analytical ice-sheet models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    2005-01-01

    To model present-day or palaeo-ice sheets in a realistic way requires numerical methods with high spatial resolution and a comprehensive description of the relevant physical processes. Nevertheless, some basic elements of the interaction between ice sheets and climate can be investigated by simple m

  5. Controls on late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic eolian deposition of the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolf, John E.

    1988-04-01

    The Oregon coastal dunes and Great Sand Dunes of Colorado illustrate the dynamic relationships between factors that enhance and inhibit eolian-sand deposition. Abundant sand supply, persistent sand-transporting winds, and a well-drained, low-relief surface are the most important enhancing factors. Sand supply is a function of source, concentration, and sand availability to the wind. Abundant precipitation does not preclude deposition of eolian sand. Inhibiting factors result in sand stabilization or reduction in sand supply and include water saturation to the surface of sand accumulation, freezing of sand moisture, formation of desert pavement, and, most importantly, vegetative cover. Inhibiting factors are directly or indirectly a function of climate. Through time, climate has been a function of atmospheric circulation vis a vis continental position. Vegetative cover is a function of climate and plant evolution. Evolution of land plants, angiosperms and grasses divide the geologic history of eolian sand deposition into four intervals of decreasing latitudinal and areal distribution and increasing climatic contrast. Two types of dunefields are identified on the basis of processes responsible for sand concentration and relation of paleowind to fluvial paleoslope. Type I eolian sands are concentrated by fluvial processes only. They are relatively thin, interbedded with, and commonly overlain by, fluvial sediments. Type II sands are concentrated by fluvial and littoral processes on coasts with onshore winds. They are relatively thicker than Type I sands, intertongue at their bases but are not interbedded with fluvial sediments, and commonly are overlain by marine sediments. Both types may be initiated by tectonic uplift or climatic change in the source area. Type II sands also may be initiated by change in sea level at the site of deposition. The Pangean interval is related to low stand in world sea level and corresponding widespread deposition and preservation of

  6. Late Pleistocene eolian features in southeastern Maryland and Chesapeake Bay region indicate strong WNW-NW winds accompanied growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Litwin, R.J.; Pavich, M.J.; Brook, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Inactive parabolic dunes are present in southeastern Maryland, USA, along the east bank of the Potomac River. More elongate and finer-grained eolian deposits and paha-like ridges characterize the Potomac River-Patuxent River upland and the west side of Chesapeake Bay. These ridges are streamlined erosional features, veneered with eolian sediment and interspersed with dunes in the low-relief headwaters of Potomac- and Patuxent-river tributaries. Axis data for the dunes and ridges indicate formation by WNW-NW winds. Optically stimulated luminescence and radiocarbon age data suggest dune formation from ??? 33-15??ka, agreeing with the 30-13??ka ages Denny, C.S., Owens, J.P., Sirkin, L., Rubin, M., 1979. The Parsonburg Sand in the central Delmarva Peninsula, Maryland and Delaware. U.S. Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 1067-B, 16??pp. suggested for eolian deposits east of Chesapeake Bay. Age range and paleowind direction(s) for eolian features in the Bay region approximate those for late Wisconsin loess in the North American midcontinent. Formation of midcontinent loess and Bay-region eolian features was coeval with rapid growth of the Laurentide Ice Sheet and strong cooling episodes (??18O minima) evident in Greenland ice cores. Age and paleowind-direction coincidence, for eolian features in the midcontinent and Bay region, indicates strong mid-latitude WNW-NW winds for several hundred kilometers south of the Laurentide glacial terminus that were oblique to previously simulated anticyclonic winds for the last glacial maximum.

  7. The offshore export of sand during exceptional discharge from California rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Jonathan A.; Barnard, Patrick L.

    2012-01-01

    Littoral cells along active tectonic margins receive large inputs of sand and gravel from coastal watersheds and commonly lose this sediment to submarine canyons. One hypothesis is that the majority of coarse (sand and gravel) river sediment discharge will be emplaced within and immediately “resupply” local littoral cells. A competing hypothesis is that the infrequent, large floods that supply the majority of littoral sediment may discharge water-sediment mixtures within negatively buoyant hyperpycnal plumes that transport sediment offshore of the littoral cell. Here we summarize pre- and post-flood surveys of two wave-dominated California (United States) river deltas during record to near-record floods to help evaluate these hypotheses: the 1982–1983 delta at the San Lorenzo River mouth and the 2005 delta at the Santa Clara River mouth. Flood sedimentation at both deltas resulted in several meters of aggradation and hundreds of meters of offshore displacement of isobaths. One substantial difference between these deltas was the thick (>2 m) aggradation of sand on the inner shelf of the Santa Clara River delta that contained substantial amounts (∼50%) of littoral-grade sediment. Once deposited on the inner shelf, only a fraction (∼20%) of this river sand was observed to migrate toward the beach over the following 5 yr. Furthermore, simple hypopycnal plume behavior could not explain deposition of this sand on the inner shelf. Thus, during an exceptional flood a substantial amount of littoral-grade sand was exported offshore of the littoral system at the Santa Clara River mouth—likely from hyperpycnal plume processes—and was deposited on the inner shelf.

  8. Ecotoxicological impacts of effluents generated by oil sands bitumen extraction and oil sands lixiviation on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenest, T; Turcotte, P; Gagné, F; Gagnon, C; Blaise, C

    2012-05-15

    The exploitation of Athabasca oil sands deposits in northern Alberta has known an intense development in recent years. This development has raised concern about the ecotoxicological risk of such industrial activities adjacent to the Athabasca River. Indeed, bitumen extraction generated large amounts of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) which are discharged in tailing ponds in the Athabasca River watershed. This study sought to evaluate and compare the toxicity of OSPW and oil sands lixiviate water (OSLW) with a baseline (oil sands exposed to water; OSW) on a microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, at different concentrations (1.9, 5.5, 12.25, 25 and 37.5%, v/v). Chemical analyses of water-soluble contaminants showed that OSPW and OSLW were enriched in different elements such as vanadium (enrichment factor, EF=66 and 12, respectively), aluminum (EF=64 and 15, respectively), iron (EF=52.5 and 17.1, respectively) and chromium (39 and 10, respectively). The toxicity of OSPW on cells with optimal intracellular esterase activity and chlorophyll autofluorescence (viable cells) (72h-IC 50%37.5%, v/v). OSLW was 4.4 times less toxic (IC 50%=8.5%, v/v) than OSPW and 4.5 times more toxic than OSW. The inhibition of viable cell growth was significantly and highly correlated (copper, lead, molybdenum and vanadium concentrations. The specific photosynthetic responses studied with JIP-test (rapid and polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence emission) showed a stimulation of the different functional parameters (efficiency of PSII to absorb energy from photons, size of effective PSII antenna and vitality of photosynthetic apparatus for energy conversion) in cultures exposed to OSPW and OSLW. To our knowledge, our study highlights the first evidence of physiological effects of OSPW and OSLW on microalgae. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ecotoxicological impacts of effluents generated by oil sands bitumen extraction and oil sands lixiviation on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenest, T., E-mail: tdebenest@yahoo.fr [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Turcotte, P. [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Gagne, F., E-mail: francois.gagne@ec.gc.ca [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada); Gagnon, C.; Blaise, C. [Environment Canada, Fluvial Ecosystem Research, 105 McGill Street, 7 floor, Montreal, Quebec, H2Y 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-05-15

    The exploitation of Athabasca oil sands deposits in northern Alberta has known an intense development in recent years. This development has raised concern about the ecotoxicological risk of such industrial activities adjacent to the Athabasca River. Indeed, bitumen extraction generated large amounts of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) which are discharged in tailing ponds in the Athabasca River watershed. This study sought to evaluate and compare the toxicity of OSPW and oil sands lixiviate water (OSLW) with a baseline (oil sands exposed to water; OSW) on a microalgae, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata, at different concentrations (1.9, 5.5, 12.25, 25 and 37.5%, v/v). Chemical analyses of water-soluble contaminants showed that OSPW and OSLW were enriched in different elements such as vanadium (enrichment factor, EF = 66 and 12, respectively), aluminum (EF = 64 and 15, respectively), iron (EF = 52.5 and 17.1, respectively) and chromium (39 and 10, respectively). The toxicity of OSPW on cells with optimal intracellular esterase activity and chlorophyll autofluorescence (viable cells) (72 h-IC 50% < 1.9%) was 20 times higher than the one of OSW (72 h-IC 50% > 37.5%, v/v). OSLW was 4.4 times less toxic (IC 50% = 8.5%, v/v) than OSPW and 4.5 times more toxic than OSW. The inhibition of viable cell growth was significantly and highly correlated (<-0.7) with the increase of arsenic, beryllium, chromium, copper, lead, molybdenum and vanadium concentrations. The specific photosynthetic responses studied with JIP-test (rapid and polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence emission) showed a stimulation of the different functional parameters (efficiency of PSII to absorb energy from photons, size of effective PSII antenna and vitality of photosynthetic apparatus for energy conversion) in cultures exposed to OSPW and OSLW. To our knowledge, our study highlights the first evidence of physiological effects of OSPW and OSLW on microalgae.

  10. Immobilization of TiO2 nanofibers on reduced graphene sheets: Novel strategy in electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Hem Raj; Adhikari, Surya Prasad; Pant, Bishweshwar; Joshi, Mahesh K; Kim, Han Joo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2015-11-01

    A simple and efficient approach is developed to immobilize TiO2 nanofibers onto reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. Here, TiO2 nanofiber-intercalated RGO sheets are readily produced by two-step procedure involving the use of electrospinning process to fabricate TiO2 precursor containing polymeric fibers on the surface of GO sheets, followed by simultaneous TiO2 nanofibers formation and GO reduction by calcinations. GO sheets deposited on the collector during electrospinning/electrospray can act as substrate on to which TiO2 precursor containing polymer nanofibers can be deposited which give TiO2 NFs doped RGO sheets on calcinations. Formation of corrugated structure cavities of graphene sheets decorated with TiO2 nanofibers on their surface demonstrates that our method constitutes an alternative top-down strategy toward fabricating verities of nanofiber-decorated graphene sheets. It was found that the synthesized TiO2/RGO composite revealed a remarkable increased in photocatalytic activity compared to pristine TiO2 nanofibers. Therefore, engineering of TiO2 nanofiber-intercalated RGO sheets using proposed facile technique can be considered a promising method for catalytic and other applications.

  11. Pattern formation - Instabilities in sand ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. L.; v. Hecke, M.; Haaning, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sand ripples are seen below shallow wavy water and are formed whenever water oscillates over a bed of sand. Here we analyse the instabilities that can upset this perfect patterning when the ripples are subjected to large changes in driving amplitude or frequency, causing them to deform both...

  12. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  13. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  14. Understanding Colombian Amazonian white sand forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peñuela-Mora, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Although progress has been made in studies on white sand forests in the Amazon, there is still a considerable gap in our knowledge of the unique species composition of white sand forests and their structure and dynamics, especially in Western Amazon. This thesis aims to fill this gap by addressing t

  15. RANS-based simulation of wave-induced sheet-flow transport of graded sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calistan, Ugur; Fuhrman, David R.

    2017-01-01

    for each grain fraction, includingeffects associated with increased exposure of larger particles within a mixture. The suspended sedimenttransport model also makes use of modified reference concentration approach, wherein reference concentrationscomputed individually for each fraction are translated....... The sediment transport model is validated against sheet-flow experimentaloscillatory tunnel measurements beneath velocity-skewed wave signals, and demonstrates similar accuracy(transport rates generally within a factor of two) for both graded and uniform sands. The model is likewisevalidated against...

  16. Sediment Deposition, Erosion, and Bathymetric Change in Central San Francisco Bay: 1855-1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, Theresa A.; Foxgrover, Amy C.; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2008-01-01

    Central San Francisco Bay is the hub of a dynamic estuarine system connecting the San Joaquin and Sacramento River Deltas, Suisun Bay, and San Pablo Bay to the Pacific Ocean and South San Francisco Bay. To understand the role that Central San Francisco Bay plays in sediment transport throughout the system, it is necessary to first determine historical changes in patterns of sediment deposition and erosion from both natural and anthropogenic forces. The first extensive hydrographic survey of Central San Francisco Bay was conducted in 1853 by the National Ocean Service (NOS) (formerly the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey (USCGS)). From 1894 to 1979, four additional surveys, composed of a total of approximately 700,000 bathymetric soundings, were collected within Central San Francisco Bay. Converting these soundings into accurate bathymetric models involved many steps. The soundings were either hand digitized directly from the original USCGS and NOS hydrographic sheets (H-sheets) or obtained digitally from the National Geophysical Data Center's (NGDC) Geophysical Data System (GEODAS) (National Geophysical Data Center, 1996). Soundings were supplemented with contours that were either taken directly from the H-sheets or added in by hand. Shorelines and marsh areas were obtained from topographic sheets. The digitized soundings, depth contours, shorelines, and marsh areas were entered into a geographic information system (GIS) and georeferenced to a common horizontal datum. Using surface modeling software, bathymetric grids with a horizontal resolution of 25 m were developed for each of the five hydrographic surveys. Before analyses of sediment deposition and erosion were conducted, interpolation bias was removed and all of the grids were converted to a common vertical datum. These bathymetric grids were then used to develop bathymetric change maps for subsequent survey periods and to determine long-term changes in deposition and erosion by calculating volumes and

  17. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  18. Characteristics Of Basaltic Sand: Size, Shape, And Composition As A Function Of Transport Process And Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, R. A.; Needell, Z. A.; Rose, T. R.

    2012-04-01

    quartz, feldspar, and heavy minerals commonly found in most terrestrial sedimentary deposits, basaltic sediments are composed of varying amounts of olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase, and vitric and lithic fragments. One of the few locations on Earth containing such material is the Ka'u Desert of Hawaii. This area is unique in that both eolian and fluvial sediment pathways occur in the same area, thus allowing a direct comparison of particles transported by different processes over identical distances (~20 km). We are currently documenting the physical and chemical changes that take place in basaltic sediments as they are transported by wind and water over increasing distances. This will result in an improvement in our understanding of traditional sedimentological concepts when applying them to Martian surface materials. Process: The Ka'u Desert is ~350 km2 and contains the largest basaltic dune fields on Earth. We have identified several different dune types located in various parts of the desert, including climbing and falling dunes, sand sheets, parabolic dunes (that were initially barchans), and crescentic dunes. Fluvial sediments occur as floodout deposits where ephemeral streams go from confined to unconfined flow outside the continuous Keanakako'i Formation [7]. There are also a number of sand bottom streams and playas that occur along a series of channels that extend from the Keanakako'i Formation ~20 km to the sea. We have collected samples from dunes and fluvial deposits at various locations in the Ka'u Desert, at varying distances from sources and subject to different environmental processes. In the lab, we have begun to use optical and scanning electron microscopic images to assess how grain size, shape, and angularity of individual particles change with increasing transport distances. We are also conducting point counts of particles contained within each sample to better understand how olivine, pyroxene, feldspar, and lithic and vitric fragments weather with

  19. Mineral magnetic characteristics of the late Quaternary coastal red sands of Bheemuni, East Coast (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Priyeshu; Sangode, S. J.; Parmar, Nikita; Meshram, D. C.; Jadhav, Priyanka; Singhvi, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    The voluminous red sand deposits of Bheemuni in the east coast of India provide record of coastal land-sea interaction during the late Quaternary climatic and eustatic oscillations. Limited information on the origin and depositional environments of these red sands and their chronology is available. We studied two inland to coast cross profiles from Bheemuni red sand deposits using mineral magnetism, color characteristics and Citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extractable pedogenic iron oxides over 23 horizons along with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) chronology at 6 horizons. The oldest exposed bed had an optical age of 48.9 ± 1.7 ka. Differential ages between the two parallel sections (SOS = 48.9 ± 1.7 to 12.1 ± 0.3 ka and IMD = 29.3 ± 3.5 ka) suggest laterally shifting fluvial sedimentation. Both the profiles show significant amount of antiferromagnetic oxide (hematite) along with ferrimagnetic (magnetite/maghemite) mineral composition. The granulometric (/domain-) sensitive parameters (χFD, χARM, SIRM/χLF and χARM/χLF) indicate variable concentration of superparamagnetic (SP) and single domain (SD) particles between the two profiles. The higher frequency dependent and pedogenic magnetic susceptibilities (χFD and χpedo) in the younger (IMD) profile suggest enhanced pedogenesis under a warm-wet climate post 29.3 ka and also during Holocene. A combination of hard isothermal remanent magnetization (HIRM) and redness rating (RR) index indicates distinct but variable concentration of a) crystalline and b) poorly crystalline (pigmentary) hematites in both the profiles. We consider that the former (#a) is derived from hinterland red soils and possibly due to post-depositional diagenesis, and the latter (#b) precipitated from the dissolved iron under fluvial regime imparting the unique red coloration to Bheemuni sands. Partial to complete alteration of ferromagnesian minerals due to pedogenesis in hinterlands under warm-wet climate was therefore the

  20. Choosing an optimum sand control method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Khamehchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation sand control is always one of the main concerns of production engineers. There are some different methods to prevent sand production. Choosing a method for preventing formation sand production depends on different reservoir parameters and politic and economic conditions. Sometimes, economic and politic conditions are more effective to choose an optimum than reservoir parameters. Often, simultaneous investigation of politic and economic conditions with reservoir parameters has different results with what is expected. So, choosing the best sand control method is the result of thorough study. Global oil price, duration of sand control project and costs of necessary equipment for each method as economic and politic conditions and well productivity index as reservoir parameter are the main parameters studied in this paper.

  1. Effects of process parameters on sheet resistance uniformity of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    An alternative indium-free material for transparent conducting oxides of fluorine-doped tin oxide [FTO] thin films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate [PET] was prepared by electron cyclotron resonance - metal organic chemical vapor deposition [ECR-MOCVD]. One of the essential issues regarding metal oxide film deposition is the sheet resistance uniformity of the film. Variations in process parameters, in this case, working and bubbler pressures of ECR-MOCVD, can lead to a change in resist...

  2. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Isehunwa,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field were evaluated. Sand failure mechanisms and contributing parameters were identified and compared with published profiles. The results showed that cohesive stress is the predominant sand failure mechanism. Water cut, bean size and gas oil ratio (GOR impact sand production in the Niger Delta.

  3. Windblown Pliocene diatoms and East Antarctic Ice Sheet retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Reed P; DeConto, Robert M; Pollard, David; Alley, Richard B

    2016-09-20

    Marine diatoms in tillites along the Transantarctic Mountains (TAMs) have been used to suggest a diminished East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) during Pliocene warm periods. Updated ice-sheet modelling shows significant Pliocene EAIS retreat, creating marine embayments into the Wilkes and Aurora basins that were conducive to high diatom productivity and rapid accumulation of diatomaceous sediments. Here we show that subsequent isostatic uplift exposed accumulated unconsolidated marine deposits to wind erosion. We report new atmospheric modelling utilizing Pliocene climate and derived Antarctic landscapes indicating that prevailing mid-altitude winds transported diatoms towards the TAMs, dominantly from extensive emerged coastal deposits of the Aurora Basin. This result unifies leading ideas from competing sides of a contentious debate about the origin of the diatoms in the TAMs and their link to EAIS history, supporting the view that parts of the EAIS are vulnerable to relatively modest warming, with possible implications for future sea-level rise.

  4. Global sand trade is paving the way for a tragedy of the sand commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A.; Brandt, J.; Lear, K.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the first 40 years of the 21st century, planet Earth is highly likely to experience more urban land expansion than in all of history, an increase in transportation infrastructure by more than a third, and a great variety of land reclamation projects. While scientists are beginning to quantify the deep imprint of human infrastructure on biodiversity at large scales, its off-site impacts and linkages to sand mining and trade have been largely ignored. Sand is the most widely used building material in the world. With an ever-increasing demand for this resource, sand is being extracted at rates that far exceed its replenishment, and is becoming increasingly scarce. This has already led to conflicts around the world and will likely lead to a "tragedy of the sand commons" if sustainable sand mining and trade cannot be achieved. We investigate the environmental and socioeconomic interactions over large distances (telecouplings) of infrastructure development and sand mining and trade across diverse systems through transdisciplinary research and the recently proposed telecoupling framework. Our research is generating a thorough understanding of the telecouplings driven by an increasing demand for sand. In particular, we address three main research questions: 1) Where are the conflicts related to sand mining occurring?; 2) What are the major "sending" and "receiving" systems of sand?; and 3) What are the main components (e.g. causes, effects, agents, etc.) of telecoupled systems involving sand mining and trade? Our results highlight the role of global sand trade as a driver of environmental degradation that threatens the integrity of natural systems and their capacity to deliver key ecosystem services. In addition, infrastructure development and sand mining and trade have important implications for other sustainability challenges such as over-fishing and global warming. This knowledge will help to identify opportunities and tools to better promote a more sustainable use

  5. Number & operations task & drill sheets

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, Nat

    2011-01-01

    For grades 6-8, our State Standards-based combined resource meets the number & operations concepts addressed by the NCTM standards and encourages the students to review the concepts in unique ways. The task sheets introduce the mathematical concepts to the students around a central problem taken from real-life experiences, while the drill sheets provide warm-up and timed practice questions for the students to strengthen their procedural proficiency skills. Included are problems involving place value, fractions, addition, subtraction and using money. The combined task & drill sheets offer spac

  6. Seeing graphene-based sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaemyung Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-based sheets such as graphene, graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide have stimulated great interest due to their promising electronic, mechanical and thermal properties. Microscopy imaging is indispensable for characterizing these single atomic layers, and oftentimes is the first measure of sample quality. This review provides an overview of current imaging techniques for graphene-based sheets and highlights a recently developed fluorescence quenching microscopy technique that allows high-throughput, high-contrast imaging of graphene-based sheets on arbitrary substrate and even in solution.

  7. Perforation of metal sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, Jens Erik

    The main purposes of this project are:1. Development of a dynamic model for the piercing and performation process2. Analyses of the main parameters3. Establishing demands for process improvements4. Expansion of the existing parameter limitsThe literature survey describes the process influence of ...... and a tool designed for punches with minimum length. Further, a systematic problem solving procedure is established. This procedure includes simulation as an integrated part, necessary for problem detection and to predict a favourable solution....... simulation is focused on the sheet deformation. However, the effect on the tool and press is included. The process model is based on the upper bound analysis in order to predict the force progress and hole characteristics etc. Parameter analyses are divided into two groups, simulation and experimental tests....... The tests complement each other in order to reveal the dominant parameters, which are decisive for the final product. Crucial demands are established to enable the desired improvements, focused on expanding the existing parameter limits. The demands include a justified need regarding a high-speed press...

  8. Long-term sand supply to Coachella Valley Fringe-toed Lizard Habitat in the Northern Coachella Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter G.; Webb, Robert H.; Lancaster, Nicholas; Kaehler, Charles A.; Lundstrom, Scott C.

    2002-01-01

    The Coachella Valley fringe-toed lizard (Uma inornata) is a federally listed threatened species that inhabits active sand dunes in the vicinity of Palm Springs, California. The Whitewater Floodplain and Willow Hole Reserves provide some of the primary remaining habitat for this species. The sediment-delivery system that creates these active sand dunes consists of fluvial depositional areas fed episodically by ephemeral streams. Finer fluvial sediments (typically sand size and finer) are mobilized in a largely unidirectional wind field associated with strong westerly winds through San Gorgonio Pass. The fluvial depositional areas are primarily associated with floodplains of the Whitewater?San Gorgonio Rivers and Mission Creek?Morongo Wash; other small drainages also contribute fluvial sediment to the eolian system. The eolian dunes are transitory as a result of unidirectional sand movement from the depositional areas, which are recharged with fine-grained sediment only during episodic floods that typically occur during El Ni?o years. Eolian sand moves primarily from west to east through the study area; the period of maximum eolian activity is April through June. Wind speed varies diurnally, with maximum velocities typically occurring during the afternoon. Development of alluvial fans, alteration of stream channels by channelization, in-stream gravel mining, and construction of infiltration galleries were thought to reduce the amount of fluvial sediment reaching the depositional areas upwind of Uma habitat. Also, the presence of roadways, railroads, and housing developments was thought to disrupt or redirect eolian sand movement. Most of the sediment yield to the fluvial system is generated in higher elevation areas with little or no development, and sediment yield is affected primarily by climatic fluctuations and rural land use, particularly livestock grazing and wildfire. Channelization benefits sediment delivery to the depositional plains upwind of the reserves

  9. Formability of porous tantalum sheet-metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebosky, Paul S.; Schmid, Steven R.; Pasang, Timotius

    2009-08-01

    Over the past ten years, a novel cellular solid, Trabecular Metal™, has been developed for use in the orthopaedics industry as an ingrowth scaffold. Manufactured using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on top of a graphite foam substrate, this material has a regular matrix of interconnecting pores, high strength, and high porosity. Manufacturing difficulties encourage the application of bending, stamping and forming technologies to increase CVD reactor throughput and reduce material wastes. In this study, the bending and forming behaviour of Trabecular Metal™ was evaluated using a novel camera-based system for measuring surface strains, since the conventional approach of printing or etching gridded patterns was not feasible. A forming limit diagram was obtained using specially fabricated 1.65 mm thick sheets. A springback coefficient was measured and modeled using effective hexagonal cell arrangements.

  10. Geological behavior of wet outflow deposition fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德泉; 赵明华; 刘宏利; 周毅; 严聪

    2008-01-01

    The geological behaviors of wet outflow deposition fly ash were investigated, including the feature of in-situ single and even bridge cone penetration test (CPT) curves, the change of the penetration parameters and vane strength with the increase of depth and the difference of the penetration resistance on and down the water level. Drilling, CPT and vane shear test were carried out in silty clay, fine sand, and fly ash of the ash-dam. The CPT curves of the fly ash do not show a critical depth. The cone resistance (qc) of the fly ash is smaller than that of silty clay or sand; the friction resistance is smaller than that of filling silty clay, similar to that of deposition silty clay or more than that of fine sand; the friction ratio is smaller than that of filling silty clay, or more than that of deposition silty clay or much more than that of fine sand. The specific penetration resistance (ps) is similar to that of filling silty clay, or more than that of deposition silty clay. There is a clear interface effect between the deposition fly ash and the clay. Interface effect of ps-h curve at the groundwater table is clear, and ps of the fly ash reduces significantly under the table. The vane strength of the fly ash increases as the depth increases. The deposition fly ash with wet outflow is similar to silt in the geological behavior.

  11. Adsorption of dyes on Sahara desert sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlikli, Canan; Bekiari, Vlasoula; Kus, Mahmut; Boduroglu, Numan; Oner, Ilker; Lianos, Panagiotis; Lyberatos, Gerasimos; Icli, Siddik

    2009-10-15

    Sahara desert sand (SaDeS) was employed as a mineral sorbent for retaining organic dyes from aqueous solutions. Natural sand has demonstrated a strong affinity for organic dyes but significantly lost its adsorption capacity when it was washed with water. Therefore, characterization of both natural and water washed sand was performed by XRD, BET, SEM and FTIR techniques. It was found that water-soluble kyanite, which is detected in natural sand, is the dominant factor affecting adsorbance of cationic dyes. The sand adsorbs over 75% of cationic dyes but less than 21% for anionic ones. Among the dyes studied, Methylene Blue (MB) demonstrated the strongest affinity for Sahara desert sand (Q(e)=11.98 mg/g, for initial dye solution concentration 3.5 x 10(-5)mol/L). The effects of initial dye concentration, the amount of the adsorbent, the temperature and the pH of the solution on adsorption capacity were tested by using Methylene Blue as model dye. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were applied. It was concluded that adsorption of Methylene Blue on Sahara desert sand followed pseudo-second order kinetics. Gibbs free energy, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and found -6411 J/mol, -30360 J/mol and -76.58 J/mol K, respectively. These values indicate that the adsorption is an exothermic process and has a spontaneous nature at low temperatures.

  12. Critical state of sand matrix soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, λ, and Γ. The range of the value of M, λ, and Γ is 0.803-0.998, 0.144-0.248, and 1.727-2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated.

  13. Sand Flies and Their Control Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Hüseyin; Özbel, Yusuf

    2017-06-01

    The main aim of managing arthropod vectors that carry the disease agents is interrupting the infection cycle. Therefore, the management of the disease implies that all precautions related to all elements (i.e., human, arthropod vector, and reservoir) in the infection cycle need to be taken. There are important points that need to be considered while dealing with sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae), which in many regions worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical areas, are vectors of diseases such as leishmaniasis and sand fly fever and are the arthropods of the infection cycle. Because the larval control of the sand flies is very difficult and almost impossible, the management is mainly conducted for the adults. The most effective strategy for reducing both sand fly fever and leishmaniasis is managing sand flies, particularly in areas where humans are located. In this review, the morphology, biology, and taxonomy of sand flies; the integrated fighting and management methods such as insecticide-impregnated bed nets and use of curtains, zooprophylaxis, indoor and outdoor residual applications, larvicides, repellents, and insecticide-impregnated dog collars; and data regarding many issues such as insecticide resistance in sand flies have been emphasized on in the review.

  14. Critical State of Sand Matrix Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminaton Marto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, λ, and Γ. The range of the value of M, λ, and Γ is 0.803–0.998, 0.144–0.248, and 1.727–2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated.

  15. Global Sea Level Stabilization-Sand Dune Fixation: A Solar-powered Sahara Seawater Textile Pipeline

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel; Bolonkin, Alexander A

    2007-01-01

    Could anthropogenic saturation with pumped seawater of the porous ground of active sand dune fields in major deserts (e.g., the westernmost Sahara) cause a beneficial reduction of global sea level? Seawater extraction from the ocean, and its deposition on deserted sand dune fields in Mauritania and elsewhere via a Solar-powered Seawater Textile Pipeline (SSTP) can thwart the postulated future global sea level. Thus, Macro-engineering offers an additional cure for anticipated coastal change, driven by global sea level rise, that could supplement, or substitute for (1) stabilizing the shoreline with costly defensive public works (armoring macroprojects) and (2) permanent retreat from the existing shoreline (real and capital property abandonment). We propose Macro-engineering use tactical technologies that sculpt and vegetate barren near-coast sand dune fields with seawater, seawater that would otherwise, as commonly postulated, enlarge Earth seascape area! Our Macro-engineering speculation blends eremology with...

  16. Secondary ferroan dolomite rhombs in oil reservoirs, Chadra Sands, Gialo field, Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Shelton, J.W.

    1978-03-01

    Oil-productive, Oligocene Chadra sands in Gialo field, Libya, at depths of 600 to 750 m contain small dolomite rhombs. The rhombs are present as single crystals on detrital grains and as nonmosaic aggregates in pore space. The dolomite is calcium-rich and contains up to 10% iron but not measurable sodium or strontium. Total dissolved solids of produced interstitial water from the Chadra sand range from about 4,500 to 10,000 ppM. Introduction of fresh (meteoric) water into the Chadra sands, which were deposited in shallow-marine (shelf) environment, was responsible for formation of the dolomite rhombs. Iron in the dolomite rhombs was derived from alteration of galuconite.

  17. Monitoring degradation of oil sands constituents and foodweb dynamics in aquatic reclamation using stable isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farwell, A.J.; Butler, B.J.; Dixon, D.G. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology; Mackinnon, M.D. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    The process of extracting bitumen from the Athabasca oil sands deposits in northern Alberta generates large volumes of process-affected water with highly toxic constituents such as naphthenic acids. Napthenic acids can biodegrade and become less toxic in reclaimed aquatic systems. This study used stable isotopes to examine the cycling of oil sands constituents in aquatic systems. Benthic invertebrates were collected from test pits at Syncrude Canada Ltd. Dragonflies and damselflies showed trends in carbon 13 depletion and nitrogen 15 enrichment in pits with high levels of process-affected water. Chironomids and amphipods showed only nitrogen 15 enrichment. Carbon 13 depletion suggests invertebrate assimilation and incorporation of oil sands constituents through the microbial foodweb. It is important to define the isotope pathway of naphthenic acid degradation because naphthenic acids could represent a major source of carbon in reclaimed systems.

  18. State Fact Sheets on COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Search The CDC Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . COPD Homepage Data and Statistics Fact Sheets Publications Publications ...

  19. Palaeoclimate science: Pulsating ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieli, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    During the last ice age, huge numbers of icebergs were episodically discharged from an ice sheet that covered North America. Numerical modelling suggests that these events resulted from a conceptually simple feedback cycle. See Letter p.332

  20. Crescent Lake Wilderness Reference Sheet

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Reference sheet includes information about Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge, and results of the public hearing for Crescent Lake Wilderness Proposal.

  1. Industrial Stormwater Fact Sheet Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact sheets for the industrial sectors regulated by the MSGP. Each describes the types of facilities included in the sector, typical pollutants associated with the sector, and types of stormwater control measures used to minimize pollutant discharge.

  2. 2008 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  3. 2007 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  4. 2006 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  5. 2009 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  6. 2010 Swimming Season Fact Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    To help beachgoers make informed decisions about swimming at U.S. beaches, EPA annually publishes state-by-state data about beach closings and advisories for the previous year's swimming season. These fact sheets summarize that information by state.

  7. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee Dae

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic

  8. Energy information sheets, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  9. Energy information sheets, September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

  10. The 2013 social balance sheet

    OpenAIRE

    Pierrette Heuse

    2014-01-01

    The transposition into national law of Directive 2013/34/EU on the annual financial statements of companies, expected by no later than July 2015, could alter the statistical obligations on small firms in connection with the filing of their annual accounts. In any case, the social balance sheet can no longer form an integral part of their accounts. Nevertheless, it contains original information whose usefulness is highlighted, on the basis of the social balance sheets for 2012, by examining th...

  11. Formation mechanism of cracks in saturated sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobing Lu; Zhemin Zheng; Yongren Wu

    2006-01-01

    The formation mechanism of "water film" (or crack) in saturated sand is analyzed theoretically and numerically.The theoretical analysis shows that there will be no stable "water film" in the saturated sand if the strength of the skeleton is zero and no positions are choked.It is shown by numerical simulation that stable water films initiate and grow if the choking state keeps unchanged once the fluid velocities decrease to zero in the liquefied sand column.The developments of "water film" based on the model presented in this paper are compared with experimental results.

  12. Lund Sand No 0:part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    1996-01-01

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. T...

  13. Lund Sand No 0:part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    1996-01-01

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. T...

  14. Biodegradable materials as foundry moulding sands binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Major - Gabryś

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show the possibility of using biodegradable materials as part of the composition of foundry moulding and core sand binders. Research shows that moulding sands with biodegradable materials selected as binders are not only less toxic but are also better suited to mechanical reclamation than moulding sands with phenol-furfuryl resin. The use of biodegradable materials as additives to typical synthetic resins can result in their decreased toxicity and improved ability to reclamation as well as in accelerated biodegradation of binding material leftovers of mechanical reclamation.

  15. Searching for Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposits in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, M.; Alam, S.; Atwater, B.; Charoentitirat, T.; Charusiri, P.; Choowong, M.; Fernando, S.; Jankaew, K.; Jittanoon, V.; Kongko, W.; Maxcia, C.; Pailoplee, S.; Phantuwongraj, S.; Rajendran, K.; Rhodes, B.; Srichan, N.; Tejakusuma, I.; Yulianto, E.

    2007-05-01

    We found only one candidate for a pre-2004 tsunami deposit during a ten-day search in July 2006 of four coastal sites in Phangnga Province. Although our initial field effort was limited, the paucity of pre-2004 tsunami deposits suggests that either there have been few Late Holocene tsunamis like the 2004 event or that the identification of paleotsunami deposits will be challenging in this region. Our investigations at Ban Bang Neang, Ban Lang Ong, Ban Nauk Nai, and Khlong Phru Sai involved examining soils and sediments 30 to 250 cm below the surface in cutbank exposures, gouge-core samples, and excavations. We targeted swales between beach ridges in areas undisturbed by tin mining and where tsunami deposits might have accumulated and been preserved. As shown in previous studies, the deposits of the 2004 tsunami extend as much as 1.5 km inland, thin over high ground, and thicken in swales. The deposits are composed of 1 to 4 beds, ranging from coarse to very fine sand, that commonly fine upward and locally contain parallel laminations. Where estuaries are relatively unprotected by mangroves, the 2004 tsunami deposits extend farther inland. Where mangroves fringe estuaries for 100s of meters, the deposits are concentrated in areas of mangrove damage. Crabs have already destroyed much of the tsunami deposits by mixing it with underlying peaty soil. At Ban Nauk Nai, we found a candidate for a pre-2004 tsunami deposit about 1.1 km inland at the back edge of the coastal plain adjacent to a steep hillslope. The deposit, identified over a distance of 60 meters, consists of a 10-cm-thick, silty, fining-upward coarse to fine sand about 25 cm below the bottom of a shallow pond and the adjoining area. In the same area, the overlying 6 to 13- cm-thick 2004 tsunami deposit consists of a normally graded fine to very fine sand. At the other sites, we found coarse, medium, and fine sand beds typical of coastal plain beach deposits. Although tsunami deposits may occur within the

  16. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  17. Thermochemical method for the treatment of oil contaminated sand; Metodo termoquimico para tratamento de areia contaminada por oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Rosana C.G.M. [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)]|[PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Khalil, Carlos N. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    In January 2000 there was a major oil spill in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, which contaminated 2400 tons of sand. This work, based on NGS (Nitrogen Generating System) technology, was adapted for cleaning contaminated sand and recovering of spilled oil. NGS is a thermochemical method first developed for removal of paraffin deposits in production and export pipelines. The method is based on a strongly exothermic redox chemical reaction between two salts catalyzed in acidic pH. The reaction products are harmless to the environment and consist of nitrogen, sodium chloride, water and heat. By combining simultaneous effects of the treatment such as heating, turbulence and floatation, one can remove, within 98% of efficiency, spilling oil from contaminated sand. After treatment, removed oil can be securely returned to refining process. The method has proved to be efficient, fast, low cost and ecologically correct method for cleaning contaminated sand and can be applied in place right after a contamination event. (author)

  18. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>20102406 Chen Gang(China University of Geosciences,Beijing 100083,China);Li Fengming Discussion on Geological Characteristics and Genesis of Yuquanshan Graphite Deposit of Xinjiang(Xinjiang Geology,ISSN1000-8845,CN65-1092/P,27(4),2009,p.325-329,4 illus.,4 tables,5 refs.)Key words:graphite deposit,XinjiangYuquanshan graphite deposit of Xinjiang occurs in mica-quartz schist of Xingeer Information which belongs to Xinditate Group of Lower Pt in Kuluketage Block of Tarim paleo-continent,and experiences two mineralizing periods of

  19. Effect of Chromite-Silica Sands Characteristics on Performance of Ladle Filler Sands for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Free opening rate is mainly determined by the performance of the ladle filler sand. High free opening rates of ladles are required in steel making to improve steel quality. Chromite ladle filler sands are one of the most widely used ladle filler sand. Several operative variables and materials characteristics affect the performance of the sands. Three sets of chromite ladle filler sands were selected and researches were focused on the sintering hehaviour and per- formance of the sands under operative conditions. The effect of particle size distribution on sintering, microstruc- ture, flowability, and permeability were presented. In all cases, the particle size varies from 0.1 to 1.5 mm corre- sponding to free flowing powders. One of the samples has higher permeability factor in comparison with others due to low particle size distribution. The other sample presents very good free opening due to its very good flowability and permeability factor.

  20. Cyclic modular beta-sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, R Jeremy; Brower, Justin O; Castellanos, Elena; Hashemzadeh, Mehrnoosh; Khakshoor, Omid; Russu, Wade A; Nowick, James S

    2007-03-07

    The development of peptide beta-hairpins is problematic, because folding depends on the amino acid sequence and changes to the sequence can significantly decrease folding. Robust beta-hairpins that can tolerate such changes are attractive tools for studying interactions involving protein beta-sheets and developing inhibitors of these interactions. This paper introduces a new class of peptide models of protein beta-sheets that addresses the problem of separating folding from the sequence. These model beta-sheets are macrocyclic peptides that fold in water to present a pentapeptide beta-strand along one edge; the other edge contains the tripeptide beta-strand mimic Hao [JACS 2000, 122, 7654] and two additional amino acids. The pentapeptide and Hao-containing peptide strands are connected by two delta-linked ornithine (deltaOrn) turns [JACS 2003, 125, 876]. Each deltaOrn turn contains a free alpha-amino group that permits the linking of individual modules to form divalent beta-sheets. These "cyclic modular beta-sheets" are synthesized by standard solid-phase peptide synthesis of a linear precursor followed by solution-phase cyclization. Eight cyclic modular beta-sheets 1a-1h containing sequences based on beta-amyloid and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR. Linked cyclic modular beta-sheet 2, which contains two modules of 1b, was also synthesized and characterized. 1H NMR studies show downfield alpha-proton chemical shifts, deltaOrn delta-proton magnetic anisotropy, and NOE cross-peaks that establish all compounds but 1c and 1g to be moderately or well folded into a conformation that resembles a beta-sheet. Pulsed-field gradient NMR diffusion experiments show little or no self-association at low (

  1. Effects of woody vegetation on overbank sand transport during a large flood, Rio Puerco, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Eleanor R.; Perignon, Mariela C.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Tucker, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Distributions of woody vegetation on floodplain surfaces affect flood-flow erosion and deposition processes. A large flood along the lower Rio Puerco, New Mexico, in August 2006 caused extensive erosion in a reach that had been sprayed with herbicide in September 2003 for the purpose of saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) control. Large volumes of sediment, including a substantial fraction of sand, were delivered to the reach downstream, which had not been treated with herbicide. We applied physically based, one-dimensional models of flow and suspended-sediment transport to compute volume concentrations of sand in suspension in floodplain flow at a site within the sprayed reach and at a site downstream from the sprayed reach. We computed the effects of drag on woody stems in reducing the skin friction shear stress, velocity of flow, and suspended-sand transport from open paths into patches of dense stems. Total flow and suspended-sand fluxes were computed for each site using well-constrained flood-flow depths, water-surface slopes, and measured shrub characteristics. Results show that flow in open paths carried high concentrations of sand in suspension with nearly uniform vertical distributions. Drag on woody floodplain stems reduced skin friction shear stresses by two orders of magnitude, yet sufficient velocities were maintained to transport sand more than 50 m into fields of dense, free-surface-penetrating stems. An increase in shrub canopy extent from 31% in the sprayed reach site to 49% in the downstream site was found to account for 69% of the computed decrease in discharge between the two sites. The results demonstrate the need to compute the spatial distribution of skin friction shear stress in order to effectively compute suspended-sand transport and to predict the fate of sediment and contaminants carried in suspension during large floods.

  2. Potential Liquefaction of Loose Sand Lenses: Case Study In Surabaya East Coastal Plain, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putera Agung M. Agung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The zone of east coastal Surabaya becomes the object of development for the city, especially to the east coastal plain. Although in the recent years, that area does not have a structure or heavy construction and or a high rise building yet, but in the future the zone will turn into a business area with a variety of activities.. The zone of east coastal Surabaya is an alluvium deposit area. This layer is considered as clay deposited from some rivers and sea. From general information, the typical soil stratigraphy consists of soft clay and silt layers with many sand lenses with or without coarse grained soil with a depth varying from 0.00 to 10.00 meters (m. The saturated sand lenses with a water table depth varies from 0.40 to 1.20 m is susceptible earthquake and it has a relatively large seismic amplification from base-rock due to geological and soil condition nature of the site. Liquefaction hazard of the sand lenses has to be anticipated and evaluated. For development of Surabaya city area toward the east coastal plain, all developer are recommended to give some criteria of sand lenses density and some consideration for anticipating the liquefaction hazard.

  3. Luminescence dating of aeolian sands from archaeological sites in Northern Britain: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, A. A.; Sanderson, D. C. W.; Hansom, J. D.; Housley, R. A.

    2001-12-01

    Luminescence dating of aeolian sands from archaeological sites has potential to contribute to regional chronologies for sediment deposition and to provide a greater understanding of climatic influences on early communities. The Northern and Western Isles of Scotland provide important opportunities for sampling archaeologically intercalated sands for these purposes, and to provide constrained samples for method validation. A wide range of modern beaches have been sampled in the Western and Orkney Isles of Scotland to examine regional variations in luminescence sensitivity, residuals and ease of bleaching. These modern sands have negligible residuals for infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL), small optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) residuals and significant thermoluminescence residuals. The relationship between these signals and laboratory bleaching results may indicate the initial depositional environment, and hence lead to a means of identifying well-bleached dating samples. Both sensitivities and residuals show regional differences, reflecting local geology. Preliminary ages obtained from aeolian sands associated with archaeological sites at Amble (Northumbria) and Tofts Ness (Sanday, Orkney) using regenerative blue OSL techniques on extracted quartz are broadly consistent with external age controls from the first and third millennium BC.

  4. Groundwater Flow and Salt Transport at a Sand Tailings Dam: Field Observations and Modelling Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, A. C.; Mendoza, C. A.

    2004-05-01

    Large volumes of sand tailings are produced during the extraction of bitumen from the oil sands of Northeastern Alberta. The long-term groundwater response and subsequent movement of water and solutes within the large permeable sand tailings storage areas is uncertain. At the Southwest Sand Storage (SWSS) Facility, located at Syncrude's Mildred Lake operations near Ft. McMurray, there is concern that salts from the tailings water may discharge to newly placed reclamation material that covers the sand tailings. This saline discharge water could destroy the reclamation soil structure and negatively impact vegetation. The steady-state groundwater flow and transient movement of salts at the local (bench and slope) and intermediate (pile) scales in the SWSS are investigated. Water levels, seepage and groundwater quality (including TDS) have been measured for over a year along two transects of piezometers installed in the SWSS. The field data have been used to complete traditional hydrogeological interpretations of the site, and to develop a conceptual model of flow and transport. The local and intermediate flow systems and salt transport in the dam are being evaluated with numerical models. The models will allow possible future hydrogeological behaviour of the structure to be tested. Preliminary results show differences in flow systems and salinity distribution that depend on the deposition of the SWSS. This research will facilitate better long-term environmental management of this and similar sites.

  5. Evolution of radiative sand ridge field of the South Yellow Sea and its sedimentary characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 朱大奎; 尤坤元; 潘少明; 朱晓东; 邹欣庆; 张永战

    1999-01-01

    A sand ridge field of 22 470 km~2 consists of fine sands and silts originally from the old Changjiang River sediment during the late Pleistocene period. Late Holocene sand stratum with its well-preserved laminary bedding of more clay particles reflects the influence from the Yellow River. There are three genetic types of morphology of sand ridge field as follows: (ⅰ) reformed alluvial sandy bodies and old river valleys, located in the central and southern parts, formed from the end of Pleistocene to the present. (ⅱ) Radiative current ridges and patrimonal valley type, located in the northeastern part, formed during the early or middle Holocene time. (ⅲ) Eroded-depositional sandy bodies in the north and outer parts, and erosional trough in the north formed since the middle Holocene transgression. The sand ridge field has a periodic nature of developing processes: the period of sediment accumulation by rivers during cold epoch with low sea level and the period of erosional formation by tidal currents d

  6. Production and Properties of a Thickener with Ability of Suspending Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Bo-tao; WANG De-ming; LI Zeng-hua; CHEN jian-hua

    2006-01-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of pouring sands, a thickener with the ability to suspend sands was developed.It is mixed with sands to form densified slurry, and can insure the sands against deposition, jamming pipelines and dehydration. The chemical structure of the thickener is introduced in this paper and the production process is studied. The main processes include immersion, decomposition, dilution and addition of additives. In order to produce a thickener with high viscosity to suspend sands, key factors must be controlled in each process: the immersion time is 2 h; the mass fraction of formaldehyde is 0.01% and mass of NaCO3 accounts for 15% of dry material; the water temperature is 65 ℃ in summer and 72 ℃ in winter and the decomposition time is 2 h in the reaction; the densified decomposition solution should be diluted to 1% mass fraction; the additives of calcium ions and pH indicators must be added to the diluted liquid; the mass fraction of CaCl2 is 0.048% and the pH value of the solution is 7.5. The thickener is a gel with three-dimensional network structure, a liquid with non-Newtonian behaviour and the characteristics of pseudo-plastic material, a solution with little resistance and the ability to revive its oral primary viscosity. It has been successfully applied in Shendong Mines and has great value and wide-spread prospective use.

  7. Sand Lake WMD vegetation mapping project update

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final report on the vegetation mapping project at Sand Lake Wetland Management District. This project is being completed by the use of SPRING software and ground...

  8. Bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus

    Global applications of pesticides in agricultural production have led to the detection of trace amounts of pesticides in groundwater resources in levels exceeding the EU threshold limit for drinking water of 0.1 µg L-1. Pesticide-polluted groundwater may be remediated by inoculating waterworks sand...... for degradation performances in flow-through sand columns, with the aim of identifying a suitable inoculant strain for future environmental applications. Another aim was to identify a suitable genetic marker to monitor phenoxy acid degradation in strain Sphingobium sp. PM2. We were not able to link motility...... and biofilm formation to the strains´ ability to adhere to sand. Nevertheless, a correlation was found between cell surface hydrophobicity and adhesion and overall degradation performances in flow-through sand columns. We identified S phingobium sp. PM2 as a promising inoculant strain, displaying efficient...

  9. Carbon cycle: New pathways in the sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Organic carbon decomposition in anoxic marine sediments was thought to be dominated by bacteria, but experimental data and microbial culture studies now show that microalgae buried in coastal sands may also play an important role in carbon turnover.

  10. Microbial abundance in surface ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eStibal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measuring microbial abundance in glacier ice and identifying its controls is essential for a better understanding and quantification of biogeochemical processes in glacial ecosystems. However, cell enumeration of glacier ice samples is challenging due to typically low cell numbers and the presence of interfering mineral particles. We quantified for the first time the abundance of microbial cells in surface ice from geographically distinct sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet, using three enumeration methods: epifluorescence microscopy (EFM, flow cytometry (FCM and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. In addition, we reviewed published data on microbial abundance in glacier ice and tested the three methods on artificial ice samples of realistic cell (10^2 – 10^7 cells ml-1 and mineral particle (0.1 – 100 mg/ml concentrations, simulating a range of glacial ice types, from clean subsurface ice to surface ice to sediment-laden basal ice. We then used multivariate statistical analysis to identify factors responsible for the variation in microbial abundance on the ice sheet. EFM gave the most accurate and reproducible results of the tested methodologies, and was therefore selected as the most suitable technique for cell enumeration of ice containing dust. Cell numbers in surface ice samples, determined by EFM, ranged from ca 2 x 10^3 to ca 2 x 10^6 cells/ml while dust concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2 mg/ml. The lowest abundances were found in ice sampled from the accumulation area of the ice sheet and in samples affected by fresh snow; these samples may be considered as a reference point of the cell abundance of precipitants that are deposited on the ice sheet surface. Dust content was the most significant variable to explain the variation in the abundance data, which suggests a direct association between deposited dust particles and cells and/or by their provision of limited nutrients to microbial communities on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  11. LATE PLEISTOCENE SAND DUNE DEVELOPMENT AND CLIMATIC CHANGES IN THE MU US DESERT,CHINA BASED ON LUMINESCENCE D%石英光释光测年揭示的晚第四纪毛乌素沙地演化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何忠; 周杰; 赖忠平; 杨林海; 隆浩; 梁剑鸣

    2009-01-01

    本研究利用石英光释光测年的单片再生法(Single-aliquot Regenerative-dose Protocol,简称SAR)对毛乌素沙地内部西北-东南方向5个风成砂-砂质古土壤剖面进行了年代测定,结合年代框架和剖面沉积相、磁化率及粒度特征探讨了晚第四纪以来毛乌素沙地演化和气候变化.研究表明毛乌素沙地在晚第四纪以来经历了多次沙地固定与活化的交替演化:距今91.0ka,71.0ka,48.0ka,22.0ka,11.6ka,5.0ka,1.1ka,1.0ka和0.4ka前后风成砂沉积,沙地活化,指示气候干旱,植被覆盖度低;在距今65ka和全新世适宜期(8.5~5.0ka),沙地固定成壤,砂质古土壤发育,指示气候湿润.另外,剖面中风成砂层数变多、厚度增加、粒径变粗指示了晚第四纪以来毛乌素沙地干旱化趋势加强.%The Mu Us Desert,located in the northwestern fringe of the East Asian monsoon region,is sensitive to climate variations.The desert is characterized by mobile,semi-fixed and fixed sand dunes.At present,the Mu Us Desert is a mosaic of partially to fully active small transverse ridge dunes and large stable sand sheets,most of the dunes in the Mu Us Desert are transverse dunes aligned northeast-southwes,reflecting the regional pattern of sand-moving winds controlled by the cold and dry northwest winter monsoon.Due to its high deposition rates and high sensitivity to climate change,alternating units of dune sands and sandy paleosols in the Mu Us Desert recorded multiple episodes of dune construction and stabilization,in response to strengthening-weakening fluctuations of the East Asian monsoon.However,the aeolian sequences in the desert are often episodically interupted,seen as unconformities,non-aeolian deposition,and mixing of sediments,caused by strong wind erosions.Difficulties for compilation of a continueous sedimentary sequence can be overcome by dating sand dune activities at multiple sites,ultimately producing a high-resolution record of sand dune development and

  12. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140876 Gao Junbo(College of Resources and Environmental Engineering,Guizhou University,Guiyang 550025,China);Yang Ruidong Study on the Strontium Isotopic Composition of Large Devonian Barite Deposits from Zhenning,Guizhou Province(Geochimica,

  13. CRADE OF SAND AND DUST STORM WEATHER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Ruoyun; Tian Cuiying; Bi Baogui; Yang Keming; Wang Youheng; Tuo Ya; Ding Haifang; Zhang Tairen

    2011-01-01

    Background Sand and dust storm,as one of the main disastrous weathers that affect northern China,not only affect the people health and normal life,but cause the short-term climatic changes due to the direct and indirect radiation of the earth-atmosphere system through the dust floating in the sky.The sand end dust weather and its potential harm on the national economy,ecological environment,social activities and other aspects have aroused worldwide concern.

  14. Laboratory evaluation of selected tar sand asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.W.; Epps, J.A.; Gallaway, B.M.

    1980-12-01

    Three tar sand asphalts of similar grades prepared from one syncrude by three different refining methods were characterized by tests commonly used to specify paving asphalts together with certain special tests. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures were prepared using these asphalts and tested in the laboratory to determine strength stiffness stability, tensile properties, temperature effects and water susceptibility. Comparison of the tar sand asphalt properties to conventional petroleum asphalt properties reveal no striking differences.

  15. Response to Oil Sands Products Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Tailings ponds are an operating facility common to all types of surface mining. For oil sands, tailings consisting of water , sand, clay, and residual ...oil, are pumped to these basins—or ponds— where settling occurs and water is recycled for reuse in the process. When the ponds are no longer required...of crude oil transported by tank vessel in Washington waters . In a 2013 Bloomburg Business news article , Dan Murtaugh states, “The dock probably

  16. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  17. Pragmatics of reclaimed sand quality assessment recovered nowadays from various used sand systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the reclamation degree of used sands is not a simple, clearly defined issue. The great variety of technologies ofmoulding and core sands, based on the organic and inorganic binders does not allow the use of a single, universal index assessing thedegree of reclamation. The article presents the problems of research relating to selection of proper criteria for assessing the degree ofreclamation process of used moulding and core sands deriving from different technologies. The most often applied in practice types ofused sands and the most adequate in practice methods of assessing the degrees of their reclamation were characterized.

  18. Sand Dune Encroachment and Desertification Processes of the Rigboland Sand Sea, Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam; McQueen, Kenneth G; Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Naseri, Hamidreza

    2017-05-08

    Early studies on sand dune movement and desertification in Iran have not always been convincingly demonstrated because of problems with the field-based measurements. In some areas where various land uses have been engulfed by aeolian sand dunes, desertification is clear, but in other less settled areas, it may not be so obvious. The objective of this study is to demonstrate encroachments of the Rigboland sand sea, central Iran, in its different directions and variable magnitude rates. Determining the rate and direction of the sand sea movements is critical for specifying which lands should be prioritized and quickly protected. The study has trialed a change detection technique which uses a Cross-Tabulation module to compare two available LandsatTM images over the Rigboland sand sea. This indicates that within a ten-year span (from 1988 to 1998) more than 200 ha/yr were added to the Rigboland sand sea, from the alluvial fan landforms in the eastern upstream, outer margins of the Rigboland sand sea. Coupled with GIS techniques, this type of analysis of the remote sensing (RS) images provides an effective tool for the monitoring and prognostication of sand dune movement and sand sea change.

  19. Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Li Bo; Xiao-Jing Zheng; Shao-Zhen Duan; Yi-Rui Liang

    2013-01-01

    In the research of windblown sand movement,the lift-off and incident velocities of saltating sand particles play a significant role in bridging the spatial and temporal scales from single sand particle's motion to windblown sand flux.In this paper,we achieved wind tunnel measurements of the movement of sand particles near sand bed through improving the wind tunnel experimental scheme of paticle image velocimetry (PIV) and data processing method.And then the influence of observation height on the probability distributions of lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles was analyzed.The results demonstrate that the observation height has no obvious influence on the distribution pattern of the lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles,i.e.,the probability distribution of horizontal and vertical velocities of lift-off and incident sand particles follow a Gaussian distribution and a negative exponential distribution,respectively.However,it influences the center of the Gaussian distribution,the decay constant and the amplitude of the negative exponential distribution.

  20. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>20122457 Cai Jianshe ( Fujian Institute of Geological Survey and Drawing,Fuzhou 350011,China ) On the Geologic Characteristics and Genesis of the Longtangsi Fluorite Deposit in Pucheng County,Fujian Province ( Geology of Fujian,ISSN1001-3970,CN35-1080 / P,30 ( 4 ), 2011,p.301-306,3illus.,1table,6 refs.,with English abstract ) Key words:fluorspar deposit,Fujian Province

  1. Recent Sand Avalanching on Rabe Crater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Dark streaks on the steep, down-wind slopes of sand dunes in Rabe Crater are seen at several locations in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. These streaks indicate relatively recent (i.e., in the past few years or less) movement of sand down these slopes.Sand dunes move forward by the combined action of wind that drives sand up the shallow slope on the windward side of the dune (in this case, the slopes that face toward the lower right) and the avalanching of this sand down the steeper, lee-side slope. The steep slope is also known as the slip face. The dark streaks indicated by arrows are evidence for sand avalanches that occurred within a few months or years of the time when the picture was taken in March 1999. Other streaks which are seen criss-crossing the dunes may be the result of passing dust devils. This image is illuminated from the upper left and located in Rabe Crater of the Hellespontus-Noachis region near 44.2oS, 325.6oW.

  2. Discrete particle simulation of mixed sand transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengjun Xiao; Liejin Guo; Debiao Li; Yueshe Wang

    2012-01-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian numerical simulation is performed on mixed sand transport.Volume averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate gas motion,and particle motion is calculated using Newton's equation,involving a hard sphere model to describe particle-to-particle and particle-to-wall collisions.The influence of wall characteristics,size distribution of sand particles and boundary layer depth on vertical distribution of sand mass flux and particle mean horizontal velocity is analyzed,suggesting that all these three factors affect sand transport at different levels.In all cases,for small size groups,sand mass flux first increases with height and then decreases while for large size groups,it decreases exponentially with height and for middle size groups the behavior is in-between.The mean horizontal velocity for all size groups well fits experimental data,that is,increasing logarithmically with height in the middle height region.Wall characteristics greatly affects particle to wall collision and makes the flat bed similar to a Gobi surface and the rough bed similar to a sandy surface.Particle size distribution largely affects the sand mass flux and the highest heights they can reach especially for larger particles.

  3. Predicting the occurrence of sand banks in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Henriët H.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sand banks have a wavelength between 1 and 10 km, and they are up to several tens of meters high. Also, sand banks may have an impact on large-scale human activities that take place in the North Sea like sand mining, shipping, offshore wind farms, etc. Therefore, it is important to know where sand b

  4. Automobile sheet metal part production with incremental sheet forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail DURGUN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, effect of global warming is increasing drastically so it leads to increased interest on energy efficiency and sustainable production methods. As a result of adverse conditions, national and international project platforms, OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers, SMEs (Small and Mid-size Manufacturers perform many studies or improve existing methodologies in scope of advanced manufacturing techniques. In this study, advanced manufacturing and sustainable production method "Incremental Sheet Metal Forming (ISF" was used for sheet metal forming process. A vehicle fender was manufactured with or without die by using different toolpath strategies and die sets. At the end of the study, Results have been investigated under the influence of method and parameters used.Keywords: Template incremental sheet metal, Metal forming

  5. Layers, Landslides, and Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 27 October 2003This image shows the northern rim of one of the Valles Marineris canyons. Careful inspection shows many interesting features here. Note that the spurs and gullies in the canyon wall disappear some distance below the top of the canyon wall, indicating the presence of some smooth material here that weathers differently from the underlying rocks. On the floor of the canyon, there are remains from a landslide that came hurtling down the canyon wall between two spurs. Riding over the topography of the canyon floor are many large sand dunes, migrating generally from the lower right to upper left.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14.1, Longitude 306.7 East (53.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Regional sustainable development strategy for the Athabasca oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braat, T.; Barrett, R. [Alberta Environment, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the efforts by Alberta Environment to implement a regional sustainable development strategy for the oil sands industry. Alberta Environment gathers the views from industry, government, First Nations and non-governmental organizations on issues regarding cumulative environmental impacts and sustainable industrial development in Alberta's Athabasca oil sands area. This mandate is carried out through a multi-stakeholder partnership initiative called the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). CEMA develops environmental management tools, guidelines and objectives to address environmental issues such as acid deposition, trace air pollutants and surface water quality. The NOx/SO{sub 2} Working Group and the Trace Metal and Air Contaminants Working Group of CEMA address air emissions issues. Their recommendations are referred to the appropriate regulatory agency for implementation. The Lakeland Industry and Community Association (LICA) was created in response to expansion of oil and gas production in the Cold Lake area. LICA is a not-for-profit organization that addresses the concerns of residents living near the Lakeland area to ensure that development is conducted in an environmentally responsible manner. The organization is developing regional environmental monitoring programs for soil, air and water. tabs., figs.

  7. The microbiology of oil sands tailings: past, present, future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foght, Julia M; Gieg, Lisa M; Siddique, Tariq

    2017-05-01

    Surface mining of enormous oil sands deposits in northeastern Alberta, Canada since 1967 has contributed greatly to Canada's economy but has also received negative international attention due largely to environmental concerns and challenges. Not only have microbes profoundly affected the composition and behavior of this petroleum resource over geological time, they currently influence the management of semi-solid tailings in oil sands tailings ponds (OSTPs) and tailings reclamation. Historically, microbial impacts on OSTPs were generally discounted, but next-generation sequencing and biogeochemical studies have revealed unexpectedly diverse indigenous communities and expanded our fundamental understanding of anaerobic microbial functions. OSTPs that experienced different processing and management histories have developed distinct microbial communities that influence the behavior and reclamation of the tailings stored therein. In particular, the interactions of Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes with methanogenic archaea impact greenhouse gas emissions, sulfur cycling, pore water toxicity, sediment biogeochemistry and densification, water usage and the trajectory of long-term mine waste reclamation. This review summarizes historical data; synthesizes current understanding of microbial diversity and activities in situ and in vitro; predicts microbial effects on tailings remediation and reclamation; and highlights knowledge gaps for future research. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Oil sands tailings technology : understanding the impact to reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamer, M. [Suncor Energy Inc., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed tailings management techniques at oil sands mines and their effects on reclamation schedules and outcomes. The layer of mature fine tailings (MFT) that forms in tailings ponds does not settle within a reasonable time frame, requiring more and larger tailings ponds for storing MFT. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology was developed to accelerate the consolidation of MFT, although the process nonetheless takes decades. CT is produced from mixing tailings sand, gypsum, and MFT to create a mixture that will consolidate more quickly and release water. However, CT production is tied to the extraction process, making it applicable only when the plant is operational, and a precise recipe and accurate injection are required for CT to work. In tailings reduction operations (TRO), a new approach to tailings management, MFT is mixed with a polymer flocculant, deposited in thin layers, and allowed to dry. TRO has a significant advantage over CT in that the latter takes up to 30 years to consolidate to a trafficable surface compared to weeks for TRO. TRO allows MFT to be consumed more quickly than it is produced, reducing need to build more tailings ponds, operates independent of plant operations, accelerates the reclamation time frame, and offers enhanced flexibility in final tailings placement sites. TRO also creates a dry landscape, to which well established reclamation techniques can be applied. Dried MFT is a new material type, and research is exploring optimum reclamation techniques. 2 figs.

  9. Road dust from pavement wear and traction sanding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupiainen, K.

    2007-07-01

    Vehicles affect the concentrations of ambient airborne particles through exhaust emissions, but particles are also formed in the mechanical processes in the tire-road interface, brakes, and engine. Particles deposited on or in the vicinity of the road may be re-entrained, or resuspended, into air through vehicle-induced turbulence and shearing stress of the tires. A commonly used term for these particles is 'road dust'. The processes affecting road dust emissions are complex and currently not well known. Road dust has been acknowledged as a dominant source of PM10 especially during spring in the sub-arctic urban areas, e.g. in Scandinavia, Finland, North America and Japan. The high proportion of road dust in sub-arctic regions of the world has been linked to the snowy winter conditions that make it necessary to use traction control methods. Traction control methods include dispersion of traction sand, melting of ice with brine solutions, and equipping the tires with either metal studs (studded winter tires), snow chains, or special tire design (friction tires). Several of these methods enhance the formation of mineral particles from pavement wear and/or from traction sand that accumulate in the road environment during winter. When snow and ice melt and surfaces dry out, traffic-induced turbulence makes some of the particles airborne. A general aim of this study was to study processes and factors underlying and affecting the formation and emissions of road dust from paved road surfaces. Special emphasis was placed on studying particle formation and sources during tire road interaction, especially when different applications of traction control, namely traction sanding and/or winter tires were in use. Respirable particles with aerodynamic diameter below 10 micrometers (PM10) have been the main concern, but other size ranges and particle size distributions were also studied. The following specific research questions were addressed: (i) How do traction

  10. Obliquity-paced Pliocene West Antarctic ice sheet oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naish, T.; Powell, R.; Levy, R.; Wilson, G.; Scherer, R.; Talarico, F.; Krissek, L.; Niessen, F.; Pompilio, M.; Wilson, T.; Carter, L.; DeConto, R.; Huybers, P.; McKay, R.; Pollard, D.; Ross, J.; Winter, D.; Barrett, P.; Browne, G.; Cody, R.; Cowan, E.; Crampton, J.; Dunbar, G.; Dunbar, N.; Florindo, F.; Gebhardt, C.; Graham, I.; Hannah, M.; Hansaraj, D.; Harwood, D.; Helling, D.; Henrys, S.; Hinnov, L.; Kuhn, G.; Kyle, P.; Laufer, A.; Maffioli, P.; Magens, D.; Mandernack, K.; McIntosh, W.; Millan, C.; Morin, R.; Ohneiser, C.; Paulsen, T.; Persico, D.; Raine, I.; Reed, J.; Riesselman, C.; Sagnotti, L.; Schmitt, D.; Sjunneskog, C.; Strong, P.; Taviani, M.; Vogel, S.; Wilch, T.; Williams, T.

    2009-01-01

    Thirty years after oxygen isotope records from microfossils deposited in ocean sediments confirmed the hypothesis that variations in the Earth's orbital geometry control the ice ages, fundamental questions remain over the response of the Antarctic ice sheets to orbital cycles. Furthermore, an understanding of the behaviour of the marine-based West Antarctic ice sheet (WAIS) during the 'warmer-than-present' early-Pliocene epoch (???5-3 Myr ago) is needed to better constrain the possible range of ice-sheet behaviour in the context of future global warming. Here we present a marine glacial record from the upper 600 m of the AND-1B sediment core recovered from beneath the northwest part of the Ross ice shelf by the ANDRILL programme and demonstrate well-dated, ???40-kyr cyclic variations in ice-sheet extent linked to cycles in insolation influenced by changes in the Earth's axial tilt (obliquity) during the Pliocene. Our data provide direct evidence for orbitally induced oscillations in the WAIS, which periodically collapsed, resulting in a switch from grounded ice, or ice shelves, to open waters in the Ross embayment when planetary temperatures were up to ???3??C warmer than today and atmospheric CO 2 concentration was as high as ???400 p.p.m.v. (refs 5, 6). The evidence is consistent with a new ice-sheet/ice-shelf model that simulates fluctuations in Antarctic ice volume of up to +7 m in equivalent sea level associated with the loss of the WAIS and up to +3 m in equivalent sea level from the East Antarctic ice sheet, in response to ocean-induced melting paced by obliquity. During interglacial times, diatomaceous sediments indicate high surface-water productivity, minimal summer sea ice and air temperatures above freezing, suggesting an additional influence of surface melt under conditions of elevated CO2. ??2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of the compact Ti layer on the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells assembled using stainless steel sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lijian; Wu, Mingxing; Wang, Yongmei; Guo, Wei; Ma, Chunyu; Ma, Tingli; Silva, Rui

    2013-06-01

    Titanium films have been deposited on stainless steel metal sheets using dc magnetron sputtering technique at different substrate temperatures. The structure of the titanium films strongly depend on the substrate temperature. The titanium film deposited at the substrate temperature lower than 300 °C has a loose flat sheet grains structure and the titanium film prepared at the substrate temperature higher than 500 °C has a dense nubby grains structure. The DSSC assembled using stainless steel sheet coated with titanium film deposited at high substrate temperature has a low charge transfer resistance in the TiO2/Ti interface and results in a high conversion efficiency. The DSSC assembled using stainless steel sheet coated with titanium film deposited at temperature higher than 500 °C has higher conversion efficiency than that assembled using titanium metal sheet as the substrate. The maximum conversion efficiency, 2.26% is obtained for DSSC assembled using stainless steel sheet coated with titanium film deposited at 700 °C substrate temperature, which is about 70% of the conversion efficiency of the FTO reference cell used in this study.

  12. Connecting onshore and offshore near-surface geology: Delaware's sand inventory project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, K.W.; Jordan, R.R.; Talley, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1988, the Delaware Geological Survey began a program to inventory on-land sand resources suitable for beach nourishment. The inventory included an assessment of the native beach textures using existing data and developing parameters of what would be considered suitable sand textures for Delaware's Atlantic beaches. An assessment of the economics of on-land sand resources was also conducted, and it was determined that the cost of the sand was competitive with offshore dredging costs. In addition, the sand resources were put into a geologic context for purposes of predicting which depositional environments and lithostratigraphic units were most likely to produce suitable sand resources. The results of the work identified several suitable on-land sand resource areas in the Omar and Beaverdam formations that were deposited in barrier-tidal delta and fluvial-estuarine environments, respectively. The identified on-land resources areas have not been utilized due to difficulties of truck transport and development pressures in the resource areas. The Delaware Geological Survey's participation in years 8, 9, and 10 of the Continental Margins Program was developed to extend the known resource areas onshore to offshore Delaware in order to determine potential offshore sand resources for beach nourishment. Years 8 and 9 involved primarily the collection of all available data on the offshore geology. These data included all seismic lines, surface grab samples, and cores. The data were filtered for those that had reliable locations and geologic information that could be used for geologic investigations. Year 10 completed the investigations onshore by construction of a geologic cross-section from data along the coast of Delaware from Cape Henlopen to Fenwick. This cross section identified the geologic units and potential sand resource bodies as found immediately along the coast. These units and resources are currently being extended offshore and tied to known and

  13. Sedimentology of Hirnantian glaciomarine deposits in the Balkan Terrane, western Bulgaria: Fixing a piece of the north peri-Gondwana jigsaw puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalov, Athanas

    2017-04-01

    Glaciomarine deposits of late Hirnantian age in the western part of the Palaeozoic Balkan Terrane have persistent thickness ( 7 m) and lateral uniformity in rock colour, bedding pattern, lithology, and sedimentary structures. Four lithofacies are distinguished from base to top: lonestone-bearing diamictites, interbedded structureless mudstones, crudely laminated diamictites, and finely laminated mudstones. The diamictites are clast-poor to clast-rich comprising muddy to sandy varieties. Their compositional maturity is evidenced by the very high amount of detrital quartz compared to the paucity of feldspar and unstable lithic grains. Other textural components include extraclasts derived from the local Ordovician basement, mudstone intraclasts, and sediment aggregates. Turbate structures, grain lineations, and soft sediment deformation of the matrix below larger grains are locally observed. Sedimentological analysis reveals that deposition occurred in an ice-intermediate to ice-distal, poorly agitated shelf environment by material supplied from meltwater buoyant plumes and rain-out from ice-rafted debris. Remobilization by mass-flow processes (cohesive debris flows and slumps) was an important mechanism particularly for the formation of massive diamictites. The glaciomarine deposits represent a typical deglaciation sequence reflecting retreat of the ice front (grounded or floating ice sheet), relative sea-level rise and gradually reduced sedimentation rate with increasing contribution from suspension fallout. This sequence was deposited on the non-glaciated shelf of the intracratonic North Gondwana platform along the southern margin of the Rheic Ocean. The Hirnantian strata of the Balkan Terrane can be correlated with similar glaciomarine deposits known from peri-Gondwana terranes elsewhere in Europe showing clear 'Armorican affinity'. Several lines of evidence suggest that the provenance of siliciclastic material was associated mainly with sedimentary recycling of

  14. Sand and soil dynamics studied by quartz OSL dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinga, J.; Schilder, M.; van Mourik, J.

    2012-04-01

    Landscape evolution is the result of altering periods with active geomorphological processes and relatively stable periods with soil development. Soils and buried soils in polycyclic profiles are important indicators of landscape stability. Buried soils as micropodzols in polycyclic driftsand sequences are a common phenomena in driftsand landscapes. Insight in the age of the buried soils is of paramount importance to determine whether they indicate local or regional phases of landscape stability. However, accurate datingof palaeosols is often problematic. Here we investigate the use of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating for determining the time, available for soil formation and duration of palaeosol formation. We studied young drift-sand deposits in the Weerterbergen area in SE-Netherlands. Samples were taken from six shallow pits (hearths in the area. Combining this information with the OSL ages made clear that some of the 'palaeosols' consisted of wind-blown material only and did not reflect a landscape stability phase.

  15. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions.

  16. Sandy inland braidplain deposition with local aeolian sedimentation in the lower and middle parts of the buntsandstein and sandy coastal braidplain deposition in the topmost zechstein in the sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowski, Jerzy; Mader, Detlef

    The lower and middle parts of the Buntsandstein between Röt and Zechstein in the Sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland) crop out in the marginal seams of the North Sudetic Trough and the Intra Sudetic Trough. The continental red beds originate in predominantly sandy braided river systems of an extensive inland alluvial plain in almost arid climate. The sediments are laid down in channels and floodplains of a moderately- to highly-braided, sandy to pebbly stream complex consisting of narrowly- to moderately-spaced low-sinuosity watercourses and narrow to wide overbank plains between the channels. Rapid aggradation and abandonment, quick lateral migration or high avulsion rates of the considerably mobile streams result in effective combing of the interchannel areas. Persistent high-energy overspilling of watercourse banks and invasion of bed-load-saturated flood surges into the overbank areas often lead to primary restriction or even suppression of formation of topstratum suspension fines. Secondarily, the silty-clayey and fine sandy overbank sediments which could occasionally originate in remote or sheltered lakes and ponds are frequently completely reworked by considerable lateral and vertical erosion during sidewards displacement of the rivers. As a result of both primary-depositional restriction and secondary-erosional removal of floodplain fines, the channel sediments are commonly stacked upon each other to multistorey stream sand complexes. Emergence and desiccation of parts of the alluvial plain sometimes give rise to aeolian deflation and accumulation of the winnowed sand to small dunelets and wind ripple trains. The aeolian depositional environment representing a more peripheral erg facies with sheet sand interdune milieu could not be fully ascertained due to poor outcrop conditions, but is likely to occur locally in view of comparative interpretation with other mixed dune and river sand sequences in the Mid-European Buntsandstein. Variations of fluvial style are

  17. Comparison on characteristic of Mesoparticle Graphene Sand Composite (MGSC) using different types of sugar to remove methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zularisam, A. W.; Wahida, Norul; Alfian, Ahmad

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the green method to synthesis two types of adsorbent called mesoparticle graphene sand composite (MGSC) by using table sugar (MGSCts) and arenga palm sugar (MGSCaps) as different carbon sources to remove methylene blue acted as a dye model. Immobilisations of these materials on sand were introduced by using pyrolysis method without binder usage. Sand was treated by removing deleterious materials before sieved. The solutions of sugar were prepared and heated to 95 °C. The sand and sugar solutions were mixed and constantly stirred before putting them in furnace with nitrogen environment to produce MGSCts and MGSCaps. The composites were activated by using concentrated sulphuric acid to open the pores and maximise the capacity of absorbency. The analyses on the characteristic of both MGSCts and MGSCaps were conducted through field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), elemental dispersive x-ray (EDX) and elemental mapping (EM). FESEM analyses exhibited that the coating process was done uniformly as there were layers of coating sheets formation on the sand particles surfaces. After conducting EDX and EM, there were major elements found in both MGSCts and MGSCaps which were carbon, oxygen and silica. EM exhibited the distribution of these elements were scattered on the MGSC’s surfaces. Removal of methylene blue was successfully carried out by using both MGSCts and MGSCaps, with maximum removal up to 40% at the first hour of contact time.

  18. Optimal swimming of a sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Lauga, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Propulsion at microscopic scales is often achieved through propagating traveling waves along hairlike organelles called flagella. Taylor's two-dimensional swimming sheet model is frequently used to provide insight into problems of flagellar propulsion. We derive numerically the large-amplitude wave form of the two-dimensional swimming sheet that yields optimum hydrodynamic efficiency: the ratio of the squared swimming speed to the rate-of-working of the sheet against the fluid. Using the boundary element method, we show that the optimal wave form is a front-back symmetric regularized cusp that is 25% more efficient than the optimal sine wave. This optimal two-dimensional shape is smooth, qualitatively different from the kinked form of Lighthill's optimal three-dimensional flagellum, not predicted by small-amplitude theory, and different from the smooth circular-arc-like shape of active elastic filaments.

  19. NONMETALS DEPOSITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>20110947 Chen Xinglong(Guizhou Bureau of Nonferrous Metal and Nuclear Geology,Guiyang 550005,China);Gong Heqiang Endowment Factors and Development & Utilization Strategy of Bauxite Resource in North Guizhou Province(Guizhou Geology,ISSN1000-5943,CN52-1059/P,27(2),2010,p.106-110,6 refs.,with English abstract)Key words:bauxite deposit,Guizhou Province20110948 Dang Yanxia(Mineral Resource & Reservoir Evaluation Center,Urumiq 830000,China);Fan Wenjun Geological Features and a Primary Study of Metallogenesis of the Wucaiwang Zeolite Deposit,Fuyun County(Xinjiang Geology,ISSN1000-8845,CN65-1092/P,28(2),2010,p.167-170,2 illus.,1 table,5 refs.)Key words:zeolite deposit,Xinjiang Nearly all zeolite deposits in the world result from low-temperature-alteration of glass-bearing volcanic rocks.The southern slope of the Kalamali Mountain is one of the regions where medium to acid volcanics are major lithological type,thus it is a preferred area to look for zeolite deposit.The Wucaiwang zeolite ore district consists of mainly acid volcanic-clastic rocks.

  20. Sheet Bending using Soft Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinke, J.

    2011-05-01

    Sheet bending is usually performed by air bending and V-die bending processes. Both processes apply rigid tools. These solid tools facilitate the generation of software for the numerical control of those processes. When the lower rigid die is replaced with a soft or rubber tool, the numerical control becomes much more difficult, since the soft tool deforms too. Compared to other bending processes the rubber backed bending process has some distinct advantages, like large radius-to-thickness ratios, applicability to materials with topcoats, well defined radii, and the feasibility of forming details (ridges, beads). These advantages may give the process exclusive benefits over conventional bending processes, not only for industries related to mechanical engineering and sheet metal forming, but also for other disciplines like Architecture and Industrial Design The largest disadvantage is that also the soft (rubber) tool deforms. Although the tool deformation is elastic and recovers after each process cycle, the applied force during bending is related to the deformation of the metal sheet and the deformation of the rubber. The deformation of the rubber interacts with the process but also with sheet parameters. This makes the numerical control of the process much more complicated. This paper presents a model for the bending of sheet materials using a rubber lower die. This model can be implemented in software in order to control the bending process numerically. The model itself is based on numerical and experimental research. In this research a number of variables related to the tooling and the material have been evaluated. The numerical part of the research was used to investigate the influence of the features of the soft lower tool, like the hardness and dimensions, and the influence of the sheet thickness, which also interacts with the soft tool deformation. The experimental research was focused on the relation between the machine control parameters and the most