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Sample records for sand sandstone sandy

  1. Depositional models of sandy debrites and turbidites of Palaeogene reservoir sands in deep-lacustrine environments, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Chen, G.

    2013-12-01

    Two depositional models are proposed for deep-lacustrine petroleum reservior sands (Palaeogene) in the Fushan Sag, Beibuwan Basin, South China. This facies trend is used as a template for predicting the distribution of reservoir facies of the Fushan oilfield. Based on examination of 150m of conventional cores from 13 drilled wells, four depositional facies have been interpreted: (1) fine-grained massive sandstone with floating mudstone clasts and planar clast fabric (sandy debrite); (2) fine-grained sandstone and siltstone showing contorted bedding, sand injection, and ptygmatic folding (sandy slump), (3) fine-grained sandstone with thin layers of normal grading and flute casts (turbidite), and (4) mudstone with faint laminae (suspension fallout). Combined with multiple seismic attributes, two depositional models are characterized by (1) sublacustrine fan: thick turbidite units occur at the bottom of the western sag beneath a series of normal faults slope. (2) Thinner deposition of sandy debrites mainly distribute at the bottom of eastern sag far from sandy slump at the lake margin slope, which interpreted to be controlled by "two-step" flexure slope break. The transfer zone located in the centre area is confirmed to be the primary origin for such differential depositions. In our study area, sandy debrites constitute the producing petroleum reservoirs, but turbidites are non reservoirs. This dramatic understanding will well account for "eastern much more than western" distribution of proven petroleum reserves and be applicable to predicting reservoir distribution.

  2. Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet Christopher Martens Dept. of Marine Sciences CB...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dissolved and Bubble Gas Concentrations in Sandy Surficial Sediments of the West Florida Sand Sheet 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...was noted that there was substantially higher organic material in the shallow troughs of the sand ripples than on the crests. Most of this appears

  3. Field investigation of surface sand and dust movement over different sandy grasslands in the Otindag Sandy Land, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shulin; Wang, Tao; Chen, Guangting; Guo, Jian; Xue, Xian; Ma, Shaoxiu

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of sand and dust movement over different sandy grasslands in China’s Otindag Sandy Land were explored based on field observations and laboratory analyses. Threshold wind speeds (the speed required to initiate sand movement) at a height of 2 m above the ground were estimated in the field for different surface types. Threshold wind speed above shifting dunes in the study area is about 4.6 m s-1 at this height. This value was smaller than values observed above other surfaces, resulting in a greater risk of blowing sand above these dunes. Differences in sand transport rates (STR) as a function of the severity of desertification resulted primarily from differences in surface vegetation cover and secondarily from the soil’s grain-size distribution. STR increased exponentially with increasing near-bed wind velocity. Under the same wind conditions, STR increased with increasing severity of desertification: from 0.08 g cm-2 min-1 above semi-fixed dunes to 8 g cm-2 min-1 above semi-shifting dunes and 25 g cm-2 min-1 above shifting dunes. Vegetation’s affect on STR was clearly large. Different components of sand and dust were trapped over different lands: mostly sand grains but little dust were trapped above shifting dunes, but much dust was collected over semi-shifting and semi-fixed dunes. Human disturbance is likely to produce dust even from fixed dunes as a result of trampling by animals and vehicle travel. In addition, spring rainfall decreased the risk of sand and dust movement by accelerating germination of plants and the formation of a soil crust.

  4. Stratigraphy and petroleum potential of Trout Creek and Twentymile sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siepman, B.R.

    1985-05-01

    The Trout Creek and Twentymile Sandstones (Mesaverde Group) in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado, are thick, upward-coarsening sequences that were deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior basin during Campanian time. These units trend northeast-southwest and undergo a facies change to coal-bearing strata on the northwest. Surface data collected along the southeastern rim of the Sand Wash basin were combined with well-log data from approximately 100 drill holes that have penetrated the Trout Creek or Twentymile in the subsurface. The sandstones exhibit distinctive vertical profiles with regard to grain size, sedimentary structures, and biogenic structures. A depositional model that incorporates the key elements of the modern Nile River (northeast Africa) and Nayarit (west-central Mexico) coastal systems is proposed for the Trout Creek and Twentymile sandstones and associated strata. The model depicts a wave-dominated deltaic, strand-plain, and barrier-island system. Depositional cycles are asymmetrical in cross section as they are largely progradational and lack significant transgressive deposits. Source rock-reservoir rock relationships are ideal as marine shales underlie, and coal-bearing strata overlie sheetlike reservoir sandstones. Humic coal, the dominant source of Mesaverde gas, generates major quantities of methane upon reaching thermal maturity. Existing Mesaverde gas fields are largely structural traps, but stratigraphic and combination traps may prove to be equally important. The sparsely drilled deeper part of the basin warrants testing as large, overpressured-gas accumulations in tight-sandstone reservoirs are likely to be found.

  5. Utilisation of Sand from Kaolin Washing for the Manufacture of Alkali-activated Artificial Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavro, Martin; Vavro, Leona; Mec, Pavel; Soucek, Kamil; Pticen, Frantisek; Reiterman, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    Sandstones represent a traditional natural stones which are widely used in Czech architecture and sculpture over a long time. Thanks to their relatively easy workability, sandstones provide a wide range of stone products and also represent a popular material for architectural and sculptural purposes. In the field of restoration of artworks, they are therefore often used for manufacturing stone statue copies originally made from the same or similar type of stone. Despite a relatively common and varied occurrence of natural sandstones, the method of the artificial stone facsimiles creation in the form of various cast elements is also often applied in restoration practice. The history of application of artificial stones in civil engineering and architecture goes back to the ancient times, i.e. to Roman antiquity and possibly up to the time of ancient Egypt. The lack of appropriate natural rock, suitable in the view of colour, grain size or texture is the main reason of manufacturing copies based on synthetic mixtures. The other reason is high financial costs to create a sculpture copy from natural materials. Mixtures made from white and/or grey cements, sands, carefully selected crushed stone or well graded natural gravels, and mineral coloring pigments or mixtures with acrylate, polyester, and epoxy resins binder are the most frequently used artificial materials for cast stone manufacturing. This paper aims to bring information about composition and properties of artificial sandstones made from alkali-activated binder mixtures based on metakaolin and granulated blast furnace slag. The filler of this artificial stone is represented by fine-grained sand generated during kaolin wet processing. Used sand is mainly formed by quartz, feldspars, micas (muscovite > biotite), residual kaolin, and to a lesser extent also by Fe oxyhydroxides ("limonite"), titanium dioxide mineral (probably anatase), and carbonate mineral unidentified in detail. Annual Czech production of this

  6. Sand-fixing effects of Caragana microphylla shrub in Horqin sandy land, North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanfeng HE; Lanlan QIU; Deming JIANG; Lamusa A; Zhimin LIU; Yongming LUO

    2008-01-01

    In the semi-arid Horqin sandy land of north China,Caragana microphylla, a leguminous shrub, is the dominant plant species and is widely used in vegetation reestablishment programs to stabilize shifting sand. The sand-fixing effects of 6- and 11-year-old C. Microphylla plantations were studied. The results showed that: 1) the wind velocity and sand transport rate in the plantation were less than those in dunes;2) the air temperature in the plantation was lower than those in dunes. Relative humidity was higher and the soil temperature was lower, which benefits plant growth; 3) the physical and chemical characteristics of soil were improved to some extent over age. The porosity and percentage of tiny sand (diameter 0.05-0.1 mm) and clay particle (diameter<0.05 mm) increased,bulk density in surface soil decreased, and saturated water-holding capacity improved. Organic C, total N, available N and available K content increased gradually, and soil fertility was enhanced.

  7. Sound speed in air-filled sand and 03ine shallow-layer sandy sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Zuwen

    2009-01-01

    Based on the author's theory for acoustic propagation in granular media and by employing the extinction theorem, the sound speed formulae in these media were derived. The numerical computations of sound speed in 03ine sediments and air-filled sand were carried out, and the results demonstrated that under the normal atmosphere the sound speed in air- filled sand is lower than the sound speed in the air. The numerical results also indicated that the influence of scattering interaction between the grains upon the sound speed in the 03ine shallow-layer sandy sediments has to be taken into account; however, the influence of the viscous-wave interaction can be neglected. The theoretical results obtained from the rigid-granular model seem to match the measured data better than from the elastic-granular model, even the latter model fits better for the real situation, indicating further measurements are necessary in order to gain an insight into this problem thoroughly. Through an analysis of experimental data published in journals a conclusion can be drawn that the theory of granular media is suited to deal with the problems of the sound propagation in air-filled sand better than the theory of porous media.

  8. Vertical distribution of soil moisture and surface sandy soil wind erosion for different types of sand dune on the southeastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChaoFeng Fu; JingBo Zhao; FanMin Mei; TianJie Shao; Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Soil moisture is a critical state affecting a variety of land surface and subsurface processes. We report investigation results of the factors controlling vertical variation of soil moisture and sand transport rate of three types of dunes on the south-eastern margin of the Mu Us Sandy Land. Samples were taken from holes drilled to a depth of 4 m at different topographic sites on the dunes, and were analyzed for soil moisture, grain-size distribution and surface sediment discharge. The results show that: (1) The average soil moisture varies in different types of dunes, with the following sequences ordered from highest to lowest: in the shrubs-covered dunes and the trees-covered dunes the sequence is from inter-dunes lowland to windward slope to leeward slope. The average moisture in the bare-migratory sand dunes is sequenced from inter-dunes lowland to leeward slope to windward slope. (2) Vegetation form and surface coverage affect the range of soil moisture of different types of dunes in the same topographic position. The coefficient of variation of soil moisture for shrubs-covered dunes is higher than that of other types of dune. (3) The effect of shrubs on dune soil moisture is explained in terms of the greater ability of shrubs to trap fine-grained atmospheric dust and hold moisture. (4) The estimated sand transport rates over sand dunes with sparse shrubs are less than those over bare-migratory dunes or sand dunes with sparse trees, indi-cating that shrubs are more effective in inhibiting wind erosion in the sandy land area.

  9. Nivelstein sandstone, weakly lithified pure silica sands from the Dutch-German border area, intermittently used in architecture for two millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Timo G.; Wim Dubelaar, C.

    2017-04-01

    The current paper provides a concise overview of the geological setting of the Nivelstein sandstone in broad sense, its petrographic and physical characteristics, and its use as natural stone. Miocene pure silica sands occur around Heerlen in the southeastern part of the Dutch province of Limburg and Herzogenrath in adjacent Germany, as well as in the Belgian province of Limburg near Opgrimbie. In Dutch Limburg and in Germany are three large active exploitations, quarrying the sands for industrial purposes. On top of the unconsolidated sands in the Herzogenrath quarry, lithified banks of sandstone occur, known as Nivelstein (or more rarely Herzogenrath) sandstone. This sandstone has been used as dimension stone and ornamental stone since Roman times. In the 11th century the quarry was reopened and after a long period of disuse sandstone blocks were again quarried in the second half of the 19th century. The lithification of the Nivelstein sandstone usually is very weak, with grain to grain contacts and some newly formed quartz rims only. The clay content is extremely low and is restricted to tiny booklets of kaolinite. Despite the weak cementation the Nivelstein sandstone has proved to be very time-resistant building stone that forms a major element in the stone cultural heritage of the Dutch- German border area.

  10. Transport and Retention of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Loamy Sand and Sandy Loam Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, E. N.; Korte, C.; L'Ollivier, C.; Dubey, J. P.; Aurélien, D.; Darnault, C. J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most prevalent parasites affecting warm-blooded animals and humans. It has a complex life cycle that involves a wide variety of intermediate hosts with felids as a definitive host. Humans may contract it through consumption of infected, undercooked meat or by water or food sources contaminated with the oocyst form of the parasite. Infection of pregnant women can cause stillbirth, neurological effects or blindness. Because of the prevalence of cats, including on farms where oocyst-contaminated cat feces, animal feed, soil and water have been found, T. gondii is spread almost throughout the entire globe. It has been implicated or suspected in waterborne infections since the 1990s. This study aims to characterize the transport and retention of T. gondii oocysts in field soils. The four soils used were collected from fallow and cultivated fields in Illinois and Utah, USA. They are classified as loamy sands and sandy loams. Soil columns were subjected to continuous artificial rainfall until they reached steady state at which point pulses that included 2.5 million T. gondii oocysts (Me49 strain) and KBr as a tracer were added. After the pulse infiltrated, continuous rainfall was resumed. Rain applied all columns was a 1 mM KCl solution. Leachate samples were collected, analyzed using qPCR for T. gondii and bromide ions and breakthrough curves were produced. Soil was sliced into 1 to 2 cm sections, for which water content and T. gondii concentration were measured to access degree of saturation and oocyst retention.

  11. Changes in soil and vegetation on moving sand dunes after exclosure in Horqin Sandy Land, Northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In the semiarid Horqin Sandy Land of northern China, land desertification is the main causation in vegetation degradation and formation of moving dunes. A study was conducted from 1996 to 2005 to monitor the changes of vegetation characteristics and soil properties after moving dunes were fenced. The changes were compared between moving sand dunes with exclosure and without exclosure to evaluate the effectiveness of vegetation and soil restoration after exclosure establishment. The results show that exlosure establishment facilitated the colonization and development of plant species by ameliorating stressful environmental conditions. Species diversity, average coverage, and plant density significantly increased after exclosure of moving sand dunes along sequence compared with sand dunes without exclosure. Vegetation recovery on moving sand dunes accelerated by exclosure resulted in significant changes in soil properties including increased silt and clay contents, organic C and total N and decreased sand content, especially at the 0-5 cm depth. The results implied that moving sand dunes can be rapidly fixed by construction of exclosure.

  12. The making of a sandstone colossus: Tectonically and climatically induced flushing of 'Nubian' sands in the Early Paleozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Stefan M.; Hagadorn, James W.; Donselaar, Marinus E.

    2013-04-01

    Massive 'Nubian' sandstones of Cambro-Ordovician age drape most of the Arabian and northern African tectonic plates and preserve a sensitive record of how continental margins evolve under greenhouse conditions. These strata also contain important aquifers, petroleum reservoirs, and archaeological monuments such as Petra, and they were formed by a geologically sudden and long-lasting influx of >500,000 km3 of predominantly quartz sand. The cause and timing of this continent-scale sedimentation event were so far unknown. Here we constrain the depositional history of these strata and hypothesize that poleward migration of the Gondwanan supercontinent out of the horse latitudes caused a five-fold increase in sedimentation rates and buildup of one of the largest epicratonic sand wedges in earth history. Geohistorical sedimentation and subsidence modeling of these sandstones is presented, based on sedimentologic, biostratigraphic, basement paleotopographic, facies, and tectonic dip analyses of a well-preserved paleoslope-axial transect of 542-462 million-year-old strata in Jordan. This region experienced a ~25 m/Ma increase in sedimentation rate over ~30 Ma, concomitant with near-equilibrium plate subsidence response. Sedimentary rocks in the studied sequences exhibit coeval compositional variations that suggest a change in sedimentation style from immature to ultramature clastics. Our results are internally consistent with movement of a continent from an arid subtropical high toward a wet subpolar low, which would have caused widespread flushing of hypermature sands sourced from the interior of the African-Nubian Shield toward the continent margin.

  13. An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated Sandstones and Clayey Sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mese, Ali; Dvorkin, Jack; Shillinglaw, John

    2000-09-11

    This project include experimental data and a set of models for relating elastic moduli/porosity/texture and static-to-dynamic moduli to strength and failure relationships for unconsolidated sands and clayey sands. The results of the project should provide the industry with a basis for wider use of oil base drilling fluids in water sensitive formations by implementing drill cutting injection into existing wells at abandoned formations and controlling fracture geometry to prevent ground water contamination.

  14. A quantitative analysis on the sources of dune sand in the Hulun Buir Sandy Land:application of stepwise discriminant analysis (SDA) to the granulometric data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANGuang; ZHANGGuifang; YANGWenbin

    2004-01-01

    Quantltatively determining the sources of dune sand uis one of the problems necessarily and urgently to be solved in aeolian landforms and desertification research. Based on the granulometric data of sand materials from the Hulun Buir Sandy Land, the paper employs the stepwise discriminant analysis technique (SDA) for two groups to select the principal factors determining the differences between surface loose sediments. The extent of similarity between two statistical populations can be described quantitatively by three factors such as the number of principal variables, Mahalanobis distance D2 and confidence level α for F-test. Results reveal that: 1) Aeolian dune sand in the region mainly derives from Hailar Formation (Q3), while fluvial sand and palaeosol also supply partially source sand for dunes; and 2) in the vicinity of Cuogang Town and west of the broad valley of the lower reaches of Hailar River, fluvial sand can naturally become principal supplier for dune sand.

  15. Experimental sand burial affects seedling survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiao; Busso, Carlos Alberto; Jiang, Deming; Musa, Ala; Wu, Dafu; Wang, Yongcui; Miao, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    As a native tree species, Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm) is widely distributed in the Horqin Sandy Land, China. However, seedlings of this species have to withstand various depths of sand burial after emergence because of increasing soil degradation, which is mainly caused by overgrazing, climate change, and wind erosion. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the changes in its survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation when seedlings were buried at different burial depths: unburied controls and seedlings buried vertically up to 33, 67, 100, or 133 % of their initial mean seedling height. The results showed that partial sand burial treatments (i.e., less than 67 % burial) did not reduce seedling survivorship, which still reached 100 %. However, seedling mortality increased when sand burial was equal to or greater than 100 %. In comparison with the control treatment, seedling height and stem diameter increased at least by 6 and 14 % with partial burial, respectively. In the meantime, seedling taproot length, total biomass, and relative mass growth rates were at least enhanced by 10, 15.6, and 27.6 %, respectively, with the partial sand burial treatment. Furthermore, sand burial decreased total leaf area and changed biomass allocation in seedlings, partitioning more biomass to aboveground organs (e.g., leaves) and less to belowground parts (roots). Complete sand burial after seedling emergence inhibited its re-emergence and growth, even leading to death. Our findings indicated that seedlings of sandy elm showed some resistance to partial sand burial and were adapted to sandy environments from an evolutionary perspective. The negative effect of excessive sand burial after seedling emergence might help in understanding failures in recruitments of sparse elm in the study region.

  16. Climate-change impacts on sandy-beach biota: crossing a line in the sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, David S; Schlacher, Thomas A; Defeo, Omar

    2014-08-01

    Sandy ocean beaches are iconic assets that provide irreplaceable ecosystem services to society. Despite their great socioeconomic importance, beaches as ecosystems are severely under-represented in the literature on climate-change ecology. Here, we redress this imbalance by examining whether beach biota have been observed to respond to recent climate change in ways that are consistent with expectations under climate change. We base our assessments on evidence coming from case studies on beach invertebrates in South America and on sea turtles globally. Surprisingly, we find that observational evidence for climate-change responses in beach biota is more convincing for invertebrates than for highly charismatic turtles. This asymmetry is paradoxical given the better theoretical understanding of the mechanisms by which turtles are likely to respond to changes in climate. Regardless of this disparity, knowledge of the unique attributes of beach systems can complement our detection of climate-change impacts on sandy-shore invertebrates to add rigor to studies of climate-change ecology for sandy beaches. To this end, we combine theory from beach ecology and climate-change ecology to put forward a suite of predictive hypotheses regarding climate impacts on beaches and to suggest ways that these can be tested. Addressing these hypotheses could significantly advance both beach and climate-change ecology, thereby progressing understanding of how future climate change will impact coastal ecosystems more generally.

  17. Contributions of different land cover types in Otindag Sandy Land and Bashang area of Hebei Province to the material source of sand stormy weather in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongyan; TIAN Yuhong; DING Deng

    2003-01-01

    Different land cover types in Otindag Sandy Land and Bashang area of Hebei Province are linked to a material source of sand stormy weather in Beijing based on results of field vegetation and soil survey and laboratory works. Results of grain size analysis show that dust release potential in per unit area of moving sandy land is small, while lowland meadow and meadow steppe in stony hillshave high potential of releasing dusts in per unit area during sand stormy weather occurrence. Further considering the effects of vegetation, it is inferred that the moving sandy land served as a material source of past dust storm and the possibility of dust release in per unit area is low in current time. Typical steppe in stony hills is undergoing desertification and its dust release possibility in per unit area is high. Farmland has strong potential of release dusts when they are ploughed in spring, but a large amount of therophytes grow and thus prevent dusts from release when cultivation was terminated. Potentials of dust release in per unit area in fixed sand dunes, stony mountain meadow steppe and lowland meadow are low due to high cover of perennials. Sand dune reactivation and desiccation of lakes and lowlands under estimated future climatic change will makethem serve as a future material source of sand stormy weather.

  18. Soil Moisture Eff ects on Sand Saltation and Dust Emission Observed over the Horqin Sandy Land Area in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaolan; ZHANG Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the eff ects of soil moisture on sand saltation and dust emission over the Horqin Sandy Land area are investigated, based on observations of three dust events in 2010. The minimum friction velocity initiating the motion of surface particles, namely, the threshold friction velocity, is estimated to be 0.34, 0.40, and 0.50 m s−1 under the very dry, dry, and wet soil conditions, respectively. In comparison with the observations during the dust events under the very dry and dry soil conditions, the dust emission fl ux during the wet event is smaller, but the saltation activities of sand particles (d≧50 µm) are stronger. The size distributions of airborne dust particles (0.1≦d≦20 µm) show that concentrations of the fi ner dust particles (0.1≦d≦0.3 µm) have a secondary peak under dry soil conditions, while they are absent under wet soil conditions. This suggests that the surface soil particle size distribution can be changed by soil moisture. Under wet soil conditions, the particles appear to have a larger size, and hence more potential saltating particles are available. This explains the occurrence of stronger saltation processes observed under wet soil conditions.

  19. Characteristics of stemflow for sand-fixed shrubs in Mu Us sandy land, Northwest China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG ZhiPeng; LI XiaoYan; LIU LianYou; WU JianJun; HASI Eerdun; SUN YongLiang

    2008-01-01

    Little work has been done on stemflow for desert shrubs in China. This study measured stemflow in two shrubs of Salix psammophila C. Wang et Chang Y. Yang and Artemisia sphaerocephala Krasch in Mu Us sandy land and established a relationship between stemflow and canopy characteristics, rainfall amount and intensity. During the experimental period, the amount of stemflow for S. psammophila and A. sphaerocephala accounted for 7.6% and 2.7% of the gross rainfall respectively. Statistical analysis showed that there was a significant positive linear correlation between rainfall and stemflow for the two shrubs; while the relationship between stemflow percentage and rainfall suggested that there existed a rainfall depth threshold of 3-5 mm for S. psammophila and 5-7 mm for A. sphaerocephala. Stemflow percentage positively increased with rainfall depth increasing before the rainfall depth threshold values had been reached but showed stability after the threshold. A stepwise regression analysis suggested that the shrubs with more branches, larger crown volume and smaller branch angle inclination tended to collect more volumes of stemflow. Moreover, stemflow amount and percentage increased with the maximum rain intensity increasing in 10 minutes (/10) and the stemflow percentage tended to increase quickly with /10 when it was less than 3.0 mm h-1 for S. psammophila and 2.0 mm h-1 for A. sphaero-cephala, and then showed stable trend with increasing of/10.

  20. Extraction of bitumen, crude oil and its products from tar sand and contaminated sandy soil under effect of ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, O V; Abramov, V O; Myasnikov, S K; Mullakaev, M S

    2009-03-01

    In the present paper, the kinetics of the water extraction of bitumen from tar sand and crude oil or residual fuel oil from model contaminated soils under the effect of ultrasound is studied. The influence of process temperature, ultrasound power, the nature, and properties of the components of heterogeneous mixtures being separated, and the concentration of added alkaline reagents on the rate and degree of oil recovery is investigated. A functional form of the dependencies of separation efficiency on the mean size of solid particles and the temperature of a working medium is found. Optimum concentrations of reagents in the process solution are determined. It is shown that the spent solution of sodium silicate can be multiply used for separation, its reuse even speeding up the yield of oil in the initial period. Taking into account obtained results, a multipurpose pilot plant with a flow-type reactor for ultrasonic extraction of petroleum and its products from contaminated soils was manufactured and tested. During tests, the purification of sandy soil contaminated with residual fuel oil was carried out which verified the results of laboratory studies.

  1. Contrasting styles of large-scale displacement of unconsolidated sand: examples from the early Jurassic Navajo Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Gerald

    2015-04-01

    Large-scale soft-sediment deformation features in the Navajo Sandstone have been a topic of interest for nearly 40 years, ever since they were first explored as a criterion for discriminating between marine and continental processes in the depositional environment. For much of this time, evidence for large-scale sediment displacements was commonly attributed to processes of mass wasting. That is, gravity-driven movements of surficial sand. These slope failures were attributed to the inherent susceptibility of dune sand responding to environmental triggers such as earthquakes, floods, impacts, and the differential loading associated with dune topography. During the last decade, a new wave of research is focusing on the event significance of deformation features in more detail, revealing a broad diversity of large-scale deformation morphologies. This research has led to a better appreciation of subsurface dynamics in the early Jurassic deformation events recorded in the Navajo Sandstone, including the important role of intrastratal sediment flow. This report documents two illustrative examples of large-scale sediment displacements represented in extensive outcrops of the Navajo Sandstone along the Utah/Arizona border. Architectural relationships in these outcrops provide definitive constraints that enable the recognition of a large-scale sediment outflow, at one location, and an equally large-scale subsurface flow at the other. At both sites, evidence for associated processes of liquefaction appear at depths of at least 40 m below the original depositional surface, which is nearly an order of magnitude greater than has commonly been reported from modern settings. The surficial, mass flow feature displays attributes that are consistent with much smaller-scale sediment eruptions (sand volcanoes) that are often documented from modern earthquake zones, including the development of hydraulic pressure from localized, subsurface liquefaction and the subsequent escape of

  2. Classification of Land Use on Sand-Dune Topography by Object-Based Analysis, Digital Photogrammetry, and GIS Analysis in the Horqin Sandy Land, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takafumi Miyasaka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous field research on the Horqin Sandy Land (China, which has suffered from severe desertification during recent decades, revealed how land use on a sand-dune topography affects both land degradation and restoration. This study aimed to depict the spatial distribution of local land use in order to shed more light on previous field findings regarding policies on a broader scale. We performed the following analyses with Panchromatic Remote-sensing Instrument for Stereo Mapping (PRISM and Advanced Visible and Near Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2 images of Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS: (1 object-based classification to discriminate preliminary classification of land-use types that were approximately differentiated by ordinary pixel-based analysis with spectral information; (2 digital photogrammetry to generate a digital surface model (DSM with adequately high accuracy to represent undulating sand-dune topography; (3 geographic information system (GIS analysis to classify major topographic types with the digital surface model (DSM; and (4 overlay of the two classification results to depict the local land-use types. The overall accuracies of the object-based and GIS-based classifications were high, at 93% (kappa statistic: 0.84 and 89% (kappa statistic: 0.81, respectively. The resultant local land-use map represents areas covered in previous field studies, showing where and how land degradation and restoration are likely to occur. This research can contribute to future environmental surveys, models, and policies in the study area.

  3. 疏松砂岩稠油油藏水平井临界出砂量数值模拟%NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR THE CRITICAL SAND PRODUCTION RATE IN THE HORIZONTAL WELLBORE OF UNCONSOLIDATED SANDSTONE HEAVY OIL RESERVOIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建; 汪志明; 李帮民

    2012-01-01

    In the exploitation process of the moderate sand production from the unconsolidated sandstone heavy-oil reservoirs, the sand particles which are produced in the horizontal reservoirs easily flow into the horizontal boreholes, deposit, and form sand bed. Finally the many damages such as the buried oil reservoirs and blocked oil string by the sand etc. Are resulted in. By means of FLUENT hydrodynamic software, the studies of numerical simulation for the critical sand production rates taken under the different conditions of horizontal-borehole flow velocity are conducted in the exploitation process of the moderate sand production. The results show that there all exist a critical sand production in different flow rates. At this time, the fixed sand bed in the horizontal intervals does not occur, the height of moving sand bed is less then 5 mm and furthermore the critical sand production rates are quantitatively presented under the conditions of different borehole velocities. The research achievements stated above can provide evidences for the technological design of the moderate sand production in the unconsolidated sandstone oil reservoirs in Bohai area.%疏松砂岩稠油油藏适度出砂开采过程中,在水平段储层产出砂粒随稠油进入水平井筒后容易沉积形成砂床,造成油层砂埋、油管砂堵等危害.利用FLUENT流体力学软件对适度出砂开采过程中水平井筒不同井筒流速下可携带的临界出砂量开展了数值模拟研究.结果表明,针对不同井筒流速条件下,均存在一个临界出砂量,此时水平井段未出现固定砂床,移动砂床平均高度小于5 mm,并定量给出了不同井筒流速时的临界出砂量.研究结果可为渤海疏松砂岩油藏适度出砂开采工艺设计提供依据.

  4. 从沙物质粒度分析结果研讨沙生植物的固沙作用%Research on sand-fixation role of desert plants based on analysis of sandy soil sizes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文彪; 肖巍

    2011-01-01

    在库布齐沙漠西部地区固定半固定沙丘柽柳、梭梭、白刺、油蒿、花棒等沙生植物生长区,通过对表面干沙和深层湿沙的沙粒粒径进行对比分析,获得以下数据:表面干沙和深层湿沙极粗沙、粗沙、中沙、细沙、极细沙、粉沙的含量分别为0.14%、0.10%、0.24%、72.90%、24.12%、1.85%;0.04%、0.05%、0.27%、79.20%、19.30%、0.55%。从总体上看,表面干沙的沙粒细沙、极细沙百分含量高于深层湿沙,说明取样时取样点处于堆积状态,细沙、极细沙、粉沙(0.25~0.05mm)的含量高达98.87%。由于沙生植物的固定、尘土的堆积和成土作用,固定半固定风沙土的粉粒和粘粒含量逐渐增加。随着有机质和粘粒的增加,土壤结构改善,微因聚体增加,容量减小,孔隙度提高。试验证明沙生植物灌丛下的沙粒粒径比流动沙丘沙粒粒径细,充分体现了植物改良沙质土壤的作用。%An transverse comparison on sandy soil particle sizes of the surface dry sand and in-depth wet sand in western regions of Kubuqi desert where Haloxlon ammodendron Bge,Nitraria tangutorum Bobr,Artemisia ordosica Krash,Ulmus pumila and some desert plants grow had been done.The results were as follows: The contents of extreme coarse sand,coarse sand,fine sand,extreme fine sand,fine-grained sand on surface dry sand and in-depth wet sand were 0.14%,0.10%,0.24%,72.90%,24.12%,1.85%,0.04%,0.05%,0.27%,79.20%,19.30%,0.55% respectively.In General,the percentage of fine sand,extreme fine sand on the surface dry sand was higher than that in wet sand,which showed that samples were under the stack condition,The contents of fine sand,extreme fine sand and fine-grained sand were up to 98.87%.Because the desert plants could fix and stack sand,the contents of particles and clay particles of the sand were gradually increasing.As the amount of organic matter and clay particle increased,the structure of soil had been improved

  5. 疏松砂岩油藏砾石充填防砂参数优化技术研究%Loose Sandstone Reservoir Gravel Packing Sand Control Technology Research on Parameters Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨巍; 温志刚; 魏旭

    2013-01-01

    In general, the loose sandstone reservoir has poor diagenesis, high shale content and serious sand production; screen gravel packing sand control is the main technology that maintained development and production in oilfield. The diameter of the sand from formation has changed, the sand filling into the gravel and mixing with the gravel during the production, so that the production is gradually decreased. Based on the study of formation sand grain size distribution, the median particle size of filling gravel in the casing layer deficit breaks through traditional 5-6 times of median formation sand, based on experiments, selected the 3-4 times of median formation sand filling gravel, sand and gravel mixed probability can be reduced. Combining classification of filling technique, the application on site achieved good results.%一般地,疏松砂岩油藏成岩性差,泥质含量高,出砂严重,筛管砾石充填防砂是维持油田开发生产的主要工艺.地层出砂粒径发生变化后,生产过程中地层砂进入充填砾石层产生了互混,使油井产液量逐渐下降.在研究地层出砂粒径分布的基础上,在套管外地层亏空处充填砾石粒度中值突破传统的5-6倍地层砂粒度中值的常规做法,以实验为基础,选择了3-4倍地层砂粒度中值的充填砾石,可降低砂砾互混的概率.结合分级充填技术,在现场应用中取得了很好的效果.

  6. Rate type isotach compaction of consolidated sandstone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, J.A. de; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Pruiksma, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory experiments on samples from a consolidated sandstone reservoir are presented that demonstrate rate type compaction behaviour similar to that observed on unconsolidated sands and soils. Such rate type behaviour can have large consequences for reservoir compaction, surface subsidence and

  7. Prediction of Sand Production from a Saudi Sandstone Reservoir Prévision de la production de sable pour un réservoir gréseux d'Arabie Saoudite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Awad M. N.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Sand production is encountered in some Saudi oil fields. Six sand samples produced from different wells in a Saudi oil reservoir were obtained. Sandstone samples obtained from the same reservoir were subjected to uniaxial and triaxial failure tests. The debris produced from the sandstone samples and the six sand samples were characterized for their mineralogy using X-ray diffractometer and grain size distribution using standard sieves. Statistical analyses were employed to check whether a statistical difference between the sand samples produced from oil wells and debris collected from the failed sandstone specimens is significant or not. The critical oil rates of the Saudi oil reservoir were also calculated for different well inclination angles. Results show that, no significant statistical difference between the sand samples and debris exists at a confidence level of 95%. Two obvious failure mechanisms, splitting and shear failure, are responsible for sand production from the studied Saudi oil reservoir. The maximum sand-free production for the studied oil reservoir range from 960 to 4080 barrels per day. La production de sable est un phénomène rencontré dans certains gisements pétroliers saoudiens. L'étude a porté sur six échantillons de sable provenant de différents puits d'exploitation d'un réservoir gréseux. Des échantillons de grès issus de ce même réservoir ont été soumis à des essais de compression uniaxiale et triaxiale. Les débris des échantillons de grès et les échantillons de sable ont fait l'objet d'un examen minéralogique par diffractométrie aux rayons X et granulométrie sur tamis standards. Les méthodes d'analyse statistique ont été employées pour vérifier si la différence statistique entre les échantillons de sable provenant des puits et les débris des échantillons de grès est significative ou non. On a également calculé les taux critiques de production du gisement saoudien pour diff

  8. A quantitative analysis on the sources of dune sand in the Hulun Buir Sandy Land:application of stepwise discriminant analysis (SDA) to the granulometric data%呼伦贝尔沙地沙丘砂来源的定量分析--逐步判别分析(SDA)在粒度分析方面的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩广; 张桂芳; 杨文斌

    2004-01-01

    Quantitatively determining the sources of dune sand is one of the problems necessarily and urgently to be solved in aeolian landforms and desertification research. Based on the granulometric data of sand materials from the Hulun Buir Sandy Land, the paper employs the stepwise discriminant analysis technique (SDA) for two groups to select the principal factors determining the differences between surface loose sediments. The extent of similarity between two statistical populations can be described quantitatively by three factors such as the number of principal variables, Mahalanobis distance D2 and confidence level α for F-test. Results reveal that: 1) Aeolian dune sand in the region mainly derives from Hailar Formation (Q3), while fluvial sand and palaeosol also supply partially source sand for dunes; and 2) in the vicinity of Cuogang Town and west of the broad valley of the lower reaches of Hailar River, fluvial sand can naturally become principal supplier for dune sand.

  9. Origins of massive-type sandstones in braided river systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charlotte A. L.; Turner, Brian R.

    1998-07-01

    This study details largely ignored massive-type, predominantly structureless sandstones preserved within braided fluvial successions of Carboniferous to Triassic age. Architectural element analysis reveals that these sediments were deposited within sand-dominated perennial systems of low braiding index. Cross-stratified braid bar deposits are interbedded with, and laterally equivalent to geometrically distinct, largely structureless massive-type sandbodies identified as two separate architectural elements: channel-like (SMC) and sheet-like (SMS). Sub-divisions within these broad categories define six geometric units which are texturally distinct from each other and from the structured sediments of the same lithological unit. Since massive-type sandstone elements have many features in common with the deposits of highly concentrated, laminar sediment/water flows, they are interpreted in terms of similar depositional processes. SMC elements form elongate channel-like features which trend both at high angles to, and parallel with, the palaeoflow of host fluvial channels. The lower bounding surfaces of SMC elements may be either erosive or non-erosive, and describe symmetrical cross-sections with margins dipping debris flows related to fluvial bank and/or bar collapse. SMS elements form sandsheets up to 8 m in thickness which may be traced >250 m parallel and transverse to the fluvial palaeoflow direction established from cross-stratified sandstones of adjacent architectural elements. The basal surface of SMS elements may either be undulose (where the sandbodies are termed SMSU) or erosional (where they are termed SMSE). Internally SMSU elements preserve parallel laminae marginal to basal scours, diffuse sweeping laminae, isolated cross-sets and water escape structures. The SMSU sediments are compositionally identical to the structured sandstones with which they are associated and are interpreted as the result of deposition from highly concentrated stream flows

  10. Spatial Heterogeneity of Soil Nutrients after the Establishment of Caragana intermedia Plantation on Sand Dunes in Alpine Sandy Land of the Tibet Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingxue; Jia, Zhiqing; Zhu, Yajuan; Wang, Yongsheng; Li, Hong; Yang, Defu; Zhao, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    The Gonghe Basin region of the Tibet Plateau is severely affected by desertification. Compared with other desertified land, the main features of this region is windy, cold and short growing season, resulting in relatively difficult for vegetation restoration. In this harsh environment, identification the spatial distribution of soil nutrients and analysis its impact factors after vegetation establishment will be helpful for understanding the ecological relationship between soil and environment. Therefore, in this study, the 12-year-old C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes was selected as the experimental site. Soil samples were collected under and between shrubs on the windward slopes, dune tops and leeward slopes with different soil depth. Then analyzed soil organic matter (SOM), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total potassium (TK), available nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK). The results showed that the spatial heterogeneity of soil nutrients was existed in C. intermedia plantation on sand dunes. (1) Depth was the most important impact factor, soil nutrients were decreased with greater soil depth. One of the possible reasons is that windblown fine materials and litters were accumulated on surface soil, when they were decomposed, more nutrients were aggregated on surface soil. (2) Topography also affected the distribution of soil nutrients, more soil nutrients distributed on windward slopes. The herbaceous coverage were higher and C. intermedia ground diameter were larger on windward slopes, both of them probably related to the high soil nutrients level for windward slopes. (3) Soil "fertile islands" were formed, and the "fertile islands" were more marked on lower soil nutrients level topography positions, while it decreased towards higher soil nutrients level topography positions. The enrichment ratio (E) for TN and AN were higher than other nutrients, most likely because C. intermedia is a leguminous shrub.

  11. Experimental Research on Suitable Sand Thickness in Coal Gangue Waste Land in Sandy Area of Northern Shaanxi Province%陕北沙区煤矸石山适宜的覆沙厚度试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国平; 毕银丽; 李莹; 李军保; 张继平

    2016-01-01

    [目的]解决陕北沙区煤矸石废弃地占地面积大,植被恢复困难和治理造价高的问题。[方法]利用野外试验,设计半隐蔽沙蒿沙障(2 m ×2 m)下的3种覆沙厚度(30,50和70 cm)共3种类型的处理。4种乡土灌木树种沙地柏(Sabina chinensis )、长柄扁桃(A mygdalus pedunculata)、紫穗槐(A morpha f ruti‐cosa)和蒙古莸(Caryopteris mongholica)进行对比试验。[结果]成活率、保存率、新稍生长量和地径变化随着覆沙厚度的增加,其指标均有所提高;多因素方差分析表明种间存在极显著差异,在0.05的显著水平下,紫穗槐与其它植物种均存在显著差异,蒙古莸与沙地柏间存在显著差异;在0.01显著水平下,蒙古莸、长柄扁桃和沙地柏间差异性不显著;覆沙30 cm 与覆沙50 cm ,覆沙70 cm 间均存在显著差异,覆沙50 cm和覆沙70 cm 间差异性均达不到显著水平。[结论]综合因素条件下,覆沙50 cm是该区域煤矸石山土地复垦及生态恢复植被需要基质的最佳选择。%[Objective] To solve the issues of large coal gangue waste land area and high cost in vegetation res‐toration in sandy area of Northern Shaanxi Province .[Methods] Three sand thickness (30 ,50 and 70 cm) and a semi‐covered A rtemisia sand barrier(2 m × 2 m) were set .Four different kinds of native shrub species including Sabina chinensis ,A mygdalus pedunculata ,A morpha f ruticosa and Caryopteris mongholica were selected for the experiments .[Results] The survival rate ,saving rate ,the amount of new growth and diameter had improved due to the increase of sand thickness .Multi‐factor variance analysis showed that there were significant differences among different species .Significant differences were found between A . f ruticosa Linn and other types ,and between C .mongholica Bunge and S .vulgaris(p < 0 .05 ) .There were no significant difference between C .mongholicaBunge ,A

  12. Sand on the move: Post Hurricane Sandy analysis of the coastal sediment budget and bedform migration at Jones Inlet, Long Island, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, M. K.; Goff, J. A.; Austin, J. A.; Flood, R. D.; Christensen, B. A.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy struck the Northeast coast of the United States on October 29, 2012. Although sustained winds were downgraded to ~70 kts upon landfall, the vast area of the storm along with the direction of impact resulted in major storm-surge flooding and damage, as well as significant changes to the morphology of the coast-line, altering the characteristics of major barrier islands, inlets, and estuaries. A January 2013 post-storm survey aboard the R/V Pritchard, conducted by the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Stony Brook University, and Adelphi University, sought to investigate the impact of this post-tropical cyclone on the southwestern coast of Long Island, NY which sustained storm surges of up to 4 m above normal sea level. The objective of this project is to gain insight on the sedimentological volume changes and bathymetrical alterations made on the seafloor within Jones Inlet and the immediate estuaries behind Jones Beach and Long Beach Island. By studying these changes we hope to gain a better understanding of how large cyclonic storms alter sediment volumes and seafloor topography within major inlets and estuarine systems. These modifications can be observed in post-storm multibeam swath bathymetry and backscatter when compared to similar pre-storm data collected in 2010 by Stony Brook University. Post-storm CHIRP seismic reflection data were also collected, in order to define stratigraphic geometries, as well as grab samples to determine grain size distributions and ground truth for the backscatter data. The acoustic reflections imaged in the CHIRP data allow basal reflectors and dominate horizons to be traced throughout the inlet and estuaries. Our analysis focuses on (1) defining and quantifying areas of deposition and erosion from before-and-after bathymetry data; (2) comparing bedform patterns and grain size distributions from before-and-after backscatter and grab sample analysis; and (3) defining stratal geometries of the shallow

  13. Sandy beaches in a coastline vulnerable to erosion in Atlantic Canada: Macrobenthic community structure in relation to backshore and physical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Mitchell R.; Duarte, Cristian; Quijón, Pedro A.

    2017-07-01

    Most literature suggests that sandy beach macrobenthic communities are structured by physical factors. However, an aspect that has not been studied in detail is whether those physical factors change with erosion or the association of beaches to backshore features like sand dunes, till bluffs, and sandstone cliffs. We addressed this question by sampling 14 sandy beaches on the north shore of Prince Edward Island, Atlantic Canada. Two null hypotheses were tested: first, there is no relationship between physical factors and community descriptors across sandy beaches, and second, there is no difference among beaches associated with distinct backshore features both in terms of physical factors and community descriptors. In order to test these hypotheses, samples of macrobenthic organisms and measurements of grain size, slope, beach deposit index and erosion rates were obtained. Our surveys collected a total of 14 taxa numerically dominated by the spionid polychaete Scolelepis squamata. With regards to the first hypothesis, regression analyses showed that community descriptors were all positively related to erosion rates while unrelated to the variation in grain size, slope and beach deposit index. As for the second hypothesis, erosion rates were significantly different among beaches associated to till bluffs (highest), dunes and sandstone cliffs (lowest). Meanwhile, the other physical factors did not significantly differ among backshore features. Species richness was highest in beaches associated to till bluffs and lowest in those associated to sandstone cliffs. Abundance values were also lowest in beaches associated to sandstone cliffs, and their community composition was significantly different to those associated to dunes and till bluffs. We suggest that the relationship between erosion rates and community descriptors is complex and may be mediated by the availability of nutrients: higher erosion levels might account for higher concentrations of nutrients for

  14. 科尔沁沙地小叶锦鸡儿固沙群落土壤微生物功能多样性%Soil microbes functional diversity in sand-fixing Caragana microphylla communities in Horqin Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹成有; 姚金冬; 韩晓姝; 张颖

    2011-01-01

    Aimed to understand the soil microbes functional diversity in sand-fixing Caragana mi-crophylla communities in Horqin Sandy Land, the soil microbial carbon sources metabolism diversity in 9-, 16-, and 26-yr-old C. microphylla plantations, natural C. micropkylla community, and mov-ing sand dune was examined by the method of Biolog ECO-microplate culture. Within 264 h of cul-ture , the average well color development ( AWCD) and the capabilities of soil microbes in metabo-lizing carboxylic acids, carbohydrates, polymers, amino acids, amines, and aromatics were obvi-ously higher in moving sand dune than in the plantations. The carbon source types metabolized by soil microbes increased with the increasing age of the plantations, and the carbon source metabolic pattern of the soil microbes in 26-yr-old C. microphylla plantation was similar to that in natural C. microphylla community. The functional diversity and evenness index of soil microbes decreased after the establishment of C. microphylla on moving sand dune, whereas the functional diversity of soil microbes increased with increasing age of C. microphylla plantation.%为探讨科尔沁沙地流动沙丘上建立小叶锦鸡儿固沙植被后土壤微生物群落代谢功能的变化,采用Biolog-ECO微平板检测法,研究了9、16和26年生人工群落以及流动沙丘和天然小叶锦鸡儿群落土壤微生物碳源代谢的多样性变化特征.结果表明:在培养的264 h内,流动沙丘土壤微生物平均颜色变化率,以及对羧酸类、糖类、多聚物类、氨基酸类、胺类和芳香类化合物类的代谢能力明显高于人工群落;随着人工群落年龄的增加,土壤微生物代谢碳源种类增加,26年生人工群落土壤微生物的碳源代谢模式已接近天然群落.流动沙丘建立小叶锦鸡儿植被后,土壤微生物群落碳源代谢功能多样性和均匀度指数下降;随着植物群落发育年龄的增长,微生物功能多样性逐渐提高.

  15. Organic matter dynamics in coarse sandy calcareous soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, A.A.; Reuler, van H.

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of organic matter in coarse sandy calcareous soils (beach sand) is thought to be much higher than in acid fine sandy soils but relatively little research is performed on these soils. Laboratory incubation experiments in which the release of soil carbon (C) is determined may overest

  16. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  17. Regeneration of dredged sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Knaapen, Michiel; Scholl, Olaf; Scholl, O.; Trenteseaux., A.; Garlan, T.

    2000-01-01

    Sand waves form a wavy pattern in the offshore sandy seabed. Since their crests reduce the navigability, it is important to know their evolution. A simple model is presented to estimate the recovery of sand wave amplitudes. This model is partially based on the similarity with sea ripples and

  18. Authigenic K-NH{sub 4}-feldspar in sandstones: A fingerprint of the diagenesis of organic matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramseyer, K. [Univ. Bern (Switzerland). Geologisches Inst.; Diamond, L.W. [Univ. Bern (Switzerland). Mineralogisch-Petrographisches Inst.; Boles, J.R. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1993-11-01

    In arkosic sandstones of the San Joaquin and Los Angeles Basins presently at temperatures between 35 C and 174 C, trace amounts of authigenic K-NH{sub 4}-feldspar are present as microfracture fillings and overgrowths on detrital K-feldspar. Microchemical analyses of this authigenic phase reveal up to 80 mole % buddingtonite. The largest ammonium concentrations are observed in a sandy interval of the Antelope shale (80 mole %) and in the Stevens Sands ({approx} 50 mole %) of the San Joaquin Basin. This latter unit was deposited as a turbidite in the organic-rich Fruitvale Shale, an equivalent of the Antelope Shale. The lowest ammonium contents (0-16 mole %) are present in the shallow-marine Vedder Sands and the marginal marine San Joaquin Formation in the same basin. Petrographic, {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 13}C, and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr analyses of a dolomite cement that postdates authigenic K-NH{sub 4}-feldspar indicate that the feldspar precipitated below 28 C in the zone of methanogenesis, from pore waters with the same Sr signature as sea water at the time of sedimentation. Authigenic K-NH{sub 4}-feldspar is thus an early-diagenetic phase that crystallized prior to oil migration, under anoxic conditions when organic matter releases ammonium. The source of ammonium is bacterial decay of organic matter in the sandstones themselves and/or in contemporaneous shales.

  19. Acidification of sandy grasslands - consequences for plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Pål Axel; Mårtensson, Linda-Maria; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Questions: (1) Does soil acidification in calcareous sandy grasslands lead to loss of plant diversity? (2) What is the relationship between the soil content of lime and the plant availability of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in sandy grasslands? Location: Sandy glaciofluvial deposits...... in south-eastern Sweden covered by xeric sand calcareous grasslands (EU habitat directive 6120). Methods: Soil and vegetation were investigated in most of the xeric sand calcareous grasslands in the Scania region (136 sample plots distributed over four or five major areas and about 25 different sites...

  20. Hurricane Sandy and earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    MAVASHEV BORIS; MAVASHEV IGOR

    2013-01-01

    Submit for consideration the connection between formation of a hurricane Sandy and earthquakes. As a rule, weather anomalies precede and accompany earthquakes. The hurricane Sandy emerged 2 days prior to strong earthquakes that occurred in the area. And the trajectory of the hurricane Sandy matched the epicenter of the earthquakes. Possibility of early prediction of natural disasters will minimize the moral and material damage.

  1. Kaolinite Mobilisation in Sandstone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Kets, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The effect of temperature and salinity on sandstone permeability is critical to the feasibility of heat storage in geothermal aquifers. Permeability reduction has been observed in Berea sandstone when the salinity of the pore water is reduced as well as when the sample is heated. Several authors...

  2. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of a Nigerian standard sand: Igbokoda sand

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojuri, OO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the Middle Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone near Ottawa, Illinois, had been picked by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as the reference sand to employ in testing cement and strength of concrete [9]. To the best of our knowledge... and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques due to its importance in cement, geotechnical/geo-environmental research in Nigeria. This should halt importation of standard silica sand for mortar and concrete testing...

  4. STATUS, CAUSES AND COMBATING SUGGESTIONS OF SANDY DESERTIFICATION IN QINGHAI-TIBET PLATEAU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-hua; DONG Guang-rong; LI Sen; DONG Yu-xiang

    2005-01-01

    The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is one of the major sandy desertification regions of China. Based on the recent investigation on sandy desertification, this paper analyses the status such as the type, area, distribution and damage of sandy land desertification in the plateau. Through the analysis on the factors affecting sandy desertification in the region's natural and socio-economic systems as well as the processes and their interrelations, it can be concluded that sandy desertification in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau resulted from the combined actions of normal natural sand drift processes, natural sandy desertification processes caused by climatic changes and man-made sandy desertification caused by improper human activities. In addition, it also predicts the possible developmental trend including the increase in desertification area and the enhancement in desertification developmental degree with the exacerbation of the complex processes, and finally puts forward some strategic suggestions to combat sandy desertification in the coming years.

  5. Bacterial Rhizosphere Biodiversity from Several Pioneer Desert Sand Plants Near Jizan, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Jorge R.

    2016-04-08

    Life in arid regions and, in particular, hot deserts is often limited due to their harsh environmental conditions, such as large temperature fluctuations and low amounts of water. These extreme environments can influence the microbial community present on the surface sands and any rhizosphere members surrounding desert plant roots. The Jizan desert area, located in Saudi Arabia, supports particular vegetation that grows in the large sandy flat terrain. We examined five different samples, four from the rhizosphere of pioneer plants plus a surface sand sample, and used pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified V1-V3 regions of 16S rDNA genes from total extracted DNA to reveal and compare the bacterial population diversity of the samples. The results showed a total of 3,530 OTUs in the five samples, calculated using ≥ 97% sequence similarity levels. The Chao1 estimation of the bacterial diversity fluctuated from 637 to 2,026 OTUs for a given sample. The most abundant members found in the samples belong to the Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla. This work shows that the Jizan desert area of Saudi Arabia can contain a diverse bacterial community on the sand and surrounding the roots of pioneer desert plants. It also shows that desert sand microbiomes can vary depending on conditions, with broad implications for sandstone monument bacterial communities

  6. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  7. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  8. Stochastic reconstruction of sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manwart; Torquato; Hilfer

    2000-07-01

    A simulated annealing algorithm is employed to generate a stochastic model for a Berea sandstone and a Fontainebleau sandstone, with each a prescribed two-point probability function, lineal-path function, and "pore size" distribution function, respectively. We find that the temperature decrease of the annealing has to be rather quick to yield isotropic and percolating configurations. A comparison of simple morphological quantities indicates good agreement between the reconstructions and the original sandstones. Also, the mean survival time of a random walker in the pore space is reproduced with good accuracy. However, a more detailed investigation by means of local porosity theory shows that there may be significant differences of the geometrical connectivity between the reconstructed and the experimental samples.

  9. Comparison of Spatial and Temporal Variation of Soil Moisture for Three Sand Fixation Forests in the Southeast Edge of Keerqin Sandy Land%科尔沁沙地东南缘3种固沙林土壤水分时空变化的比较1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩辉

    2015-01-01

    以科尔沁沙地东南缘章古台地区的樟子松、油松、赤松等3种主要固沙林为研究对象,连续4a实测了0~300 cm土层在主要生长季的土壤含水率。结果表明:不同类型固沙林土壤含水率的空间异质性明显,30 cm以上表层土壤含水率均比较高,深层土壤含水率均明显降低;赤松林地50~200 cm土层、油松林地150~300 cm土层、樟子松林地30~150 cm土层土壤含水率在生长季下降明显,而无木本植被的沙丘(对照)在0~300 cm土层的土壤含水率基本没有变化。%We measured the soil moisture content in the 0-300 cm soil layer of three types of sand fixing vegetations , Pinus syl-vestiris var.mongoliea, Pinus tablu aeformsi and Pinus densiflora of Zhanggutai region in the southeast edge of Keerqin sandy landwere during the main growing season for four consecutive years .The soil moisture content in the 0-100 cm soil layer in all types of sand-fixation forests were higher than that in bare sand dunes (check), and soil moisture content in 200-300cm layer was significantly lower than that in the bare sand dunes .The spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture con-tent of different types of sand fixation forests was obvious .soil moisture content in 0-30 cm layer was higher, soil moisture content decreased in any other layers significantly , soil moisture content in Pinus densiflora forest land in 50-200 cm soil layer decreased obviously , soil moisture content in 150-300 cm soil layers in Pinus tabulaeformis decreased significantly , and soil moisture content in 30-150 cm soil layer in the Pinus ylvestiris var.mongoliea forests decreased significantly .The soil moisture content of bare sand dunes in the soil layer of 0-300 cm changed little .

  10. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  11. Abrasive wear based predictive maintenance for systems operating in sandy conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldman, M.; Tinga, T.; Heide, E. van der; Masen, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Machines operating in sandy environments are damaged by the abrasive action of sand particles that enter the machine and become entrapped between components and contacting surfaces. In the case of the military services the combination of a sandy environment and the wide range of tasks to be fulfille

  12. Analyzing Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Angelyn; Meyer, Stephan; Edwards, Becca

    2015-03-01

    Post-tropical Storm Sandy underwent extratropical transition shortly before making landfall in southern New Jersey October 29 2012. Data from this system was compared with data from Hurricane Ike (2008) which represents a classic hurricane with a clear eye wall and symmetry after landfall. Storm Sandy collided with a low pressure system coming in from the north as the hurricane made landfall on the US East coast. This contributed to Storm Sandy acting as a non-typical hurricane when it made landfall. Time histories of wind speed and wind direction were generated from data provided by Texas Tech's StickNet probes for both storms. The NOAA Weather and Climate program were used to generate radar loops of reflectivity during the landfall for both storms; these loops were compared with time histories for both Ike and Sandy to identify a relationship between time series data and storm-scale features identified on radar.

  13. Subsurface petroleum geology of Santa Rosa sandstone (Triassic), northeast New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhead, R. F.

    The Santa Rose Sandstone (Triassic) occurs at depths of less than 2,000 ft over most of northeast New Mexico. Two major petroleum accumulations are known to exist in it. These outcrops of oil impregnated sandstone are known as the Santa Rosa tar sands. The oil in the tar sands is viscous and heavy. The other known petroleum accumulation is a pool of heavy oil that occurs at depths of 400 ft to 800 ft in northeast Guadalupe County. Attempts are being made to recover the heavy oil with steamflooding in two small pilot fields. The lower and upper sandstone units are blanket deposits composed mostly of fine to medium grained porous sandstones and minor red siliciclastic mudstones. The middle mudstone unit is a blanket deposit composed chiefly of red siliciclastic mudstones and minor lenticular sandstones. Stratigraphic and petrographic studies indicate that good reservoirs are widespread in the lower and upper sandstone unit. The blanket geometry of the lower and upper sandstone units indicates that structure probably plays an important or even dominant role in the trapping of any undiscovered hydrocarbons in the Santa Rosa. Oil proximal to the outcrop belt of the Santa Rosa Sandstone has probably been flushed by recently recharged fresh ground water. Although the source of the oil in Santa Rosa Sandstone is not definitely known, geochemical studies point to the San Andres Formation (Permian) or possibly Pennsylanian rocks.

  14. Landscape Change and Sandy Desertification Monitoring and Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltahir M. Elhadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The objective of this study is to develop techniques for assessing and analyzing sand desertification in the northern part of Shaanxi Province, China. Approach: In order to reveal the process of land degradation, especially the latest situation of sandy desertification, a method integrating remote sensing, Geographic Information System (GIS and field survey was employed to build a sandy desertification dataset for analysis. Remote Sensing images included the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM images in 1987 and Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+ images in 1999. Eight land-cover classes, including active sand dunes, fixed sand dunes, semi-fixed sand dunes, grass land, farm land, wet land, built up area and unused land and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, were identified. Results: The results showed that the active sand dunes and semi-fixed sand dunes have increased with a change rate of 128.70 and 55.65 km2 year-1, respectively, in the meantime the fixed sand dunes has decreased with a decreasing rate of 182.14 km2 year-1. During the 1987s, the area of sandy desertified land reached 12,006.11 km2 (57.17% of the total sandy area, of which severely desertified, medium desertified and slightly desertified land areas were 4,442.23, 4,253.45 and 3,310.43 km2, respectively. By the year 1999, the area of desertified land was increased to 13,782.30 km2 (65.63% of the total sandy area, of which severely desertified, medium desertified and slightly desertified land areas were 5,169.89, 4,918.15 and 3,694.26 km2, respectively increasing by 1,776.19 km2. Conclusion: Spatial change detection based on active sand dunes showed that the expansion area was much larger than the reversion in the past two decades and that several active sand belts has been formed, suggesting that sandy desertification of northern part of Shaanxi Province, China, will be a long-term task.

  15. A Sand Control System for Light Oil Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yuzhang

    1996-01-01

    @@ Over 30-year water flooding in light oil sandstone reservoirs with loose argillaceous cement in Karamay oilfield results in severe sand production, varying from well to well with the different date of well completion.

  16. 科尔沁沙地沙丘-草甸区土壤水分动态模拟研究%THE DYNAMIC SIMULATION OF SOIL WATER IN THE HORQIN SANDY LAND WITH SAND - MEADOW LAND FEATURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李东方; 刘廷玺; 胡洋洋; 李世强

    2012-01-01

    Time series autoregressive model was adopted to simulate the dynamic processes of soil water capacity in dunes and meadows of Horqin Sandy Land. Hie results indicated that the model order of dunes is 8, whereas, for meadows is 11. By comparing the computed soil water capacity with the observed data, indicating that the model has fair accuracy and it can be used to predict the soil water capacity in this area.%本文采用时间序列自回归模型对科尔沁沙地沙丘、草甸区土壤贮水量动态进行了模拟.最终确定沙地土壤水分的AR模型阶次为8,草甸AR模型阶次为11.将模型计算得到的土壤贮水量与实测值进行对比分析,结果表明,模型拟合精度较高,所建立的AR(p)模型能够较好的进行该地区土壤贮水量的动态预测.

  17. Diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs in Carboniferous Benxi Formation, Southeast Ordos Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Yu, Xinghe; Shan, Xin; Su, Dongxu; Wang, Jiao; Li, Yalong; Shi, Xin; Xu, Liqiang

    2016-04-01

    The Ordos Basin, situated in west-central China, is one of the oldest and most important fossil-fuel energy base, which contains large reserves of coal, oil and natural gas. The Upper Palaeozoic strata are widely distributed with rich gas-bearing and large natural gas resources, whose potential is tremendous. Recent years have witnessed a great tight gas exploration improvement of the Upper Paleozoic in Southeastern Ordos basin. The Carboniferous Benxi Formation, mainly buried more than 2,500m, is the key target strata for hydrocarbon exploration, which was deposited in a barrier island and tidal flat environment. The sandy bars and flats are the favorable sedimentary microfacies. With an integrated approach of thin-section petrophysics, constant velocity mercury injection test, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry, diagenesis and porosity evolution of tight sand reservoirs of Benxi Formation were analyzed in detail. The result shows that the main lithology of sandstone in this area is dominated by moderately to well sorted quartz sandstone. The average porosity and permeability is 4.72% and 1.22mD. The reservoirs of Benxi Formation holds a variety of pore types and the pore throats, with obvious heterogeneity and poor connection. Based on the capillary pressure curve morphological characteristics and parameters, combined with thin section and phycical property data, the reservoir pore structure of Benxi Formation can be divided into 4 types, including mid pore mid throat type(I), mid pore fine throat type(II), small pore fine throat type(III) and micro pro micro throat type(Ⅳ). The reservoirs primarily fall in B-subsate of middle diagenesis and late diagenesis, which mainly undergo compaction, cmentation, dissolution and fracturing process. Employing the empirical formula of different sorting for unconsolideated sandstone porosity, the initial sandstone porosity is 38.32% on average. Quantitative evaluation of the increase and decrease of

  18. Distribution of Soil Moisture Content in Different Types of Sand Dunes in the Southeastern Marginal Zone of the Mu Us Sandy Land%毛乌素沙地东南缘不同类型沙丘土壤水分分布特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符超峰; 赵景波

    2011-01-01

    The study area is located in the southeastern marginal zone of the Mu Us Sandy Land, and it is a semi-arid climate area with annual precipitation of 394. 7 mm. Based on the investigation in the study area in late-April 2009, the sand dunes were divided into bare migratory dunes, shrub-covered dunes and tree-covered dunes according to the vegetation types and vegetation coverage on the sand dune surface, and the samples of drilling holes of 4 m in depth at different topographic sites of the dunes were taken for analyzing the change of soil moisture content and soil granular properties of the sand dunes. The results are as follows; (1) Average soil moisture content at depth of 4 m was different from different dune types, that of the shrub-covered dunes and tree-covered dunes was in an order of dune intervale > windward slope > leeward slope, but that of the bare migratory sand dunes was in an order of dune intervale > leeward slope > windward slope. Furthermore, the variation of soil moisture content at different depth of each dune type was different, and that of shrub-covered dunes at different depth was more significant than that of the tree-covered dunes and bare migratory dunes; (2) Vegetation types and surface vegetation coverage affected the variation of soil moisture content of dunes at the same topographic positions of different dune types. Results of the test show that the soil moisture content on windward slope was in an order of shrub-covered dunes > tree-covered dunes > bare migratory dunes, it on leeward slope was in an order of shrub-covered dunes > bare migratory sand dunes > tree-covered dunes, and it at dune intervale was in an order of shrub-covered dunes > tree-covered dunes > bare migratory dunes;the variation coefficient of soil moisture content of shrub-covered dunes was higher than that of other dune types, the soil moisture content of shrub-covered dunes at different depth fluctuated more obviously compared with that of other dune types, and

  19. Simulation of channel sandstone architecture in an incised valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frykman, P.; Johannessen, P.; Andsbjerg, J.

    1998-12-31

    The present report describes a geostatistical modelling study that is aimed at reflecting the architecture of the channel sandstones in an incised valley fill. The example used for this study is a part of the Middle Jurassic sandy succession of the Bryne Formation in the Danish central Graben. The succession consists mainly of fluvial sediments in the lower part, overlain by tidal influenced sediments, which again is overlain by shallow marine sediments. The modelling study has been performed on a sequence of incised valley sediments in the upper part of the Bryne Formation overlying fluvial sediments. (au) EFP-96. 19 refs.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE RESERVOIRS FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY: THE PERMIAN UPPER MINNELUSA FORMATION, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Scheffler, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Upper Minnelusa sandstones form a complex group of reservoirs because of variations in regional setting, sedimentology, and diagenetic alteration. Structural lineaments separate the reservoirs into northern and southern zones. Production in the north is from a single pay sand, and in the south from multi-pay sands due to differential erosion on top of the Upper Minnelusa. The intercalation of eolian dune, interdune, and sabkha sandstones with marine sandstones, carbonates, and anhydrites results in significant reservoir heterogeneity. Diagenetic alterations further enhance heterogeneity, because the degree of cementation and dissolution is partly facies-related.

  1. Broadband Scattering from Sand and Sand/Mud Sediments with Extensive Environmental Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    frequency sound speed and attenuation measurements in sandy sediments with a portable velocimeter.” (4) Proceedings from the 2nd International...Bay, FL off the shore of Shell Island. The sediment consisted of the 15 cm mud layer overlying a muddy, coarse sand basement. Scattering data was...Demoulin, X., L. Guillon, and B.T. Hefner (2017), “High-frequency sound speed and attenuation measurements in sandy sediments with a portable

  2. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  3. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  4. Improvement of attenuation functions of a clayey sandstone for landfill leachate containment by bentonite addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Ana I; Fernández, Raúl; Sánchez Jiménez, Nicanor; Rodríguez Rastrero, Manuel; Regadío, Mercedes; de Soto, Isabel S; Cuevas, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Enhanced sand-clay mixtures have been prepared by using a sandstone arkosic material and have been evaluated for consideration as landfill liners. A lab-scale test was carried out under controlled conditions with different amended natural sandstones whereby leachate was passed through the compacted mixtures. The compacted samples consisted of siliceous sand (quartz-feldspar sand separated from the arkose sandstone) and clay (purified clay from arkose sandstone and two commercial bentonites) materials that were mixed in different proportions. The separation of mineral materials from a common and abundant natural source, for soil protection purposes, is proposed as an economic and environmentally efficient practice. The liner qualities were compared for their mineralogical, physicochemical and major ions transport and adsorption properties. Although all samples fulfilled hydraulic conductivity requirements, the addition of bentonite to arkose sandstone was determined to be an effective strategy to decrease the permeability of the soil and to improve the pollutants retention. The clay materials from arkose sandstone also contributed to pollutant retention by a significant improvement of the cation exchange capacity of the bulk material. However, the mixtures prepared with clay materials from the arkose, exhibited a slight increase of hydraulic conductivity. This effect has to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  6. Sedimentary and petrofacies analyses of the Amasiri Sandstone, southern Benue Trough, Nigeria: Implications for depositional environment and tectonic provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, A. U.; Igwe, E. O.; Nwajide, C. S.

    2016-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the depositional environment, provenance and tectonic setting for the Turonian Amasiri Sandstone, southern Benue Trough, Nigeria, using lithofacies analysis and re-appraisal of petrography of the sandstones. Local stratigraphy and field relationships show a thick succession of shales alternating with elongate/parallel sandstone ridges extending eastwards from Akpoha to Amasiri through Itigidi and Ugep to Apiapum areas. Lithofacies analysis reveals 9 lithofacies suggestive of storm (mass flow) and tidal shelf processes. These include dark grey to black laminated shale/silty mudstones, bioturbated mudstones, coquinoid limestones, very fine-grained bioturbated sandstones with shell hash/debris in places and limestone rip-up clasts, massive and chaotic sandy conglomerate with rip - up clasts, fine to medium-grained, parallel laminated sandstone, hummocky cross-stratified, massive, medium to coarse-grained sandstones, medium to very coarse-grained, planar cross-bedded sandstone, with clay-draped foresets and Ophiomorpha burrows, and coarse-grained trough cross-bedded sandstone. Petrofacies analysis identifies the sandstones as feldspathic and arkosic arenites. Ternary plot of framework mineralogy indicates derivation from an uplifted continental block related to the nearby Oban Massif and Cameroon Basement Complex.

  7. Distribution characteristics and petroleum geological significance of the Silurian asphaltic sandstones in Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG; Jun; PANG; Xiongqi; LIU; Luofu; JIANG; Zhenxue; LIU

    2004-01-01

    The Tarim Basin is a typical superimposed basin in which there have occurred multiphase adjustment and destruction of the reservoirs. The widely distributed asphaltic sandstones of the Silurian are the very product after destruction of the reservoirs. Studies show that the Silurian asphaltic sandstones distributed in both the middle and western parts on the basin are controlled chiefly by the Caledonian oil source area and by the Tazhong, Tabei and Bachu uplifts, whereas the distribution of the asphaltic sandstones on local structural belts is controlled by the reservoir's sedimentary system. Vertically, most of the asphaltic sandstones are under the regional caprock of red mudstones and the upper sandstone section of compact lithology. Due to the difference of hydrocarbon destruction in the early stage and the influence of hydrocarbon recharge in the late stage, the asphaltic sandstones and oil-bearing sandstones in the Tazhong area can be vertically divided into the upper and lower sections and they have an interactive distribution relationship as well. Asphaltic sandstones exist not only in intergranular pores but also inside the grains of sand and between the crevices, proving the destruction of early reservoirs due to uplifting. The existence of asphaltic sandstones over a large area reveals that the large-scale migration and accumulation and the subsequent destruction of hydrocarbons in the Craton area. The destruction caused a loss of the reserve resources of the Palaeozoic amounting to nearly 13.3 billion tons. Asphaltic sandstones formed after the destruction of oil and gas may serve as an effective caprock which is beneficial to accumulation of hydrocarbons and formation of the pool sealed by asphaltic sandstones in the later stage. The destruction of the early Silurian hydrocarbons depends on the stratigraphic burial depth. The deep part under the northern slope of Tazhong is an area favorable to search of undestroyed Silurian oil reservoirs.

  8. Seed Mucilage Improves Seedling Emergence of a Sand Desert Shrub

    OpenAIRE

    Xuejun Yang; Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Guangzheng Liu; Zhenying Huang

    2012-01-01

    The success of seedling establishment of desert plants is determined by seedling emergence response to an unpredictable precipitation regime. Sand burial is a crucial and frequent environmental stress that impacts seedling establishment on sand dunes. However, little is known about the ecological role of seed mucilage in seedling emergence in arid sandy environments. We hypothesized that seed mucilage enhances seedling emergence in a low precipitation regime and under conditions of sand buria...

  9. Architecture of an Upper Jurassic barrier island sandstone reservoir, Danish Central Graben:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars H.; Nielsen, Lars

    2010-01-01

    An unusually thick (c. 88 m), transgressive barrier island and shoreface sandstone succession characterizes the Upper Jurassic Heno Formation reservoir of the Freja oil field situated on the boundary of Denmark and Norway. The development and preservation of such thick transgressive barrier islan...... such that the island aggraded and even prograded seawards and became wider and longer due to the large surplus of sand....

  10. Cementation of Loose Sand Particles based on Bio-cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RONG Hui; QIAN Chunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Loose sand particles could be cemented to sandstone by bio-cement (microbial induced magnesium carbonate). The bio-sandstone was firstly prepared, and then the compressive strength and the porosity of the sandstone cemented by microbial induced magnesium carbonate were tested to characterize the cementation effectiveness. In addition, the formed mineral composition and the microstructure of bio-sandstone were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The experimental results show that the feasibility of binding loose sand particles using microbial induced magnesium carbonate precipitation is available and the acquired compressive strength of bio-sandstone can be excellent at certain ages. Moreover, the compressive strength and the porosity could be improved with the increase of microbial induced magnesium carbonate content. XRD results indicate that the morphology of magnesium carbonate induced by microbe appears as needles and SEM results show that the cementation of loose sand particles to sandstone mainly relies on the microbial induced formation of magnesium carbonate precipitation around individual particles and at particle-particle contacts.

  11. Biological soil crust formation under artificial vegetation effect and its properties in the Mugetan sandy land, northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. W.; Jia, Y. H.; Zhang, K.

    2016-08-01

    Mugetan sandy land is an inland desertification area of about 2,065 km2 in the northeastern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. In the ecological restoration region of the Mugetan sandy land, different crusts have formed under the action of vegetation in three types of sandy soil (i.e. semi-fixed sand dune, fixed sand dune and ancient fixed aeolian sandy soil). The surface sand particle distribution, mineral component and vegetation composition of moving sand dunes and three types of sandy soil were studied in 2010-2014 to analyze the biological crust formation properties in the Mugetan sandy land and the effects of artificial vegetation. Results from this study revealed that artificial vegetation increases the clay content and encourages the development of biological curst. The fine particles (i.e. clay and humus) of the surface layer of the sand dunes increased more than 15% ten years after the artificial vegetation planting, and further increased up to 20% after one hundred years. The interaction of clay, humus, and other fine particles formed the soil aggregate structure. Meanwhile, under the vegetation effect from the microbes, algae, and moss, the sand particles stuck together and a biological crust formed. The interconnection of the partial crusts caused the sand dunes to gradually be fixed as a whole. Maintaining the integrity of the biological crust plays a vital role in fixing the sand under the crust. The precipitation and temperature conditions in the Mugetan sandy land could satisfy the demand of biological crust formation and development. If rational vegetation measures are adopted in the region with moving sand dunes, the lichen-moss-algae biological curst will form after ten years, but it still takes more time for the sand dunes to reach the nutrient enrichment state. If the biological curst is partly broken due to human activities, reasonable closure and restoration measures can shorten the restoration time of the biological crust.

  12. Quantitative studies of hydrocarbon loss of the Silurian bitumen sandstone in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of Tarim Basin experienced several tectonic movements,of which Caledonian movement caused a serious damage to reservoirs of Silurian. The earlier reservoirs size and the later hydrocarbon loss are two key factors to exploration prospect of Silurian. On the basis of net thickness of bituminous sandstone and recovery coefficient of crude oil converting to bitumen,the scale of the hydrocarbon loss of palaeo-accumulation in bitumen sandstone of Silurian was calculated (86.30×108t). The deter-mination of net thickness of bitumen sandstone was completed mainly by several methods,such as physical property demarcation,observing lithology,grains with oil inclusion (GOI) technology,and quantitative grains fluorescence (QGF) technology. The samples of black sandstone and white sand-stone were collected and compared by means of the methods mentioned above. The results showed that there was little hydrocarbon,or none,in the white sandstone. The recovery coefficient was ob-tained by the analyses of plentiful physical parameters of crude oil and bitumen sandstone,based on the hypothesis that nonhydrocarbon compounds and bitumen were invariable in the process of bitu-men forming. The calculated result,which is more scientific and actual,indicates the exploration pros-pect is more promising in Silurian of the Tarim Basin.

  13. Real-Time Simulation of Aeolian Sand Movement and Sand Ripple Evolution: A Method Based on the Physics of Blown Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Bao-Gang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Simulation and visualization of aeolian sand movement and sand ripple evolution are a challenging subject.In this paper,we propose a physically based modeling and simulating method that can be used to synthesize sandy terrain in various patterns.Our method is based on the mechanical behavior of individual sand grains,which are widely studied in the physics of blown sand.We accounted significant mechanisms of sand transportation into the sand model,such as saltation,successive saltation and collapsing,while simplified the vegetation model and wind field model to make the simulation feasible and affordable.We implemented the proposed method on the programming graphics processing unit (GPU) to get real-time simulation and rendering.Finally,we proved that our method can reflect many characteristics of sand ripple evolution through several demonstrations.We also gave several synthesized desert scenes made from the simulated height field to display its significance on application.

  14. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  15. Hurricane Sandy washover deposits on Fire Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Selle, SeanPaul M.; Lunghino, Brent D.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Costa, Pedro J.M.

    2017-02-16

    Washover deposits on Fire Island, New York, from Hurricane Sandy in 2012 were investigated a year after the storm to document the sedimentary characteristics of hurricane washover features. Sediment data collected in the field includes stratigraphic descriptions and photos from trenches, bulk sediment samples, U-channels, and gouge and push cores. Samples and push cores were further analyzed in the laboratory for grain size, density variations using x-ray computed tomography (CT), and surface microtexture using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Elevation profiles of washover features were measured using Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) with Real Time Kinematic processing. The DGPS elevations were compared to lidar (light detection and ranging) data from pre- and post-Sandy surveys to assess the degree to which washover deposit thicknesses changed within the year following deposition. Hurricane Sandy washover deposits as much as 1 meter thick were observed in trenches. Initial results show that the upper parts of the deposits have been reworked significantly in some places by wind, but there are still areas where the deposits are almost entirely intact. Where mostly intact, the washover deposits consist of massive or weakly laminated sand near the base, overlain by more strongly laminated sands.

  16. GREYBULL SANDSTONE PETROLEUM POTENTIAL ON THE CROW INDIAN RESERVATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL MONTANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Lopez

    2000-12-14

    Evaluation of the Lower Cretaceous Greybull Sandstone on the Crow Indian Reservation for potential stratigraphic traps in the valley-fill sandstone was the focus of this project. The Crow Reservation area, located in south-central Montana, is part of the Rocky Mountain Foreland structural province, which is characterized by Laramide uplifts and intervening structural basins. The Pryor and Bighorn mountains, like other foreland uplifts, are characterized by asymmetrical folds associated with basement-involved reverse faults. The reservation area east of the mountains is on the northwestern flank of the Powder River Basin. Therefore, regional dips are eastward and southeastward; however, several prominent structural features interrupt these regional dips. The nearly 4,000 mi{sup 2} reservation is under explored but has strong potential for increased oil and gas development. Oil and gas production is well established in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to the south as well as in the areas north and west of the reservation. However, only limited petroleum production has been established within the reservation. Geologic relations and trends indicate strong potential for oil and gas accumulations, but drilling has been insufficient for their discovery. The Greybull Sandstone, which is part of the transgressive systems tract that includes the overlying Fall River Sandstone, was deposited on a major regional unconformity. The erosional surface at the base of the Greybull Sandstone is the +100 Ma, late Aptian-Early Albian regional unconformity of Weimer (1984). This lowstand erosional surface was controlled by a basin-wide drop in sea level. In areas where incised Greybull channels are absent, the lowstand erosional unconformity is at the base of the Fall River Sandstone and equivalent formations. During the pre-Greybull lowstand, sediment bypassed this region. In the subsequent marine transgression, streams began to aggrade and deposit sand of the lower Greybull Sandstone

  17. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bühring, S.I.; Ehrenhauss, S.; Kamp, A.; Moodley, L.; Prof. Witte, U.

    2006-01-01

    In situ and on-board pulse-chase experiments were carried out on a sublittoral fine sand in the German Bight (southern North Sea) to investigate the hypothesis that sandy sediments are highly active and have fast turnover rates. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments where we

  18. Factors affecting N immobilisation/mineralisation kinetics for cellulose-, glucose- and straw-amended sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinten, A.J.A.; Whitmore, A.P.; Bloem, J.; Howard, R.; Wright, F.

    2002-01-01

    The kinetics of nitrogen immobilization/mineralization for cellulose-, glucose- and straw-amended sandy soils were investigated in a series of laboratory incubations. Three Scottish soils expected to exhibit a range of biological activity were used: aloamy sand, intensively cropped horticultural soi

  19. Transport of water and solutes in wettable and water repellent sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.

    1996-01-01

    The research yielded the following conclusions and results: preferential flow can be expected in recently deposited, loosely packed, wettable dune sands; preferential flow is common in most water-repellent sandy soils; distribution flow in topsoils isa process of major importance, resulting in a

  20. CO2 Storage Potential of the Eocene Tay Sandstone, Central North Sea, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Christopher; Williams, John

    2017-04-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is crucial for low-carbon industry, climate mitigation and a sustainable energy future. The offshore capacity of the UK is substantial and has been estimated at 78 Gt of CO2 in saline aquifers and hydrocarbon fields. The early-mid Eocene Tay Sandstone Member of the Central North Sea (CNS) is a submarine-fan system and potential storage reservoir with a theoretical capacity of 123 Mt of CO2. The Tay Sandstone comprises of 4 sequences, amalgamating into a fan complex 125km long and 40 km at a minimum of 1500 m depth striking NW-SE, hosting several hydrocarbon fields including Gannett A, B, D and Pict. In order to better understand the storage potential and characteristics, the Tay Sandstone over Quadrant 21 has been interpreted using log correlation and 3D seismic. Understanding the internal and external geometry of the sandstone as well as the lateral extent of the unit is essential when considering CO2 vertical and horizontal fluid flow pathways and storage security. 3D seismic mapping of a clear mounded feature has revealed the youngest sequence of the Tay complex; a homogenous sand-rich channel 12 km long, 1.5 km wide and on average 100 m thick. The sandstone has porosity >35%, permeability >5 D and a net to gross of 0.8, giving a total pore volume of 927x106 m3. The remaining three sequences are a series of stacked channels and interbedded mudstones which are more quiescent on the seismic, however, well logs indicate each subsequent sequence reduce in net to gross with age as mud has a greater influence in the early fan system. Nevertheless, the sandstone properties remain relatively consistent and are far more laterally extensive than the youngest sequence. The Tay Sandstone spatially overlaps several other potential storage sites including the older Tertiary sandstones of the Cromarty, Forties and Mey Members and deeper Jurassic reservoirs. This favours the Tay Sandstone to be considered in a secondary or multiple stacked

  1. Attenuation of Landfill Leachate In Unsaturated Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, A. P.; Brook, C.; Godley, A.; Lewin, K.; Young, C. P.

    Landfill leachate emanating from old "dilute and disperse" sites represents a potential (and in many cases actual) threat to the integrity of groundwater. Indeed, this concern has been included in EU legislation (80/86/EEC), where key contaminants (e.g. ammonia, various toxic organic compounds and heavy metals) are explicitly highlighted in terms of their impact on groundwater. In the UK, whilst there are a substantial number of unlined landfills sited on major aquifers, many of these are in locations where there is a substantial unsaturated zone. Thus, there exists the opportunity for the modification and attenuation of contaminants prior to it encountering the water table. An understanding of likely changes in leachate content and concentrations at such sites will enable a more comprehensive assessment of the potential risks and liabilities posed by such sites to be evaluated. The Burntstump landfill, situated 8 km north of Nottingham (UK), is sited on an outcrop of Sherwood sandstone. The fine friable sand has been quarried since the 1960s and the excavated volume used to store municipal waste. Filling at the site commenced in the mid 1970s and originally was unlined. In 1978 the first of what was to become a series of boreholes was installed within an area of roughly 5 m radius over one of the original waste cells. Cores of the waste and underlying sandstone were extracted and analysed for a range of physical and chemical parameters. The most recent set of analyses were obtained in 2000. The series of investigations therefore provide an important record of leachate migration and modification through the unsaturated zone for over twenty years. The progression of the leachate front is clearly delineated by the chloride concentration profile with an average velocity of around 1.6 m.yr-1. Combining this value with an average (and reasonably uniform) measured moisture content of about 7% gives a mean inter-granular specific discharge of 110 mm.yr-1. An interesting

  2. Assessment of sandy desertification trends in the Shule River Basin from 1978 to 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Song; ChangZhen Yan; Sen Li; JiaLi Xie

    2014-01-01

    Sandy desertification in the Shule River Basin has expanded dramatically during the past 30 years. We evaluated the status, evolution, and main causes of sandy desertification by interpreting Landsat images which were acquired in 1978, 1990, 2000, 2005, and 2010, and analyzing the relevant meteorological data. The results show there was 3,477.95 km2, 3,733.32 km2, 3,620.29 km2, 3,565.65 km2, and 3,557.88 km2 of sandy desertified land in 1978, 1990, 2000, 2005, and 2010, respectively. From 1978 to 1990, not only the area of sandy desertified land (SDL) but also the degree of SDL levels increased. From 1990 to 2010 there was widespread restoration of SDL but the recovery trend of SDL gradually slowed. Although climate change contributes to expanding sandy desertification, human activities can either accelerate or reverse trends of natural sandy desertification. Some detrimental human activities can accelerate sandy desertification, but, conversely, desertification control measures such as the Three-North Shelter Forest Project and watershed rehabilitation programs in areas including the Shule River Basin resulted in many SDL being turned into grasslands or forest lands when shrubs and trees were planted to fix mobile sands at the edges of oases and cities. With population growth, much SDL has been reclaimed as farm land using water-saving agricultural methods or has been turned into built-up land as a result of urbanization.

  3. Comments on“Sidewinding with Minimal Slip:Snake and Robot Ascent of Sandy Slopes”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jinguo; GAO Yang; WANG Yuechao; MA Shugen; LUO Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Marvi et al (Science, 2014, vol.346, p.224) concluded a sidewinder rattlesnake increases the body contact length with the sand when granular incline angle increases. They also claimed the same principle should work on robotic snake too. We have evidence to prove that this conclusion is only partial in describing the snake body-sand interaction. There should be three phases that fully represent the snake locomotion behaviors during ascent of sandy slopes, namely lifting, descending, and ceasing. The snake body-sand interaction during the descending and ceasing phases helps with the climbing while such interaction during the lifting phase in fact contributes resistance.

  4. Sandy PMO Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 Financial Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Sandy PMO: Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (Sandy Supplemental Bill) Financial Data. This is the Sandy Supplemental Quarterly Financial Datasets that are...

  5. Depositional Environments of the Upper Permian Quartzose Sandstone (Shandong Province, North China):Insight from Trace Element Geochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dawei L; Zengxue Li; Jitao Chen; Ying Liu; Zengqi Zhang; Jipo Liang; Haiyan Liu

    2015-01-01

    The depositional environment of the Upper Permian quartzose sandstone (Kuishan sand-stone in Shihezi Formation of Upper Permian) in the North China epicontinental basin is controversial. In order to test the previous hypotheses, we analyzed sedimentological characteristics of the Kuishan sandstones in outcrops and boreholes, and carried out trace element geochemical analysis by electron probe microanalyzer. Three lithofacies were recognized, including normal-graded conglomerate (Cng), trough and planar cross-bedded coarse sandstone (CStpc), and planar cross-bedded medium sandstone (MSpc). Normal-graded conglomerate (Cng) formed in the meandering river or deltaic distributary channels. Trough and planar cross-bedded coarse sandstone (CStpc) formed in meandering river or distributary channels of near-source deltaic plain. Planar cross-bedded medium sandstone (MSpc) formed in the siliciclastic beach with high-to moderate-energy conditions. By the petrology and trace elements analysis, three relatively large-scale transgressions were revealed. Each transgression was re-flected by the lower content of Ba and ratios of Fe/Mn, and the high content of B and ratios of B/Ga. The ratios of Ni/Co of all samples are all lower than 2, suggesting oxygen-enriched shallower water en-vironment during deposition of the Kuishan sandstones.

  6. Appalachian Basin Low-Permeability Sandstone Reservoir Characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray Boswell; Susan Pool; Skip Pratt; David Matchen

    1993-04-30

    A preliminary assessment of Appalachian basin natural gas reservoirs designated as 'tight sands' by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) suggests that greater than 90% of the 'tight sand' resource occurs within two groups of genetically-related units; (1) the Lower Silurian Medina interval, and (2) the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Acadian clastic wedge. These intervals were targeted for detailed study with the goal of producing geologic reservoir characterization data sets compatible with the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS: ICF Resources, Inc.) reservoir simulator. The first phase of the study, completed in September, 1991, addressed the Medina reservoirs. The second phase, concerned with the Acadian clastic wedge, was completed in October, 1992. This report is a combined and updated version of the reports submitted in association with those efforts. The Medina interval consists of numerous interfingering fluvial/deltaic sandstones that produce oil and natural gas along an arcuate belt that stretches from eastern Kentucky to western New York. Geophysical well logs from 433 wells were examined in order to determine the geologic characteristics of six separate reservoir-bearing intervals. The Acadian clastic wedge is a thick, highly-lenticular package of interfingering fluvial-deltaic sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Geologic analyses of more than 800 wells resulted in a geologic/engineering characterization of seven separate stratigraphic intervals. For both study areas, well log and other data were analyzed to determine regional reservoir distribution, reservoir thickness, lithology, porosity, water saturation, pressure and temperature. These data were mapped, evaluated, and compiled into various TGAS data sets that reflect estimates of original gas-in-place, remaining reserves, and 'tight' reserves. The maps and data produced represent the first basin-wide geologic characterization for either interval. This report

  7. Sandy grassland blowouts in Hulunbuir,northeast China:geomorphology,distribution,and causes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Altan MunkhDalai; FENG Zongwei; WANG Xiaoke; SUN Hongwei; ZHAO Jiaming; U Hurlee

    2007-01-01

    A sandy grassland blowout consists of an aeolian depression formed in top soil and the underlying sand deposit underlie,and the adjoining redeposit of sand derived from the depression. Research based on field survey and topographic mapping combined with aerophotograph interpretation reveals that: (1) All the three sand land tracts in Hulunbuir Grasslands are composed of blowout depressions and adjoining dunes, with interlaying remnants of sandy grasslands as background; (2) blowout depressions and their adjoining dunes can be classified according to their morphometric characteristics, development stages, and initiating factors; (3) blowouts develop mostly in the upper parts of sidelong aweather and sunward slopes inclining southwestward when west wind prevails; (4) initiation of blowouts is closely related with the coupling of extreme droughts and wide spread intense human disturbance to the fragile topsoil layer. The investigations indicate that key factors to prevent desertification are to protect grassland vegetation and topsoil.

  8. Hurricane Sandy Poster (October 29, 2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hurricane Sandy poster. Multi-spectral image from Suomi-NPP shows Hurricane Sandy approaching the New Jersey Coast on October 29, 2012. Poster size is approximately...

  9. On Sandy Shores. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Craig; And Others

    The activities in this guide (for grades 2-4) transport students to the sandy shore, one of the most fascinating ecosystems on the planet. At this ecological juncture a multiplicity of life forms find ways to survive, thrive, and interact with each other. Using a wide variety of learning formats, students explore and deepen their understanding of…

  10. Downslope coarsening in aeolian grainflows of the Navajo Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loope, David B.; Elder, James F.; Sweeney, Mark R.

    2012-07-01

    Downslope coarsening in grainflows has been observed on present-day dunes and generated in labs, but few previous studies have examined vertical sorting in ancient aeolian grainflows. We studied the grainflow strata of the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in the southern Utah portion of its outcrop belt from Zion National Park (west) to Coyote Buttes and The Dive (east). At each study site, thick sets of grainflow-dominated cross-strata that were deposited by large transverse dunes comprise the bulk of the Navajo Sandstone. We studied three stratigraphic columns, one per site, composed almost exclusively of aeolian cross-strata. For each column, samples were obtained from one grainflow stratum in each consecutive set of the column, for a total of 139 samples from thirty-two sets of cross-strata. To investigate grading perpendicular to bedding within individual grainflows, we collected fourteen samples from four superimposed grainflow strata at The Dive. Samples were analyzed with a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser diffraction particle analyser. The median grain size of grainflow samples ranges from fine sand (164 μm) to coarse sand (617 μm). Using Folk and Ward criteria, samples are well-sorted to moderately-well-sorted. All but one of the twenty-eight sets showed at least slight downslope coarsening, but in general, downslope coarsening was not as well-developed or as consistent as that reported in laboratory subaqueous grainflows. Because coarse sand should be quickly sequestered within preserved cross-strata when bedforms climb, grain-size studies may help to test hypotheses for the stacking of sets of cross-strata.

  11. Regularities of wind-erosion of different land-use types in Yongding River sandy land,Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Depeng; Liu Yongbing; Zang Runguo; Wang Xian

    2006-01-01

    The threshold wind velocity of a number of variables was studied in four different land-use types:farmland,forestland,wild grassland and a flood plain in the Yongding River sandy land in Beijing.The variables studied were transport of sand, underlying surface roughness,windblown sediment,wind-sand flow structure,soil mechanical composition and amount of wind erosion.The following conclusions were drawn: 1) The order of decreasing threshold of wind speed for sand displacement and surface roughness were forestland,wild grassland,farmland,sparse wild grassland and flood plain.2) There were significant differences in sand flux among different ground covers.At a height of 0-20 cm,the height increased while the sediment discharge percent of sand flux decreased;there were significant differences in the sand flow formation under different land-use types.3) The mechanical composition of sand particles consisted mainly of silver sand in the flood plain and sparse wild grassland,and of silver sand,particle silver sand and floury sand in other land-use types.4) The amounts of wind erosion and sand sediment were different among different land-use types.Increased vegetation cover and change in farming techniques were suggested to prevent and control wind erosion of sand and soil.

  12. PARTICULAR ASPECTS OF APPLICABILITY OF PROVISIONS OF THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL THEORY OF EFFECTIVE STRESSES TO SANDY SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potapov Aleksandr Dmitrievich

    2012-10-01

    V.I. Osipov. The analysis of several genetic types of quaternary sands, performed by the authors, makes it possible to use the number of contacts to identify the morphology of sand grains within the framework of the analysis of soils. The authors demonstrate that the employment of the formulas developed by academician V.I. Osipov in the calculation of the number of contacts between particles in natural sandy soils is virtually impossible due to the fact that no natural sand particles can boast an ideal spherical shape. The number of contacts between the sand particles may increase due to the defects of their shape and the nature of the particle surface. In this study, the shape and nature of the surface of sand grains represent those of the sands of various origins. The authors have employed a composite index of morphology that takes account of the shape and nature of the surface throughout the amount of sand under research. Similar calculations that take account of the morphology of grains were performed for selected fractions of sands to eliminate the influence of grain size on the packing of sands. The analysis of provisions of the physical and chemical theory of effective stresses of soils and the study of multiple types of natural sands demonstrate that further research of formation and phases of coagulation contacts between particles of soil requires a detailed study of structural features of sands. These structural features include the grain size, homogeneity, the shape and nature of the surface of sand grains. Both individual particles of sand and sandy soil are to be subjected to morphological assessments. The parameters to be assessed will include density and composition of sandy soils, as the soil porosity affects the formation of true contacts between particles of sand and determines their number. Mineral composition is an important factor affecting the shape and nature of the surface of sand grains. The research performed by the authors contemplates

  13. MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SAND FRACTION IN A SAND GRAIN IMAGE CAPTURE SYSTEM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Arruda Viana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Morphology studies assume significant importance in analysis of phenomena of granular systems packaging, in particular with a view to the use of the technique of soil stabilization named particle size correction in forest roads. In this context, this study aimed to develop and operationalize a Sand Grain Image Capture System and, hereby, determine the morphological indices of the sand fractions of two sandy soils called João Pinheiro (JP and Cachoeira da Prata (CP. Soil samples, air-dried, were sieved (2.0 mm nominal mesh size for removal of gravels. The materials that passed through the sieve were subjected to dispersion, washing in 0.053 mm nominal mesh size sieve, removal of organic matter and iron oxides to obtain the clean sand fractions. Subsequently, each soil sample was sieved for separation into twelve classes, between the diameters of 0.149 mm and 1.190 mm, using a Rotap shaker. Next, tests were carried out to characterize the morphometric attributes of the twelve classes of sand fractions of the soils studied. For validation of the performance of the Sand Grain Image Capture System, the results were compared to those obtained using a standard procedure for image analysis. The analysis of the results led to the following conclusions: (i the sand fraction of the JP soil presented higher values for the morphometric indices roundness, elongation and compactness compared to sand fraction of the CP soil; and (ii the Sand Grain Image Capture System worked properly, with practicality.

  14. EFFECTS OF ALKALINE SANDY LOAM ON SULFURIC SOIL ACIDITY AND SULFIDIC SOIL OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Michael

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available  In poor soils, addition of alkaline sandy loam containing an adequate proportion of sand, silt and clay would add value by improving the texture, structure and organic matter (OM for general use of the soils. In acid sulfate soils (ASS, addition of alkaline sandy would improve the texture and leach out salts as well as add a sufficient proportion of OM for vegetation establishment. In this study, addition of alkaline sandy loam into sulfuric soil effectively increased the pH, lowered the redox and reduced the sulfate content, the magnitude of the effects dependent on moisture content. Addition of alkaline sandy loam in combination with OM was highly effective than the effects of the lone alkaline sandy loam. When alkaline sandy was added alone or in combination with OM into sulfidic soil, the effects on pH and the redox were similar as in the sulfuric soil but the effect on sulfate content was variable. The effects under aerobic conditions were higher than under anaerobic conditions. The findings of this study have important implications for the general management of ASS where lime availability is a concern and its application is limited.International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-3, June-August 2015Page: 42-54

  15. Heavy mineral sorting in downwards injected Palaeocene sandstone, Siri Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazerouni, Afsoon Moatari; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan Byskov

    2011-01-01

    near the Danish Central Graben of the North Sea hydrocarbon province. The emplacement of large-scale injectite complexes has been commonly attributed to seismic activity and consequent sand liquefaction. However, due to very small differences in textural and compositional properties, and the lack...... /geochemical distinction between "in situ" sandstones and their related injectites, especially where primary sedimentary structures are removed by fluidization or minor remobilization....

  16. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  17. Discrete particle simulation of mixed sand transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengjun Xiao; Liejin Guo; Debiao Li; Yueshe Wang

    2012-01-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian numerical simulation is performed on mixed sand transport.Volume averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate gas motion,and particle motion is calculated using Newton's equation,involving a hard sphere model to describe particle-to-particle and particle-to-wall collisions.The influence of wall characteristics,size distribution of sand particles and boundary layer depth on vertical distribution of sand mass flux and particle mean horizontal velocity is analyzed,suggesting that all these three factors affect sand transport at different levels.In all cases,for small size groups,sand mass flux first increases with height and then decreases while for large size groups,it decreases exponentially with height and for middle size groups the behavior is in-between.The mean horizontal velocity for all size groups well fits experimental data,that is,increasing logarithmically with height in the middle height region.Wall characteristics greatly affects particle to wall collision and makes the flat bed similar to a Gobi surface and the rough bed similar to a sandy surface.Particle size distribution largely affects the sand mass flux and the highest heights they can reach especially for larger particles.

  18. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  19. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  20. Effect of pore-size distribution on the collapse behaviour of anthropogenic sandy soil deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Baille Wiebke; Jebeli Alireza; Schanz Tom

    2016-01-01

    In the former open-pit mines of the Lusatian region in Germany, several liquefaction events have occurred during the recent years in the anthropogenic deposits made of very loose sandy soils. These events are related to the rising ground water table after the stop of controlled ground water lowering. The very loose state is due to the formation of sand aggregates (pseudo-grains) during the deposition process. The pseudo-grains enclose larger voids of dimension greater than the single sand gra...

  1. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  2. Natural persistence of the coastal plant Glehnia littoralis along temperate sandy coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Xiao; Chu, Jian-Min; Liu, Xiao-Shan

    2017-01-01

    We studied germination behaviors and persistence mechanism of wild Glehnia littoralis, a typical coastal species at temperate sandy coasts of the North Pacific Ocean, and tested the hypothesis that the coastal plants may have evolved special seeds adapting to the coasts, by which they recruit and persist easily, occupying the coasts as ideal habitats. In the Shandong Peninsula, China, we investigated temperature and moisture conditions of coast sand in relation to germination and evaluated effects of sand burial, seawater immersion and sowing time on germination. When germination began, daily dawn temperatures of sand were about 10 °C and daily noon temperatures were about 25 °C; the temperatures were not different in the sand seeds exhibited large germination rates if sand burial was at depths >= 3 cm and winter freezing was kept longer than 2.5 months. Seeds experiencing seawater immersion were able to germinate well. These evidences suggest that G. littoralis has evolved special seeds adapting to seawater dispersal and specific season rhythm. By the seeds, G. littoralis occupies temperate sandy coasts as ideal habitats to persist. PMID:28211487

  3. Research on characteristics of wind-sand fluid and sandy disaster reduction at Kecheng(K454~45g) section along Qing-Zang Railway%青藏铁路客城区段风沙流特点及沙害防治措施的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于云江; 史培军; 鲁春霞

    2001-01-01

    青藏线哈(尔盖)-格(尔木)段位于青藏高原,横穿柴达木沙漠,集沙漠特征与高原气候于一体.不少地段曾因沙害造成行车中断和机车掉道等事故,其中以客城最为突出.在以往相关研究的文献中.确定主风向是以风的频率为主。但在以防止沙子上道为主要目标的铁路防沙中.本文提出的以输沙量为依据所确定的主风向,能为防沙措施提供更为合理的依据.在该段铁路防沙中,采用了竹片栅栏与碎石方格相结合的阻、固措施,其中碎石方格系在铁路防沙中首次使用.经过观测,证实阻沙措施降低了风速;固沙措施增加了地面的粗糙度,大大减少了输沙量,为植物的生长创造了有利条件。在该地采用碎石方格固沙既有使用寿命长,又有取材方便的优点。自防沙工程竣工以来取得了明显的经济效益,同时减轻了工人的劳动强度,确保了该段行车安全。%Railway section from Hargei to Germu lies in Qing-Zang Plateau crosses Caidamu desert, with desert feature and plateau climate. Accident of interrupting and derailment had once happened in some sections because of wind-sand calamity, especially at Kecheng section. In the past literature, the main wind direction was defined by the frequency of wind, but the authors found that it is reliable to ascertain main wind direction in terms of transported sand amount in controlling shifting sand for railway safety. In order to control mobile sand along railway at Kecheng section, we used integrated measures combining sand obstruction and sand fixation using bamboo fence and broken stone-checker as windbreak which was put into practice firstly in mobile sand-control along railway. The observation results showed that the obstructing-sand measure reduced velocity of wind greatly; the fixing-sand measures increased roughness of earth surface, and thus shifting sand were decreased, which created a favorable

  4. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  5. Diagenesis characteristics and their influence on Porosity and Permeability of sandstone from Yingcheng Formation in Jinshan field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ruiyao,GAO Fuhong; ZHANG Zhongyue

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the diagenesis and its influence on Porosity and Permeability of sandstones from Yingcheng Formation in Jinshan field,aPPlying thin sections,casting and scanning electron microscoPe, the authors studied PetrograPhy,diagenesis,Porosity and Permeability of Yingcheng Formation sandstone reser-voir. The results show that the reservoir of Yingcheng Formation is mainly comPosed of lithic arkoses. Sand-stones exPerienced comPaction,Pressolution,cementation,metasomatism and dissolution. The Primary Pores of the sandstones are undeveloPed;most of Pores are the secondary Pores,which are mainly intragranular dissolu-tion Pores in feldsPar and debris. The comPaction and cementation reduced the Primary Pores in sandstones,the Porosity and Permeability decreased;while the dissolution formed the secondary Pores,resulting in the Porosity and Permeability increase. Due to comPaction and cementation,the Porosity and Permeability are reduced with increasing of dePth. There exists an abnormal enlargement of Porosity and Permeability within a dePth range 2 310-2 450 m. In combination with analysis of Petrology,the dissolution of feldsPar and debris is most deve-loPed in the dePth range. Therefore,comPaction,cementation and dissolution are the imPortant factors which affect the Porosity and Permeability of sandstones.

  6. George Sandi "Consuelo" / Ott Ojamaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojamaa, Ott, 1926-1996

    2010-01-01

    Arvustus: Sand, George, pseud. Consuelo. 1-2. : romaan / [prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Leili-Maria Kask järelsõna ja märkused: Ott Ojamaa]. Tallinn : Eesti Riiklik Kirjastus, 1961. (Suuri sõnameistreid). 2. tr. ilmus 1988. a.

  7. George Sandi "Consuelo" / Ott Ojamaa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojamaa, Ott, 1926-1996

    2010-01-01

    Arvustus: Sand, George, pseud. Consuelo. 1-2. : romaan / [prantsuse keelest tõlkinud Leili-Maria Kask järelsõna ja märkused: Ott Ojamaa]. Tallinn : Eesti Riiklik Kirjastus, 1961. (Suuri sõnameistreid). 2. tr. ilmus 1988. a.

  8. Overtopping resistant dike, Sandy dike

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ComCoast

    2005-01-01

    An important element in the ComCoast concept is the overtopable sea defence (often a dike). In this concept the landward (inner) slope of the dike is adjusted in such a way that it can withstand higher overtopping rates. Two new concepts for covering the inner slope, sand cover and perforated mats,

  9. Devonian sand injections and volcanism in the Murzuq Basin (south-west Libya)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Julien; Ghienne, Jean-Francois

    The highly prolific Murzuq basin in SW Libya was considered devoid of large sand injection system and volcanic activity during the Lower Palaeozoic. This study identified numerous evidences of kilometre-scale sand injections in association with volcanism of Lower Devonian age. The sand injection...... system is original by its interaction with volcanism and its situation in an epicontinental intracratonic basin. The sand injections form a seal-bypass system between the Ordovician-Cambrian reservoirs and the Lower Devonian sandstones, breaching through the Silurian shale seal (and source rock...

  10. Experimental strain analysis of Clarens Sandstone colonised by endolithic lichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wessels

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available Endolithic lichens occur commonly on Clarens Sandstone in South Africa, where they significantly contribute to the weathering of sandstone by means of mechanical and chemical weathering processes. This preliminary investigation reports on the success- ful use of strain gauges in detecting strain differences between sandstone without epilithic lichens and sandstone colonised by the euendolithic lichen Lecidea aff. sarcogynoides Korb. Mechanical weathering, expressed as strain changes, in Clarens Sandstone was studied during the transition from relatively dry winter to wet summer conditions. Daily weathering of sandstone due to thermal expansion and contraction of colonised and uncolonised sandstone could be shown. Our results show that liquid water in sandstone enhances the mechanical weathering of uncolonised Clarens Sandstone while water in the gaseous phase enhances mechanical weathering of sandstone by euendolithic lichens.

  11. THE PROBLEMATIC OF SANDY LANDS IN PARANAVAI MUNICIPALITY –PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Eduardo Freres Stipp

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The sandy lands are a process of scouring with sand forming a sandy area, which correspondsto a reworking of the sands due its constant mobility, involving the transformation of notsolids deposits is sandy areas. This work tried to establish the characterization of thisphenomenon of scouring with sand in a local level, occurring in arenaceous areas in theNortheast of the state of Paraná, specifically in the urban site of Paranavaí. It was also madean evaluation of the environmental degradation as well as different causes for what provokedthese sandy areas. Being an area with a high level of soil decomposition with the highwaysroutes crossing it, it was necessary, besides bibliographic data that allowed a theoretical basis,a research applied in order to supply subsides for future planning related to the spaceorganization. The evolution of the use and soil occupation in this area has been processedwithin an urban planning which considered by no account neither soil characteristic, thevegetation nor the predominant climate in that region. The mechanisms of region atmospherecirculation were analyzed, the alterations or attributes of the climate as well, aiming toidentify the genesis of the erosion sandy and possible time and space distribution. Initially, themain characteristics of the region were collected, components e processes working on the landmodel. It was observed how it worked and the use and occupation of the soil in past times andcurrently. During 2004, using the Environmental Fragility Letter, the areas of erosion wereidentified, ravines and strong erosion that compounds the first stages of the focused problem.The sandy land is a process that involves erosion, transport, e accumulation, meaning most oftimes the loosing of Biosphere productivity. For monitoring these risk areas some measuringcanes were made to measure the soil loss, which were used in several spots of erosion in theurban area in Paranavaí. The measurement happened in

  12. Intersecting faults and sandstone stratigraphy at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonder Haar, S.; Howard, J.H.

    1980-02-01

    The northwest-southeast trending Cerro Prieto fault is part of a major regional lineament that extends into Sonaro and has characteristics of both a wrench fault and an oceanic transform fault. The distribution of lithologies and temperature within the field was studied by comparing data from well cuttings, cores, well logs, and geochemical analyses. Across the earliest developed portion of the field, in particular along a 1.25-km northeast-southwest section from well M-9 to M-10, interesting correlations emerge that indicate a relationship among lithology, microfracturing, and temperature distribution. In the upper portion of Reservoir A of this stratigraphic section, between 1200 and 1400 m, the percentage of sandstones ranges from 20 to 55. Temperatures are 225/sup 0/ to 275/sup 0/C based on well logs, calcite isotope maxima, and Na-K-Ca indices. The study shows that an isothermal high in this vicinity corresponds to the lowest total percentage of sandstones. Scanning electron microphotographs of well cores and cuttings from sandstone and shale units reveal clogging, mineral dissolution, and mineral precipitation along microfractures. The working hypothesis is that these sandy shale and siltstone facies are most amenable to increased microfracturing and, in turn, such microfracturing allows for higher temperature fluid to rise to shallower depths in the reservoir.

  13. Extraction Efficiency of Belonolaimus longicaudatus from Sandy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, R; Frederick, J J

    1991-10-01

    Numbers of Belonolaimus longicaudatus extracted from sandy soils (91-92% sand) by sieving and centrifugation were only 40-55% of those extracted by sieving and incubation on a Baermann tray. Residues normally discarded at each step of the sieving plus Baermann tray extraction procedure were examined for nematodes to obtain estimates of extraction efficiencies. For third-stage and fourth-stage juveniles, males, and females, estimates of extraction efficiency ranged from 60 to 65% in one experiment and 73 to 82% in another. Estimated extraction efficiencies for second-stage juveniles were lower (33% in one experiment, 67% in another) due to losses during sieving. When sterilized soil was seeded with known numbers of B. longicaudatus, 60% of second-stage juveniles and 68-76% of other stages were recovered. Most stages of B. longicaudatus could be extracted from these soils by sieving plus Baermann incubation with an efficiency of 60-70%.

  14. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  15. "Sydney sandstone": Heritage Stone from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Barry; Kramar, Sabina

    2014-05-01

    Sydney is Australia's oldest city being founded in 1788. The city was fortunate to be established on an extensive and a relatively undeformed layer of lithified quartz sandstone of Triassic age that has proved to be an ideal building stone. The stone has been long identified by geologists as the Hawkesbury Sandstone. On the other hand the term "Sydney sandstone" has also been widely used over a long period, even to the extent of being utilised as the title of published books, so its formal designation as a heritage stone will immediately formalise this term. The oldest international usage is believed to be its use in the construction of the Stone Store at Kerikeri, New Zealand (1832-1836). In the late 19th century, public buildings such as hospitals, court houses as well as the prominent Sydney Town Hall, Sydney General Post Office, Art Gallery of New South Wales, State Library of New South Wales as well as numerous schools, churches, office building buildings, University, hotels, houses, retaining walls were all constructed using Sydney sandstone. Innumerable sculptures utilising the gold-coloured stone also embellished the city ranging from decorative friezes and capitals on building to significant monuments. Also in the late 19th and early 20th century, Sydney sandstone was used for major construction in most other major Australian cities especially Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane to the extent that complaints were expressed that suitable local stone materials were being neglected. Quarrying of Sydney sandstone continues today. In 2000 it was recorded noted that there were 33 significant operating Sydney sandstone quarries including aggregate and dimension stone operations. In addition sandstone continues to be sourced today from construction sites across the city area. Today major dimension stone producers (eg Gosford Quarries) sell Sydney sandstone not only into the Sydney market but also on national and international markets as cladding and paving products

  16. Mitigation of Liquefaction in Sandy Soils Using Stone Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Levent; Kayabalı, Kamil

    2010-05-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the leading causes of earthquake-induced damage to structures. Soil improvement methods provide effective solutions to reduce the risk of soil liquefaction. Thus, soil ground treatments are applied using various techniques. However, except for a few ground treatment methods, they generally require a high cost and a lot of time. Especially in order to prevent the risk of soil liquefaction, stone columns conctructed by vibro-systems (vibro-compaction, vibro-replacement) are one of the traditional geotechnical methods. The construction of stone columns not only enhances the ability of clean sand to drain excess pore water during an earthquake, but also increases the relative density of the soil. Thus, this application prevents the development of the excess pore water pressure in sand during earthquakes and keeps the pore pressure ratio below a certain value. This paper presents the stone column methods used against soil liquefaction in detail. At this stage, (a) the performances of the stone columns were investigated in different spacing and diameters of columns during past earthquakes, (b) recent studies about design and field applications of stone columns were presented, and (c) a new design method considering the relative density of soil and the capacity of drenage of columns were explained in sandy soil. Furthermore, with this new method, earthquake performances of the stone columns constructed at different areas were investigated before the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1994 Northbridge earthquakes, as case histories of field applications, and design charts were compiled for suitable spacing and diameters of stone columns with consideration to the different sandy soil parameters and earhquake conditions. Key Words: Soil improvement, stone column, excess pore water pressure

  17. Early Pliocene Hiatus in Sand Output by the Colorado River: Evidence From Marine Deposits in the Salton Trough, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, R. J.; Bykerk-Kauffman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Early Pliocene deposits in the western Salton Trough preserve a high-fidelity record of sediment dispersal into the marine realm during initiation and early evolution of the Colorado River (CR). Grain-size fractionation, sediment routing, and transport dynamics of the early CR delta are recorded in sediments of the Fish Creek - Vallecito basin, which was located ~100 km south of Yuma along the transform plate boundary at 5 Ma. Early Pliocene delivery of CR sand to the basin took place in two distinct pulses: (1) deposition of sandy turbidites (Wind Caves Mbr of the Latrania Fm) in a restricted submarine canyon at Split Mt Gorge between ~5.3 and 5.1 Ma; and (2) progradation of a thick, widespread, coarsening-up deltaic sequence of marine mudstone, sandstone, and coquinas (Deguynos Fm) between ~4.8 and 4.2 Ma. Estimated flux of CR sediment during Wind Caves deposition was weak (~3-5 Mt/yr) compared to the long-term average (172±64 Mt/yr). The two pulses of CR sand input are separated by the Coyote Clay (CC, ~5.1-4.8 Ma), a regionally correlable, greenish-yellow-weathering marine claystone unit at the base of the Deguynos Fm. CC gradationally overlies Wind Caves turbidites in the area of the paleocanyon. In contrast, in the Coyote Mts 15-23 km to the south and SE, CC rests on coarse-grained locally-derived late Miocene sedimentary rocks, Alverson volcanics, and metamorphic basement rock along a regional unconformity. Identical claystone facies occur in the NW Indio Hills (restores to Yuma at the mouth of the CR at 5 Ma), and Sierra Cucapa in Mexico (~200 km south of Yuma at 5 Ma). Marine localities outside of the Wind Caves paleocanyon experienced slow to negligible sedimentation along a rugged rocky shoreline until abrupt arrival of CR-derived clay. CC accumulated in a sand-starved, pro-delta marine setting (Winker, 1987) over an inferred N-S distance of ~200 km. We therefore reject an alternate hypothesis that CC accumulated on the muddy slope of the prograding CR

  18. Preliminary reconstruction of the desert and sandy land distributions in China since the last interglacial period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Huizhong; SU; Zhizhu; YANG; Ping; DONG; Guangrong

    2004-01-01

    The desert and sandy land are the products of arid climate. The spatial distribution of modern deserts and sandy land in China and their relation to climate show following characteristics: arid and hyper-arid desert zones, at isohyet of less than 200 mm, are dominated by mobile dunes; semi-arid steppe and arid desert steppe with the precipitation between 200-400mm, are dominated by semi-fixed and fixed sand dunes; the precipitation of sub-humid forest grassland and humid forest zones with scattered fixed sand land is higher than 400 mm. With this as reference, in combination with considerable amount of paleoclimatic data in desert regions and adjacent regions, the distributions of desert and sandy land in China during the last interglacial period, the last glacial maximum (LGM), and the Holocene megathermal, were preliminarily reconstructed. The results compared with that of today show that the distribution of desert and sandy land in China was greatly dwindled during last interglacial period, and the mobile dune area was about two-thirds of that of today's, but greatly expanded during LGM. However, the dwindling area of desert and sandy land in the Holocene megathermal was smaller than that in the last interglacial period. The forcing mechanism was mainly related to the changes of East Asian winter and summer monsoon, south-northward swing of the westerlies and the variations of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau monsoon intensity caused by global climate changes during the cold and warm intervals since the last interglacial period.

  19. PHYSICAL MODELING OF ODOMETRIC COMPRESSION OF SAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyashenko P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The odometric compression of sand with constant rate of loading (CRL or constant rate of deformation (CRD and continuous registration of the corresponding reaction allows to identify the effect of stepwise changes of deformation (at the CRL and the power reaction (at the CRD. Physical modeling of compression on the sandy model showed the same effect. The physical model was made of fine sand with marks, mimicking large inclusions. Compression of the soil at the CRD was uneven, stepwise, and the strain rate of the upper boundary of the sandy model changed cyclically. Maximum amplitudes of cycles passed through a maximum. Inside of the sand model, the uneven strain resulted in the mutual displacement of the adjacent parts located at the same depth. The growth of external pressure, the marks showed an increase or decrease in displacement and even move opposite to the direction of movement (settlement the upper boundary of the model ‒ "floating" of marks. Marks, at different depths, got at the same time different movements, including mutually contradictory. The mark settlements sudden growth when the sufficiently large pressure. These increments in settlements remained until the end of loading decreasing with depth. They were a confirmation of the hypothesis about the total destruction of the soil sample at a pressure of "structural strength". The hypothesis of the "floating" reason based on the obvious assumption that the marks are moved together with the surrounding sand. The explanation of the effect of "floating" is supported by the fact that the value of "floating" the more, the greater the depth

  20. Origin of modern quartzarenite beach sands in a temperate climate, Florida and Alabama, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehring, Joseph L.; McBride, Earle F.

    2007-10-01

    Quartzarenite coastal sands extending from eastern Louisiana eastward to Apalachee Bay, Florida, are anomalous: their position 7° north of the Tropic of Cancer contrasts with most other known modern quartzarenites, most of which are in a tropical setting. To determine the origin of these quartzarenite beach sands, we compared the mineralogy of samples taken from Alabama and Florida beaches, rivers that supply sand to the coast, and well cuttings representative of sandstone bedrock exposed in the Alabama coastal plain. To help assess the abundance of recycled quartz, and accepting the conventional wisdom that rounded sand-size quartz grains are recycled, we quantified the roundness of quartz grains in thin sections of river, beach, and well samples. We also determined the abundance of recycled grains with authigenic quartz using cathodoluminescence. River sands on Precambrian and Paleozoic bedrock in the study area have subarkose and sublitharenite compositions. However, as far as 200 km inland from the coast, river sands have attained quartzarenite composition and all rivers are presently delivering sand with at least 97% quartz to the coast. Rivers develop quartzarenite sand composition where they traverse poorly consolidated Tertiary sandstones, all of which we sampled are composed of > 95% quartz. Published experimental work indicates that abrasional rounding of sand-size quartz by rivers is insignificant and rounding in beaches is extremely slow. Hence, the abundance of quartz grains with some degree of rounding (96% for beaches; > 75% for rivers) further attests to the abundance of recycled quartz.

  1. Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic) reservoir sandstones in the Witch Ground Graben, U. K. North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harker, S.D. (Occidental Petroleum (Caledonia) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)); Mantel, K.A. (Narwhal, London (United Kingdom)); Morton, D.J. (Deminex U.K. Oil and Gas Ltd., London (United Kingdom)); Riley, L.A. (Paleoservices, Watford (United Kingdom))

    1991-03-01

    Oil-bearing Late Jurassic Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sandstones of the Sgiath and Piper formations are of major economic importance in the Witch Ground Graben. They form the reservoirs in Scott, which in 1993 will be the largest producing North Sea oil field to come on stream for more than a decade. Together with Scott, the Piper, Saltire, Tartan, Highlander, Petronella, Rob Roy, and Ivanhoe fields contained almost 2 Bbbl of recoverable reserves in these formations. The Sgiath and Piper represent two phases of Late Jurassic transgression and regression, initially represented by paralic deposited sand culminating in a wave-dominated delta sequence. The history of the Sgiath and Piper formations is reviewed and lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic correlations presented to illustrate the distribution of the reservoir sandstones.

  2. Sandstone composition and provenance of the Rotliegend of the NE German Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Tommy

    1998-03-01

    The NE German Basin contains an approximately 2.5 km thick Rotliegend sedimentary section, subdivided into 4 formations. These were, deposited following the cessation of the Late Carboniferous/Early Permian volcanic episode and a ca. 20 Ma period of erosion and non-deposition. Initial deposition was confined to two areas, but with increasing thermal subsidence the basin extended to the south. Petrographic (190 sandstones) and geochemical (48 sandstones and mudstones) analyses suggested that the sands are quartz-rich and are derived largely from cratonic or recycled sources. Volcanic and sedimentary rock fragments form most of the labile grains. The succession was deposited in a relatively stable tectonic environment with sediment input derived largely from the lower and upper Palaeozoic strata of the Variscan hinterland and the Upper Carboniferous and Lower Permian volcanics. Volcanic input increases with younger stratigraphic units. This is interpreted as resulting from the unroofing of a more basic source.

  3. IMPLEMENTASI SANDI HILL UNTUK PENYANDIAN CITRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JJ Siang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hill's code is one of text encoding technique. In this research, Hill's code is extended to image encoding. The image used is BMP 24 bit format. 2x2 and 3x3 matrices is used as a key. The results show that Hill's code is suitable for image whose RGB values vary highly. On the contrary, it is not suitable for less varied RGB images since its original pattern is still persisted in encrypted image. Hill's code for image encoding has also disadvantage in the case that the key matrix is not unique. However, for daily application, with good key matrix, Hill's code can be applied to encode image since it's process only deals with simple matrix operation so it become fast. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Sandi Hill merupakan salah satu teknik penyandian teks. Dalam penelitian ini, pemakaian sandi Hill diperluas dari teks ke citra bertipe BMP 24 bit. Matriks yang dipakai berordo 2x2 dan 3x3. Hasil percobaan menunjukkan bahwa sandi Hill cocok untuk enkripsi citra dengan variasi nilai RGB antar piksel berdekatan yang tinggi (seperti foto, tapi tidak cocok untuk citra dengan variasi nilai RGB yang rendah (seperti gambar kartun karena pola citra asli masih tampak dalam citra sandi. Sandi Hill juga memiliki kelemahan dalam hal tidak tunggalnya matriks kunci yang dapat dipakai. Akan tetapi untuk pemakaian biasa, dengan pemilihan matriks kunci yang baik, sandi Hill dapat dipakai untuk penyandian karena hanya melibatkan operasi matriks biasa sehingga prosesnya relatif cepat. Kata kunci: Sandi Hill, Citra, Relatif Prima.

  4. Seed mucilage improves seedling emergence of a sand desert shrub.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Yang

    Full Text Available The success of seedling establishment of desert plants is determined by seedling emergence response to an unpredictable precipitation regime. Sand burial is a crucial and frequent environmental stress that impacts seedling establishment on sand dunes. However, little is known about the ecological role of seed mucilage in seedling emergence in arid sandy environments. We hypothesized that seed mucilage enhances seedling emergence in a low precipitation regime and under conditions of sand burial. In a greenhouse experiment, two types of Artemisia sphaerocephala achenes (intact and demucilaged were exposed to different combinations of burial depth (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 mm and irrigation regimes (low, medium and high, which simulated the precipitation amount and frequency in May, June and July in the natural habitat, respectively. Seedling emergence increased with increasing irrigation. It was highest at 5 mm sand burial depth and ceased at burial depths greater than 20 mm in all irrigation regimes. Mucilage significantly enhanced seedling emergence at 0, 5 and 10 mm burial depths in low irrigation, at 0 and 5 mm burial depths in medium irrigation and at 0 and 10 mm burial depths in high irrigation. Seed mucilage also reduced seedling mortality at the shallow sand burial depths. Moreover, mucilage significantly affected seedling emergence time and quiescence and dormancy percentages. Our findings suggest that seed mucilage plays an ecologically important role in successful seedling establishment of A. sphaerocephala by improving seedling emergence and reducing seedling mortality in stressful habitats of the sandy desert environment.

  5. 白云凹陷珠江组深水扇砂质碎屑流沉积学特征%Depositional Features of Sandy Debris Flow of Submarine Fan in Zhujiang Formation,Baiyun Sag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑荣才; 李云; 戴朝成; 高博禹; 胡晓庆; 王昌勇

    2012-01-01

    珠江口盆地白云凹陷深海水域的珠江组为油气勘探开发新领域,但珠江组厚层块状砂岩储层的成因仍存在很大争议.通过对砂岩储层的物质组分、沉积构造、粒度分布、古地形和古构造背景及地震与测井等资料的综合分析;确定白云凹陷珠江组属于深水扇沉积体系,扇体中广泛发育的厚层块状砂岩为深水扇沉积体系中内—中扇水道的砂质碎屑流沉积充填物.在详细描述砂质碎屑流沉积学特征和识别标志的基础上,确定砂质碎屑流与低位期陆架边缘三角洲前缘砂体与海平面大幅度下降期的某种触发机制作用下发生的重力滑塌和砂崩有关,具备“源-渠-汇”耦合关系的深水扇沉积模式.%The deep-water Zhujiang Formation in Baiyun sag of Pearl River Mouth basin has been a new area for hydrocarbon exploration and development, but there is still much controversy about the genesis of massive sandstone reservoirs. Based on comprehensive analysis of composition, sedimentary structures, grain size distribution, ancient topography as well as seismic and logging data, the Zhujiang Formation was deposited by submarine fan system, and a wide range of thick massive sandstoneswere products of sandy debris flow filling withininner-middle fan channels. According to detailed features and identification signs, the sandy debris flow was related to gravitational slump and sand collapse of sandbodies from the shelf edge delta front triggered by certainmechanism duringsignificant sea-level falling, and then the "Source-Drainage-Sink" coupling model of sandy debris flow deposits in submarine fan was set up.

  6. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  7. Age of the Bedford Shale, Berea Sandstone, and Sunbury Shale in the Appalachian and Michigan basins, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witt, Wallace

    1970-01-01

    The suggestion by Sanford (1967, p. 994) that the Bedford Shale, Berea Sandstone, and Sunbury Shale of the Michigan basin are of Late Devonian age because these strata contain Hymenozonotriletes lepidophytus Kedo is invalid for these formations in the Appalachian basin, the area of their type localities. Endosporites lacunosus Winslow, a synonym of Hymenozonotriletes lepidophytus Kedo, occurs in upper Chautauqua (Upper Devonian) rocks through much of the Kinderhook (Lower Mississippian) strata in Ohio. The Sunbury Shale, the Sunbury Member of the Orangeville Shale in part of northern Ohio, contains a Siplionodella fauna which clearly demonstrates the Kinderhook age of the unit. The basal strata of the Bedford Shale contain Spathoffnathodus anteposlcornis which suggests a very Late Devonian or very Early Mississippian age for this part of the Bedford. Except for the basal fossil zone, most of the Bedford Shale and the younger Berea Sandstone overlie the Murrysville sand, which along the Allegheny Front in central Pennsylvania contains an Adiantites flora of Early Mississippian (Kinderhook) age. The presence of Adiantites in the Murrysville sand indicates that most of the Bedford Shale and all the Berea Sandstone are of Early Mississippian age. Lithostratigraphic evidence suggests that the Berea Sandstone of Ohio may be a temporal equivalent of the basal Beckville Member of the Pocono Formation of the Anthracite region of Pennsylvania. The clearly demonstrable Kinderhook age of the Sunbury, Berea, and most of the Bedford in the Appalachian basin strongly indicates a similar age for the same units in the Michigan basin.

  8. Giant weathering pits in the Entrada Sandstone, southeastern Utah: Preliminary findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netoff, D.I. (Sam Houston State Univ., Huntsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Geography and Geology); Shroba, R.R. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Giant weathering pits formed in outcrops of the lower Entrada Sandstone slickrock of Jurassic age are present in two areas in the Glen Canyon region of arid southeastern Utah. The pits are far larger than any previously described in the geologic literature. The pits near Cookie Jar Butte are commonly cylindrical, typically have low width-to-depth ratios (1.5--3.6), and have a depth of closure of as much as 18 m. There are no obvious lithologic or structural controls that determine their shape or location. Many of the pits at Rock Creek Bay are elongate; several of them have long axes in excess of 53 m, and the longest one is 74 m. Many of the pit walls are breached at the top, and the depth of closure is generally less than 6 m. The shapes of these pits are influenced by point orientation and pit coalescence. Thin-section analyses of near-surface sandstone cores taken near Cookie Jar Butte from pit walls, floors, and rims reveal no significant diagenetic alteration of the fine-grained to very fine frained quartzose sandstone (quartz arenite). Quartz grains appear fresh, and feldspar grains are only slightly weathered. The cement between the grains is mostly CaCO[sub 3]. In several of the pits in both areas sandy sediment veneers the bedrock floor. This sediment is similar in character to the adjacent sandstone and is probably locally derived. Possible origins of the giant pits include various physical, chemical, and biological weathering processes that initiate pit development, followed by excavation by plunge-pool action, wind deflation, dissolution, and piping. Preliminary field and laboratory data do not clearly identify and single process of group of processes that account for pit development.

  9. Strengthening the face zone of a well with tar-sandstone mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazlov, M.N.; Maslov, I.I.; Shved, G.M.; Fisenko, N.T.

    1978-01-01

    Results are given for laboratory studies and the industrial introduction of a new technique of strengthening loose sands of the facing zone of wells of horizon IV of the Anastas-Troits field with tar-sand mixtures. The producing zone of the fourth horizon was subjected to significant breaks at very small depressions whose intensity fluctuated in time, depending on the fluid yield, and increased sharply as the flooding of the well increased. A description is given of the new technique, based on laboratory studies and pilot-industrial tests, that provides for the preparation of an assigned permeability on the surface of the tar-sand mixture that is determined by an applied graph. This mixture is pumped into the face zone to create a blocking debris cone of ring sand along the entire stripped layer. When the tar-sand mixture hardens in the face zone a matrix is formed that has the necessary permeability and sufficient hardness to prevent the destruction of the bed. A basic arrangement is shown for binding the aggregate with the well opening for placing the tar-sand filter and the sequence of the operations. The tar-sand filter is installed in 30 minutes. This technique was used to strengthen the face zone of 50 wells in 1977. The positive results of strengthening the loose sand of the face zone are: the prevention of the formation of sandy samples and the continuous operation of the wells; a longer inter-service operating period of the wells; an increase in the pressure on the opening of most wells as a result of the lower water content in the recovered fluid, and a reduction in the expenditure of tar.

  10. Effect of pore-size distribution on the collapse behaviour of anthropogenic sandy soil deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baille Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the former open-pit mines of the Lusatian region in Germany, several liquefaction events have occurred during the recent years in the anthropogenic deposits made of very loose sandy soils. These events are related to the rising ground water table after the stop of controlled ground water lowering. The very loose state is due to the formation of sand aggregates (pseudo-grains during the deposition process. The pseudo-grains enclose larger voids of dimension greater than the single sand grain. Wetting induced collapse of the pseudo-grains is presumed to be one of the possible mechanisms triggering liquefaction. In the present study, the effect of larger voids on the wetting induced deformation behaviour of sandy soils is experimentally investigated by laboratory box tests. The deformation field in the sample during wetting was measured using Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique. The results show that the observed deformations are affected by the pore size distribution, thus the amount of voids between the pseudo-grains (macro-void ratio and the voids inside the pseudo-grains (matrix void ratio. The global void ratio of a sandy soil is not sufficient as single state parameter, but the pore size distribution has to be taken into account, experimentally as well as in modelling.

  11. EAARL Coastal Topography-Sandy Hook 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface/bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey...

  12. Heterotrophic bacterial populations in tropical sandy beaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Distribution pattern of heterotrophic bacterial flora of three sandy beaches of the west coast of India was studied. The population in these beaches was microbiologically different. Population peaks of halotolerant and limnotolerant forms were...

  13. Comparative study on microphytobenthic pigments of muddy and sandy intertidal sediments of the Tagus estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartaxana, P.; Mendes, C. R.; van Leeuwe, M. A.; Brotas, V.

    2006-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of microphytobenthic pigments determined by HPLC (chlorophylls and carotenoids) were compared between muddy and sandy sediments of the Tagus estuary (Portugal). In the two types of sediment, with similar periods of illuminated emersion, chlorophyll a concentrations on a per area basis (mg m -2) were comparable (down to 2 mm). Pigment analysis also revealed similar microphytobenthic communities in terms of algal classes. Diatoms were the dominant microalgae, but cyanophytes, euglenophytes and phanerogam debris were also present. For both muddy and sandy sediments, microphytobenthic biomass showed a high level of variability both within and between two consecutive years. Microphytobenthos was highly stratified in the mud, with most of the chlorophyll a occurring in the top 500 μm. In the sand, relatively constant concentrations were found throughout the sediment profile down to 3 mm. This is probably related to deeper light penetration in sandy sediment and/or increased physical mixing caused by invertebrate activity or overlying currents, leading to the burial of an important fraction of the microphytobenthic cells. Differences observed in the intensity of sediment coloration of muddy and sandy sediments might have resulted from the different vertical distribution of benthic biomass.

  14. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Špirutová; J. Beňo; V. Bednářová; J. Kříž; M. Kandrnál

    2012-01-01

    Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron) are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this co...

  15. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  16. Impact Metamorphism of Sandstones at Amguid Crater, Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoui, R.; Belhai, D.

    2016-08-01

    Amguid is a 450 m diameter sample crater; it is emplaced in Lower Devonian sandstones.We have carried out a petrographic study in order to investigate shock effects recorded in these sandstones and define shock stages in Amguid.

  17. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  18. Laboratory investigation on streaming potential for sandy soil and weathered rock; Shitsunai jikken ni yoru sashitsu jiban oyobi fuka ganban no ryudo den`i no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H.; Shima, H. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Laboratory experiment on sandy soil and weathered rock was conducted to clarify the generation mechanism of streaming potential due to underground fluid. Streaming potential is caused by underground fluid flow, namely by fluid flow in porous substances as electrokinetic phenomenon. In experiment, Inagi sand, Toyoura sand and strongly decomposed weathered granite were used. In Inagi and Toyoura sands, positive streaming potential was observed downstream in fluid flow. Streaming potential could be nearly determined as primary function of fluid velocity, and generated streaming potential increased with fluid resistivity. Streaming potential was higher in Inagi sand than Toyoura sand, probably depending on hydraulic radius, size of bleeding channel, and conductivity of sand surface. In weathered granite, negative streaming potential was measured. In the case of positive {zeta} potential, negative streaming potential is theoretically generated downstream in fluid flow. This experiment suggested possible generation of negative streaming potential in some kinds of ground. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Fractures and stresses in Bone Spring sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, J.C.; Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Northrop, D.A.

    1990-09-01

    This project is a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and Harvey E. Yates Company being conducted under the auspices of the Oil Recovery Technology Partnership. The project seeks to apply perspectives related to the effects of natural fractures, stress, and sedimentology to the simulation and production of low-permeability gas reservoirs to low-permeability oil reservoirs as typified by the Bone Spring sandstones of the Permian Basin, southeast New Mexico. This report presents the results and analysis obtained in 1989 from 233 ft of oriented core, comprehensive suite of logs, various in situ stress measurements, and detailed well tests conducted in conjunction with the drilling of two development wells. Natural fractures were observed in core and logs in the interbed carbonates, but there was no direct evidence of fractures in the sandstones. However, production tests of the sandstones indicated permeabilities and behavior typical of a dual porosity reservoir. A general northeast trend for the maximum principal horizontal stress was observed in an elastic strain recovery measurements and in strikes of drilling-induced fractures; this direction is subparallel to the principal fracture trend observed in the interbed carbonates. Many of the results presented are believed to be new information for the Bone Spring sandstones. 57 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Intertidal benthic community ecology of sand-dwelling macroinvertebrates of Goa beaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Harkantra, S.N.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Studies on the intertidal ecology of two sandy beaches of Goa along the western coast of India revealed the presence of 47 species of macroinvertebrates belonging to 32 families. The open beach at Candolim, characterized by coarse sand-grain size...

  1. Introduction to special section on marine sand wave and river dune dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Dohmen-Janssen, C. Marjolein

    2005-01-01

    Marine sand waves and river dunes are rhythmic patterns, formed at the interface between a sandy bed and turbulent flows, driven by tidal and river currents. Their origin, development, and dynamics are far from being fully understood. To enhance the discussion on this topic we organized the internat

  2. Enhanced benthic activity in sandy sublittoral sediments: Evidence from 13C tracer experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bühring, Solveig I.; Ehrenhauss, Sandra; Kamp, Anja

    2006-01-01

    investigated the pathway of settling particulate organic carbon through the benthic food web. The diatom Ditylum brightwellii was labelled with the stable carbon isotope 13C and injected into incubation chambers. On-board incubations lasted 12, 30 and 132 h, while the in situ experiment was incubated for 32 h......In situ and on-board pulse-chase experiments were carried out on a sublittoral fine sand in the German Bight (southern North Sea) to investigate the hypothesis that sandy sediments are highly active and have fast turnover rates. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments where we....... The study revealed a stepwise short-term processing of a phytoplankton bloom settling on a sandy sediment. After the 12 h incubation, the largest fraction of recovered carbon was in the bacteria (62%), but after longer incubation times (30 and 32 h in situ) the macrofauna gained more importance (15 and 48...

  3. The effect of very low water content on the complex dielectric permittivity of clays, sand-clay and sand rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, T. A.; Bobrov, P. P.; Kroshka, E. S.; Lapina, A. S.; Rodionova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    The results of measurements of complex relative permittivity of bentonite and clayey sandstone with different degrees of salinity with low moisture are given in the range of temperatures -20° to  +105 °C at frequencies from 25 Hz to 1 GHz. It is shown, that even a small amount of water in sandy and sandy-argillaceous rocks causes an increase of the real part of complex relative permittivity at frequencies below 100 Hz. The explanation by linearly-broken dependence of refractive index on moisture is given at its small values. By a dielectric method it is shown that in the process of water film formation on the surface of a mineral, the water molecules binding energy changes. Big distinctions in low-frequency dielectric relaxation times testify to the change of binding energy of molecules of water on the surface of a mineral. Also dependences of relaxation times on temperature are various. The results of dielectric measurements showed a strong influence of the salt on the dielectric permittivity of the clay and clayey sandstone even at a low moisture level.

  4. Considering temperature dependence of thermo-physical properties of sandy soils in two scenarios of oil pollution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aleksey V.Malyshev; Anatoly M.Timofeev

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the heat conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of sandy soil contaminated in two scenarios of oil pollu tion, and also determined the temperature dependencies of these changed thermophysical properties. In the first pollution scenario, the oil product was introduced into wet river sand, and in the second case, dry sand was contaminated by the oil product and was then moistened with water. By considering these two scenarios as multicomponent dispersion systems with varying degrees of contamination and humidity, and by using a polystructural granular model with pore spaces and closed inclusions, we calculated that the heat conductivity of the sandy soil increased under the first pollution scenario and decreased under the second, but the change in the volumetric heat capacity of the sandy soil was proportional only to the amount of oil pollution, not the manner in which it was introduced. We also determined the temperature dependencies of these two thermophysical properties of sandy soil when polluted by oil, of which information will be useful for future containment and remediation of oil contaminated soil.

  5. Plant functional diversity enhances associations of soil fungal diversity with vegetation and soil in the restoration of semiarid sandy grassland

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Xiaoan; Wang, Shaokun; Lv, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhang, Tonghui; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The trait‐based approach shows that plant functional diversity strongly affects ecosystem properties. However, few empirical studies show the relationship between soil fungal diversity and plant functional diversity in natural ecosystems. We investigated soil fungal diversity along a restoration gradient of sandy grassland (mobile dune, semifixed dune, fixed dune, and grassland) in Horqin Sand Land, northern China, using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 18S rRNA and gen...

  6. Caracterização e classificação de solos desenvolvidos de arenitos da formação Aquidauana-MS Characterization and classification of soils developed from sandstone of the Aquidauana formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolimar Antonio Schiavo

    2010-06-01

    sandstones. Four soils profiles along a representative toposequence of gentle slopes were sampled and studied. The profiles were located on the shoulder (P1, backslope (P2, footslope ( P3 and toeslope (P4. The soil profiles were morphologically described and physical and chemical properties of their horizons evaluated. The sand fraction was predominant in all profiles (> 680 g kg-1, with textures ranging from sandy loam (P4 to clay sandy loam. The water pH values ranged from 4.2 to 6.5. The cation exchange capacity values ranged from 1.6 cmol c kg-1(in P4 to 10.3 cmol c kg-1 (in P2, with a predominance of hydrogen ions in P1 and P4, and calcium in profile P2 and P3. The P1 and P4 pedons were dystrophic, whereas in P2 and P3, a high base saturation status evidenced an eutrophic character. Except in P2, the profiles presented low activity clays. In all soil profiles the morphological, physical, chemical and mineralogical properties were conditioned by the parent material and relief, demonstrating the influence of these factors on the pedogenesis.

  7. Penetration grouting reinforcement of sandy gravel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; PENG Zhen-bin; TANG Yi-qun; PENG Wen-xiang; HE Zhong-ming

    2008-01-01

    To study the relationship between grouting effect and grouting factors, three factors (seven parameters) directionless pressure and small cycle grouting model experiment on sandy gravel was done, which was designed according to uniform design method. And regressing was applied to analysis of the test data. The two models test results indicate that when the diffusing radius of grout changes from 26 to 51 era, the grouted sandy gravel compressing strength changes fTom 2.13 to 12.30 MPa; the relationship between diffusing radius(R) and water cement ratio(m), permeability coefficient(k), grouting pressure(p), grouting time(t) is R=19.953m0.121k0.429p0.412t0.437, the relationship between compressing strength(P) and porosity(n), water cement ratio, grouting pressure, grouting time is P=0.984n0.517m-1.488p0.118t0.031.So the porosity of sandy gravel, the permeability coefficient of sandy gravel, grouting pressure, grouting time, water cement ratio are main factors to influence the grouting effect. The grouting pressure is the main factor to influence grouting diffusing radius, and the water cement ratio is the main factor to influence grouted sandy gravel compressing strength.

  8. Glider observations and modeling of sediment transport in Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Travis; Seroka, Greg; Kohut, Josh; Schofield, Oscar; Glenn, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Regional sediment resuspension and transport are examined as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) in October 2012. A Teledyne-Webb Slocum glider, equipped with a Nortek Aquadopp current profiler, was deployed on the continental shelf ahead of the storm, and is used to validate sediment transport routines coupled to the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The glider was deployed on 25 October, 5 days before Sandy made landfall in southern New Jersey (NJ) and flew along the 40 m isobath south of the Hudson Shelf Valley. We used optical and acoustic backscatter to compare with two modeled size classes along the glider track, 0.1 and 0.4 mm sand, respectively. Observations and modeling revealed full water column resuspension for both size classes for over 24 h during peak waves and currents, with transport oriented along-shelf toward the southwest. Regional model predictions showed over 3 cm of sediment eroded on the northern portion of the NJ shelf where waves and currents were the highest. As the storm passed and winds reversed from onshore to offshore on the southern portion of the domain waves and subsequently orbital velocities necessary for resuspension were reduced leading to over 3 cm of deposition across the entire shelf, just north of Delaware Bay. This study highlights the utility of gliders as a new asset in support of the development and verification of regional sediment resuspension and transport models, particularly during large tropical and extratropical cyclones when in situ data sets are not readily available.

  9. High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

  10. Numerical analysis of solid–liquidtwo-phase turbulent flow in Francis turbine runner with splitter bladesin sandy water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Hong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available As the key component of a hydroelectric power generation system, hydraulic turbine plays a decisive role in the overall performance of the system. There are many sandy rivers in the world, and turbines working in these rivers are seriously damaged. Therefore, the research of flow in sandy water has great theoretical significance and practical value. Based on the specific hydrological conditions of a hydropower station, the solid–liquid two-phase flow in the whole flow passage of a Francis turbine with splitter blades in sandy water was numerically studied. A geometric model of the whole flow passage of the Francis turbine was established on the basis of given design parameters. The solid–liquid two-phase turbulent flows in Francis turbine runner under three different loads were numerically analyzed by using this model. The three different loads are as follows: Condition 1: single unit with 1/4 load, Condition 2: single unit with 1/2 load, and Condition 3: single unit with full load. The distributions of pressure and sand concentration on the leading side and the suction side of the runner blades, as well as the velocity vector distribution of water and sand on the horizontal section of the runner, were obtained under different load conditions. Therefore, the damages to various flow passage components by sand can be qualitatively predicated under various conditions. To guarantee the safety and stability of the unit, the adverse conditions shall be avoided, which can provide certain reference for plant operation.

  11. Effect of the coastal conservation due to beach nourishment of Totori sand dune coast

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Shibutani; Matsubara, Y.; Kuroiwa, M.

    2013-01-01

    Tottori Sand Dune Coast located at western part of Japan is a sandy beach with a length about 8km facing Sea of Japan. The coast has been eroded starting around 1940s and the beach nourishment project has been carried out to restore the shoreline since 2005 at Tottori Sand Dune Coast. In the project, the deposition sands at port and river mouth were transported to the erosional area and injected in the region of the offshore erosional area and the backshore area and the total volumes of the s...

  12. Implications of Fecal Bacteria Input from Latrine-Polluted Ponds for Wells in Sandy Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappett, Peter S. K.; McKay, Larry D.; Layton, Alice; Williams, Daniel E.; Alam, Md. J.; Huq, Md. R.; Mey, Jacob; Feighery, John E.; Culligan, Patricia J.; Mailloux, Brian J.; Zhuang, Jie; Escamilla, Veronica; Emch, Michael; Perfect, Edmund; Sayler, Gary S.; Ahmed, Kazi M.; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Ponds receiving latrine effluents may serve as sources of fecal contamination to shallow aquifers tapped by millions of tube-wells in Bangladesh. To test this hypothesis, transects of monitoring wells radiating away from four ponds were installed in a shallow sandy aquifer underlying a densely populated village and monitored for 14 months. Two of the ponds extended to medium sand. Another pond was sited within silty sand and the last in silt. The fecal indicator bacterium E. coli was rarely detected along the transects during the dry season and was only detected near the ponds extending to medium sand up to 7 m away during the monsoon. A log-linear decline in E. coli and Bacteroidales concentrations with distance along the transects in the early monsoon indicates that ponds excavated in medium sand were the likely source of contamination. Spatial removal rates ranged from 0.5-1.3 log10/m. After the ponds were artificially filled with groundwater to simulate the impact of a rain storm, E. coli levels increased near a pond recently excavated in medium sand, but no others. These observations show that adjacent sediment grain-size and how recently a pond was excavated influence how much fecal contamination ponds receiving latrine effluents contribute to neighboring groundwater. PMID:22191430

  13. Implications of fecal bacteria input from latrine-polluted ponds for wells in sandy aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappett, Peter S K; McKay, Larry D; Layton, Alice; Williams, Daniel E; Alam, Md J; Huq, Md R; Mey, Jacob; Feighery, John E; Culligan, Patricia J; Mailloux, Brian J; Zhuang, Jie; Escamilla, Veronica; Emch, Michael; Perfect, Edmund; Sayler, Gary S; Ahmed, Kazi M; van Geen, Alexander

    2012-02-07

    Ponds receiving latrine effluents may serve as sources of fecal contamination to shallow aquifers tapped by millions of tube-wells in Bangladesh. To test this hypothesis, transects of monitoring wells radiating away from four ponds were installed in a shallow sandy aquifer underlying a densely populated village and monitored for 14 months. Two of the ponds extended to medium sand. Another pond was sited within silty sand and the last in silt. The fecal indicator bacterium E. coli was rarely detected along the transects during the dry season and was only detected near the ponds extending to medium sand up to 7 m away during the monsoon. A log-linear decline in E. coli and Bacteroidales concentrations with distance along the transects in the early monsoon indicates that ponds excavated in medium sand were the likely source of contamination. Spatial removal rates ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 log(10)/m. After the ponds were artificially filled with groundwater to simulate the impact of a rain storm, E. coli levels increased near a pond recently excavated in medium sand, but no others. These observations show that adjacent sediment grain-size and how recently a pond was excavated influence the how much fecal contamination ponds receiving latrine effluents contribute to neighboring groundwater.

  14. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction...... in sand-gravel material, the storage media is to be water satured. In this case, handling of such material on site is rather complex. The conduction is highly dependent on the thermal properties of the storage media and so is the overall thermal performance of a storage applying such media. For sandy...... media no convectional heat transport is found. It would be relevant to extend the investigation to media that enables convectional heat transport. A last conclusion is that such experiments, necessary for proper designing of sand-gravel storage types, are a very cheap form of collecting information...

  15. Pore-scaling Modeling of Physical Property Changes During CO2 Injection into Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keehm, Y.; Yoo, G.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is a green-house gas and is believed to be an important factor in global warming and climate change. Many countries around the world are working on reducing and sequestrating CO2 to follow international regulations. One of promising area for CO2 sequestration is the storage in geological formation. To accurately determine the performance of geological injection and storage, quantification and monitoring of the physical property changes are essential. In this paper, we are presenting a new approach for the monitoring of CO2 sequestration in sandstone using pore-scale simulation techniques. The method consists of three steps: 1) acquisition of high-resolution pore microstructures by X-ray micro-tomography; 2) CO2 injection simulation using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) two-phase flow simulation; and 3) FEM property simulations (electrical and elastic) at different CO2 saturations during the injection. We use three different sandstone samples: sand-pack, Berea sandstone, and B2 sandstone from offshore of Korea. The porosity of the sand-pack is 42% and that of two sandstone samples is around 17%. The digital pore structures were obtained by X-ray micro-tomography with a spatial resolution of 2 micron. The LB two-phase flow simulation is then conducted by injecting CO2 into fully water-saturated samples and gives a realistic movement of CO2 in the pore structure. At each CO2 saturation, electrical and elastic properties are determined by pore-scale FEM simulation techniques. The electrical conductivity decreases almost linearly as CO2 saturations increases; however, the P-wave velocity decrease more rapidly at the low CO2 saturation (up to 30%), than at higher saturation. S-wave velocity does not show any significant changes. The higher porosity rock shows more sensitivity to saturation changes. The modeling shows that we can have quantitative relations between physical properties and CO2 saturation, which can be used to determine injection performance and

  16. Chemical Stablilisation of Sand : Part VIII Furan Resins as Dune and Coastal Sand Stabiliser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal

    1990-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies on furan resin as dune sand stabiliser are presented. Influence of acid catalysts, viz. phenol disulphonic acid, sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid and phosphoric acid and other catalysts, viz. trichlorotoluene and benzoyl chloride along with promoters, zinc chloride and ferric chloride, on the strength of stabilised furan resin-sand specimens has been discussed. Optimisation studies on resin content, catalysts and promoters and curing conditions have revealed that maximum strength of 260 kg/cm/sup 2/ of the standard specimens made by compaction of coastal sand using furan resins (10 per cent, sulphuric acid (9N, 30 per cent and a curing time of 2 hr at 40 degree Centigrade is higher than the 170 kg/cm/sup 2/ of specimens made of Rajasthan desert sand. Sandy patches stabilised by seepage technique recorded a maximum strength of 125 kg/cm/sup 2/. Physico-chemical characteristics of this system and effect of environment on stabilised specimens have also been studied and field trials conducted successfully. This resin-catalyst system would be extremely useful in humid and saline field (coastal areas for different military applications.

  17. Compost amendment of sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.; Razzaghi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand...... and significantly decreased bulk density, with no effect on plant available water compared to the control. Fresh and dry fruit weights were significantly increased after compost addition. Plant height, leaf number, stem diameter, and total biomass did not significantly improve after compost addition. Spent mushroom...

  18. Assessment of physical and chemical indicators of sandy soil quality for sustainable crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiec, Jerzy; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Sandy soils are used in agriculture in many regions of the world. The share of sandy soils in Poland is about 55%. The aim of this study was to assess spatial variability of soil physical and chemical properties affecting soil quality and crop yields in the scale of field (40 x 600 m) during three years of different weather conditions. The experimental field was located on the post glacial and acidified sandy deposits of low productivity (Szaniawy, Podlasie Region, Poland). Physical soil quality indicators included: content of sand, silt, clay and water, bulk density and those chemical: organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, acidity (pH). Measurements of the most soil properties were done at spring and summer each year in topsoil and subsoil layer in 150 points. Crop yields were evaluated in places close to measuring points of the soil properties. Basic statistics including mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis minimal, maximal and correlations between the soil properties and crop yields were calculated. Analysis of spatial dependence and distribution for each property was performed using geostatistical methods. Mathematical functions were fitted to the experimentally derived semivariograms that were used for mapping the soil properties and crop yield by kriging. The results showed that the largest variations had clay content (CV 67%) and the lowest: sand content (5%). The crop yield was most negatively correlated with sand content and most positively with soil water content and cation exchange capacity. In general the exponential semivariogram models fairly good matched to empirical data. The range of semivariogram models of the measured indicators varied from 14 m to 250 m indicate high and moderate spatial variability. The values of the nugget-to-sill+nugget ratios showed that most of the soil properties and crop yields exhibited strong and moderate spatial dependency. The kriging maps allowed identification of low yielding sub-field areas that

  19. Mixed fluvial systems of Messak Sandstone, a deposit of Nubian lithofacies, southwestern Libya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    The Messak Sandstone is a coarse to pebbly, tabular cross-bedded, Lower Cretaceous deposit of the widespread Nubian lithofacies. It was deposited at the northern edge of the Murzuq basin in southwestern Libya. Although the sedimentary record is predominantly one of braided fluvial systems, a common subfacies within the formation is interpreted to record the passage of straight-crested sand waves across laterally migrating point bars in sinuous rivers, similar to the pattern documented by Singh and Kumar on the modern Ganga and Yamuna Rivers. Because the sand waves were larger on the lower parts of the point bars, lateral migration created diagnostic thinning-upward, unidirectional cosets of tabular cross-beds as well as fining-upward, grain-size trends. Common, thick, interbedded claystones, deposited in associated paludal and lacustrine environments, and high variance in cross-bed dispersion patterns also suggest the local presence of sinuous fluvial systems within the overall braided regime. The Messak Sandstone contains some of the features that led Harms et al to propose an unconventional low-sinuosity fluvial environment for the Nubian lithofacies in Egypt, and the continuously high water levels of this model may explain channel-scale clay drapes and overturned cross-beds in the Messak. However, most of the Messak characteristics are incompatible with the low-sinuosity model, suggesting instead that the fluvial channels in the Murzuq basin alternated between braided and high-sinuosity patterns.

  20. The gravel sand transition in a disturbed catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, A. David

    1999-03-01

    More than 40 million cubic metres of mining waste were supplied to the Ringarooma River between 1875 and 1984, leading to successive phases of aggradation and degradation. The natural bed material is gravel but, given the volume of introduced load and the fact that much of the input was less than 5 mm in diameter, the size composition of the bed changed from gravel to sand during the phase of downstream progressive aggradation. A very sharp gravel-sand transition developed in which median grain size decreased from over 30 mm to under 3 mm in less than 500 m. With upstream supplies of mining debris becoming depleted first, degradation followed the same downstream progressive pattern as aggradation, causing the transition to migrate downstream. By 1984, the river could be regarded as a series of zones, each characterized by a particular bed condition: a natural cobble-gravel bed, unaffected by mining inputs (0-32 km); pre-disturbance bed re-exposed by degradation over 35-40 years (32-53 km); sandy substrate with a gravel armour produced by differential transport during degradation (53-65 km); sand dominated but with developing surface patches of coarser material (65-75 km); sandy bed reflecting the size composition of the original mining input (75-118 km). Although the gravel-sand transition itself is sharp, the transitional zone is lengthy (53-75 km). As degradation continues, the gravel-sand transition is expected to progress downstream but it has remained in a stable position for 12 years. Indeed, two major floods during the period released large quantities of sand from the sub-armour layer and newly-formed banks of mine tailings, causing fining both above and below the transition. Surface grain size is an adjustable component in the transitional zone as the river strives to recover from a major anthropogenic disturbance.

  1. Experimental Analysis of Sandstone and Travertine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Doležel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandstone and travertine are sedimentary rocks. The former is clastic, while the latter is sourced by chemical precipitation from hot springs. Their applications in civil engineering structures are mostly influenced by the ability to carry compression loading. A three-point bending experiment is usually used to determine material characteristics. However it does not correspond very well to applicatiosn in structures. For this reason we used a uniaxial compression test to obtain the modulus of elasticity and the stress-strain diagram. To obtain detailed information about the crystalline structure of sandstone and travertine a microscopic analysis wascarried out, using optical microscopy and an EDAX multichannel spectrometer for elementary microanalysis. 

  2. Laboratory Liquefaction Test of Sand Based on Grain Size and Relative Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hakam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquefaction due to strong earthquakes often occurs in sandy soil under low water table conditions with certain physical properties. The physical properties of sandy soil that give effect to liquefaction resistance include grain size and relative density. This paper presents the physical properties of sand soils related to their resistance to vibration. Vibration tests were conducted by using a shaking table. The acceleration and settlement of the samples were recorded during shaking. The tests were conducted with variation of soil density and mean grain size. The test results showed that average grain size and relative density of sand have a unique effect on liquefaction resistance. It can be concluded that there is a density limit with respect to the mean grain size of the sand particles associated with the liquefaction resistance for a certain acceleration.

  3. Electrofacies vs. lithofacies sandstone reservoir characterization Campanian sequence, Arshad gas/oil field, Central Sirt Basin, Libya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki, Milad; Darwish, Mohamed

    2017-06-01

    The present study focuses on the vertically stacked sandstones of the Arshad Sandstone in Arshad gas/oil field, Central Sirt Basin, Libya, and is based on the conventional cores analysis and wireline log interpretation. Six lithofacies types (F1 to F6) were identified based on the lithology, sedimentary structures and biogenic features, and are supported by wireline log calibration. From which four types (F1-F4) represent the main Campanian sandstone reservoirs in the Arshad gas/oil field. Lithofacies F5 is the basal conglomerates at the lower part of the Arshad sandstones. The Paleozoic Gargaf Formation is represented by lithofacies F6 which is the source provenance for the above lithofacies types. Arshad sediments are interpreted to be deposited in shallow marginal and nearshore marine environment influenced by waves and storms representing interactive shelf to fluvio-marine conditions. The main seal rocks are the Campanian Sirte shale deposited in a major flooding events during sea level rise. It is contended that the syn-depositional tectonics controlled the distribution of the reservoir facies in time and space. In addition, the post-depositional changes controlled the reservoir quality and performance. Petrophysical interpretation from the porosity log values were confirmed by the conventional core measurements of the different sandstone lithofacies types. Porosity ranges from 5 to 20% and permeability is between 0 and 20 mD. Petrophysical cut-off summary of the lower part of the clastic dominated sequence (i. e. Arshad Sandstone) calculated from six wells includes net pay sand ranging from 19.5‧ to 202.05‧, average porosity from 7.7 to 15% and water saturation from 19 to 58%.

  4. [Simulation alfalfa growth in Wulanbuhe sandy region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wenming; Bao, Xuemei

    2002-12-01

    Based on the theories of accumulated temperature and on the physio-ecological characteristics of Medicago sativa, a simulation model for its growth under soil water stress in arid sandy region was developed. The model was mainly composed of four modules: the stage module of growth, the dynamic module of leaf area index, the accumulated module of dry matter, and the distributive module of dry matter. After simulating and calculating, the model could be used to predict the growing progress and dynamic changes of leaf area and yield for herbage in sandy region. The result shows that the application of the model to production is usually effective.

  5. Performance of Different Acids on Sandstone Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Zaman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation of sandstone formations is a challenging task, which involves several chemicals and physical interactions of the acid with the formation. Some of these reactions may result in formation damage. Mud acid has been successfully used to stimulate sandstone reservoirs for a number of years. It is a mixture of hydrofluoric (HF and hydrochloric (HCl acids designed to dissolve clays and siliceous fines accumulated in the near-wellbore region. Matrix acidizing may also be used to increase formation permeability in undamaged wells. The change may be up to 50% to 100% with the mud acid. For any acidizing process, the selection of acid (Formulation and Concentration and the design (Pre-flush, Main Acid, After-flush is very important. Different researchers are using different combinations of acids with different concentrations to get the best results for acidization. Mainly the common practice is combination of Hydrochloric Acid – Hydrofluoric with Concentration (3% HF – 12% HCl. This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation of Orthophosphoric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in one combination and the second combination is Fluoboric and formic acid and the third one is formic and hydrofluoric acid. The results are compared with the mud acid and the results calculated are porosity, permeability, and FESEM Analysis and Strength tests. All of these new combinations shows that these have the potential to be used as acidizing acids on sandstone formations.

  6. Gravelly to sandy braidplain deposition in the czerwona góra beds and stryczowice beds (middle buntsandstein) of the northeastern holy cross mountains (poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Detlef; Barczuk, Andrezej

    The Czerwona Góra Beds and Stryczowice Beds in the northeastern part of the Holy Cross Mountains in Poland represent the installation of an extensive open high-energy braidplain following the precursory buildout of a chain of restricted alluvial fans in the preceding Zwola Beds which initiate the Buntsandstein deposition. The conglomerates and sandstones originate in channels of braided rivers as gravelly longitudinal bars, sandy transverse bars and sand sheets on the floor of the watercourses and on moderately-elevated platforms within the streams. Topstratum deposition particularly including suspension settling is very restricted due to effective primary suppression of origin as a consequence of persistence of vigorous floods. Resulting from short periodicity and large extension of high-water surges, the conglomerates and sandstones which successively accumulate on the bottom of the streams coalesce by vertical stacking and lateral amalgamation to thick and extensive complexes of multistorey substratum deposits. Indications of minor aeolian influence are only present in the basal Zwola Beds, with some reworked ventifacts testifying to almost complete subsequent destruction of rarely formed aeolian features in very limited spots of the river complex. The petrographical composition and textural maturity of the gravel is largely independent from the depositional processes. The laterally changing composition of the pebbles and cobbles in the Czerwona Góra Beds with almost exclusive presence of siliceous clasts around Czerwona Góra and occurrence of considerable amounts of carbonate clasts around Stryczowice testifies to a diversified regional geology in the provenance area and to delivery of the detritus in several discrete flows which are directed to different areas and which are laterally overlapping. Preferential downcutting of the carbonate source rocks below the base level of erosion and absence of significant rejuvenation of the relief results in upwards

  7. Provenance, tectonics and palaeoclimate of Proterozoic Chandarpur sandstones, Chattisgarh basin: A petrographic view

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudeb Datta

    2005-06-01

    Sandstones of early Neoproterozoic Chandarpur Group, Chattisgarh Supergroup, central India display progressive change towards greater textural and mineralogical maturity from base to top of the succession. The clay-silt matrix decreases, sorting of sand grains improves, frequency of rounded grains increases, monocrystalline quartz content increases with concomitant decrease in polycrystalline quartz, feldspar and rock fragments. The trend of variations in different mineralogical and textural attributes, however, exhibits inflections at different stratigraphic levels. The sandstones of the basal Lohardih Formation are alluvial fan deposits, characterized by high matrix and feldspar content, iron-oxide impregnated highly angular grains and poor sorting. Petrographic properties collectively indicate that the sandstones were derived from a weathered granitic crust under a humid climatic condition. Abundance of well rounded grains within the alluvial fan and overlying braided fluvial deposit indicates prolonged wind action during episodes of high aridity. The shallow marine deposit overlying the fluvial deposits in the upper part of the Lohardih Formation exhibits bedto- bed variation in the frequency of angular grains, feldspar content and overall maturity suggesting environmentally controlled segregation of sediments. The abrupt appearance of coarse-grained immature sandstones with concomitant reappearance of iron-oxide impregnated/altered feldspar grains in the upper part of the shelf deposits of the Chaporadih Formation point to a phase of tectonic uplift that possibly triggered a regression. Continued regression and peneplanation heralded the deposition of supermature medium-grained purple quartzarenite of the upper shoreface Kansapathar Formation in the uppermost part of the Chandarpur succession under a hot desertic climatic condition. The provenance analysis revealed that the Chandarpur clastics were derived from granites and granite–gneisses of a continental

  8. Compost amendment of sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.; Razzaghi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand...... and greenhouse tomato productivity. Disturbed and intact soil samples were taken from a decade-long compost field experiment on loamy sand with three compost types at application rate of 30 m3 ha-1 yr-1 (7.5 ton ha-1 yr-1). The soils were characterized for chemical and physical properties. Tomato was planted...... in a greenhouse using soil samples from the field and vegetative and yield parameters (plant height, stem diameter, leaf number, and fruit yield), water productivity, and harvest index were evaluated. All compost types significantly increased soil total carbon, total nitrogen, pH, electrical conductivity...

  9. Sidewinding with minimal slip: Snake and robot ascent of sandy slopes

    CERN Document Server

    Marvi, Hamidreza; Gravish, Nick; Astley, Henry; Travers, Matthew; Hatton, Ross L; Mendelson, Joseph R; Choset, Howie; Hu, David L; Goldman, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    Limbless organisms such as snakes can navigate nearly all terrain. In particular, desert-dwelling sidewinder rattlesnakes (Crotalus cerastes) operate effectively on inclined granular media (such as sand dunes) that induce failure in field-tested limbless robots through slipping and pitching. Our laboratory experiments reveal that as granular incline angle increases, sidewinder rattlesnakes increase the length of their body in contact with the sand. Implementing this strategy in a physical robot model of the snake enables the device to ascend sandy slopes close to the angle of maximum slope stability. Plate drag experiments demonstrate that granular yield stresses decrease with increasing incline angle. Together, these three approaches demonstrate how sidewinding with contact-length control mitigates failure on granular media.

  10. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in friction angle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamed Farshbaf Aghajani; Hossein Salehzadeh; Habib Shahnazari

    2015-09-01

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of anisotropy of shear strength parameter on the stability of a sandy slope by performing the limit equilibrium analysis. Because of scarcity of mathematical equation for anisotropic friction angle of sand, at first, all results of principal stress rotation tests are processed by artificial neural network and a computational procedure is developed for determining sand friction angle subjected to various loading directions. By implementing this procedure, slope stability analysis is performed in both isotropic and anisotropic conditions. The results indicate that while isotropic slope stability overestimates the factor of safety between 5 and 25% which the deviation is more for flatter slope, the location of critical slip surface is coincident in both conditions. Also in specific slip surface, the parameters of face angle, geometry of slip surface and soil properties relating to anisotropy are the main factors governing the result of anisotropic slope stability.

  11. Diesel and silica monitoring at two sites following hurricane sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Alice; Zuckerman, Norman; Luo, Honghong; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien; Lucchini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Following Hurricane Sandy, which hit New York City and New Jersey in October 2012, industrial hygienists from the Mount Sinai and Belleview/New York University occupational medicine clinics conducted monitoring for diesel exhaust and silica in lower Manhattan and Rockaway Peninsula. Average daytime elemental carbon levels at three stations in lower Manhattan on December 4, 2012, ranged from 9 to18 μg/m(3). Sub-micron particle counts at various times on the same day were over 200,000 particles per cubic centimeter on many streets in lower Manhattan. In Rockaway Peninsula on December 12, 2012, all average daytime elemental carbon levels were below a detection limit of approximately 7 μg/m(3). The average daytime crystalline silica dust concentration was below detection at two sites on Rockaway Peninsula, and was 0.015 mg/m(3) quartz where sand was being replaced on the beach. The daily average levels of elemental carbon and airborne particulates that we measured are in the range of levels that have been found to cause respiratory effects in sensitive subpopulations like asthmatic patients after 2 hr of exposure. Control of exposure to diesel exhaust must be considered following natural disasters where diesel-powered equipment is used in cleanup and recovery. Although peak silica exposures were not likely captured in this study, but were reported by a government agency to have exceeded recommended guidelines for at least one cleanup worker, we recommend further study of silica exposures when debris removal operations or traffic create visible levels of suspended dust from soil or sand.

  12. Hydrofacies In Sandstones. Evidence For Feedback Between Sandstone Lithofacies and Permeability Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, J. P.; Newell, A.; Moreau, M.

    In order to enhance our ability to develop effective numerical models of flow and con- taminant transport in the Permo-Triassic sandstone aquifer of the UK, relationships between lithofacies, rock mass characteristics (such as porosity and pore-throat size distribution), and permeability have been investigated through a series of case studies. Flow in the Permo-Triassic sandstones is primarily through the matrix. Permeability distribution is principally a function of the pore-throat size distribution and there is a relatively weak correlation with primary sedimentary lithofacies. It is observed that matrix permeability data broadly fall into two, discontinuous, sub-populations above and below about 1 mD. It is proposed that modification of primary sedimentary litho- facies by circulation of groundwater is the main control on the development of these two permeability sub-populations or hydrofacies. Identification of these two hydrofa- cies has significant implications for numerical modelling of the sandstones.

  13. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  14. Interstitial meiofauna of Namib sandy beaches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-03-16

    Mar 16, 1988 ... sandy beaches on the Namibian coast, Langstrand and Cape Cross. A transverse ... prominent in the mid-shore at Cape Cross but occurred in low numbers at Langstrand , where archiannelids ... Koop (1983) recorded the faunal composition of local .... four replicate sediment cores were taken at 15 cm.

  15. An experimental study on dynamic response for MICP strengthening liquefiable sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiguang; Cheng, Xiaohui; Ma, Qiang

    2016-12-01

    The technology of bio-grouting is a new technique for soft ground improvement. Many researchers have carried out a large number of experiments and study on this topic. However, few studies have been carried out on the dynamic response of solidified sand samples, such reducing liquefaction in sand. To study this characteristic of microbial-strengthened liquefiable sandy foundation, a microorganism formula and grouting scheme is applied. After grouting, the solidified samples are tested via dynamic triaxial testing to examine the cyclic performance of solidified sand samples. The results indicate that the solidified sand samples with various strengths can be obtained to meet different engineering requirements, the use of bacteria solution and nutritive salt is reduced, and solidified time is shortened to 1-2 days. Most importantly, in the study of the dynamic response, it is found that the MICP grouting scheme is effective in improving liquefiable sand characteristic, such as liquefaction resistance.

  16. Stability characteristics of the open channel flow above the asymmetrical irregular sand ripples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sandy bed cannot keep its original smoothness as the flows pass. With the increase of the flow intensity, the bed forms will appear as sand ripples and dune in turn. Among these morphologies, the sand ripple scale is the smallest, which is generally symmetrical when it just appears, but as time goes on, the asymmetrical form gradually develops. Just because of this sand ripples asymmetry, it manifests the influence of the flow on the bed morphology and also the impact on the laminar flow dynamical process, especially the stability characteristics. The stability features of laminar flow on open channels with the asymmetrical sand ripples are discussed, and also the results on the symmetrical sand ripples are compared in detail.

  17. Bibliography of sandy beaches and sandy beach organisms on the African continent

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bally, R

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography covers the literature relating to sandy beaches on the African continent and outlying islands. The bibliography lists biological, chemical, geographical and geological references and covers shallow marine sediments, surf zones off...

  18. 77 FR 74341 - Establishing the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force By the authority vested in me as President by the.... Hurricane Sandy made landfall on October 29, 2012, resulting in major flooding, extensive structural damage... assist the affected region. A disaster of Hurricane Sandy's magnitude merits a comprehensive...

  19. PAH concentrations in Coquina (Donax spp.) on a sandy beach shoreline impacted by a marine oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Richard A; Vestal, Alexandra; Welch, Christina; Barnes, Gracie; Pelot, Robert; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick

    2014-06-15

    The BP MC252 well failure in the Gulf of Mexico, April 2010 caused concern for crude oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure along the sandy beaches of the Florida Panhandle. We began collections of Coquina clams (Donax spp.) from the surf zone of Florida Panhandle beaches to monitor PAH contamination to compliment analysis of surf zone sand samples. These clams had higher levels of PAHs relative to ambient sand, and this allowed us to continue to monitor PAH levels after sand concentrations fell below limits of detection. PAH levels in the Coquina tissues were highly variable, perhaps indicative of the heterogeneous distribution of oil and tar on the beaches and exposure to tar particles. Overall, PAH levels decreased continuously in both sand and Coquina tissues, reaching limits of detection within one and two years respectively after oil landed on Florida Panhandle beaches. Our work suggests these surf zone molluscs may be used to monitor pollutant exposure along high energy sandy beach shorelines.

  20. Origin of gray-green sandstone in ore bed of sandstone type uranium deposit in north Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Dongsheng sandstone-type uranium deposit is located in the northern part of Ordos Basin, occurring in the transitional zones between gray-green and gray sandstones of Jurassic Zhiluo Formation. Sandstones in oxidized zone of the ore bed look gray-green, being of unique signature and different from one of ordinary inter-layered oxidation zone of sandstone-type uranium deposits. The character and origin of gray-green sandstones are systematically studied through their petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry. It is pointed out that this color of sandstones is originated from secondary oil-gas reduction processes after paleo-oxidation, being due to acicular-leaf chlorite covering surfaces of the sandstone grains. To find out the origin of gray-green sandstone and recognize paleo-oxidation zones in the ore bed are of not only theoretical significance for understanding metallogenesis of this kind of sandstone-type uranium deposit, but also very importantly practical significance for prospecting for similar kind of sandstone-type uranium deposit.

  1. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  2. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  3. Hurricane Sandy's Impact on Coastal Sedimentation on Long Island's South Shore: Results from a 2013 Rapid Response Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, B. A.; Goff, J. A.; Flood, R. D.; Austin, J. A., Jr.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the NY coast, we conducted subsurface and multi-beam analyses, ground-truthed by grab samples, in 3 areas: the western end of Fire Island (FIW), eastern Fire Island (FIE) where a new inlet formed during the storm, and Long Beach (LB). Grab samples yielded sands and muds, a surprise given the shallow (10-25m) water depths. Muds rested on top of sands and were removed for additional analyses. Since percent mud could not be determined absolutely, sediments were washed through a 63 mm sieve, RoTapped for 10 minutes at ¼ Φ, and weight percent calculated for the coarse fraction. At FIW and FIE, fine sands dominate the shallowest depths studied, consistent with previous studies. At FIE, the sedimentary wedge extends to ~15m, with finest sands (peak 3-3.5 Φ) in shallowest waters surveyed (~10m). Slightly coarser (2.5Φ) sediments plus relict gravels are present in swales where the wedge shoals. This supports mapping results indicating sand ridges migrated to the SW. Medium to fine sand is present at the deepest extent of the wedge; the grain size distribution matches a sample taken in the swash zone on the eastern flank of the new breach. Sediments may have been transported shoreward and then reworked post-Sandy. Samples seaward of the new breach were capped by a mud layer, which in turn had a layer of fine sand resting on it, evidence of a nascent ebb tidal deposit. At FIW, sediments in the shallow NE swale are finer (3.5Φ) and better sorted. As the region is underlain by relict sediments, these fine sands may be relicts exposed by storm-driven bedform migration. Deeper water (~22m w.d.) samples at FIW are coarser and contain shell hash. Sand on the lee side of the sand ridge, which CHIRP profiles show did not migrate significantly and accumulated sands, are medium (1.5 Φ), and match the grain sizes found on Fire Island beach. Muds contain heavy metals in concentrations consistent with transport from adjacent estuaries.

  4. Patterns of Phylogenetic Diversity of Subtropical Rainforest of the Great Sandy Region, Australia Indicate Long Term Climatic Refugia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion G Howard

    Full Text Available Australia's Great Sandy Region is of international significance containing two World Heritage areas and patches of rainforest growing on white sand. Previous broad-scale analysis found the Great Sandy biogeographic subregion contained a significantly more phylogenetically even subset of species than expected by chance contrasting with rainforest on white sand in Peru. This study aimed to test the patterns of rainforest diversity and relatedness at a finer scale and to investigate why we may find different patterns of phylogenetic evenness compared with rainforests on white sands in other parts of the world. This study focussed on rainforest sites within the Great Sandy and surrounding areas in South East Queensland (SEQ, Australia. We undertook field collections, expanded our three-marker DNA barcode library of SEQ rainforest plants and updated the phylogeny to 95% of the SEQ rainforest flora. We sampled species composition of rainforest in fixed area plots from 100 sites. We calculated phylogenetic diversity (PD measures as well as species richness (SR for each rainforest community. These combined with site variables such as geology, were used to evaluate patterns and relatedness. We found that many rainforest communities in the Great Sandy area were significantly phylogenetically even at the individual site level consistent with a broader subregion analysis. Sites from adjacent areas were either not significant or were significantly phylogenetically clustered. Some results in the neighbouring areas were consistent with historic range expansions. In contrast with expectations, sites located on the oldest substrates had significantly lower phylogenetic diversity (PD. Fraser Island was once connected to mainland Australia, our results are consistent with a region geologically old enough to have continuously supported rainforest in refugia. The interface of tropical and temperate floras in part also explains the significant phylogenetic evenness

  5. Patterns of Phylogenetic Diversity of Subtropical Rainforest of the Great Sandy Region, Australia Indicate Long Term Climatic Refugia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Marion G; McDonald, William J F; Forster, Paul I; Kress, W John; Erickson, David; Faith, Daniel P; Shapcott, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Australia's Great Sandy Region is of international significance containing two World Heritage areas and patches of rainforest growing on white sand. Previous broad-scale analysis found the Great Sandy biogeographic subregion contained a significantly more phylogenetically even subset of species than expected by chance contrasting with rainforest on white sand in Peru. This study aimed to test the patterns of rainforest diversity and relatedness at a finer scale and to investigate why we may find different patterns of phylogenetic evenness compared with rainforests on white sands in other parts of the world. This study focussed on rainforest sites within the Great Sandy and surrounding areas in South East Queensland (SEQ), Australia. We undertook field collections, expanded our three-marker DNA barcode library of SEQ rainforest plants and updated the phylogeny to 95% of the SEQ rainforest flora. We sampled species composition of rainforest in fixed area plots from 100 sites. We calculated phylogenetic diversity (PD) measures as well as species richness (SR) for each rainforest community. These combined with site variables such as geology, were used to evaluate patterns and relatedness. We found that many rainforest communities in the Great Sandy area were significantly phylogenetically even at the individual site level consistent with a broader subregion analysis. Sites from adjacent areas were either not significant or were significantly phylogenetically clustered. Some results in the neighbouring areas were consistent with historic range expansions. In contrast with expectations, sites located on the oldest substrates had significantly lower phylogenetic diversity (PD). Fraser Island was once connected to mainland Australia, our results are consistent with a region geologically old enough to have continuously supported rainforest in refugia. The interface of tropical and temperate floras in part also explains the significant phylogenetic evenness and higher than

  6. Colonization dynamics of ciliate morphotypes modified by shifting sandy sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risse-Buhl, Ute; Felsmann, Katja; Mutz, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Sandy stream-bed sediments colonized by a diverse ciliate community are subject to various disturbance regimes. In microcosms, we investigated the effect of sediment shifting on the colonization dynamics of 3 ciliate morphotypes differing in morphology, behavior and feeding strategy. The dynamics of the ciliate morphotypes inhabiting sediment pore water and overlying water were observed at 3 sediment shifting frequencies: (1) stable sediments, (2) periodically shifting sediments such as migrating ripples, and (3) continuously shifting sediments as occurring during scour events of the uppermost sediment. Sediment shifting significantly affected the abundance and growth rate of the ciliate morphotypes. The free-swimming filter feeder Dexiostoma campylum was vulnerable to washout by sediment shifting since significantly higher numbers occurred in the overlying water than in pore water. Abundance of D. campylum only increased in pore water of stable sediments. On the contrary, the vagile grasper feeder Chilodonella uncinata and the sessile filter feeder Vorticella convallaria had positive growth rates and successfully colonized sediments that shifted periodically and continuously. Thus, the spatio-temporal pattern of sediment dynamics acts as an essential factor of impact on the structure, distribution and function of ciliate communities in sand-bed streams.

  7. Extraction of sandy bedforms features through geodesic morphometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debese, Nathalie; Jacq, Jean-José; Garlan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    State-of-art echosounders reveal fine-scale details of mobile sandy bedforms, which are commonly found on continental shelfs. At present, their dynamics are still far from being completely understood. These bedforms are a serious threat to navigation security, anthropic structures and activities, placing emphasis on research breakthroughs. Bedform geometries and their dynamics are closely linked; therefore, one approach is to develop semi-automatic tools aiming at extracting their structural features from bathymetric datasets. Current approaches mimic manual processes or rely on morphological simplification of bedforms. The 1D and 2D approaches cannot address the wide ranges of both types and complexities of bedforms. In contrast, this work attempts to follow a 3D global semi-automatic approach based on a bathymetric TIN. The currently extracted primitives are the salient ridge and valley lines of the sand structures, i.e., waves and mega-ripples. The main difficulty is eliminating the ripples that are found to heavily overprint any observations. To this end, an anisotropic filter that is able to discard these structures while still enhancing the wave ridges is proposed. The second part of the work addresses the semi-automatic interactive extraction and 3D augmented display of the main lines structures. The proposed protocol also allows geoscientists to interactively insert topological constraints.

  8. Using humic acid for remediation of sandy soils contaminated by heavy metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a new remediation technology for contaminated sandy soil using humic acid (HA). Distribution of amount of Cr (VI) in the aqueous or solid system containing humic acid and sandy soil, was studied using batch experiments, es-pecially for effects of reaction time, pH, concentrations, temperature and irradiation on the reduction of Cr (VI), and the optimum reaction conditions. The results indicated a significant increase of the adsorption of Cr (VI) because of the complexion reaction between HA and Cr (VI) that occurred under acidic condition. The reaction mechanisms of HA with chromium on sand surfaces were certified. Thus it came to a conclusion that HA could be used effectively on remediation of Cr (VI)-contaminated soil and groundwater in a wide range of pH, with or without sunlight. These results suggest that the organic-inorganic complex-such as sandy soils coated with humic substances-is important as a metal reservoir in the environment.

  9. Compaction creep of sands due to time-dependent grain failure : Effects of chemical environment, applied stress, and grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzesowsky, R. H.; Hangx, S. J. T.; Brantut, N.; Spiers, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    Time-dependent brittle creep plays a role in controlling compaction of sands and sandstones under upper crustal conditions, influencing phenomena such as production-induced reservoir compaction, surface subsidence, and induced seismicity. Brittle creep also plays a role in determining the mechanical

  10. Analysis of Radiation Exposure for Naval Personnel at Operation SANDSTONE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-15

    Operation SANDSTONE Dose Reconstruction Methodology I I 2-1 Enewetak Atoll Anchorage Areas 14 2-2 Destroyer Patrol Sector Chart for Operation SANDSTONE 18...2-3 Average Free-Field Radiation Intensity for Southern and Northern Anchorage Areas - Enewetak Atoll 24 2-4 Average Free-Field Radiation Intensity...Operation SANDSTONE was the second nuclear test series held in the Marshall 0 Islands. It consisted of three nuclear weapon tests at Enewetak * Atoll in

  11. The dangers of taking mud for granted: Lessons from Lower Old Red Sandstone dryland river systems of South Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, V. Paul; Marriott, Susan B.

    2007-02-01

    Mudrocks are a prominent feature of many ancient dryland successions but they are not always a product of the settling out of suspension load. From studies of the late Silurian-early Devonian Old Red Sandstone mudrocks of South Wales it has been shown that many were not overbank sediments deposited from suspension on floodplains, but were emplaced as sand- and silt-sized aggregates transported as bed load and deposited in sinuous channels and as braid-bar complexes on multi-stage floodplains in dryland river systems. Using the Old Red Sandstone examples criteria are provided for the recognition of similar deposits in the sedimentary record. One important aspect of these mudrocks is that they can represent multiple recycling events and can constitute condensed deposits that may be characteristic of closed alluvial basins with periodically limited sediment supply.

  12. [Geostatistics analyzing to cause of formation of circle distribution of plant communities in Horqin Sandy Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xingdong; Gao, Yubao; Zhao, Wenzhi; Cong, Zili

    2004-09-01

    Investigation results in the present study showed that plant communities took typical concentric circles distribution patterns along habitat gradient from top, slope to interdune on a few large fixed dunes in middle part of Korqin Sandy Land. In order to explain this phenomenon, analysis of water content and its spatial heterogeneity in sand layers on different locations of dunes was conducted. In these dunes, water contents in sand layers of the tops were lower than those of the slopes; both of them were lower than those of the interdunes. According to the results of geostatistics analysis, whether shifting dune or fixed dune, spatial heterogeneity of water contents in sand layers took on regular changes, such as ratios between nugget and sill and ranges reduced gradually, fractal dimension increased gradually, the regular changes of these parameters indicated that random spatial heterogeneity reduced gradually, and autocorrelation spatial heterogeneity increased gradually from the top, the slope to the interdune. The regular changes of water contents in sand layers and their spatial heterogeneity of different locations of the dunes, thus, might be an important cause resulted in the formation of the concentric circles patterns of the plant communities on these fixed dunes.

  13. Zonation of macrobenthos across a mesotidal sandy beach: Variability based on physical factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcedo, M. Cecilia; Fiori, Sandra M.; Bremec, Claudia S.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamic and unstable nature of sandy beaches results in a highly variable distribution of macroinfauna inhabiting the intertidal fringe. Storm-induced sediment movement on the beaches could alter the distribution of organisms, leading to an indistinct zonation scheme. In this context, the zonation pattern of macroinfauna was studied monthly during 2010 in an exposed mesotidal sandy beach on the SW Atlantic coast of Argentina (39°S). Faunal samples were collected with a plastic core (0.02 m2) at 10 to 12 levels along five replicated transects extending from above the drift line to the low tide swash zone. Sand samples were also taken at each level. Wave height and period were measured in situ and data of wind speed and direction were provided by the National Weather Service (SMN). The relationship between the formation of zonation schemes, meteorological data and the physical features of the beach were explored. The results show some significant trends: the supralittoral zone was characterized by the absence of organisms on all sampling occasions. During most of the year the zonation scheme comprised two zones, both within the littoral zone; during winter months, no zonation schemes were found. This contrasting pattern could have been determined by the harsh wind-driven waves, leading to sand movements and thus promoting variations in faunal distribution. Sedimentological changes driven by storms could therefore be the cause of a hidden zonation scheme occurring during winter months, highlighting the importance of a climatic variable in the detection of macrofaunal zonation patterns.

  14. Rock doughnut and pothole structures of the Clarens Fm. Sandstone in the Karoo Basin, South Africa: Possible links to Lower Jurassic fluid seepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grab, Stefan; Svensen, Henrik

    2011-08-01

    South Africa has a wealth of sandstone landforms, yet many of these have not been examined in detail to expand knowledge on their morphology and process origins. Here we present data on primary morphological statistics, rock hardness, surface roughness and petrographic investigations of rock doughnuts and associated pothole structures in Golden Gate Highlands National Park (GGHNP) and in the Witkop III complex, with the aim of using such data and field observations to argue their likely origins. Schmidt hammer R-values indicate consistently harder doughnut rims (mean = 48.7; n = 150) than the enclosed potholes (mean = 37.8; n = 150) and surrounding sandstone platform (mean = 39.7; n = 250). The petrography of Clarens Fm. Sandstone shows that the typical whitish sandstone is affected by intense chemical weathering. Pothole rims and the irregular reddish crust typical of the Witkop III outcrops show a secondary cementation by microcrystalline silica. Although preservation of old land surfaces is difficult to prove, small and circular pipe structures filled with calcite-cemented sand are present locally surrounding the Witkop III hydrothermal complex, and represent conduits for fluidized sand. Based on the morphologies of the Witkop III summit with the associated potholes and pipes, we hypothesize that they are remnants of morphologies created by Jurassic fluid seepage, with a superimposed and secondary silica cementation. Given that fluidization structures evidently occur in Clarens Fm. Sandstone, as is the case at Witkop, such mechanisms could possibly have contributed to the observed rock doughnut structures elsewhere on Clarens Fm. Sandstones, such as at the GGHNP where the rock doughnut morphological attributes are typical to landforms originating from fluid venting.

  15. Estimation of uranium migration parameters in sandstone aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malov, A I

    2016-03-01

    The chemical composition and isotopes of carbon and uranium were investigated in groundwater samples that were collected from 16 wells and 2 sources in the Northern Dvina Basin, Northwest Russia. Across the dataset, the temperatures in the groundwater ranged from 3.6 to 6.9 °C, the pH ranged from 7.6 to 9.0, the Eh ranged from -137 to +128 mV, the total dissolved solids (TDS) ranged from 209 to 22,000 mg L(-1), and the dissolved oxygen (DO) ranged from 0 to 9.9 ppm. The (14)C activity ranged from 0 to 69.96 ± 0.69 percent modern carbon (pmC). The uranium content in the groundwater ranged from 0.006 to 16 ppb, and the (234)U:(238)U activity ratio ranged from 1.35 ± 0.21 to 8.61 ± 1.35. The uranium concentration and (234)U:(238)U activity ratio increased from the recharge area to the redox barrier; behind the barrier, the uranium content is minimal. The results were systematized by creating a conceptual model of the Northern Dvina Basin's hydrogeological system. The use of uranium isotope dating in conjunction with radiocarbon dating allowed the determination of important water-rock interaction parameters, such as the dissolution rate:recoil loss factor ratio Rd:p (a(-1)) and the uranium retardation factor:recoil loss factor ratio R:p in the aquifer. The (14)C age of the water was estimated to be between modern and >35,000 years. The (234)U-(238)U age of the water was estimated to be between 260 and 582,000 years. The Rd:p ratio decreases with increasing groundwater residence time in the aquifer from n × 10(-5) to n × 10(-7) a(-1). This finding is observed because the TDS increases in that direction from 0.2 to 9 g L(-1), and accordingly, the mineral saturation indices increase. Relatively high values of R:p (200-1000) characterize aquifers in sandy-clayey sediments from the Late Pleistocene and the deepest parts of the Vendian strata. In samples from the sandstones of the upper part of the Vendian strata, the R:p value is ∼ 24, i.e., sorption processes are

  16. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  17. Influence of Particle Shape on Drag Coefficient for Commonly Occuring Sandy Particles in Coastal Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Arora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A well defined relationship connecting settling velocity with sediment geometry and ambient properties is an essential pre-requisite for coastal and hydraulic engineering studies. An established relationship for settling velocity of sandy particles assuming spherical shape geometry is available in the literature. In reality, the sediment particles need not be spherical at all times, which influences settling velocity that is strongly biased to the drag coefficient. Based on quantitative comparison with measured data collected at Oahu Islands located in the Hawaiian archipelago, USA this work provides a relationship between drag coefficient and particle shape factor for sand grains viz; sand, sandy loam and fine sandy loam typically found in coastal environment (typical size ranges from 0.05 to 2.0 mm. The particle Reynolds number and shape factor are evaluated for each grain. The drag coefficient evaluated as function of nominal diameter and Reynolds number show a positive correlation over a wide range of shape factors used in this study. A comprehensive correlation has been developed of the drag coefficient for non-spherical particles as a function of Reynolds number and particle shape. Further a regression analysis was performed on the functional dependence of drag coefficient on particle shape. Based on this study, it could be advocated the validity of Krumbien shape factor holds well for the above characterized grain size and various particle shapes considered. Hence, the settling velocity of particles has a functional dependence on estimated drag coefficient with important implications for modeling sediment transport and swash zone hydrodynamics.

  18. AN ALTERNATE METHOD TO PREVENT SAND ABRASIVE EROSION IN PIPELINES FOR TRANSPORTING HIGH-SPEED NATURAL GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an alternate method to re-move the sand carried by natural gas in the upstream pipelinestherefore preventing sand abrasive erosion in pipelines used intransporting high-speed natural gas. Conventionally, most ex-perts pay much attention to improving the anti-erosion charac-teristics of the pipeline materials to solve the problem of seri-ous abrasive erosion, but without significant success. Basedon the theory of multiphase flow and analysis of the character-istics of sandy jets, a new equipment named "Sand Catcher" isintroduced in this article. Experimental results show that theSand Catcher effectively removes most of the sand in the natu-ral gas and significantly reduces the abrasive erosion of thepipelines. The Sand Catcher can be widely applied in practicein the near future.

  19. THE BIODIVERSITY AT SANDI BIRD SANCTUARY, HARDOI WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO MIGRATORY BIRDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Indian subcontinent plays host to a number of migratory birds in summers as well as winters. It is estimated that over hundred species of migratory birds fly to India, either in search of feeding grounds or to escape the severe winter of their native habitat. Sandi bird sanctuary was created in 1990 in order to protect and conserve the natural habitation and surroundings and also the marine vegetation for the migratory birds, as well as for the local people of the region. The term migration is used to describe movements of populations of birds or other animals. There are three types of migrants. One way to look at migration is to consider the distances traveled. The pattern of migration can vary within each category, but is most variable in short and medium distance migrants. The origin of migration is related to the distance traveled. The birds migrating through the area, take shelter on the river front before going to the Sandi Bird sanctuary. The birds generally migrate in the winter months of October-November-December. Bird sanctuary is a popular tourist location. Sandi particularly attracts ornithologists and bird watchers, as many rare migratory birds take refuge in the sanctuary. The bird watching camps arranged to observe the migratory birds at Sandi Bird Sanctuary in the month of October and November 2012. The migratory birds at Sandi Bird Sanctuary include great crested grebe, white storks, black lbis, glossy lbis, spoonbill, ruddy shelduck, pin tail, sholveller, spot bill duck, mallard, gadwall, wigeon, tufted pochard, gargancey teal, common teal, cotton teal, grey lag goose, coot, black tailed godwit, painted stock pin tail snipe, marsh sand piper, common tern, river tern, magpie robin, white wagtail, pied wagtail, common snipe, starlings, white lbis, red crested pochard, common pochard, painted stock, black lbis, curlew, Indian skimmer etc. The resident birds at Sandi Bird Sanctuary include little grebe, darter, purple heron, grey

  20. Paleohydrologic controls on soft-sediment deformation in the Navajo Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Gerald; Cushman, Robert; Nick, Kevin; Miall, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Many workers have noted the presence of contorted cross-strata in the Navajo Sandstone and other ancient eolianites, and have recognized their significance as indicators of sediment saturation during the accumulation history. Horowitz (1982) proposed a general model for the production of such features in ancient ergs by episodic, seismically induced liquefaction of accumulated sand. A key feature of that popular model is the prevalence of a flat water table, characteristic of a hyper-arid climatic regime, during deformation. Under arid climatic conditions, the water table is established by regional flow and liquefaction is limited to the saturated regions below the level of interdune troughs. However, various paleohydrological indicators from Navajo Sandstone outcrops point toward a broader range of water table configurations during the deformation history of that eolianite. Some outcrops reveal extensive deformation complexes that do not appear to have extended to the contemporary depositional surface. These km-scale zones of deformation, affecting multiple sets of cross-strata, and grading upward into undeformed crossbeds may represent deep water table conditions, coupled with high intensity triggers, which produced exclusively intrastratal deformation. Such occurrences contrast with smaller-scale complexes formed within the zone of interaction between the products of soft-sediment deformation and surface processes of deposition and erosion. The Horowitz model targets the smaller-scale deformation morphologies produced in this near-surface environment. This study examines the implications of a wet climatic regime for the Horowitz deformation model. It demonstrates how a contoured water table, characteristic of humid climates, may have facilitated deformation within active bedforms, as well as in the accumulation. Intra-dune deformation would enable deflation of deformation features during the normal course of dune migration, more parsimoniously accounting for

  1. Decay of sandstone monuments in Petra (Jordan): Gravity-induced stress as a stabilizing factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řihošek, Jaroslav; Bruthans, Jiří; Mašín, David; Filippi, Michal; Schweigstillova, Jana

    2016-04-01

    As demonstrated by physical experiments and numerical modeling the gravity-induced stress (stress in further text) in sandstone massive reduces weathering and erosion rate (Bruthans et al. 2014). This finding is in contrast to common view that stress threatens stability of man-made monuments carved to sandstone. Certain low- levels of gravity-induced stress can in fact stabilize and protect these forms against weathering and disintegration. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate the effect of the stress on weathering of sandstone monuments at the Petra World Heritage Site in Jordan via field observations, salt weathering experiments, and physical and numerical modeling. Previous studies on weathering of Petra monuments have neglected the impact of stress, but the ubiquitous presence of stress-controlled landforms in Petra suggests that it has a substantial effect on weathering and erosion processes on man-made monuments and natural surfaces. Laboratory salt weathering experiments with cubes of Umm Ishrin sandstone from Petra demonstrated the inverse relationship between stress magnitude and decay rate. Physical modeling with Strelec locked sand from the Czech Republic was used to simulate weathering and decay of Petra monuments. Sharp forms subjected to water erosion decayed to rounded shapes strikingly similar to tombs in Petra subjected to more than 2000 years of weathering and erosion. The physical modeling results enabled visualization of the recession of monument surfaces in high spatial and temporal resolution and indicate that the recession rate of Petra monuments is far from constant both in space and time. Numerical modeling of stress fields confirms the physical modeling results. This novel approach to investigate weathering clearly demonstrates that increased stress decreases the decay rate of Petra monuments. To properly delineate the endangered zones of monuments, the potential damage caused by weathering agents should be combined with stress

  2. [Microbiological quality of seaside sands: a beach in Latium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Lucia; Briancesco, Rossella; Cataldo, Claudia; Di Girolamo, Irene

    2002-01-01

    This study is focused on the microbiological quality of a sandy beach in the coastal area around Rome, Italy. The microbiological surveys were carried out on the sands collected both on the beach and on the waterline. A low-concentration of faecal bacteria (streptococci outnumbered Escherichia coli) and a constant rate of staphylococci were detected over the sampling period. Significant statistical correlations were calculated between yeasts and moulds, Escherichia coli and streptococci, streptococci and sulfite-reducing clostridium spores. This survey's data could be a baseline for future studies.

  3. Study on sand particles creep model and open pit mine landslide mechanism caused by sand fatigue liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dong-Ning; Wang, Lai-Gui; Zhang, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Kun

    2017-06-01

    The sand particles in the sand - rock composite slope of the open pit mine occurs creep deformation and fatigue liquefaction under the action of vehicle load vibration and hydraulic gradient, which causes landslide geological disasters and it destroys the surface environment. To reveal the mechanism, a mechanics model based on the model considering the soil structural change with a new “plastic hinge” element is developed, to improve its constitutive and creep curve equations. Data from sand creep experiments are used to identify the parameters in the model and to validate the model. The results show that the mechanical model can describe the rotation progress between the sand particles, disclose the negative acceleration creep deformation stage during the third phase, and require fewer parameters while maintaining accuracy. It provides a new creep model considering rotation to analyze sand creep mechanism, which provides a theoretical basis for revealing the open pit mine landslide mechanism induced by creep deformation and fatigue liquefaction of sandy soil.

  4. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  5. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  6. Vestled - Hvide Sande

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten; Hesselbjerg, Marianne; Schønherr, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side......Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side...

  7. Mechanism of Solid Bitumen in Silurian Sandstones of Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jinglian; Zhu Bingquan

    1997-01-01

    @@ There are a large amount of solid bitumen within Silurian sandstones in Tabei, Tazhong, Kalpin uprifts of the Tarim Basin. Petroleum geochemists are interested in the super giant fossil oil pool. Unfortunately,some key questions have not been solved, such as: what generated the bitumen? When did the bitumen generate and when did the bitumen accumulated in the sandstones?

  8. Reservoir attributes of a hydrocarbon-prone sandstone complex: case of the Pab Formation (Late Cretaceous) of Southwest Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Umar, Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Salam; Kelling, Gilbert;

    2016-01-01

    Links between the architectural elements of major sand bodies and reservoir attributes have been explored in a field study of the hydrocarbon-yielding Late Cretaceous Pab Formation of southwest Pakistan. The lithofacies and facies associations represented in the Pab Formation are the main...... porosity values than more shale-rich successions. Diagenetic studies of Pab sandstones reveal that intense mechanical compaction and cementation have reduced primary porosity and reservoir quality. Conversely, dissolution of detrital feldspar grains and volcanic fragments during burial and later uplift...

  9. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  10. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  11. Subsurface sandstone mapping by combination of GPR and ERT method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    It is important to know the shape and distribution of sandstone bodies in the subsurface when forma-tion and migration of a dune model are determined.The information plays a significant role in identification of the continental oil and gas accumulation.In this study,the combination of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity tomography method (ERT)is used in mapping the distribution of sandstone bodies in Yanchang Formation.Six GPR profiles and seven ERT profiles are used to analysis.GPR data show clear re-flections from the top interface of sandstones.ERT data show a continuous high resistivity anomaly correspon-ding to the sandstone body.Combined the reconstructed 3D images by GPR and ERT,the spatial distribution of sandstone bodies is described.

  12. Screening of cellulose decomposing fungi in sandy dune soil of Horqin Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaoKun Wang; XueYong Zhao; XiaoAn Zuo; XinPing Liu; Hao Qu; Wei Mao; JianYing Yun

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose decomposing fungi play an important role in litter decomposition and are decisive in nutrient cycling in sandy land ecosystems. Thirty-one strains were isolated to select efficient cellulose decomposers, and four efficient cellulose decomposing fungi (NM3-1, NM3-2, NM3-3, and NM3-4) were screened using a CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose) carbon source in dune soil of Horqin Sandy Land. They were identified as Asperigillus calidoustus, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Hypocrea lixii by rDNA-ITS molecular biological methods. Cloth decomposition rates were 15.71%, 15.89%, 17.29%, and 17.89%by the four efficient decomposers incubated for 30 days, respectively. Screening of efficient cellulose decomposers can not only increase the dune soil functional microbe bank, but can also accelerate litter decom-position and available nutrient input in the Horqin Sandy Land.

  13. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic significance of biogenic structures from a late Paleozoic marginal- to open-marine reservoir, Morrow Sandstone, subsurface of southwest Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buatois, L.A.; Mangano, M.G.; Alissa, A.; Carr, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    Integrated ichnologic, sedimentologic, and stratigraphic studies of cores and well logs from Lower Pennsylvanian oil and gas reservoirs (lower Morrow Sandstone, southwest Kansas) allow distinction between fluvio-estuarine and open marine deposits in the Gentzler and Arroyo fields. The fluvio-estuarine facies assemblage is composed of both interfluve and valley-fill deposits, encompassing a variety of depositional environments such as fluvial channel, interfluve paleosol, bay head delta, estuary bay, restricted tidal flat, intertidal channel, and estuary mouth. Deposition in a brackish-water estuarine valley is supported by the presence of a low diversity, opportunistic, impoverished marine ichnofaunal assemblage dominated by infaunal structures, representing an example of a mixed, depauperate Cruziana and Skolithos ichnofacies. Overall distribution of ichnofossils along the estuarine valley was mainly controlled by the salinity gradient, with other parameters, such as oxygenation, substrate and energy, acting at a more local scale. The lower Morrow estuarine system displays the classical tripartite division of wave-dominated estuaries (i.e. seaward-marine sand plug, fine-grained central bay, and sandy landward zone), but tidal action is also recorded. The estuarine valley displays a northwest-southeast trend, draining to the open sea in the southeast. Recognition of valley-fill sandstones in the lower Morrow has implications for reservoir characterization. While the open marine model predicts a "layer-cake" style of facies distribution as a consequence of strandline shoreline progradation, identification of valley-fill sequences points to more compartmentalized reservoirs, due to the heterogeneity created by valley incision and subsequent infill. The open-marine facies assemblage comprises upper, middle, and lower shoreface; offshore transition; offshore; and shelf deposits. In contrast to the estuarine assemblage, open marine ichnofaunas are characterized by a

  14. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic significance of biogenic structures from a late Paleozoic marginal- to open-marine reservoir, Morrow Sandstone, subsurface of southwest Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buatois, Luis A.; Mángano, M. Gabriela; Alissa, Abdulrahman; Carr, Timothy R.

    2002-09-01

    Integrated ichnologic, sedimentologic, and stratigraphic studies of cores and well logs from Lower Pennsylvanian oil and gas reservoirs (lower Morrow Sandstone, southwest Kansas) allow distinction between fluvio-estuarine and open marine deposits in the Gentzler and Arroyo fields. The fluvio-estuarine facies assemblage is composed of both interfluve and valley-fill deposits, encompassing a variety of depositional environments such as fluvial channel, interfluve paleosol, bay head delta, estuary bay, restricted tidal flat, intertidal channel, and estuary mouth. Deposition in a brackish-water estuarine valley is supported by the presence of a low diversity, opportunistic, impoverished marine ichnofaunal assemblage dominated by infaunal structures, representing an example of a mixed, depauperate Cruziana and Skolithos ichnofacies. Overall distribution of ichnofossils along the estuarine valley was mainly controlled by the salinity gradient, with other parameters, such as oxygenation, substrate and energy, acting at a more local scale. The lower Morrow estuarine system displays the classical tripartite division of wave-dominated estuaries (i.e. seaward-marine sand plug, fine-grained central bay, and sandy landward zone), but tidal action is also recorded. The estuarine valley displays a northwest-southeast trend, draining to the open sea in the southeast. Recognition of valley-fill sandstones in the lower Morrow has implications for reservoir characterization. While the open marine model predicts a "layer-cake" style of facies distribution as a consequence of strandline shoreline progradation, identification of valley-fill sequences points to more compartmentalized reservoirs, due to the heterogeneity created by valley incision and subsequent infill. The open-marine facies assemblage comprises upper, middle, and lower shoreface; offshore transition; offshore; and shelf deposits. In contrast to the estuarine assemblage, open marine ichnofaunas are characterized by a

  15. Relief-induced soil zones at the Cretaceous sandstone-mudstone contact in the Stolowe Mountains, SW Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabala, Cezary; Waroszewski, Jaroslaw; Jezierski, Pawel

    2014-05-01

    Regolith translocation on mountain slope built of stratified rocks creates mixed or layered covers which may obliterate the actual transitions of rocks. The covers are seldom delineated on geological maps due to their insignificant thickness; however, enough large to influence the soil morphology and ecological functions. A toposequence of six soil sections situated at the contact of Cretaceous sandstone and mudstone was investigated to evaluate the influence of relief-position and morphological processes on slope cover formation, as well as soil and forest habitat arrangement. At least four distinct soil zones were distinguished in the 400 m long catena: (1) Arenosols and sand Regosols zone, on active fluvial cones and blocky covers directly below sandstone cliffs; (2) upper mid-slope zone of Podzols developed from sandstone-derived materials with periglacial features (solifluction) in the subsoil; (3) lower mid-slope and foot-slope zone of Stagnosols and Planosols with prolonged water stagnation over the impermeable subsoil developed from sandstone or mixed sandstone-mudstone regolith; excess of water is also the sign of mudstone bedrock that forces lateral water flow; and (4) toe-slope zone of Cambisols developed from the mudstone regolith. Past and present-day morphological processes have broadened the area mantled by sandstone-derived materials from upper-slope and created transitional materials that enhanced soil variability and multi-step zonality over the presumably sharp contact of sandstone and mudstone bedrocks. Financed in part by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of Poland (project number: N N310 435938) and National Science Centre (project OPUS 2012/05/B/NZ9/03389). Lorz, C., Heller, K., Kleber, A. (2011): Stratification of the regolith continuum - a key property for processes and functions of landscapes. Z Geomorphol 55, 3: 277-292. Sauer, D., Felix-Heningsen, P. (2006): Saprolite, soils and sediments in the Rhenish Massif as records of

  16. Effect of temperature on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Kjøller, Claus

    assumptions would be required in order to estimate sandstone permeability based on the Kozeny equation. An effective specific surface area per pore volume for permeability was estimated by using image analysis and pore size distributions as from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) transverse relaxation data...... be determined based on the Klinkenberg (1941) procedure, which accounts for effects on permeability of gas slip on the fluid-solid interface by means of several permeability measurements with different pore pressures. A comparison between the equivalent pore sizes as estimated using the Kozeny equation...... at 80°C than at 20°C; at 80°C the main effect might be due to an alteration of pore fluid rheology, whereas at 20°C particles might be filtered in pore constrictions. DLVO theory (Derjaguin and Landau (1941); Verwey and Overbeek (1948)) was used to compare effects of temperature and salinity on surface...

  17. Dilatant hardening of fluid-saturated sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhnenko, Roman Y.; Labuz, Joseph F.

    2015-02-01

    The presence of pore fluid in rock affects both the elastic and inelastic deformation processes, yet laboratory testing is typically performed on dry material even though in situ the rock is often saturated. Techniques were developed for testing fluid-saturated porous rock under the limiting conditions of drained, undrained, and unjacketed response. Confined compression experiments, both conventional triaxial and plane strain, were performed on water-saturated Berea sandstone to investigate poroelastic and inelastic behavior. Measured drained response was used to calibrate an elasto-plastic constitutive model that predicts undrained inelastic deformation. The experimental data show good agreement with the model: dilatant hardening in undrained triaxial and plane strain compression tests under constant mean stress was predicted and observed.

  18. Influence of the properties of granite and sandstone in the desalination process by electrokinetic technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feijoo, J.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pozo-Antonio, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    such as sand disaggregation and superficial detachments. These problems can be solved by conservation technologies, which are aimed to decrease the salt concentration in rocks (desalination).The present study aimed to investigate the efficiency of electrokinetic techniques for desalination of two different......) achieved in both stones.From the results obtained, it was possible to find those inherent factors to each stone which could have an influence on the efficacy of the treatment. With this technique it was possible to reduce the salt concentration in the granite almost to 100%. However, in the sandstone...... samples the decreases were not equally high, mainly at the intermediate levels where slight enrichments were observed. The results indicate that although the used technique is efficient for salt removal regardless of the porosimetric distribution of the rock, the better interconnection between the pores...

  19. Experimental Investigation on Dilation Mechanisms of Land-Facies Karamay Oil Sand Reservoirs under Water Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Botao; Jin, Yan; Pang, Huiwen; Cerato, Amy B.

    2016-04-01

    The success of steam-assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is strongly dependent on the formation of a homogeneous and highly permeable zone in the land-facies Karamay oil sand reservoirs. To accomplish this, hydraulic fracturing is applied through controlled water injection to a pair of horizontal wells to create a dilation zone between the dual wells. The mechanical response of the reservoirs during this injection process, however, has remained unclear for the land-facies oil sand that has a loosely packed structure. This research conducted triaxial, permeability and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests on the field-collected oil sand samples. The tests evaluated the influences of the field temperature, confining stress and injection pressure on the dilation mechanisms as shear dilation and tensile parting during injection. To account for petrophysical heterogeneity, five reservoir rocks including regular oil sand, mud-rich oil sand, bitumen-rich oil sand, mudstone and sandstone were investigated. It was found that the permeability evolution in the oil sand samples subjected to shear dilation closely followed the porosity and microcrack evolutions in the shear bands. In contrast, the mudstone and sandstone samples developed distinct shear planes, which formed preferred permeation paths. Tensile parting expanded the pore space and increased the permeability of all the samples in various degrees. Based on this analysis, it is concluded that the range of injection propagation in the pay zone determines the overall quality of hydraulic fracturing, while the injection pressure must be carefully controlled. A region in a reservoir has little dilation upon injection if it remains unsaturated. Moreover, a cooling of the injected water can strengthen the dilation potential of a reservoir. Finally, it is suggested that the numerical modeling of water injection in the Karamay oil sand reservoirs must take into account the volumetric plastic strain in hydrostatic loading.

  20. Mechanism of formation of wiggly compaction bands in porous sandstone: 1. Observations and conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Pollard, David D.; Deng, Shang; Aydin, Atilla

    2015-12-01

    Field observations are combined with microscopic analyses to investigate the mechanism of formation of wiggly compaction bands (CBs) in the porous Jurassic aeolian Aztec Sandstone exposed at Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada. Among the three types of CBs (T1, T2, and T3), we focused on the wiggly CBs (T3), which show a chevron (T31) or wavy (T32) pattern with typical corner angles of approximately 90° or 130°, respectively. Where corner angles of wiggly CBs increase to 180°, they become straight CBs (T33). Image analyses of thin sections using an optical microscope show host rock porosity increases downslope in this dune, and the predominant type of wiggly CBs also varies from chevron to straight CBs. Specifically, band type varies continuously from chevron to wavy to straight where the porosity and grain sorting of the host rock increase systematically. Based on the crack and anticrack models, we infer that the change from chevron to straight CBs is due to increasing failure angle of the sandstone and this may correlate with increasing grain sorting. Wavy CBs with intermediate failure angle and host rock porosity are an intermediate stage between chevron and straight CBs. Previous sedimentological studies also have suggested that grain size and sorting degree increase downslope on the downwind side of sand dunes due to a sieving process of the wind-blown grains. Therefore, the transition of wiggly CB types in this regard correlates with increasing sorting and perhaps with increasing porosity downslope.

  1. New geochronologic and stratigraphic evidence confirms the paleocene age of the dinosaur-bearing ojo alamo sandstone and animas formation in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Dinosaur fossils are present in the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and Animas Formation in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and Colorado. Evidence for the Paleo-cene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone includes palynologic and paleomagnetic data. Palynologic data indicate that the entire Ojo Alamo Sandstone, including the lower dinosaur-bearing part, is Paleocene in age. All of the palynomorph-productive rock samples collected from the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at multiple localities lacked Creta-ceous index palynomorphs (except for rare, reworked specimens) and produced Paleocene index palynomorphs. Paleocene palynomorphs have been identified strati-graphically below dinosaur fossils at two separate localities in the Ojo Alamo Sand-stone in the central and southern parts of the basin. The Animas Formation in the Colorado part of the basin also contains dinosaur fossils, and its Paleocene age has been established based on fossil leaves and palynology. Magnetostratigraphy provides independent evidence for the Paleocene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone and its dinosaur-bearing beds. Normal-polarity magnetochron C29n (early Paleocene) has been identified in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at six localities in the southern part of the San Juan Basin. An assemblage of 34 skeletal elements from a single hadrosaur, found in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone in the southern San Juan Basin, provided conclusive evidence that this assemblage could not have been reworked from underlying Cretaceous strata. In addition, geochemical studies of 15 vertebrate bones from the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and 15 bone samples from the underlying Kirtland Formation of Late Creta-ceous (Campanian) age show that each sample suite contained distinctly different abundances of uranium and rare-earth elements, indicating that the bones were miner-alized in place soon after burial, and that none of the Paleocene dinosaur bones ana-lyzed had been reworked. ?? U.S. Geological Survey, Public Domain April 2009.

  2. Passive millimeter-wave imagery of helicopter obstacles in a sand environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, David A.

    2006-05-01

    Operation of military helicopters in a dusty environment challenges pilots with reduced visibility. Passive millimeter-wave (MMW) imaging has the potential to be used in these environments to image through dust cloud obscurants. The millimeter-wave phenomenology of the sand environment and the obstacles present in that environment are explored in this work. A 93 GHz polarimetric passive MMW imager was used to characterize an obstacle-rich sand environment and the results are presented. It is shown that there is a strong polarimetric signature present for both sand and cinder block between 10 and 30 degrees depression angles. Also shown is the phenomenology associated with shadows on sand. It was determined that berms and ditches can be very difficult to detect using even a sensitive MMW radiometer. The results can be used to model the performance of passive MMW imaging systems in a sandy environment.

  3. Relationship between Spectral Induced Polarization Measurements and Grain Size of Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, N. V.; Hou, C. Y.; Freed, D.; Fellah, K.; Feng, L.; Xu, G.; Slater, L. D.

    2016-12-01

    Frequency dependence of the complex conductivity of ion-conductive soils and sediments in the range from millihertz to kilohertz can exhibit what is called the spectral induced polarization (SIP) effect, in which the impedance phase shows a near-resonance peak at a characteristic frequency as a result of a strong polarization response. Because the conventional Maxwell-Wagner interfacial polarization related to rock texture cannot provide an adequate explanation, the electrochemical polarization related to the electrical double layer formed in the presence of grains with surface charge is often invoked as a main mechanism for the SIP effect. Several studies demonstrating the link between SIP effect and the dominant grain size have previously been conducted on loose sands. Although loose sands provide good control of the grain size, they are not entirely representative of the consolidated sedimentary rocks common in the subsurface. In the present study we investigate the relationship between SIP effect and dominant grain size of well-characterized quarried consolidated sandstones. The choice of samples minimizes the influence of other factors, such as the presence of clays, on the SIP effect. Dominant grain size was determined using digital image analysis of scanning electron microscope (SEM) images obtained on thin sections. SIP spectra were measured on a collection of quarried clay-free sandstones saturated with brines. All rocks displayed a distinct peak in the imaginary conductivity dispersion curve. Also, we establish a rock model based on differential effective medium approach that accounts for both the interfacial polarization and electrochemical polarization due to the presence of charged grains. Experimental data is inverted with the model to obtain the dominant grain size. The model is shown to be capable of reproducing experimental data, and the inverted dominant grain size compares favorably with values determined from image analysis.

  4. Heavy mineral sorting as a tool to distinguish depositional characteristics of “in situ” sands from their related injected sands in a Palaeogene submarine Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moatari Kazerouni, Afsoon; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan. B

    Postdepositional remoblization and injection of sand are important processes in deep-water clastic systems. Subsurface mobilisation and injection of sand has been recently recognised as a significant control of deep-water sandstone geometry. Kilometre-scale injection complexes have been interpreted...... in the Paleocene Siri Canyon near the Danish Central Graben of the North Sea hydrocarbon province from borehole data. The emplacement of large-scale injection complexes has been commonly attributed in the geological literature to seismic activity and consequent sand liquefaction. However, due to very small...... differences in textural and compositional properties, and the lack of depositional structures of reservoir sands in the Siri Canyon, the distinction between "in situ" and injected or remobilised sands is difficult. Large scale heavy mineral sorting (in 10 m thick units) is observed in several reservoir units...

  5. Holocene beach buildup and coastal aeolian sand incursions off the Nile littoral cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roskin, Joel; Sivan, Dorit; Shtienberg, Gilad; Porat, Naomi; Bookman, Revital

    2017-04-01

    Israel's coastal plain is abundant with sand originating from the Nile littoral cell. The inland windblown loose sand has formed 3-6 km wide lobe-like sand and dune fields currently comprised of foredunes, linear and northeasterly facing transverse and parabolic dunes that are currently stabilized by vegetation. This study reviews the architecture and history of the these dune fields aiming to: (a) Date the timings of beach accretion, and sand and dune incursions. (b) Discriminate between natural and human-induced forcing factors of sand mobilization and stabilization in time and space. (c) Present a model of the dunescape development. (d) Assess scenarios of sand transport in the future charcaterized by intense human impact and climate change. Luminescence ages, radiocarbon dates and relative ages from previously published geological and archaeological reports, historical texts, together with new optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages and stratigraphic and sedimentological data are analyzed. The deposition, mobilizations and preservation of the sand bodies, initially induced by the decline in sea level rise at 6-4 ka, were later controlled by historic land-use intensity and modern land-use/negligence practices. At 6 ka, beach sand buildup rapidly started. Where aeolianite ridges bordered the coast, pulses of sand with biogenic carbonate grains unconformably draped the ridges and rapidly consolidated into a distinct sandy calcarenite unit. Further east, sand sheets and low dunes partly pedogenized following their incursion, but did not cement. The water retention capacities of the sand sheets enabled the establishment of a sand-stabilizing vegetation cover that probably became an attractive environment for fuel and grazing. The growing Hellenistic-Roman-Byzantine ( 2.4-1.3 ka) populations probably led to increased consumption and massive destruction of sand stabilizing vegetation, enabling sand erodibility and mobilization during winter storms. The sand

  6. Mechanical and Hydraulic Properties of Wax-coated Sands for Sport Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardet, J. P.; Benazza, C.; Bruchon, J. F.; Mishra, M.

    2009-06-01

    Natural soils such as sandy loams are being replaced by synthetic soils for various types of sport and recreational surfaces, including horseracing tracks. These synthetic soils are made of a mixture of sand, microcrystalline wax, synthetic fibers and rubber chips which optimize the mechanical and hydraulic properties of natural soils so that they drain faster after rainstorms and decrease risks of sport injuries while retaining appropriate sport performances. Silica sand, which makes up the largest fraction of synthetic soils, is hydrophyllic by nature, i.e., tends to retain water on sand grain surfaces. After rainstorms, hydrophilic surfaces retain a large amount of water, are difficult to compact, and yield uncontrollable mechanical and hydraulic properties when too moist. The addition of wax contributes to improving both mechanical and hydraulic properties of sands. Wax coats the sand grains with a thin layer, and enhances adherence between sand particles. It repels water from sand grains and influences both compaction and hydraulic properties. This study reports experimental results that help to understand the properties of wax-coated sands used in synthetic surfaces, especially the degradation of synthetic surfaces that have insufficient wax-coatings.

  7. Advanced Techniques for Simulating the Behavior of Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, M.; Bailey, M.

    2009-12-01

    Computer graphics and visualization techniques continue to provide untapped research opportunities, particularly when working with earth science disciplines. Through collaboration with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs we are developing new techniques for simulating sand. In addition, through collaboration with the Oregon Space Grant, we’ve been communicating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to exchange ideas and gain feedback on our work. More specifically, JPL’s DARTS Laboratory specializes in planetary vehicle simulation, such as the Mars rovers. This simulation utilizes a virtual "sand box" to test how planetary rovers respond to different terrains while traversing them. Unfortunately, this simulation is unable to fully mimic the harsh, sandy environments of those found on Mars. Ideally, these simulations should allow a rover to interact with the sand beneath it, particularly for different sand granularities and densities. In particular, there may be situations where a rover may become stuck in sand due to lack of friction between the sand and wheels. In fact, in May 2009, the Spirit rover became stuck in the Martian sand and has provided additional motivation for this research. In order to develop a new sand simulation model, high performance computing will play a very important role in this work. More specifically, graphics processing units (GPUs) are useful due to their ability to run general purpose algorithms and ability to perform massively parallel computations. In prior research, simulating vast quantities of sand has been difficult to compute in real-time due to the computational complexity of many colliding particles. With the use of GPUs however, each particle collision will be parallelized, allowing for a dramatic performance increase. In addition, spatial partitioning will also provide a speed boost as this will help limit the number of particle collision calculations. However, since the goal of this

  8. Identification of TCE and PCE sorption and biodegradation parameters in a sandy aquifer for fate and transport modelling: batch and column studies

    OpenAIRE

    Kret, E.; Kiecak, A.; Malina, G.; Nijenhuis, I.; Postawa, A.

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the sorption and biodegradation parameters of trichloroethene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene (PCE) as input data required for their fate and transport modelling in a Quaternary sandy aquifer. Sorption was determined based on batch and column experiments, while biodegradation was investigated using the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). The aquifer materials medium (soil 1) to fine (soil 2) sands and groundwater samples came from the representat...

  9. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs.

  10. Evolution of radiative sand ridge field of the South Yellow Sea and its sedimentary characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王颖; 朱大奎; 尤坤元; 潘少明; 朱晓东; 邹欣庆; 张永战

    1999-01-01

    A sand ridge field of 22 470 km~2 consists of fine sands and silts originally from the old Changjiang River sediment during the late Pleistocene period. Late Holocene sand stratum with its well-preserved laminary bedding of more clay particles reflects the influence from the Yellow River. There are three genetic types of morphology of sand ridge field as follows: (ⅰ) reformed alluvial sandy bodies and old river valleys, located in the central and southern parts, formed from the end of Pleistocene to the present. (ⅱ) Radiative current ridges and patrimonal valley type, located in the northeastern part, formed during the early or middle Holocene time. (ⅲ) Eroded-depositional sandy bodies in the north and outer parts, and erosional trough in the north formed since the middle Holocene transgression. The sand ridge field has a periodic nature of developing processes: the period of sediment accumulation by rivers during cold epoch with low sea level and the period of erosional formation by tidal currents d

  11. Evolution of pore space in sandstones in relation to diagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, G.

    1982-01-01

    Results are described from studying the collector properties of a bed of sandstones of Yan-10 at the oil field Malin of the Ordosskiy oil and gas basin. The bed is represented by ancient river sandstones of the Jurassic age occurring on eroded surface of the Triassic deposits (Yangan series) and covered with bed of coal deposits Yan-9. The following conclusions were drawn from the results of the studies. Evolution of the pore space actually is the process of gradual substitution of the primary pores by secondary; in this case decrease in porosity in the quartz sandstones occurs mainly because of depositing in the pores of authigenic minerals, and in the sandstones whose grains consist of minerals with lower mechanical strength, because of packing. Secondary porosity develops because of dissolving and kaolinization in the sandstones with high content of feldspars. This process is possibly associated with decarboxilation of organic matter of interlayers of coal and calcareous shales under the influence of increased temperature in the submersion process. Since it has been established that considerable influence on porosity comes from the mineralogical position of the sandstones controlled by the sources of formation, in order to reveal the zones for development of primary and secondary porosity, it is very important to reveal the sources of removal of detrital rocks. A study was also made of the influence of diagenesis on uniformity and texture of the sandstones (by the methods of curves of capillary pressure).

  12. Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

    2009-01-01

    We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not

  13. Geochemical behavior of rare-earth elements and other major and minor elements in sound-producing and silent beach sands in Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The major element composition of sound-producing sand is reported together with rare-earth elements (REE) and other selected elements for the first time. Rare-earth element concentrations in beach sands from Miyagi and Tottori in Japan were determined by induction-coupled, argon-plasma spectrometry (ICP-MS) to characterize the REE of sound-producing and silent sands relative to the parental rocks. Sound-producing sand beaches are very common and all over in Japan: five beaches in Miyagi and 2 in Tottori are selected with other silent sand beaches in the areas. Both sound-producing sand and silent sand samples from Miyagi and Tottori contain more than 60wt% of SiO2 and are composed mainly of quartz and feldspar. Miyagi sand samples are characterized by light REE enrichment and flat chondrite-normalized patterns that are similar to those of local source sandstone. However, all sand samples from Miyatojima in Miyagi show positive Eu anomalies, a characteristic feature not shown in other sand samples from Miyagi. Tottori sand samples also are characterized by high REE contents and remarkable positive Eu anomalies. The sands containing lower REE contents are due to high quartz and feldspar contents. Miyatojima sand samples and Tottori sand samples have high REE contents and show remarkable positive Eu anomalies due to the presence of feldspar.The best results are obtained using all of the geological methods and the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) as a measure of the similarity between sound-producing sand and silent sand. The difference between sound-producing sand and silent sand is obtained from the PCA results.

  14. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  15. Bearing capacity of Skirt circular footing on sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Z. EL Wakil

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Skirts are used to improve the bearing capacity of shallow footings on sandy soil by constraining the soil beneath and containing the plastic flow of soil. They are used as an alternative to deep foundations in soils with low strength at the surface. As there has been available little work studying the performance of skirted foundation, we are performing eighteen laboratory experiments on circular steel footings of different diameters and different skirt lengths. The aim of these experiments is to shed some lights on the effects of skirts on the bearing capacity of shallow footings. The effects of skirt length and the relative density of sand on the ultimate load attained were investigated. From the accomplished laboratory tests, it was found that skirts improve appreciably the sustainability of shallow footings to applied load as they increase the ultimate load of shallow footings by some up to 6.25 times for the current study conditions and variables. The performance of skirted footing depends upon the relative density of sand and on the skirt length to footing diameter ratio. Skirts are more beneficial in case of footings on loose sand than in case of medium and dense sand.

  16. Identification and Spatial Distribution of Remotely Sensed Sand on Fringing Reefs of Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, C. L.; Fletcher, C. H.; Hochberg, E. J.

    2004-12-01

    What surficial spatial patterns predominate among sand accumulations on fringing reefs? Do these patterns provide clues to transport mechanisms and factors governing deposition? Understanding of these spatial characteristics is integral for studying sand as a resource, a benthic habitat, and a mobile geologic unit on the sea floor. Using Quickbird imagery of fringing reefs on Oahu, Hawaii, we tested multiple data processing techniques with a linear classifier that utilized a fixed set of training groups and a truth image. Results show the Lyzenga method provided the best quantitative results, and analyst review finds this method to be the best qualitative spatial display as well. Highly accurate spatial data produced from the classified image, combined with bathymetry data from Shoals LIDAR were then utilized to begin identifying spatial distribution of the sandy substrate across the sea floor. Using basic geomorphologic reef descriptions and general spatial characteristics of the sandy substrate is the first step in identifying patterns of distribution within and juxtaposition to the reef. These results, when compiled from several sites, may begin to provide better understanding of sand's role in the reef geomorphology, though current results are not yet sufficient for predicting sandy substrate characteristics from remotely sensed data.

  17. Eolian sand deposition during th Medieval Climatic Anomaly in Playa San Bartolo, Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, B.; Schaaf, P. E.; Murray, A.; Caballero, M.; Lozano Garcia, S.; Ramirez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Records of past climatic changes in desert environments are scarce due to the poor preservation of biological proxies. To overcome this lack we consider the paleoenvironmental significance and age of a lunette dune in the eastern rim of the Playa San Bartolo (PSB) in Sonoran Desert (Mexico). Rock magnetism, mineralogical, and geochemical analysis (major, trace and REE) allow assessment of sediment provenance and changes in the composition of the PSB dune over time. Thermoluminiscence and optical stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) provide the chronology of lunette dune development. Dune sediments are composed by intercalated layers of sand beds and sandy silt strata. Variability in composition of dune sediments is attributed to changes in sediment sources. Mineralogical, geochemical and magnetic data show clear differences between the sand and the sandy silt of the PSB dune deposits, which suggest different sediment sources. Sand sized deposits, characterized by coarse magnetite grains, are mainly eroded from granitoids from nearby outcrops. Sandy silt deposits, rich in fine grained magnetite and evaporative minerals, resulted after the erosion of volcanic rocks and their soils from sierras at the NE of PSB during heavy rainfall episodes, the flooding of PSB and later deflation and accumulation in the dune of both detritic and authigenic components. The upper 6 m of dune accumulation occurred largely during AD 500 to 1200, a period that correlates with the Medieval climatic anomaly (AD 300 to 1300). These findings suggest that main dune accretion occurred during regionally extended drought conditions, disrupted by sporadic heavy rainfall.

  18. Hydrogeologic Data of the Denver Basin, Colorado. Colorado Water Conservation Board Basic Data Report Number 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    sand: Overburden . 60 60 Sand and sandy snale 1 241 Topsoil and sand. . . 10 - 0 Dawson Formation (lower part): Shale. hard, blue. . . 245 ruviers ...upper part): Clay . 25 .50 Louviers Alluviums Shale. brown ,.... 17 55 ruviers Alluviums Boulders. sand, and Sandstone v-ater-bearinqj 21 𔄀 Gravel

  19. Formation mechanism and model for sand lens reservoirs in the Jiyang Sub-basin, East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Pilong; PANG; Xiongqi; CHEN; Dongxia; ZHANG; Shanwen

    2004-01-01

    The Bohai Bay basin comprises some very important and well documented subtle traps known in China, which have been the major exploration focus and have become a major petroleum play since the 1990s. However, recent exploration showed that the oil-bearing properties of some sand lens reservoirs may vary significantly and the accumulation mechanisms for these lithological subtle traps are not well understood. Based on statistical analysis of oil-bearing properties for 123 sand lens reservoirs in the Jiyang Sub-basin and combined with detailed anatomy of typical sand lens reservoirs and NMR experiments, it has been shown that the structural and sedimentary factors, hydrocarbon generation and expulsion conditions of the surrounding source rocks, as well as the petrophysical properties of sand lens reservoirs are the main controlling factors for the formation of sand lens reservoirs. The formation of a sand lens reservoir depends on the interaction between the hydrocarbon accumulation driving force and the resistance force. The driving force is made up of the differential capillary pressure between sandstones and sources rocks and the hydrocarbon diffusion force, and as well as the hydrocarbon expansion force. The resistance force is the friction resistance force for hydrocarbons and water to move through the pore throats of the sand lens. The sedimentary environment, source rock condition and sand reservoir properties can change from unfavorable to favorable depending on the combination of these factors. When these three factors all reach certain thresholds, the sand lens reservoirs may begin to be filled by hydrocarbons. When all of these conditions become favorable for the formation of sand lens reservoirs, the reservoir would have high oil saturation. This approach has been applied to evaluating the potential of petroleum accumulation in the sand lens reservoirs in the third member of the Neogene Shahejie Formation in the Jiyang Sub-basin.

  20. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  1. A two scale analysis of tight sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Davy, C. A.; Song, Y.; Troadec, D.; Hauss, G.; Skoczylas, F.

    2015-12-01

    Tight sandstones have a low porosity and a very small permeability K. Available models for K do not compare well with measurements. These sandstones are made of SiO_2 grains, with a typical size of several hundreds of micron. These grains are separated by a network of micro-cracks, with sizes ranging between microns down to tens of nm. Therefore, the structure can be schematized by Voronoi polyhedra separated by plane and permeable polygonal micro-cracks. Our goal is to estimate K based on a two scale analysis and to compare the results to measurements. For a particular sample [2], local measurements on several scales include FIB/SEM [3], CMT and 2D SEM. FIB/SEM is selected because the peak pore size given by Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry is of 350nm. FIB/SEM imaging (with 50 nm voxel size) identifies an individual crack of 180nm average opening, whereas CMT provides a connected porosity (individual crack) for 60 nm voxel size, of 4 micron average opening. Numerical modelling is performed by combining the micro-crack network scale (given by 2D SEM) and the 3D micro-crack scale (given by either FIB/SEM or CMT). Estimates of the micro-crack density are derived from 2D SEM trace maps by counting the intersections with scanlines, the surface density of traces, and the number of fracture intersections. K is deduced by using a semi empirical formula valid for identical, isotropic and uniformly distributed fractures [1]. This value is proportional to the micro-crack transmissivity sigma. Sigma is determined by solving the Stokes equation in the micro-cracks measured by FIB/SEM or CMT. K is obtained by combining the two previous results. Good correlation with measured values on centimetric plugs is found when using sigma from CMT data. The results are discussed and further research is proposed. [1] Adler et al, Fractured porous media, Oxford Univ. Press, 2012. [2] Duan et al, Int. J. Rock Mech. Mining Sci., 65, p75, 2014. [3] Song et al, Marine and Petroleum Eng., 65, p63

  2. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal impact assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: coastal topography and bathymetry, impacts to coastal beaches and barriers, impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology, impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures, impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife. This fact sheet focuses assessing impacts to coastal beaches and barriers.

  3. Factors controlling localization of uranium deposits in the Dakota Sandstone, Gallup and Ambrosia Lake mining districts, McKinley County, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Charles Thomas; Green, Morris W.

    1977-01-01

    Geologic studies were made at all of the uranium mines and prospects in the Dakota Sandstone of Early(?) and Late Cretaceous age in the Gallup mining district, McKinley County, New Mexico. Dakota mines in the adjacent Ambrosia Lake mining district were visited briefly for comparative purposes. Mines in the eastern part of the Gallup district, and in the Ambrosia Lake district, are on the Chaco slope of the southern San Juan Basin in strata which dip gently northward toward the central part of the basin. Mines in the western part of the Gallup district are along the Gallup hogback (Nutria monocline) in strata which dip steeply westward into the Gallup sag. Geologic factors which controlled formation of the uranium deposits in the Dakota Sandstone are: (1) a source of uranium, believed to be uranium deposits of the underlying Morrison Formation of Late Jurassic age; (2) the accessibility to the Dakota of uranium-bearing solutions from the Morrison; (3) the presence in the Dakota of permeable sandstone beds overlain by impermeable carbonaceous shale beds; and (4) the occurrence within the permeable Dakota sandstone beds of carbonaceous reducing material as bedding-plane laminae, or as pockets of carbonaceous trash. Most of the Dakota uranium deposits are found in the lower part of the formation in marginal-marine distributary-channel sandstones which were deposited in the backshore environment. However, the Hogback no. 4 (Hyde) Mine (Gallup district) occurs in sandy paludal shale of the backshore environment, and another deposit, the Silver Spur (Ambrosia Lake district), is found in what is interpreted to be a massive beach or barrier-bar sandstone of the foreshore environment in the upper part of the Dakota. The sedimentary depositional environment most favorable for the accumulation of uranium is that of backshore areas lateral to main distributary channels, where levee, splay, and some distributary-channel sandstones intertongue with gray carbonaceous shales and

  4. 78 FR 32296 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... recipients most severely affected by Hurricane Sandy: the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New Jersey... Federal Register notice, bringing the total amount of Hurricane Sandy Emergency Relief funds allocated...

  5. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  6. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  7. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  8. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  9. Virksomhedens sande ansigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholt, Marianne Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Er modhistorier en byrde eller en styrke i forandringsprocesser? Hvad stiller vi op, når adgangen til organisationens sande identitet går gennem medarbejdernes modhistorier? Når vi sammenholder denne erkendelse med vores viden om, at medarbejdere helt naturligt afholder sig fra at videregive disse...

  10. Sand (CSW4)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  11. Sand supply to beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2017-04-01

    In most cases, beaches and dunes are built by sand that has been transported onshore from the shoreface. While this has been known for a long time, we are still not able to quantitatively predict onshore sediment transport and sand supply to beaches. Sediment transport processes operating during brief, high-energy stormy conditions - when beaches erode and sand moves offshore - are fairly well known and they can be modelled with a reasonable degree of confidence. However, the slower onshore sand transport leading to beach recovery under low-to-moderate energy conditions - and the reason why beaches and dunes exist in the first place - is not yet well understood. This severely limits our capability to understand and predict coastal behaviour on long time scales, for example in response to changing sea level or wave conditions. This paper will discuss issues and recent developments in sediment transport measurement and prediction on the lower and upper shoreface and into the swash zone. The focus will be on the integration and upscaling of small-scale deterministic process measurements into parametric models that may increase modelling capabilities of coastal behaviour on larger temporal and spatial scales.

  12. Coastal geology and recent origins for Sand Point, Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Krantz, David E.; Castaneda, Mario R.; Loope, Walter L.; Jol, Harry M.; Goble, Ronald J.; Higley, Melinda C.; DeWald, Samantha; Hansen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sand Point is a small cuspate foreland located along the southeastern shore of Lake Superior within Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near Munising, Michigan. Park managers’ concerns for the integrity of historic buildings at the northern periphery of the point during the rising lake levels in the mid-1980s greatly elevated the priority of research into the geomorphic history and age of Sand Point. To pursue this priority, we recovered sediment cores from four ponds on Sand Point, assessed subsurface stratigraphy onshore and offshore using geophysical techniques, and interpreted the chronology of events using radiocarbon and luminescence dating. Sand Point formed at the southwest edge of a subaqueous platform whose base is probably constructed of glacial diamicton and outwash. During the post-glacial Nipissing Transgression, the base was mantled with sand derived from erosion of adjacent sandstone cliffs. An aerial photograph time sequence, 1939–present, shows that the periphery of the platform has evolved considerably during historical time, infl uenced by transport of sediment into adjacent South Bay. Shallow seismic refl ections suggest slump blocks along the leading edge of the platform. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and shallow seismic refl ections to the northwest of the platform reveal large sand waves within a deep (12 m) channel produced by currents fl owing episodically to the northeast into Lake Superior. Ground-penetrating radar profi les show transport and deposition of sand across the upper surface of the platform. Basal radiocarbon dates from ponds between subaerial beach ridges range in age from 540 to 910 cal yr B.P., suggesting that Sand Point became emergent during the last ~1000 years, upon the separation of Lake Superior from Lakes Huron and Michigan. However, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from the beach ridges were two to three times as old as the radiocarbon ages, implying that emergence of Sand Point may have begun

  13. Refuge Management Plan: Sandstone Unit Rice Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Part I of this management plan for the Sandstone Unit of Rice Lake NWR summarizes background information on the location, history, environment, resources,...

  14. Size effect of sandstone after high temperature under uniaxial compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Hai-jian; JING Hong-wen; MAO Xian-biao; ZHAO Hong-hui; YIN Qian; WANG Chen

    2015-01-01

    Uniaxial compression tests on sandstone samples with five different sizes after high temperature processes were performed in order to investigate the size effect and its evolution. The test results show that the density, longitudinal wave velocity, peak strength, average modulus and secant modulus of sandstone decrease with the increase of temperature, however, peak strain increases gradually. With the increase of ratio of height to diameter, peak strength of sandstone decreases, which has an obvious size effect. A new theoretical model of size effect of sandstone material considering the influence of temperature is put forward, and with the increase of temperature, the size effect is more apparent. The threshold decreases gradually with the increase of temperature, and the deviations of the experimental values and the theoretical values are between 0.44% and 6.06%, which shows quite a credibility of the theoretical model.

  15. Study on the cutting plane friction law of sandstone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Ying-da (翟英达); KANG Li-xun(康立勋)

    2003-01-01

    The friction characteristics of rock damage plane have important impact on the stability of block structure formed after the stratum is broken. The mechanics properties of rock damage plane are described by parameters such as roughness coefficient, wall compress strength and basic friction angle. These three coefficients for fine grain sandstone and medium-granular sandstone and grit sandstone are test. The friction stress is researched at the condition of different normal compressive stress acting on the tension damage plane. The friction law of tension damage plane of sandstone abided by is summed up. This law will provide scientific basis for block structure stability judging in basic roof stratum and roof pressure intensity calculating.

  16. Grass Cover Influences Hydrophysical Parameters and Heterogeneity of Water Flow in a Sandy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. LICHNER; D. J. ELDRIDGE; K. SCHACHT; N. ZHUKOVA; L. HOLKO; M. (S)(I)R; J. PECHO

    2011-01-01

    Vegetation cover has a major effect on water flow in soils.Two sites,separated by distance of about 50 m,were selected to quantify the influence of grass cover on hydrophysical parameters and heterogeneity of water flow in a sandy soil emerging during a heavy rain following a long hot,dry period.A control soil (pure sand) with limited impact of vegetation or organic matter was obtained by sampling at 50 cm depth beneath a glade area,and a grassland soil was covered in a 10 cm thick humic layer and colonised by grasses.The persistence of water repellency was measured using the water drop penetration time test,sorptivity and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity using a mini disk infiltrometer,and saturated hydraulic conductivity using a double-ring infiltrometer.Dye tracer experiments were used to assess the heterogeneity of water flow,and both the modified method for estimating effective cross section and an original method for assessing the degree of preferential flow were used to quantify this heterogeneity from the images of dyed soil profiles.Most hydrophysical parameters were substantially different between the two surfaces.The grassland soil had an index of water repellency about 10 times that of pure sand and the persistence of water repellency almost 350 times that of pure sand.Water and ethanol sorptivities in the grassland soil were 7% and 43%,respectively,of those of the pure sand.Hydraulic conductivity and saturated hydraulic conductivities in the grassland soil were 5% and 16% of those of the pure sand,respectively.Dye tracer experiments revealed a stable flow with "air-draining" condition in pure sand and well-developed preferential flow in grassland soil,corresponding to individual grass tussocks and small micro-depressions.The grassland soil was substantially more water repellent and had 3 times the degree of preferential flow compared to pure sand.The results of this study reinforce our view that the consequences of any change in climate

  17. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  18. The Effect of Assistive Anchor-Like Grousers on Wheeled Rover Performance over Unconsolidated Sandy Dune Inclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad Najmuddin; Aoshima, Shinichi; Shiroma, Naoji; Fukuoka, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-15

    Typical rovers with wheels equipped with conventional grousers are prone to getting stuck in unconsolidated sandy dune inclines as the wheels tend to sink into the sand. This phenomenon is caused by the motion of the grouser through the sand during the latter half of the rotation, in which the grouser pushes the sand from underneath the wheel upwards and towards the backside of the wheel. This creates a space that the wheel can sink into. To minimize sand movement and subsequent sinkage, we propose the concept of using an "assistive grouser", which is attached to the side of a conventional rover wheel. The assistive grouser is designed to be able to autonomously maintain a uniform angle relative to the rover body independent of the rotation of the wheels. Rotating the wheel causes the assistive grousers to automatically penetrate into the sand slope surface at a constant angle of attack, thereby acting as an anchor and providing traction for the wheel. Maintaining a uniform grouser angle as opposed to a rotating motion also assists in extracting the grouser out of the sand without moving the sand towards the back of the wheel. Moreover, the angle of the assistive grousers is held constantly by a single dedicated motor, meaning that the angle of the assistive grousers can be optimized to provide the least amount of sinkage for each slope angle. The experimental results showed that for slope angles of 0-30 degrees, the rover equipped with the proposed assistive grousers experienced significantly less sinkage and consumed less current compared to the rover equipped with conventional grousers.

  19. Sandstone petrofacies in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas, J.; Ochoa, M; R Mas; Arribas, Mª E.; González-Acebrón, L.

    2007-01-01

    [EN] During the most active rifting stages in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin (Cameros Basin and Aragonese Branch of the Iberian Range), thick sequences of continental clastic deposits were generated. Sandstone records from Rift cycle 1 (Permo-Triassic) and Rift cycle 2 (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) show similarities in composition. Based on the most recent data, this paper describes sandstone petrofacies developed during both rifting periods. Six petrofacies can be d...

  20. Sandstone petrofacies in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas Mocoroa, José; Ochoa, M; Mas Mayoral, José Ramón; Arribas Mocoroa, María Eugenia; González-Acebrón, L.

    2007-01-01

    During the most active rifting stages in the northwestern sector of the Iberian Basin (Cameros Basin and Aragonese Branch of the Iberian Range), thick sequences of continental clastic deposits were generated. Sandstone records from Rift cycle 1 (Permo-Triassic) and Rift cycle 2 (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) show similarities in composition. Based on the most recent data, this paper describes sandstone petrofacies developed during both rifting periods. Six petrofacies can be distinguishe...

  1. Micropore Structure Representation of Sandstone in Petroleum Reservoirs Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Yong-Qiang; ZHU Xing; WU Jun-Zheng; BAI Wen-Guang

    2011-01-01

    @@ The pore structure of sandstone in an oil reservoir is investigated using atomic force microscopy(AFM).At nanoscale resolution,AFM images of sandstone show us the fine structure.The real height data of images display the three-dimensional space structure of sandstone effectively.The three-dimensional analysis results show that the AFM images of sandstone have unique characteristics that,like fingerprints,can identify different structural properties of sandstones.The results demonstrate that AFM is an effective method used to represent original sandstone in petroleum reservoirs,and may help geologists to appreciate the sandstone in oil reservoirs fully.

  2. Simulation of atrazine and metabolite transport and fate in a sandy-till aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jonathan; Chesters, Gordon

    1995-11-01

    In a 2.5-yr field study we determined the distribution of atrazine and its metabolites in a sandy-till aquifer overlying Cambrian sandstone in a dairy farming area. Flow paths are predominantly downward at piezometer nests where vertical hydraulic gradients dominate. Atrazine and desethylated atrazine concentrations along those flow paths generally decrease with increasing estimated groundwater travel time to the monitoring points. A one-dimensional contaminant transport model is developed in FORTRAN incorporating major chemical processes and dispersion along simulated flow paths. Separate simulations of atrazine and desethylated atrazine transport to individual piezometers are made, each with an appropriate average groundwater velocity. Regression equations are developed, based on an extensive literature review, to estimate acceptable sorption and dispersivity coefficients for the transport model. The one-dimensional simulations are calibrated using the field concentration-travel time relationships for atrazine and desethylated atrazine. The calibration procedure provides estimates of atrazine and desethylated atrazine degradation rates in groundwater corresponding to half-lives of 3470 and 2770 days, respectively. Although uncertain, the estimates provide evidence of much slower degradation in the aquifer than indicated by laboratory experiments. Using the calibrated transport parameter values, simulations of long-term steady-state leaching to the water table demonstrate that even with such slow degradation rates, steady-state concentrations at most piezometers are reached within ˜ 20 yr. Concentrations in the underlying sandstone aquifer are therefore not expected to increase substantially over time due to continued atrazine use. However, the slow degradation rates mean that even with the most optimistic condition, i.e. all input to the aquifer ceases in response to a cessation of atrazine application, it may take more than a decade for concentrations deeper in

  3. Petroacoustic Modelling of Heterolithic Sandstone Reservoirs: A Novel Approach to Gassmann Modelling Incorporating Sedimentological Constraints and NMR Porosity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; Lovell, M.; Davies, S. J.; Pritchard, T.; Sirju, C.; Abdelkarim, A.

    2012-12-01

    Heterolithic or 'shaly' sandstone reservoirs constitute a significant proportion of hydrocarbon resources. Petroacoustic models (a combination of petrophysics and rock physics) enhance the ability to extract reservoir properties from seismic data, providing a connection between seismic and fine-scale rock properties. By incorporating sedimentological observations these models can be better constrained and improved. Petroacoustic modelling is complicated by the unpredictable effects of clay minerals and clay-sized particles on geophysical properties. Such effects are responsible for erroneous results when models developed for "clean" reservoirs - such as Gassmann's equation (Gassmann, 1951) - are applied to heterolithic sandstone reservoirs. Gassmann's equation is arguably the most popular petroacoustic modelling technique in the hydrocarbon industry and is used to model elastic effects of changing reservoir fluid saturations. Successful implementation of Gassmann's equation requires well-constrained drained rock frame properties, which in heterolithic sandstones are heavily influenced by reservoir sedimentology, particularly clay distribution. The prevalent approach to categorising clay distribution is based on the Thomas - Stieber model (Thomas & Stieber, 1975), this approach is inconsistent with current understanding of 'shaly sand' sedimentology and omits properties such as sorting and grain size. The novel approach presented here demonstrates that characterising reservoir sedimentology constitutes an important modelling phase. As well as incorporating sedimentological constraints, this novel approach also aims to improve drained frame moduli estimates through more careful consideration of Gassmann's model assumptions and limitations. A key assumption of Gassmann's equation is a pore space in total communication with movable fluids. This assumption is often violated by conventional applications in heterolithic sandstone reservoirs where effective porosity, which

  4. Sandstone provenance and diagenesis in relation to Late Cretaceous regional depositional systems and paleogeography, Sacramento Basin, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertz, K.A. Jr. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA)); Nilsen, T.H. (Applied Earth Technology, Inc., Redwood City, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Petrographic modal analyses of sandstone samples from the Upper Cretaceous Guinda, Forbes, Kone, Marsh Creek, Chico, Starky, Winters, and Mokelumne River formations of the Sacramento basin reveal that samples are dominated by plutoniclastic and volcaniclastic detritus, have intermediate plagioclase-to-total=feldspar ratios (0.48-0.65), and have high but variable L{sub v}/L ratios (0.51-0.80). Forbes/Kione sandstones, in comparison to Starkey/Winters samples, have higher proportions of volcaniclastic (plagioclase) to plutoniclastic (Q{sub m}, K) detritus and higher W{sub p}/total Q and L{sub m}/L{sub v} ratios. The Chico Formation, like the Starkey/Winters, is dominated by plutoniclastic material; in comparison to Forbes/Kione samples, the Chico has higher total lithic values (L{sub t}), especially in the L{sub m} fraction. These data strongly support derivation of the sands from the Cordilleran magmatic arc system to the north and east. Sandstones from the Chico, Starkey, Winters, and Mokelumne River formations were derived primarily from the dissected Sierran magmatic arc complex to the east, with a minor but significant secondary source in foothill belt metamorphic complexes. Forbes and Kione sandstones, in contrast, appear to have been derived from the Idaho Batholith and Blue Mountain regions of Idaho/Oregon to the north and northeast. When corrections are applied to account for significant diagenetic dissolution of plagioclase and compactional alteration of lithic fragments (especially L{sub v}), the dissected or transitional arc provenance for most samples is strengthened. Modal data and paleogeographic reconstructions suggest that during the early and middle Campanian, most detritus in the Sacramento basin was derived from the north/northeast (erosion of the Idaho batholith arc system), reflecting southward progradation of the Kion/Forbes delta-submarine fan system into the longitudinal forearc basin.

  5. Palaeozoic sandstone reservoirs of the Hamada Basin, NW Libya: effects of synsedimentary processes on porosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, S.H.A.; Mansouri, A.; El Ghoul, M. (Arabian Gulf Oil Co., Benghazi (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya). Exploration Div.)

    1993-07-01

    The Hamada Basin of NW Libya is an intracratonic basin in which a thick sequence of clastic rocks was deposited during the Palaeozoic. These sediments were derived from a PreCambrian basement of felsic igneous and metamorphic rocks, and include both sands and clays; almost all the clays in formations of Palaeozoic age were produced from the alteration of feldspar. Structures were developed as these sediments were draped over the surface of the basement. Reservoirs in the Lower Palaeozoic (Lower Devonian, Lower Silurian and Cambro-Ordovician Sandstones) appear to have developed as a result of synsedimentary processes, such as winnowing and washing-out of clayey material from the sand by percolating waters, and sliding and slumping on the steep depositional surface during or soon after deposition. Oil traps are independent of structural elevation, but appear to have developed on those surfaces which were sufficiently steep to have initiated the above synsedimentary processes. This theory has been successfully tested in many places in the basin, and may provide a lead for exploration in other basins in Libya that have similar geological settings. (Author)

  6. Impact of Hurricane Sandy on the Shoreface and Inner Shelf, Offshore Long Island: Evidence for Ravinement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, J. A.; Austin, J. A.; Flood, R. D.; Schwab, W. C.; Denny, J. F.; Christensen, B. A.; Browne, C. M.; Saustrup, S.

    2013-12-01

    In January 2013, approximately two months after Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the Mid-Atlantic Bight, a scientific team from the University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, partnering with colleagues at Adelphi and Stony Brook universities and the USGS, conducted marine geophysical and surficial sampling surveys both offshore and in the inshore bays of Long Island, NY. The primary scientific goal was to assess the impact of the storm on the shoreface and inner shelf. Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone near Brigantine, NJ, with 70-kt maximum sustained winds. However, its unusual trajectory and massive size created record storm surges along the heavily-populated NJ and NY coastlines. As a result, infrastructure in the NY metropolitan area was damaged, and the Long Island barrier island system was both breached in places and elsewhere seriously eroded. The surveys included ten days of operations aboard Stony Brook's R/V Seawolf, offshore of Long Beach and Fire Island, barrier islands south of Long Island, complementing ongoing land-based studies of Sandy's impact on the NY-NJ barrier island system. Data collection involved multibeam bathymetric swath mapping, CHIRP very high resolution acoustic subbottom profiling, and surface sediment (grab) sampling to provide ground truth for the geophysical data. We surveyed regions that had been previously surveyed, both by Stony Brook in 2001 and 2005 to support reef management, and by the USGS for coastal sedimentary research, most recently in 2011 offshore Fire Island. These areas include shoreface-attached sand ridges that may be exchanging sand with the barrier island shoreface. We focus on before-and-after data comparisons on the shoreface and inner shelf, searching in particular for evidence that the storm contributed significantly to ravinement, either by wave- or current-forced erosion along the shoreface or via migration of shoreface-attached or detached sand ridges on the inner shelf. The interpreted

  7. The protection of sandy shores - Can we afford to ignore the contribution of seagrass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maike

    2017-08-15

    Shore nourishment is considered an effective soft coastal protection measure for sandy shorelines. However, sand demand and costs are high, especially as nourishment has to be repeated regularly due to ongoing erosion. Seagrass meadows are able to trap and stabilise sediment by reducing bed shear stress. Moreover, they reduce flow velocity and wave energy in regions beyond their boundaries. Especially small species may not provide these ecosystem services sufficiently to protect shorelines from erosion, but they may stabilise beach profiles enough to increase nourishment intervals. This review discusses the potential benefits of integrating ecosystem services provided by seagrass meadows, both existing and newly planted, in nourishment plans, and also addresses potential limitations such as unsuitable hydrodynamic conditions and seasonality. Finally, it highlights knowledge gaps that should be addressed by interdisciplinary research to improve nourishment plans and use seagrass ecosystem services to their full potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Particle Size and Soil Compaction on Gas Transport Parameters in Variably Saturated, Sandy Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2009-01-01

    the water retention curve), both exhibiting similar and exponential relationships with D50. Under variably saturated conditions, higher Dp and ka in coarser sand (larger D50) were observed due to rapid gas diffusion and advection through the less tortuous large-pore networks. In addition, soil compaction......The soil gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) and air permeability (ka) and their dependency on soil air content ( ) control gas diffusion and advection in soils. This study investigated the effects of average particle size (D50) and dry bulk density ( b) on Dp and ka for six sandy soils under variably...... saturated conditions. Data showed that particle size markedly affects the effective diameter of the drained pores active in leading gas through the sample at –100 cm H2O of soil water matric potential (calculated from Dp and ka) as well as the average pore diameter at half saturation (calculated from...

  9. Road traffic and sandy playground influence on ambient pollutants in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, M. C.; Rivas, I.; Moreno, T.; Alastuey, A.; Font, O.; Córdoba, P.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Sunyer, J.; Querol, X.

    2015-06-01

    Urban air pollution has a greater impact on children's health compared to adults. In the framework of the BREATHE (BRain dEvelopment and Air polluTion ultrafine particles in scHool childrEn) project, the present work studies the impact of road traffic and the presence of sandy playgrounds on the outdoor air quality around schools. Four schools were selected for intensive campaigns of one month. PM2.5 samples were collected daily from 8:00 to 20:00 and chemically analysed. Real time measurements of NOx, black carbon (BC), PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations were carried out. Sand samples from five school playgrounds were characterized. The results confirm the representativeness of the general BREATHE project campaigns (eight weekdays measurements at each of the 39 schools). NOx, BC and PMx concentrations were higher in the school located nearest to traffic in the city centre with the daily pattern reflecting the traffic rush hours. The NOx concentrations were found to decrease with distance to the main road. The road traffic influence on ambient pollutants was higher on weekdays than weekends. The PM10 concentrations at one of the schools were mainly driven by the influence of the sandy playground, with peaks up to 25, 57 and 12 times higher than night background concentrations during mid-morning break, lunch break and end of school day, respectively. The airborne mineral matter concentrations registered at this school further confirm this origin. Nevertheless the influence of the re-suspension from the sandy playground was very local and decreased drastically within a short distance. The possible impact of the use of the private car for children's commuting on the outdoor air quality of the schools cannot be quantitatively assessed due to the overlapping with the rush hour of the city.

  10. Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction — Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Benzel, William M.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Hageman, Philip L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Adams, Monique; Berry, Cyrus J.; Fischer, Jeffrey; Fisher, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity).

  11. Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction - Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S; Benzel, William M; Hoefen, Todd M; Hageman, Philip L; Morman, Suzette A; Reilly, Timothy J; Adams, Monique; Berry, Cyrus J; Fischer, Jeffrey M; Fisher, Irene

    2016-06-30

    Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity).

  12. Diagenesis Along Fractures in an Eolian Sandstone, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Yen, A. S.; Rampe, E. B.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Chipera, S. J.; Downs, R.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Vaniman, D. T.; Gellert, R.; Sutter, B.; Treiman, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring sedimentary deposits in Gale crater since August 2012. The rover has traversed up section through approx.100 m of sedimentary rocks deposited in fluvial, deltaic, lacustrine, and eolian environments (Bradbury group and overlying Mount Sharp group). The Stimson formation lies unconformable over a lacustrine mudstone at the base of the Mount Sharp group and has been interpreted to be a cross-bedded sandstone of lithified eolian dunes. Mineralogy of the unaltered Stimson sandstone consists of plagioclase feldspar, pyroxenes, and magnetite with minor abundances of hematite, and Ca-sulfates (anhydrite, bassanite). Unaltered sandstone has a composition similar to the average Mars crustal composition. Alteration "halos" occur adjacent to fractures in the Stimson. Fluids passing through these fractures have altered the chemistry and mineralogy of the sandstone. Silicon and S enrichments and depletions in Al, Fe, Mg, Na, K, Ni and Mn suggest aqueous alteration in an open hydrologic system. Mineralogy of the altered Stimson is dominated by Ca-sulfates, Si-rich X-ray amorphous materials along with plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and pyroxenes, but less abundant in the altered compared to the unaltered Stimson sandstone and lower pyroxene/plagioclase feldspar. The mineralogy and geochemistry of the altered sandstone suggest a complicated history with several (many?) episodes of aqueous alteration under a variety of environmental conditions (e.g., acidic, alkaline).

  13. Key Elements Controlling Oil Accumulation within the Tight Sandstones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Hu; Zhiping Zeng; Jianzhang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Tight oil sandstone reservoirs with low porosity and permeability, which are an uncon-ventional petroleum resource, have been discovered in the Jurassic intervals of the central Junggar Ba-sin, the northwestern China. To reveal the accumulation mechanism, a relatively comprehensive re-search was conducted, including oil-source correlation, porosity evolution, and hydrocarbon charging history. The results show that crude oil of these tight sandstone reservoirs were mainly from Permian source rocks with some contribution from Jurassic source rocks. The reservoirs were buried at shallow depth (5%). In contrast, the sandstone reservoir had already become tight and did not provide available space to ac-cumulate oil due to severe compaction and cementation when hydrocarbon from Jurassic source rock filled, evidenced by low GOI values (<5%). Therefore, reservoir porosity controls the oil accumulation within tight sandstone. Whether tight sandstone reservoirs accumulate oil depends on the reservoir quality when hydrocarbons charge. Before the exploration of tight oil sandstone reservoirs, it should be required to investigate the relationship between oil charging history and porosity evolution to reduce the exploration risk and figure out the available targets.

  14. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  15. Microhabitat use by two rocky shore gastropods in an intertidal sandy substrate with rocky fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turra, A; Denadai, M R

    2006-02-01

    Sandy beaches in some areas of the São Sebastião Channel in southeastern Brazil have unremittingly undergone a variety of impacts, including the deposition of rock fragments in the intertidal region. Consequently, these environments support a rich fauna comprising both sandy beach and rocky shore organisms. Two rocky shore gastropods, Tegula viridula and Morula nodulosa, are particularly abundant in such environments. An evaluation of the use of microhabitats by these two species revealed that they occupy the available microhabitats in different proportions and the presence of one species is associated with the absence of the other. Morula nodulosa is randomly dispersed, occupying mostly areas with rock fragments covered with sediment and branching brown algae. Tegula viridula shows a clumped dispersion associated with the patchiness of the microhabitats used: the presence of encrusting green algae and absence of sediment and branching brown algae covering the rocks. These findings suggest T. viridula has a lower tolerance than M. nodulosa to sand inundation of the rocky fragments, a stochastic event common to the environment in question.

  16. Microhabitat use by two rocky shore gastropods in an intertidal sandy substrate with rocky fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Turra

    Full Text Available Sandy beaches in some areas of the São Sebastião Channel in southeastern Brazil have unremittingly undergone a variety of impacts, including the deposition of rock fragments in the intertidal region. Consequently, these environments support a rich fauna comprising both sandy beach and rocky shore organisms. Two rocky shore gastropods, Tegula viridula and Morula nodulosa, are particularly abundant in such environments. An evaluation of the use of microhabitats by these two species revealed that they occupy the available microhabitats in different proportions and the presence of one species is associated with the absence of the other. Morula nodulosa is randomly dispersed, occupying mostly areas with rock fragments covered with sediment and branching brown algae. Tegula viridula shows a clumped dispersion associated with the patchiness of the microhabitats used: the presence of encrusting green algae and absence of sediment and branching brown algae covering the rocks. These findings suggest T. viridula has a lower tolerance than M. nodulosa to sand inundation of the rocky fragments, a stochastic event common to the environment in question.

  17. Inhibiting water evaporation of sandy soil by the soil particles modified with Japanese wax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zeng-Zhi; WANG Hong-Juan; Li Cui-Lan

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to resolve the problems of water conservation of sandy soil in desertification areas. The surface of soil particles was modified by molecules of natural Japanese wax through some specially screened surfactant. The modified particles were then well sprayed onto the sand, which was placed in an artificial climate box with simulating desert environment, to form a soil film with effect of suppressing water and gas-permeability. Structure of soil film was analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectrometry (IR). And its mechanism of water inhibition was illustrated with DSC and TG curves. Its influence on grass-planting was tested through the instruments of water detector. The results show that sorbitol anhydride stearate(Span 80)could well disperse the Japanese wax and make it combine with the clay which is also dispersed. The pores among soil particles grew smaller and turned from hydrophilic into hydrophobic, in which way resistance to water penetrating through the film was increased. Experimental grass grows normally on sandy soil with the soil film in the artificial desert climate box, indicating that the soil particles modified with Japanese wax is an effective method to inhibit water evaporation.

  18. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Summers Engel

    Full Text Available Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales. Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales. These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment

  19. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Annette Summers; Gupta, Axita A

    2014-01-01

    Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales). Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales). These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment. Future research will

  20. Distributional patterns in an insect community inhabiting a sandy beach of Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourglia, Virginia; González-Vainer, Patricia; Defeo, Omar

    2015-12-01

    Most studies of sandy beach macrofauna have been restricted to semiterrestrial species and do not include insects when providing species richness and abundance estimates. Particularly, spatio-temporal patterns of community structure of the entomofauna inhabiting these ecosystems have been scarcely documented. This study assessed spatio-temporal distributional patterns of the night active entomofauna on a beach-dune system of Uruguay, including variations in species richness, abundance and diversity, and their relationship with environmental factors. A deconstructive taxonomic analysis was also performed, considering richness and abundance patterns separately for the most abundant insect Orders (Hymenoptera and Coleoptera) to better understand the factors which drive their patterns. We found clear temporal and across-shore patterns in the insect community inhabiting a land-ocean interface, which matched spatiotemporal variations in the environment. Abundance and species richness were highest in spring and summer, concurrently with high temperatures and low values of sediment moisture and compaction. Multivariate ordinations showed two well-defined species groups, which separated summer, autumn and spring samples from winter ones. Generalized Linear Models allowed us to describe a clear segregation in space of the most important orders of the insect community, with specific preferences for the terrestrial (Hymenoptera) and beach (Coleoptera) fringes. Hymenoptera preferred the dune zone, characterized by high elevation and low sand moisture and compaction levels, whereas Coleoptera preferred gentle slopes and fine and humid sands of the beach. Our results suggest that beach and dune ecosystems operate as two separate components in regard to their physical and biological features. The high values of species richness and abundance of insects reveal that this group has a more significant ecological role than that originally considered so far in sandy beach ecology.

  1. Dispersants as used in response to the MC252-Spill Lead to higher mobility of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in oil-contaminated Gulf of Mexico sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuijdgeest, A.; Huettel, M.

    2012-01-01

    After the explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, large volumes of crude oil were washed onto and embedded in the sandy beaches and sublittoral sands of the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Some of this oil was mechanically or chemically dispersed before reaching the shore. With a set of laboratory-colu

  2. Rediscovering community--reflections after Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hoboken, New Jersey, is a town of 50,000 residents located across the Hudson River from New York City. Most of Hoboken's infrastructure was compromised during Hurricane Sandy as a result of flooding and power outages that rendered many businesses inoperable, including all of the pharmacies in town. Despite a focus on emergency preparedness since Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, there were no contingencies in place to facilitate and assess the medication needs of the community in the event of a natural disaster. This essay describes how the author rediscovered the meaning of community, and through working with colleagues in other health care disciplines and non-health care volunteers, provided care to patients in suboptimal circumstances.

  3. Hurricane Sandy science plan: New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Clarice N.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. More than one-half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of a coast, and this number is increasing. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is one of the largest providers of geologic and hydrologic information in the world. Federal, State, and local partners depend on the USGS science to know how to prepare for hurricane hazards and reduce losses from future hurricanes. The USGS works closely with other bureaus within the Department of the Interior, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and many State and local agencies to identify their information needs before, during, and after hurricanes.

  4. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...... of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors...

  5. Dynamic triggering during rupture nucleation in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubnel, Alexandre; Chanard, Kristel; Latour, Soumaya; Petrelis, François; Hatano, Takahiro; Mair, Karen; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Fluid induced stress perturbations in the crust at seismogenic depths can be caused by various sources, such as deglaciation unloading, magmatic intrusion or fluid injection and withdrawal. Numbers of studies have robustly shown their link to earthquake triggering. However, the role of small periodic stress variations induced by solid earth and oceanic tides or seasonal hydrology in the seismic cycle, of the order of a few kPa, remains unclear. Indeed, the existence or absence of correlation between these loading phenomena and earthquakes have been equally proposed in the literature. To investigate this question, we performed a set of triaxial deformation experiments on porous water-saturated Fontainebleau sandstones. Rock samples were loaded by the combined action of steps of constant stress (creep), intended to simulate tectonic loading and small sinusoidal pore pressure variations with a range of amplitudes, analogous to tides or seasonal loading. All tests were conducted at a regulated temperature of 35C and a constant 35 MPa confining pressure. Our experimental results show that (1) pore pressure oscillations do not seem to influence the deformation rate at which the rock fails, (2) they correlate with acoustic emissions. Even more interestingly, we observe a progressive increase of the correlation coefficient in time as the rock approaches failure. The correlation coefficient is also sensitive to the amplitude of pore pressure oscillations as larger oscillations produce higher correlation levels. Finally, we show that, in the last hours of creep before failure, acoustic emissions occur significantly more when the pore pressure is at its lowest. This suggest that the correlation of small stress perturbations and acoustic emissions depend on the state stress of a rock and the amplitude of the perturbations and that emissions occur more likely when cracks are unclamped.

  6. Study on sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment at frequency ranges of 0.5-3 kHz and 90-170 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng-qi; Liu, Bao-hua; Yu, Kai-ben; Kan, Guang-ming; Yang, Zhi-guo

    2017-03-01

    In order to study the properties of sound-speed dispersion in a sandy sediment, the sound speed was measured both at high frequency (90-170 kHz) and low frequency (0.5-3 kHz) in laboratory environments. At high frequency, a sampling measurement was conducted with boiled and uncooked sand samples collected from the bottom of a large water tank. The sound speed was directly obtained through transmission measurement using single source and single hydrophone. At low frequency, an in situ measurement was conducted in the water tank, where the sandy sediment had been homogeneously paved at the bottom for a long time. The sound speed was indirectly inverted according to the traveling time of signals received by three buried hydrophones in the sandy sediment and the geometry in experiment. The results show that the mean sound speed is approximate 1710-1713 m/s with a weak positive gradient in the sand sample after being boiled (as a method to eliminate bubbles as much as possible) at high frequency, which agrees well with the predictions of Biot theory, the effective density fluid model (EDFM) and Buckingham's theory. However, the sound speed in the uncooked sandy sediment obviously decreases (about 80%) both at high frequency and low frequency due to plenty of bubbles in existence. And the sound-speed dispersion performs a weak negative gradient at high frequency. Finally, a water-unsaturated Biot model is presented for trying to explain the decrease of sound speed in the sandy sediment with plenty of bubbles.

  7. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report.

  8. Effect of temperature on ultrasonic velocities of unconsolidated sandstones reservoirs during the SAGD recovery process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delage P.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD is a thermal in-situ technology that has been successfully used to enhance the recovery of heavy oil and bitumen in the Western Canada and in the Eastern Venezuela basins. Pressure and temperature variations during SAGD operations induce complex changes in the mechanical and acoustic properties of the reservoir rocks as well as of the caprock. To study these changes, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities Vp, Vs were performed on both reconstituted samples and natural samples from oil sands reservoir. Reconstituted samples were made of Fontainebleau sands with a slight cementation formed by a silicate solution. They have a high porosity (about 30 % to 40 % and a high permeability (up to 10 D. Natural oil sands samples are unconsolidated sandstones extracted from the fluvio-estuarine McMurray Formation in Alberta (Canada. The saturating fluids were bitumen and glycerol with a strongly temperature dependent viscosity. The tests were carried out at different temperatures (in the range 40° and +86°C and at different effective pressures (from 12 bars up to 120 bars. Experimental results firstly showed that the elastic wave propagation velocities measured are strongly dependent on temperature and pore fluid viscosity whereas little effect of effective pressure was observed. Velocities decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing effective pressure. These effects are mainly due to the variations of the saturating fluids properties. Finally, the tests were modelled by using Ciz and Shapiro (2007 approach and satisfactory velocities values were obtained with highly viscous fluids, a case that cannot be easily explained by using the poro-elastic theory of Biot-Gassmann.

  9. Effect of temperature on ultrasonic velocities of unconsolidated sandstones reservoirs during the SAGD recovery process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, D.-H.; Nauroy, J.-F.; Delage, P.; Mainguy, M.

    2010-06-01

    The steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) is a thermal in-situ technology that has been successfully used to enhance the recovery of heavy oil and bitumen in the Western Canada and in the Eastern Venezuela basins. Pressure and temperature variations during SAGD operations induce complex changes in the mechanical and acoustic properties of the reservoir rocks as well as of the caprock. To study these changes, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities Vp, Vs were performed on both reconstituted samples and natural samples from oil sands reservoir. Reconstituted samples were made of Fontainebleau sands with a slight cementation formed by a silicate solution. They have a high porosity (about 30 % to 40 %) and a high permeability (up to 10 D). Natural oil sands samples are unconsolidated sandstones extracted from the fluvio-estuarine McMurray Formation in Alberta (Canada). The saturating fluids were bitumen and glycerol with a strongly temperature dependent viscosity. The tests were carried out at different temperatures (in the range 40° and +86°C) and at different effective pressures (from 12 bars up to 120 bars). Experimental results firstly showed that the elastic wave propagation velocities measured are strongly dependent on temperature and pore fluid viscosity whereas little effect of effective pressure was observed. Velocities decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing effective pressure. These effects are mainly due to the variations of the saturating fluids properties. Finally, the tests were modelled by using Ciz and Shapiro (2007) approach and satisfactory velocities values were obtained with highly viscous fluids, a case that cannot be easily explained by using the poro-elastic theory of Biot-Gassmann.

  10. PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

  11. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  12. First-Year Downstream Sediment Budget Following the Marmot Dam Removal from the Sandy River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, C. J.; Wilcock, P. R.; Pittman, A.

    2008-12-01

    The October 2007 removal of the Marmot Dam, from the Sandy River, OR, provides an opportunity to assess the impact of increased sediment flux on a river channel. The Sandy River drains the west flank of Mt Hood and typically carries a large load of sand and gravel. The 14-meter-tall dam impounded over 750,000 m3 of sediment, only a small amount of which was removed during the decommissioning. Using a one- dimensional modeling approach, it was assessed that the river could transport the accumulated sediment without large adverse impacts downstream of the dam (Cui et al, 2008 - abstract submitted). In order to observe the actual changes to the river due to the dam removal and to test the modeled predictions, a significant monitoring effort has be in place on the Sandy River including bedload and suspended load measurements, discharge measurements, high-fidelity topographic surveys, repeat photography, multiple airborne LIDAR flights, long profile surveys, as well as mapping and characterizing the grain sizes throughout several reaches downstream of the dam. A key step in the quest to describe and predict the spatial distribution of the sediment throughout the downstream reach is to first account for all the sediment (both stored in the reservoir and supplied from upstream). Here, we examine the transport and deposition downstream of the dam through a 2-fraction sediment budget approach using the former dam as the upstream limit of the reach and choosing a the mouth of a bedrock gorge 7 km below the dam site as the downstream limit. Suspended sediment and bedload measurements taken by the USGS just below the dam site (Major et al, 2008 - abstract submitted) are combined with suspended sediment and bedload measurements collected just below the mouth of the gorge and the annual hydrograph to define the sediment fluxes into and out of the reach. Repeat surveys in the reach below the dam (Wallick et al, 2008 - abstract submitted) provide the measure of change in storage

  13. Plant functional diversity enhances associations of soil fungal diversity with vegetation and soil in the restoration of semiarid sandy grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaoan; Wang, Shaokun; Lv, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhang, Tonghui; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The trait-based approach shows that plant functional diversity strongly affects ecosystem properties. However, few empirical studies show the relationship between soil fungal diversity and plant functional diversity in natural ecosystems. We investigated soil fungal diversity along a restoration gradient of sandy grassland (mobile dune, semifixed dune, fixed dune, and grassland) in Horqin Sand Land, northern China, using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 18S rRNA and gene sequencing. We also examined associations of soil fungal diversity with plant functional diversity reflected by the dominant species' traits in community (community-weighted mean, CWM) and the dispersion of functional trait values (FD is). We further used the structure equation model (SEM) to evaluate how plant richness, biomass, functional diversity, and soil properties affect soil fungal diversity in sandy grassland restoration. Soil fungal richness in mobile dune and semifixed dune was markedly lower than those of fixed dune and grassland (P functional diversity explained nearly 70% variances of soil fungal richness. Strong association of soil fungal richness with the dominant species in the community supported the mass ratio hypothesis. Our results clearly highlight the role of plant functional diversity in enhancing associations of soil fungal diversity with community structure and soil properties in sandy grassland ecosystems.

  14. Horizontal and vertical distribution of meiofauna on sandy beaches of the North Sea (The Netherlands, Belgium, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwicki, Lech; Troch, Marleen De; Urban-Malinga, Barbara; Gheskiere, Tom; Węslawski, Jan Marcin

    2005-11-01

    Sandy intertidal zones were analysed for the presence of meiofauna. The material was collected on six macro-tidal sandy beaches along the North Sea (The Netherlands, France, Belgium), in order to analyse the vertical and horizontal meiofaunal distribution patterns. Eleven higher meiofauna taxa (one represented by larval stage—Copepoda nauplii) were recorded. The maximum total meiofauna abundance was observed on the Dutch beach (4,295±911 ind. 10 cm-2) in the Westerschelde estuary, while the lowest values (361±128 ind. 10 cm-2) were recorded in France at the Audresselles beach. Meiofauna of the different localities consisted mainly of nematodes, harpacticoids and turbellarians. Nematodes numerically dominated all sampled stations, comprising more than 45% of the total meiofauna density. Meiofauna was mainly concentrated at the sand surface with about 70% present in the uppermost 5 cm. Meiofauna occurred across the entire intertidal zone. A clear zonation pattern in the distribution of meiofauna taxa across the beaches was observed. The present work suggests that designation of exposed sandy beaches as physically controlled (McLachlan 1988) does not explain their biological variability.

  15. Sandstone Diagenesis at Gale Crater, Mars, As Observed By Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebach, K. L.; Grotzinger, J. P.; McLennan, S. M.; Hurowitz, J.; Kah, L. C.; Edgett, K. S.; Williams, R. M. E.; Wiens, R. C.; Schieber, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, has encountered a significant number of poorly-sorted and very well-lithified sandstones along its traverse on the floor of Gale Crater. We use images from the hand-lens imager (MAHLI) and elemental chemistry from the ChemCam laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument (LIBS) and the alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer (APXS) to begin to constrain the diagenetic history of these sandstones, including lithification and possible later dissolution. Investigation of MAHLI images reveals that the sediments are poorly-sorted and show very low apparent porosity, generally less than ~5%. However, in some cases, such as the Gillespie Lake sandstone identified in Yellowknife Bay, this apparent porosity includes a significant fraction of void spaces larger than typical sediment grain sizes (~30% by number or 75% of void spaces by area). One possible explanation of these larger pits is that they represent recent removal of soft intraclasts by eolian abrasion. Another possibility is that later diagenetic fluids caused dissolution of more soluble grains, and production of secondary porosity. Investigation into the elemental chemistry of the sandstones has shown that they have a relatively unaltered basaltic bulk composition in spite of possessing a variety of secondary minerals and amorphous material, indicating isochemical diagenetic processes. The chemistry and mineralogy of the cement is not immediately evident based on the initial analyses; there is not a high percentage of salts or evaporative minerals that may easily cement near-surface sandstones. Furthermore, these sandstones lack textures and compositions consistent with pedogenic processes, such as calcrete, silcrete, or ferricrete. Instead, they may record burial and cementation at depth. Cement composition may be constrained through comparison to terrestrial basaltic sandstones, and studying chemical variations along ChemCam and APXS transects of the rocks.

  16. Landscape Visual Quality and Meiofauna Biodiversity on Sandy Beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Gabriela; Marenzi, Rosemeri C.; Polette, Marcos; Netto, Sérgio A.

    2016-10-01

    Sandy beaches are central economic assets, attracting more recreational users than other coastal ecosystems. However, urbanization and landscape modification can compromise both the functional integrity and the attractiveness of beach ecosystems. Our study aimed at investigating the relationship between sandy beach artificialization and the landscape perception by the users, and between sandy beach visual attractiveness and biodiversity. We conducted visual and biodiversity assessments of urbanized and semiurbanized sandy beaches in Brazil and Uruguay. We specifically examined meiofauna as an indicator of biodiversity. We hypothesized that urbanization of sandy beaches results in a higher number of landscape detractors that negatively affect user evaluation, and that lower-rated beach units support lower levels of biodiversity. We found that urbanized beach units were rated lower than semiurbanized units, indicating that visual quality was sensitive to human interventions. Our expectations regarding the relationship between landscape perception and biodiversity were only partially met; only few structural and functional descriptors of meiofauna assemblages differed among classes of visual quality. However, lower-rated beach units exhibited signs of lower environmental quality, indicated by higher oligochaete densities and significant differences in meiofauna structure. We conclude that managing sandy beaches needs to advance beyond assessment of aesthetic parameters to also include the structure and function of beach ecosystems. Use of such supporting tools for managing sandy beaches is particularly important in view of sea level rise and increasing coastal development.

  17. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  18. [Dynamic changes of surface soil organic carbon and light-fraction organic carbon after mobile dune afforestation with Mongolian pine in Horqin Sandy Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wen; Li, Yu-qiang; Wang, Shao-kun; Feng, Jing; Su, Na

    2011-08-01

    This paper studied the dynamic changes of surface (0-15 cm) soil organic carbon (SOC) and light-fraction organic carbon (LFOC) in 25- and 35-year-old sand-fixing Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) plantations in Horqin Sandy Land, with a mobile dune as a comparison site. After the afforestation on mobile dune, the content of coarse sand in soil decreased, while that of fine sand and clay-silt increased significantly. The SOC and LFOC contents also increased significantly, but tended to decrease with increasing soil depth. Afforestation increased the storages of SOC and LFOC in surface soil, and the increment increased with plantation age. In the two plantations, the increment of surface soil LFOC storage was much higher than that of SOC storage, suggesting that mobile dune afforestation had a larger effect on surface soil LFOC than on SOC.

  19. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  20. Distribution of petrophysical properties for sandy-clayey reservoirs by fractal interpolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lozada-Zumaeta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The sandy-clayey hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Upper Paleocene and Lower Eocene located to the north of Veracruz State, Mexico, present highly complex geological and petrophysical characteristics. These reservoirs, which consist of sandstone and shale bodies within a depth interval ranging from 500 to 2000 m, were characterized statistically by means of fractal modeling and geostatistical tools. For 14 wells within an area of study of approximately 6 km2, various geophysical well logs were initially edited and further analyzed to establish a correlation between logs and core data. The fractal modeling based on the R/S (rescaled range methodology and the interpolation method by successive random additions were used to generate pseudo-well logs between observed wells. The application of geostatistical tools, sequential Gaussian simulation and exponential model variograms contributed to estimate the spatial distribution of petrophysical properties such as effective porosity (PHIE, permeability (K and shale volume (VSH. From the analysis and correlation of the information generated in the present study, it can be said, from a general point of view, that the results not only are correlated with already reported information but also provide significant characterization elements that would be hardly obtained by means of conventional techniques.

  1. Effects of Super Strom Sandy on Depositional Environments Offshore Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; McHugh, C. M.; Christensen, B. A.; Dutton, J.; Brownawell, B.; Gurung, D.

    2013-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy's landfall affected the coastlines over a broad swath of mid-Atlantic including New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. The effects included breaching, overwash and erosion of barrier islands, some of which are heavily populated and sustained extensive damage. The peak storm-tide elevation produced by Hurricane Sandy measured by USGS stations in Jamaica Bay was about 3.5 m, 1.4 m more than the historical peak-water level elevations in the same area. As part of a National Science Foundation RAPID response we sampled the sediment in West Bay, Middle Bay, East Bay, Jones Inlet and Reynolds Channel of Long Island, New York from the R/V Pritchard. The sediment sampling took place 4 months after the storm and prior to any similar large storms. The sampling strategy was designed to characterize the post-storm sedimentation in distinct depositional environments. In this survey 156 grab samples were recovered from areas, many of which had been sampled prior to the storm. The samples were analyzed for grain size variability, short-lived radioisotopes and x-ray fluorescence elemental analyses. Google Earth images from before and after the storm reveal moderate to severe erosion and overwash of the dunes in Jones inlet, and Middle and East Bays. The Long Beach barrier island tidal marshes were submerged for several days post Sandy and underwent severe erosion. The storm surge brought from offshore a layer of coarse sand that was deposited over mussel beds. Most of the mussels were dead indicative of the strength of the waves. Be-7 concentrations allowed tracking the path of the storm from the bays and inlets, to the offshore. Some of the highest Be-7 concentrations ever detected in the local estuaries: 5,329, 4,955 and 4,553 pCi/kg were measured in West Bay and Middle Bay Channels. Additionally, unusually high Be-7 concentrations of 2,130 pCi/kg were recorded ~5.24 km offshore from Long Beach barrier island four months after the

  2. Erosion characteristic of slope sandstone soaking in acid mine drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Li-chun; CHEN Jia-sheng; WU Ai-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Acid mine drainage(AMD) is one of the main reasons of slope instability in chemical mines with high sulfide. The pH values of the solution inside the mining pit decrease with the increasing of distance from ore body and vary from 1.2 to 4.6,according to the results of the water environmental investigation and the composition test of the slope sandstone in Xinqiao Pyrite Mine. Comparative experiments between original sandstone and AMD eroded sandstone samples show that after AMD erosion the uniaxial compressive strength and elastic modulus decrease by 30%-50% and 25%-45%, respectively, the cohesion and internal friction angle decrease obviously, and the Poisson ratio fluctuates between 0.20-0.29. The greater joints development, the higher residual stress after peak value, and the longer time to damage. Besides above, the reaction mechanism analysis of AMD eroded sandstone shows that the fillings in joints and fissures of sandstone are frequently decomposed and polyreacted, resulting in changes of interior molecule structure and framework composition, and decreases of cohesion and angle of internal friction between rock structure interfaces.

  3. Seed Burial Depth and Soil Water Content Affect Seedling Emergence and Growth of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of seed burial depth and soil water content on seedling emergence and growth of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm, an important native tree species distributed over the European-Asian steppe. Experimental sand burial depths in the soil were 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 cm, and soil water contents were 4%, 8%, 12% and 16% of field capacity. All two-way ANOVA (five sand burial depths and four soil water contents results showed that seed burial depths, soil water content and their interactions significantly affected all the studied plant variables. Most of the times, seedling emergence conditions were greater at the lower sand burial depths (less than 1.0 cm than at the higher (more than 1.0 cm seed burial depths, and at the lower water content (less than 12% than at the higher soil water content. However, high seed burial depths (more than 1.5 cm or low soil water content (less than 12% reduced seedling growth or change in the root/shoot biomass ratios. In conclusion, the most suitable range of sand burial was from 0.5 to 1.0 cm soil depth and soil water content was about 12%, respectively, for the processes of seedling emergence and growth. These findings indicate that seeds of the sandy elm should be kept at rather shallow soil depths, and water should be added up to 12% of soil capacity when conducting elm planting and management. Our findings could help to create a more appropriate sandy elm cultivation and understand sparse elm woodland recruitment failures in arid and semi-arid regions.

  4. Reefs, sand and reef-like sand: A comparison of the benthic biodiversity of habitats in the Dutch Borkum Reef Grounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Joop W. P.; Bos, Oscar G.; Glorius, Sander; Lengkeek, Wouter; Cuperus, Joël; van der Weide, Babeth; Agüera, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Reefs play an important role in the distribution of species associated with hard substrates and are of value for biodiversity conservation. High densities of the habitat building annelid Lanice conchilega also increase local biodiversity. This study describes the benthic biodiversity of a rocky reef and its surrounding sand bottom with dense L. conchilega beds in the Borkum Reef Grounds, north of the island of Schiermonnikoog in the Dutch North Sea. A side-scan sonar survey revealed distinct seabed areas with high acoustic reflections, indicating the presence of hard substrate on the sandy seafloor. To ground truth the side-scan sonar data and make an inventory of the biodiversity of the observed habitats, a multi-method sampling approach (box corer, SCUBA airlift sampler and visual transects, drop-down camera) was used. This revealed (1) rocky reefs: a combination of gravel, stones and rocks; (2) individual rocks in a sandy environment; (3) sand with dense L. conchilega beds (> 1500 ind·m- 2) and (4) sand bottom habitat. A total of 193 taxa were found with many unique species per habitat. Species richness was significantly higher on sand when compared to the rocky reef (NB-GLM; p = 0.006), caused by the presence of dense L. conchilega beds (Poisson GLM; p 1500 ind·m- 2 to be 74 km2. Further research should focus on the possible function of L. conchilega as an ecosystem engineer creating intermediate sand-reef systems. For mapping these L. conchilega beds, we advise using side-scan sonar imaging combined with ground truthing by drop-down cameras.

  5. On the Impact Angle of Hurricane Sandy's New Jersey Landfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy's track crossed the New Jersey coastline at an angle closer to perpendicular than any previous hurricane in the historic record, one of the factors contributing to recordsetting peak-water levels in parts of New Jersey and New York. To estimate the occurrence rate of Sandy-like tracks, we use a stochastic model built on historical hurricane data from the entire North Atlantic to generate a large sample of synthetic hurricanes. From this synthetic set we calculate that under long-term average climate conditions, a hurricane of Sandy's intensity or greater (category 1+) makes NJ landfall at an angle at least as close to perpendicular as Sandy's at an average annual rate of 0.0014 yr-1 (95% confidence range 0.0007 to 0.0023); i.e., a return period of 714 years (95% confidence range 435 to 1429).

  6. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Post Sandy (Long Island, NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Long Island New York Sandy LIDAR lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G14PD00296 Woolpert...

  7. Hurricane Sandy: Rapid Response Imagery of the Surrounding Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of Hurricane Sandy. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The images were acquired...

  8. 2008 USDA Forest Service Lidar: Sandy River Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Sandy River study area in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service. The areas...

  9. James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory @ Sandy Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, located on the New Jersey shore at Sandy Hook, is a state-of-the-art marine research facility shared by the National...

  10. Studies on Thiobacilli spp. isolated from sandy beaches of Kerala

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gore, P.S.; Raveendran, O.; Unnithan, R.V.

    Occurrence, isolation and oxidative activity of Thiobacilli spp. from some sandy beaches of Kerala are reported. These organisms were encountered in polluted beaches and were dominant during monsoon in all the beaches...

  11. James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory @ Sandy Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, located on the New Jersey shore at Sandy Hook, is a state-of-the-art marine research facility shared by the National...

  12. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Sandy Restoration (Delaware and Maryland)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Geographic Extent: SANDY_Restoration_DE_MD_QL2 Area of Interest covers approximately 3.096 square miles. Lot #5 contains the full project area Dataset Description:...

  13. Short Communication Energy and ash contents of sandy beach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    macrofauna found on three exposed sandy beaches on the west coast ... that they often form the predominant shore type (Bally,. McQuaid ... their sediments are given in Table I. Animals ..... The biochemical composition of the tropical intertida1 ...

  14. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  15. Effective Thermal Conductivity Modeling of Sandstones: SVM Framework Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Alireza; Masoudi, Mohammad; Ghaderi-Ardakani, Alireza; Arabloo, Milad; Amani, Mahmood

    2016-06-01

    Among the most significant physical characteristics of porous media, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is used for estimating the thermal enhanced oil recovery process efficiency, hydrocarbon reservoir thermal design, and numerical simulation. This paper reports the implementation of an innovative least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) algorithm for the development of enhanced model capable of predicting the ETCs of dry sandstones. By means of several statistical parameters, the validity of the presented model was evaluated. The prediction of the developed model for determining the ETCs of dry sandstones was in excellent agreement with the reported data with a coefficient of determination value ({R}2) of 0.983 and an average absolute relative deviation of 0.35 %. Results from present research show that the proposed LS-SVM model is robust, reliable, and efficient in calculating the ETCs of sandstones.

  16. Optical coherence tomography for vulnerability assessment of sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemand, Elizabeth; Liang, Haida

    2013-05-10

    Sandstone is an important cultural heritage material, in both architectural and natural settings, such as neolithic rock art panels. The majority of deterioration effects in porous materials such as sandstone are influenced by the presence and movement of water through the material. The presence of water within the porous network of a material results in changes in the optical coherence tomography signal intensity that can be used to monitor the wetting front of water penetration of dry porous materials at various depths. The technique is able to detect wetting front velocities from 1 cm s(-1) to 10(-6) cm s(-1), covering the full range of hydraulic conductivities likely to occur in natural sandstones from pervious to impervious.

  17. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting...... and permeability is caused by increased diagenetic changes of the sandstones due to increased burial depth and temperatures. Therefore, the highest water temperatures typically correspond with the lowest porosities and permeabilities. Especially the permeability is crucial for the performance of the geothermal......-line fractures. Continuous thin chlorite coatings results in less porosity- and permeability-reduction with burial than the general reduction with burial, unless carbonate cemented. Therefore, localities of sandstones characterized by these continuous chlorite coatings may represent fine geothermal reservoirs...

  18. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  19. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  20. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  1. Characterization of the Oriskany and Berea Sandstones: Evaluating Biogeochemical Reactions of Potential Sandstone–Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verba, Circe [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Harris, Aubrey [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2016-07-07

    The Marcellus shale, located in the mid-Atlantic Appalachian Basin, has been identified as a source for natural gas and targeted for hydraulic fracturing recovery methods. Hydraulic fracturing is a technique used by the oil and gas industry to access petroleum reserves in geologic formations that cannot be accessed with conventional drilling techniques (Capo et al., 2014). This unconventional technique fractures rock formations that have low permeability by pumping pressurized hydraulic fracturing fluids into the subsurface. Although the major components of hydraulic fracturing fluid are water and sand, chemicals, such as recalcitrant biocides and polyacrylamide, are also used (Frac Focus, 2015). There is domestic concern that the chemicals could reach groundwater or surface water during transport, storage, or the fracturing process (Chapman et al., 2012). In the event of a surface spill, understanding the natural attenuation of the chemicals in hydraulic fracturing fluid, as well as the physical and chemical properties of the aquifers surrounding the spill site, will help mitigate potential dangers to drinking water. However, reports on the degradation pathways of these chemicals are limited in existing literature. The Appalachian Basin Marcellus shale and its surrounding sandstones host diverse mineralogical suites. During the hydraulic fracturing process, the hydraulic fracturing fluids come into contact with variable mineral compositions. The reactions between the fracturing fluid chemicals and the minerals are very diverse. This report: 1) describes common minerals (e.g. quartz, clay, pyrite, and carbonates) present in the Marcellus shale, as well as the Oriskany and Berea sandstones, which are located stratigraphically below and above the Marcellus shale; 2) summarizes the existing literature of the degradation pathways for common hydraulic fracturing fluid chemicals [polyacrylamide, ethylene glycol, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), glutaraldehyde

  2. A family of sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We study some dynamical properties of a family of two-dimensional cellular automata: those that arise from an underlying one dimensional sand automaton whose local rule is obtained using a latin square. We identify a simple sand automaton G whose local rule is algebraic, and classify this automaton as having equicontinuity points, but not being equicontinuous. We also show it is not surjective. We generalise some of these results to a wider class of sand automata.

  3. Dilatometric Characterization of Foundry Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Břuska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this contribution is summary of physical – chemistry properties of usually used foundry silica and no – silica sands in Czech foundries. With the help of dilatometry analysis theoretical assumptions of influence of grain shape and size on dilatation value of sands were confirmed. Determined was the possibility of dilatometry analysis employment for preparing special (hybrid sands with lower and/or more linear character of dilatation.

  4. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisited using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M.M.; McBride, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf ???5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  5. Anatomy of a shoreface sand ridge revisted using foraminifera: False Cape Shoals, Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci M.; McBride, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    Certain details regarding the origin and evolution of shelf sand ridges remain elusive. Knowledge of their internal stratigraphy and microfossil distribution is necessary to define the origin and to determine the processes that modify sand ridges. Fourteen vibracores from False Cape Shoal A, a well-developed shoreface-attached sand ridge on the Virginia/North Carolina inner continental shelf, were examined to document the internal stratigraphy and benthic foraminiferal assemblages, as well as to reconstruct the depositional environments recorded in down-core sediments. Seven sedimentary and foraminiferal facies correspond to the following stratigraphic units: fossiliferous silt, barren sand, clay to sandy clay, laminated and bioturbated sand, poorly sorted massive sand, fine clean sand, and poorly sorted clay to gravel. The units represent a Pleistocene estuary and shoreface, a Holocene estuary, ebb tidal delta, modern shelf, modern shoreface, and swale fill, respectively. The succession of depositional environments reflects a Pleistocene sea-level highstand and subsequent regression followed by the Holocene transgression in which barrier island/spit systems formed along the Virginia/North Carolina inner shelf not, vert, ~5.2 ka and migrated landward and an ebb tidal delta that was deposited, reworked, and covered by shelf sand.

  6. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note that the tes......The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...... that the testing procedure and the data processing were carried out according to the specifications of ETCS-F1.97....

  7. MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE AND CLAY, NORTH-EAST CONSTANTINE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M BENYAMINA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The north-east area of Constantine has a very complex geological setting. The variety of sedimentary rocks such as sandstone and clay in abundance, represent a big importance in the industry and road infrastructure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM/EDS, FTIR spectroscopy of sandstone and clay are required for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the existing phases. In addition, chemical analysis of the same samples is required to confirm the XRD, EDS (Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy results. The results of this multidisciplinary study, obtained by various analytical techniques, show a good agreement on the existing phases.

  8. Natural and Laboratory-Induced Compaction Bands in Aztec Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimson, B. C.; Lee, H.

    2002-12-01

    The Aztec sandstone used in this research is from the Valley of Fire State Park area, Nevada. This Jurassic aeolian sandstone is extremely weak (uniaxial compressive strength of 1-2 MPa); porosity averages 26%; grains are subrounded and have a bimodal size distribution (0.1 mm and 0.5 mm); its mineral composition (K. Sternlof, personal comm.) is 93% quartz, 5% k-spar, and 2% kaolinite, Fe carbonate and others; grain bonding is primarily through suturing. Sternlof et al. (EOS, November, 2001) observed substantial exposure of mainly compactive deformation bands in the Aztec sandstone. We studied an SEM image of a compaction band found in a hand sample of the Aztec sandstone. We also conducted a drilling test in a 130x130x180 mm prismatic specimen subjected to a preset far-field true triaxial stress condition (\\sigmah = 15 MPa, \\sigmav = 25 MPa, \\sigmaH = 40 MPa). Drilling of a 20 mm dia. vertical hole created a long fracture-like thin tabular breakout along the \\sigmah springline and perpendicular to \\sigmaH direction. SEM analysis of the zones ahead of the breakout tips revealed narrow bands of presumed debonded intact grains interspersed with grain fragments. We infer that the fragments were formed from multiple splitting or crushing of compacted grains in the band of high compressive stress concentration developed along the \\sigmah springline. SEM images away from the breakout tip surroundings showed no such fragments. SEM study of the natural compaction band showed a similar arrangement of mainly intact grains surrounded by grain fragments. Using the Optimas optical software package, we found the percentage of pore area within the band ahead of the breakout tips to average 17%; outside of this zone it was 23%. In the natural compaction band pore area occupied 8.5% of the band; in the host rock adjacent to the compaction band it averaged 19%. These readings strongly suggest porosity reduction due to compaction in both cases. The close resemblance between the

  9. Groundwater flow model for the Little Plover River basin in Wisconsin’s Central Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ken Bradbury,; Fienen, Michael N.; Kniffin, Maribeth; Jacob Krause,; Westenbroek, Stephen M.; Leaf, Andrew T.; Barlow, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    The Little Plover River is a groundwater-fed stream in the sand plains region of central Wisconsin. In this region, sandy sediment deposited during or soon after the last glaciation forms an important unconfined sand and gravel aquifer. This aquifer supplies water for numerous high-capacity irrigation, municipal, and industrial wells that support a thriving agricultural industry. In recent years the addition of many new wells, combined with observed diminished flows in the Little Plover and other nearby rivers, has raised concerns about the impacts of the wells on groundwater levels and on water levels and flows in nearby lakes, streams, and wetlands. Diverse stakeholder groups, including well operators, Growers, environmentalists, local land owners, and regulatory and government officials have sought a better understanding of the local groundwater-surface water system and have a shared desire to balance the water needs of the he liagricultural, industrial, and urban users with the maintenance and protection of groundwater-dependent natural resources. To help address these issues, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources requested that the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey and U.S. Geological Survey cooperatively develop a groundwater flow model that could be used to demonstrate the relationships among groundwater, surface water, and well withdrawals and also be a tool for testing and evaluating alternative water management strategies for the central sands region. Because of an abundance of previous studies, data availability, local interest, and existing regulatory constraints the model focuses on the Little Plover River watershed, but the modeling methodology developed during this study can apply to much of the larger central sands of Wisconsin. The Little Plover River groundwater flow model simulates three-dimensional groundwater movement in and around the Little Plover River basin under steady-state and transient conditions. This model

  10. EAARL-B Coastal Topography--Eastern New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy, 2012: First Surface, Pre-Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz and binary point-cloud data, as well as a digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the New Jersey coastline, pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy (October...

  11. Net-Infiltration map of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop area in western Washington County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilweil, Victor M.; McKinney, Tim S.

    2007-01-01

    As populations grow in the arid southwestern United States and desert bedrock aquifers are increasingly targeted for future development, understanding and quantifying the spatial variability of net infiltration and recharge becomes critically important for inventorying groundwater resources and mapping contamination vulnerability. A Geographic Information System (GIS)-based model utilizing readily available soils, topographic, precipitation, and outcrop data has been developed for predicting net infiltration to exposed and soil-covered areas of the Navajo Sandstone outcrop of southwestern Utah. The Navajo Sandstone is an important regional bedrock aquifer. The GIS model determines the net-infiltration percentage of precipitation by using an empirical equation. This relation is derived from least squares linear regression between three surficial parameters (soil coarseness, topographic slope, and downgradient distance from outcrop) and the percentage of estimated net infiltration based on environmental tracer data from excavations and boreholes at Sand Hollow Reservoir in the southeastern part of the study area.Processed GIS raster layers are applied as parameters in the empirical equation for determining net infiltration for soil-covered areas as a percentage of precipitation. This net-infiltration percentage is multiplied by average annual Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) precipitation data to obtain an infiltration rate for each model cell. Additionally, net infiltration on exposed outcrop areas is set to 10 percent of precipitation on the basis of borehole net-infiltration estimates. Soils and outcrop net-infiltration rates are merged to form a final map.Areas of low, medium, and high potential for ground-water recharge have been identified, and estimates of net infiltration range from 0.1 to 66 millimeters per year (mm/yr). Estimated net-infiltration rates of less than 10 mm/yr are considered low, rates of 10 to 50 mm/yr are

  12. Sandy inland braidplain deposition with local aeolian sedimentation in the lower and middle parts of the buntsandstein and sandy coastal braidplain deposition in the topmost zechstein in the sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowski, Jerzy; Mader, Detlef

    The lower and middle parts of the Buntsandstein between Röt and Zechstein in the Sudetes (Lower Silesia, Poland) crop out in the marginal seams of the North Sudetic Trough and the Intra Sudetic Trough. The continental red beds originate in predominantly sandy braided river systems of an extensive inland alluvial plain in almost arid climate. The sediments are laid down in channels and floodplains of a moderately- to highly-braided, sandy to pebbly stream complex consisting of narrowly- to moderately-spaced low-sinuosity watercourses and narrow to wide overbank plains between the channels. Rapid aggradation and abandonment, quick lateral migration or high avulsion rates of the considerably mobile streams result in effective combing of the interchannel areas. Persistent high-energy overspilling of watercourse banks and invasion of bed-load-saturated flood surges into the overbank areas often lead to primary restriction or even suppression of formation of topstratum suspension fines. Secondarily, the silty-clayey and fine sandy overbank sediments which could occasionally originate in remote or sheltered lakes and ponds are frequently completely reworked by considerable lateral and vertical erosion during sidewards displacement of the rivers. As a result of both primary-depositional restriction and secondary-erosional removal of floodplain fines, the channel sediments are commonly stacked upon each other to multistorey stream sand complexes. Emergence and desiccation of parts of the alluvial plain sometimes give rise to aeolian deflation and accumulation of the winnowed sand to small dunelets and wind ripple trains. The aeolian depositional environment representing a more peripheral erg facies with sheet sand interdune milieu could not be fully ascertained due to poor outcrop conditions, but is likely to occur locally in view of comparative interpretation with other mixed dune and river sand sequences in the Mid-European Buntsandstein. Variations of fluvial style are

  13. Vertical structure and dominating factors of sand body during Late Triassic Chang 9 time of Yanchang Formation in Ordos Basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁熊; 陈景山; 谭秀成; 林丹; 赵子豪; 姚泾利; 邓秀芹; 李元昊

    2015-01-01

    Based on a synthetic geological study of drilling, well logging and core observations, two main genetic types of Chang 9 sand body in Odors Basin were recognized, which included two effects, that is, delta environment and tractive current effects that lead to the development of mouth bar, distal bar, sheet sand and other sand bodies of subaerial and subaqueous distributary channel, natural levee, flood fan and delta front, and shore-shallow lake environment and lake flow transformation effects that result in the development of sandy beach bar, sheet sand and other sand bodies. Chang 9 sand body mainly developed five basic vertical structures, namely box shape, campaniform, infundibuliform, finger and dentoid. The vertical stacking patterns of multilayer sand body was complex, and the common shapes included box shape + box shape, campaniform + campaniform, campaniform + box shape, infundibuliform+infundibuliform, campaniform+infundibuliform, box shape+campaniform, box shape+infundibuliform, and finger+finger. Based on the analysis on major dominating factors of vertical structure of sand body, sedimentary environment, sedimentary facies and rise, fall and cycle of base level are identified as the major geological factors that control the vertical structure of single sand body as well as vertical stacking patterns and distribution of multistory sand bodies.

  14. Batch and column studies of adsorption of Li, Ni and Br by a reference sand for contaminant transport experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seigel, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ward, D.B.; Bryan, C.R. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A processed quartz sand (Wedron 510), mined from the St. Peter sandstone, has been characterized by a variety of chemical and physical methods for use as a reference porous media in transport model validation experiments. Wedron 510 sand was used in an intermediate-scale experiment involving migration of Ni, Li and Br through a 6-m high x 3-m diameter caisson. Ni and Li adsorption/desorption, and Li/Ni site-competition experiments yielded information on the importance of the trace mineral phases to adsorption of Li and Ni by the sand. The presence of an iron hydroxide coating similar to goethite on the sand grains is suggested by visual observation and leaching experiments. Kaolinite was identified by SEM and XRD as a significant trace mineral phase in the sand and occurs as small particles coating the sand grains. Quartz, the predominant constituent of the sand by weight, does not appear to contribute significantly to the adsorption properties of the sand. Qualitatively, the adsorption properties of the sand can be adequately modeled as a two-mineral system (goethite and kaolinite). The studies described in this report should provide a basis for understanding transport of Ni, Li and Br through porous media similar to the reference sand. Techniques were developed for obtaining parameter values for surface complexation and kinetic adsorption models for the sand and its mineral components. These constants can be used directly in coupled hydrogeochemical transport codes. The techniques should be useful for characterization of other natural materials and elements in high-level nuclear waste in support of coupled hydrogeochemical transport calculations for Yucca Mountain.

  15. Deep Compaction Control of Sandy Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bałachowski Lech

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibroflotation, vibratory compaction, micro-blasting or heavy tamping are typical improvement methods for the cohesionless deposits of high thickness. The complex mechanism of deep soil compaction is related to void ratio decrease with grain rearrangements, lateral stress increase, prestressing effect of certain number of load cycles, water pressure dissipation, aging and other effects. Calibration chamber based interpretation of CPTU/DMT can be used to take into account vertical and horizontal stress and void ratio effects. Some examples of interpretation of soundings in pre-treated and compacted sands are given. Some acceptance criteria for compaction control are discussed. The improvement factors are analysed including the normalised approach based on the soil behaviour type index.

  16. Trilobites from the Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kristian Grube; Nielsen, Arne Thorshøj; Harper, David Alexander Taylor;

    2014-01-01

    During the Middle Ordovician (Darriwilian) sandstones and siltstones were deposited in the epicontinental Larapintine Sea, which covered large parts of central Australia. The Darriwilian Stairway Sandstone has, for the first time, been sampled stratigraphically for macrofossils to track marine be...

  17. Cathodoluminescence investigations on quartz cement in sandstones of Khabour Formation from Iraqi Kurdistan region, northern Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omer, Muhamed Fakhri; Friis, Henrik

    The Ordovician deltaic to shallow marine Khabour Formation in Northern Iraq consists mainly of sandstone with minor siltstone and interbedded shale. The sandstones are pervasively cemented by quartz that resulted in very little preserved primary porosity. Cathodoluminescence and petrographic stud...

  18. Altitude of the bottom of the Trinidad Sandstone in the Raton Basin, Las Animas County, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of structure contours that show lines of equal altitude of the bottom of the Trinidad Sandstone, the contact between the Trinidad Sandstone...

  19. Brazilian sandy beach macrofauna production: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Petracco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of the studies on the production of Brazilian sandy beach macrofauna was analyzed on the basis of the data available in the literature. For this purpose, the representativeness of the production dataset was examined by latitudinal distribution, degree of exposure and morphodynamic state of beaches, taxonomic groups, and methods employed. A descriptive analysis was, further, made to investigate the trends in production of the more representative taxonomic groups and species of sandy beach macrofauna. A total of 69 macrofauna annual production estimates were obtained for 38 populations from 25 studies carried out between 22º56'S and 32º20'S. Production estimates were restricted to populations on beaches located on the southern and southeastern Brazilian coast. Most of the populations in the dataset inhabit exposed dissipative sandy beaches and are mainly represented by mollusks and crustaceans, with a smaller number of polychaetes. The trends in production among taxonomic groups follow a similar pattern to that observed on beaches throughout the world, with high values for bivalves and decapods. The high turnover rate (P/B ratio of the latter was due to the presence of several populations of the mole crab Emerita brasiliensis, which can attain high values of productivity, in the dataset. Most of the studies focus on the comparison of production and, especially, of P/B ratio according to life history traits in populations of the same species/taxonomic group. Despite the importance of life history-production studies, other approaches, such as the effect of man-induce disturbances on the macrofauna, should be undertaken in these threatened environments.O estado da arte dos estudos de produção da macrofauna de praias arenosas brasileiras foi analisado a partir de informações disponíveis na literatura. Para essa finalidade, a representatividade dos dados de produção foi examinada de acordo com a distribuição latitudinal

  20. Growth, Yield and WUE of Drip and Sprinkler Irrigated Okra Grown On Sandy Soil Under Semi-Arid Conditions in Southeast Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plauborg, Finn

    Vegetable production systems at the Keta sand spit, Southeast Ghana, are typically managed with excessive amounts of irrigation water and fertilizers on sandy soils with low inherent water and nutrient retention capacities. The shallow groundwater which is the primary irrigation water resource...... is prone to salinization from the Keta lagoon, the Atlantic Ocean and brackish water underneath (Kortatsi and Agyeku, 1999). To ensure the sustainability of vegetable production at the Keta spit, introduction of water saving irrigation systems and improved irrigation management schemes are important. Thus...... for the drip irrigated okra crop was 269 mm compared to 379 mm for sprinkler. By adopting drip irrigation to okra, the seasonal crop water use could be reduced close to 30 %. From the results it is concluded that on rough textured sandy soil drip irrigation with frequent weekly fertigation resulted...

  1. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  2. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N.

    1983-01-01

    The intrinsic properties of the genetic sandstone units that typify many geopressured geothermal aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Gulf Coast region were systematically investigated classified, and differentiated. The following topics are coverd: structural and stratigraphic limits of sandstone reservoirs, characteristics and dimensions of Gulf Coast sandstones; fault-compartment areas; comparison of production and geologic estimates of aquifer fluid volume; geologic setting and reservoir characteristics, Wells of Opportunity; internal properties of sandstones; and implications for geopressured fluid production. (MHR)

  3. The effect of hot water injection on sandstone permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Haugwitz, Christian; Jacobsen, Peter Sally Munch;

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal energy storage can be achieved by hot water injection in geothermal sandstone aquifers. We present an analysis of literature data in combination with new short-term flow through permeability experiments in order to address physical and physico-chemical mechanisms that can alter...

  4. DELAYED POLYMER CROSSLINKING USED FOR PROFILE CONTROL IN SANDSTONE RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhongmao; Dong Bo; Fu Xiaofeng; Rong Jiashu

    1997-01-01

    @@ Most of the oil reservoirs in Jilin province occur in fractured sandstone with low permeability and heavy heterogeneity. In addition, with fracture development, the artificial fractures around producing wells and water injection wells have been increased, further aggravating the heterogeneity of oil reservoirs.

  5. Diagenetic effect on permeabilities of geothermal sandstone reservoirs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weibel, Rikke; Olivarius, Mette; Kristensen, Lars

    The Danish subsurface contains abundant sedimentary deposits, which can be utilized for geothermal heating. The Upper Triassic – Lower Jurassic continental-marine sandstones of the Gassum Formation has been utilised as a geothermal reservoir for the Thisted Geothermal Plant since 1984 extracting ...

  6. Diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments of the Bunter Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    The Bunter Sandstone Formation in the northern North German Basin has large geothermal potential with high porosity and permeability (generally >15% and >100 mD, respectively) and with pore fluid temperatures that are adequate for geothermal energy production (c. 55–60˚C). A combined investigatio...

  7. Inelastic compaction, dilation and hysteresis of sandstones under hydrostatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Eyal; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Ougier-Simonin, Audrey; Hamiel, Yariv; Zhu, Wenlu

    2014-05-01

    Sandstones display non-linear and inelastic behaviour such as hysteresis when subjected to cyclic loading. We present three hydrostatic compaction experiments with multiple loading-unloading cycles on Berea and Darley Dale sandstones and explain their hysteretic behaviour using non-linear inelastic compaction and dilation. Each experiment included eight to nine loading-unloading cycles with increasing maximum pressure in each subsequent cycle. Different pressure-volumetric strain relations during loading and unloading were observed. During the first cycles, under relatively low pressures, not all of the volumetric strain is recovered at the end of each cycle whereas at the last cycles, under relatively high pressures, the strain is recovered and the pressure-volumetric strain hysteresis loops are closed. The observed pressure-volumetric strain relations are non-linear and the effective bulk modulus of the sandstones changes between cycles. Observations are modelled with two inelastic deformation processes: irreversible compaction caused by changes in grain packing and recoverable compaction associated with grain contact adhesion, frictional sliding on grains or frictional sliding on cracks. The irreversible compaction is suggested to reflect rearrangement of grains into a more compact mode as the maximum pressure increases. Our model describes the `inelastic compaction envelope' in which sandstone sample will follow during hydrostatic loading. Irreversible compaction occurs when pressure is greater than a threshold value defined by the `inelastic compaction envelope'.

  8. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  9. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  10. Deformation bands in porous sandstones their microstructure and petrophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Anita

    2007-12-15

    Deformation bands are commonly thin tabular zones of crushed or reorganized grains that form in highly porous rocks and sediments. Unlike a fault, typically the slip is negligible in deformation bands. In this dissertation the microstructure and petrophysical properties of deformation bands have been investigated through microscopy and numerical analysis of experimental and natural examples. The experimental work consists of a series of ring-shear experiments performed on porous sand at 5 and 20 MPa normal stresses and followed by microscopic examination of thin sections from the sheared samples. The results of the ring-shear experiments and comparison of them to natural deformation bands reveals that burial depth (level of normal stress in the experiments) and the amount of shear displacement during deformation are the two significant factors influencing the mode in which grains break and the type of shear zone that forms. Two end-member types of experimental shear zones were identified: (a) Shear zones with diffuse boundaries, which formed at low levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement; and (b) Shear zones with sharp boundaries, which formed at higher levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement. Our interpretation is that with increasing burial depth (approximately more than one kilometer, simulated in the experiments by higher levels of normal stress), the predominant mode of grain fracturing changes from flaking to splitting; which facilitates the formation of sharp-boundary shear zones. This change to grain splitting increases the power law dimension of the grain size distribution (D is about 1.5 in sharp boundary shear zones). Based on our observations, initial grain size has no influence in the deformation behavior of the sand at 5 MPa normal stresses. A new type of cataclastic deformation band is described through outcrop and microscopic studies; here termed a 'slipped deformation band'. Whereas previously reported cataclastic

  11. Deformation bands in porous sandstones their microstructure and petrophysical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Anita

    2007-12-15

    Deformation bands are commonly thin tabular zones of crushed or reorganized grains that form in highly porous rocks and sediments. Unlike a fault, typically the slip is negligible in deformation bands. In this dissertation the microstructure and petrophysical properties of deformation bands have been investigated through microscopy and numerical analysis of experimental and natural examples. The experimental work consists of a series of ring-shear experiments performed on porous sand at 5 and 20 MPa normal stresses and followed by microscopic examination of thin sections from the sheared samples. The results of the ring-shear experiments and comparison of them to natural deformation bands reveals that burial depth (level of normal stress in the experiments) and the amount of shear displacement during deformation are the two significant factors influencing the mode in which grains break and the type of shear zone that forms. Two end-member types of experimental shear zones were identified: (a) Shear zones with diffuse boundaries, which formed at low levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement; and (b) Shear zones with sharp boundaries, which formed at higher levels of normal stress and/or shear displacement. Our interpretation is that with increasing burial depth (approximately more than one kilometer, simulated in the experiments by higher levels of normal stress), the predominant mode of grain fracturing changes from flaking to splitting; which facilitates the formation of sharp-boundary shear zones. This change to grain splitting increases the power law dimension of the grain size distribution (D is about 1.5 in sharp boundary shear zones). Based on our observations, initial grain size has no influence in the deformation behavior of the sand at 5 MPa normal stresses. A new type of cataclastic deformation band is described through outcrop and microscopic studies; here termed a 'slipped deformation band'. Whereas previously reported cataclastic

  12. Numerical Analysis of Flow Erosion on Sand Discharge Pipe in Nitrogen Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In nitrogen drilling, entrained sand particles in the gas flow may cause erosive wear on metal surfaces and have a significant effect on the operational life of discharge pipelines, especially for elbows. In this paper, computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations based code FLUENT is carried out to investigate the flow erosion on a sand discharge pipe in conjunction with an erosion model. The motion of the continuum phase is captured based on solving the three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations, while the kinematics and trajectory of the sand particles are evaluated by the discrete phase model (DPM. The flow field has been examined in terms of pressure, velocity, and erosion rate profiles along the flow path in the bend of the simulated discharge pipe. Effects of flow parameters such as inlet velocity, sandy volume fraction, and particle diameter and structure parameters such as pipe diameter and bend curvature are analyzed based on a series of numerical simulations. The results show that small pipe diameter or small bend curvature leads to serious erosion, while slow flow, little sandy volume fraction, and small particle diameter can weaken erosion. The results obtained from the present work provide useful guidance to practical operation and discharge pipe design.

  13. The impact of Hurricane Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf of Fire Island, New York: Large bedform migration but limited erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John A.; Flood, Roger D.; Austin, James A., Jr.; Schwab, William C.; Christensen, Beth; Browne, Cassandra M.; Denny, Jane F.; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the impact of superstorm Sandy on the lower shoreface and inner shelf offshore the barrier island system of Fire Island, NY using before-and-after surveys involving swath bathymetry, backscatter and CHIRP acoustic reflection data. As sea level rises over the long term, the shoreface and inner shelf are eroded as barrier islands migrate landward; large storms like Sandy are thought to be a primary driver of this largely evolutionary process. The "before" data were collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a long-term investigation of the Fire Island barrier system. The "after" data were collected in January, 2013, ~two months after the storm. Surprisingly, no widespread erosional event was observed. Rather, the primary impact of Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf was to force migration of major bedforms (sand ridges and sorted bedforms) 10's of meters WSW alongshore, decreasing in migration distance with increasing water depth. Although greater in rate, this migratory behavior is no different than observations made over the 15-year span prior to the 2011 survey. Stratigraphic observations of buried, offshore-thinning fluvial channels indicate that long-term erosion of older sediments is focused in water depths ranging from the base of the shoreface (~13-16 m) to ~21 m on the inner shelf, which is coincident with the range of depth over which sand ridges and sorted bedforms migrated in response to Sandy. We hypothesize that bedform migration regulates erosion over these water depths and controls the formation of a widely observed transgressive ravinement; focusing erosion of older material occurs at the base of the stoss (upcurrent) flank of the bedforms. Secondary storm impacts include the formation of ephemeral hummocky bedforms and the deposition of a mud event layer.

  14. The impact of Hurricane Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf of Fire Island, New York: large bedform migration but limited erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, John A.; Flood, Roger D.; Austin, James A.; Schwab, William C.; Christensen, Beth A.; Browne, Cassandra M.; Denny, Jane F.; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the impact of superstorm Sandy on the lower shoreface and inner shelf offshore the barrier island system of Fire Island, NY using before-and-after surveys involving swath bathymetry, backscatter and CHIRP acoustic reflection data. As sea level rises over the long term, the shoreface and inner shelf are eroded as barrier islands migrate landward; large storms like Sandy are thought to be a primary driver of this largely evolutionary process. The “before” data were collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of a long-term investigation of the Fire Island barrier system. The “after” data were collected in January, 2013, ~two months after the storm. Surprisingly, no widespread erosional event was observed. Rather, the primary impact of Sandy on the shoreface and inner shelf was to force migration of major bedforms (sand ridges and sorted bedforms) 10’s of meters WSW alongshore, decreasing in migration distance with increasing water depth. Although greater in rate, this migratory behavior is no different than observations made over the 15-year span prior to the 2011 survey. Stratigraphic observations of buried, offshore-thinning fluvial channels indicate that long-term erosion of older sediments is focused in water depths ranging from the base of the shoreface (~13–16 m) to ~21 m on the inner shelf, which is coincident with the range of depth over which sand ridges and sorted bedforms migrated in response to Sandy. We hypothesize that bedform migration regulates erosion over these water depths and controls the formation of a widely observed transgressive ravinement; focusing erosion of older material occurs at the base of the stoss (upcurrent) flank of the bedforms. Secondary storm impacts include the formation of ephemeral hummocky bedforms and the deposition of a mud event layer.

  15. Characterizing gas shaly sandstone reservoirs using the magnetic resonance technology in the Anaco area, East Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fam, Maged; August, Howard [Halliburton, Houston, TX (United States); Zambrano, Carlos; Rivero, Fidel [PDVSA Gas (Venezuela)

    2008-07-01

    With demand for natural gas on the rise every day, accounting for and booking every cubic foot of gas is becoming very important to operators exploiting natural gas reservoirs. The initial estimates of gas reserves are usually established through the use of petrophysical parameters normally based on wireline and/or LWD logs. Conventional logs, such as gamma ray, density, neutron, resistivity and sonic, are traditionally used to calculate these parameters. Sometimes, however, the use of such conventional logs may not be enough to provide a high degree of accuracy in determining these petrophysical parameters, which are critical to reserve estimates. Insufficient accuracy can be due to high complexities in the rock properties and/or a formation fluid distribution within the reservoir layers that is very difficult to characterize with conventional logs alone. The high degree of heterogeneity in the shaly sandstone rock properties of the Anaco area, East Venezuela, can be characterized by clean, high porosity, high permeability sands to very shaly, highly laminated, and low porosity rock. This wide variation in the reservoir properties may pose difficulties in identifying gas bearing zones which may affect the final gas reserves estimates in the area. The application of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) logging technology in the area, combined with the application of its latest acquisition and interpretation methods, has proven to be very adequate in detecting and quantifying gas zones as well as providing more realistic petrophysical parameters for better reserve estimates. This article demonstrates the effectiveness of applying the MRI logging technology to obtain improved petrophysical parameters that will help better characterize the shaly-sands of Anaco area gas reservoirs. This article also demonstrates the value of MRI in determining fluid types, including distinguishing between bound water and free water, as well as differentiating between gas and liquid

  16. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in organo-mineral particles of alluvial sandy soil profiles at a petroleum-contaminated site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhe; Zeng, Fangang; Xue, Nandong; Li, Fasheng

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and the distribution of 16 USEPA priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in two alluvial sandy soil profiles and in their four sizes of organo-mineral particles (200 μm coarse sand) beside a typical oil sludge storage site in eastern China. PAHs were mainly enriched in the surface soil (0-20 cm) and the concentrations declined in deeper soils, from 3.68 to 0.128 μg/g in profile 1 and 10.8 to 0.143 μg/g in profile 2 (dry wt.). The PAHs in the upper soil layers of this study site mainly came from combustion pollution, whereas in the lower soil layers petroleum contamination became the major source of PAHs. The content of different sized organo-mineral particles of this alluvial sandy soil decreased in the following order: fine sand>coarse sand>silt>clay. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the different sized soil fractions of this study site were dominated by quartz, calcite and feldspar. The particle surface became smoother with size increasing as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized soil fractions. The highest PAH concentration was associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay>silt>coarse sand>fine sand. Soil organic matter (SOM) content, mineral composition and particle surface characteristics were suggested as three main factors affecting the distribution of PAHs in different sized organo-mineral particles. This study will help to understand the distribution and transport characteristics of PAHs in soil profiles at petroleum-contaminated sites.

  17. Sand harm in taklimakan Desert highway and sand control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANZhiwen; WANGTao; SUNQingwei; DONGZhibao; WANGXunming

    2003-01-01

    Reputed as a wonderful achievement of the world’s highway construction history,the Taklimakan Desert highway is nor facing serious sand drift encroachment problems due to its 447-km-long passage of sand sea consisting of crescent dunes,barchan chains,compound transverse dune ridges and complex megadunes.To solve some technical problems in the protection of the highway from sang drift encroachment,desert experts have been conducting the theoretical and applied studies on sand movement laws;causes,severities and time-space differentiation of sand drift damages;and control ways including mechanical,chemical and biological measures.In this paper the authors give an overall summry on the research contents and recent progress in the control of sand drift damages in China and hold that the theoretical researc results and practices in the prevention of sand drift encroachment on the cross-desert highway represnt a breakthrough and has an cpoch-making significance.Since the construction of protective forest along the cross-desert highway requires large amount of ground water,what will be its environmental consequence and whether it can effectively halt sand drift encroachment on the highway forever are the questions to be studied urgently.

  18. Controls on the Lower Cretaceous Punt Sandstone Member, a massive deep-water clastic deposystem, Inner Moray Firth, UK North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argent, J.D.; Stewart, S.A. [Amerada Hess Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Underhill, J.R. [University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2000-08-01

    Interpretation of high-quality seismic data, constrained by exploration wells, provides insights into controls on the stratigraphic architecture and deep-water sedimentary processes that governed deposition of the Lower Cretaceous Punt Sandstone Member in the Inner Moray Firth Basin. We suggest a model of deposition in which sediment provenance from the north and west progressively filled depositional accommodation in proximal depocentres before spilling into more distal areas via linear, confined and incised channel complexes. As well as giving important clues into post-rift depositional processes in the basin, and a well-imaged ancient analogue for the deposition of massive deep-water sands, the seismic and stratigraphic data may also provide important insights into factors governing the poorly imaged Lower Cretaceous sands in neighbouring basins of the North Sea. (Author)

  19. An Investigation into the Processes and Quantity of Dust Emissions over Gravel and Sand Deserts in North-Western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengcai; Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqian; Wu, Guoxi; Cui, Xujia

    2017-06-01

    Year-long field observations have shown that there are spatial and temporal variations in the quantity of dust emissions for particulate matter {<}10 μm (PM10), particulate matter {<}63 μm (PM63) and vertical dust flux over different gravel surfaces (with loose sand, without loose sand, with a crust, and without a crust), with the greatest emissions occurring in the spring. The largest quantity of PM10 and PM63 emissions occurred over gravel with a loose sand surface (1.1 × 10^{-3} and 10.2 × 10^{-3} kg m^{-1} day^{-1}, respectively). The gravel surface without loose sand and without a crust presents the lowest values of PM63 (1.6 × 10^{-3} kg m^{-1} day^{-1}) and PM10 (3.3 × 10^{-4} kg m^{-1} day^{-1}). However, the vertical dust flux was largest at over sandy surface (373 × 10^{-3 } kg m^{-2} day^{-1}). Multivariate correlation analysis indicates that the quantity of PM10 is strongly negatively correlated to gravel coverage (R^{2 }= 0.55). The quantity of PM10 dust emissions over a gravel surface with loose sand is approximately three times greater than that of a gravel surface with a crust. The mean quantity of PM10, PM63 and vertical dust flux over a gravel surface decreased with increasing gravel coverage. By comparing the quantity of PM10 dust emissions over gravel and sandy deserts, we found that gravel deserts and sandy deserts are both major sources of dust for dust storms in this region.

  20. Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

    2002-11-01

    The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years

  1. Hurricane Sandy Washover Deposits on Southern Long Beach Island, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. M.; Richmond, B. M.; Kane, H. H.; Lunghino, B.

    2015-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy washover deposits were investigated at Forsyth National Wildlife Refuge (FNWR) on Southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey in order to map deposit thickness and characterize the sedimentary deposits. FNWR was chosen as a field area because there has been relatively little anthropogenic shoreline modification since washover deposition from Hurricane Sandy. Sediment, elevation, and geophysical data were collected during the April 2015 field campaign, approximately two and a half years after the storm. Sediment deposit data included trenches, stratigraphic descriptions, bulk sediment samples, push cores, Russian cores, and photos. Computed tomography (CT) scanning was conducted on push cores in order to acquire high resolution imaging of density, grain size, and sedimentary structure. Profiles of washover elevation were measured using Differential GPS with Real Time Kinematic processing. Ground Penetrating Radar data was collected to image the depth of the deposit and identify sedimentary structures. These data sets are compared to pre- and post -Sandy lidar surveys in order to determine post-Sandy modification in the two and a half years following the hurricane. We compare sediment thickness and sedimentary characteristics to hurricane Sandy deposits elsewhere along the U.S. eastern seaboard and to tsunami deposits.

  2. Temporal variations in microbial activities and carbon turnover in subtidal sandy sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böer, S. I.; Arnosti, C.; van Beusekom, J. E. E.; Boetius, A.

    2009-07-01

    Temporal dynamics and vertical patterns in bacterial abundances and activities were studied in a shallow subtidal sand flat in the Sylt-Rømø Basin (North Frisian Wadden Sea, Germany). Extracellular enzymatic activities, bacterial carbon production and community respiration showed strong (factor of 4-5) temporal variations that were mostly related to seasonal temperature change and to changes in substrate availability. These temporal patterns in enzymatic activity were barely reflected in bacterial (200-400 mmol C m-2) and microphytobenthic biomass (800-1500 mmol C m-2) or the sedimentary carbohydrate inventory (1300-2900 mmol C m-2), suggesting that grazing controls the standing stocks of the microphytobenthic and bacterial assemblages. Despite their exposure to strong hydrodynamic forces such as tidal currents and wind-induced wave surge, the subtidal sandy sediments showed persistent vertical gradients in bacterial abundances, carbon production and extracellular enzymatic activities at all times. The vertical distribution of these parameters was tightly coupled to that of the microphytobenthos, dominated by diatoms. Despite the low organic carbon content typical for surge-exposed sandy sediments, high extracellular enzymatic activities and bacterial carbon production rates indicate a very active heterotrophic bacterial community, with a gross secondary productivity of 30-180 mmol C m-2, and a biomass turnover time of 2-18 days. Our data suggest that this high activity is supported by the rapid flux of carbohydrates from microphytobenthic primary productivity. Accordingly, the potential activities of enzymes hydrolyzing carbohydrates cover most of the total bacterial carbon demand during all seasons.

  3. Temporal variations in microbial activities and carbon turnover in subtidal sandy sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boetius

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporal dynamics and vertical patterns in bacterial abundances and activities were studied in a shallow subtidal sand flat in the Sylt-Rømø Basin (North Frisian Wadden Sea, Germany. Extracellular enzymatic activities, bacterial carbon production and community respiration showed strong (factor of 4–5 temporal variations that were mostly related to seasonal temperature change and to changes in substrate availability. These temporal patterns in enzymatic activity were barely reflected in bacterial (200–400 mmol C m−2 and microphytobenthic biomass (800–1500 mmol C m−2 or the sedimentary carbohydrate inventory (1300–2900 mmol C m−2, suggesting that grazing controls the standing stocks of the microphytobenthic and bacterial assemblages. Despite their exposure to strong hydrodynamic forces such as tidal currents and wind-induced wave surge, the subtidal sandy sediments showed persistent vertical gradients in bacterial abundances, carbon production and extracellular enzymatic activities at all times. The vertical distribution of these parameters was tightly coupled to that of the microphytobenthos, dominated by diatoms. Despite the low organic carbon content typical for surge-exposed sandy sediments, high extracellular enzymatic activities and bacterial carbon production rates indicate a very active heterotrophic bacterial community, with a gross secondary productivity of 30–180 mmol C m−2, and a biomass turnover time of 2–18 days. Our data suggest that this high activity is supported by the rapid flux of carbohydrates from microphytobenthic primary productivity. Accordingly, the potential activities of enzymes hydrolyzing carbohydrates cover most of the total bacterial carbon demand during all seasons.

  4. Reevaluation of the Reservoir Gas Sands of Rashidpur Gas Field: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eahsanul Haque, Akm; Ahmed, Nur

    2010-05-01

    Rashidpur Gas Field is located in the west of Srimongal in East Central Bangladesh. The accumulation associated with the Miocene Bhuban-Boka Bil Sandstone Reservoirs in a structural trap. The structure is about 35 km long and 7 km wide with amplitude of some 4900 ft. Rashidpur anticline is a sub-meriodinal axis, elongated, asymmetrical doubly plunging anticline which has two pay sands namely Upper Gas Sand (UGS) and Lower Gas Sand (LGS) indicated in all four wells drilled in the structure. After penetrating the shalebsection beneath LGS, drilling plan was rescheduled to a depth of 9200 ft in order to investigate the deeper sands of potential hydrocarbon accumulation. On reaching a depth of 10073 ft a sudden kick occurred, which halted the drilling operation and forced to kill the well. An immediate sidetrack well (4521 ft) was drilled at Well-4 and an existence of a sealing fault was drawn on the final report. But mud logs of Well-3 and Well-4 based on the hydrocarbon component of UGS and LGS clearly indicate the absence of any fault between Well-3 and Well-4. Recent geological investigation in the study area reveals the updated facts on the two wells of Rashidpur Gas Field. The paper analyses mud logs and other geological data and reevaluates the reservoir gas sands of Rashidpur Gas Field.

  5. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  6. Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous turbidite sandstones in the Central Graben, North Sea; with special focus on the Danish Gertrud Graben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannessen, P.

    1998-10-01

    Thick Late Jurassic - Early cretaceous turbidite sandstone successions in the Central Graben are uncommon except from the Moray Firth and Viking Graven north of the Central Graben, where several important hydrocarbon producing turbidite sandstone fields are known. The only hydrocarbon producing turbidite reservoir sandstones in the Central Graben is the up to 55 m thick Ribble Sandstone Member located in the British South-west Central Graben, where it is lying above thick shoreface reservoir sandstones of the Fulmar Formation, separated by offshore claystones of the Kimmeridge Clay Formation. The turbidite sandstones of the Ribble Sandstone Member derived from the more proximal thick reservoir sandstones of the Fulmar Formation located near the Mid North Sea High. It has not yet been possible to correlate thick shoreface sandstones of the Norwegian Ula Formation or the Danish Heno Formation to more distal thick turbidite sandstones derived from the shoreface sandstones. (au) 60 fig., 85 refs.

  7. Tidal River Elbe - a sediment budget for the grain size fraction of medium sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterscheid, Axel

    2016-04-01

    marine clay by capital dredging, Weichselion sandy deposits, which formed the geological layer underneath, now became part of the sediment transport regime. Nowadays, most sections of the main channel are morphologically characterized by a medium sandy river bed and subaquatic dunes of several meters height followed by sections of a poorly structured river bed caused by the sedimentation of silty sediments. By setting up the sediment balance for medium sand, the fluxes entering the estuary from the inland Elbe is one source term in the equation. The average annual load for the medium sand is estimated to be 110,000 m³/year (1996 - 2008, measurement station Neu Darchau). Further downstream in the tidal part of the river there are no further measurement stations located, but the analysis of a time series of multibeam sonar data (2000 to 2014) shows that large amounts of medium sand episodically pass the tidal weir at Geesthacht only in the event of extreme flood. This is due to a significant increase in bed volume between Geesthacht and the Port of Hamburg in the aftermath of a singular extreme event. Until the next extreme event the bed volume (functions as temporary storage for medium sand) is eroding again, which is the second source term. By comparing the information on bed load fluxes, the evolution of bed volumes over time and the dredging statistics we can conclude for the longer term that the total amount of medium sand that has been dredged and taken out of the system for constructional purposes is the same order of magnitude compared to the sum of both source terms. Hence, there is no or very limited net transport of medium sand passing the port area and entering the downstream river section. From the subsequent analysis of multibeam sonar data (2008 - 2014) we know for the river section from Hamburg to Brunsbuettel (total distance of 40 km) that there has been a continuous loss of about 1 Mio. m³/a in bed volumes, which means a deficit situation for medium

  8. Basical characteristics of fluid geologic process of interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-typeuranium deposit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; BoLin; LIU; ChiYang; WANG; JianQiang

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the physicochemical properties such as component, formulation, genesis, tem- perature, pH, Eh, salinity and pressure of all main alteration fluid of interlayer oxidation zone sand- stone-type uranium deposits after studying the geologic process and geochemistry of internal typical sandstone-type uranium deposits such as Shihongtan deposit in the Turpan-Hami basin, 512 deposit in the Yili basin, Dongsheng deposit in the Ordos basin. The composition of fluid can be divided into two parts based on the analysis of inclusion: one can be affirmed as atmospheric water with ordinary temperature epigenesist according to the character of hydrogen and oxygen isotope of inclusion, the other is natural gas containing gaseous hydrocarbon like CH4, and CO2 as well as a little H2S, CO, H2, N2 and so on, it always contains a small quantity of hydrocarbon liquid in petroliferous basins. The fluid property of oxidation alteration zone is always oxidation alkaline, and neutrality or weak acid-weak alkaline and reducibility during the metallizing process, but at secondary reduction or deoxidization zone it becomes strong reduction alkaline. Oxygenic groundwater in the fluid is the activate and mig- ratory medium of uranium element, but the gaseous hydrocarbon like CH4 as well as H2, H2S, CO from natural gas is the important sedimentary reducer of uranium mineral; the transformation of pH,Eh in fluid environment is the main reason for the formation of uranium metallization.

  9. Relationships between electrical properties and petrography of El-Maghara sandstone formations, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Kassab

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Realization of electrical and petrography of rocks is absolutely necessary for geophysical investigations. The petrographical, petrophysical and electrical properties of sandstone rocks (El-Maghara Formation, North Sinai, Egypt will be discussed in the present work. The goal of this paper was to highlight interrelations between electrical properties in terms of frequency (conductivity, permittivity and impedance and petrography, as well as mineral composition. Electrical properties including (conductivity and dielectric constant were measured at room temperature and humidity of (∼35%. The frequency range used will be from 10 Hz to 100 kHz. Slight changes between samples in electrical properties were found to result from changes in composition and texture. Electrical properties generally change with grain size, shape, sorting, mineralogy and mineral composition. The dielectric constant decreases with frequency and increases with increasing clay content. The conductivity increases with the increase in conductor channels among electrodes. Many parameters can combine together to lead to the same electrical properties. The samples are mainly composed of sand with clay and carbonate.

  10. Physical and hydric behavior of sand-bentonite mixtures subjected to salinity and sodicity constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Benkhelifa; Moulay, Belkhodja; Youcef, Daoud; Philippe, Cambier

    2015-04-01

    Data show that 64% of arid and 97% of those hyper-arid, in world, are located in Africa and Asia. Soils in these regions, predominantly sandy, differ from those of wetlands by properties related to moisture deficiency. Organic matter is less than 1% and cation exchange capacity does not exceed the meq.100 g-1 soil. Therefore, they are vulnerable to physical, chemical and biological degradation phenomena. Algeria is among the countries most affected since 95% of the area is arid and semi-arid. The addition of clay is an ancient technic used locally in Algeria in arid and semi-arid areas to improve water reserve and resistance to wind erosion of sandy soils. The literature reports that sandy soils amended with 10% of their dry weight in bentonite, registers a yield increases ranging from 10 to 40% depending on the crop. If works of the role of clay on the physical, chemical and hydric characteristics of sandy soils are relatively abundant, the effects of this mineral on the edaphic behavior of the substrate and the crops in abiotic conditions of salinity and sodicity remain insufficiently studied. These are related to an accumulation of soluble salts in the rhizosphere. In Algeria, 10 to 15% of irrigated land are affected by salinization. In this work, we studied the physical and hydric evolution of sand-clay mixtures subjected to abiotic stress of salinity and sodicity. Indeed, it is important to understand the scientific basis of clays properties, when they are added to the sand in order to optimize the characteristics of the blends and enhance this traditional amendment technic in the context where it is practiced in Algeria. The first result shows that bentonite modifies completely the physical and hydric properties of clay-sand mixtures. In addition to its beneficial effect on the hydration properties, it allows to attenuate the stress effects of salinity and sodicity observed on the properties of the mixture and the morphological properties of a bioindicator

  11. Multidisciplinary studies on ancient sandstone quarries of Western Sardinia (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, Silvana Maria; Del Vais, Carla; Naitza, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    The ancient coastal quarries of Mediterranean are increasingly considered geosites of multidisciplinary relevance. They are sites of historical-archaeological interest that show ancient techniques of stone extraction; they are significant for cultural heritage conservation and restoration, as sources of the stones used in ancient buildings and monuments; they are sites of geological relevance, as often retain important stratigraphic sections; they are also useful markers of secular changes in the sea level. A multisciplinary study is in progress on the ancient quarries of the Sinis region (western Sardinia island), integrating archaeological, geological, minero-petrographical data. In Sardinia, coastal quarries have been established from Punic and Roman times. Many of them exploited Quaternary sediments along the southern and western coasts of the island. They consist of middle-late Pleistocene marine conglomerates and carbonate sandstones, and of coastal (aeolian) carbonate sandstones. Sandstone blocks of different sizes have been widely used in ancient cities for buildings, defensive works, harbours, etc. Three main areas of stone extraction (San Giovanni di Sinis, Punta Maimoni, Is Arutas) have been so far recognized in the Sinis. GIS-supported mapping and documentation of the sites includes their geology and stratigraphy, the extension and layout of the quarries, and an evaluation of volumes of extracted rocks. Documented archaeological evidences include ancient extraction fronts, spoil heaps, working areas, working traces in the old fronts, transport routes of blocks, and traces of loading facilities. The study is aimed at reconstructing the relationships of the quarries with the urban areas of Sinis, as the ancient Punic-Roman city of Tharros. Consequently, a minero-petrographical characterization (optical microscopy, XRD) is performed on sandstones sampled in each quarry, and in historical buildings in Tharros and other centres of the region (Cabras

  12. Sandy Deposits of the 2006 Java Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setja Atmadja, C. M.; Yulianto, E.

    2007-05-01

    A field reconnaissance was performed out a week after Java tsunami on July, last year. It focused on documentation of sedimentary deposit as the first step to study delineate tsunami history in extend to tsunami hazard assessments. In a region with tremendous tsunami thread, the 2006 Java tsunami still gave a shock with at least 650 death tolls at 300 km affected coast line. The slight felt shaking onshore and unobvious leading recession of sea water were probably the reason as these were the reverse indications of tsunami to the lessons learned from the great Sumatra 2004 event. In addition, although tsunami of similar size have struck the southern coast of Java at least twice in the last century, in 1921 and 1994, tsunami history and the potential threat is still unknown to local population. Three shore normal transects across coastal plain were made in the two affected sites to exhibit the recent tsunami deposit thickness, internal layering, and landward extent. During the documentation, we also discovered two additional sand beds at the end of 2006 deposit landward extent in greater depth. All this information may provides preliminary information to better identify the geologic traces of earlier Javanese tsunami which in turn may help constructing Java's tsunami history.

  13. Discrete Element Method simulations of the saturation of aeolian sand transport

    CERN Document Server

    Pähtz, Thomas; Carneiro, Marcus V; Araújo, Nuno A M; Herrmann, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    The saturation length of aeolian sand transport ($L_s$), characterizing the distance needed by wind-blown sand to adapt to changes in the wind shear, is essential for accurate modeling of the morphodynamics of Earth's sandy landscapes and for explaining the formation and shape of sand dunes. In the last decade, it has become a widely-accepted hypothesis that $L_s$ is proportional to the characteristic distance needed by transported particles to reach the wind speed (the ``drag length''). Here we challenge this hypothesis. From extensive numerical Discrete Element Method simulations, we find that, for medium and strong winds, $L_s\\propto V_s^2/g$, where $V_s$ is the saturated value of the average speed of sand particles traveling above the surface and $g$ the gravitational constant. We show that this proportionality is consistent with a recent analytical model, in which the drag length is just one of four similarly important length scales relevant for sand transport saturation.

  14. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  15. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  16. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in organo-mineral particles of alluvial sandy soil profiles at a petroleum-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zhe [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Zeng, Fangang [School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Xue, Nandong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Fasheng, E-mail: ligulax@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and the distribution of 16 USEPA priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in two alluvial sandy soil profiles and in their four sizes of organo-mineral particles (< 2 {mu}m clay, 2-20 {mu}m silt, 20-200 {mu}m fine sand, and > 200 {mu}m coarse sand) beside a typical oil sludge storage site in eastern China. PAHs were mainly enriched in the surface soil (0-20 cm) and the concentrations declined in deeper soils, from 3.68 to 0.128 {mu}g/g in profile 1 and 10.8 to 0.143 {mu}g/g in profile 2 (dry wt.). The PAHs in the upper soil layers of this study site mainly came from combustion pollution, whereas in the lower soil layers petroleum contamination became the major source of PAHs. The content of different sized organo-mineral particles of this alluvial sandy soil decreased in the following order: fine sand > coarse sand > silt > clay. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the different sized soil fractions of this study site were dominated by quartz, calcite and feldspar. The particle surface became smoother with size increasing as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized soil fractions. The highest PAH concentration was associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Soil organic matter (SOM) content, mineral composition and particle surface characteristics were suggested as three main factors affecting the distribution of PAHs in different sized organo-mineral particles. This study will help to understand the distribution and transport characteristics of PAHs in soil profiles at petroleum-contaminated sites. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest PAH concentrations were associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil organic

  17. Did Hurricane Sandy influence the 2012 US presidential election?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joshua

    2014-07-01

    Despite drawing on a common pool of data, observers of the 2012 presidential campaign came to different conclusions about whether, how, and to what extent "October surprise" Hurricane Sandy influenced the election. The present study used a mixed correlational and experimental design to assess the relation between, and effect of, the salience of Hurricane Sandy on attitudes and voting intentions regarding President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in a large sample of voting-aged adults. Results suggest that immediately following positive news coverage of Obama's handling of the storm's aftermath, Sandy's salience positively influenced attitudes toward Obama, but that by election day, reminders of the hurricane became a drag instead of a boon for the President. In addition to theoretical implications, this study provides an example of how to combine methodological approaches to help answer questions about the impact of unpredictable, large-scale events as they unfold.

  18. Hurricane Sandy, Disaster Preparedness, and the Recovery Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy was the second largest and costliest hurricane in U.S. history to affect multiple states and communities. This article describes the lived experiences of 24 occupational therapy students who lived through Hurricane Sandy using the Recovery Model to frame the research. Occupational therapy student narratives were collected and analyzed using qualitative methods and framed by the Recovery Model. Directed content and thematic analysis was performed using the 10 components of the Recovery Model. The 10 components of the Recovery Model were experienced by or had an impact on the occupational therapy students as they coped and recovered in the aftermath of the natural disaster. This study provides insight into the lived experiences and recovery perspectives of occupational therapy students who experienced Hurricane Sandy. Further research is indicated in applying the Recovery Model to people who survive disasters. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  19. Traces of the heritage arising from the Macelj sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golež, Mateja

    2014-05-01

    The landscape of Southeast Slovenia and its stone heritage principally reveal itself through various Miocene sandstones. The most frequently found type on the borderline between Slovenia and Croatia, i.e. east of Rogatec, is the micaceous-quartz Macelj sandstone. This rock ranges in colour from greenish grey to bluish grey and yellowish, depending on the content of glauconite, which colours it green. In its composition, the rock is a heterogeneous mixture of grains of quartz, dolomite, muscovite, microcline, anorthite and glauconite. The average size of grains is 300μm. In cross-section, they are oblong, semi-rounded or round. The mechanical-physical and durability properties of the Macelj sandstone, which have been characterised pursuant to the applicable standards for natural stone, reveal that the rock exhibits poor resistance to active substances from the atmosphere, particularly in the presence of salt. In the surroundings of Rogatec, there are around 45 abandoned quarries of the Macelj sandstone, which are the result of the exploitation of this mineral resource from the 17th century on. The local quarrymen earned their bread until 1957, when the Kambrus quarry industry closed down. From the original use of this mineral resource as construction and decorative material, the useful value of the Macelj sandstone expanded during the development of the metals industry to the manufacture of large and small grindstones for the needs of the domestic and international market. Therefore, traces of quarrying can not only be seen in the disused quarries, but also in the rich architectural heritage of Rogatec and its surroundings, the stone furniture - from portals, window frames, wells, various troughs, pavements to stone walls - and other. The living quarrying heritage slowly passed into oblivion after World War II, although the analysis of the social image of the people residing in Rogatec and its surroundings revealed that there was an average of one stonemason in

  20. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  1. Family Structures, Relationships, and Housing Recovery Decisions after Hurricane Sandy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nejat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the recovery phase of a disaster cycle is still in its infancy. Recent major disasters such as Hurricane Sandy have revealed the inability of existing policies and planning to promptly restore infrastructure, residential properties, and commercial activities in affected communities. In this setting, a thorough grasp of housing recovery decisions can lead to effective post-disaster planning by policyholders and public officials. The objective of this research is to integrate vignette and survey design to study how family bonds affected rebuilding/relocating decisions after Hurricane Sandy. Multinomial logistic regression was used to investigate respondents’ family structures before Sandy and explore whether their relationships with family members changed after Sandy. The study also explores the effect of the aforementioned relationship and its changes on households’ plans to either rebuild/repair their homes or relocate. These results were compared to another multinomial logistic regression which was applied to examine the impact of familial bonds on respondents’ suggestions to a vignette family concerning rebuilding and relocating after a hurricane similar to Sandy. Results indicate that respondents who lived with family members before Sandy were less likely to plan for relocating than those who lived alone. A more detailed examination shows that this effect was driven by those who improved their relationships with family members; those who did not improve their family relationships were not significantly different from those who lived alone, when it came to rebuilding/relocation planning. Those who improved their relationships with family members were also less likely to suggest that the vignette family relocate. This study supports the general hypothesis that family bonds reduce the desire to relocate, and provides empirical evidence that family mechanisms are important for the rebuilding/relocating decision

  2. Geomorphic response of the Sandy River, Oregon, to removal of Marmot Dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jon J.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Podolak, Charles J.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Grant, Gordon E.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Pittman, Smokey; Bragg, Heather M.; Wallick, J. Rose; Tanner, Dwight Q.; Rhode, Abagail; Wilcock, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    The October 2007 breaching of a temporary cofferdam constructed during removal of the 15-meter (m)-tall Marmot Dam on the Sandy River, Oregon, triggered a rapid sequence of fluvial responses as ~730,000 cubic meters (m3) of sand and gravel filling the former reservoir became available to a high-gradient river. Using direct measurements of sediment transport, photogrammetry, airborne light detection and ranging (lidar) surveys, and, between transport events, repeat ground surveys of the reservoir reach and channel downstream, we monitored the erosion, transport, and deposition of this sediment in the hours, days, and months following breaching of the cofferdam. Rapid erosion of reservoir sediment led to exceptional suspended-sediment and bedload-sediment transport rates near the dam site, as well as to elevated transport rates at downstream measurement sites in the weeks and months after breaching. Measurements of sediment transport 0.4 kilometers (km) downstream of the dam site during and following breaching show a spike in the transport of fine suspended sediment within minutes after breaching, followed by high rates of suspended-load and bedload transport of sand. Significant transport of gravel bedload past the measurement site did not begin until 18 to 20 hours after breaching. For at least 7 months after breaching, bedload transport rates just below the dam site during high flows remained as much as 10 times above rates measured upstream of the dam site and farther downstream. The elevated sediment load was derived from eroded reservoir sediment, which began eroding when a meters-tall knickpoint migrated about 200 m upstream in the first hour after breaching. Rapid knickpoint migration triggered vertical incision and bank collapse in unconsolidated sand and gravel, leading to rapid channel widening. Over the following days and months, the knickpoint migrated upstream more slowly, simultaneously decreasing in height and becoming less distinct. Within 7 months

  3. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  4. Microbial mat-induced sedimentary structures in siliciclastic sediments: Examples from the 1.6 Ga Chorhat Sandstone, Vindhyan Supergroup, M.P., India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subir Sarkar; Santanu Banerjee; Pradip Samanta; Silambuchelvan Jeevankumar

    2006-02-01

    This paper addresses macroscopic signatures of microbial mat-related structures within the 1.6 Ga-old Chorhat Sandstone of the Semri Group –the basal stratigraphic unit of the Vindhyan succession in Son valley.The Chorhat Sandstone broadly represents a prograding succession of three depositional facies ranging from shallow shelf to coastal margin with aeolian sandsheet.The mat-mediated structures were generated because of plastic or brittle deformation of sand,turned cohesive and even thixotropic because of microbial mat growth.Mat growth also favoured abundant preservation of structures that usually have low preservation potential. Prolific growth of microbial mat in the subtidal to intertidal zone of the Chorhat sea was facilitated due to lack of grazing and burrowing activities of organisms in the Precambrian.It further indicates low rate of sedimentation between the storms,as also attested by frequent superposition of storm-beds,even near the storm wave base.It also reduces erosion and that,in turn,would imply low sediment concentration in flows leading to development of bedforms that are likely to be smaller in size and isolated from each other in a single train in contrast to those that form in mat-free sands.

  5. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  6. Effect Of Hot Water Injection On Sandstone Permeability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbrand, Esther; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2012-01-01

    The seasonal imbalance between supply and demand of renewable energy requires temporary storage, which can be achieved by hot water injection in warm aquifers. This requires that the permeability and porosity of the aquifer are not reduced significantly by heating. We present an overview...... of published results regarding the effect of temperature on sandstone permeability. These tests are performed with mineral oil, nitrogen gas, distilled water and solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 as well as brines that contain a mixture of salts. Thirteen sandstone formations, ranging from quartz arenites...... not account for all the permeability reductions observed. Permeablity reduction occurs both when distilled water is the saturating fluid as well as in tests with NaCl, KCl or CaCl2 solutions, however, this is not the case in tests with mineral oil or nitrogen gas. The formation of a filter cake or influx...

  7. Comparative study between Botucatu and Berea sandstone properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Oldemar Ribeiro; Balaban, Rosangela de Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study is the analysis and comparison between Berea and Botucatu sandstone, concerning the problems with regard to the loss of permeability or water sensitivity or loss of hydraulic conductivity due to the presence of swelling or non-swelling clays. Some porous volumes of synthetic seawater of different salinities were displaced through the porous media of Berea and Botucatu formations. It was observed that even the plugs of Berea, with no-swelling clays in their composition, had the permeability reduced as soon as the brine salinity reached a lower limit. As expected, the same occurred with the Botucatu sandstone samples, however, in this case,the sensitivity to the low salinity was much more effective.

  8. Study of microwave response of coal and sandstone samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Singh, Ramesh P.; Singh, K. P.

    1980-07-01

    Detailed measurements of relative dielectric constant and loss tangent of coal and sandstone samples have been carried out in the X-band of microwave frequency range (8-10 GHz). The effect of moisture, saline and petrol content on the dielectric and loss tangent has been studied. The reflection and transmission coefficient of these samples have been computed. The application of such measurements to geophysical prospecting has been discussed.

  9. New Acid Combination for a Successful Sandstone Acidizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, M. U.; Mahmud, H. K. B.; Rezaee, R.

    2017-05-01

    With the development of new enhanced oil recovery techniques, sandstone acidizing has been introduced and played a pivotal role in the petroleum industry. Different acid combinations have been applied, which react with the formation, dissolve the soluble particles; thus increase the production of hydrocarbons. To solve the problems which occurred using current preflush sandstone acidizing technology (hydrochloric acid); a new acid combination has been developed. Core flooding experiments on sandstone core samples with dimensions 1.5 in. × 3 in. were conducted at a flow rate of 2 cm3/min. A series of hydrochloric-acetic acid mixtures with different ratios were tested under 150°F temperature. The core flooding experiments performed are aimed to dissolve carbonate, sodium, potassium and calcium particles from the core samples. These experiments are followed by few important tests which include, porosity-permeability, pH value, Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) analysis and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR measurements). All the results are compared with the results of conventional hydrochloric acid technology. NMR and porosity analysis concluded that the new acid combination is more effective in creating fresh pore spaces and thus increasing the reservoir permeability. It can be seen from the pore distribution before and after the acidizing. Prior applying acid; the large size of pores appears most frequently in the pore distribution while with the applied acid, it was found that the small pore size is most the predominant of the pore distribution. These results are validated using ICP analysis which shows the effective removal of calcium and other positive ions from the core sample. This study concludes that the combination of acetic-hydrochloric acid can be a potential candidate for the preflush stage of sandstone acidizing at high temperature reservoirs.

  10. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Derived products of a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012...

  11. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Lidar-extracted dune features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dune crest and toe positions along a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October...

  12. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Derived products of a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012 hurricane...

  13. 2012 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Lidar: Northeast Atlantic Coast Post-Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  14. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Digital elevation model (DEM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A DEM was produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012...

  15. 2012 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Lidar: Northeast Atlantic Coast Post-Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  16. Distribution and enzymatic activity of heterotrophic bacteria decomposing selected macromolecular compounds in a Baltic Sea sandy beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgórska, B.; Mudryk, Z. J.

    2003-03-01

    The potential capability to decompose macromolecular compounds, and the level of extracellular enzyme activities were determined in heterotrophic bacteria isolated from a sandy beach in Sopot on the Southern Baltic Sea coast. Individual isolates were capable of hydrolysing a wide spectrum of organic macromolecular compounds. Lipids, gelatine, and DNA were hydrolyzed most efficiently. Only a very small percentage of strains were able to decompose cellulose, and no pectinolytic bacteria were found. Except for starch-hydrolysis, no significant differences in the intensity of organic compound decomposition were recorded between horizontal and vertical profiles of the studied beach. Of all the studied extracellular enzymes, alkaline phosphatase, esterase lipase, and leucine acrylaminidase were most active; in contrast, the activity α-fucosidase, α-galactosidase and β-glucouronidase was the weakest. The level of extracellular enzyme activity was similar in both sand layers.

  17. Strength and elastic properties of sandstone under different testing conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yun-ping; WANG Si-jing; WANG En-zhi

    2007-01-01

    A laboratory experimental program performed on Wuhan sandstones was presented under monotonic loading, partial cyclic loading during loading path and sine wave cyclic loading with different strain rates to compare uniaxial compression strength and elastic properties (elastic modulus and Poisson ratio) under different conditions and influence of pore fluid on them. When the loading strain rates are 10-5, 10-4 and 10-3/s, uniaxial compression strengths of dry sandstones are 82.3, 126.6 and 141.6 MPa,respectively, and that of water saturated sandstones are 70.5, 108.3 and 124.1 MPa, respectively. The above results show that the uniaxial compression strength increases with the increase of strain rate, however, variation of softening coefficient is insignificant.Under monotonic loading condition, tangent modulus increases with an increment of stress (strain) to a maximum value at a certain stress level, beyond which it starts to decline. Under the partial cyclic loading during loading path condition, unloading or reloading modulus is larger than loading modulus, and unloading and reloading moduli are almost constants with respect to stress level,especially unloading modulus. Under the sine wave cyclic loading condition, tangent modulus and Poisson ratio display asymmetric 'X' shape with various strain, and the average unloading modulus is larger than the average loading modulus.

  18. Calcium lignosulfonate adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Reid B; Bai, Baojun

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes adsorption and desorption studies carried out with calcium lignosulfonate (CLS) on Berea sandstone. Circulation experiments were performed to determine CLS adsorption isotherms and the effects of CLS concentration, temperature, salinity, brine hardness, and injection rate on adsorption density. Flow-through experiments were performed to assess the reversibility of CLS adsorption and the influence of postflush rate, brine concentration, brine hardness, brine pH, and temperature on the desorption process. Results indicate that CLS adsorption isotherms on Berea sandstone follow the Freundlich isotherm law. The results presented in this paper on the effects of CLS adsorption and desorption on Berea sandstone show that: (1) increasing CLS concentration and salinity increases CLS adsorption density; (2) increasing temperature will decrease adsorption density; (3) increasing injection rate of CLS solution will slightly decrease CLS adsorption density; (4) postflush rate and salinity of brine have a large impact on the CLS desorption process; (5) the adsorption and desorption process are not completely reversible; and (5) temperature and pH of the postflush brine have little effect on desorption.

  19. Morphological records of storm floods exemplified by the impact of the 1872 Baltic storm on a sandy spit system in south-eastern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Bendixen, Mette; Hede, Mikkel Ulfeldt

    2014-01-01

    Beach-ridge systems are important geo-archives providing evidence for past wave climate including catastrophic storm flood events. This study investigates the morphological impacts of the 1872 Baltic storm flood on a beach-ridge system (sandy spit) in south-eastern Denmark and evaluates...... the dune ridge at several sites and wash-over fans were generated until a level where the mean water level had dropped too much. Phase 4: the non-vegetated wash-over fans functioned as pathways for aeolian sand transport and relatively high dunes were formed in particular along the margins of the fan where...... aeolian sand was trapped by existing vegetation. The studied beach-ridge system records about 4500 years of accumulation; the storm flood sediments described are unique suggesting that the 1872 Baltic storm flood event was an extreme event. Thus studies of beach-ridge systems form a new source...

  20. Geology and ground-water resources of the Big Sandy Creek Valley, Lincoln, Cheyenne, and Kiowa Counties, Colorado; with a section on Chemical quality of the ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Donald L.; Horr, Clarence Albert

    1967-01-01

    This report describes the geology and ground-water resources of that part of the Big Sandy Creek valley from about 6 miles east of Limon, Colo., downstream to the Kiowa County and Prowers County line, an area of about 1,400 square miles. The valley is drained by Big Sandy Creek and its principal tributary, Rush Creek. The land surface ranges from flat to rolling; the most irregular topography is in the sandhills south and west of Big Sandy Creek. Farming and livestock raising are the principal occupations. Irrigated lands constitute only a sin311 part of the project area, but during the last 15 years irrigation has expanded. Exposed rocks range in age from Late Cretaceous to Recent. They comprise the Carlile Shale, Niobrara Formations, Pierre Shale (all Late Cretaceous), upland deposits (Pleistocene), valley-fill deposits (Pleistocene and Recent), and dune sand (Pleistocene and Recent). Because the Upper Cretaceous formations are relatively impermeable and inhibit water movement, they allow ground water to accumul3te in the overlying unconsolidated Pleistocene and Recent deposits. The valley-fill deposits constitute the major aquifer and yield as much as 800 gpm (gallons per mixture) to wells along Big Sandy and Rush Creeks. Transmissibilities average about 45,000 gallons per day per foot. Maximum well yields in the tributary valleys are about 200 gpm and average 5 to 10 gpm. The dune sand and upland deposits generally are drained and yield water to wells in only a few places. The ground-water reservoir is recharged only from direct infiltration of precipitation, which annually averages about 12 inches for the entire basin, and from infiltration of floodwater. Floods in the ephemeral Big Sandy Creek are a major source of recharge to ground-water reservoirs. Observations of a flood near Kit Carson indicated that about 3 acre-feet of runoff percolated into the ground-water reservoir through each acre of the wetted stream channel The downstream decrease in channel and

  1. Feeding biology of a guild of benthivorous fishes in a sandy shore on south-eastern Brazilian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahorcsak, P; Silvano, R A; Sazima, I

    2000-08-01

    The feeding biology of eight species of benthivorous fishes was studied in a sandy shore at Anchieta Island, south-eastern Brazilian coast. The fishes fed mainly on Amphipoda and Mysidacea crustaceans. The diet of the most abundant species, the drum Umbrina coroides, was analyzed in three standard length classes (20-55, 56-90 and 91-135 mm). This sciaenid showed an ontogenetic diet shift from Mysidacea to Amphipoda. The feeding behaviour of the sciaenid U. coroides and the gerreid Eucinostomus gula was recorded while snorkeling. During their foraging both species uncovered small organisms buried in the sand. Notwithstanding general similarities in diet, U. coroides and E. gula presented differences in feeding behaviour and morphology. Two carangid species of the genus Trachinotus differed in diet composition and consumed a larger array of food items than the remaining fish species. Differences in diet and feeding activity between the remaining benthivorous species were noted. These differences possibly reduce overlap in resource use and favour the coexistence of guilds of benthivorous fishes on sandy shores.

  2. Low level off-road vehicle (ORV) traffic negatively impacts macroinvertebrate assemblages at sandy beaches in south-western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Rebecca; Speldewinde, Peter C; Stewart, Barbara A

    2016-04-28

    Off-road vehicle use is arguably one of the most environmentally damaging human activities undertaken on sandy beaches worldwide. Existing studies focused on areas of high traffic volumes have demonstrated significantly lower abundance, diversity and species richness of fauna in zones where traffic is concentrated. The impact of lower traffic volumes is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the impacts of relatively low-level vehicle traffic on sandy beach fauna by sampling invertebrate communities at eight beaches located in south-western Australia. We found that even low-level vehicle traffic negatively impacts the physical beach environment, and consequently, the ability of many species to survive in this habitat in the face of this disturbance. Compaction, rutting and displacement of the sand matrix were observed over a large area, resulting in significant decreases in species diversity and density, and measurable shifts in community structure on beaches that experienced off-road vehicle traffic. Communities at impact sites did not display seasonal recovery as traffic was not significantly different between seasons. Given a choice between either reducing traffic volumes, or excluding ORV traffic from beaches, our results suggest that the latter would be more appropriate when the retention of ecological integrity is the objective.

  3. On the role of Posidonia oceanica beach wrack for macroinvertebrates of a Tyrrhenian sandy shore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, Isabella; Mateo, Miguel Ángel; Serrano, Oscar; Fallaci, Mario; Gagnarli, Elena; Serrano, Laura; Chelazzi, Lorenzo

    2009-01-01

    The use of Posidonia oceanica beach wrack by macroinvertebrates of the sandy beach at Burano (Tuscany, Italy) was assessed by following the colonisation dynamics of the wrack and analysing the stable isotopes 'scenario' of the main local carbon and nitrogen sources and consumers. One-hundred experimental cylinders, filled with P. oceanica wrack, were placed on the beach and sampled over a 1-month period. Abundance and species richness of macroinvertebrates in wracks varied through time. Wrack was colonised by crustaceans almost immediately after deployment of the experimental cylinders. The amphipod Talitrus saltator largely dominated the faunal assembly and, together with the isopod Tylos europaeus, occupied the wracks closer to the sealine. These were followed by dipterans, staphylinids, pselaphids and tenebrionids that occurred in drier wracks higher up on the eulittoral. Moisture content of the wrack and sand decreased through space and time. This was the primary factor explaining the spatial and temporal changes observed in macroinvertebrate abundance, with species colonising or abandoning wracks according to thresholds of environmental parameters. Isotopic analysis clearly established the absence of any direct dietary link between P. oceanica wrack and macroinvertebrates. Terrestrial food sources were also discarded. Both our experimental data and a literature search showed that the organic matter from seston as filtered by the sand is the most plausible carbon and nitrogen source for beach food webs. Even if P. oceanica wrack is not a trophic source for macroinvertebrates, it is vitally important as a physical structure that provides detritivorous and predatory species with refuge from environmentally stressful conditions.

  4. Prescribed differences in exercise intensity based on the TCAR test over sandy ground and grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fernandes da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of training might be influenced by exercise mode and type of terrain. Thus, the objective of this study was a to compare the physiological indices determined in the TCAR test carried out on natural grass (NG and sandy ground (SG, and b to analyze heart rate (HR and blood lactate responses during constant exercise on SG and NG. Ten soccer players (15.11 ± 1.1 years, 168 ± 4.0 cm, 60 ± 4.0 kg were submitted to the TCAR test to determine peak velocity (PV and the intensity corresponding to 80.4% PV (V80.4 on NG and SG. The second evaluation consisted of two constant load tests (CLT (80.4% PV on NG and SG with a duration of 27 min. The paired Student t-test was used to compare the tests carried out on NG and SG. ANOVA (two-way, complemented by the Tukey test, was used to compare lactate concentrations [La] at 9, 18 and 27 min between the two types of terrain. A p value <0.05 was adopted. PV and V80.4 (15.3±1.0 and 12.3±0.6 km/h were significantly higher on grass than on sand (14.3±1.0 and 11.5±0.4 km/h. Lactate concentration during the CLT [LaV80.4] was significantly higher on sand (4.1±0.9 mmol/L than on grass (2.8±0.7 mmol/L. In the CLT, no significant difference in mean HR was observed between the two terrains, whereas there was a difference in [La]. In conclusion, the type of terrain interferes with indicators associated with aerobic power and capacity obtained by the TCAR test.

  5. Effects of soil amendment on soil characteristics and maize yield in Horqin Sandy Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Liu, J. H.; Zhao, B. P.; Xue, A.; Hao, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    A 4-year experiment was conducted to investigate the inter-annual effects of sandy soil amendment on maize yield, soil water storage and soil enzymatic activities in sandy soil in Northeast China in 2010 to 2014. We applied the sandy soil amendment in different year, and investigated the different effects of sandy soil amendment in 2014. There were six treatments including: (1) no sandy soil amendment application (CK); (2) one year after applying sandy soil amendment (T1); (3) two years after applying sandy soil amendment(T2); (4) three years after applying sandy soil amendment(T3); (5)four years after applying sandy soil amendment(T4); (6) five years after applying sandy soil amendment (T5). T refers to treatment, and the number refers to the year after application of the sandy soil amendment. Comparing with CK, sandy soil amendments improved the soil water storage, soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in different growth stages and soil layers, the order of soil water storage in all treatments roughly performed: T3 > T5 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. the order of soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in all treatments roughly performed: T5 > T3 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. Soil application of sandy soil amendment significantly (p≤⃒0.05) increased the grain yield and biomass yield by 22.75%-41.42% and 29.92%-45.45% respectively, and maize yield gradually increased with the years go by in the following five years. Sandy soil amendment used in poor sandy soil had a positive effect on soil water storage, soil enzymatic activities and maize yield, after five years applied sandy soil amendment (T5) showed the best effects among all the treatments, and deserves further research.

  6. A new and practical method to obtain grain size measurements in sandy shores based on digital image acquisition and processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, P.; Cunha, T. R.; Gama, C.; Bernardes, C.

    2012-12-01

    Modern methods for the automated evaluation of sediment size in sandy shores relay on digital image processing algorithms as an alternative to time-consuming traditional sieving methodologies. However, the requirements necessary to guarantee that the considered image processing algorithm has a good grain identification success rate impose the need for dedicated hardware setups to capture the sand surface images. Examples are specially designed camera housings that maintain a constant distance between the camera lens and the sand surface, tripods to fix and maintain the camera angle orthogonal to the sand surface, external illumination systems that guarantee the light level necessary for the image processing algorithms, and special lenses and focusing systems for close proximity image capturing. In some cases, controlled image-capturing conditions can make the fieldwork more laborious which incurs in significant costs for monitoring campaigns considering large areas. To circumvent this problem, it is proposed a new automated image-processing algorithm that identifies sand grains in digital images acquired with a standard digital camera without any extra hardware attached to it. The accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm are evaluated in this work by means of a laboratory test on previously controlled grain samples, field tests where 64 samples (spread over a beach stretch of 65 km and with grain size ranging from 0.5 mm to 1.9 mm) were processed by both the proposed method and by sieving and finally by manual point count on all acquired images. The calculated root-mean-square (RMS) error between mean grain sizes obtained from the proposed image processing method and the sieve method (for the 64 samples) was 0.33 mm, and for the image processing method versus manual point counts comparison, with the same images, was 0.12 mm. The achieved correlation coefficients (r) were 0.91 and 0.96, respectively.

  7. Heavy mineral analysis for assessing the provenance of sandy sediment in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, F. L.; Woodrow, D. L.; McGann, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Heavy minerals have been used to trace the sources and transportation of sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay and nearby coastal areas since the 1960s. We have the opportunity to sample similar environments and revisit the heavy mineral populations under the current San Francisco Coastal System study of the provenance of beach sand. Most of the sandy sediment in San Francisco Bay can be traced to distant sources including the Sierra Nevada batholith and associated terranes with local contributions from the Franciscan Complex. Heavy minerals from Sierran sources include ordinary hornblende, metamorphic amphiboles, and hypersthene while those from the Franciscan Complex include other types of pyroxene, epidote, basaltic hornblende, and glaucophane... Tertiary strata and volcanics in the surrounding hills and displaced Sierran rocks found on the continental shelf west of the San Andreas Fault Zone introduce similar minerals, but perhaps in a lesser volume to be identified as major contributors... The primary result of cluster analysis of heavy minerals separated from sand-sized sediment taken within San Francisco Bay, the adjacent continental shelf, local beaches, cliffs outside the Golden Gate, and upstream drainages indicate a widespread occurrence of sediment traceable to the Sierra Nevada. A second cluster of samples identifies samples of mixed Sierran and Franciscan lineage within the strait of the Golden Gate, on the San Francisco bar, and on coastal beaches. Sediment samples with predominantly Franciscan mineral content appear on beaches around Point Reyes, possibly transported from the Russian River. The heavy mineral composition supports transport from the east, through San Francisco Bay and out the Golden Gate to the San Francisco bar and southward.

  8. Meiofauna of some sandy beaches of Andaman Islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.

    Comparatively high meiofauna numbers were recorded from beaches having fine sand particles than those having coarse to medium sand particles The fauna was dominated mainly by nematodes (53.7%), harpacticoids (13.7%) and polychaetes (12.8%) On all...

  9. Deaths associated with Hurricane Sandy - October-November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit the northeastern U.S. coastline. Sandy's tropical storm winds stretched over 900 miles (1,440 km), causing storm surges and destruction over a larger area than that affected by hurricanes with more intensity but narrower paths. Based on storm surge predictions, mandatory evacuations were ordered on October 28, including for New York City's Evacuation Zone A, the coastal zone at risk for flooding from any hurricane. By October 31, the region had 6-12 inches (15-30 cm) of precipitation, 7-8 million customers without power, approximately 20,000 persons in shelters, and news reports of numerous fatalities (Robert Neurath, CDC, personal communication, 2013). To characterize deaths related to Sandy, CDC analyzed data on 117 hurricane-related deaths captured by American Red Cross (Red Cross) mortality tracking during October 28-November 30, 2012. This report describes the results of that analysis, which found drowning was the most common cause of death related to Sandy, and 45% of drowning deaths occurred in flooded homes in Evacuation Zone A. Drowning is a leading cause of hurricane death but is preventable with advance warning systems and evacuation plans. Emergency plans should ensure that persons receive and comprehend evacuation messages and have the necessary resources to comply with them.

  10. Hurricane Sandy: An Educational Bibliography of Key Research Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There, undoubtedly, will be a flurry of research activity in the "Superstorm" Sandy impact area on a myriad of disaster-related topics, across academic disciplines. The purpose of this study was to review the disaster research related specifically to hurricanes in the educational and social sciences that would best serve as a compendium…

  11. Patterns of species richness in sandy beaches of South America

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Species richness of the intertidal macroinfauna of exposed sandy beaches around South America is reviewed in relation ... The middle shore is prim

  12. Microfungi diversity isolation from sandy soil of Acapulco touristic beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microscopic fungi diversity in marine sandy soil habitats is associated with key functions of beach ecosystems. There are few reports on their presence in Mexican beaches. Although standard methods to obtain the fungi from soil samples are established, the aim of this pilot study was to test the pla...

  13. On the water saturation calculation in hydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stalheim, Stein Ottar

    2002-07-01

    The main goal of this work was to identify the most important uncertainty sources in water saturation calculation and examine the possibility for developing new S{sub w} - equations or possibility to develop methods to remove weaknesses and uncertainties in existing S{sub w} - equations. Due to the need for industrial applicability of the equations we aimed for results with the following properties: The accuracy in S{sub w} should increase compared with existing S{sub w} - equations. The equations should be simple to use in petrophysical evaluations. The equations should be based on conventional logs and use as few as possible input parameters. The equations should be numerical stable. This thesis includes an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of the most common S{sub w} equations. The results are addressed in chapter 3 and were intended to find the most important uncertainty sources in water saturation calculation. To increase the knowledge of the relationship between R{sub t} and S{sub w} in hydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs and to understand how the pore geometry affects the conductivity (n and m) of the rock a theoretical study was done. It was also an aim to examine the possibility for developing new S{sub w} - equations (or investigation an effective medium model) valid inhydrocarbon sandstone reservoirs. The results are presented in paper 1. A new equation for water saturation calculation in clean sandstone oil reservoirs is addressed in paper 2. A recommendation for best practice of water saturation calculation in non water wet formation is addressed in paper 3. Finally a new equation for water saturation calculation in thinly interbedded sandstone/mudstone reservoirs is presented in paper 4. The papers are titled: 1) Is the saturation exponent n a constant. 2) A New Model for Calculating Water Saturation In 3) Influence of wettability on water saturation modeling. 4) Water Saturation Calculations in Thinly Interbedded Sandstone/mudstone Reservoirs. A

  14. Experimental deformation in sandstone, carbonates and quartz aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Cecilia See Nga [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The first part of my thesis is mainly focused on the effect of grain size distribution on compaction localization in porous sandstone. To identify the microstructural parameters that influence compaction band formation, I conducted a systematic study of mechanical deformation, failure mode and microstructural evolution in Bleurswiller and Boise sandstones, of similar porosity (~25%) and mineralogy but different sorting. Discrete compaction bands were observed to develop over a wide range of pressure in the Bleurswiller sandstone that has a relatively uniform grain size distribution. In contrast, compaction localization was not observed in the poorly sorted Boise sandstone. My results demonstrate that grain size distribution exerts important influence on compaction band development, in agreement with recently published data from Valley of Fire and Buckskin Gulch, as well as numerical studies. The second part aimed to improve current knowledge on inelastic behavior, failure mode and brittle-ductile transition in another sedimentary rock, porous carbonates. A micritic Tavel (porosity of ~13%) and an allochemical Indiana (~18%) limestones were deformed under compaction in wet and dry conditions. At lower confining pressures, shear localization occurred in brittle faulting regime. Through transitional regime, the deformation switched to cataclastic flow regime at higher confining pressure. Specifically in the cataclastic regime, the (dry and wet) Tavel and dry Indiana failed by distributed cataclastic flow, while in contrast, wet Indiana failed as compaction localization. My results demonstrate that different failure modes and mechanical behaviors under different deformation regimes and water saturation are fundamental prior to any geophysical application in porous carbonates. The third part aimed to focus on investigating compaction on quartz aggregate starting at low (MPa) using X-ray diffraction. We report the diffraction peak evolution of quartz with increasing

  15. Microplastics elutriation from sandy sediments: A granulometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierski, Mikaël; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bourseau, Patrick; Bellegou, Hervé; César, Guy; Sire, Olivier; Bruzaud, Stéphane

    2016-06-15

    Although relatively easy to extract in the marine environment, microplastics are very difficult to recover when they are trapped in sediments. The elutriation column is one of the best tools currently available for extracting plastics from sediment, but with a high sand recovery yield. This study aims to address the following questions: (i) is it possible to use a sedimentological approach to limit the sand recovery? (ii) does the extraction velocity of the sand and plastic particles vary according to density and granulometry? (iii) what is the relative recovery efficiency obtained for dense polymer particles mixed with marine sand? Based on a new granulometric classification, different plastic particle-size fractions are defined. Their extraction velocities are experimentally determined on particles of sediment and different plastics (PA, PVC). The particle recovery experiments indicate that it is possible to extract >90% of dense plastic particles in cases of negligible sand recovery.

  16. 78 FR 46999 - Additional Waivers and Alternative Requirements for Hurricane Sandy Grantees in Receipt of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Additional Waivers and Alternative Requirements for Hurricane Sandy Grantees in... impacted and distressed areas declared a major disaster due to Hurricane Sandy (see 78 FR 14329, published....) (Stafford Act), due to Hurricane Sandy and other eligible events in calendar years 2011, 2012, and 2013....

  17. 77 FR 74891 - Order Granting Exemptions From Certain Rules of Regulation SHO Related to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... COMMISSION Order Granting Exemptions From Certain Rules of Regulation SHO Related to Hurricane Sandy December 12, 2012. I. Introduction Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the mid-Atlantic Coast on October 29... in the Vault at the time Hurricane Sandy made landfall, facilitating DTCC's ability to...

  18. 78 FR 33467 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency; Correction AGENCY: Federal Transit... by Hurricane Sandy. This amount was in addition to the initial $2 billion allocation announced in the... allocation restoration FTA Section 5324 Emergency Relief Program Allocations for Hurricane Sandy, by...

  19. 33 CFR 165.507 - Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... south (eastbound) span of the William P. Lane Jr. Memorial Bridge, from the western shore at Sandy Point..., between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. 165.507 Section 165.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.507 Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. (a...

  20. Compaction and Permeability Reduction of Castlegate Sandstone under Pore Pressure Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate time-dependent compaction and permeability changes by cycling pore pressure with application to compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a reservoir. Preliminary experiments capture the impacts of hydrostatic stress, pore water pressure, pore pressure cycling, chemical, and time-dependent considerations near a borehole in a CAES reservoir analog. CAES involves creating an air bubble in a reservoir. The high pressure bubble serves as a mechanical battery to store potential energy. When there is excess grid energy, bubble pressure is increased by air compression, and when there is energy needed on the grid, stored air pressure is released through turbines to generate electricity. The analog conditions considered are depth ~1 km, overburden stress ~20 MPa and a pore pressure ~10MPa. Pore pressure is cycled daily or more frequently between ~10 MPa and 6 MPa, consistent with operations of a CAES facility at this depth and may continue for operational lifetime (25 years). The rock can vary from initially fully-to-partially saturated. Pore pressure cycling changes the effective stress.Jacketed, room temperature tap water-saturated samples of Castlegate Sandstone are hydrostatically confined (20 MPa) and subjected to a pore pressure resulting in an effective pressure of ~10 MPa. Pore pressure is cycled between 6 to 10 MPa. Sample displacement measurements yielded determinations of volumetric strain and from water flow measurements permeability was determined. Experiments ran for two to four weeks, with 2 to 3 pore pressure cycles per day. The Castlegate is a fluvial high porosity (>20%) primarily quartz sandstone, loosely calcite cemented, containing a small amount of clay.Pore pressure cycling induces compaction (~.1%) and permeability decreases (~20%). The results imply that time-dependent compactive processes are operative. The load path, of increasing and decreasing pore pressure, may facilitate local loosening and grain readjustments that results in the

  1. Architectural evidence of dune collapse in the Navajo Sandstone, Zion National Park, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Colby; Bryant, Gerald; Nick, Kevin E.

    2016-10-01

    The Canyon Overlook Trail of Zion National Park follows an outcrop of Navajo Sandstone, which displays a uniquely well-exposed assemblage of features associated with failure of the lee face of a large eolian dune, and run-out over an expanse of interdune sediments downwind of that bedform. Exposed features include dramatic folds in the interdune succession and a stacked series of thrust sheets incorporating both interdune and overlying dune deposits. Thrust surfaces display consistent strikes, parallel to those of undeformed foresets, and incorporate zones of brittle failure and fluid deformation, including folds overturned in the direction of foreset dip. These features correspond to predictions made by a previous researcher's model of dune collapse, formulated from less fortuitously exposed architectures in the Navajo Sandstone. Unlike the previous model, however, this site preserves distinct indications that the bulk of deformed material accumulated above the level of the contemporary interdune surface, in an aggradational succession. Paleotopographic reconstruction, based on preserved facies relationships at this site, indicates the presence of a large dune, partially encroached upon a well-developed wet interdune succession, made up of two half-meter carbonate mud layers, separated by a meter of medium-grained sand. Trapping of pore water pressure between these mud layers during liquefaction reduced shear strength in this interval, facilitating the collapse of the lee face of the upwind dune into the interdune area, and transmitted resultant shear forces to distal portions of the interdune expanse, in the shallow subsurface. Shear failure developed along bedding planes in the horizontally laminated carbonate muds, which provided both lubrication of the shear surfaces and structural support for the preservation of coherent thrust sheets during production of an imbricated succession of shear zones in the toe portion of the slump. Individual shear surfaces

  2. The Effect of Hydrous Supercritical Carbon Dioxide on the Mohr Coulomb Failure Envelope in Boise Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choens, R. C., II; Dewers, T. A.; Ilgen, A.; Espinoza, N.; Aman, M.

    2016-12-01

    Experimental rock deformation was used to quantify the relationship between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2), water vapor, and failure strength in an analog for Tertiary sandstone saline formation reservoirs. Storing large volumes of carbon dioxide in depleted petroleum reservoirs and deep saline aquifers over geologic time is an important tool in mitigating effects of climate change. Carbon dioxide is injected as a supercritical phase, where it forms a buoyant plume. At brine-plume interfaces, scCO2 dissolves over time into the brine, lowering pH and perturbing the local chemical environment. Previous work has shown that the resulting geochemical changes at mineral-fluid interfaces can alter rock mechanical properties, generally causing a decrease in strength. Additionally, water from the native brine can dissolve into the scCO2 plume where it is present as humidity. This study investigates the effect of hydrous scCO2 and CO2-saturated brine on shear failure of Boise sandstone. Samples are held in a hydrostatic pressure vessel at 2250 PSI confining pressure (PC) and 70 C, and scCO2 at specific humidity is circulated through the core for 24 hours at 2000 PSI and 70 C. Experiments are conducted at relative humidity levels of 0, 14, 28, 42, 56, 70, 84, 98, and 100% relative humidity. After the scCO2 core flood is finished, triaxial compression experiments are conducted on the samples at room temperature and an axial strain rate of 10-5 sec-1. Experiments are conducted at 500, 1000, and 1500 PSI PC. The results demonstrate that water present as humidity in scCO2 can reduce failure strength and lower slopes of the Mohr-Coulomb failure envelope. These effects increase with increasing humidity, as dry scCO2 does not affect rock strength, and may be influenced by capillary condensation of water films from humid scCO2. The reductions in failure strength seen in this study could be important in predicting reservoir response to injection, reservoir caprock integrity, and

  3. The Early Shorebird Will Catch Fewer Invertebrates on Trampled Sandy Beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Carracher, Lucy K.; Porch, Nicholas; Connolly, Rod M.; Olds, Andrew D.; Gilby, Ben L.; Ekanayake, Kasun B.; Maslo, Brooke; Weston, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Many species of birds breeding on ocean beaches and in coastal dunes are of global conservation concern. Most of these species rely on invertebrates (e.g. insects, small crustaceans) as an irreplaceable food source, foraging primarily around the strandline on the upper beach near the dunes. Sandy beaches are also prime sites for human recreation, which impacts these food resources via negative trampling effects. We quantified acute trampling impacts on assemblages of upper shore invertebrates in a controlled experiment over a range of foot traffic intensities (up to 56 steps per square metre) on a temperate beach in Victoria, Australia. Trampling significantly altered assemblage structure (species composition and density) and was correlated with significant declines in invertebrate abundance and species richness. Trampling effects were strongest for rare species. In heavily trafficked plots the abundance of sand hoppers (Amphipoda), a principal prey item of threatened Hooded Plovers breeding on this beach, was halved. In contrast to the consistently strong effects of trampling, natural habitat attributes (e.g. sediment grain size, compactness) were much less influential predictors. If acute suppression of invertebrates caused by trampling, as demonstrated here, is more widespread on beaches it may constitute a significant threat to endangered vertebrates reliant on these invertebrates. This calls for a re-thinking of conservation actions by considering active management of food resources, possibly through enhancement of wrack or direct augmentation of prey items to breeding territories. PMID:27564550

  4. Effects of grazing and climate change on species diversity in sandy grassland, Inner Mongolia, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshiya; Okuro

    2009-01-01

    To understand the effects of animal grazing activities and climate change on sandy grassland vegetation in northern China, a field grazing and protected enclosure experiment was conducted from 1992 through 2006 in Horqin Sand Land, Inner Mongolia. The results showed that (1) the grazing was primary responsible for changes of the vegetation richness and diversity in the grazing grassland and that changing climate was the main reason for changes in the species richness and diversity in the grassland protected from grazing; (2) light and moderate grazing can promote restoration of the richness and the diversity in the degraded grassland, and heavy grazing could result in a decrease of the richness and diversity; (3) heavy grazing can result in significant decrease of the perennial diversity, and moderate and light grazing promotes increase of the perennial diversity; the grazing, whether heavy or moderate and light grazing, was beneficial to increase of the annual diversity; (4) heavy grazing was not beneficial to diversity of Graminean and Chenopodiaceae, and moderate and light grazing was favorable the diversity of Compositae and Chenopodiaceae; (5) the warm-humid climate was favorable to increase of the richness and the diversity, and the warm-drought climate could result in decease of the richness and the diversity; (6) increased precipitation was favorable to perennial diversity and the diversity of Graminean, Leguminosae, and Compositae, and decreased precipitation had few effects on the annual diversity and Chenopodiaceae diversity.

  5. Precipitation patterns and moisture fluxes in a sandy, tropical environment with a shallow water table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minihane, M. R.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2011-08-01

    Identifying the dominant mechanisms controlling recharge in shallow sandy soils in tropical climates has received relatively little attention. Given the expansion of coastal fill using marine sands and the growth of coastal populations throughout the tropics, there is a need to better understand the nature of water balances in these settings. We use time series of field observations at a coastal landfill in Singapore coupled with numerical modeling using the Richards' equation to examine the impact of precipitation patterns on soil moisture dynamics, including percolation past the root zone and recharge, in such an environment. A threshold in total precipitation event depth, much more so than peak precipitation intensity, is the strongest event control on recharge. However, shallow antecedent moisture, and therefore the timing between events along with the seasonal depth to water table, also play significant roles in determining recharge amounts. For example, at our field site, precipitation events of less than 3 mm per event yield little to no direct recharge, but for larger events, moisture content changes below the root zone are linearly correlated to the product of the average antecedent moisture content and the total event precipitation. Therefore, water resources planners need to consider identifying threshold precipitation volumes, along with the multiple time scales that capture variability in event antecedent conditions and storm frequency in assessing the role of recharge in coastal water balances in tropical settings.

  6. The Early Shorebird Will Catch Fewer Invertebrates on Trampled Sandy Beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlacher, Thomas A; Carracher, Lucy K; Porch, Nicholas; Connolly, Rod M; Olds, Andrew D; Gilby, Ben L; Ekanayake, Kasun B; Maslo, Brooke; Weston, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Many species of birds breeding on ocean beaches and in coastal dunes are of global conservation concern. Most of these species rely on invertebrates (e.g. insects, small crustaceans) as an irreplaceable food source, foraging primarily around the strandline on the upper beach near the dunes. Sandy beaches are also prime sites for human recreation, which impacts these food resources via negative trampling effects. We quantified acute trampling impacts on assemblages of upper shore invertebrates in a controlled experiment over a range of foot traffic intensities (up to 56 steps per square metre) on a temperate beach in Victoria, Australia. Trampling significantly altered assemblage structure (species composition and density) and was correlated with significant declines in invertebrate abundance and species richness. Trampling effects were strongest for rare species. In heavily trafficked plots the abundance of sand hoppers (Amphipoda), a principal prey item of threatened Hooded Plovers breeding on this beach, was halved. In contrast to the consistently strong effects of trampling, natural habitat attributes (e.g. sediment grain size, compactness) were much less influential predictors. If acute suppression of invertebrates caused by trampling, as demonstrated here, is more widespread on beaches it may constitute a significant threat to endangered vertebrates reliant on these invertebrates. This calls for a re-thinking of conservation actions by considering active management of food resources, possibly through enhancement of wrack or direct augmentation of prey items to breeding territories.

  7. Predicting the Grouting Ability of Sandy Soils by Artificial Neural Networks Based On Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Hassanlourad

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the grouting ability of sandy soils is investigated by artificial neural networks based on the results of chemical grout injection tests. In order to evaluate the soil grouting potential, experimental samples were prepared and then injected. The sand samples with three different particle sizes (medium, fine, and silty and three relative densities (%30, %50, and %90 were injected with the sodium silicate grout with three different concentrations (water to sodium silicate ratio of 0.33, 1, and 2. A multi-layer Perceptron type of the artificial neural network was trained and tested using the results of 138 experimental tests. The multi-layer Perceptron included one input layer, two hidden layers and one output layer. The input parameters consisted of initial relative densities of grouted samples, the average size of particles (D50, the ratio of the grout water to sodium silicate and the grout pressure. The output parameter was the grout injection radius. The results of the experimental tests showed that the radius of grout injection is a complicated function of the mentioned parameters. In addition, the results of the trained artificial neural network showed to be reasonably consistent with the experimental results.

  8. Physical criteria for distinguishing sandy tsunami and storm deposits using modern examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert A.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2007-01-01

    Modern subaerial sand beds deposited by major tsunamis and hurricanes were compared at trench, transect, and sub-regional spatial scales to evaluate which attributes are most useful for distinguishing the two types of deposits. Physical criteria that may be diagnostic include: sediment composition, textures and grading, types and organization of stratification, thickness, geometry, and landscape conformity. Published reports of Pacific Ocean tsunami impacts and our field observations suggest that sandy tsunami deposits are generally 30 cm thick, generally extend The distinctions between tsunami and storm deposits are related to differences in the hydrodynamics and sediment-sorting processes during transport. Tsunami deposition results from a few high-velocity, long-period waves that entrain sediment from the shoreface, beach, and landward erosion zone. Tsunamis can have flow depths greater than 10 m, transport sediment primarily in suspension, and distribute the load over a broad region where sediment falls out of suspension when flow decelerates. In contrast, storm inundation generally is gradual and prolonged, consisting of many waves that erode beaches and dunes with no significant overland return flow until after the main flooding. Storm flow depths are commonly

  9. Impact of oasis establishment on underground environment in salinized sandy lands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Yuanjie(赵元杰); ZHANG; Henian(张鹤年); Maimaitiaiti(买买堤艾堤); SUN; Yongqiang(孙永强)

    2002-01-01

    The salinized sandy lands are the important reclaimable reserve wastelands in thesouth area of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. But it is necessary that the eco-logical environment of the area is not destroyed by action of oasis development. The main factor tohinder oasis development is land salinization. Rational oasis establishment rebuilds wastelandswith lower productivity and utilization efficiency for the growth of agriculture, forestry, and stock raising. The results of surveying sub-soil environment of Aimugaike. Awati oasis in Hotian County ofthe Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region show that the underground water and soil environment arenot deteriorated under the rational management and administration, which could be coordinatedfor obtaining economic and environmental benefit. During the oasis establishment period from1997 to 1999, the plowland area has reached 166.7 hm2, and the seed cotton yield per unit areahas reached 2250 kg @ hm-2, the area of timber forest and active sand break forest has reached 20hm2, the area of fruit trees is 71.5 hm2; and the soil moisture has decreased from 22.07% to18.12%. In the first year of oasis establishment, the soil type has changed salt soil into light saltsoil, in the second year the soil has been out of salt harm; and the content of soil organic matter intopsoil has increased obviously.

  10. Nesting of Phrynops geoffroanus (Testudines: Chelidae on sandy beaches along the Upper Xingu River, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo D. Ferreira Júnior

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the first data on incubation temperature of Phrynops geoffroanus (Schweigger, 1812 in a natural environment, and provides information on nest predation, hatching success and size of offspring born in the nests on sandy beaches along the Upper Xingu River. Thirty-one P. geoffroanus nests were found, of which eleven were completely predated, mainly by Cerdocyon thous (Linnaeus, 1766. Incubation was completed in nine out of the 17 nests protected by netting. The nests presented an average of 13.1 eggs and were distributed over the various geomorphological sectors of the nine sampled beaches. The size and weight of the hatchlings varied significantly between nests, and the incubation period in protected nests lasted for 76.5 days, less than reported for controlled incubation in the laboratory. Daily variation in incubation temperature in the three nests monitored for temperature was lower in those situated in fine sand sediments. Incubation temperature varied from 22 to 39 C and may have affected hatching success, which reached 60.8% in protected nests. Nest distribution in different geomorphological sectors indicated the plasticity of P. geoffroanus in terms of variation in nesting environment, which partly explains the species' broad geographical distribution.

  11. Desorption kinetics of benzene in a sandy soil in the presence of powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J-W; Kim, S-B; Kim, D-J

    2007-02-01

    Desorption kinetics of benzene was investigated with a modified biphasic desorption model in a sandy soil with five different powdered activated carbon (PAC) contents (0, 1, 2, 5, 10% w/w) as sorbents. Sorption experiments followed by series dilution desorption were conducted for each sorbent. Desorption of benzene was successively performed at two stages using deionized water and hexane. Modeling was performed on both desorption isotherm and desorption rate for water-induced desorption to elucidate the presence of sorption-desorption hysteresis and biphasic desorption and if present to quantify the desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) and labile fraction (F) of desorption site responsible for rapid process. Desorption isotherms revealed that sorption-desorption exhibited a severe hysteresis with a significant fraction of benzene being irreversibly adsorbed onto both pure sand and PAC, and that desorption-resistant fraction (q (irr)) increased with PAC content. Desorption kinetic modeling showed that desorption of benzene was biphasic with much higher (4-40 times) rate constant for rapid process (k (1)) than that for slow process (k (2)), and that the difference in the rate constant increased with PAC content. The labile fraction (F) of desorption site showed a decreasing tendency with PAC. The experimental results would provide valuable information on remediation methods for soils and groundwater contaminated with BTEX.

  12. Effects of sand burial on growth and antioxidant enzyme activities of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in northern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Qu; HaLin Zhao; RuiLian Zhou; Jin Li; ChengChen Pan

    2015-01-01

    Growth and physiological responses of wheat to sand burial were studied in Horqin Sandy Land, to determine the impact on productivity and survival as well as antioxidant enzymes responses. This study consisted of one control (no sand) and four sand burial treatments:25%, 50%, 75%and 100%of seedling height, respectively. Minor burial (25%) had no effect on wheat growth and survival;deep burial (100%) was fatal, and the others had an intermediate effect. Thus, the survival limit to sand burial was equal to seedling height. Sand burial mainly decreased shoot biomass and crop yield, but had small effects on belowground biomass. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased with time after burial in all treatments with surviving plants. Peroxidase (POD) activity increased after six days under burial, and catalase (CAT) activity de-creased after burial, but recovered after 12 days. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker for oxidative stress, was low on the sixth day, but increased thereafter with burial depth. Thus, sand burial>25%should be avoided due to growth rate reduction leading to reduced crop yield, and even 25%burial showed physiological indicators of stress.

  13. Sonic and electrical properties of partially saturated tight-gas sands. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nur, A.

    1983-03-01

    This study was aimed at relating the seismic and the electrical properties of tight-gas rocks to their pore-space geometry, permeability, and level of water saturation. Here we report results of a laboratory experimental study of wave propagation in Cotton Valley and Spirit River Sandstones as a function of partial water saturation (SW) and wave frequency. We find that wave velocities and the velocity ratio are sensitive to the presence of gas. Furthermore, wave attenuation is sensitive to the amount of gas in the pore space. Ultrasonic measurements in tight-gas sands tend to yield higher velocity values, due to the inability of the pore fluid pressure to homogenize during the passage of waves. Laboratory measurements were made also of the complex electrical response of selected tight rocks, and compared with normal permeability Berea Sandstone. The results show that the dielectric property of tight-gas sands is very sensitive to partial water saturation, and may give not only insight into the nature of the pore space, but also provide a practical measure of S/sub w/ in situ. 35 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  15. Documentation and hydrologic analysis of Hurricane Sandy in New Jersey, October 29–30, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro, Thomas P.; Deetz, Anna; Hearn, Paul

    2016-11-17

    In 2012, a late season tropical depression developed into a tropical storm and later a hurricane. The hurricane, named “Hurricane Sandy,” gained strength to a Category 3 storm on October 25, 2012, and underwent several transitions on its approach to the mid-Atlantic region of the eastern coast of the United States. By October 28, 2012, Hurricane Sandy had strengthened into the largest hurricane ever recorded in the North Atlantic and was tracking parallel to the east coast of United States, heading toward New Jersey. On October 29, 2012, the storm turned west-northwest and made landfall near Atlantic City, N.J. The high winds and wind-driven storm surge caused massive damage along the entire coastline of New Jersey. Millions of people were left without power or communication networks. Many homes were completely destroyed. Sand dunes were eroded, and the barrier island at Mantoloking was breached, connecting the ocean with Barnegat Bay.Several days before the storm made landfall in New Jersey, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) made a decision to deploy a temporary network of storm-tide sensors and barometric pressure sensors from Virginia to Maine to supplement the existing USGS and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) networks of permanent tide monitoring stations. After the storm made landfall, the USGS conducted a sensor data recovery and high-water-mark collection campaign in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).Peak storm-tide elevations documented at USGS tide gages, tidal crest-stage gages, temporary storm sensor locations, and high-water-mark sites indicate the area from southern Monmouth County, N.J., north through Raritan Bay, N.J., had the highest peak storm-tide elevations during this storm. The USGS tide gages at Raritan River at South Amboy and Raritan Bay at Keansburg, part of the New Jersey Tide Telemetry System, each recorded peak storm-tide elevations of greater than 13 feet (ft)—more than 5 ft

  16. Sand control with ceramic screens in unconsolidated reservoirs demonstrated in the mature Gaiselberg oilfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildhack, Stefanie [ESK Ceramics GmbH und Co. KG, Kempten (Germany); Muessig, Siegfried; Strahammer, Franz; Leitner, Manfred [Rohoel Aufsuchungs-AG (RAG), Vienna (Austria)

    2012-06-15

    The Oil Production in the operation centre Zistersdorf of the Rohoel-Aufsuchungs AG (RAG) looks back on a long history and a great variety of different types of completions. After the first oil-bearing well RAG-002 in 1937 the development of the RAG field started, followed by more exploration successes in the Gaiselberg oil field from 1938 onwards. The production comes primarily from the sandstone reservoirs of the Sarmat; the deeper horizons usually show a good compaction paired with reasonable permeability. The lower layers, however, are more and more unconsolidated. To prevent sand production and to protect the completion equipment metal screens in combination with gravel packs were installed. Gravel Packs, however, generate an additional pressure drop, which can lead in some cases to a production loss of up to 50% from the very beginning. In addition they are prone to abrasion and incur high completion costs. With the completion of the newly developed sand control screen based on ceramic materials, the next step towards sand control in an unconsolidated reservoir was implemented subsequent to the successful protection of well jewellery in wells after massive hydraulic frac operations. In this article the construction, deployment in the well Ga-016 below a sucker rod pump and the analysis of the production performance are all discussed. It will be demonstrated that with this application a fundamental step in sand control in unconsolidated reservoirs has been achieved. (orig.)

  17. An integrated model for dune morphology and sand fluxes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, K. D.; Bridges, N. T.; Ayoub, F.; Newman, C. E.; Quade, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    The transport and deposition of sand is the most prevalent agent of landscape modification on Mars today, with fluxes comparable to some sand dunes on Earth. Until now, the relationship between sand flux and dune field morphology has been poorly constrained. By tracking dune movement over ∼10 km-long dune fields in Herschel Crater and Nili Patera, representative of many dune fields on Mars, we find a downwind flux decrease that correlates with a sequence of changing morphology from barchans to barchanoids and seifs (longitudinal dunes) to isolated dome dunes and ending with sand sheets. We show empirical consistency with atmospheric Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) theory which can describe these broad flux and morphology changes in Martian dune fields. Deviations from IBL flux predictions are from wind streamline compressions up slopes, leading to a speedup effect. By establishing a dune field morphology type example and correlating it with measured and predicted flux changes, we provide an integrated morphology and flux model that can be applied to other areas of Mars and be used to infer paleo-environmental conditions from preserved sandstone.

  18. Event sand layers suggesting the possibility of tsunami deposits identified in the upper Holocene sequence nearby the Kuwana fault, central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Y.; Sugai, T.; Matsuzaki, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Kuwana fault is located on coastal area situated on inner part of the Ise Bay, central Japan, which opens to the Nankai Trough. This reverse fault displaces a late Pleistocene terrace surface with 1 to 2 mm/yr of average vertical slip rate, and a topset of delta at several meters, respectively. And, this fault is estimated to have generated two historical earthquakes (the AD 745 Tempyo and the AD 1586 Tensho earthquakes). We identified two event sand layers from upper Holocene sequence on the upthrown side of the Kuwana fault. Upper Holocene deposits in this study area show prograding delta sequence; prodelta mud, delta front sandy silt to sand, and flood plain sand/mud, respectively, from lower to upper. Two sand layers intervene in delta front sandy silt layer, respectively. Lower sand layer (S1) shows upward-coarsening succession, whereas upper sand layer (S2) upward-fining succession. These sand layers contain sharp contact, rip-up crust, and shell fragment, indicating strong stream flow. Radiocarbon ages show that these strong stream flow events occurred between 3000 and 1600 years ago. Decreasing of salinity is estimated from decreasing trend of electrical conductivity (EC) across S1. Based on the possibility that decreasing of salinity can be occurred by shallowing of water depth caused by coseismic uplift, and that S1 can be correlated with previously known faulting event on the Kuwana fault, S1 is considered to be tsunami deposits caused by faulting on the Kuwana fault. On the other hand, S2, which cannot be correlated with previously known faulting events on the Kuwana fault, may be tsunami deposits by ocean-trench earthquake or storm deposits. In the presentation, we will discuss more detail correlation of these sand deposits not only in the upthrown side of the Kuwana fault, but also downthrown side of the fault.

  19. Provenance of the heavy metals in sand sediments of the Oman Sea (Sistan and Baluchestan district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Soleimani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Mineral composition of source rock is one of the most important factors for concentration and distribution of heavy metals in sediments. Therefore, study on distribution of these elements and the related minerals in sediments provides information about natural origin of elements. Moreover, the interpretation of origin and distribution of sandy sediments is considerably enhanced by mineralogical and geochemical studies of these sediments. The main objective of this research is to evaluate distribution of Zn, Cu, Sr, Cd, Fe and Mn in sand sediments of the Oman Sea, their relationship with mineral composition of the sediments and also determining their provenance. Materials and Methods Sampling of surface sediments of the Oman Sea was performed in 16 sampling stations. Heavy minerals and rock fragments of the sediments in fine and coarse sand sizes respectively were qualitatively and quantitatively studied by polarizing microscope (Folk, 1974; Pettijohn et al., 1981; Tucker, 1988. Concentration of the heavy metals were also analyzed by AAS method (Mico et al., 2008. Result Mineralogical composition of the studied sediments contain quartz, feldspars and heavy minerals in their order of abundances. The rock fragments consist of sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic in their order of frequencies as well. The concentrations of the studied heavy metals (in ppm in the sediments are Cd (1.42, Cu (9.99, Zn (36.72, Sr (181.18, Mn (377.33 and Fe (20247.55 in their order of abundances. Distribution of the Zn concentration generally shows decreasing trend from west of the study area to the Guatr Bay. The concentrations of Zn and Cu show close relationship with the frequencies of biotite and muscovite. The Cu concentration also shows positive correlation with the Zn and Fe concentrations. Distribution of the Sr and Cd concentrations is similar to variation of the calcium carbonate content. The Cd and Sr concentrations also show positive correlation

  20. Assessment of recycled PET properties for application on oil wells as sand control agents; Avaliacao de propriedades de PET reciclado para aplicacao em pocos de petroleo como agente de contencao de areia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Alexandre Zacarias Ignacio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delpech, Marcia Cerqueira [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], e-mail: mcd@uerj.br

    2008-07-01

    The Sand Control is fundamental for oil production in unconsolidated sandstone formations. It consists of the installation of a filter made of stainless steel screens and grained materials (sand control agents) which are, normally, high density inorganic substances (sand, ceramic, bauxite). Shallow formations, near to the sea bed, are more sensitive and need different kinds of sand control agents with low density. The objective of this work was the evaluation of recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, as sand control agent for oil wells. Pack permeability and thermal stability tests results, after up to six months of exposure to sea water and crude oil, have indicated that the recycled PET kept the necessary characteristics for the proposed application. Also, it was observed that the PET grain pack did not presented significant property modifications in the exposure conditions, when compared to the non-exposed samples. (author)

  1. Assessment of recycled PET properties for application on oil wells as sand control agents; Avaliacao de propriedades de PET reciclado para aplicacao em pocos de petroleo como agente de contencao de areia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Alexandre Zacarias Ignacio [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Delpech, Marcia Cerqueira [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IQ/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], e-mail: mcd@uerj.br

    2008-07-01

    The Sand Control is fundamental for oil production in unconsolidated sandstone formations. It consists of the installation of a filter made of stainless steel screens and grained materials (sand control agents) which are, normally, high density inorganic substances (sand, ceramic, bauxite). Shallow formations, near to the sea bed, are more sensitive and need different kinds of sand control agents with low density. The objective of this work was the evaluation of recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, as sand control agent for oil wells. Pack permeability and thermal stability tests results, after up to six months of exposure to sea water and crude oil, have indicated that the recycled PET kept the necessary characteristics for the proposed application. Also, it was observed that the PET grain pack did not presented significant property modifications in the exposure conditions, when compared to the non-exposed samples. (author)

  2. Numerical modeling of the effects of Hurricane Sandy and potential future hurricanes on spatial patterns of salt marsh morphology in Jamaica Bay, New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqing; Chen, Qin; Hu, Kelin; Snedden, Gregg A.; Hartig, Ellen K.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Johnson, Cody L.; Orton, Philip M.

    2017-03-29

    model was run to predict the effects of Sandy-like and Irene-like hurricanes with different storm tracks and wind intensities on wetland morphology in Jamaica Bay. Model results indicate that, in Jamaica Bay salt marshes, the morphological changes (greater than 5 millimeters [mm] determined by the long-term marsh accretion rate) caused by Hurricane Sandy were complex and spatially heterogeneous. Most of the erosion (5–40 mm) and deposition (5–30 mm) were mainly characterized by fine sand for channels and bay bottoms and by mud for marsh areas. Hurricane Sandy-generated deposition and erosion were generated locally. The storm-induced net sediment input through Rockaway Inlet was only about 1 percent of the total amount of the sediment reworked by the hurricane. Salt marshes inside the western part of the bay showed erosion overall while marshes inside the eastern part showed deposition from Hurricane Sandy. Model results indicated that most of the marshes could recover from Hurricane Sandy-induced erosion after 1 year and demonstrated continued marsh accretion after the hurricane over the course of long simulation periods although the effect (accretion) was diminished. Local waves and currents generated by Hurricane Sandy appeared to play a critical role in sediment transport and associated wetland morphological change in Jamaica Bay. Hypothetical hurricanes, depending on their track and intensity, cause variable responses in spatial patterns of sediment deposition and erosion compared to simulations without the hurricane. In general, hurricanes passing west of the Jamaica Bay estuary appear to be more destructive to the salt marshes than those passing the east. Consequently, marshes inside the western part of the bay were likely to be more vulnerable to hurricanes than marshes inside the eastern part of the bay. 

  3. Terraforming planet Dune: Climate-vegetation interactions on a sandy planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresto Aleina, F.; Baudena, M.; D'Andrea, F.; Provenzale, A.

    2012-04-01

    The climate and the biosphere of planet Earth interact in multiple, complicated ways and on many spatial and temporal scales. Some of these processes can be studied with the help of simple mathematical models, as done for the effects of vegetation on albedo in desert areas and for the mechanisms by which terrestrial vegetation affects water fluxes in arid environments. Conceptual models of this kind do not attempt at providing quantitative descriptions of the climate-biosphere interaction, but rather to explore avenues and mechanisms which can play a role in the real system, providing inspiration for further research. In this work, we develop a simple conceptual box model in the spirit illustrated above, to explore whether and how vegetation affects the planetary hydrologic cycle. We imagine a planet with no oceans and whose surface is entirely covered with sand, quite similar to planet Dune of the science-fiction series by Frank Herbert (1965). We suppose that water is entirely in the sand, below the surface. Without vegetation, only evaporation takes place, affecting the upper sand layer for a maximum depth of a few cm. The amount of water that is evaporated in the atmosphere is relatively small, and not sufficient to trigger a full hydrologic cycle. The question is what happens to this planet when vegetation is introduced: the root depth can reach a meter or more, and plant transpiration can then transfer a much larger amount of water to the atmosphere. One may wonder whether the presence of vegetation is sufficient to trigger a hydrologic cycle with enough precipitation to sustain the vegetation itself and, if the answer is positive, what is the minimum vegetation cover that is required to maintain the cycle active. In more precise terms, we want to know whether the introduction of vegetation and of the evapotranspiration feedback allows for the existence of multiple equilibria (or solutions) in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere system. Although the box model

  4. Heterogeneity of sandy conglomerate reservoir and its influence on remaining oil distribution: A case study from Badaowan Formation in the mid-west of block Ⅱ in Karamay Oilfield%砂砾岩储层非均质性及其对剩余油分布的影响——以克拉玛依油田二中西区八道湾组为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何辉; 宋新民; 蒋有伟; 彭仕宓; 李彦兰; 孙景民

    2012-01-01

    At present,the voidage-injection imbalance,interlayer interference and in-layer interference leaded by the reservoir heterogeneity are extremely highlighted during the production tail of sandy conglomerate reservoir in the mid-fan of alluvial fan.Taking the Jurassic Badaowan Formation in mid-west of the block II in Karamay Oilfield as an example,this paper studied the reservoir heterogeneity of alluvial fan sandy conglomerate reservoir.Based on outcrop observation,core description,electrofacies analysis,the single sand body description technique was used to divide the reservoir into 4 types of microfacies-lithofacies single sand body.Combining with the macroscopic and microscopic heterogeneity in different single sand body,the remaining oil were divided into 3 enriched types: Ⅰ-type braided channel gritstone facies,which has mesopore and small throat texture;Ⅱ-type braided channel fine sandstone facies,which has small pore and small throat texture;Ⅲ-type braided channel sandy conglomerate facies,which has small pore and fine throat texture.It is concluded that the type Ⅲ has the best water flooding effect and should be the main object of stabilizing oil production and controlling water cut,and the type I and Ⅱ,where the properties are relatively worse and the heterogeneity is stronger,should be the next potential target.Using this method of"recognizing the reservoir hetero-geneity and resolving it" as the breakthrough point to analyze the single sand body and the heterogeneity,which can provide better reference for forecasting the distribution of remaining oil in the sandy conglomerate reservoir.%冲积扇扇中砂砾岩油藏开发后期储层强非均质性引起的注采不平衡、层间干扰矛盾及层内差异等问题极为凸显。以克拉玛依油田二中西区八道湾组冲积扇扇中砂砾岩油藏为例,开展了储层非均质性精细表征研究。运用野外露头观察、岩心描述、测井相分析等,以单砂体刻画

  5. The Effect of Soil Particle Arrangement on Shear Strength Behavior of Silty Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Norsyahariati Nik Daud

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of fines in sandy soil is recognized as a problem in geotechnical engineering. It is often assumed that the strength and liquefaction potential of a soil decreases with increasing fines content. Sand with a significant amount of fines is always encountered in geotechnical engineering projects. The main interest of this paper is to study the effect of particles arrangement and stress behaviour on sand and silty sand sample. The objectives are to determine the basic properties as well as the morphological and mineralogical properties and the relationship of those properties to the stress behaviour of the soils. Sand-silt mixtures with fines contents of 20% and 40% were prepared and a series of testing was carried out to determine their basic properties, morphological and thin section properties, and mechanical properties by using direct shear box equipment. Results show that the basic properties and morphological properties of soil affect the mechanical behaviour of soil. Shape of the soil particle can influence the packing of the soil, hence altering the mechanical behaviour of the soil. From the thin section, the soil is observed to be well graded and have a dense packing while the minerals observed were mainly quartz and rutile.

  6. Novel foraging in the swash zone on Pacific sand crabs (Emerita analoga, Hippidae) by mallards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; McLaughlin, John P.; Dugan, Jenifer E.

    2013-01-01

    Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) have been observed foraging on intertidal Pacific sand crabs (Hippidae, Emerita analoga) in the swash zone of sandy beaches around Coal Oil Point Reserve, California, and several other beaches on the west coast since at least November 2010. Unlike foraging shorebirds, Mallards do not avoid incoming swashes. Instead, the incoming swash lifts and deposits them down the beach. Shorebirds and diving ducks commonly feed on sand crabs, but sand crabs appear to be a novel behavior and food source for Mallards. Previous surveys of beaches did not report foraging Mallards on regional beaches, whereas foraging Mallards were common in contemporary (recent) surveys and anecdotal reports. Observations of this potentially new behavior were separated by as much as 1,300 km, indicating that this was not a local phenomenon. Mallards foraged singly, in pairs, and in flocks. An expansion of diet to sand crabs carries risks of exposure to surf, human disturbance, high salt intake, and transmission of acanthocephalan and trematode parasites for Mallards but has the benefit of providing a dependable source of animal protein.

  7. The significance of grain morphology, moisture, and strain rate on the rapid compaction of silica sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. I.; Braithwaite, C. H.; Taylor, N. E.; Pullen, A. D.; Jardine, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    There is considerable interest in the high-rate compaction of brittle granular materials such as sand. However, the vast majority of studies focus on a single granular system, limiting our ability to make comparisons between materials to discern how granular structure manifests as bulk material response. Here, three different silica sands with similar grain size and shape are studied: we compare a rough quarry sand, a smoother-grained sand, and a sandy loam. Quasi-static compaction and planar shock loading responses are compared, and recovered samples analyzed. The combination provides information regarding the interplay between granular properties, loading conditions, and material response. We show that the fundamental grain-scale behaviour depends on loading conditions: At low strain rates compaction behaviour is dominated by grain morphology, and in particular, smoothness and particle size distribution. Under shock loading, grain rearrangement and force chain effects are suppressed, and the nature of inter-granular contact points, modified by the presence of moisture or fines, is most important. Furthermore, grain fracture under shock loading is substantially reduced with increasing moisture content.

  8. Imaging the Morrow A Sandstone Using Shear Wave VSP Data, Postle Field, Oklahoma

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    Naser Tamimi

    2012-01-01

    potential to enhance shear wave imaging of the thin heterogeneous Morrow A sandstone at Postle Field. The zero-offset VSP results confirm the advantages of shear wave over compressional wave in imaging the Morrow A sandstone. Also, the final shear wave VSP image shows that, applying the proposed processing flow, we are able to image the Morrow A sandstone where the thickness is as thin as 8.5 m.

  9. Petrology and stratigraphy of Paleogene nonmarine sandstones, Cascade Range, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, Virgil A.

    1979-01-01

    The Cascade Range of Washington north of 47? latitude is composed of probable Paleozoic and Mesozoic metamorphic rocks and Mesozoic and Tertiary plutonic rocks. Several Paleogene nonmarine arkosic sandstone units fringe and in part occur within the complex crystalline core. The early to middle Eocene Chuckanut Formation is present on the west side of the crystalline core in the western foothills of the Cascades. The early to middle Eocene Swauk Formation partially encircles the Mt. Stuart massif of the central Cascades. In the western foothills of the Cascades, between the main body of Chuckanut Formation near Bellingham and the main outcrop area of the Swauk Formation south of Mt. Stuart, many smaller bodies of arkosic sandstone have variously been referred to either the Swauk or Chuckanut Formations. The early Eocene Manastash Formation occurs locally in an area south of the Yakima River. The middle to late Eocene Chumstick Formation is mostly confined to the Chiwaukum graben within the crystalline core and is separated from the Swauk Formation on the southwest by the Leavenworth Fault. The Oligocene Wenatchee Formation unconformably over lies the Chumstick Formation near Wenatchee. The middle to late Eocene Roslyn Formation crops out north of the Yakima River and is underlain by the Teanaway Basalt which separates the Roslyn from the older Swauk Formation. The middle Eocene to early Oligocene Naches Formation forms a north-trending body that crosses the Yakima River and is in fault contact with both the Swauk and Manastash Formations. The middle to late Eocene Puget Group underlies the Quaternary deposits of the Puget Lowland southeast of Seattle on the western flank of the Cascades. The various formations are all composed predominantly of fine- to medium-grained sandstones with lesser amounts of interbedded shale, conglomerate and coal. Compositionally, the units are predominantly either feldspathic or litho-feldspathic subquartzose sandstones. Volcanic rocks

  10. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  11. Testing Associations of Plant Functional Diversity with Carbon and Nitrogen Storage along a Restoration Gradient of Sandy Grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaoan; Zhou, Xin; Lv, Peng; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Shaokun; Yue, Xiyuan

    2016-01-01

    The trait-based approach shows that ecosystem function is strongly affected by plant functional diversity as reflected by the traits of the most abundant species (community-weighted mean, CWM) and functional dispersion (FDis). Effects of CWM and FDis individually support the biomass ratio hypothesis and the niche complementarity hypothesis. However, there is little empirical evidence on the relative roles of CWM traits and FDis in explaining the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage in grassland ecosystems. We measured plant functional traits in the 34 most abundant species across 24 sites along a restoration gradient of sandy grassland (mobile dune, semi-fixed dune, fixed dune, and grassland) in Horqin Sand Land, northern China. Thereafter, we calculated the CWM traits, the functional divergence of each single trait (FDvar) and the trait dispersion of multiple traits (FDis). We also measured the C and N storage in plant, litter, root, and soil. Using a stepwise multiple regression analysis, we further assessed which of the functional diversity components best explained C and N storage in the sandy grassland restoration. We found consistent links between C or N storage and leaf traits related to plant resource use strategy. However, the CWM of plant height was retained as an important predictor of C and N storage in plant, litter, soil, and total ecosystem in the final multiple models. CWMs of specific leaf area and plant height best predicted soil C and N storage and total ecosystem N storage. FDis was one of good predictors of litter C and N storage as well as total ecosystem C storage. These results suggest that ecosystem C and N pools in the sandy grassland restoration are primarily associated with the traits of the most abundant species in communities, thereby supporting the biomass ratio hypothesis. The positive associations of FDis with C storage in litter and total ecosystem provide evidence to support the niche complementarity hypothesis. Both functional

  12. Testing associations of plant functional diversity with carbon and nitrogen storage along a restoration gradient of sandy grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoan eZuo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The trait-based approach shows that ecosystem function is strongly affected by plant functional diversity as reflected by the traits of the most abundant species (community-weighted mean, CWM and functional dispersion (FDis. Effects of CWM and FDis individually support the biomass ratio hypothesis and the niche complementarity hypothesis. However, there is little empirical evidence on the relative roles of CWM traits and FDis in explaining the carbon (C and nitrogen (N storage in grassland ecosystems. We measured plant functional traits in the 34 most abundant species across 24 sites along a restoration gradient of sandy grassland (mobile dune, semi-fixed dune, fixed dune and grassland in Horqin Sand Land, northern China. Thereafter, we calculated the CWM traits, the functional divergence of each single trait (FDvar and the trait dispersion of multiple traits (FDis. We also measured the C and N storage in plant, litter, root and soil. Using a stepwise multiple regression analysis, we further assessed which of the functional diversity components best explained C and N storage in the sandy grassland restoration. We found consistent links between C or N storage and leaf traits related to plant resource use strategy. However, the CWM of plant height was retained as an important predictor of C and N storage in plant, litter, soil and total ecosystem in the final multiple models. CWMs of specific leaf area and plant height best predicted soil C and N storage and total ecosystem N storage. FDis was one of good predictors of litter C and N storage as well as total ecosystem C storage. These results suggest that ecosystem C and N pools in the sandy grassland restoration are primarily associated with the traits of the most abundant species in communities, thereby supporting the biomass ratio hypothesis. The positive associations of FDis with C storage in litter and total ecosystem provide evidence to support the niche complementarity hypothesis. Both

  13. The biogenic emission potential of nitric oxide from sandy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J. B.; Meixner, F. X.; Sun, Z. G.; Chen, X. B.; Mamtimin, B.

    2009-04-01

    There are about 160.9 Mha of sandy land in China, about 17.6% of total Chinese area, which mainly distributed in 35°-50° N. The western Songnen Plain, which located in the semi-arid region of Northeastern China, is one of the main sandy soil distribution regions. The changes of land use in sandy soil are accompanied by changes in biogeochemical cycles of nutrients, particularly of the air-surface exchange of trace gases like nitric oxide. Our study, based on results obtained by a laboratory incubation technique, focuses on (a) NO production and consumption in sandy soils from two types of land use as function of soil temperature and soil moisture, and (b) The biogenic emission potential of nitric oxide from sandy soils in semi-arid region. At 25˚C, average NO production (in terms of mass of N) was 0.016,and 0.013 ng kg-1s-1 in sandy soils from soybean land (SL) and man-made forest (MF), re¬spectively. NO consumption rate constant ranged from 0.26×10-6 to 7.28×10-6 m3 kg-1s-1. At 25˚C and under optimum soil moisture conditions for NO production, the NO compensation point mixing ratio was about 266 and 161 ug m-3 (465,and 281 ppb) for soils of SL and MF, respectively. Statistically sound relationships have been observed between NO fluxes and soil moisture (optimum curves). NO fluxes also increased exponentially with soil temperature at any given soil moisture. The optimum soil moisture for which maximum NO flux was observed was independent of soil temperature. The maximum of NO flux potentials for SL and MF soils (at 25°C) were 59.6 and 36.5 ng m-2s-1 at water-filled pore space (%WFPS) of 26 and 24, respectively. The NO flux potential was about 2 times larger for cropland soil than for man-made forest soils, most likely due to fertilizer application to the cropland soils.

  14. California Shoreline Sand Retention: Existing Structure Performance and Future Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, N. E.; Griggs, G. B.

    2008-12-01

    Amidst rising sea level, climate change and expanding coastal populations, sandy beaches are frequently exposed to erosional processes. Effective sea level rise will lead to recreational beach loss as a result of coastal inundation. Beach nourishment is growing in popularity as a mitigation approach to meet the increasing need to protect coastal resources. The practice of beach nourishment along high energy shorelines, such as in California, is often improved by the construction of sediment retention structures (groins) to enhance project lifespans. However, our current ability to design effective littoral barriers is extremely limited. An underutilized and cost-effective resource for critically analyzing engineered retention structure performance is the record of existing structures within California. The impacts of 205 structures along California's 1700 km shoreline have been systematically explored though measurements collected from aerial imagery and historic shoreline positions. The findings of this study suggest that approximately 30 million m3 of sand and 18% of California's total exposed sandy beach area is presently retained in fillet and salient beaches associated with man-made structures such as groins, breakwaters, piers and jetties. Preliminary results suggest statistically significant correlations between structure effectiveness and key characteristics such as orientation, littoral cell position and construction materials. The central product of this study is a complete and robust GIS catalog of retention structures along California's coastline. A detailed analysis of historic structure performance combined with a systematically measured record of structure characteristics for the entire state results in a useful product to help coastal planners use the lessons of the past to plan future beach management.

  15. Time-dependent compaction band formation in sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip G.

    2015-07-01

    Compaction bands in sandstone are laterally extensive planar deformation features that are characterized by lower porosity and permeability than the surrounding host rock. As a result, this form of localization has important implications for both strain partitioning and fluid flow in the Earth's upper crust. To better understand the time dependency of compaction band growth, we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (initial porosity = 0.24) under constant stress (creep) conditions in the compactant regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the compactant regime, manifest as compaction bands. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterized by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain rate to shear failure, compaction creep is characterized by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain rate. The global decrease in the rates of axial strain, acoustic emission energy, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated at intervals by higher rate excursions, interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence, background creep strain rate, is decreased. However, the inelastic strain associated with the growth of a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude (from 10-8 to 10-5 s-1). We find that despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate (from both creep and constant strain rate experiments), the characteristics (geometry and thickness) of the compaction bands remain essentially the same. Several lines of evidence, notably the similarity between the differential stress dependence of creep strain rate in the dilatant and compactant regimes, suggest that as for dilatant creep, subcritical stress corrosion cracking is the mechanism responsible for

  16. Diagenesis of shallowly buried cratonic sandstones, southwest Sinai, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Alaa M. K.; Abdel-Wahab, Antar; McBride, Earle F.

    1998-08-01

    In spite of their age, quartzose and feldspathic Lower Carboniferous sandstones deposited on the Arabian shield in western Sinai remain friable and porous (average of 19%, maximum of 25%) except for strongly cemented ferricretes and silcretes. These fluvial and shallow-marine sandstones were not buried more than 1.5 km until Late Cretaceous and younger time, when the deepest rocks reached 2.5 km. Owing to shallow burial depths and episodic exposure, meteoric water dominated the pore system for most of geologic time: iron oxides had multiple diagenetic stages and yield Carboniferous and Late Cretaceous paleomagnetic signatures, and oxygen isotopic data for authigenic quartz, sparry calcite, and kaolinite yield meteoric signatures. The most significant diagenetic changes were: (1) cementation by iron oxide that locally reaches 40% in groundwater ferricretes; (2) reduction in porosity to 19% from an assumed original porosity 45% (19% porosity was lost by compaction and 7% by cementation); (3) generation of diagenetic quartzarenites by the loss of 7% detrital feldspar by kaolinization and dissolution; and (4) development of three thin mature silcretes apparently by thermal groundwaters. Some outcrop samples have halite and gypsum cements of young but uncertain origin: recycled from topographically higher younger rocks or from aerosols? Mature silcretes are strongly cemented by microcrystalline quartz, multiply zoned syntaxial quartz, and, originally, minor opal. Quartz overgrowths in most sandstones average only 2.2%, but display a variety of textures and in places overprint isopachous opal (now dissolved) grain coats. These features have more in common with incipient silcrete cement than normal burial quartz cement. Most silica was imported in groundwater.

  17. Sandy Desertification Status and its Driving Mechanism in North Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yuxiang

    2004-01-01

    As the main body of Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, North Tibet Plateau is one of three major sandy desertification regions in China and also a representative sandy desertification zone of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Accordingly, it is an important region for the study of recent sandy desertification processes and formation mechanism. From such aspects as desertified land types, areas and distributions etc., this paper analyses in detail the sandy desertification status on North Tibet Plateau,and qualitatively and quantitatively deals with the main factors that affect recent sandy desertification processes and the driving mechanism. Research results show that North Tibet Plateau is an important sandy desertification region in China characterized with large desertified land areas, diversified types,high severity, extensive distributions and serious damages. Sandy desertification occurrence and development resulted from combined effects of natural factors, anthropogenic factors, natural processes and man-made processes, of which climatic change is the main driving force.

  18. Population genetic structure of a sandstone specialist and a generalist heath species at two levels of sandstone patchiness across the Strait of Gibraltar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-López, Manuel Jesús; Segarra-Moragues, José Gabriel; Ojeda, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Many habitat specialist species are originally composed of small, discontinuous populations because their habitats are naturally fragmented or patchy. They may have suffered the long-term effects of natural patchiness. Mediterranean heathlands, a representative habitat in the Strait of Gibraltar region, are associated with nutrient-poor, acidic sandstone soils. Sandstone soil patches in the African side of the Strait (Tangier) are, in general, smaller and more scattered than in the European side (Algeciras). In this study, we analyze the effect of this sandstone patchiness on the population genetic diversity and structure of two Erica species from these Mediterranean heathlands that differ in their edaphic specificity, E. australis, sandstone specialist, and E. arborea, generalist. Average levels of within-population genetic diversity and gene flow between populations were significantly lower in Tangier (high sandstone patchiness) than in Algeciras (low patchiness) for the sandstone specialist, whereas no differences between both sides of the Strait were detected in the edaphic generalist. Since most endemic species in Mediterranean heathlands of the Strait of Gibraltar are sandstone specialists, these results highlight an increased vulnerability to loss of genetic diversity and local extinction of the heathland endemic flora in the Tangier side of the Strait of Gibraltar.

  19. Population genetic structure of a sandstone specialist and a generalist heath species at two levels of sandstone patchiness across the Strait of Gibraltar.

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    Manuel Jesús Gil-López

    Full Text Available Many habitat specialist species are originally composed of small, discontinuous populations because their habitats are naturally fragmented or patchy. They may have suffered the long-term effects of natural patchiness. Mediterranean heathlands, a representative habitat in the Strait of Gibraltar region, are associated with nutrient-poor, acidic sandstone soils. Sandstone soil patches in the African side of the Strait (Tangier are, in general, smaller and more scattered than in the European side (Algeciras. In this study, we analyze the effect of this sandstone patchiness on the population genetic diversity and structure of two Erica species from these Mediterranean heathlands that differ in their edaphic specificity, E. australis, sandstone specialist, and E. arborea, generalist. Average levels of within-population genetic diversity and gene flow between populations were significantly lower in Tangier (high sandstone patchiness than in Algeciras (low patchiness for the sandstone specialist, whereas no differences between both sides of the Strait were detected in the edaphic generalist. Since most endemic species in Mediterranean heathlands of the Strait of Gibraltar are sandstone specialists, these results highlight an increased vulnerability to loss of genetic diversity and local extinction of the heathland endemic flora in the Tangier side of the Strait of Gibraltar.

  20. FACIES ANALYSIS, STRATIGRAPHY AND PALAEONTOLOGY (MOLLUSCS AND VERTEBRATES IN THE UPPER PLIOCENE SANDY FLOOD-BASIN DEPOSITS OF THE UPPER VALDARNO BASIN (NORTHERN APENNINES

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    MASSIMILIANO GHINASSI

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Valdarno Basin, one of the most investigated Neogene–Quaternary basins of the Northern Apennines, developed during three main phases, as testified by the occurrence of three unconformity-bounded stratigraphic units (UBSUs in the basin infill. Despite numerous studies having been carried out, biochronological, paleoecological and stratigraphical issues in the lower portion of the Montevarchi Synthem (second phase have yet to be understood. Sandy deposits (Montecarlo Sand and Silt Unit, stratigraphically located in this portion of the Montevarchi Synthem, are the focus of this multidisciplinary study. These deposits conformably overlie sandy fluvio-eolian sediments and are, in turn, capped by fluvio-palustrine deposits through a progressive unconformity. Facies analysis suggest a sandy flood-basin environment for these deposits, characterised by variations in water discharge and flood event energy. Mollusc and fish remains, pointing to quiet or slow-moving shallow waters, have been affected by transport processes before final burial in overbank areas. Fish remains of the primary marine family Mugilids highlight a connection between the basin and the sea that was previously only supposed. Small mammal remains, referred to the rodent Mimomys polonicus, are coherent with a water-rich environment. Cyclic variations in shell content and sedimentological characteristics testify to the occurrence of short-term climatic oscillations during this warming phase. This study fits with paleomagnetic and radiometric datings and mammal biochronology, in indicating that the Montecarlo Sand and Silt Unit belongs to a time interval preceding the Reunion paleomagnetic event. The depositional evolution of the Montecarlo Unit was driven by climatic change from arid to humid conditions, related to a global increase in temperature that occurred between 2.4 and 2.2 Ma.

  1. A comparison of fish communities of subtidal seagrass beds and sandy seabeds in 13 marine embayments of a Caribbean island, based on species, families, size distribution and functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, I.; van der Velde, G.

    2004-08-01

    Differences in fish community structure between different estuaries, lagoons and bays can be very large, and generalisations are complicated by the use of a wide variety of sampling methods. In the present study, fish communities of subtidal seagrass beds and sandy seabeds in 13 marine embayments of a single Caribbean island were therefore sampled using a uniform method. The objective of the study was to determine whether the seagrass and sandy seabed habitats of various embayments are characterised by typical fish assemblages which differ in terms of taxa (species, families), size classes (life stages) and functional groups (ecological species groups, feeding time and diet). This was linked to the hypothesis that differences in fish assemblages between habitats in different embayments are larger at taxonomic levels than at the level of functional groups. A second objective was to determine the most useful discriminating features between the two habitat types. The above hypothesis was rejected, since differences in fish assemblages from different seagrass and sandy seabed sites did not increase from functional to taxonomic level, but from size class to diet/species to family/feeding time to ecological species group. However, the seagrass and sandy seabed habitats could each be characterised by typical fish assemblages which differed in taxonomical and functional group composition, irrespective of differences in environmental and biotic variables between the embayments in which these habitats were situated. The two habitat types could be best characterised on the basis of fish family, ecological species group, feeding time and size distribution. Seagrass beds mainly harboured nocturnally active nursery species (Haemulidae, Lutjanidae, etc.), whose relative abundance was related to vegetation (mainly seagrass) cover. Sandy seabeds mainly harboured diurnally active bay species (Gerreidae, etc.) whose relative abundance was related to cover of bare sand. Similarities

  2. The Scientific and Institutional Context for the Removal of Marmot Dam, Sandy River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, G. E.; Major, J. J.; O'Connor, J.; Wallick, J. R.; Marr, J.; Wilcock, P.; Podolack, C.

    2008-12-01

    Dam removal has been widely viewed as an important river restoration strategy and an interesting scientific opportunity, the latter because it represents a real-time, full-scale field experiment on fluvial adjustment. Removals therefore offer an excellent setting for testing analytical models of sediment transport, morphologic change, and our capacity to predict short- and medium-term channel evolution in response to changing water and sediment transport regimes. Most dam removals to date have involved relatively small structures and modest releases of sediment stored in pre-removal reservoirs. The largest instantaneous and uncontrolled release of sediment accompanying a dam removal occurred with the breaching of the Marmot coffer dam on the Sandy River in Oregon in October 2007. Marmot Dam was a 14-m-high by 50-m-wide diversion dam built in 1913 as part of a larger hydroelectric project. It was located on the Sandy River, an energetic gravel to cobble-bed river that naturally carries copious quantities of sand and gravel, ~45 km upstream from its confluence with the Columbia River near Portland, Oregon. At the time of removal, the reservoir upstream of the dam was completely filled with ~750,000 m3 of sand (40%) and gravel (60%). The river below the dam includes bedrock gorges, mixed bedrock/alluvial reaches, and alluvial reaches with well-developed gravel and sand bars. The decision to remove the dam was motivated by a combination of increasing maintenance costs and an unfavorable future economic return due to the necessity of installing expensive fish passage facilities to meet relicensing requirements. Portland General Electric, the dam's owner, surrendered the dam's license in 1999, and removal commenced in summer 2007. To remove the concrete structure, a temporary coffer dam was constructed 70 m upstream. In October 2007 the coffer dam was breached and the river allowed to erode the remaining impounded sediment (~730,000 m3). Physical modeling conducted at

  3. Greybull Sandstone Petroleum Potential on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, David A.

    2002-05-13

    The focus of this project was to explore for stratigraphic traps that may be present in valley-fill sandstone at the top of the Lower Cretaceous Kootenai Formation. This sandstone interval, generally known as the Greybull Sandstone, has been identified along the western edge of the reservation and is a known oil and gas reservoir in the surrounding region. The Greybull Sandstone was chosen as the focus of this research because it is an excellent, well-documented, productive reservoir in adjacent areas, such as Elk Basin; Mosser Dome field, a few miles northwest of the reservation; and several other oil and gas fields in the northern portion of the Bighorn Basin.

  4. Water Vapor Diffusion and Adsorption of Sandstones: Influence of Rock Texture and Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Keppert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The term sandstone is used for wide range of rocks containing quartz clasts which can be cemented by secondary precipitated quartz or calcite; moreover the space between clasts can be filled by matrix. These facts result in existence of numerous rocks having highly various properties. Sandstones have been used as construction materials due to their good accessibility and workability. Since most of sandstones are porous, water vapor can penetrate through sandstone constructions. The rate of water vapor diffusion, as well as the vapor sorption isotherm, was determined for range of sandstone types. The diffusion resistance factor was found to be dependent on the total porosity of sandstone but the sorption behavior was strongly influenced by nature of the particular sandstone; the specific surface area of stone and presence of clay matrix are determining its sorption isotherm. The published data enable estimating (i diffusion resistance factor of a sandstone via knowledge of its total porosity and (ii the sorption isotherm via knowledge of the stone’s nature and specific surface area. This approach can significantly reduce the time necessary to acquire vapor-related properties of a sandstone.

  5. Mechanical properties and failure characteristics of fractured sandstone with grouting and anchorage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong Yijiang; Han Lijun; Qu Tao; Yang Shengqi

    2014-01-01

    Based on uniaxial compression experimental results on fractured sandstone with grouting and anchorage, we studied the strength and deformation properties, the failure model, crack formation and evolution laws of fractured sandstone under different conditions of anchorage. The experimental results show that the strength and elastic modulus of fractured sandstone with different fracture angles are sig-nificantly lower than those of intact sandstone. Compared with the fractured samples without anchorage, the peak strength, residual strength, peak and ultimate axial strain of fractured sandstone under different anchorage increase by 64.5-320.0%, 62.8-493.0%, and 31.6-181.4%, respectively. The number of bolts and degree of pre-stress has certain effects on the peak strength and failure model of fractured sandstone. The peak strength of fractured sandstone under different anchorage increases to some extent, and the failure model of fractured sandstone also transforms from tensile failure to tensile-shear mixed failure with the number of bolts. The pre-stress can restrain the formation and evolution process of tensile cracks, delay the failure process of fractured sandstone under anchorage and impel the transformation of failure model from brittle failure to plastic failure.

  6. Magnetic Titanohematite Minerals in Uranium-Bearing Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard L.

    1977-01-01

    Detrital grains of the rhombohedral ilmenite (FeT1O3)--hematite (Fe2O3) solid solution series (titanohematites) have been identified by thermomagnetic, reflection microscopic, and X-ray diffraction analysis in six uranium-bearing sandstones in the western United States. Many of the titanohematites are ferrimagnetic and have Curie temperatures ranging from about 70 Deg C to 220 Deg C. Magnetic titanohematite is commonly more abundant than magnetite in many samples and, therefore, should be considered as a major source of the permanent magnetization in these units.

  7. Diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments of the Bunter Sandstone Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Mette; Weibel, Rikke; Friis, Henrik

    The Bunter Sandstone Formation in the northern North German Basin has large geothermal potential with high porosity and permeability (generally >15% and >100 mD, respectively) and with pore fluid temperatures that are adequate for geothermal energy production (c. 55–60˚C). A combined investigation...... of diagenesis, provenance and depositional environments is used to identify the reservoir rocks that possess the best quality. This is accomplished by integrating various methods including: seismic reflection data, sedimentological description of cores, mineral quantification by point counting, measurement...

  8. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  9. Initiation of acoustic emission in fluid-saturated sandstone samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, V. B.; Patonin, A. V.; Ponomarev, A. V.; Potanina, M. G.; Smirnov, V. B.; Stroganova, S. M.

    2016-07-01

    A rock behavior experiment with uniaxial compression revealed the effect of acoustic activity in loaded fluid-saturated Berea sandstone samples in response to an electric current. It is established that it is substantially intensified in periods of the current impact and decreases after its cut-off. The current impact also results in a growth of radial deformation indicating an increase in the sample volume. The effect of acoustic activation increases in response to increased heat emitted by the electric current during its flow through the sample, which allows the discovered effect to be explained by initiation of its destruction due to thermal expansion of the fluid in rock interstices and fissures.

  10. Vegetation pattern variation, soil degradation and their relationship along a grassland desertification gradient in Horqin Sandy Land, northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaoan; Zhao, Halin; Zhao, Xueyong; Guo, Yirui; Yun, Jianying; Wang, Shaokun; Miyasaka, Takafumi

    2009-09-01

    The Horqin Sandy Land is one of the most severely desertified regions in northern China. Plant communities and soil conditions at five stages of grassland desertification (potential, light, moderate, severe and very severe) were selected for the study of vegetation pattern variation relating to soil degradation. The results showed that vegetation cover, species richness and diversity, aboveground biomass (AGB), underground biomass, litter, soil organic carbon (C), total nitrogen (N), total phosphorus (P), electrical conductivity, very fine sand (0.1-0.05 mm) content and silt (0.05-0.002 mm) content decreased with the desertification development. Plant community succession presented that the palatable herbaceous plants gave place to the shrub species with asexual reproduction and sand pioneer plants. The decline of vegetation cover and AGB was positively related to the loss of soil organic C and total N with progressive desertification ( P < 0.01). The multivariate statistical analysis showed that plant community distribution, species diversity and ecological dominance had the close relationship with the gradient of soil nutrients in the processes of grassland desertification. These results suggest that grassland desertification results in the variation of vegetation pattern which presents the different composition and structure of plant community highly influenced by the soil properties.

  11. Numerical prediction on the scour burial of cylinder object freely resting on the sandy seabed in the East China Sea using the DRAMBUIE model1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-guang PANG; Li-qian LIU; Kun LI

    2014-01-01

    After experiencing 8-day combined tidal current, circulation and wave actions, scour depth surrounding cylinder object freely resting on sandy seabed in the East China Sea (ECS) in January is numerically predicted using the DRAMBUIE model designed for scour burial, which has been widely used and verified by in-situ experiments. During the period of numerical integration, the value of time t is generally variable at every time step via the special time-stepped approach developed by this paper to eliminate the time error. The tidal current velocity, wave orbital velocity and the depth-averaged circulation in the ECS have been obtained by numerical simulations with Estuarine Coastal and Ocean Model (ECOM), Simulating Waves Nearshore (SWAN) model and Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model respectively. The control experiment and several idealized test cases on influential factors in scour depth reveal that the dominant hydrodynamic factor is tidal current in the ECS under normal weather conditions, and the impacts of shelf circulation and wave motion on local scour almost can be ignored with an exception of the Kuroshio area where the high-speed mainstream of Kuroshio flows. It is also indicated that in sandy sediments, the distribution of scour depth nearly follows the pattern of tidal currents, while the secondary influencing factor on scour depth appears to be grain size of sandy sediment in the ECS. Numerical tests on sediment grain size further testify that much finer sand is more easily scoured, and an increasing trend for scour depth with reduction of grain size is displayed due to imposed resistance of larger sized particles. Three aspects explored by this paper, including the empirical equations in the Defense Research Agency Mine Burial Environment (DRAMBUIE) model, the accuracy of inputs and infill process can severely affect the prediction of scour depth surrounding cylinder objects freely resting on sandy seabed in the ECS.

  12. [Effects of short-term fencing on organic carbon fractions and physical stability of sandy sierozem in desert steppe of Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-Guo; Song, Nai-Ping; Li, Xue-Bin; Liu, Bing-Ru

    2012-12-01

    In order to explore the change patterns of organic carbon fractions and physical stability of sandy sierozem in desert steppe at the early stage of fencing, 0-40 cm soil samples were collected from a 5-year fenced desert steppe (inside the fence) and a free grazing steppe (outside the fence) in Yanchi County of Ningxia, Northwest China, with the soil organic carbon, labile organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon contents and soil particle composition analyzed. No significant differences were observed in the soil organic carbon content and soil particle composition inside and outside the fence. The average soil organic carbon inside and outside the fences was 3.25 g x kg(-1), the percentages of sand, silt, and clay were averagely 72%, 16%, and 12%, respectively, and the soil physical stability index was 1.30% -1.31%. The soil active organic carbon showed a significant change in 10-20 cm layer. The soil labile organic carbon content was 0.80 g x kg(-1) inside the fence, which was significantly higher than that outside the fence (0.62 g x kg(-1)). The percentage of soil particulate organic carbon was 50.9% inside the fence, which was also significantly higher than that outside the fence (31.7%). The soil texture inside the fence changed from sandy to loam, and the soil labile organic carbon content increased gradually; while the soil texture outside the fence was sandy, and its vertical change was relatively smooth. The organic carbon of sandy si- erozem in the desert steppe under the conditions of short-term fencing was still in a balance between consumption and accumulation, the soil texture was relatively stable, and the soil physical stability changed little. It was suggested that the soil active organic carbon content and its relative percentage in 10-20 cm layer could be used as the indicators of early soil quality change of desert steppe.

  13. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  14. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  15. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  16. Quantifying the digital traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Tobias; Moat, Helen Susannah; Bishop, Steven R; Treleaven, Philip; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-11-05

    Society's increasing interactions with technology are creating extensive "digital traces" of our collective human behavior. These new data sources are fuelling the rapid development of the new field of computational social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data from Flickr, a popular website for sharing personal photographs. In this case study, we find that the number of photos taken and subsequently uploaded to Flickr with titles, descriptions or tags related to Hurricane Sandy bears a striking correlation to the atmospheric pressure in the US state New Jersey during this period. Appropriate leverage of such information could be useful to policy makers and others charged with emergency crisis management.

  17. Detrital minerals from source to sink : tracing Orange River sand from Lesotho to Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Vermeesch, Pieter; Andò, Sergio; Resentini, Alberto; Vezzoli, Giovanni; Lustrino, Michele; Padoan, Marta; Pereira, Alcides

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative provenance analysis based on high-resolution bulk-petrography and heavy-mineral data on beach and dune sands, integrated with detrital-zircon geochronology and chemical analyses of pyroxene, garnet and staurolite, demonstrates that sand carried by the Orange River and derived from Lesotho and South Africa is carried by powerful and persistent longshore currents as far as southern Angola (Garzanti et al., 2014a). This is the longest cell of littoral sand transport documented so far on Earth, and a great test case for investigating physical controls on sand texture and composition. We have monitored textural, mineralogical and geochemical variability of beach and eolian-dune sands along a 1750 km stretch of the Atlantic coast of southern Africa by using an integrated set of techniques, including image analysis, laser granulometry, optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and bulk-sediment geochemistry (Garzanti et al., 2014b). Our results contrast with previous reports that feldspars and volcanic detritus break down during transport, that sand grains are rounded rapidly in shallow-marine environments, and that quartzose sands may be produced by physical processes alone. We demonstrate that basaltic rock fragments and pyroxenes, traditionally believed to be rapidly destroyed, survive healthily the 4000 km-long multistep hazardous journey from Lesotho volcanic highlands to Angola. Feldspar abundance remains remarkably constant from the Orange mouth to southern Angola, and quartz increases only very slightly, possibly as a result of local recycling. Among sedimentary and metasedimentary rock fragments, unconsolidated or strongly foliated types are readily comminuted when they enter the high-energy marine environment, but cemented sandstone/siltstone grains can survive the travel from the Karoo Basin of South Africa to northern Namibia and beyond. No detrital mineral displays a significant increase in grain roundness after 300-350 km of longshore transport in

  18. Quantifying the Digital Traces of Hurricane Sandy on Flickr

    OpenAIRE

    Preis, Tobias; Moat, Helen Susannah; Bishop, Steven R.; Treleaven, Philip; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Society’s increasing interactions with technology are creating extensive “digital traces” of our collective human behavior. These new data sources are fuelling the rapid development of the new field of computational social science. To investigate user attention to the Hurricane Sandy disaster in 2012, we analyze data from Flickr, a popular website for sharing personal photographs. In this case study, we find that the number of photos taken and subsequently uploaded to Flickr with titles, desc...

  19. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  20. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  1. Impact on sand and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, R.P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the impact of a body on sand and water. When a body impacts a free surface in the inertial regime the series of events is the following: On impact material is blown away in all directions and an impact cavity forms. Due to the hydrostatic pressure from the sides the cav

  2. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  3. The search for a source rock for the giant Tar Sand triangle accumulation, southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntoon, J.E.; Hansley, P.L.; Naeser, N.D.

    1999-01-01

    A large proportion (about 36%) of the world's oil resource is contained in accumulations of heavy oil or tar. In these large deposits of degraded oil, the oil in place represents only a fraction of what was present at the time of accumulation. In many of these deposits, the source of the oil is unknown, and the oil is thought to have migrated over long distances to the reservoirs. The Tar Sand triangle in southeastern Utah contains the largest tar sand accumulation in the United States, with 6.3 billion bbl of heavy oil estimated to be in place. The deposit is thought to have originally contained 13-16 billion bbl prior to the biodegradation, water washing, and erosion that have taken place since the middle - late Tertiary. The source of the oil is unknown. The tar is primarily contained within the Lower Permian White Rim Sandstone, but extends into permeable parts of overlying and underlying beds. Oil is interpreted to have migrated into the White Rim sometime during the Tertiary when the formation was at a depth of approximately 3500 m. This conclusion is based on integration of fluid inclusion analysis, time-temperature reconstruction, and apatite fission-track modeling for the White Rim Sandstone. Homogenization temperatures cluster around 85-90??C for primary fluid inclusions in authigenic, nonferroan dolomite in the White Rim. The fluid inclusions are associated with fluorescent oil-bearing inclusions, indicating that dolomite precipitation was coeval with oil migration. Burial reconstruction suggests that the White Rim Sandstone reached its maximum burial depth from 60 to 24 Ma, and that maximum burial was followed by unroofing from 24 to 0 Ma. Time-temperature modeling indicates that the formation experienced temperatures of 85-90??C from about 35 to 40 Ma during maximum burial. Maximum formation temperatures of about 105-110??C were reached at about 24 Ma, just prior to unroofing. Thermal modeling is used to examine the history of potential source rocks

  4. Soil bacterial community responses to revegetation of moving sand dune in semi-arid grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chengyou; Zhang, Ying; Cui, Zhenbo; Feng, Shuwei; Wang, Tingting; Ren, Qing

    2017-08-01

    Grasslands in semi-arid Northern China are widely desertified, thus inducing the formation of a large area of moving sand lands. Revegetation of the sandy land is commonly adopted to restore degraded grasslands. The structure of the soil microbial community might dramatically change during degradation and recovery because microorganisms are one of the major drivers of ecological process through their interactions with plants and soil. Assuming that soil properties are the key determinants of the structure of soil bacterial community within the same soil type, whether the vegetation type causes the significant difference in the structure of soil bacterial community during revegetation and restoration of the degraded grasslands remains poorly understood. Our study aimed to (1) investigate the response of soil bacterial communities to the changes during vegetation degradation and recovery and (2) evaluate whether the soil bacterial communities under plantations return to their native state. We detected the shifts in diversities and compositions of the soil bacterial communities and the relative abundance of dominant bacterial taxa by using the high-throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing technique in an area covered by 32-year-old Caragana microphylla, Artemisia halodendron, Hedysarum fruticosum, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica, Populus simonii, and Salix gordejevii sand-fixing plantations and in the native community (NC) dominated by elm, and moving sandy dune (MS). We found that the obtained operational taxonomic units by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and diversity index in MS were all significantly lower than those in NC, and the number and composition of dominant genera were significantly different between NC and MS. Interestingly, the compositions of bacterial communities and the dominant genera in different sand-fixation plantations (C. microphylla, A. halodendron, H. fruticosum, P. sylvestris var. mongolica, P. simonii, and S. gordejevii) were all similar to those of

  5. Brazilian sandy beaches: characteristics, ecosystem services, impacts, knowledge and priorities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Cecília Zacagnini Amaral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Sandy beaches constitute a key ecosystem and provide socioeconomic goods and services, thereby playing an important role in the maintenance of human populations and in biodiversity conservation. Despite the ecological and social importance of these ecosytems, Brazilian sandy beaches are significantly impacted by human interference, chemical and organic pollution and tourism, as well as global climate change. These factors drive the need to better understand the environmental change and its consequences for biota. To promote the implementation of integrated studies to detect the effects of regional and global environmental change on beaches and on other benthic habitats of the Brazilian coast, Brazilian marine researchers have established The Coastal Benthic Habitats Monitoring Network (ReBentos. In order to provide input for sample planning by ReBentos, we have conducted an intensive review of the studies conducted on Brazilian beaches and summarized the current knowledge about this environment. In this paper, we present the results of this review and describe the physical, biological and socioeconomics features of Brazilian beaches. We have used these results, our personal experience and worldwide literature to identify research projects that should be prioritized in the assessment of regional and global change on Brazilian sandy beaches. We trust that this paper will provide insights for future studies and represent a significant step towards the conservation of Brazilian beaches and their biodiversity.

  6. experimental studies of sand production from unconsolidated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    Production of sand during oil and gas exploration causes severe operational prob- ... duction such as risk of well failure, erosion of pipelines and surface facilities, sand separa- tion and disposal ... ment, theoretical and numerical analysis have.

  7. Measuring the zeta potential. The relationships with sandstone fineness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luxán, M. P.

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of the zeta potential technique in the area of construction materials and Portland cement is quite recent. The initial research work involved the study of cement suspensions or suspensions of one of the components of cement, such as alite, tricalcium alumínate, in the presence of additives and, more specifically, superplasticizers. The studies of this sort were extended with the mixing of active additions into cement (fly ashes, etc.. The present study discusses the application of siliceous materials (sandstone as a basis of the research into the behaviour of sandstone mortars containing repair products.

    La aplicación de la técnica del potencial zeta en el campo de los materiales de construcción y del cemento portland es muy reciente. Las primeras investigaciones se refieren al estudio de suspensiones de cemento o de alguno de sus compuestos que lo forman como alita, aluminato tricálcico, en presencia de aditivos y, más concretamente, de superfluidificantes. Con la incorporación de adiciones activas al cemento (cenizas volantes,... se amplían los estudios de este tipo de cementos. En este trabajo se considera la aplicación a los materiales silíceos (arenisca como base para la investigación del comportamiento de los morteros de arenisca conteniendo productos de reparación.

  8. The Creep Properties of Fine Sandstone under Uniaxial Tensile Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Haifei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A graduated uniaxial direct tensile creep test for fine sandstone is conducted by adopting a custom-designed direct tensile test device for rock. The experiment shows that the tensile creep of fine sandstone has similar creep curve patterns to those of compression creep, while the ratios of the creep strain to the total strain obtained in the tensile tests are substantially higher than those obtained for similar compression tests, which indicates that the creep ability of rock in the tensile process is higher than that in the uniaxial compression process. Based on the elastic modulus in the approximately linear portion of the obtained isochronous stress-strain curves of the tensile creep, the time dependence of the elasticity modulus for the Kelvin model is evaluated, and a revised generalized Kelvin model is obtained by substitution into the generalized Kelvin model. A new viscousplastic model is proposed to describe the accelerated creep properties, and this model is combined in series with the revised generalized Kelvin model to form a new nonlinear viscoelastic-plastic creep model that can describe the properties of attenuation creep, steady creep, and accelerated creep. Comparison of the test and theoretical curves demonstrates that they are nearly identical, which verifies the performance of the model.

  9. Microstructural changes of sandstone specimens during CO2 injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Son, J.; Oh, M.; Park, H. D.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is a technology to isolate CO2 from atmosphere, by capturing it from sources, transporting it to injection area, and injecting it into suitable geological formation, ocean, or mineral carbonation plant. Geological storage of carbon dioxide is the most effective and economical method, and until now a lot of demonstration projects were carried out successfully such as Sleipner, Weyburn, and In Salah. In Republic of Korea, small-scale CO2 injection demonstration project is now under investigation in offshore Pohang Basin with sandstone reservoir and the mudstone caprock. When CO2 is injected in target site, the rock around injection well can be deteriorated because of extreme change of temperature and pressure. In this study supercritical CO2 was injected in sandstone specimen and the initiation and propagation of fracture inside the specimens were observed using X-ray computed tomography (CT). X-ray CT method is a computer technology to observe inner density of target object in three dimensional image. Because of its non-destructivity and high resolution, it is suitable for consistent observation of the same specimen. Porosity and permeability of the specimens were measured using X-ray CT images and both of them were increased after injection. P- and S-wave velocity were also measured to assess the change of mechanical property and both of them were decreased after injection because of growth of inner fractures. The data from this research can be used as input data of CCS site.

  10. Water coning mechanism in Tarim fractured sandstone gas reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈伟军; 刘晓华; 李熙喆; 陆家亮

    2015-01-01

    The problem of water coning into the Tarim fractured sandstone gas reservoirs becomes one of the major concerns in terms of productivity, increased operating costs and environmental effects. Water coning is a phenomenon caused by the imbalance between gravity and viscous forces around the completion interval. There are several controllable and uncontrollable parameters influencing this problem. In order to simulate the key parameters affecting the water coning phenomenon, a model was developed to represent a single well with an underlying aquifer using the fractured sandstone gas reservoir data of the A-Well in Dina gas fields. The parametric study was performed by varying six properties individually over a representative range. The results show that matrix permeability, well penetration (especially fracture permeability), vertical-to-horizontal permeability ratio, aquifer size and gas production rate have considerable effect on water coning in the fractured gas reservoirs. Thus, investigation of the effective parameters is necessary to understand the mechanism of water coning phenomenon. Simulation of the problem helps to optimize the conditions in which the breakthrough of water coning is delayed.

  11. Dispersion analysis of velocity and attenuation in Berea sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Kenneth W.

    1985-07-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements were made on dry, brine- and oil-saturated Berea sandstone and fused glass beads. The results for fused glass beads are consistent with the predictions of Biot theory. They indicate that as predicted, the Biot absorption/dispersion mechanism shifts to higher frequencies as the fluid viscosity increases. Similar data for Berea sandstone are not consistent with Biot theory, since observed velocities are generally higher than predicted. Using the Biot theory, we calculate low- and high-frequency velocities for the liquid-saturated samples. "Biot dispersion" is then defined as the percent difference between the low- and high-frequency limits. "Apparent dispersion" is defined as the percent difference between the measured ultrasonic velocity and the low-frequency Biot limit. Comparison of these two measures of dispersion gives insight into the presence of a non-Biot absorption/dispersion mechanism. Whenever the apparent dispersion is larger than the Biot dispersion, the extra dispersion is interpreted as being caused by a local flow relaxation. To be consistent with attenuation data, this relaxation must be distributed over at least five to six decades in frequency.

  12. Selected trace and minor elements in sandstones from Paraguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facetti-Masulli, J.F.; Gonzalez, E. [Hydroconsult SRL, Asuncion (Paraguay); Kump, P. [J. Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-07-01

    Selected trace and minor elements analyzed by XRF in sandstone samples were Rb-Sr-Zr-Nb-Ba-La-Ce-Nd as well as Ti-Mn-Fe with which they are often correlated. Refractory elements like REE are considered useful indicators of geochemical processes and, in this case, of provenance. Usually they maintain their original relationships and are transferred almost directly into sediments. The values here found, absolute and normalized, show correlations among the samples, allowing the establishment of their origin. Most of them in the spidergram patterns display positive spikes of Zr, and negative anomalies at Nb, Sr, Ti: differences in their height/depth could be in relation with the different Series or Formations. Strikingly, spidergrams of samples collected from the Patino Formation show marked negative anomalies interalia of Ba, as well as positive spikes of Nb and Zr, very similar to those found in magmatic specimens from Misiones, Carapegua-Acahay and Alto Paraguay Province and quite different from the other analyzed samples. In addition a remarkable presence of Precambrian signatures were found in the analyzed sandstones from the Paleozoic. (orig.)

  13. Acoustic Emission Parameters of Three Gorges Sandstone during Shear Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an experimental investigation of sandstone samples from the Three Gorges during shear failure was conducted using acoustic emission (AE and direct shear tests. The AE count rate, cumulative AE count, AE energy, and amplitude of the sandstone samples were determined. Then, the relationships among the AE signals and shearing behaviors of the samples were analyzed in order to detect micro-crack initiation and propagation and reflect shear failure. The results indicated that both the shear strength and displacement exhibited a logarithmic relationship with the displacement rate at peak levels of stress. In addition, the various characteristics of the AE signals were apparent in various situations. The AE signals corresponded with the shear stress under different displacement rates. As the displacement rate increased, the amount of accumulative damage to each specimen decreased, while the AE energy peaked earlier and more significantly. The cumulative AE count primarily increased during the post-peak period. Furthermore, the AE count rate and amplitude exhibited two peaks during the peak shear stress period due to crack coalescence and rock bridge breakage. These isolated cracks later formed larger fractures and eventually caused ruptures.

  14. Core-log integration for a Saudi Arabian sandstone reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, S.; Al-Kaabi, A.U.; Amabeoku, M.O.; Al-Fossail, K.

    1995-10-01

    For a detailed characterization of a reservoir, core-log integration is essential. In this paper, data integration from logs and cores of a Saudi Arabian sandstone reservoir is discussed with particular attention to effects of clay on resistivity logs and water saturation. There are four sources of data, namely, core resistivity measurement, clay study from cores (XRD, CEC), spectral core gamma ray, and well logs. In order to generate continuous cation exchange capacity (CEC) with depth, spectral gamma ray measurements (both from core and downhole log) and CEC from cores and correlated. Q{sub v} (CEC per unit pore volume) values are calculated utilizing only well logs by applying Waxman-Smits equation in water bearing zone. Log derived Q{sub v} values from water zone were then correlated with porosity to generate Q{sub v} values in the oil column and compared with core derived Z{sub v}. Finally, data from well logs (porosity, resistivity and Q{sub v}) and cores (resistivity parameters m, n, and Q{sub v}) were integrated for more accurate water saturation calculation. The core-log correlation can be applied to other wells avoiding expensive core analysis, and the technique developed in this project can be used in other sandstone reservoirs.

  15. POPULATION DYNAMICS OF PICEA MONGOLICA IN SANDY FOREST STEPPE ECOTONE%内蒙古沙地森林草原过渡带中沙地云杉种群动态

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹春静; 韩士杰; 周玉梅; 徐文铎

    2001-01-01

    沙地云杉是我国内蒙东部沙地森林草原过渡带的特有濒危树种. 沙地云杉林是陆地上非常特殊的森林生态系统类型. 本文研究了沙地云杉的种群动态, 建立了沙地云杉种群生命表、年龄结构、存活曲线和生殖力表, 同时研究了沙地云杉种群分布格局及增长动态, 可为沙地治理和沙地森林生态系统研究提供科学依据. 图2 表6 参16%Picea mongolica is an endemic and endangered tree species in sandy forest steppe ecotone in eastern Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China, and P. mongolica forest is a very special sandy forest ecosystem. In this paper, population dynamics of P. mongolica in sandy forest steppe ecotone were studied; the population life table, age structure, survival curve, and fecundity schedule were established; and population distribution pattern and increasing tendency were also studied to provide some scientific bases for sand controlling and researches on sandy forest ecosystems. Fig 2, Tab 6, Ref 16

  16. Assessment of grass root effects on soil piping in sandy soils using the pinhole test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatek-Jakiel, Anita; Vannoppen, Wouter; Poesen, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Soil piping is a complex land degradation process, which involves the hydraulic removal of soil particles by subsurface flow. This process is frequently underestimated and omitted in most soil erosion studies. However, during the last decades several studies reported the importance of soil piping in various climatic zones and for a wide range of soil types. Compared to sheet, rill and gully erosion, very few studies focused on the factors controlling piping and, so far, there is no research study dealing with the effects of plant roots on piping susceptibility of soils having a low cohesion. The objective of this study is therefore to assess the impact of grass root density (RD) on soil piping in sandy soils using the pinhole test. The pinhole test involves a water flow passing through a hole of 1 mm diameter in a soil specimen (sampled using a metal ring with a diameter of 5 cm and a length of 8 cm), under varying hydraulic heads (50 mm, 180 mm, 380 mm and 1020 mm; Nadal-Romero et al., 2011). To provide a quantitative assessment piping susceptibility of the soil sample, the pipeflow discharge (cm3 s-1) and the sediment discharge (g s-1) were measured every minute during a five minute test. Bare and root-permeated samples were tested, using a sandy soil with a sand, silt, clay content of respectively, 94%, 4% and 2%. The root-permeated topsoil samples were taken in field plots sown with a mixture of grasses with fibrous roots. All soil samples were placed on a sandbox with a 100 mm head for 24 hours to ensure a similar water content for all samples. In total, 67 pinhole tests (lasting 5 minutes each) were conducted, i.e. 43 root-permeated soil samples with RD ranging from 0.01 to 0.93 kg m-3 and 24 root-free soil samples as a reference. Clear piping erosion could be observed in 65% of the root-free soil samples, whereas only 17% of rooted soil samples revealed clear piping erosion during the tests. Statistical analyses show that there is a negative correlation (-0

  17. UK silica sand resources for fracking

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2013-01-01

    UK silica sand resources for fracking Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG Email: Silica sand is high purity quartz sand that is mainly used for glass production, as foundry sand, in horticulture, leisure and other industrial uses. One specialist use is as a ‘proppant’ to enhance oil and gas recovery. This presentation will focus on this application, particularly for shale gas recovery where it is mo...

  18. Physical Property Changes During CO2 Injection into Sandstone from Pukpyeong Formation, South Korea: Pore-scale Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J.; Keehm, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon dioxide is believed to be responsible for global warming and climate change, and Korea government puts a great effort in CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage). The geological sequestration is regarded as one viable option and we are looking for prospecting formations for carbon storage. In this paper, we present a new approach to determine physical property changes during CO2 injection and preliminary results from applying the method to one of prospective Tertiary formation in South Korea. The so-called computational rock physics method is composed of three steps: 1) acquisition of high-resolution pore microstructures by X-ray micro-tomography; 2) CO2 injection simulation using lattice-Boltzmann (LB) two-phase flow simulation; and 3) FEM property simulations (electrical and elastic) at different CO2 saturations during the injection. We have been shown the viability of the method last year. This year we applied this method to one of CS (carbon storage) target area, Pukpyeong formation located in north-eastern part of South Korea. From thin section analysis, we found that the formation is composed of mudstone, sandstone and conglomerate, and most of them are poorly consolidated. The mudstone and poorly-sorted conglomerate are believed to have very low permeability, and the effect of CO2 injection would be significant. Thus we focus on sandstone units and get pore microstructure of those units. We then performed the computational rock physics analysis, and present the relations of Vp - CO2 saturation, and electrical conductivity - CO2 saturation for a few sand units. We also present the preliminary upscaling results by putting combined sandstone and mudstone units into FEM modeling. The modeling results implies that the new computational approach can be very useful to characterizing the CS sites especially in early stage. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP

  19. An integrated petrophysical and rock physics analysis to improve reservoir characterization of Cretaceous sand intervals in Middle Indus Basin, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Tahir; Chun, Wang Yan; MonaLisa; Khalid, Perveiz; Xue Qing, Liu; Ehsan, Muhammad Irfan; Jawad Munawar, Muhammad; Wei, Xie

    2017-03-01

    The sand intervals of the Lower Goru Formation of the Cretaceous age, widely distributed in the Middle and Lower Indus Basin of Pakistan, are proven reservoirs. However, in the Sawan gas field of the Middle Indus Basin, these sandstone intervals are very deep and extremely heterogeneous in character, which makes it difficult to discriminate lithologies and fluid saturation. Based on petrophysical analysis and rock physics modeling, an integrated approach is adopted to discriminate between lithologies and fluid saturation in the above-mentioned sand intervals. The seismic velocities are modeled using the Xu–White clay–sand mixing rock physics model. The calibrated rock physics model shows good consistency between measured and modeled velocities. The correlation between measured and modeled P and S wave velocities is 92.76% and 84.99%, respectively. This calibrated model has been successfully used to estimate other elastic parameters, even in those wells where both shear and sonic logs were missing. These estimated elastic parameters were cross-plotted to discriminate between the lithology and fluid content in the target zone. Cross plots clearly separate the shale, shaly sand, and gas-bearing sand clusters, which was not possible through conventional petrophysical analysis. These data clusters have been exported to the corresponding well for the purpose of interpolation between wells and to analyze the lateral and vertical variations in lithology and fluid content in the reservoir zone.

  20. Spatial distribution of sandy desertificationchange in the west of Jilin Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUHuiqing; XUJiawei; LVXinmiao

    2003-01-01

    The sandy land of the western part of Jilin Province is located in the ecotone of semi-humid and semi-arid area in the temperate zone of China. The sandy desertification has widely spread in the region because of the vulnerable natural conditions and the unreasonable human activity; as a result of this, the precious land resources and the economic development in the area have been seriously impacted. In this paper, the sandy land ecologic environment geographic information system is established based on the multi-spectral, multi-temporal Landsat TM images and field investigation. The comprehensive indexes of sandy desertification extent assessment which include vegetation degradation, wind erosion extent and soil depth are presented to classify the sandy land in western Jilin into three levels--slight, moderate and severe sandy desertification with the support of GIS platform. The results demonstrate that the sandy desertification has been partly controlled in the past twenty years, except some small sites. However, this doesn't necessarily mean that there is nothing for more concern. The two main causes of sandy desertification have not been eliminated yet, one is its natural factor, especially the physical and chemical characters of sandy soil and dry climate; another is the immoderate economic activity of human being that has highly accelerated the sandy desertification process.