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Sample records for sand removal tool

  1. Biofilm removal technique using sands as a research tool for accessing microbial attachment on surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanon Trachoo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms have profound impacts on improved survival of the constituent microorganisms in nature. Biofilms were believed to protect constituent microorganisms from sanitizer treatment, provide a more suitable habitat for microorganisms, and become a site for genetic material exchanges between microorganisms. As we realize more about the significance of biofilm, methods used for biofilm study should be consistently developed and evaluated. To determine microbial attachment on surfaces, usually biofilms are grown on substratum surfaces and removed by vortexing with glass beads or scraping. However, scraping is not as effective as vortexing with glass beads. Another approach is direct-agar overlaying which cannot be used with high density biofilm. In this experiment, we compared effectiveness of glass beads (298±28 μm in diameter and sands (width: 221±55 μm and length: 329±118 μm in removing biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by vortexing method. The results suggested that acid-washed sands, which are significantly less inexpensive than glass beads, were as effective as (P>0.05 analytical grade glass beads in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm removal without inhibiting growth of the organism.

  2. Graphitic packing removal tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, K.E.; Kolsun, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Graphitic packing removal tools are described for removal of the seal rings in one piece from valves and pumps. The packing removal tool has a cylindrical base ring the same size as the packing ring with a surface finish, perforations, knurling or threads for adhesion to the seal ring. Elongated leg shanks are mounted axially along the circumferential center. A slit or slits permit insertion around shafts. A removal tool follower stabilizes the upper portion of the legs to allow a spanner wrench to be used for insertion and removal.

  3. Pathogen removal using saturated sand colums supplemented with hydrochar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    This PhD study has evaluated hydrochars derived from biowastes as adsorbents for pathogen removal in water treatment. Pathogen removal experiments were conducted by carrying out breakthrough analysis using a simple sand filtration set-up. Glass columns packed by 10 cm sand bed supplemented with mino

  4. Removal of heavy metals through adsorption using sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The removal of four heavy metals i.e. Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn from their aqueous solutions, using ordinary sand as an adsorbent, was studied at 20oC. The amount of metal adsorbed to form monolayer on sand(am), obtained from Langmuir isotherm, exhibited the preference of metals for sand in the order Pb>Cr>Cu>Zn. The heavy metal-sand adsorption phenomena can be illustrated on the basis of the interaction between surface functional group of silicates (sand) and the metal ions. It is deduced that sand can be used as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater (containing low conc. of metals), especially in the developing countries.

  5. Evaluate of head loss, sediment value and copper removal in sand media (rapid sand filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneshi Navab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with the technology development and increasing consumption of water resources, we are experiencing low qualities in the mentioned resources. Copper brings about serious environment al pollution, threatening human health and ecosystem. This metal found variously in water resources and industrial activities. Therefore, it needs to treat the water resources from these excessive amounts. Different methods have used for this reason but the most used method during recent years has been the absorption by economic absorbers such as sand. Rapid sand filters usually used in water and wastewater treatment plants for water clarification. In this research, a single layer gravity rapid sand filter has used to reduce different concentrations of copper. sediment value and head loss arising in filter media is simulated by using combination of Carman-Kozeny, Rose and Gregory models in different discharges of rapid sand filter. Results have shown that with increasing in discharge and decreasing in input copper concentration, arriving time to given head loss, is increasing. In addition, results demonstrated that with increasing in copper concentration in influent, removal efficiency is decreasing somewhat. Results of this research can applied in an appropriate design of rapid sand filter to copper removal, a prediction of rapid sand filter ability to copper removal and an estimation of arising head loss during filter work thus evaluating of time interval backwash. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i2.10641 International Journal of the Environment Vol.3(2 2014: 276-286

  6. Pathogen removal using saturated sand colums supplemented with hydrochar

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, J W

    2015-01-01

    This PhD study has evaluated hydrochars derived from biowastes as adsorbents for pathogen removal in water treatment. Pathogen removal experiments were conducted by carrying out breakthrough analysis using a simple sand filtration set-up. Glass columns packed by 10 cm sand bed supplemented with minor amount of hydrochar (1.5 %, w/w) were flushed with artificial ground water seeded with test microorganisms at an upward flow rate of 1 mL / min. Either back flushing or deionized water flushing w...

  7. Virus removal vs. subsurface water velocity during slow sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizer, Halim; Brackmann, Bernhard; Rahman, M Azizur; Szewzyk, Regine; Sprenger, Christoph; Holzbecher, Ekkehard; López-Pila, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    In an attempt to obtain a conservative estimate of virus removal during slow sand and river bank filtration, a somatic phage was isolated with slow decay and poor adsorption to coarse sand. We continuously fed a phage suspension to a 7-m infiltration path and measured the phage removal. In a second set of experiments, we fed the phage suspension to 1-m long columns run at different pore water velocities. Using the data obtained, a mathematical model was constructed describing removal vs. pore water velocity (PWV), assuming different statistical distributions of the adsorption coefficient λ. The bimodal distribution best fit the results for PWVs higher than 1 m/d. It predicted a removal of approximately 4 log10 after 50 days infiltration at 1 m/d. At PWVs below 1 m/d the model underestimated removal. Sand-bound phages dissociated slowly into the liquid phase, with a detachment constant kdet of 2.6 × 10⁻⁵. This low kdet suggests that river bank filtration plants should be intermittently operated when viral overload is suspected, e.g. during flooding events or at high water-marks in rivers, in order for viruses to become soil-associated during the periods of standstill. Resuming filtration will allow only a very slow virus release from the soil.

  8. Arsenate removal from water using sand--red mud columns.

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    Genç-Fuhrman, Hülya; Bregnhøj, Henrik; McConchie, David

    2005-08-01

    This study describes experiments in which sorption filters, filled with chemically modified red mud (Bauxsol) or activated Bauxsol (AB) coated sand, are used to remove As(V) (arsenate) from water. Bauxsol-coated sand (BCS) and AB-coated sand (ABCS) are prepared by mixing Bauxsol or AB with wet sand and drying. Samples of the BCS and ABCS are also used in batch experiments to obtain isotherm data. The observed adsorption data fit the Langmuir model well, with adsorption maxima of 3.32 and 1.64 mgg(-1) at pH values of 4.5 and 7.1, respectively for BCS; and of 2.14 mgg(-1) for ABCS at a pH of 7.1. Test results show that higher arsenate adsorption capacities can be achieved for both BCS and ABCS when using the columns compared to results for batch experiments; the difference is greater for BCS. Additional batch tests, carried out for 21 days using BCS to explain the observed discrepancy, show that the equilibrium time previously used in batch experiments was too short because adsorption continued for at least 21 days and reached 87% after 21 days compared to only 35% obtained after 4h. Fixed bed column tests, used to investigate the effects of flow rate and initial arsenate concentration indicate that the process is sensitive to both parameters, with lower flow rates (longer effective residence times in the columns) and initial arsenate concentrations providing better column performance. An examination of the combined effect of potential competing anions (i.e. silicate, phosphate, sulphate and bicarbonate) on the column performance showed that the presence of these anions in tap water slightly decreases arsenate removal. Each breakthrough curve is compared to the Thomas model, and it is found that the model may be applied to estimate the arsenate sorption capacity in columns filled with BCS and ABCS. The data obtained from both batch and column studies indicate that BCS and ABCS filtration could be effectively used to remove arsenate from water, with the latter being

  9. Integration of sand and membrane filtration systems for iron and pesticide removal without chemical addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    Pilot plant investigations of sand and membrane filtration (MF/UF/NF/LPRO) have been performed to treat groundwater polluted with pesticides. The results show that simple treatment, with use of aeration and sand filtration or MF/UF membranes, does not remove pesticides. However, by reducing...... the content of key foulants, the techniques can be used as a pre-treatment for nanofiltration and low pressure reverse osmosis that has proved to be capable of removing pesticides. It was found that a lower fouling potential could be obtained by using the membranes, but that sand filter was better at removing...

  10. Mecoprop (MCPP) removal in full-scale rapid sand filters at a groundwater-based waterworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde J., E-mail: mjhe@env.dtu.dk; Arvin, Erik; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-11-15

    Contamination by the herbicide mecoprop (MCPP) was detected in groundwater abstraction wells at Kerteminde Waterworks in concentrations up to 0.08 μg/L. MCPP was removed to below detection limit in a simple treatment line where anaerobic groundwater was aerated and subsequently filtered by primary and secondary rapid sand filters. Water quality parameters were measured throughout the waterworks, and they behaved as designed for. MCPP was removed in secondary rapid sand filters — removal was the greatest in the sand filters in the filter line with the highest contact time (63 min). In these secondary sand filters, MCPP concentration decreased from 0.037 μg/L to below the detection limit of 0.01 μg/L. MCPP was removed continuously at different filter depths (0.80 m). Additionally, biodegradation, mineralisation and adsorption were investigated in the laboratory in order to elucidate removal mechanisms in the full-scale system. Therefore, microcosms were set up with filter sand, water and {sup 14}C-labelled MCPP at an initial concentration of 0.2 μg/L. After 24 h, 79–86% of the initial concentration of MCPP was removed. Sorption removed 11–15%, while the remaining part was removed by microbial processes, leading to a complete mineralisation of 13–18%. Microbial removal in the filter sand was similar at different depths of the rapid sand filter, while the amount of MCPP which adsorbed to the filter sand after 48 h decreased with depth from 21% of the initial MCPP in the top layer to 7% in the bottom layer. It was concluded that MCPP was removed in secondary rapid sand filters at Kerteminde Waterworks, to which both adsorption and microbial degradation contributed. - Highlights: • A full-scale groundwater based waterworks was able to remove MCPP. • In the secondary rapid sand filters, MCPP decreased from 0.037 μg/L to < 0.010 μg/L. • The filter sand removed MCPP both by sorption and by microbial degradation. • Microbial removal was unchanged while

  11. Integration of sand and membrane filtration systems for iron and pesticide removal without chemical addition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    Pilot plant investigations of sand and membrane filtration (MF/UF/NF/LPRO) have been performed to treat groundwater polluted with pesticides. The results show that simple treatment, with use of aeration and sand filtration or MF/UF membranes, does not remove pesticides. However, by reducing...... the content of key foulants, the techniques can be used as a pre-treatment for nanofiltration and low pressure reverse osmosis that has proved to be capable of removing pesticides. It was found that a lower fouling potential could be obtained by using the membranes, but that sand filter was better at removing...... manganese and dissolved organic matter. The results indicate that combining aeration; sand filtration and membrane techniques might be a good option for pesticide removal without any addition of chemicals and minimized membrane maintenance....

  12. Limited effectiveness of household sand filters for removal of arsenic from well water in North Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmiawati, Cimi; Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Iida, Machiko; Maeda, Masao; Ohnuma, Shoko; Yajima, Ichiro; Ohgami, Nobutaka; Oshino, Reina; Al Hossain, M M Aeorangajeb; Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Kato, Masashi

    2016-12-01

    Since well water utilized for domestic purposes in the Red River Delta of North Vietnam has been reported to be polluted by arsenic, barium, iron, and manganese, household sand filters consisting of various components are used. Information regarding the effectiveness of various sand filters for removal of the four toxic elements in well water is limited. In this study, arsenic levels in 13/20 of well water samples and 1/7 of tap water samples exceeded World Health Organization (WHO) health-based guideline value for drinking water. Moreover, 2/20, 6/20, and 4/20 of well water samples had levels exceeding the present and previous guideline levels for barium, iron, and manganese, respectively. Levels of iron and manganese, but not arsenic, in well water treated by sand filters were lower than those in untreated water, although previous studies showed that sand filters removed all of those elements from water. A low ratio of iron/arsenic in well water may not be sufficient for efficient removal of arsenic from household sand filters. The levels of barium in well water treated by sand filters, especially a filter composed of sand and charcoal, were significantly lower than those in untreated water. Thus, we demonstrated characteristics of sand filters in North Vietnam.

  13. COMPARISON OF PHENOL REMOVAL IN ANAEROBIC FLUIDIZED BED REACTORS WITH SAND AND GAC MEDIA

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    A.R. Yazdanbakhsh; A.R. Mesdaghinia; A. Torabian; M. Shariat

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study two identical anaerobic completely mixed fluidized bed reactors with GAC and sand media were employed for COD & phenol removal. At loading rate of 1.6 g phenol L-1d-1, the efficiency of phenol removal in GAC & sand reactors were 97.7% & 74%, respectively. At high loading rate of phenol (6.09 g phenol I: 1d1 the efficiency of phenol removal in GAC reactor was better than 95%. In GAC reactor, the main mechanism for phenol removal at steady state condition was biological process; this was concluded through balance of gas production and COD removal. Better efficiency of GAC reactor comparing with sand reactor was because of resistance to fluctuations, higher surface for biomass growth and adsorption capacity of activated carbon.

  14. A mathematical model for removal of human pathogenic viruses and bacteria by slow sand filtration under variable operational conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, J.F.; Berg, H.H.J.L. van den; Colin, M.; Dullemont, Y.; Hijnen, W.A.M.; Magic-Knezev, A.; Oorthuizen, W.A.; Wubbels, G.

    2013-01-01

    Slow sand filtration (SSF) in drinking water production removes pathogenic microorganisms, but detection limits and variable operational conditions complicate assessment of removal efficiency. Therefore, amodel was developed to predict removal ofhuman pathogenic viruses and bacteria as a function of

  15. Removing adsorbed heavy metal ions from sand surfaces via applying interfacial properties of rhamnolipid.

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    Haryanto, Bode; Chang, Chien-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the interfacial properties of biosurfactant rhamnolipid were investigated and were applied to remove adsorbed heavy metal ions from sand surfaces with flushing operations. The surface tension-lowering activity, micelle charge characteristic, and foaming ability of rhamnolipid were identified first. For rhamnolipid in water, the negatively charged characteristic of micelles or aggregates was confirmed and the foaming ability at concentrations higher than 40 mg/L was evaluated. By using the rhamnolipid solutions in a batch washing approach, the potential of applying the interfacial properties of rhamnolipid to remove adsorbed copper ions from sand surfaces was then demonstrated. In rhamnolipid solution flushing operations for sand-packed medium, higher efficiency was found for the removal of adsorbed copper ions with residual type than with inner-sphere interaction type, implying the important role of interaction type between the copper ion and the sand surface in the removal efficiency. In addition, the channeling effect of rhamnolipid solution flow in the sand-packed medium was clearly observed in the solution flushing operations and was responsible for the low removal efficiency with low contact areas between solution and sand. By using rhamnolipid solution with foam to flush the sand-packed medium, one could find that the channeling effect of the solution flow was reduced and became less pronounced with the increase in the rhamnolipid concentration, or with the enhanced foaming ability. With the reduced channeling effect in the flushing operations, the removal efficiency for adsorbed copper ions was significantly improved. The results suggested that the foam-enhanced rhamnolipid solution flushing operation was efficient in terms of surfactant usage and operation time.

  16. Removal of Cadmium, Copper, Lead and Nickel from Aqueous Solution by White, Yellow and Red United Arab Emirates Sand

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    L. Pappalardo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: To remove toxic heavy metal ions from wastewater using local sand as a low cost adsorbent. Approach: Removal efficiency of Cd(II, Cu(II, Pb(II and Ni(II from aqueous solution by white, yellow and red UAE sand was investigated at 25.0°C using the methods of batch equilibrium adsorption and column filtration. In each case, a mixture containing 20 ppm of each ion was employed. In the equilibrium study, the effect of sand dosage was measured for mixtures containing 20 ppm of each ion. In the column filtration study, the mixture was added to a column packed with yellow sand and the composition of the effluent was measured for each 0.050 dm3 portion. Concentrations were measured on an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer “ICP-AES”. Results: Removal efficiency by sand type was found to follow the order yellow>white>red. At low sand dosages, removal efficiencies of Pb(II and Cu(II were much higher than those for Ni(II and Cd(II. For example, at a sand dosage of 0.02 kg dm-3, removal efficiencies of Pb(II, Cu(II, Cd(II and Ni(II were, respectively, 95, 86, 33 and 23% for yellow sand; 89, 86, 30 and 18% for white sand; and 75, 63, 12 and 13% for red sand. Column filtration using yellow sand confirmed that removal efficiency followed the order Pb(II>Cu(II>Cd(II>Ni(II, with all four ions completely removed at mass ratios (metal/sand lower than 3.0×10-4. Conclusion: Equilibration on sand and sand filtration are most efficient for the removal Pb(II and Cu(II. Sand filtration can be effectively utilized to separate Pb(II and Cu(II from a mixture containing all four ions.

  17. Removal of arsenic from aqueous solution by iron-coated sand and manganese-coated sand having different mineral types.

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    Chang, Yoon-Young; Song, Ki-Hoon; Yu, Mok-Ryun; Yang, Jae-Kyu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the coating temperature during the preparation of manganese-coated sand (MCS) and iron-coated sand (ICS) on the removals of As(III) and As(V) were evaluated. The mineral type of manganese oxide on MCS-150, prepared at 150 °C, was identified as a mixture of pyrolusite and ramsdellite, which changed to high crystalline pyrolusite above 300 °C. The mineral type of ICS-150, prepared at 150 °C, was a mixture of goethite and hematite, which changed to high crystalline goethite above 300 °C. The adsorption efficiency was determined according to the mineral type which depended on the coating temperature. The As(III) oxidation efficiency of MCS-150 and As(V) adsorption efficiency of ICS-150 were approximately 77 and 70% higher compared with those of MCS-600 and ICS-600, respectively, prepared at 600 °C. Regardless of the coating temperature, the amounts of manganese and iron coated on the sand substrates were similar.

  18. Total Coliforms and Turbidity Removal of Water in the Continuous Sand Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Mahvi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The continuous filter is a kind of sand filter, which will operate without any interruptions for backwashing and also it accepts high-suspended solid levels in feed stream. Fouled sand is continuously removed from the filter bed, washed and recycled back without interruption with filtration process. Various samples of water with certain amounts of turbidity enter through a feed pipe and being distributed to the filter. A central column runs from top to bottom of the filter. The water is led through an outer tube in the column by a set of radial, distributor arms. The polluted water flows up ward through the sand bed. The water emerges; clean, in the top section of the tank, and eventually spills over a weir, and then inters into a discharge pipe. In this research, the continuous sand filter was studied to determine its disinfection efficiency in addition to turbidity removal. The results showed that the filtered water had a high quality and the turbidity reduction was 95.5 %. Inspecting the work of the filter had revealed that the removal rates of coliforms and microbial colonies were 99.67 % and 98.99 % respectively. On the other hand, by the use of direct filtration, turbidity reduction was over 97 %. In direct filtration, drinking water with less than 1 NTU turbidity was provided. This continuous sand filter has the advantage of stable operation and more energy saving as compared to the conventional ones.

  19. Comparison of sand-based water filters for point-of-use arsenic removal in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kate; Li, Zhenyu; Chen, Bohan; Liang, Honggang; Zhang, Xinyi; Xu, Ruifei; Li, Zhilin; Dai, Huanfang; Wei, Caijie; Liu, Shuming

    2017-02-01

    Contamination of groundwater wells by arsenic is a major problem in China. This study compared arsenic removal efficiency of five sand-based point-of-use filters with the aim of selecting the most effective filter for use in a village in Shanxi province, where the main groundwater source had arsenic concentration >200 μg/L. A biosand filter, two arsenic biosand filters, a SONO-style filter and a version of the biosand filter with nails embedded in the sand were tested. The biosand filter with embedded nails was the most consistent and effective under the study conditions, likely due to increased contact time between water and nails and sustained corrosion. Effluent arsenic was below China's standard of 50 μg/L for more than six months after construction. The removal rate averaged 92% and was never below 86%. In comparison, arsenic removal for the nail-free biosand filter was never higher than 53% and declined with time. The arsenic biosand filter, in which nails sit in a diffuser basin above the sand, performed better but effluent arsenic almost always exceeded the standard. This highlights the positive impact on arsenic removal of embedding nails within the top layer of biosand filter sand and the promise of this low-cost filtration method for rural areas affected by arsenic contamination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Manganese Coated Sand for Copper (II Removal from Water in Batch Mode

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    Nidal Hilal

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Removal of heavy metals, such as copper ions, from water is important to protect human health and the environment. In this study, manganese coated sand (MCS was used as an adsorbent to remove copper ions in a batch system. Equilibrium data were determined at a temperature of 25.6 °C and the Langmuir model was used to describe the experimental data. Mn-coating improved the removal of copper ions by 70% as compared to uncoated sand. Based on a kinetics study, the adsorption of copper ions on MCS was found to occur through a chemisorption process and the pseudo-second-order model was found to fit the kinetics experimental data well. Due to particle interactions, the equilibrium uptake was reduced as the ratio of sand to volume of solution increased. pH affected the removal of copper ions with lowest uptakes found at pH 3 and pHs >7, whilst at pHs in the range of 4 to 7, the uptake was highest and almost constant at the value of 0.0179 mg/g ± 4%. This study has also revealed that copper ions removal was dissolved oxygen (DO dependent with the highest removal occurring at ambient DO concentration, which suggests that DO should be carefully studied when dealing with copper ions adsorption.

  1. Removal of dissolved heavy metals from pre-settled stormwater runoff by iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J.; Ledin, Anna; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2002-01-01

    by IOCS after 480 pore volumes. Control columns with uncoated filter sand show that lead, copper and zinc were removed with >95%, 35% and 5%, respectively. The removal of the negative metaloxy-ion, CrO4-3 was insignificant in both IOCS and sand columns at pH=7.7. Destruction of the columns after...

  2. Fly-ash-amended sand as filter media in bioretention cells to improve phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Brown, Glenn O; Storm, Daniel E; Zhang, Hailin

    2008-06-01

    This study identified material with high phosphorus sorption suitable for bioretention filter media. Materials examined were fly ash, two expanded shales, peat moss, limestone, and two common Oklahoma soils--Teller loam and Dougherty sand. The peat moss was a phosphorus source, while the two soils, limestone, and one expanded shale had only modest sorption capacity. One expanded shale and the fly ash had significant phosphorus sorption. Fly ash is unsuitable for use in a pure form, as a result of its low permeability, but phosphorus sorption on the sand was increased significantly with the incorporation of small amounts of fly ash. Column leaching experiments found that the sand with 2.5 and 5% fly ash and the better expanded shale had linear, non-equilibrium transport retardation factors of 272, 1618, and 185, with first-order rate coefficients of 0.153, 0.0752, and 0.113 hour(-1), respectively. Desorption experiments showed that the phosphorus sorption on the sand/fly ash mixture is largely nonreversible. Transport simulation assuming a 1-m-deep sand/fly ash treatment layer, with 5% of the watershed area, showed that the sand/fly ash filter media could effectively treat 1 mg/L influent for 12 years in a paved watershed and 34 years in a grassed watershed before exceeding Oklahoma's scenic rivers' phosphorus criterion of 0.037 mg/L. Significant phosphorus removal would continue for over 100 years.

  3. Metal removal from oil sands tailings pond water by indigenous micro-alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Hamed; Ulrich, Ania C; Liu, Yang

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the removal of ten target metals of environmental concern ((53)Cr, Mn, Co, (60)Ni, (65)Cu, (66)Zn, As, (88)Sr, (95)Mo, and Ba) from oil sands tailings pond water. The organism responsible for removal was found to be an indigenous green micro-alga identified as Parachlorella kessleri by sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene. P. kessleri grew in tailings pond water samples taken from two oil sands operators (Syncrude Canada Ltd. and Albian Sands Energy Inc.), and enriched with low (0.24 mM NO(3)(-) and 0.016 mM PO(4)(-3)) and high (1.98 mM NO(3)(-) and 0.20mM PO(4)(-3)) concentrations of nutrient supplements (the most realistic scenario). The removal of (60)Ni, (65)Cu, As, (88)Sr, (95)Mo, and Ba from Syncrude tailings pond water was significantly enhanced by high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus, whereas the high nutrient concentrations adversely affected the removal of Co, (60)Ni, As, (88)Sr, and Mo in samples of Albian tailings pond water. Based on ANOVA two-factor analysis, higher nutrient concentration does not always result in higher metal removal, and TPW source must also be considered. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A new sand adsorbent for the removal and reuse of nickel ions from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wenhong; Qi, Ling; Duan, Huimin; Liu, Shiquan

    2017-04-01

    Nickel ions (Ni(II)) in aqueous solutions were removed by a sand adsorbent with a surface functionalized porous coating. The sand adsorbent has a very large surface area of 150 m(2)/g. The influence of pH, initial concentration of the solution, temperature, contact time and adsorbent dosage on the removal efficiency of the synthesized sand adsorbent toward Ni(II) in the aqueous solutions were studied. The results indicate that the adsorption of nickel onto the sand adsorbent greatly increases the pH range of 2-4 and slightly increases with temperature from 25 to 40 °C. The maximum removal efficiency and ion retention in per unit mass of the adsorbent were 100% and 5.78 mg/g, respectively, under the specified experimental conditions. The adsorption can be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorbed nickel (4.24 mg/g) together with the spent adsorbent were successfully employed to prepare a brown glass, suggesting a new way to reutilize the recovered nickel from wastewater and to avoid secondary pollution caused by the used adsorbents.

  5. Application of ultrasound and quartz sand for the removal of disinfection byproducts from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wu; Dong, Lili; Luo, Zhen; Cui, Xiaochun; Liu, Jiancong; Liu, Zhongmou; Huo, Mingxin

    2014-04-01

    To the best of our knowledge, little information is available on the combined use of ultrasound (US) and quartz sand (QS) in the removal of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) from drinking water. This study investigates the removal efficiency for 12 DBPs from drinking water by 20 kHz sonolytic treatment, QS adsorption, and their combination. Results indicate that DBPs with logKow≤1.12 could not be sonolysized; for logKow≥1.97, more than 20% removal efficiency was observed, but the removal efficiency was unrelated to logKow. DBPs containing a nitro group are more sensitive to US than those that comprise nitrile, hydrogen, and hydroxyl groups. Among the 12 investigated DBPs, 9 could be adsorbed by QS adsorption. The adsorption efficiency ranged from 12% for 1,1-dichloro-2-propanone to 80% for trichloroacetonitrile. A synergistic effect was found between the US and QS on DBPs removal, and all the 12 DBPs could be effectively removed by the combined use of US and QS. In the presence of US, part of the QS particles were corroded into small particles which play a role in increasing the number of cavitation bubbles and reducing cavitation bubble size and then improve the removal efficiency of DBPs. On the other hand, the presence of US enhances the DBP mass transfer rate to cavitation bubbles and quartz sand. In addition, sonolytic treatment led to a slight decrease of pH, and TOC values decreased under all the three treatment processes.

  6. Removal of Cryptosporidium and polystyrene microspheres from swimming pool water with sand, cartridge, and precoat filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amburgey, James E; Walsh, Kimberly J; Fielding, Roy R; Arrowood, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Cryptosporidium has caused the majority of waterborne disease outbreaks in treated recreational water venues in the USA for many years running. This research project evaluated some common US swimming pool filters for removing Cryptosporidium oocysts, 5-µm diameter polystyrene microspheres, and 1-µm diameter polystyrene microspheres. A 946 L hot tub with interchangeable sand, cartridge, and precoat filters was used at room temperature for this research. Simulated pool water for each experiment was created from Charlotte, NC (USA) tap water supplemented with alkalinity, hardness, chlorine, and a mixture of artificial sweat and urine. Precoat (i.e., diatomaceous earth and perlite) filters demonstrated pathogen removal efficiencies of 2.3 to 4.4 log (or 99.4-99.996%). However, sand and cartridge filters had average Cryptosporidium removals of 0.19 log (36%) or less. The combined low filter removal efficiencies of sand and cartridge filters along with the chlorine-resistant properties of Cryptosporidium oocysts could indicate a regulatory gap warranting further attention and having significant implications on the protection of public health in recreational water facilities. The 5-µm microspheres were a good surrogate for Cryptosporidium oocysts in this study and hold promise for use in future research projects, field trials, and/or product testing on swimming pool filters.

  7. [Steam and air co-injection in removing TCE in 2D-sand box].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Peng, Sheng; Chen, Jia-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Steam and air co-injection is a newly developed and promising soil remediation technique for non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in vadose zone. In this study, in order to investigate the mechanism of the remediation process, trichloroethylene (TCE) removal using steam and air co-injection was carried out in a 2-dimensional sandbox with different layered sand structures. The results showed that co-injection perfectly improved the "tailing" effect compared to soil vapor extraction (SVE), and the remediation process of steam and air co-injection could be divided into SVE stage, steam strengthening stage and heat penetration stage. Removal ratio of the experiment with scattered contaminant area was higher and removal speed was faster. The removal ratios from the two experiments were 93.5% and 88.2%, and the removal periods were 83.9 min and 90.6 min, respectively. Steam strengthened the heat penetration stage. The temperature transition region was wider in the scattered NAPLs distribution experiment, which reduced the accumulation of TCE. Slight downward movement of TCE was observed in the experiment with TCE initially distributed in a fine sand zone. And such downward movement of TCE reduced the TCE removal ratio.

  8. Modeling the Performance of Sand Filters for Removing Runoff Suspended Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for US Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000 ERDC/EL CR-13-3 ii Abstract Geotextile tubes...sediments in urban stormwater runoff, and thus should be effective in removing metals in runoff from SAFRs. Porous geotextile fabric is used to hold...public release; unlimited distribution. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Geotextile tubes filled with sand are being evaluated for filter

  9. Biological removal of iron and manganese in rapid sand filters - Process understanding of iron and manganese removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Katie

    -filter, where iron is removed. Step 2: Filtration in an after-filter where e.g. ammonium and manganese is removed. The treatment relies on microbial processes and may present an alternative, greener and more sustainable approach for drinking water production spending less chemicals and energy than chemical (e.......g. flocculation) and physical (e.g. membrane filtration) based technologies. The removal of dissolved manganese and iron is important. If manganese and iron enter the distribution system, the water will become coloured and have a metallic taste, and it may cause problems in the distribution network due......, it is essential to ensure that the required microorganisms are present and that both the physical and the nutritional requirements of those organisms are fulfilled. However, the knowledge on the microbiology and processes in rapid sand filters is limited, especially on which parameters that affect the biological...

  10. Microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment – Potential and kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    or metabolites mecoprop (MCPP), bentazone, glyphosate and p-nitrophenol were applied in initial concentrations of 0.03–2.4 μg/L. In all the investigated waterworks the concentration of pesticides in the water decreased – MCPP decreased to 42–85%, bentazone to 15–35%, glyphosate to 7–14% and p-nitrophenol 1......–3% – from the initial concentration over a period of 6–13 days. Mineralisation of three out of four investigated pesticides was observed at Sjælsø waterworks Plant II – up to 43% of the initial glyphosate was mineralised within six days. At Sjælsø waterworks Plant II the removal kinetics of bentazone......Filter sand samples, taken from aerobic rapid sand filters used for treating groundwater at three Danish waterworks, were investigated for their pesticide removal potential and to assess the kinetics of the removal process. Microcosms were set up with filter sand, treated water, and the pesticides...

  11. Removal of arsenic from contaminated groundwater with application of iron electrodissolution, aeration and sand filtration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Arturi, Kasia; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2014-01-01

    The results from a new water treatment system for arsenic removal are presented. The technology is based on the employment of an electrolytic iron dissolution and efficient aeration procedure prior to sand filtration. The treatment was introduced and investigated in a pilot scale plant and full...... scale waterworks. The pilot scale results showed a possibility for an efficient arsenic removal from spiked solutions (with As in the range of 50–85 μg/L) depending on the process conditions (flow and applied current). In the waterworks where the system was implemented for a period of 14 months...

  12. Effect of filtration rate on coal-sand dual-media filter performances for microalgae removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiri, Nour-Eddine; Monnier, Elodie; Raimbault, Virginie; Massé, Anthony; Séchet, Véronique; Jaouen, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    This study tested the efficiency of granular filtration using a bilayer sand filter for microalgae removal from culture dilutions ranging from 10,000 to 17,000 cells/mL. The objective is to evaluate the removal capacity of the filter without chemical coagulation. Two filter media, sand and anthracite, with mean grain sizes of 0.395 and 1.2 mm, respectively, were used in constant-flow-rate experiments (down-flow mode) with suspensions containing Heterocapsa triquetra microalga. The conventional rapid filtration which usually operates at a constant rate of approximately 5 m(3)/m(2) h is compared to high-rate filtration. Two filtration velocities (5 and 10 m/h) were investigated with bed depth of 1100 mm. Average microalgal cell removal rates were 90% at 5 m/h and 68% at 10 m/h. Turbidity removal was more than 71% at 5 m/h but just 57% at 10 m/h. Head losses did not increase significantly, and values measured at process end were 32 mbar at 5 m/h and 78 mbar at 10 m/h. Retention probabilities were calculated from experimental data. A theoretical model was used to evaluate the contributions of the different drivers of microalgae removal. Hypotheses are developed on the understanding of change in the mechanisms of retention as a function of filtration velocity.

  13. Mecoprop (MCPP) removal in full-scale rapid sand filters at a groundwater-based waterworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Arvin, Erik; Corfitzen, Charlotte B.;

    2014-01-01

    Contamination by the herbicide mecoprop (MCPP) was detected in groundwater abstraction wells at Kerteminde Waterworks in concentrations up to 0.08μg/L. MCPP was removed to below detection limit in a simple treatment line where anaerobic groundwater was aerated and subsequently filtered by primary...... filters, MCPP concentration decreased from 0.037μg/L to below the detection limit of 0.01μg/L. MCPP was removed continuously at different filter depths (0.80m).Additionally, biodegradation, mineralisation and adsorption were investigated in the laboratory in order to elucidate removal mechanisms.......It was concluded that MCPP was removed in secondary rapid sand filters at Kerteminde Waterworks, to which both adsorption and microbial degradation contributed....

  14. Comparison of a sand and membrane filtration unit for drinking water production –focus on the arsenic removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowalski, Krysztof; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic removal from groundwater by help of micro- (pore size of 1 µm) and ultrafiltration (pore size of 0,04 µm) was evaluated and compared with sand filtration. The dead-end filtration enabled to compare MF/UF with conventional sand filter. The results indicate that none of membrane processes w...

  15. Unloading Characteristics of Sand-drift in Wind-shallow Areas along Railway and the Effect of Sand Removal by Force of Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Xin, Guo-Wei; Zhi, Ling-yan; Jiang, Fu-qiang

    2017-01-01

    Wind-shield walls decrease the velocity of wind-drift sand flow in transit. This results in sand accumulating in the wind-shadow zone of both windshield wall and track line, causing severe sand sediment hazard. This study reveals the characteristics of sand accumulation and the laws of wind-blown sand removal in the wind-shadow areas of three different types of windshield walls, utilizing three-dimensional numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments and on-site sand sediment tests. The results revealed the formation of apparent vortex and acceleration zones on the leeward side of solid windshield walls. For uniform openings, the vortex area moved back and narrowed. When bottom-opening windshield walls were adopted, the track-supporting layer at the step became a conflux acceleration zone, forming a low velocity vortex zone near the track line. At high wind speeds, windshield walls with bottom-openings achieved improved sand dredging. Considering hydrodynamic mechanisms, the flow field structure on the leeward side of different types of windshield structures is a result of convergence and diffusion of fluids caused by an obstacle. This convergence and diffusion effect of air fluid is more apparent at high wind velocities, but not obvious at low wind velocities. PMID:28120915

  16. Unloading Characteristics of Sand-drift in Wind-shallow Areas along Railway and the Effect of Sand Removal by Force of Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-Jun; Xin, Guo-Wei; Zhi, Ling-Yan; Jiang, Fu-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Wind-shield walls decrease the velocity of wind-drift sand flow in transit. This results in sand accumulating in the wind-shadow zone of both windshield wall and track line, causing severe sand sediment hazard. This study reveals the characteristics of sand accumulation and the laws of wind-blown sand removal in the wind-shadow areas of three different types of windshield walls, utilizing three-dimensional numerical simulations and wind tunnel experiments and on-site sand sediment tests. The results revealed the formation of apparent vortex and acceleration zones on the leeward side of solid windshield walls. For uniform openings, the vortex area moved back and narrowed. When bottom-opening windshield walls were adopted, the track-supporting layer at the step became a conflux acceleration zone, forming a low velocity vortex zone near the track line. At high wind speeds, windshield walls with bottom-openings achieved improved sand dredging. Considering hydrodynamic mechanisms, the flow field structure on the leeward side of different types of windshield structures is a result of convergence and diffusion of fluids caused by an obstacle. This convergence and diffusion effect of air fluid is more apparent at high wind velocities, but not obvious at low wind velocities.

  17. Nitrogen removal in a combined system: vertical vegetated bed over horizontal flow sand bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawanichkul, S; Neamkam, P; Shutes, R B

    2001-01-01

    Pig farm wastewater creates various problems in many areas throughout Thailand. Constructed wetland systems are an appropriate, low cost treatment option for tropical countries such as Thailand. In this study, a combined system (a vertical flow bed planted with Cyperus flabelliformis over a horizontal flow sand bed without plants) was used to treat settled pig farm wastewater. This system is suitable for using in farms where land is limited. The average COD and nitrogen loading rate of the vegetated vertical flow bed were 105 g/m2 x d and 11 g/m2 x d respectively. The wastewater was fed intermittently at intervals of 4 hours with a hydraulic loading rate of 3.7 cm/d. The recirculation of the effluent increased total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency from 71% to 85%. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) removal efficiencies were 95% and 98%. Nitrification was significant in vertical flow Cyperus bed, and the concentration of nitrate increased by a factor of 140. The horizontal flow sand bed enhanced COD removal and nitrate reduction was 60%. Plant uptake of nitrogen was 1.1 g N/m2 x d or dry biomass production was 2.8 kg/m2 over 100 days.

  18. Comparison of quartz sand, anthracite, shale and biological ceramsite for adsorptive removal of phosphorus from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng; Jia, Liyue; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang; Kirumba, George

    2014-02-01

    The choice of substrates with high phosphorus adsorption capacity is vital for sustainable phosphorus removal from waste water in constructed wetlands. In this study, four substrates were used: quartz sand, anthracite, shale and biological ceramsite. These substrate samples were characterized by Xray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy studies for their mineral components (chemical components) and surface characteristics. The dynamic experimental results revealed the following ranking order for total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency: anthracite > biological ceramsite > shale > quartz sand. The adsorptive removal capacities for TP using anthracite, biological ceramsite, shale and quartz sand were 85.87, 81.44, 59.65, and 55.98 mg/kg, respectively. Phosphorus desorption was also studied to analyze the substrates' adsorption efficiency in wastewater treatment as well as the substrates' ability to be reused for treatment. It was noted that the removal performance for the different forms of phosphorus was dependent on the nature of the substrate and the adsorption mechanism. A comparative analysis showed that the removal of particulate phosphorus was much easier using shale. Whereas anthracite had the highest soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) adsorptive capacity, biological ceramsite had the highest dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) removal capacity. Phosphorus removal by shale and biological ceramsite was mainly through chemical adsorption, precipitation or biological adsorption. On the other hand, phosphorus removal through physical adsorption (electrostatic attraction or ion exchange) was dominant in anthracite and quartz sand.

  19. Iron coated sand/glauconite filters for phosphorus removal from artificially drained agricultural fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermoere, Stany; De Neve, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    Flanders (Belgium) is confronted with reactive phosphorus concentrations in streams and lakes which are three to four times higher than the 0.1 ppm P limit set by the Water Framework Directive. Much of the excessive P input in surface waters is derived from agriculture. Direct P input from artificially drained fields (short-circuiting the buffering capacity of the subsoil) is suspected to be one of the major sources. We aim to develop simple and cheap filters that can be directly installed in the field to reduce P concentration from the drain water. Here we report on the performance of such filters tested at lab scale. As starting materials for the P filter, iron coated sand and acid pre-treated glauconite were used. These materials, both rich in Fe, were mixed in ratios of 75/25, 65/35, 50/50 and 0/100 (iron coated sand/glauconite ratio based on weight basis) and filled in plastic tubes. A screening experiment using the constant head method with a 0.01 M CaCl2 solution containing 1 ppm P showed that all four types of mixtures reduced the P concentration in the outflowing water to almost zero, and that the 75/25, 65/35 and 0/100 mixtures had a sufficiently large hydraulic conductivity of 0.9 to 6.0 cm/min, while the hydraulic conductivity of the 50/50 mixture was too low (CaCl2 solution containing 1 ppm P was passed through the filters over several days, in amounts equivalent to half of the yearly water volume passing through the drains. This experiment firstly showed that in all cases the hydraulic conductivity fluctuated strongly: it decreased from 4.0-6.0 cm/min to 2.0-1.5 cm/min for the 75/25 filter, and to values < 0.4 cm/min for the 65/35 filter, whereas it increased from 0.8 to 1.4 cm/min for the 0/100 filter. Secondly, we observed a decrease in the P removal efficiency with time on each day for all filters: from 90% removal to 80% removal for the 75/25 and 65/35 filters, while for the 0/100 filter the P removal almost reduced to 0%. Based on these results

  20. Performance of a sand filter in removal of micro-algae from seawater in aquaculture production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiri, N E; Castaing, J B; Massé, A; Jaouen, P

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a sand filter was used to remove micro-algae from seawater feeding aquaculture ponds. A lab-scale sand filter was used to filter 30,000 cells/mL of Heterocapsa triquetra suspension, a non-toxic micro-alga that has morphological and dimensional (15-20 microm) similarities with Alexandrium sp., one of the smallest toxic micro-algae in seawater. Removal efficiency and capture mechanisms for a fixed superficial velocity (3.5 m/h) were evaluated in relation to size distribution and mean diameter of the sand. Various sands (average diameter ranging between 200 microm and 600 microm) were characterized and used as porous media. The structural parameters of the fixed beds were evaluated for each medium using experimental measurements of pressure drop as a function of superficial velocity over a range of Reynolds numbers covering Darcy's regime and the inertial regime. For a filtration cycle of six hours, the best efficiency (E = 90%) was obtained with the following sand characteristics: sieved sand with a range of grain diameter of 100 and 300 microm and a mean grain diameter equal to 256 microm. Results obtained show the influence of the size distribution of sand on the quality of retention of the micro-algae studied.

  1. Comparison on characteristic of Mesoparticle Graphene Sand Composite (MGSC) using different types of sugar to remove methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zularisam, A. W.; Wahida, Norul; Alfian, Ahmad

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the green method to synthesis two types of adsorbent called mesoparticle graphene sand composite (MGSC) by using table sugar (MGSCts) and arenga palm sugar (MGSCaps) as different carbon sources to remove methylene blue acted as a dye model. Immobilisations of these materials on sand were introduced by using pyrolysis method without binder usage. Sand was treated by removing deleterious materials before sieved. The solutions of sugar were prepared and heated to 95 °C. The sand and sugar solutions were mixed and constantly stirred before putting them in furnace with nitrogen environment to produce MGSCts and MGSCaps. The composites were activated by using concentrated sulphuric acid to open the pores and maximise the capacity of absorbency. The analyses on the characteristic of both MGSCts and MGSCaps were conducted through field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), elemental dispersive x-ray (EDX) and elemental mapping (EM). FESEM analyses exhibited that the coating process was done uniformly as there were layers of coating sheets formation on the sand particles surfaces. After conducting EDX and EM, there were major elements found in both MGSCts and MGSCaps which were carbon, oxygen and silica. EM exhibited the distribution of these elements were scattered on the MGSC’s surfaces. Removal of methylene blue was successfully carried out by using both MGSCts and MGSCaps, with maximum removal up to 40% at the first hour of contact time.

  2. Microbial community composition of a household sand filter used for arsenic, iron, and manganese removal from groundwater in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Katja Sonja; Weigold, Pascal; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    Household sand filters are used in rural areas of Vietnam to remove As, Fe, and Mn from groundwater for drinking water purposes. Currently, it is unknown what role microbial processes play in mineral oxide formation and As removal during water filtration. We performed most probable number counts to quantify the abundance of physiological groups of microorganisms capable of catalyzing Fe- and Mn-redox transformation processes in a household sand filter. We found up to 10(4) cells g(-1) dry sand of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, and no microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, but up to 10(6) cells g(-1) dry sand Mn-oxidizing bacteria. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing confirmed MPN counts insofar as only low abundances of known taxa capable of performing Fe- and Mn-redox transformations were detected. Instead the microbial community on the sand filter was dominated by nitrifying microorganisms, e.g. Nitrospira, Nitrosomonadales, and an archaeal OTU affiliated to Candidatus Nitrososphaera. Quantitative PCR for Nitrospira and ammonia monooxygenase genes agreed with DNA sequencing results underlining the numerical importance of nitrifiers in the sand filter. Based on our analysis of the microbial community composition and previous studies on the solid phase chemistry of sand filters we conclude that abiotic Fe(II) oxidation processes prevail over biotic Fe(II) oxidation on the filter. Yet, Mn-oxidizing bacteria play an important role for Mn(II) oxidation and Mn(III/IV) oxide precipitation in a distinct layer of the sand filter. The formation of Mn(III/IV) oxides contributes to abiotic As(III) oxidation and immobilization of As(V) by sorption to Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides.

  3. Modeling the Performance of Biological Rapid Sand Filters Used to Remove Ammonium, Iron, and Manganese From Drinking Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.;

    filter management to performance . Biological rapid sand filters are used for the dual purpose of particle removal (including microorganisms) and contaminant removal through biological activity on the filter media. For drinking water treatment in the United States, biological filters use granular......Although biological rapid sand filters are a well established technology for treating drinking water, there is still a lack of scientific understanding of the processes controlling their performance. For example, the distribution and role of microorganisms in contaminant removal in the filter has...... for chlorine addition following treatment. Under the normal conditions found in many water treatment plants, reduced iron can be oxidized through aeration and the precipitates can be captured by the filter media. Ammonium and manganese can be removed biologically. This research uses both pilot and full scale...

  4. Adsorptive removal of nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) antiscalant from membrane concentrates by iron-coated waste filtration sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boels, L; Tervahauta, T; Witkamp, G J

    2010-10-15

    Iron-coated waste filtration sand was investigated as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from membrane concentrates. The adsorption of this phosphonate-based antiscalant on this material was measured and compared with two commercially available anion exchange resins and activated carbon. Comprehensive adsorption experiments were conducted in several synthetic concentrate solutions and in a concentrate collected from a full scale nano-filtration brackish water desalination plant. The effect of pH, ionic strength and the presence of competitive anions on the equilibrium adsorption were investigated. The results showed that, in contrast to the anion exchange resins, the adsorption on coated filtration sand is not suppressed at increasing ionic strength and is much less affected by the competitive anions carbonate and sulphate. The adsorption decreased slightly when the pH was raised from 7.0 to 8.0. The adsorption isotherms in the real nano-filtration concentrate, measured in the concentration interval of 5-50 mg dm(-1) NTMP, showed that the maximum adsorption capacity of coated filtration sand was 4.06 mg g(-1). The adsorption capacity per unit mass of the adsorbents at low NTMP concentration (12.5 mg dm(-3)) followed the decreasing order Amberlite IRA-410>coated filtration sand>Amberlite IRA-900>Norit SAE Super. This demonstrates that the use of iron-coated waste filtration sand offers a promising means for the removal of NTMP from membrane concentrates.

  5. Kinetic and isotherm studies for nickel (II) removal using novel mesoparticle graphene sand composite synthesised from sand and arenga palm sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zularisam, A. W.; Wahida, Norul

    2017-07-01

    Nickel (II) is one of the most toxic contaminants recognised as a carcinogenic and mutagenic agent which needs complete removal from wastewater before disposal. In the present study, a novel adsorbent called mesoparticle graphene sand composite (MGSCaps) was synthesised from arenga palm sugar and sand by using a green, simple, low cost and efficient methodology. Subsequently, this composite was characterised and identified using field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and elemental mapping (EM). The adsorption process was investigated and optimised under the experimental parameters such as pH, contact time and bed depth. The results showed that the interaction between nickel (II) and MGSCaps was not ion to ion interaction hence removal of Ni (II) can be applied at any pH. The results were also exhibited the higher contact time and bed depth, the higher removal percentage of nickel (II) occurred. Adsorption kinetic data were modelled using Pseudo-first-order and Pseudo-second-order equation models. The experimental results indicated pseudo-second-order kinetic equation was most suitable to describe the experimental adsorption kinetics data with maximum capacity of 40% nickel (II) removal for the first hour. The equilibrium adsorption data was fitted with Langmuir, and Freundlich isotherms equations. The data suggested that the most fitted equation model is the Freundlich with correlation R2=0.9974. Based on the obtained results, it can be stated that the adsorption method using MGSCaps is an efficient, facile and reliable method for the removal of nickel (II) from waste water.

  6. Arsenic removal from drinking water by a household sand filter in Vietnam--effect of filter usage practices on arsenic removal efficiency and microbiological water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Katja Sonja; Lan, Vi Mai; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Berg, Michael; Voegelin, Andreas; Planer-Friedrich, Britta; Zahoransky, Jan; Müller, Stefanie-Katharina; Byrne, James Martin; Schröder, Christian; Behrens, Sebastian; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Household sand filters are applied to treat arsenic- and iron-containing anoxic groundwater that is used as drinking water in rural areas of North Vietnam. These filters immobilize poisonous arsenic (As) via co-oxidation with Fe(II) and sorption to or co-precipitation with the formed Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxides. However, information is lacking regarding the effect of the frequency and duration of filter use as well as of filter sand replacement on the residual As concentrations in the filtered water and on the presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria in the filtered and stored water. We therefore scrutinized a household sand filter with respect to As removal efficiency and the presence of fecal indicator bacteria in treated water as a function of filter operation before and after sand replacement. Quantification of As in the filtered water showed that periods of intense daily use followed by periods of non-use and even sand replacement did not significantly (pwater (95% removal). The first flush of water from the filter contained As concentrations below the drinking water limit and suggests that this water can be used without risk for human health. Colony forming units (CFUs) of coliform bacteria increased during filtration and storage from 5 ± 4 per 100mL in the groundwater to 5.1 ± 1.5 × 10(3) and 15 ± 1.4 × 10(3) per 100mL in the filtered water and in the water from the storage tank, respectively. After filter sand replacement, CFUs of Escherichia coli of samples contained CFUs of Enterococcus spp. No critical enrichment of fecal indicator bacteria belonging to E. coli or Enterococcus spp. was observed in the treated drinking water by qPCR targeting the 23S rRNA gene. The results demonstrate the efficient and reliable performance of household sand filters regarding As removal, but indicate a potential risk for human health arising from the enrichment of coliform bacteria during filtration and from E. coli cells that are introduced by sand replacement.

  7. Bacterial, viral and turbidity removal by intermittent slow sand filtration for household use in developing countries: experimental investigation and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Marion W; Tiwari, Sangam K; Darby, Jeannie

    2011-11-15

    A two-factor three-block experimental design was developed to permit rigorous evaluation and modeling of the main effects and interactions of sand size (d(10) of 0.17 and 0.52 mm) and hydraulic head (10, 20, and 30 cm) on removal of fecal coliform (FC) bacteria, MS2 bacteriophage virus, and turbidity, under two batch operating modes ('long' and 'short') in intermittent slow sand filters (ISSFs). Long operation involved an overnight pause time between feeding of two successive 20 L batches (16 h average batch residence time (RT)). Short operation involved no pause between two 20 L batch feeds (5h average batch RT). Conditions tested were representative of those encountered in developing country field settings. Over a ten week period, the 18 experimental filters were fed river water augmented with wastewater (influent turbidity of 5.4-58.6 NTU) and maintained with the wet harrowing method. Linear mixed modeling allowed systematic estimates of the independent marginal effects of each independent variable on each performance outcome of interest while controlling for the effects of variations in a batch's actual residence time, days since maintenance, and influent turbidity. This is the first study in which simultaneous measurement of bacteria, viruses and turbidity removal at the batch level over an extended duration has been undertaken with a large number of replicate units to permit rigorous modeling of ISSF performance variability within and across a range of likely filter design configurations and operating conditions. On average, the experimental filters removed 1.40 log fecal coliform CFU (SD 0.40 log, N=249), 0.54 log MS2 PFU (SD 0.42 log, N=245) and 89.0 percent turbidity (SD 6.9 percent, N=263). Effluent turbidity averaged 1.24 NTU (SD 0.53 NTU, N=263) and always remained below 3 NTU. Under the best performing design configuration and operating mode (fine sand, 10 cm head, long operation, initial HLR of 0.01-0.03 m/h), mean 1.82 log removal of bacteria (98

  8. Removal of nitrate, ammonia and phosphate from aqueous solutions in packed bed filter using biochar augmented sand media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hanandeh Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients from wastewater are a major source of pollution because they can cause significant impact on the ecosystem. Accordingly, it is important that the nutrient concentrations are kept to admissible levels to the receiving environment. Often regulatory limits are set on the maximum allowable concentrations in the effluent. Therefore, wastewater must be treated to meet safe levels of discharge. In this study, laboratory investigation of the efficiency of packed bed filters to remove nitrate, ammonium and phosphate from aqueous solutions were conducted. Sand and sand augmented with hydrochloric acid treated biochar (SBC were used as packing media. Synthetic wastewater solution was prepared with PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ concentrations 20, 10, 50 mg/L, respectively. Each experiment ran for a period of five days; samples from the effluent were collected on alternate days. All experiments were duplicated. Over the experiment period, the average removal efficiency of PO43−, NO3−, NH4+ were 99.2%, 72.9%, 96.7% in the sand packed columns and 99.2%, 82.3%, 97.4% in the SBC packed columns, respectively. Although, the presence of biochar in the packing media had little effect on phosphate and ammonium removal, it significantly improved nitrate removal.

  9. Assessment of water removal from oil sands tailings by evaporation and under-drainage, and the impact on tailings consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fernando F.; Sanin, Maria Victoria [Golder Associates Ltd (Canada); Sedgwick, Andrea [Total EandP Canada (Canada); Blum, Jim [JG Blum Consulting Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Tailings, left-over material produced during the extraction process that separates bitumen from oil sand, are challenging the oil sands industry. These tailings require large surface areas and contain mature fine tailings, made up of fine clay particles suspended in water, which do not settle within a reasonable timeframe. Consequently, maximizing water removal from oil sands tailings is required to accelerate tailings consolidation. The study described in this paper was developed to measure the water loss from oil sands tailings associated with evaporation and under-drainage, using laboratory drying column tests, and to evaluate the impact of water loss on the process of tailings consolidation and the gain in shear strength for different lift thicknesses. Water removal from the tailings through evaporation occurred at a nearly constant rate, while the rate of under-drainage progressively reduced with time. Additionally, it was found that thinner lifts would have better performance in terms of tailings consolidation and gain in shear strength than thick lifts.

  10. Biomass Composition and Mineral Removal of Sugarcane and Energy Cane on a Sand Soil in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Approximately 20% of Sugarcane is grown on sand soils in south Florida, but yields and profits are lower compared to sugarcane grown on organic soils in the region. Energy cane may be an alternative crop on sand soils in the future to improve profits because of the growing interest of increased biom...

  11. An approach for phosphate removal with quartz sand, ceramsite, blast furnace slag and steel slag as seed crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liping; Wang, Guangwei; Zhang, Shoubin; Yang, Zhongxi; Li, Yanbo

    2012-01-01

    The phosphate removal abilities and crystallization performance of quartz sand, ceramsite, blast furnace slag and steel slag were investigated. The residual phosphate concentrations in the reaction solutions were not changed by addition of the ceramsite, quartz sand and blast furnace slag. The steel slag could provide alkalinity and Ca(2+) to the reaction solution due to its hydration activity, and performed a better phosphate removal performance than the other three. Under the conditions of Ca/P 2.0, pH 8.5 and 10 mg P/L, the phosphate crystallization occurred during 12 h. The quartz sand and ceramsite did not improve the phosphate crystallization, but steel slag was an effective seed crystal. The phosphate concentration decreased drastically after 12 h after addition of steel slag, and near complete removal was achieved after 48 h. The XRD analysis showed that the main crystallization products were hydroxyapatite (HAP) and the crystallinity increased with the reaction time. Phosphate was successfully recovered from low phosphate concentration wastewater using steel slag as seed material.

  12. Breathing zone particle size and lead concentration from sanding operations to remove lead based paints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W K; Carpenter, R L; Kimmel, E C

    1999-02-01

    The relationship between lead concentration in the dry film of lead based paints applied to steel bulkheads aboard ship, the lead concentration found in the air when the paint is removed by mechanical means, and blood lead concentrations of workers involved in lead based paint removal has not been well characterized. Intuitively a direct relationship must exist but confounding factors confuse the issue. Simultaneous sampling procedures from the same paint removal operation may differ by several orders of magnitude. The process from dried film to aerosol (airborne dust) exposure, and on to dose can be separated into two major phases; (1) generation of the dust and its transport through the air to the worker and (2) uptake and dose related factors within the body. Both phases involve complex interactions and there are a number of factors within each phase that significantly affect the potential lead dose for the worker. This study attempts to clarify the mechanisms involved in the generation and transportation of the dust to the worker by evaluating the relationship of a number of key factors on particle size and lead distribution within the aerosol dust generated when lead based paint is removed by sanding. The study examined the relationship between particle size in the dust and grit size of the abrasive. It also examined the distribution of lead within selected particle sizes. The Mass Median Aerodynamic Diameter (MMAD) was used as an indicator of change in the particle size distribution. Particle size distributions were evaluated using a TSI Aerodynamic Particle Sizer, a five stage cyclone and scanning electron microscopy. Lead distribution was determined using the five stage cyclone, and personal or area samples analyzed using inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Mass concentrations were evaluated using a MIE Mass Concentration Analyzer and gravimetric analysis of filter samples collected in the breathing zone. Student's t-tests were used to evaluate changes in

  13. Bacteriophages and Clostridium spores as indicator organisms for removal of pathogens by passage through saturated dune sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijven, J F; de Bruin, H A M; Hassanizadeh, S M; de Roda Husman, A M

    2003-05-01

    In a field study on the efficiency of dune recharge for drinking water production, bacteriophage MS2 was shown to be removed 8 log(10) by passage through the dune sand. The question of whether pathogenic viruses would be removed as much as MS2 was studied by comparing complete breakthrough curves of MS2 with those of the human viruses Coxsackievirus B4 (CB4) and Poliovirus 1 (PV1) in laboratory columns. The columns were designed to closely simulate the field conditions: same sand, water, porewater velocity and temperature. Employing a two-site kinetic model to simulate breakthrough curves, attachment/detachment to two types of kinetic sites as well as inactivation of free and attached viruses were evaluated. It was found that attachment to only one of the sites is of significance for determining overall removal. At field scale, removal of the less negatively charged PV1 was extrapolated to be about 30 times greater than that of MS2, but removal of CB4 would be only as much as that of MS2. Also, removal of spores of Clostridium perfringens D10, a potential surrogate for Cryptosporidium oocysts, was studied. The attachment rate coefficient of the spores was 7.5 times greater than that of MS2. However, this does not imply that the removal of the spores is 7.5 times greater than that of MS2. Due to negligible inactivation in combination with detachment of previously attached spores, the actual removal rate of the spores depends on the duration of contamination and eventually all spores will break through. Provided no irreversible attachment or physical straining occurs, this may also be the case for other persistent microorganisms, like oocysts of Cryptosporidium.

  14. Modified biopolymers as sorbents for the removal of naphthenic acids from oil sands process affected water (OSPW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Muhammad; Khosa, M A; Siddique, Tariq; Ullah, Aman

    2016-11-01

    Oil sands operations consume large volumes of water in bitumen extraction process and produce tailings that express pore water to the surface of tailings ponds known as oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). The OSPW is toxic and cannot be released into the environment without treatment. In addition to metals, dissolved solids, dissolved gases, hydrocarbons and polyaromatic compounds etc., OSPW also contains a complex mixture of dissolved organic acids, referred to as naphthenic acids (NAs). The NAs are highly toxic and react with metals to develop highly corrosive functionalities which cause corrosion in the oil sands processing and refining processes. We have chemically modified keratin biopolymer using polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) nanocages and goethite dopant to unfold keratinous structure for improving functionality. The untreated neat keratin and two modified sorbents were characterized to investigate structural, morphological, dimensional and thermal properties. These sorbents were then tested for the removal of NAs from OSPW. The NAs were selectively extracted and quantified before and after sorption process. The biosorption capacity (Q), rejection percentage (R%) and isotherm models were studied to investigate NAs removal efficiency of POSS modified keratin biopolymer (PMKB) and goethite modified keratin biopolymer (GMKB) from aliquots of OSPW.

  15. Ozonation of oil sands process water removes naphthenic acids and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Angela C; Zubot, Warren; MacKinnon, Michael D; Smith, Daniel W; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2008-03-01

    Naphthenic acids are naturally-occurring, aliphatic or alicyclic carboxylic acids found in petroleum. Water used to extract bitumen from the Athabasca oil sands becomes toxic to various organisms due to the presence of naphthenic acids released from the bitumen. Natural biodegradation was expected to be the most cost-effective method for reducing the toxicity of the oil sands process water (OSPW). However, naphthenic acids are poorly biodegraded in the holding ponds located on properties leased by the oil sands companies. In the present study, chemical oxidation using ozone was investigated as an option for mitigation of this toxicity. Ozonation of sediment-free OSPW was conducted using proprietary technology manufactured by Seair Diffusion Systems Inc. Ozonation for 50min generated a non-toxic effluent (based on the Microtox bioassay) and decreased the naphthenic acids concentration by approximately 70%. After 130min of ozonation, the residual naphthenic acids concentration was 2mgl(-1): or = 22).

  16. ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE FINISH AND DIMENSIONAL ACCURACY OF TOOLS MANUFACTURED BY METAL CASTING IN RAPID PROTOTYPING SAND MOULDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyembwe, K.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an initial assessment of the quality parameters of the surface finish and dimensional accuracy of tools made by metal casting in rapid prototyping (RP sand moulds is undertaken. A case study from a local tool room, dealing with the manufacturing of an aluminium die for the lost wax process, is employed. Modern techniques, including surface roughness analysis and three dimensional scanning, are used to determine and understand how each manufacturing step influences the final quality of the cast tool. The best surface finish obtained for the cast die had arithmetic average roughness (Ra and mean average roughness (Rz respectively equal to 3.23m and 11.38m. In terms of dimensional accuracy, 82% of cast-die points coincided with the Computer Aided Design (CAD data, which is within the typical tolerances of sand cast products. The investigation shows that mould coating contributes slightly to the improvement of the cast tool surface finish. The study also found that the additive manufacturing of the sand mould was the chief factor responsible for the loss of dimensional accuracy. These findings indicate that machining will always be required to improve the surface finish and the dimensional accuracy of cast tools in RP sand moulds.

  17. Removal of dissolved heavy metals from pre-settled stormwater runoff by iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J.; Ledin, Anna; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2002-01-01

    Sorption to iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) is a promosing technology for removal of the dissolved heavy metal fraction in stormwater runoff. The development of a new technology is necessary since studies of stormwater runoff from traffic areas indicate that an oil separator and detention pond may...... not guarantee that emission limit values set by the Danish EPA are satisfied. Runoff water was sampled from an urban highway, allowed to settle for 24 hours to simulate the effect of a detention pond, and finally spiked with metals to ensure concentration levels similar to high levels reported in the leterature...

  18. Transport and removal of viruses in saturated sand columns under oxic and anoxic conditions--Potential implications for groundwater protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohnert, Anne; Apelt, Susann; Klitzke, Sondra; Chorus, Ingrid; Szewzyk, Regine; Selinka, Hans-Christoph

    2014-11-01

    To protect groundwater as a drinking water resource from microbiological contamination, protection zones are installed. While travelling through these zones, concentrations of potential pathogens should decline to levels that pose no risks to human health. Removal of viruses during subsurface passage is influenced by physicochemical conditions, such as oxygen concentration, which also affects virus survival. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of redox conditions on the removal of viruses during sand filtration. Experiments in glass columns filled with medium-grained sand were conducted to investigate virus removal in the presence and absence of dissolved oxygen. Bacteriophages MS2 and PhiX174, as surrogates for human enteric viruses were spiked in pulsed or in continuous mode and pumped through the columns at a filter velocity of about 1m/d. Virus breakthrough curves were analyzed by calculating total viral elimination and fitted using one-dimensional transport models (CXTFIT and HYDRUS-1D). While short-term experiments with pulsed virus application showed only small differences with regard to virus removal under oxic and anoxic conditions, a long-term experiment with continuous dosing revealed a clearly lower elimination of viruses under anoxic conditions. These findings suggest that less inactivation and less adsorption of viruses in anoxic environments affect their removal. Therefore, in risk assessment studies aimed to secure drinking water resources from viral contamination and optimization of protection zones, the oxic and anoxic conditions in the subsurface should also be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of As(V) removal from water by zirconium oxide-coated marine sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tabrez Alam; Chaudhry, Saif Ali; Ali, Imran

    2013-08-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a major threat to human beings globally. Among various methods available for arsenic removal, adsorption is fast, inexpensive, selective, accurate, reproducible and eco-friendly in nature. The present paper describes removal of arsenate from water on zirconium oxide-coated sand (novel adsorbent). In the present work, zirconium oxide-coated sand was prepared and characterised by infrared and X-ray diffraction techniques. Batch experiments were performed to optimise different adsorption parameters such as initial arsenate concentration (100-1,000 μg/L), dose (1-8 g/L), pH of the solution (2-14), contact time (15-150 min.), and temperature (20, 30, 35 and 40 °C). The experimental data were analysed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. Furthermore, thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were evaluated to know the mode of adsorption between ZrOCMS and As(V). The maximum removal of arsenic, 97 %, was achieved at initial arsenic concentration of 200 μg/L, after 75 min at dosage of 5.0 g/L, pH 7.0 and 27 ± 2 °C. For 600 μg/L concentration, the maximum Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity was found to be 270 μg/g at 35 °C. Kinetic modelling data indicated that adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The mechanism is controlled by liquid film diffusion model. Thermodynamic parameter, ΔH°, was -57.782, while the values of ΔG° were -9.460, -12.183, -13.343 and -13.905 kJ/mol at 20, 30, 35 and 40 °C, respectively, suggesting exothermic and spontaneous nature of the process. The change in entropy, ΔS°= -0.23 kJ/mol indicated that the entropy decreased due to adsorption of arsenate ion onto the solid adsorbent. The results indicated that the reported zirconium oxide-coated marine sand (ZrOCMS) was good adsorbent with 97 % removal capacity at 200 μg/L concentration. It is interesting to note that the permissible limit of arsenic as per World Health Organization is 10

  20. Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics reveal predation by protozoa drives E. coli removal in slow sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haig, Sarah-Jane; Schirmer, Melanie; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Gibbs, Joseph; Davies, Robert L; Collins, Gavin; Quince, Christopher

    2015-03-17

    Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics were applied to study samples taken from laboratory-scale slow sand filters 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after challenging with (13)C-labelled Escherichia coli to determine the mechanisms and organisms responsible for coliform removal. Before spiking, the filters had been continuously operated for 7 weeks using water from the River Kelvin, Glasgow as their influent source. Direct counts and quantitative PCR assays revealed a clear predator-prey response between protozoa and E. coli. The importance of top-down trophic-interactions was confirmed by metagenomic analysis, identifying several protozoan and viral species connected to E. coli attrition, with protozoan grazing responsible for the majority of the removal. In addition to top-down mechanisms, indirect mechanisms, such as algal reactive oxygen species-induced lysis, and mutualistic interactions between algae and fungi, were also associated with coliform removal. The findings significantly further our understanding of the processes and trophic interactions underpinning E. coli removal. This study provides an example for similar studies, and the opportunity to better understand, manage and enhance E. coli removal by allowing the creation of more complex trophic interaction models.

  1. Application Of Bacterial Iron Reduction For The Removal Of Iron Impurities From Industrial Silica Sand And Kaolin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A.; Yahaya, S.; Fialips, C. I.; White, M.; Manning, D. A.; Gray, N.

    2008-12-01

    Biogeochemical evidence exists to support the potential importance of crystalline or amorphous Fe minerals as electron acceptor for Fe reducing bacteria in soils and subsurface sediments. This microbial metabolic activity can be exploited as alternative method in different industrial applications. For instance, the removal of ferric iron impurities from minerals for the glass and paper industries currently rely on physical and chemical treatments having substantial economical and environmental disadvantages. The ability to remove iron by other means, such as bacterial iron reduction, may reduce costs, allow lower grade material to be mined, and improve the efficiency of mineral processing. Kaolin clay and silica sand are used in a wide range of industrial applications, particularly in paper, ceramics and glass manufacturing. Depending on the geological conditions of deposition, they are often associated with iron (hydr)oxides that are either adsorbed to the mineral surfaces or admixed as separate iron bearing minerals. In this study, we have examined the Fe(III) removal efficiency from kaolin and silica sand by a series of iron- reducing bacteria from the Shewanella species (S. alga BrY, S. oneidensis MR-1, S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. putrefaciens ATCC 8071) in the presence of anthraquinone 2,6 disulfonate (AQDS). We have also investigated the effectiveness of a natural organic matter, extracted with the silica sand, as a substitute to AQDS for enhancing Fe(III) reduction kinetics. The microbial reduction of Fe(III) was achieved using batch cultures under non-growth conditions. The rate and the extent of Fe(III) reduction was monitored as a function of the initial Fe(III) content, Shewanella species and temperature. The bacterially- treated minerals were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to observe any textural and mineralogical transformation. The whiteness and ISO brightness of the kaolin was also measured by

  2. Removal and fate of Cryptosporidium parvum, Clostridium perfringens and small-sized centric diatoms (Stephanodiscus hantzschii) in slow sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijnen, Wim A M; Dullemont, Yolanda J; Schijven, Jack F; Hanzens-Brouwer, Anke J; Rosielle, Martine; Medema, Gertjan

    2007-05-01

    The decimal elimination capacity (DEC) of slow sand filtration (SSF) for Cryptosporidium parvum was assessed to enable quantitative microbial risk analysis of a drinking water production plant. A mature pilot plant filter of 2.56m(2) was loaded with C. parvum oocysts and two other persistent organisms as potential surrogates; spores of Clostridium perfringens (SCP) and the small-sized (4-7microm) centric diatom (SSCD) Stephanodiscus hantzschii. Highly persistent micro-organisms that are retained in slow sand filters are expected to accumulate and eventually break through the filter bed. To investigate this phenomenon, a dosing period of 100 days was applied with an extended filtrate monitoring period of 150 days using large-volume sampling. Based on the breakthrough curves the DEC of the filter bed for oocysts was high and calculated to be 4.7log. During the extended filtrate monitoring period the spatial distribution of the retained organisms in the filter bed was determined. These data showed little risk of accumulation of oocysts in mature filters most likely due to predation by zooplankton. The DEC for the two surrogates, SCP and SSCD, was 3.6 and 1.8log, respectively. On basis of differences in transport behaviour, but mainly because of the high persistence compared to the persistence of oocysts, it was concluded that both spores of sulphite-reducing clostridia (incl. SCP) and SSCD are unsuited for use as surrogates for oocyst removal by slow sand filters. Further research is necessary to elucidate the role of predation in Cryptosporidium removal and the fate of consumed oocysts.

  3. Dendrogeomorphology - a new tool to study drift-sand dynamics Netherlands Journal of Geosciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouden, den J.; Sass-Klaassen, U.; Copini, P.

    2007-01-01

    dendrogeomorphological approach is presented, using wood characteristics of native oak (Quercus robur L.) to infer dynamics of aeolian sediment transport in drift-sand areas. Wood samples, taken from oaks in two drift-sand areas, were analysed to study changes in tree-ring pattern and wood anatomy a

  4. Removals of cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and cryptosporidium-sized polystyrene microspheres from swimming pool water by diatomaceous earth filtration and perlite-sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E; Hill, Vincent R; Murphy, Jennifer L; Schneeberger, Chandra L; Arrowood, Michael J; Yuan, Tao

    2017-06-01

    Removal of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from swimming pools was investigated using diatomaceous earth (DE) precoat filtration and perlite-sand filtration. In pilot-scale experiments, microsphere removals of up to 2 log were obtained with 0.7 kg·DE/m(2) at a filtration rate of 5 m/h. A slightly higher microsphere removal (2.3 log) was obtained for these DE-precoated filters when the filtration rate was 3.6 m/h. Additionally, pilot-scale perlite-sand filters achieved greater than 2 log removal when at least 0.37 kg/m(2) of perlite was used compared to 0.1-0.4 log removal without perlite both at a surface loading rate of 37 m/h. Full-scale testing achieved 2.7 log of microspheres and oocysts removal when 0.7 kg·DE/m(2) was used at 3.6 m/h. Removals were significantly decreased by a 15-minute interruption of the flow (without any mechanical agitation) to the DE filter in pilot-scale studies, which was not observed in full-scale filters. Microsphere removals were 2.7 log by perlite-sand filtration in a full-scale swimming pool filter operated at 34 m/h with 0.5 kg/m(2) of perlite. The results demonstrate that either a DE precoat filter or a perlite-sand filter can improve the efficiency of removal of microspheres and oocysts from swimming pools over a standard sand filter under the conditions studied.

  5. Effect of sand bed depth and media age on Escherichia coli and turbidity removal in biosand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napotnik, Julie A; Baker, Derek; Jellison, Kristen L

    2017-02-17

    The main objective of this study was to build several full-scale biosand filters (BSFs) and assess the long-term (9 month) efficacy for particulate and Escherichia coli removal under simulated real-world usage. Four replicates of three different filter designs were built: the traditional concrete BSF, and two scaled-down versions that use a 5-gal or 2-gal bucket, respectively, as the casing material. The smaller sand bed depths in the bucket-sized filters did not impact filter performance with respect to (i) turbidity and E. coli removal or (ii) effluent levels of turbidity and E. coli. All filters produced effluents with a mean turbidity of <0.6 NTU. In addition, 78%, 74%, and 72% of effluent samples for the concrete, 5-gal, and 2-gal filters, respectively, had E. coli concentrations <1 CFU/100 mL. The bucket-sized filters were found to be a potential alternative to the concrete BSFs for the removal of E. coli and turbidity from drinking water. Since smaller BSFs must be filled more frequently than larger BSFs to produce comparable water volumes, the effect of shorter pause periods on BSF performance should be investigated.

  6. Heavy mineral sorting as a tool to distinguish depositional characteristics of “in situ” sands from their related injected sands in a Palaeogene submarine Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moatari Kazerouni, Afsoon; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan. B

    in the Paleocene Siri Canyon near the Danish Central Graben of the North Sea hydrocarbon province from borehole data. The emplacement of large-scale injection complexes has been commonly attributed in the geological literature to seismic activity and consequent sand liquefaction. However, due to very small...... and has been interpreted to represent the depositional sorting. This study demonstrates the detailed sorting pattern of heavy minerals in thin, injected sands and relates it to the flow patterns during injection. The sorting pattern is used to explain the large scale sorting pattern of the reservoir sands...... and to suggest a tool for petrographic/geochemical distinction between "in situ" sands and their related injected sands within a submarine canyon setting....

  7. Adsorption and Removal of Organic Dye at Quartz Sand-Water Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jada A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied the transport, sorption and desorption of organic cation (Methylene Blue, MB through a porous medium consisting of quartz sand particles negatively charged. We examined various parameters such as the ionic strength of the aqueous solution, the flow velocity, the pH of the aqueous phase, the temperature of the medium and the nature of the divalent metal cations present in solution, which affect the transport and the deposition of MB through the porous medium. Step-input experiments were carried out to measure the dye retention. The data showed a decrease in the MB adsorbed amount on the quartz, when the pH of the aqueous phase, or the temperature, decreases, or when the flow rate, or the affinity of the divalent cation (Ca2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Ba2+ toward the quartz surface increases. The increase in ionic strength leads to a small decrease in the MB adsorbed amount. However, the increase in temperature leads to an increase in the retained MB amount, which suggests that the adsorption of MB on the surface of quartz is endothermic in nature. The overall data indicate that, at ambient temperature, electrostatic interaction forces, which occur between the cationic organic pollutant and the negative surface of the quartz substrate, mainly control the adsorption process.

  8. Development of a data-driven forecasting tool for hydraulically fractured, horizontal wells in tight-gas sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulga, B.; Artun, E.; Ertekin, T.

    2017-06-01

    Tight-gas sand reservoirs are considered to be one of the major unconventional resources. Due to the strong heterogeneity and very low permeability of the formation, and the complexity of well trajectories with multiple hydraulic fractures; there are challenges associated with performance forecasting and optimum exploitation of these resources using conventional modeling approaches. In this study, it is aimed to develop a data-driven forecasting tool for tight-gas sands, which are based on artificial neural networks that can complement the physics-driven modeling approach, namely numerical-simulation models. The tool is designed to predict the horizontal-well performance as a proxy to the numerical model, once the initial conditions, operational parameters, reservoir/hydraulic-fracture characteristics are provided. The data-driven model, that the forecasting tool is based on, is validated with blind cases by estimating the cumulative gas production after 10 years with an average error of 3.2%. A graphical-user-interface application is developed that allows the practicing engineer to use the developed tool in a practical manner by visualizing estimated performance for a given reservoir within a fraction of a second. Practicality of the tool is demonstrated with a case study for the Williams Fork Formation by assessing the performance of various well designs and by incorporating known uncertainties through Monte Carlo simulation. P10, P50 and P90 estimates of the horizontal-well performance are quickly obtained within acceptable accuracy levels.

  9. Phosphate limitation in biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium from drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    Removing ammonium from drinking water is important for maintaining biological stability in distribution systems. This is especially important in regions that do not use disinfectants in the treatment process or keep a disinfectant residual in the distribution system. Problems with nitrification can...... the total number of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in the column. © 2013 American Water Works Association AWWA WQTC Conference Proceedings All Rights Reserved....

  10. Ammonium removal pathways and microbial community in GAC-sand dual media filter in drinking water treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo Feng; Shuguang Xie; Xiaojian Zhang; Zhiyu Yang; Wei Ding; Xiaobin Liao; Yuanyuan Liu; Chao Chen

    2012-01-01

    A GAC-sand dual media filter (GSF) was devised as an alternative solution for drinking water treatment plant to tackle the.raw water polluted by ammonium in place of expensive ozone-GAC processes or bio-pretreatments.The ammonium removal pathways and microbial community in the GSFs were investigated.The concentrations of ammonium,nitrite and nitrate nitrogen were monitored along the filter.Total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) loss occurred during the filtration.For 1 mg ammonium removal,the TIN loss was as high as 0.35 mg,DO consumption was 3.06 mg,and alkalinity consumption was 5.55 mg.It was assumed that both nitrification and denitrification processes occur in the filters to fit the TIN loss and low DO consumption.During the filtration,nitritation,nitrification and nitritation-anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes probably occur,while traditional nitrification and denitrification and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification processes may occur.In the GSFs,Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira are likely to be involved in nitrification processes,while Novosphingobium,Comamonadaceae and Oxalobacteraceae may be involved in denitrification processes.

  11. Removal of selected pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) during sand filtration and ozonation at a municipal sewage treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Norihide; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Murata, Ayako; Kiri, Kentaro; Managaki, Satoshi; Sato, Nobuyuki; Takada, Hideshige

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the efficiencies of removal of 24 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) during sand filtration and ozonation in an operating municipal sewage treatment plant (STP). The target compounds were 2 phenolic antiseptics (thymol, triclosan), 5 acidic analgesics or anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen, naproxen, ketoprofen, fenoprofen, mefenamic acid), 4 amide pharmaceuticals (propyphenazone, crotamiton, carbamazepine, diethyltoluamide), 7 antibiotics (sulfapyridine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, azithromycin, erythromycin anhydride, clarithromycin, roxithromycin), 3 phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) (nonylphenol:NP, octylphenol:OP, bisphenol A:BPA) and 3 natural estrogens (17 beta-estradiol:E2, estrone:E1, estriol:E3). Ozonation removed approximately 80% or more of the phenolic antiseptics, crotamiton, sulfonamide and macrolide antibiotics, and 17 beta-estradiol. Their removal is discussed in terms of chemical structure. The study ascertained the validity of ozonation mechanisms proposed by previous studies in an actually running STP. Compounds with a CC double bond or an aromatic structure with electron donors (e.g., phenol, alkyl, methoxy, or non-protonated amine) were susceptible to ozonation. Compounds with amide structures were resistant. Removal of the PhACs during sand filtration was generally inefficient, probably because of their low hydrophobicities. The combination of ozonation and sand filtration with activated sludge treatment gave efficient removal (>80%) of all the target compounds except carbamazepine and diethyltoluamide. Among all the steps in the plant, ozonation contributed substantially to overall removal of naproxen, ketoprofen, triclosan, crotamiton, sulfapyridine, macrolide antibiotics, and estrone.

  12. ALCOHOL FLUSHING FOR REMOVING DNAPL'S FROM CLAY AND SAND LAYERED AQUIFER SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.J. Hayden; P. Padgett; C. Farrell; J. Diebold; X. Zhou; M. Hood

    1999-08-01

    Alcohol flushing, also called cosolvent flushing, is a relatively new in-situ remediation technology that shows promise for removing organic solvents from the soil and groundwater. Soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents and petroleum products is one of the most serious and widespread environmental problems of our time. Most of the DOE facilities and inactive sites are experiencing soil and groundwater contamination from organic solvents. These water immiscible solvents have entered the subsurface from leaking underground storage tanks and piping, and from past waste handling and disposal practices such as leaking lagoons, holding ponds and landfills. In many cases, they have traveled hundreds of feet down into the saturated zone. If left in the soil, these chemicals may pose a significant environmental and human health risk. Alcohol flushing has potential for application to spilled solvents located deep within the saturated zone which are difficult if not impossible to remove by current remediation strategies, thus, greatly expediting restoration time, reducing total remediation cost and reducing risk.

  13. "Drawing in the Sand" as a Tool for Teaching Coastal Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Joseph B.; Sturm, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Field trips are recognized as an essential component of the study of geography. They are popular with learners and teachers, but their value as learning experiences is largely assumed. What is needed are interactive and relevant learning activities like "drawing in the sand," a participatory learning activity that has been introduced…

  14. Sand filters for removal of microbes and nutrients from wastewater during a one-year pilot study in a cold temperate climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Ari; Martikainen, Kati; Matikka, Ville; Veijalainen, Anna-Maria; Pitkänen, Tarja; Heinonen-Tanski, Helvi; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2014-01-15

    Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS) are recognised as potential threats to groundwater or other water environments subject to discharged effluents. In this study, the microbiological and nutrient removal properties of three different pilot-scale sand filters (SFs) were followed over a one-year period. Moreover, a separate phosphorus removal unit was tested for six months. For the best treatment system, the average log removals were 2.2-3.5 for pathogenic human noro- and adenoviruses and 4.3-5.2 and 4.6-5.4 for indicator viruses and bacteria, respectively. The system that effectively removed microbes was also efficient at removing nutrients. However, the poorest treatment system yielded substantially lower removals. The remarkable differences noted between the studied SFs highlights the importance of construction materials and the careful planning of the filters. Moreover, seasonal conditions appear to have a clear effect on purification efficiencies, emphasising the vulnerability of these systems especially in cold climates.

  15. Cryotherapy: A viable tool to remove broncholiths under flexible bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sabrina N; Lala, Deepa; Rubio, Edmundo

    2016-12-01

    Broncholithiasis is the presence of calcific material within the tracheobronchial tree. Asymptomatic patients can be managed with observation only, whereas symptomatic disease requires surgery, rigid or flexible bronchoscopic removal. Recent reports have shown that flexible bronchoscopy can be a safe and effective option for removal of loose in addition to partially imbedded broncholiths. We present a case of a 65-yearold man with chronic cough that underwent successful cryotherapy assisted bronchoscopic removal of an imbedded broncholith. We will also review current literature regarding the management broncholithiasis.

  16. Can those organic micro-pollutants that are recalcitrant in activated sludge treatment be removed from wastewater by biofilm reactors (slow sand filters)?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escolà Casas, Mònica; Bester, Kai, E-mail: kb@dmu.dk

    2015-02-15

    The degradation of seven compounds which are usually recalcitrant in classical activated sludge treatment (e.g., diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol, iomeprol tebuconazole and propiconazole) was studied in a biofilm reactor (slow sand filtration). This reactor was used to treat real effluent-wastewater at different flow rates (hydraulic loadings) under aerobic conditions so removal and degradation kinetics of these recalcitrant compounds were calculated. With the hydraulic loading rate of 0.012 m{sup 3} m{sup 2} h{sup −1} the reactor removed 41, 94, 58, 57 and 85% of diclofenac, propranolol, iopromide, iohexol and iomeprol respectively. For these compounds the removal efficiency was dependent on hydraulic residence-times. Only 59 and 21% of the incoming tebuconazole and propiconazole respectively were removed but their removal did not depend on hydraulic residence time. Biofilm reactors are thus efficient in removing micro-pollutants and could be considered as an option for advanced treatment in small wastewater treatment plants. - Highlights: • A biofilm reactor (biofilter) can remove micro-pollutants from WWTP effluent. • Sorption could be excluded as the dominant removal mechanism. • Biodegradation was responsible for removing seven compounds. • The removal efficiency was usually proportional to the hydraulic residence-time. • Single first-order removal rates apply for most compounds.

  17. Performance of a stratified sand filter in removal of chemical oxygen demand, total suspended solids and ammonia nitrogen from high-strength wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, M G; Rodgers, M; Mulqueen, J

    2007-06-01

    A stratified sand filter column, operated in recirculation mode and treating synthetic effluent resembling high-strength dairy wastewaters was studied over a 342-d duration. The aim of this paper was to examine the organic, total suspended solids (TSS) and nutrient removal rates of the sand filter, operated in recirculation mode, under incrementally increasing hydraulic and organic loading rates and to propose a field filter-sizing criterion. Best performance was obtained at a system hydraulic loading rate of 10 L m(-2) d(-1); a higher system hydraulic loading rate (of 13.4 L m(-2) d(-1)) caused surface ponding. The system hydraulic loading rate of 10 L m(-2) d(-1) gave a filter chemical oxygen demand (COD), TSS, and total kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) loading rate of 14, 3.7, and 2.1 g m(-2) d(-1), respectively, and produced consistent COD and TSS removals of greater than 99%, and an effluent NO(3)-N concentration of 42 mg L(-1) (accounting for an 86% reduction in total nitrogen (Tot-N)). As the proportional surface area requirement for the sand filter described in this study is less than the recommended surface area requirement of a free-water surface (FWS) wetland treating an effluent of similar quality, it could provide an economic and sustainable alternative to conventional wetland treatment.

  18. Removal of organic compounds and trace metals from oil sands process-affected water using zero valent iron enhanced by petroleum coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourrezaei, Parastoo; Alpatova, Alla; Khosravi, Kambiz; Drzewicz, Przemysław; Chen, Yuan; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2014-06-15

    The oil production generates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), referring to the water that has been in contact with oil sands or released from tailings deposits. There are concerns about the environmental impacts of the release of OSPW because of its toxicity. Zero valent iron alone (ZVI) and in combination with petroleum coke (CZVI) were investigated as environmentally friendly treatment processes for the removal of naphthenic acids (NAs), acid-extractable fraction (AEF), fluorophore organic compounds, and trace metals from OSPW. While the application of 25 g/L ZVI to OSPW resulted in 58.4% removal of NAs in the presence of oxygen, the addition of 25 g petroleum coke (PC) as an electron conductor enhanced the NAs removal up to 90.9%. The increase in ZVI concentration enhanced the removals of NAs, AEF, and fluorophore compounds from OSPW. It was suggested that the electrons generated from the oxidation of ZVI were transferred to oxygen, resulting in the production of hydroxyl radicals and oxidation of NAs. When OSPW was de-oxygenated, the NAs removal decreased to 17.5% and 65.4% during treatment with ZVI and CZVI, respectively. The removal of metals in ZVI samples was similar to that obtained during CZVI treatment. Although an increase in ZVI concentration did not enhance the removal of metals, their concentrations effectively decreased at all ZVI loadings. The Microtox(®) bioassay with Vibrio fischeri showed a decrease in the toxicity of ZVI- and CZVI-treated OSPW. The results obtained in this study showed that the application of ZVI in combination with PC is a promising technology for OSPW treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Testing ecological tradeoffs of a new tool for removing fine sediment in a spring-fed stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Sechrist, Juddson D.; Marczak, Laurie B

    2014-01-01

    Excessive fine sediment is a focus of stream restoration work because it can impair the structure and function of streams, but few methods exist for removing sediment in spring-fed streams. We tested a novel method of sediment removal with the potential to have minimal adverse effects on the biological community during the restoration process. The Sand Wand system, a dredgeless vacuum developed by Streamside Technologies, was used to experimentally remove fine sediment from Kackley Springs, a spring creek in southeastern Idaho. We assessed the effects of the Sand Wand on stream physical habitat and macroinvertebrate composition for up to 60 days after the treatment. We documented changes in multiple habitat variables, including stream depth, median particle size, and the frequency of embedded substrate in stream reaches that were treated with the Sand Wand. We also found that macroinvertebrate composition was altered even though common macroinvertebrate metrics changed little after the treatment. Our results suggest that the Sand Wand was effective at removing fine sediments in Kackley Springs and did minimal harm to macroinvertebrate function, but the Sand Wand was not ultimately effective in improving substrate composition to desired conditions. Additional restoration techniques are still needed to decrease the amount of fine sediment.

  20. Removal and fate of Cryptosporidium parvum, Clostridium perfringens and small-sized centric diatoms (Stephanodiscus hantzschii) in slow sand filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hijnen, W.A.M.; Dullemont, Y.J.; Schijven, J.F.; Brouwer-Hanzens, Anke J.; Rosielle, M.; Medema, Gerriet Jan

    2007-01-01

    The decimal elimination capacity (DEC) of slow sand filtration (SSF) for Cryptosporidium parvum was assessed to enable quantitative microbial risk analysis of a drinking water production plant. A mature pilot plant filter of 2.56 m2 was loaded with C. parvum oocysts and two other persistent organism

  1. RemoveYoung: A tool for the removal of the young stellar component in galaxies within an adjustable age cutoff

    CERN Document Server

    Gomes, Jean Michel

    2016-01-01

    The optical morphology of galaxies holds the cumulative record of their assembly history, and techniques for its quantitative characterization offer a promising avenue toward understanding galaxy formation and evolution. However, the morphology of star-forming galaxies is generally dictated by the youngest stellar component, which can readily overshine faint structural/morphological features in the older underlying stellar background (e.g., relics from recent minor mergers) that could hold important insights into the galaxy build-up process. Stripping off galaxy images from the emission from stellar populations younger than an adjustable age cutoff tcut can, therefore, provide a valuable tool in extragalactic research. RemoveYoung (RY), a publicly available tool that is presented here, exploits the combined power of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) and spectral population synthesis (SPS) toward this goal. Two-dimensional (2D) post-processing of SPS models to IFS data cubes with RY permits computation of the ...

  2. 锰砂/石英砂滤池与纳滤膜组合工艺去除水中砷的研究%Study on the combined process of manganese sand/quartz sand filter and nanofiltration membrane to remove the arsenic in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭成会; 张维佳; 夏圣骥

    2011-01-01

    In this paper by employing the combined process of manganese sand/quartz sand filter and nanofiltration membrane to remove the arsenic in water, and the arsenic removal effects of manganese sand/quartz sand, nanofiltration membrane (NF90, HL), and combined process of manganese sand/quartz sand and nanofiltration were studied. The result showed that As ( Ⅲ ) and As( V )could be removed effectively by manganese sand/quartz sand filtration, and the effluent arsenic concentration could be less than 50 μg/L when the influent arsenic concentration was 250 μg/L; nanofiltration membrane could remove As(V) more than 90%, but only remove As(Ⅲ)about 40~60%; combined process of manganese sand/quartz sand and nanofiltration had strong removal effect of arsenic in water, and the arsenic concentration in effluent was less than 10 μg/L,which demonstrated that the combined process was an ideal process to remove arsenic in water.%采用锰砂/石英砂滤池与纳滤膜组合工艺处理含砷水,考察锰砂/石英砂、纳滤膜(NF90、HL)、锰砂/石英砂滤池与纳滤膜组合工艺对水中砷的去除效果.结果表明,三价砷(As(Ⅲ))和五价砷(As(Ⅴ))经锰砂/石英砂过滤后能得到很好的去除,原水砷浓度250 μg/L,出水砷浓度小于50μg/L;纳滤膜对五价砷(As(Ⅴ))的去除能力很高,能达到90%以上,但是对三价砷(As(Ⅲ))的去除率不理想,为40%~60%;锰砂/石英砂复合滤池与纳滤膜组合工艺对水中砷有很好的去除效果,出水砷浓度均小于10μg/L,是理想的饮用水除砷方法.

  3. Effect of pH and Calcium on the Adsorptive Removal of Cadmium and Copper by Iron Oxide–Coated Sand and Granular Ferric Hydroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.

    2015-08-17

    Iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were used to study the effect of Ca2+ and pH on the adsorptive removal of Cu2+ and Cd2+ from groundwater using batch adsorption experiments and kinetic modeling. It was observed that Cu2+ and Cd2+ were not stable in synthetic waters. The extent of precipitation increased with increasing pH. Removal of Cu2+ and Cd2+ was achieved through both precipitation and adsorption, with IOCS showing higher adsorption efficiency. Increase of pH (from 6 to 8) resulted in a higher overall removal efficiency of both Cu2+ and Cd2+, with precipitation as predominant removal mechanisms at higher pH values, especially for Cu2+. An increase in Ca2+ concentration increased the precipitation of Cu2+ [as Cu2(OH)2CO3 and Cu3(OH)2(CO3)2] and Cd2+ [as Cd(OH)2 and CdCO3]. In addition, Ca2+ competes with Cu2+ and Cd2+ for surface adsorption sites on IOCS and GFH, and reduces their adsorption capacity. The kinetic modeling revealed that the adsorption of Cd2+ onto IOCS is a complex process, with limited contribution of chemisorption that increases in the presence of Ca2+. © 2015 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  4. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  5. effect of turning parameters on metal removal and tool wear rates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1,3,4 DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGR., FEDERAL UNIV. OF PETROLEUM RESOURCES ... Keywords: Orthogonal array, Robust design, Tool wear rate, Metal removal rate. 1. ... use of improved harmony search algorithm to determine the optimum ... objective optimization of turning parameters was conducted using ...

  6. Suction-based grasping tool for removal of regular- and irregular-shaped intraocular foreign bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlanger, Michael S; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Mackenzie, Douglas; Olson, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    To describe a suction-based grasping tool for the surgical removal of irregular-shaped and nonferromagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. A surgical tool with suction capabilities, consisting of a stainless steel shaft with a plastic handle and a customizable and interchangeable suction tip, was designed in order to better engage and manipulate irregular-shaped in-traocular foreign bodies of various sizes and physical properties. The maximal suction force and surgical capabilities were assessed in the laboratory and on a cadaveric eye vitrectomy model. The suction force of the water-tight seal between the intraocular foreign body and the suction tip was estimated to be approximately 40 MN. During an open-sky vitrectomy in a porcine model, the device was successful in engaging and firmly securing foreign bodies of different sizes and shapes. The suction-based grasping tool enables removal of irregular-shaped and nonferromagnetic foreign bodies. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Naphthenic acids speciation and removal during petroleum-coke adsorption and ozonation of oil sands process-affected water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Fu, Hongjing; Wang, Nan; Chelme-Ayala, Pamela; Pérez-Estrada, Leonidas; Drzewicz, Przemysław; Martin, Jonathan W; Zubot, Warren; Smith, Daniel W

    2011-11-01

    The Athabasca Oil Sands industry produces large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) as a result of bitumen extraction and upgrading processes. Constituents of OSPW include chloride, naphthenic acids (NAs), aromatic hydrocarbons, and trace heavy metals, among other inorganic and organic compounds. To address the environmental issues associated with the recycling and/or safe return of OSPW into the environment, water treatment technologies are required. This study examined, for the first time, the impacts of pretreatment steps, including filtration and petroleum-coke adsorption, on ozonation requirements and performance. The effect of the initial OSPW pH on treatment performance, and the evolution of ozonation and its impact on OSPW toxicity and biodegradability were also examined. The degradation of more than 76% of total acid-extractable organics was achieved using a semi-batch ozonation system at a utilized ozone dose of 150 mg/L. With a utilized ozone dose of 100 mg/L, the treated OSPW became more biodegradable and showed no toxicity towards Vibrio fischeri. Changes in the NA profiles in terms of carbon number and number of rings were observed after ozonation. The filtration of the OSPW did not improve the ozonation performance. Petroleum-coke adsorption was found to be effective in reducing total acid-extractable organics by a 91%, NA content by an 84%, and OSPW toxicity from 4.3 to 1.1 toxicity units. The results of this study indicate that the combination of petroleum-coke adsorption and ozonation is a promising treatment approach to treat OSPW.

  8. Relating dynamic conditions to the performance of biological rapid sand filters used to remove ammonium, iron, and manganese from drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.

    months at similar operating conditions as the full scale filter to validate the performance of the pilot columns. After this, the pilot columns were fed with varying loading rates of iron, ammonium, and manganese. To fully examine the changes in filter performance several parameters were analyzed. Water......Biological rapid sand filters are used throughout the world to remove both particulates and dissolved compounds from drinking water and is a proven and effective treatment technique for providing safe and secure drinking water. However, experience has shown that some filters have problems...... consistently meeting regulatory guidelines for compounds like ammonium and reduced forms of iron and manganese. These compounds can cause biological instability in the distribution system and can lead to many problems including the growth of pathogens and aesthetic problems (taste, odor, and color...

  9. Hydrated mucilage reduces post-dispersal seed removal of a sand desert shrub by ants in a semiarid ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuejun; Baskin, Carol C; Baskin, Jerry M; Gao, Ruiru; Yang, Fan; Wei, Lingling; Li, Leilei; He, Hongju; Huang, Zhenying

    2013-12-01

    Post-dispersal seed removal by animals can lead to extensive seed loss and thus is an important factor in structuring plant communities. However, we know much less about post-dispersal seed predation than about other forms of herbivory. Mucilage plays many ecological roles in adaptation of plants to diverse environments; nevertheless, until now the role of mucilage in ant-mediated seed movement remains largely hypothetical. We studied the role of mucilage in seed removal of Artemisia sphaerocephala by ants in Mu Us Sandland in Inner Mongolia, China. Messor aciculatus was the most active seed predator of Artemisia sphaerocephala. Time to first ant collecting (T 1st) of wet intact seeds was longest and significantly different from that for dry intact seeds, wet demucilaged seeds, and dry demucilaged seeds; number of seeds removed to ant nests was lowest for wet intact seeds. After they were collected by ants, 5 % of wet intact seeds were dropped during transport. Our results indicate that seed mucilage of Artemisia sphaerocephala may play a significant role in post-dispersal seed removal by (1) making seeds less attractive to ants, thus resulting in a delay of collection time; (2) forming a strong bond to soil particles, making it difficult for ants to remove seeds; and (3) making seeds more likely to be dropped during transport, thereby allowing them to escape from predation even after collection by ants. This study demonstrates the importance of mucilage in reducing seed removal by ants and thus in anchoring seeds of desert plants in the vicinity of mother plants.

  10. RemoveYoung: A tool for the removal of the young stellar component in galaxies within an adjustable age cutoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J. M.; Papaderos, P.

    2016-10-01

    The optical morphology of galaxies holds the cumulative record of their assembly history, and techniques for its quantitative characterization offer a promising avenue toward understanding galaxy formation and evolution. However, the morphology of star-forming galaxies is generally dictated by the youngest stellar component, which can readily overshine faint structural/morphological features in the older underlying stellar background (e.g., relics from recent minor mergers) that could hold important insights into the galaxy build-up process. Stripping off galaxy images from the emission from stellar populations younger than an adjustable age cutoff tcut can therefore provide a valuable tool in extragalactic research. RemoveYoung (), a publicly available tool that is presented here, exploits the combined power of integral field spectroscopy (IFS) and spectral population synthesis (SPS) toward this goal. Two-dimensional (2D) post-processing of SPS models to IFS data cubes with permits computation of the spectral energy, surface brightness, and stellar surface density distribution of stellar populations older than a user-defined tcut. This suggests a variety of applications of star-forming galaxies, such as interacting or merging galaxy pairs and lower mass starburst galaxies near and far; these include blue compact and tidal dwarf galaxies.

  11. Biostimulation of Oil Sands Process-Affected Water with Phosphate Yields Removal of Sulfur-Containing Organics and Detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesnel, Dean M; Oldenburg, Thomas B P; Larter, Stephen R; Gieg, Lisa M; Chua, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    The ability to mitigate toxicity of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) for return into the environment is an important issue for effective tailings management in Alberta, Canada. OSPW toxicity has been linked to classical naphthenic acids (NAs), but the toxic contribution of other acid-extractable organics (AEOs) remains unknown. Here, we examine the potential for in situ bioremediation of OSPW AEOs by indigenous algae. Phosphate biostimulation was performed in OSPW to promote the growth of indigenous photosynthetic microorganisms and subsequent toxicity and chemical changes were determined. After 12 weeks, the AEO fraction of phosphate-biostimulated OSPW was significantly less toxic to the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe than unstimulated OSPW. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) analysis of the AEO fraction in phosphate-biostimulated OSPW showed decreased levels of SO3 class compounds, including a subset that may represent linear arylsulfonates. A screen with S. pombe transcription factor mutant strains for growth sensitivity to the AEO fraction or sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate revealed a mode of toxic action consistent with oxidative stress and detrimental effects on cellular membranes. These findings demonstrate a potential algal-based in situ bioremediation strategy for OSPW AEOs and uncover a link between toxicity and AEOs other than classical NAs.

  12. 氧化铁改性石英砂的复合挂膜与氨氮去除试验研究%EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON COMPOUND FORMATION AND REMOVAL AMMONIA NITROGEN USING IRON OXIDE COATED SANDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬梅; 刘贝; 庞治星; 刘培涛; 刘雄威; 李绍秀

    2012-01-01

    采用自制的氧化铁改性石英砂滤料(简称“改性砂”),对生物改性砂联合处理微污染物氨氮的复合挂膜启动性能以及滤料表面形态进行了试验研究,并与生物普通砂联用效果进行对比.结果表明,生物普通砂和生物改性砂在挂膜初期的生物量分别为15.46、13.79 nmol/g(n(P)/m(滤料)),稳定运行期分别为18.75、20.09 nmol/g;挂膜初期,生物普通砂与生物改性砂对质量浓度为1~2 mg/L氨氮的去除效果分别达到92%和95%;挂膜稳定期,前者对氨氮的去除效果约60%,后者稳定在80%左右;在不同氨氮质量浓度(0.5~4 mg/L)下,生物普通砂对氨氮去除率从60%上升至80%,生物改性砂的去除率从70%增至95%;过滤前后2种滤料表面形态均发生变化,生物改性砂表面孔隙更小,结构更加复杂多孔,表面粗糙程度进一步增加,对氨氮去除率高.%A homemade iron oxide cCoated sands filters with biological was used to remove ammonia nitrogen from contaminated source water, the process of compound formation start-up and the surface morphology of the two filters was carried out, and contrasted with the effect of biological-raw sands. The results were shown as follows: The biomass of the biological- raw sand filter, and biological-iron oxide coated sand filter were 15.46 and 13.79 nmol/g in the initial of formation, 18.75 and 20.09 nmol/g in the stable of formation. Removal of ammonia nitrogen with concentration among 1.0-2.0 mg/L using biological-raw sands and biological-iron oxide coated sands were 92% to 95% in the initial of formation, In the stable of formation, removal ammonia nitrogen using biological-raw sands stable about 60%, and removal ammonia nitrogen using biological-iron oxide coated sands stable about 80%. In different concentrations of ammonia nitrogen among 0.5~4.0 mg/L, removal efficiency of biological-raw sands from 60% rose to 80%, biological- iron oxide coated sands from 70% rose to

  13. Evaluation of virus removal efficiency of coagulation-sedimentation and rapid sand filtration processes in a drinking water treatment plant in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Tatsuya; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Torrey, Jason Robert; Visvanathan, Chettiyappan; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2016-09-15

    In order to properly assess and manage the risk of infection by enteric viruses in tap water, virus removal efficiency should be evaluated quantitatively for individual processes in actual drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs); however, there have been only a few studies due to technical difficulties in quantifying low virus concentration in water samples. In this study, the removal efficiency of indigenous viruses was evaluated for coagulation-sedimentation (CS) and rapid sand filtration (RSF) processes in a DWTP in Bangkok, Thailand by measuring the concentration of viruses before and after treatment processes using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Water samples were collected and concentrated from raw source water, after CS, and after RSF, and inhibitory substances in water samples were reduced by use of a hydrophobic resin (DAX-8). Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and JC polyomavirus (JC PyV) were found to be highly prevalent in raw waters, with concentrations of 10(2.88 ± 0.35) and 10(3.06 ± 0.42) copies/L (geometric mean ± S.D.), respectively. Step-wise removal efficiencies were calculated for individual processes, with some variation observed between wet and dry seasons. During the wet season, PMMoV was removed less by CS and more by RSF on average (0.40 log10 vs 1.26 log10, respectively), while the reverse was true for JC PyV (1.91 log10 vs 0.49 log10, respectively). Both viruses were removed similarly during the dry season, with CS removing the most virus (PMMoV, 1.61 log10 and 0.78 log10; JC PyV, 1.70 log10, and 0.59 log10; CS and RSF, respectively). These differences between seasons were potentially due to variations in raw water quality and the characteristics of the viruses themselves. These results suggest that PMMoV and JC PyV, which are more prevalent in environmental waters than the other enteric viruses evaluated in this study, could be useful in determining viral fate for the risk management of viruses in water treatment

  14. Fontainebleau Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Caspar Thrane

    2006-01-01

    The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand.......The report is a summary of results from laboratory tests in the geotechncial research group on Fontainebleau sand....

  15. FastUniq: a fast de novo duplicates removal tool for paired short reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibin Xu

    Full Text Available The presence of duplicates introduced by PCR amplification is a major issue in paired short reads from next-generation sequencing platforms. These duplicates might have a serious impact on research applications, such as scaffolding in whole-genome sequencing and discovering large-scale genome variations, and are usually removed. We present FastUniq as a fast de novo tool for removal of duplicates in paired short reads. FastUniq identifies duplicates by comparing sequences between read pairs and does not require complete genome sequences as prerequisites. FastUniq is capable of simultaneously handling reads with different lengths and results in highly efficient running time, which increases linearly at an average speed of 87 million reads per 10 minutes. FastUniq is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/fastuniq/.

  16. Agent-based model of laser hair removal: A treatment optimization and patient education tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen Bell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tracking of various parameters associated with laser hair removal is tedious and time consuming. The currently available mathematical models are not simple enough for physicians to be used as a treatment optimization and patient education tool. Aim: The aim of the study was to develop a mathematical model for laser hair removal using agent-based modeling and to make a user-friendly simulation environment. Methods: The model was created using NetLogo. The hairs were modeled as agents oscillating between anagen and telogen. The variables were assigned based on published data whenever possible and the various paths the agent could take were coded as conditional statements. The improvement was assessed using an arbitrary index which takes into account the mean diameter and pigmentation along with the number and length of hairs visible above the surface. Few of the commonly encountered scenarios were simulated using the model. Results: The model is made freely available online (http://www.gulfdoctor.net/model/lhr.htm. Limited number of simulations performed indicated that an eight-week gap between laser sessions may be more effective than a four-week gap. Conclusions: The simulation provides a reliable tool for treatment optimization and patient education as obtaining relevant clinical data is slow and labor-intensive. Its visual interface and online availability makes it useful for everyday use.

  17. Removal Tools are Faster and Produce Less Force and Torque on the Helmet Than Cutting Tools During Face-Mask Retraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Heather L; Valovich, Tamara C; Arnold, Brent L; Gansneder, Bruce M

    2002-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the retraction time, forces, and torques applied to the football helmet during removal of the face mask with different face-mask removal tools. DESIGN AND SETTING: Subjects retracted the face mask of a football helmet mounted to a force platform in a laboratory setting. They removed a standard face mask by cutting or removing (or both) the lateral plastic loop straps using 4 different tools: the Trainer's Angel (TA), FM Extractor (FM), power screwdriver (SD), and Quick Release System (QR) in a counterbalanced fashion. SUBJECTS: Eighteen certified athletic trainers participated in this study. MEASUREMENTS: We started measuring time when the subject picked up the tool and ended when the face mask was in a fully retracted position. Maximum forces and torques were measured from the force platform during the retraction process. RESULTS: The SD and QR retracted the face mask significantly faster than the TA and FM. Forces producing superior-inferior translation were least with the SD. The SD and QR produced less lateral translation and rotation and lateral flexion moment than the TA and FM. The FM produced less torque in the lateral flexion moment than the TA. CONCLUSIONS: Tools that removed the loop straps (SD, QR) were faster and produced less force and torque on the helmet than the tools that cut through the loop straps (TA, FM).

  18. Oral treatment of rodents with insecticides for control of sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and the fluorescent tracer technique (FTT) as a tool to evaluate potential sand fly control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascari, T M; Clark, J; Gordon, S; Mitchell, M A; Rowton, E D; Stout, R; Foil, L D

    2011-03-01

    In laboratory studies, insecticides (diflubenzuron, novaluron, methoprene and, pyriproxyfen) that have been incorporated into rodent diets were effective as feed-throughs against sand fly larvae. Novaluron also was effective against sand fly larvae at low concentrations and under simulated field conditions. Ivermectin has been shown to be effective as a systemic insecticide, killing 100% of blood-feeding sand flies for up to seven d after rodents were treated. The fluorescent tracer technique (FTT) is the use of certain fluorescent dyes (rhodamine B or uranine O) as feed-through transtadial biomarkers for phlebotomine sand flies, systemic biomarkers for blood-feeding sand flies, and permanent markers for nectar-feeding sand flies. The results of these laboratory studies provide proof of concept for the FTT and indicate that the FTT could be used to delineate specific foci with rodent/sand fly associations that would be susceptible to control by using feed-through or systemic insecticides, or foci where insecticide-treated sugar baits could be used against sand flies.

  19. Heavy mineral sorting as a tool to distinguish depositional characteristics of “in situ” sands from their related injected sands in a Palaeogene submarine Canyon, Danish North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moatari Kazerouni, Afsoon; Friis, Henrik; Svendsen, Johan. B

    Postdepositional remoblization and injection of sand are important processes in deep-water clastic systems. Subsurface mobilisation and injection of sand has been recently recognised as a significant control of deep-water sandstone geometry. Kilometre-scale injection complexes have been interpreted...... in the Paleocene Siri Canyon near the Danish Central Graben of the North Sea hydrocarbon province from borehole data. The emplacement of large-scale injection complexes has been commonly attributed in the geological literature to seismic activity and consequent sand liquefaction. However, due to very small...... differences in textural and compositional properties, and the lack of depositional structures of reservoir sands in the Siri Canyon, the distinction between "in situ" and injected or remobilised sands is difficult. Large scale heavy mineral sorting (in 10 m thick units) is observed in several reservoir units...

  20. Effective tool design of three-rank form as precision removal-process of ITO thin-films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pai-shan PA

    2009-01-01

    A new effective tool design of three-rank form of electroremoval was present using a precision recycle system offering faster performance in removing the indium-tin-oxide(ITO) thin-films on color filter surface of displays. Higher electric power is not required since the three-rank form tool is adopted as a feeding mode to reduce the response area. The low yield of ITO persists throughout the entire semiconductor production process. By establishing a recycle process of ultra-precise removal of the thin-film nanostructure, defective products in the optoelectronic semiconductors industry can be effectively recycled, decreasing both production costs and pollution. A 5th generation TFT-LCD was used. The design features of the removal processes for the thin-films and the tool design of three-rank form were of major interest. For the precision removal processes, a pulsed current can improve the effect of dreg discharge and contributes to the achievement of a fast workpiece (displays' color filter) feed rate, but raises the current rating. High flow velocity of the electrolyte with a high rotational speed of the tool electrodes elevates the ITO removal effect. A displays' color filter with a fast feed rate is combined with enough electric power to provide highly effective removal. A small thickness of the rank and a small arc angle of the negative-electrode correspond to a higher removal rate for ITO-film. An effective three-rank form negative-electrode provides larger discharge mobility and better removal effect. It only needs a short period of time to remove the ITO easily and cleanly.

  1. Removal of corallivorous snails as a proactive tool for the conservation of acroporid corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana E. Williams

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Corallivorous snail feeding is a common source of tissue loss for the threatened coral, Acropora palmata, accounting for roughly one-quarter of tissue loss in monitored study plots over seven years. In contrast with larger threats such as bleaching, disease, or storms, corallivory by Coralliophila abbreviata is one of the few direct sources of partial mortality that may be locally managed. We conducted a field experiment to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of snail removal. Long-term monitoring plots on six reefs in the upper Florida Keys were assigned to one of three removal treatments: (1 removal from A. palmata only, (2 removal from all host coral species, or (3 no-removal controls. During the initial removal in June 2011, 436 snails were removed from twelve 150 m2 plots. Snails were removed three additional times during a seven month “removal phase”, then counted at five surveys over the next 19 months to track recolonization. At the conclusion, snails were collected, measured and sexed. Before-After-Control-Impact analysis revealed that both snail abundance and feeding scar prevalence were reduced in removal treatments compared to the control, but there was no difference between removal treatments. Recolonization by snails to baseline abundance is estimated to be 3.7 years and did not differ between removal treatments. Recolonization rate was significantly correlated with baseline snail abundance. Maximum snail size decreased from 47.0 mm to 34.6 mm in the removal treatments. The effort required to remove snails from A. palmata was 30 diver minutes per 150 m2 plot, compared with 51 min to remove snails from all host corals. Since there was no additional benefit observed with removing snails from all host species, removals can be more efficiently focused on only A. palmata colonies and in areas where C. abbreviata abundance is high, to effectively conserve A. palmata in targeted areas.

  2. Study on Platinum Coating Depth in Focused Ion Beam Diamond Cutting Tool Milling and Methods for Removing Platinum Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woong Kirl Choi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nanomachining has attracted increasing attention in advanced manufacturing science and technologies as a value-added processes to control material structures, components, devices, and nanoscale systems. To make sub-micro patterns on these products, micro/nanoscale single-crystal diamond cutting tools are essential. Popular non-contact methods for the macro/micro processing of diamond composites are pulsed laser ablation (PLA and electric discharge machining (EDM. However, for manufacturing nanoscale diamond tools, these machining methods are not appropriate. Despite diamond’s extreme physical properties, diamond can be micro/nano machined relatively easily using a focused ion beam (FIB technique. In the FIB milling process, the surface properties of the diamond cutting tool is affected by the amorphous damage layer caused by the FIB gallium ion collision and implantation and these influence the diamond cutting tool edge sharpness and increase the processing procedures. To protect the diamond substrate, a protection layer—platinum (Pt coating is essential in diamond FIB milling. In this study, the depth of Pt coating layer which could decrease process-induced damage during FIB fabrication is investigated, along with methods for removing the Pt coating layer on diamond tools. The optimum Pt coating depth has been confirmed, which is very important for maintaining cutting tool edge sharpness and decreasing processing procedures. The ultra-precision grinding method and etching with aqua regia method have been investigated for removing the Pt coating layer. Experimental results show that when the diamond cutting tool width is bigger than 500 nm, ultra-precision grinding method is appropriate for removing Pt coating layer on diamond tool. However, the ultra-precision grinding method is not recommended for removing the Pt coating layer when the cutting tool width is smaller than 500 nm, because the possibility that the diamond

  3. Developing an interactive Tool for evaluating sand nourishment strategies along the Holland coast in perspective of benthos, fish nursery and dune quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baptist, M.J.; Wolfshaar, van de K.E.; Huisman, B.J.A.; Groot, de A.V.; Boer, de W.; Ye, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Sand nourishments can affect the coastal ecosystem in various ways. Direct effects are the burial of benthic species under a layer of sand. In the direct vicinity, suffocation of benthos can occur due to the settling of a plume of suspended sediment particles. A plume of fine particles may also incr

  4. A preprocessing tool for removing artifact from cardiac RR interval recordings using three-dimensional spatial distribution mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelberg, Nicolas J C; Neumann, David L; Shum, David H K; McConnell, Harry; Hamilton-Craig, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Artifact is common in cardiac RR interval data that is recorded for heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. A novel algorithm for artifact detection and interpolation in RR interval data is described. It is based on spatial distribution mapping of RR interval magnitude and relationships to adjacent values in three dimensions. The characteristics of normal physiological RR intervals and artifact intervals were established using 24-h recordings from 20 technician-assessed human cardiac recordings. The algorithm was incorporated into a preprocessing tool and validated using 30 artificial RR (ARR) interval data files, to which known quantities of artifact (0.5%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 5%, 7%, 10%) were added. The impact of preprocessing ARR files with 1% added artifact was also assessed using 10 time domain and frequency domain HRV metrics. The preprocessing tool was also used to preprocess 69 24-h human cardiac recordings. The tool was able to remove artifact from technician-assessed human cardiac recordings (sensitivity 0.84, SD = 0.09, specificity of 1.00, SD = 0.01) and artificial data files. The removal of artifact had a low impact on time domain and frequency domain HRV metrics (ranging from 0% to 2.5% change in values). This novel preprocessing tool can be used with human 24-h cardiac recordings to remove artifact while minimally affecting physiological data and therefore having a low impact on HRV measures of that data.

  5. Pseudoprolines as removable turn inducers: tools for the cyclization of small peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skropeta, Danielle; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Turner, Peter

    2004-12-10

    The cyclization of small peptides which do not incorporate turn inducers is often difficult. We have developed a method involving the use of removable turn inducers, in the form of pseudoprolines, for the cyclization of difficult peptide sequences. The pseudoprolines induce a cisoid amide bond in the peptide backbone which facilitates cyclization. They are then readily removed to yield a cyclic peptide that does not contain any turn inducers.

  6. Atmospheric pressure plasma: a high-performance tool for the efficient removal of biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Fricke

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The medical use of non-thermal physical plasmas is intensively investigated for sterilization and surface modification of biomedical materials. A further promising application is the removal or etching of organic substances, e.g., biofilms, from surfaces, because remnants of biofilms after conventional cleaning procedures are capable to entertain inflammatory processes in the adjacent tissues. In general, contamination of surfaces by micro-organisms is a major source of problems in health care. Especially biofilms are the most common type of microbial growth in the human body and therefore, the complete removal of pathogens is mandatory for the prevention of inflammatory infiltrate. Physical plasmas offer a huge potential to inactivate micro-organisms and to remove organic materials through plasma-generated highly reactive agents. METHOD: In this study a Candida albicans biofilm, formed on polystyrene (PS wafers, as a prototypic biofilm was used to verify the etching capability of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet operating with two different process gases (argon and argon/oxygen mixture. The capability of plasma-assisted biofilm removal was assessed by microscopic imaging. RESULTS: The Candida albicans biofilm, with a thickness of 10 to 20 µm, was removed within 300 s plasma treatment when oxygen was added to the argon gas discharge, whereas argon plasma alone was practically not sufficient in biofilm removal. The impact of plasma etching on biofilms is localized due to the limited presence of reactive plasma species validated by optical emission spectroscopy.

  7. Evaluation of a fine sediment removal tool in spring-fed and snowmelt driven streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Layhee, Megan J.; Sutphin, Zach; Sechrist, Juddson D.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of fine-grained sediments impairs the structure and function of streams, so removing fine sediments may be required to achieve restoration objectives. There has been little work on methods of removing excess sediment or on the efficacy of the methods. We used a 4-year before-after-control-impact design in southeastern Idaho streams to test a fine sediment removal system (FSRS) manufactured by Streamside Environmental LLC. The FSRS agitates fine sediment in the substrate with clean pump water and then vacuums the sediment out of the stream with a second pump. Our objectives were: 1) to test if the FSRS can selectively remove fine sediment; 2) to monitor the bio-physical responses in FSRS treated and downstream waters; and 3) to compare the bio-physical responses to the FSRS in spring-fed and snowmelt driven stream reaches. The FSRS removed ~ 14 metric tons of sediment from the two treated reaches. More than 90% of this sediment was < 2 mm, indicating that the FSRS selected for fine sediment in both stream types. Sustained effects of removing this sediment were confined to substrate improvements in treated reaches. Embeddedness in the spring-fed reach decreased and subsurface grain size in spring-fed and snowmelt driven reaches increased. We did not detect any sustained invertebrate or fish responses in treated reaches or any detrimental bio-physical responses in downstream waters. These results indicate that the FSRS reduced fine sediment levels but sediment removal did not reverse the impacts of sediment accumulation to stream biota within our monitoring time frame.

  8. PROCESSING OF MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, G.D.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1957-12-01

    A process for the recovery of thorium, uranium, and rare earths from monazite sands is presented. The sands are first digested and dissolved in concentrated NaOH, and the solution is then diluted causing precipitation of uranium, thorium and rare earth hydroxides. The precipitate is collected and dissolved in HCl, and the pH of this solution is adjusted to about 6, precipitating the hydroxides of thorium and uranium but leaving the rare earths in solution. The rare earths are then separated from the solution by precipitation at a still higher pH. The thorium and uranium containing precipitate is redissolved in HNO/sub 3/ and the two elements are separated by extraction into tributyl phosphate and back extraction with a weakly acidic solution to remove the thorium.

  9. Mechanical tools for the removal of Ixodes ricinus female ticks--differences of instruments and pulling or twisting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duscher, G G; Peschke, R; Tichy, A

    2012-10-01

    The fast and safe removal of ticks is of medical and veterinary importance since many tick-borne pathogens require time to be transmitted. In the past, many tools and applications were used to remove ticks from the skin of humans and pets. Choking the ticks by blocking their respiratory system with chemicals cannot be recommended due to the low respiratory rate of ticks. Mechanical devices to remove ticks are usually recommended; however, they vary with regard to their mechanism of seizing and holding the tick and in the way of extraction (pulling or twisting). In this study, five commercial tick removal devices with different mechanisms were tested on pets according to their practicability, injury of the mouthparts, and the idiosoma of female Ixodes ricinus ticks. Therefore, 22 veterinarians and four pet owners removed 596 ticks from various animals by using the different devices and filled in a questionnaire for each case. The tick species and instars were determined, and for the female I. ricinus ticks (n = 527) the condition of the mouthparts as well as the idiosoma was evaluated. Twisting of the female I. ricinus ticks reduced the force required for extraction, the adverse reaction of the animal and the time needed for removal. The device with a "V"-shaped slot which allows a grabbing of the mouthparts delivered the best results according to the condition of the mouthparts and the intactness of the female I. ricinus tick's body. Therefore, grabbing the mouthparts and twisting can be recommended for removal of I. ricinus females from pets.

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for determination of organic matter removal efficiency at water treatment works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Bieroza

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter (OM in drinking water treatment is a common impediment responsible for increased coagulant and disinfectant dosages, formation of carcinogenic disinfection-by products, and microbial re-growth in distribution system. The inherent heterogeneity of OM implies the utilization of advanced analytical techniques for its characterization and assessment of removal efficiency. Here, the application of simple fluorescence excitation-emission technique to OM characterization in drinking water treatment is presented. The fluorescence data of raw and clarified water was obtained from 16 drinking water treatment works. The reduction in fulvic-like fluorescence was found to significantly correlate with OM removal measured with total organic carbon (TOC. Fluorescence properties, fulvic- and tryptophan-like regions, were found to discriminate OM fractions of different removal efficiencies.

    The results obtained in the study show that fluorescence spectroscopy provides a rapid and accurate characterization and quantification of OM fractions and indication of their treatability in conventional water treatment.

  11. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for determination of organic matter removal efficiency at water treatment works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Z. Bieroza

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic matter (OM in drinking water treatment is a common impediment responsible for increased coagulant and disinfectant dosages, formation of carcinogenic disinfection-by products, and microbial re-growth in distribution system. The inherent heterogeneity of OM implies the utilization of advanced analytical techniques for its characterization and assessment of removal efficiency. Here, the application of simple fluorescence excitation-emission technique to OM characterization in drinking water treatment is presented. The fluorescence data of raw and clarified water was obtained from 16 drinking water treatment works. The reduction in fulvic-like fluorescence was found to significantly correlate with OM removal measured with total organic carbon (TOC. Fluorescence properties, fulvic- and tryptophan-like regions, were found to discriminate OM fractions of different removal efficiencies. The results obtained in the study show that fluorescence spectroscopy provides a rapid and accurate characterization and quantification of OM fractions and indication of their treatability in conventional water treatment.

  12. Characterising the Removal of Trace Organic Chemicals in Wastewater - Are we using the Right Tools?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plósz, Benedek G.; Polesel, Fabio

    Hypothesis tests posed on trace organics fate and removal in wastewater are often answered using approaches that can introduce significant bias in observations made on the system. Using non-representative sampling approaches in sewer and wastewater treatment plant studies is an example (Ort et al...

  13. Sands styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H. Moust; Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Poulsen, H. Serup

    1975-01-01

    På grundlag af triaxialforsøg med D=7 og 20 cm og varierende højde på løse og faste lejringer af Blokhussand kan effekten af varierende højde-breddeforhold og spændingsniveau samt skalaeffekten bestemmes. Ved sammenligning med pladeforsøg med overfladelast op til 8 t/m2 kan den almindelige fremga...... fremgangsmåde ved bæreevneberegninger på sand undersøges....

  14. Ozonation: a tool for removal of pharmaceuticals, contrast media and musk fragrances from wastewater?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, Thomas A; Stüber, Jeannette; Herrmann, Nadine; McDowell, Derek; Ried, Achim; Kampmann, Martin; Teiser, Bernhard

    2003-04-01

    A pilot plant for ozonation and UV-disinfection received effluent from a German municipal sewage treatment plant (STP) to test the removal of pharmaceuticals, iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) and musk fragrances from municipal wastewater. In the original STP effluent, 5 antibiotics (0.34-0.63 microgl(-1)), 5 betablockers (0.18-1.7 microgl(-1)), 4 antiphlogistics (0.10-1.3 microgl(-1)), 2 lipid regulator metabolites (0.12-0.13 microgl(-1)), the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (2.1 microgl(-1)), 4 ICM (1.1-5.2 microgl(-1)), the natural estrogen estrone (0.015 microgl(-1)) and 2 musk fragrances (0.1-0.73 microgl(-1)) were detected by LC-electrospray tandem MS and/or GC/MS/MS. ICM, derived from radiological examinations, were present with the highest concentrations (diatrizoate: 5.7 microgl(-1), iopromide: 5.2 microgl(-1)). By applying 10-15 mgl(-1) ozone (contact time: 18 min), all the pharmaceuticals investigated as well as musk fragrances (HHCB, AHTN) and estrone were no longer detected. However, ICM (diatrizoate, iopamidol, iopromide and iomeprol) were still detected in appreciable concentrations. Even with a 15 mgl(-1) ozone dose, the ionic diatrizoate only exhibited removal efficiencies of not higher than 14%, while the non-ionic ICM were removed to a degree of higher than 80%. Advanced oxidation processes (O(3)/UV-low pressure mercury arc, O(3)/H(2)O(2)), which were non-optimized for wastewater treatment, did not lead significantly to a higher removal efficiency for the ICM than ozone alone.

  15. PO43 Removal by and Permeability of Industrial Byproducts and Minerals: Granulated Blast Furnace Slag, Cement Kiln Dust, Coconut Shell Activated Carbon, Silica Sand and Zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excess aqueous concentration of phosphate degrades the overall water quality of the receiving surface waters in a cumulatively damaging process referred to as eutrophication. Adsorption of excess phosphate has proven to be the most effective, and economical methods of phosphate removal from such wat...

  16. Fluidized sand biofilters used to remove ammonia, biochemical oxygen demand, total coliform bacteria, and suspended solids from an intensive aquaculture effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effluents from aquaculture facilities must be effectively managed to remove dissolved wastes and suspended solids that can pollute receiving bodies of water. High volume, dilute flows leaving settling or filtration units can appear pristine, but still contain dissolved wastes. Effective technologie...

  17. Treatment of municipal wastewater in full-scale on-site sand filter reduces BOD efficiently but does not reach requirements for nitrogen and phosphorus removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaksonen, Petteri; Sinkkonen, Aki; Zaitsev, Gennadi; Mäkinen, Esa; Grönroos, Timo; Romantschuk, Martin

    2017-04-01

    A traditional sand filter for treatment of household wastewater was constructed in the fall of 2012 at Biolinja 12, Turku, Finland. Construction work was led and monitored by an authorized wastewater treatment consultant. The filter was placed on a field bordered by open ditches from all sides in order to collect excess rain and snowmelt waters. The filter was constructed and insulated from the environment so that all outflowing water was accounted for. Untreated, mainly municipal, wastewater from Varissuo suburb was pumped from a sewer separately via three septic tanks (volume = 1 m(3) each) into the filters. Normally, wastewater was distributed to ground filters automatically according to pre-programmed schedule. Initially, the daily flow was 1200 L day(-1) to reflect the average organic load of a household of five persons (load: ca 237 g day(-1) BOD; 73 g day(-1) total N; and 10.4 g day(-1) total P). Later in the test, the flow rate was decreased first to 900 and then to 600 L day(-1) to better reflect the average volume produced by five persons. Volumes of inlet wastewater as well as treated water were monitored by magnetic flow meters. Samples were withdrawn from the inlet water, from the water entering the filters after the third septic tank, and from the outflowing water. After an initial adaption time, the reductions in BOD and chemical oxygen demand were constantly between 92 and 98%, showing that the biological degradation process in the filters functioned optimally and clearly comply with the national and EU standards. The reduction in total nitrogen and total phosphorus, however, reached required levels only during the first months of testing, apparently when buildup of microbial biomass was still ongoing. After this initial period of 3 months showing satisfactory reduction levels, the reduction of total nitrogen varied between 5 and 25% and total phosphorus mostly between 50 and 65%. Nitrification was efficient in the filter, but as

  18. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction as an efficient tool for removal of phospholipids from human plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Bardakci, Turgay; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2016-01-01

    Generic Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction (PALME) methods for non-polar basic and non-polar acidic drugs from human plasma were investigated with respect to phospholipid removal. In both cases, extractions in 96-well format were performed from plasma (125μL), through 4μL organic solv...... matrix effects were investigated with fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and quetiapine as model analytes. No signs of matrix effects were observed. Finally, PALME was evaluated for the aforementioned drug substances, and data were in accordance with European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines....

  19. Electrochemical peroxidation as a tool to remove arsenic and copper from smelter wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez, Claudia; Hansen, Henrik K.; Nuñez, Patricio

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical peroxidation (ECP) is a method that recently has been applied in the treatment of heavy metal polluted wastewater. This method is based on the anodic dissolution of iron to ferrous ions that reacts with H2O2 to produce tiny particles of ferric oxides. These oxides adsorb metals...... wastewater samples. The concentric iron electrodes acted as ferrous ion source when applying a constant direct current with current reversal every minute and the H2O2 was added dropwise. Initial pH was fixed at 3.5, 5.0 and 6.5, respectively. The best results with the synthetic wastewater showed [99% removal...

  20. Economic Optimized Medium for Tensio-Active Agent Production by Candida sphaerica UCP0995 and Application in the Removal of Hydrophobic Contaminant from Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galba M. Campos-Takaki

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Statistical experimental designs and response surface methodology were employed to optimize the concentrations of agroindustrial residues as soybean oil (SORR from refinery, and corn steep liquor (CSL from corn industry, for tensio-active agent produced by Candida sphaerica UCP 0995. Three 22 full factorial design were applied sequentially to investigate the effects of the concentrations and interactions of soybean oil refinery residue and corn steep liquor on the surface tension of free-cell culture broth for 144 h. Two 22 central composite designs and response surface methodology were adopted to derive a statistical model to measure the effect of SORR and CSL on the surface tension of the free-cell culture broth for 144 h. The regression equation obtained from the experimental data using a central composite design was solved, and by analyzing the response surface contour plots, the optimal concentrations of the constituents of the medium were determined: 8.63% v/v (≈9% v/v of SORR and 8.80% v/v (≈9% v/v CSL. The minimum surface tension predicted and experimentally confirmed was 25.25 mN/m. The new biosurfactant, denominated Lunasan, recovered 95% of motor oil adsorbed in a sand sample, thus showing great potential for use in bioremediation processes, especially in the petroleum industry.

  1. Economic optimized medium for tensio-active agent production by Candida sphaerica UCP0995 and application in the removal of hydrophobic contaminant from sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Juliana M; Rufino, Raquel D; Albuquerque, Clarissa D C; Sarubbo, Leonie A; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2011-01-01

    Statistical experimental designs and response surface methodology were employed to optimize the concentrations of agroindustrial residues as soybean oil (SORR) from refinery, and corn steep liquor (CSL) from corn industry, for tensio-active agent produced by Candida sphaerica UCP 0995. Three 2(2) full factorial design were applied sequentially to investigate the effects of the concentrations and interactions of soybean oil refinery residue and corn steep liquor on the surface tension of free-cell culture broth for 144 h. Two 2(2) central composite designs and response surface methodology were adopted to derive a statistical model to measure the effect of SORR and CSL on the surface tension of the free-cell culture broth for 144 h. The regression equation obtained from the experimental data using a central composite design was solved, and by analyzing the response surface contour plots, the optimal concentrations of the constituents of the medium were determined: 8.63% v/v (≅9% v/v) of SORR and 8.80% v/v (≅9% v/v) CSL. The minimum surface tension predicted and experimentally confirmed was 25.25 mN/m. The new biosurfactant, denominated Lunasan, recovered 95% of motor oil adsorbed in a sand sample, thus showing great potential for use in bioremediation processes, especially in the petroleum industry.

  2. Dissolution enhancement and mathematical modeling of removal of residual trichloroethene in sands by ozonation during flushing with micro-nano-bubble solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Menghau; Teng, Chun-Hao; Yang, Tsung-Hsien

    2017-07-01

    Soil flushing using micro-nano-sized bubbles (MNB) in water as the flushing solution was tested in laboratory sand columns for the cleanup of residual trichloroethene (TCE) non-aqueous-phase-liquid (NAPL). Experiments considering flushing with MNB as well as ozone MNB (OZMNB) in water to treat soils contaminated with residual TCE liquid were conducted to examine effects of ozone on dissolution enhancement. The degrees of residual TCE saturation in soils, ranging from 0.44% to 7.6%, were tested. During flushings, aqueous TCE concentrations at the column exit were monitored and TCE masses remained in the columns after flushing were determined. Experimental results between runs with MNB and OZMNB in water revealed that dissolution enhancement was dependent on residual saturation conditions, and the maximum enhancement was around 9%. Governing equations consisting of three coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) were developed to model the system, and high-order finite difference (HOFD) method was employed to solve these PDEs. From mathematical modeling of reactive mass transfer under low residual saturation conditions (0.44% and 1.9%), experimental data were simulated and important controlling mechanisms were identified. It was concluded that a specific parameter pertinent to NAPL-water interfacial area in the Sherwood number had to be modified to satisfactorily describe the dissolution of TCE in the presence of MNB in water.

  3. Tar sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  4. It's in the sand

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2016-01-01

    Sand is sand isn’t it? Sand gets everywhere but rather than a nuisance it is a valuable, high-purity raw material. Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist at the British Geological Survey (BGS), talks us through what sand is, what it can be used for and how to find it. His exploration of sand takes us from the deserts of Arabia to the damp sand pits of Mansfield!

  5. 涂铝砂除锌吸附等温线研究及理论分析%Study and Theoretical Analysis on Adsorption Isotherm of Zinc Removal With Aluminum-Oxide-Coated Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高乃云; 徐迪民; 范瑾初; 严煦世

    2001-01-01

    The experiment and computation are introduced for adsorption isotherm of zinc removal with Aluminum-Oxide-Coated Sand (AOCS),which is described and analyzed by using the surface complexation and surface precipitation models.The isotherm of zinc removal is of Langmuir adsorption pattern and is valid for single-layer adsorption at low equilibrium concentration of Zn(Ⅱ).As the equilibrium concentration is increased to a certain extent,the sorption follows a Freundlich isotherm and multi-layer adsorption.However,further increase of the concentration results primarily in solid solution precipitation.%介绍了氧化铝涂层砂除锌吸附等温线试验、计算,并采用表面络合模型和沉积模型加以描述和分析。原水中Zn(Ⅱ)浓度低时,除锌吸附等温线属于Langmuir型,单层吸附;Zn(Ⅱ)平衡浓度增加到一定的范围时,属于Freundlich吸附等温线,多层吸附;Zn(Ⅱ)平衡浓度进一步增大,以固体溶液沉积为主。

  6. 49 CFR 1242.28 - Roadway machines, small tools and supplies, and snow removal (accounts XX-19-36 to XX-19-38...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roadway machines, small tools and supplies, and... PASSENGER SERVICE FOR RAILROADS 1 Operating Expenses-Way and Structures § 1242.28 Roadway machines, small tools and supplies, and snow removal (accounts XX-19-36 to XX-19-38, inclusive). Separate...

  7. Removal of cadmium by Lactobacillus kefir as a protective tool against toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, Esteban; Carasi, Paula; Tymczyszyn, E Elizabeth; Gómez-Zavaglia, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the capacity of Lactobacillus kefir strains to remove cadmium cations and protect eukaryotic cells from cadmium toxicity. Lb. kefir CIDCA 8348 and JCM 5818 were grown in a 1/2 dilution of MRS broth supplemented with Cd(NO3)2 ranging 0 to 1 mM. Growth kinetics were followed during 76 h at 30 °C by registering optical density at 600 nm every 4-10 h. The accumulated concentration of cadmium was determined on cultures in the stationary phase by atomic absorption. The viability of a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2) upon exposure to (a) free cadmium and (b) cadmium previously incubated with Lb. kefir strains was evaluated by determining the mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity. Lb. kefir strains were able to grow and tolerate concentrations of cadmium cations up to 1 mM. The addition of cadmium to the culture medium increased the lag time in all the concentrations used. However, a decrease of the total biomass (maximum Absorbance) was observed only at concentrations above 0.0012 and 0.0011 mM for strains CIDCA 8348 and JCM 5818, respectively. Shorter and rounder lactobacilli were observed in both strains upon microscopic observations. Moreover, dark precipitates compatible with intracellular precipitation of cadmium were observed in the cytoplasm of both strains. The ability of Lb. kefir to protect eukaryotic cells cultures from cadmium toxicity was analysed using HepG2 cells lines. Concentrations of cadmium greater than 3×10(-3) mM strongly decreased the viability of HepG2 cells. However, when the eukaryotic cells were exposed to cadmium pre-incubated 1 h with Lb. kefir the toxicity of cadmium was considerably lower, Lb. kefir JCM 5818 being more efficient. The high tolerance and binding capacity of Lb. kefir strains to cadmium concentrations largely exceeding the tolerated weekly intake (TWI) of cadmium for food (2.5 μg per kg of body weight) and water (3 μg/l) addressed to human consumption, is an important added value when

  8. Analysis of effectiveness of used sands reclamation treatment – in various technological devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dańko

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of effectiveness of spent sands reclamation treatment performed in technological devices of various intensity of dry reclamation – during which used binding material is being removed from grain surfaces – is presented in the paper. Variety of reclamation influences was considered via the realization of the so called elementary operations such as: rubbing, grinding and crushing [1-5], which are realised mainly in dry mechanical reclamation devices but also appear in other technological devices for sand preparation.The model rotor reclaimer and two types of mixers used for preparing initial foundry sands with resin U 404 and hardener 100 T3 of the Hüttenes-Albertus Company were applied for tests.The theoretical model for assessing the effectiveness of reclamation treatment developed by the author [3, 4], was experimentally verified [5, 7], with the application of standard testing procedures. The model can be considered a new tool enabling the selection of optimal reclamation times for the given used sand at the assumed intensity of silica sand matrix recovery. Sand mixture of a proper composition fulfilled needed technological properties after total hardening was used as charge material in experiments. The reclamation treatment consisted of mechanical and mechanical-cryogenic reclamation performed within a wide range of times and conditions influencing the treatment intensity.

  9. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  10. Eastern Scheldt Sand, Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. T; Madsen, E. B.; Schaarup-Jensen, A. L.

    The present data report contains data from 13 drained triaxial tests, performed on two different sand types in the Soil Mechanics Laboratory at Aalborg University in March, 1997. Two tests have been performed on Baskarp Sand No. 15, which has already ken extensively tested in the Soil Mechanics...... Laboratory. The remaining 11 triaxial tests have ben performed on Eastern Scheldt Sand, which is a material not yet investigated at the Soil Mechanics Laboratory. In the first pari of this data report, the characteristics of the two sand types in question will be presented. Next, a description...

  11. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  12. Global sand trade is paving the way for a tragedy of the sand commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, A.; Brandt, J.; Lear, K.; Liu, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the first 40 years of the 21st century, planet Earth is highly likely to experience more urban land expansion than in all of history, an increase in transportation infrastructure by more than a third, and a great variety of land reclamation projects. While scientists are beginning to quantify the deep imprint of human infrastructure on biodiversity at large scales, its off-site impacts and linkages to sand mining and trade have been largely ignored. Sand is the most widely used building material in the world. With an ever-increasing demand for this resource, sand is being extracted at rates that far exceed its replenishment, and is becoming increasingly scarce. This has already led to conflicts around the world and will likely lead to a "tragedy of the sand commons" if sustainable sand mining and trade cannot be achieved. We investigate the environmental and socioeconomic interactions over large distances (telecouplings) of infrastructure development and sand mining and trade across diverse systems through transdisciplinary research and the recently proposed telecoupling framework. Our research is generating a thorough understanding of the telecouplings driven by an increasing demand for sand. In particular, we address three main research questions: 1) Where are the conflicts related to sand mining occurring?; 2) What are the major "sending" and "receiving" systems of sand?; and 3) What are the main components (e.g. causes, effects, agents, etc.) of telecoupled systems involving sand mining and trade? Our results highlight the role of global sand trade as a driver of environmental degradation that threatens the integrity of natural systems and their capacity to deliver key ecosystem services. In addition, infrastructure development and sand mining and trade have important implications for other sustainability challenges such as over-fishing and global warming. This knowledge will help to identify opportunities and tools to better promote a more sustainable use

  13. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  14. Bacteriophage removal efficiency as a validation and operational monitoring tool for virus reduction in wastewater reclamation: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Kitajima, Masaaki; Nguyen, Thanh H; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2017-09-15

    The multiple-barrier concept is widely employed in international and domestic guidelines for wastewater reclamation and reuse for microbiological risk management, in which a wastewater reclamation system is designed to achieve guideline values of the performance target of microbe reduction. Enteric viruses are one of the pathogens for which the target reduction values are stipulated in guidelines, but frequent monitoring to validate human virus removal efficacy is challenging in a daily operation due to the cumbersome procedures for virus quantification in wastewater. Bacteriophages have been the first choice surrogate for this task, because of the well-characterized nature of strains and the presence of established protocols for quantification. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to calculate the average log10 reduction values (LRVs) of somatic coliphages, F-specific phages, MS2 coliphage and T4 phage by membrane bioreactor, activated sludge, constructed wetlands, pond systems, microfiltration and ultrafiltration. The calculated LRVs of bacteriophages were then compared with reported human enteric virus LRVs. MS2 coliphage LRVs in MBR processes were shown to be lower than those of norovirus GII and enterovirus, suggesting it as a possible validation and operational monitoring tool. The other bacteriophages provided higher LRVs compared to human viruses. The data sets on LRVs of human viruses and bacteriophages are scarce except for MBR and conventional activated sludge processes, which highlights the necessity of investigating LRVs of human viruses and bacteriophages in multiple treatment unit processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Polishing tool and the resulting TIF for three variable machine parameters as input for the removal simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Robert; Haberl, Alexander; Rascher, Rolf

    2017-06-01

    The trend in the optic industry shows, that it is increasingly important to be able to manufacture complex lens geometries on a high level of precision. From a certain limit on the required shape accuracy of optical workpieces, the processing is changed from the two-dimensional to point-shaped processing. It is very important that the process is as stable as possible during the in point-shaped processing. To ensure stability, usually only one process parameter is varied during processing. It is common that this parameter is the feed rate, which corresponds to the dwell time. In the research project ArenA-FOi (Application-oriented analysis of resource-saving and energy-efficient design of industrial facilities for the optical industry), a touching procedure is used in the point-attack, and in this case a close look is made as to whether a change of several process parameters is meaningful during a processing. The ADAPT tool in size R20 from Satisloh AG is used, which is also available for purchase. The behavior of the tool is tested under constant conditions in the MCP 250 CNC by OptoTech GmbH. A series of experiments should enable the TIF (tool influence function) to be determined using three variable parameters. Furthermore, the maximum error frequency that can be processed is calculated as an example for one parameter set and serves as an outlook for further investigations. The test results serve as the basic for the later removal simulation, which must be able to deal with a variable TIF. This topic has already been successfully implemented in another research project of the Institute for Precision Manufacturing and High-Frequency Technology (IPH) and thus this algorithm can be used. The next step is the useful implementation of the collected knowledge. The TIF must be selected on the basis of the measured data. It is important to know the error frequencies to select the optimal TIF. Thus, it is possible to compare the simulated results with real measurement

  16. MORPHOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SAND FRACTION IN A SAND GRAIN IMAGE CAPTURE SYSTEM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Arruda Viana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Morphology studies assume significant importance in analysis of phenomena of granular systems packaging, in particular with a view to the use of the technique of soil stabilization named particle size correction in forest roads. In this context, this study aimed to develop and operationalize a Sand Grain Image Capture System and, hereby, determine the morphological indices of the sand fractions of two sandy soils called João Pinheiro (JP and Cachoeira da Prata (CP. Soil samples, air-dried, were sieved (2.0 mm nominal mesh size for removal of gravels. The materials that passed through the sieve were subjected to dispersion, washing in 0.053 mm nominal mesh size sieve, removal of organic matter and iron oxides to obtain the clean sand fractions. Subsequently, each soil sample was sieved for separation into twelve classes, between the diameters of 0.149 mm and 1.190 mm, using a Rotap shaker. Next, tests were carried out to characterize the morphometric attributes of the twelve classes of sand fractions of the soils studied. For validation of the performance of the Sand Grain Image Capture System, the results were compared to those obtained using a standard procedure for image analysis. The analysis of the results led to the following conclusions: (i the sand fraction of the JP soil presented higher values for the morphometric indices roundness, elongation and compactness compared to sand fraction of the CP soil; and (ii the Sand Grain Image Capture System worked properly, with practicality.

  17. Pretreatment of turkey fat-containing wastewater in coarse sand and gravel/coarse sand bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Rashmi Singh; Cai, Ling; Tuovinen, Olli H; Mancl, Karen M

    2010-02-01

    Fat, oil and grease in wastewater can be difficult to treat because of their slow decomposition. Traditional pretreatment facilities to remove fat, oil and grease from wastewater are increasingly costly. The hypothesis in this study was that pretreatment of animal fat-containing wastewater in sand and sand/gravel filters facilitates the conversion of slowly degradable organic matter measured as the difference between chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD(5)) for subsequent biological treatment. The pretreatment was evaluated using simulated turkey-processing wastewater and coarse sand and sand/gravel filters at a constant hydraulic loading rate of 132L/m(2)/day. Two types of fixed media reactors were employed: (i) one set with a varying depth of coarse sand, and (ii) the second was similar but with an additional pea gravel cap. The results indicated that the relative removal of COD was slightly improved in the sand bioreactors with a pea gravel cap irrespective of the depth of coarse sand, but partial conversion to BOD(5) was not consistently demonstrated. Pea gravel may act as a sieve to entrap organic matter including fat globules from the wastewater. Multiple dosing at the same daily loading rate slightly improved the treatment efficiency of the sand bioreactors. The ratios of influent-COD/effluent-COD were always greater than 1.0 following a change in the dosing frequency after a rest period, suggesting that organic matter, specifically fat globules in this case, was retained by the column matrix.

  18. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Špirutová; J. Beňo; V. Bednářová; J. Kříž; M. Kandrnál

    2012-01-01

    Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron) are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this co...

  19. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...... and biotit. Mainly the sand will be used for tests concerning the development og the theory of building up pore pressure in sand, L. B. Ibsen 1993....

  20. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...

  1. Sand Dune Encroachment and Desertification Processes of the Rigboland Sand Sea, Central Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam; McQueen, Kenneth G; Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Naseri, Hamidreza

    2017-05-08

    Early studies on sand dune movement and desertification in Iran have not always been convincingly demonstrated because of problems with the field-based measurements. In some areas where various land uses have been engulfed by aeolian sand dunes, desertification is clear, but in other less settled areas, it may not be so obvious. The objective of this study is to demonstrate encroachments of the Rigboland sand sea, central Iran, in its different directions and variable magnitude rates. Determining the rate and direction of the sand sea movements is critical for specifying which lands should be prioritized and quickly protected. The study has trialed a change detection technique which uses a Cross-Tabulation module to compare two available LandsatTM images over the Rigboland sand sea. This indicates that within a ten-year span (from 1988 to 1998) more than 200 ha/yr were added to the Rigboland sand sea, from the alluvial fan landforms in the eastern upstream, outer margins of the Rigboland sand sea. Coupled with GIS techniques, this type of analysis of the remote sensing (RS) images provides an effective tool for the monitoring and prognostication of sand dune movement and sand sea change.

  2. Tekstil Atıksularının Gideriminde Atık Döküm Kumlarının Kullanımı / Using of Waste Foundry Sands in Removal of Textile Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELİF HATİCE GÜRKAN

    2012-12-01

    öküm kumlarının, tekstil endüstrisi atık sularında renk gideriminde adsorbent olarak kullanılması amaçlanmaktadır. Using of Waste Foundry Sands in Removal of Textile Wastewater Nowadays, the accelerating need of water due to usage of water in industralized countries and global warming is causing all water sources to be exhausted. The effects the industrial wastewater made to the nature are important level, changer of natural balance, and sometimes non returned position. By reusing the treated the wastewater, not only the consumption of natural water sources has been prevented, but also the amount of discharged treated wastewater and its effects to the environment has been decreased. The wastewater resulted from industries shows big differences according to the wastewater in houses in the conditions of resource, amount, and character. So output water of the industry establishment has to be purified to prevent not to dirty natural water places. Textile industry is one of the biggest industries of Turkey and it consumes Access amount of water. As there are several methods and technologies used in this sector due to the different raw materials and various chemicals, the wastewaters obtained vary related to the products produced. The most prominent feature of textile industry wastewater is contained high amounts of organic and inorganic chemicals, and high total organic carbon (TOC, chemical oxygen demand (COD and intense color. The discharge of dyes into the receiving waters constitutes only a small portion of water pollution. However the presence of very low concentrations of dyes in receiving waters is aesthetically undesirable. Therefore, treatment processes removing dyes from textile effluents have become important in order to conserve receiving waters. In this study is to investigate using the adsorpsion method of removal with waste foundry sands, which are used expecially dye nd textile industries and are an important polluting agent in the waste water dumped into

  3. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions.

  4. Sorption of Arsenite onto Mackinawite Coated Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, T. J.; Hayes, K. F.; Abriola, L. M.

    2004-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem affecting aquifers in the United States as well as abroad. Recent strengthening of the US EPA MCL for arsenic has prompted the need for technology capable of removing both arsenite and arsenate from solution. Arsenite, the more toxic form of arsenic, is more difficult to remove from anoxic zones in the subsurface. Studies by others have demonstrated the affinity of some types of iron sulfides for arsenite, such as troilite, pyrite, amorphous iron sulfide and mackinawite. However, these studies have not provided a comprehensive investigation of the macroscopic behavior of arsenite in the presence of crystalline mackinawite in a form that can be readily applied to real-world treatment technologies. This study examines the behavior of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sand. PH edge results demonstrate that arsenite sorption onto mackinawite coated sand increases with increasing pH, reaching maximum removal at pH 10. Arsenite removal, albeit slight, occurring below pH 5 is independent of pH indicative of a different removal mechanism. Isotherm studies show that at low concentrations, removal is Langmuirian in nature. Arsenite sorption abruptly converts to linear behavior at high concentrations, possibly attributed to the saturation of the monolayer. Ionic strength effects were assessed by comparing pH edge data developed for three different concentrations of NaCl background electrolyte solution. Increases in ionic strength enhance the removal of arsenite from solution, suggesting possible inner-sphere surface complexation removal mechanisms. Information gathered in this study can be used to further develop surface complexation models to describe and predict reactivity of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sands in anoxic regions. Mackinawite coated sands investigated here may provide a feasible reactive medium for implementation in above-ground sorption reactors or subsurface

  5. Investigation of Surface Roughness and Material Removal Rate (MRR on Tool Steel Using Brass and Copper Electrode for Electrical Discharge Grinding (EDG Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hafiz Helmi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the investigation on surface roughness and material removal rate (MRR of tool steel machined with brass and copper electrode for Electrical Discharge Grinding (EDG process. The machining parameter include pulse ON time, pulse OFF time, peak current and capacitance. Analysis of variance (ANOVA with Taguchi method is used to investigate the significant effect on the performance characteristic and the optimal cutting parameters of EDG. The result shows that, the surface roughness value when using of both tool materials are mostly influenced by pulse ON time and peak current. The capacitance parameter in both experiments was not giving any significant effect. The significant factors for the material removal rate due to the machining parameter are peak current parameter and ON time parameter but it also can increase the machining time

  6. Processes of microbial pesticide degradation in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    concentrations of 0.04-2.4 μg/L. The pesticides were removed from the water in microcosms with filter sand from all three investigated sand filters. Within the experimental periode of six to 13 days, 65-85% of the bentazone, 86-93% of the glyphosate, 97-99% of the p-nitrophenol was removed from the water phase......Aerobic rapid sand filters for treatment of groundwater at waterworks were investigated for the ability to remove pesticides. The potential, kinetics and mechanisms of microbial pesticide removal was investigated in microcosms consisting of filter sand, treated water and pesticides in initial...

  7. Severe sand aspiration: a case report with complete recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinjongol, Chanin; Kiatchaipipat, Surachai; Thepcharoenniran, Somchai

    2004-07-01

    A 5-year-old boy, previously healthy, was admitted to Ratchaburi Hospital after being buried in a sand pile. He presented with dyspnea and tachypnea. Chest radiograph showed opaque particles in both main and segmental bronchi (sand bronchogram). The first attempt of bronchoscopy was unsatisfactory as a considerable amount of sand particles had migrated further into the distal bronchi. A second bronchoscopy was performed with 0.9% saline lavage. Most of the sand particles were successfully removed. Intravenous steroids and antibiotics were administered for treatment. The patient was discharged uneventfully by the end of the first week of hospitalization.

  8. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  9. Simulating and understanding sand wave variation: A case study of the Golden Gate sand waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterlini, F.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Hanes, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed comparison between measured features of the Golden Gate sand wave field and the results of a nonlinear sand wave model. Because the Golden Gate sand waves exhibit large variation in their characteristics and in their environmental physics, this area gives us the opportunity to study sand wave variation between locations, within one well-measured, large area. The nonlinear model used in this paper is presently the only tool that provides information on the nonlinear evolution of large-amplitude sand waves. The model is used to increase our understanding of the coupling between the variability in environmental conditions and the sand wave characteristics. Results show that the model is able to describe the variation in the Golden Gate sand waves well when both the local oscillating tidal current and the residual current are taken into account. Current and water depth seem to be the most important factors influencing sand wave characteristics. The simulation results give further confidence in the underlying model hypothesis and assumptions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Capturing phosphates with iron enhanced sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Andrew J; Gulliver, John S; Weiss, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Most treatment practices for urban runoff capture pollutants such as phosphorus by either settling or filtration while dissolved phosphorus, typically as phosphates, is untreated. Dissolved phosphorus, however, represents an average 45% of total phosphorus in stormwater runoff and can be more than 95%. In this study, a new stormwater treatment technology to capture phosphate, called the Minnesota Filter, is introduced. The filter comprises iron filings mixed with sand and is tested for phosphate removal from synthetic stormwater. Results indicate that sand mixed with 5% iron filings captures an average of 88% phosphate for at least 200 m of treated depth, which is significantly greater than a sand filter without iron filings. Neither incorporation of iron filings into a sand filter nor capture of phosphates onto iron filings in column experiments had a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the filter at mixtures of 5% or less iron by weight. Field applications with up to 10.7% iron were operated over 1 year without detrimental effects upon hydraulic conductivity. A model is applied and fit to column studies to predict the field performance of iron-enhanced sand filters. The model predictions are verified through the predicted performance of the filters in removing phosphates in field applications. Practical applications of the technology, both existing and proposed, are presented so stormwater managers can begin implementation.

  11. MouldingSandDB – a modern database storing moulding sands properties research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jakubski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of foundry processes requires the use of modern, advanced IT tools for optimization, storage and analysis of t echnicaldata. Properties of moulding and core sands that are collected in research laboratories, manufacturers, and finally in the foundries, are not in use later on. It seems important to create a database that will allow to use the results stored, along with the possibility of searching according to set criteria, adjusted to casting practice. This paper presents part of the database named „MouldingSandDB”, which allows to collect and search data for synthetic moulding sands.

  12. Sands cykliske styrke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo

    1992-01-01

    Sands cykliske styrke kan beskrives ved Cyclic Liquefaction, Mobilisering, Stabilization og Instant Stabilization. I artiklen beskrives hvorfor Stabilization og Instant Stabilization ikke observeres, når sands udrænede styrke undersøges i triaxial celler, der anvender prøver med dobbelt prøvehøjde....

  13. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  14. A Laboratory Screening Study On The Use Of Solidifiers As A Response Tool To Remove Crude Oil Slicks On Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effectiveness of five solidifiers to remove Prudhoe Bay crude oil from artificial seawater in the laboratory was determined by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-VIS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The performance of the solidifers was determined by US-V...

  15. Influence of silicate on the transport of bacteria in quartz sand and iron mineral-coated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe; Yang, Haiyan; Wu, Dan; Ni, Jinren; Kim, Hyunjung; Tong, Meiping

    2014-11-01

    The influence of silicate on the transport and deposition of bacteria (Escherichia coli) in packed porous media were examined at a constant 20 mM ionic strength with different silicate concentrations (from 0 to 1 mM) at pH 7. Transport experiments were performed in two types of representative porous media, both bare quartz sand and iron mineral-coated quartz sand. In bare quartz sand, the breakthrough plateaus in the presence of silicate in suspensions were lower and the corresponding retained profiles were higher than those without silicate ions, indicating that the presence of silicate in suspensions decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand. Moreover, the decrease of bacteria transport in quartz sand induced by silicate was more pronounced with increasing silicate concentrations from 0 to 1 mM. However, when EPS was removed from cell surfaces, the presence of silicate in cell suspensions (with different concentrations) did not affect the transport behavior of bacteria in quartz sand. The interaction of silicate with EPS on cell surfaces negatively decreased the zeta potentials of bacteria, resulting in the decreased cell transport in bare quartz sand when silicate was copresent in bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the presence of silicate in suspensions increased cell transport in iron mineral-coated sand. Silicate ions competed with bacteria for the adsorption sites on mineral-coated sand, contributing to the increased cell transport in mineral-coated sand with silicate present in cell suspensions.

  16. Sand production prediction using ratio of shear modulus to bulk compressibility (case study)

    OpenAIRE

    Ehsan Khamehchi; Ebrahim Reisi

    2015-01-01

    Sand production is a serious problem widely existing in oil/gas production. The problems resulting from sand influx include abrasion of downhole tubular/casing, subsurface safety valve and surface equipment; casing/tubing buckling, failure of casing or liners from removal of surrounding formation, compaction and erosion; and loss of production caused by sand bridging in tubing and/or flow lines. There are several methods for predicting sand production. The methods include use of production da...

  17. CONTROL DE CALIDAD DE HERRAMIENTAS DE CORTE CON REMOCIÓN MÍNIMA DE MATERIAL QUALITY CONTROL OF CUTTING TOOLS WITH MINIMUM MATERIAL REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jandrey Maldaner

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Debido a la mejora de las tecnologías de mecanizado, es necesario que las herramientas satisfagan las demandas requeridas. Una condición especial, para poder describir con seguridad el corte con remoción mínima de material, es el conocimiento de los valores característicos de la superficie y de la geometría. Las herramientas poseen una influencia substancial en la calidad de las piezas producidas, así como en la estabilidad y en la seguridad del proceso de mecanizado. Aunque hay una gran cantidad de herramientas para el corte con remoción mínima de material, se presenta como ejemplo la investigación con medición óptica y la obtención de los valores característicos para dientes de sierras de cinta.Due to improved machine cutting technologies it is necessary that tools fulfil the required performance. A special condition, for minimal machine cutting removal, is the knowledge of surface and geometry characteristic values. These tools represent both a substantial influence on the quality of the manufactured pieces and on stability and working safety of the cutting process. Since there is a large number of tools for minimal removal of material, examples of optical measurement and examination of characteristic values by the belt saw teeth are presented.

  18. STELLA software as a tool for modelling phosphorus removal in a constructed wetland employing dewatered alum sludge as main substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J L G; Wang, Z Y; Zhao, Y Q; Babatunde, A O; Zhao, X H; Jørgensen, S E

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic simulation model was developed for the removal of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) from the vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCW) using a dynamic software program called STELLA (structural thinking, experiential learning laboratory with animation) 9.1.3 to aid in simulating the environmental nature and succession of relationship between interdependent components and processes in the VFCW system. In particular, the VFCW employed dewatered alum sludge as its main substrate to enhance phosphorus (P) immobilization. Although computer modelling of P in treatment wetland has been well studied especially in recent years, there is still a need to develop simple and realistic models that can be used for investigating the dynamics of SRP in VFCWs. The state variables included in the model are dissolved phosphorus (DISP), plant phosphorus (PLAP), detritus phosphorus (DETP), plant biomass (PLBI) and adsorbed phosphorus (ADSP). The major P transformation processes considered in this study were adsorption, plant and microbial uptake and decomposition. The forcing functions which were considered in the model are temperature, radiation, volume of wastewater, P concentration, contact time, flow rate and the adsorbent (i.e., alum sludge). The model results revealed that up to 72% of the SRP can be removed through adsorption process whereas the uptake by plants is about 20% and the remaining processes such as microbial P utilization and decomposition, accounted for 7% SRP removal based on the mass balance calculations. The results obtained indicate that the model can be used to simulate outflow SRP concentration, and it can also be used to estimate the amount of P removed by individual processes in the VFCW using alum-sludge as a substrate.

  19. Removing Turret Faults by Use of Tool Change Action Flowchart%利用换刀动作流程图维修刀塔故障

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐善伟

    2016-01-01

    以意大利BARUFFALDI TS/12为例说明刀塔的工作原理,并分析在维修中如何利用换刀过程的流程图迅速顺利地找到故障点,及时排除故障。%In this paper ,the Italian BARUFFALDI TS/12 was taken as an example ,the working principle of turret was illustrated . The paper also introduced how to use the flowchart of the tool change process to find the failure point quickly and successfully ,to re-move the trouble in time .

  20. Sand and Gravel Deposits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset is a statewide polygon coverage of sand, gravel, and stone resources. This database includes the best data available from the VT Agency of Natural...

  1. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  2. Vestled - Hvide Sande

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel-Christiansen, Carsten; Hesselbjerg, Marianne; Schønherr, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side......Værket Vestled i Hvide Sande præsenteret i sammenhæng af 1000 nutidige landskabsarkitektoniske arbejder fra hele verden, hvor hvert værk vises på én side...

  3. Extensive formation of sinkholes in unconsolidated rock due to underground erosive removal of sand at a marginal batter of an opencast mine - causes, process and geotechnical safety measures. Grossflaechige Erdfallbildungen im Lockergestein durch unterirdische erosive Ausraeumung von Sand and einer Tagebauendboeschung - Ursachen, Verlauf und geotechnische Sicherung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, H.

    1991-08-01

    When the ground water rose in the marginal batter of an opencast mine damage occurred. This was caused by the processes of internal erosion and suffusion in fine sand layers of slight thickness and by the disintegration of the overlying strata due to the formation of sinkholes. Effective safety measures involved lowering the ground-water level in the zone immediately in front of the area in question and installing an auxiliary filter unit at the marginal batter. (orig.).

  4. MECHANICAL REGENERATION OF SAND WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gnir

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental activation of the sand regenerator of the firm SINTO is carried out at ОАО “MZOO". It is shown that sand grains are cleared from films of binding agents, that allows to use the treated sand for preparation of agglutinant and core sands.

  5. Cleaning oil sands drilling waste in Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikic, N.; Nilsen, C.; Markabi, M. [Mi SWACO, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The waste generated from steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) wells is brought to the surface and separated by shale shakers. The waste can include drilling fluids and sand contaminated with bitumen. This paper described a new technology developed to treat waste using the addition of hot water and various mixing and separation technologies to reduce the viscosity of the bitumen and separate it from the sand. The bitumen-contaminated drill cuttings were mixed with hot water to form a slurry that was then separated through the G-force created by a hydrocyclone. A secondary separation was then conducted in an elutriation column to remove residual contaminants from the sand. The flow rate of the process was controlled by the fine solids composition of the cuttings, the temperature of the cleaning process, and the performance of the individual components. Laboratory tests conducted to tests the method showed that the sand particles produced using the method were clean enough to be safely disposed in the environment. A pilot study will be conducted to test the sand cleaning technology at a commercial scale. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Enzyme-based glucose delivery: a possible tool for biosorbent preparation for heavy metal removal from polluted environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palela, Mihaela; Bahrim, Gabriela Elena; Glazyrina, Julia; Brand, Eva; Neubauer, Peter

    2013-11-01

    This study was performed to examine the influence of the controlled glucose supply technology, EnBase(®) Flo, on growth and heavy metals uptake capacity of two Bacillus strains isolated from food industry wastewater. Bacillus sp. growth on EnBase Flo (mineral salt complex medium containing starch-derived polymer as substrate) was examined in 24 deep well plates, controlling the glucose amount release by adding two amyloglucosidase concentrations (3 and 6 UL(-1)). Adsorption of the heavy metals Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) was assessed in a single component system using synthetic metal solutions and as a function of the initial concentration of adsorbate, equilibrium time and removal efficiency. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were used for the mathematical description of the biosorption equilibrium and isotherm constants. A pseudo second-order model was applied to describe the uptake rate for two isolates. The EnBase(®) Flo technology improved the cells growth over ten times after 24 h of fed-batch cultivation. The EnBase(®) Flo technology improved the Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) uptake capacity of the bacterial strains by approximately 55 and 44 %, respectively. The biosorption of each metal was fairly rapid (within 30 min), which could be an advantage for large scale treatment of contaminated sites. This initial study may be a basis for future developments to apply EnBase Flo for the biomass production used further as biosorbent for heavy metal removal from aqueous solutions.

  7. Coagulation-flocculation in leachate treatment using modified micro sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaldiri, Nur Hanani; Halim, Azhar Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Sanitary landfill leachate is considered as highly polluted wastewater, without any treatment, discharging into water system will cause underground water and surface water pollutions. This study was to investigate the treatability of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate via coagulation-flocculation using poly-aluminum chloride (PAC), cationic polymer, and modified micro sand. Leachate was collected from Pulau Burung Sanitary Landfill (PBSL) located in Penang, Malaysia. Coagulation-flocculation was performed by using jar test equipment and the effect of pH, dose of coagulant and dose of polymer toward removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and suspended solid (SS) were examined. Micro sand was also used in this study to compare settling time of coagulation-flocculation process. The optimum pH, dose of coagulant (PAC) and dose of polymer (cationic) achieved were 7.0, 1000 mg/L and 8 mg/L, respectively. The dose of micro sand used for the settling time process was 300 mg/L. Results showed that 52.66% removal of COD, 97.16% removal of SS and 96.44% removal of color were achieved under optimum condition. The settling times for the settling down of the sludge or particles that formed during coagulation-flocculation process were 1 min with modified sand, 20 min with raw micro sand and 45 min without micro sand.

  8. Evaluation of contaminant removal of reverse osmosis and advanced oxidation in full-scale operation by combining passive sampling with chemical analysis and bioanalytical tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; Lawrence, Michael; Macova, Miroslava; Mueller, Jochen F; Poussade, Yvan; Robillot, Cedric; Roux, Annalie; Gernjak, Wolfgang

    2011-06-15

    Advanced water treatment of secondary treated effluent requires stringent quality control to achieve a water quality suitable for augmenting drinking water supplies. The removal of micropollutants such as pesticides, industrial chemicals, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC), pharmaceuticals, and personal care products (PPCP) is paramount. As the concentrations of individual contaminants are typically low, frequent analytical screening is both laborious and costly. We propose and validate an approach for continuous monitoring by applying passive sampling with Empore disks in vessels that were designed to slow down the water flow, and thus uptake kinetics, and ensure that the uptake is only marginally dependent on the chemicals' physicochemical properties over a relatively narrow molecular size range. This design not only assured integrative sampling over 27 days for a broad range of chemicals but also permitted the use of a suite of bioanalytical tools as sum parameters, representative of mixtures of chemicals with a common mode of toxic action. Bioassays proved to be more sensitive than chemical analysis to assess the removal of organic micropollutants by reverse osmosis, followed by UV/H₂O₂ treatment, as many individual compounds fell below the quantification limit of chemical analysis, yet still contributed to the observed mixture toxicity. Nonetheless in several cases, the responses in the bioassays were also below their quantification limits and therefore only three bioassays were evaluated here, representing nonspecific toxicity and two specific end points for estrogenicity and photosynthesis inhibition. Chemical analytical techniques were able to quantify 32 pesticides, 62 PCPPs, and 12 EDCs in reverse osmosis concentrate. However, these chemicals could explain only 1% of the nonspecific toxicity in the Microtox assay in the reverse osmosis concentrate and 0.0025% in the treated water. Likewise only 1% of the estrogenic effect in the E-SCREEN could be

  9. Enhanced microbubbles assisted cleaning of diesel contaminated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashutosh; Liu, Yu

    2017-07-25

    In this article, we investigated the effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound (US), temperature and salinity on cleaning efficacy of fine bubbles with diameter <50μm for diesel contaminated sands. About 47% and 76% diesel removal was achieved from 10% (w/w) diesel contaminated fine and medium sands respectively, after 30min treatment with 40kHz low intensity intermittent pulsed US together with MBs in contrast to 41% and 68% diesel removal while treatment with MBs alone. The effect of high temperature was found to be prominent during the initial stages of cleaning. In addition, MBs generated in 599mM saline water efficiently removed 85% diesel from fine sand within 30min in contrast to only 41% diesel removal with MBs in fresh water. This study provides evidence for developing highly efficient MBs based chemical free technology for diesel contaminated sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gamma rays as an effective tool for removing undesirable color without adverse changes in biological activities of red beet extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Lee, In Chul; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The ethanolic extracts of red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) hairy root were used to investigate the removal of color and improvement of biological activity for enhanced industrial applications. The extracts were exposed to gamma rays ranging from 2.5 to 30 kGy. The red beet hairy root is composed of two major red-colorants, betanin and isobetanin. Gamma ray radiation at 5 kGy remarkably reduced the levels of the major colorants by 94% and the reddish color was eliminated by doses greater than 10 kGy. Color removal was likely due to the gamma ray radiolysis of ethanol. Although details on the mechanism responsible for the decay of the chromophore have not been entirely determined, our results suggest that the free radicals that are produced during this process are capable of destroying the chromophore group in isobetanin, thus bleaching the substrate solution. In spite of the degradation of the major colorants, the biological activities of constituents of the extract such as DPPH radical scavenging and tyrosinase inhibition were negligibly affected by the gamma ray radiation up to 20 kGy. The antioxidant activity was 92.7% in control samples and 90.0-92.0% in irradiated samples (2.5-20 kGy), and a slight decrease to 87.5% was observed for gamma ray radiation at 30 kGy. In addition, tyrosinase inhibition activity has also the same pattern; the activity is slightly increased from 50.7% of control to 49.1-52.8% of irradiated samples (2.5-20 kGy) with a 46.8% at 30 kGy.

  11. Bituminous sands : tax issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, B. [PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper examined some of the tax issues associated with the production of bitumen or synthetic crude oil from oil sands. The oil sands deposits in Alberta are gaining more attention as the supplies of conventional oil in Canada decline. The oil sands reserves located in the Athabasca, Cold Lake and Peace River areas contain about 2.5 trillion barrels of highly viscous hydrocarbons called bitumen, of which nearly 315 billion barrels are recoverable with current technology. The extraction method varies for each geographic area, and even within zones and reservoirs. The two most common extraction methods are surface mining and in-situ extraction such as cyclic steam stimulation (CSS); low pressure steam flood; pressure cycle steam drive; steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD); hot water flooding; and, fire flood. This paper also discussed the following general tax issues: bituminous sands definition; bituminous sands leases and Canadian development expense versus Canadian oil and gas property expense (COGPE); Canadian exploration expense (CEE) for surface mining versus in-situ methods; additional capital cost allowance; and, scientific research and experimental development (SR and ED). 15 refs.

  12. Avaliação de um hidrociclone de Rietema para remoção de areia da água de irrigação Evaluation of Rietema hydrocyclone for sand removal from irrigation water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olívio J. Soccol

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, o principal objetivo foi avaliar a capacidade de um hidrociclone tipo Rietema, com 50 mm de diâmetro, em reter areia suspensa na água de irrigação. O hidrociclone operou com diferenciais de pressão que variaram de 10 a 60 kPa e vazões entre 1.159,90 a 2.603,60 L h-1. A concentração de areia na suspensão variou de 2,81 a 7,01 g L-1. Os resultados mostraram que as melhores eficiências de remoção foram obtidas para os diferenciais de pressão de 10 e 20 kPa, com diâmetros de corte de 50 mm apresentando uma eficiência granulométrica de 70%.In this work, objective was to evaluate the capacity of a Rietema kind of hydrocyclone, with 50 mm diameter, to retain suspended sand in irrigation water. The hydrocyclone was operated with pressure differentials that varied from 10 to 60 kPa and discharges between 1,159.90 and 2,603.60 L h-1. The sand concentration in suspension varied from 2.81 to 7.01 g L-1. The best results were obtained for the pressure differentials of 10 and 20 kPa, with cut diameter sizes of 50 mm showing granulometric efficiency of 70%.

  13. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  14. FLUIDIZATION COOLING OF RETURN SANDS AND ENERGY ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    In order to find out the optimal operation condition for return sands cooler, a cooling model including heat and mass transfer is constructed, and computer simulation is carried out. The results are compared with the operation data obtained from a fluidized bed sand cooler. A method is proposed for the evaluation whether the practical cooling system provides a reasonable energy cost performance. Several key points are discussed concerning enhancement of particles to air heat removal and improvement of energy effciency for cooling.

  15. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  16. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  17. Faraday, Jets, and Sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandtke, M.; van der Meer, Roger M.; Versluis, Andreas Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2003-01-01

    When a 6-mm layer of fine sand with an average grain size of 40 µm is poured into a cylindrical container and shaken vertically, thin jets are seen to emerge from an airy cloud of grains, almost like protuberances from the corona of the sun. A quasi two-dimensional setup reveals the jet-formation

  18. Building with Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Children playing in damp sand invariably try to make a tower or a tunnel. By providing experiences with a variety of materials, alone and together, teachers set up the conditions for children to learn through their senses and ensure that a class approaches a topic with a common set of experiences to build on. Learning about the properties of…

  19. Speleothems and Sand Castles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hance, Trevor; Befus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The idea of building sand castles evokes images of lazy summer days at the beach, listening to waves crash, enjoying salty breezes, and just unplugging for a while to let our inner child explore the wonderful natural toys beneath our feet. The idea of exploring caves might evoke feelings and images of claustrophobia or pioneers and Native…

  20. Virksomhedens sande ansigt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundholt, Marianne Wolff

    2017-01-01

    Er modhistorier en byrde eller en styrke i forandringsprocesser? Hvad stiller vi op, når adgangen til organisationens sande identitet går gennem medarbejdernes modhistorier? Når vi sammenholder denne erkendelse med vores viden om, at medarbejdere helt naturligt afholder sig fra at videregive disse...

  1. Sand (CSW4)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Estuarine and Coastal Research Unit

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available This report is one of a series on Cape Estuaries being published under the general title "The Estuaries of the Cape, Part 2". The report provides information on sand estuary: historical background, abiotic and biotic characteristics. It is pointed...

  2. Sand supply to beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Troels

    2017-04-01

    In most cases, beaches and dunes are built by sand that has been transported onshore from the shoreface. While this has been known for a long time, we are still not able to quantitatively predict onshore sediment transport and sand supply to beaches. Sediment transport processes operating during brief, high-energy stormy conditions - when beaches erode and sand moves offshore - are fairly well known and they can be modelled with a reasonable degree of confidence. However, the slower onshore sand transport leading to beach recovery under low-to-moderate energy conditions - and the reason why beaches and dunes exist in the first place - is not yet well understood. This severely limits our capability to understand and predict coastal behaviour on long time scales, for example in response to changing sea level or wave conditions. This paper will discuss issues and recent developments in sediment transport measurement and prediction on the lower and upper shoreface and into the swash zone. The focus will be on the integration and upscaling of small-scale deterministic process measurements into parametric models that may increase modelling capabilities of coastal behaviour on larger temporal and spatial scales.

  3. Erosion phenomena in sand moulds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors studicd the erosion phcnorncna in sand moulds pured with cast iron. Thc study comprises an evaluation of erosionresistance of thc three sands: grccn sand. sand bondcd with inorganic or organic bindcr. It was concluded that thc most resistant is [heclassic green sand with thc addition of 5 B coal dust. Resistance of the sand with organic binder is generally weak and dcvnds onkind of used raisin. Spccinl nztcntion was paid to the sands with no organic bindcr watcr glass and phospha~c. It was Sound that thcirrcsistance depends on dehydratation conditions. When the mould is stored in law humidity of atmosphcrc the very strong crosion canbe expected. It rcsul ts hrn thc micro fractures in the bridges of binders, joining the grains of the sable. This phcnomcna facilitates thetearing away of fragments of sand [tom the surface

  4. On Pluvial Compaction of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Moust

    At the Institute of Civil Engineering in Aalborg model tests on dry sand specimens have been carried out during the last five years. To reduce deviations in test results, the sand laying technique has been carefully studied, and the sand mass spreader constructed. Preliminary results have been...

  5. Antimicrobial sand via adsorption of cationic Moringa oleifera protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerri, Huda A; Adolfsen, Kristin J; McCullough, Lauren R; Velegol, Darrell; Velegol, Stephanie B

    2012-01-31

    Moringa oleifera (Moringa) seeds contain a natural cationic protein (MOCP) that can be used as an antimicrobial flocculant for water clarification. Currently, the main barrier to using Moringa seeds for producing potable water is that the seeds release other water-soluble proteins and organic matter, which increase the concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the water. The presence of this DOM supports the regrowth of pathogens in treated water, preventing its storage and later use. A new strategy has been established for retaining the MOCP protein and its ability to clarify and disinfect water while removing the excess organic matter. The MOCP is first adsorbed and immobilized onto sand granules, followed by a rinsing step wherein the excess organic matter is removed, thereby preventing later growth of bacteria in the purified water. Our hypotheses are that the protein remains adsorbed onto the sand after the functionalization treatment, and that the ability of the antimicrobial functionalized sand (f-sand) to clarify turbidity and kill bacteria, as MOCP does in bulk solution, is maintained. The data support these hypotheses, indicating that the f-sand removes silica microspheres and pathogens from water, renders adhered Escherichia coli bacteria nonviable, and reduces turbidity of a kaolin suspension. The antimicrobial properties of f-sand were assessed using fluorescent (live-dead) staining of bacteria on the surface of the f-sand. The DOM that can contribute to bacterial regrowth was shown to be significantly reduced in solution, by measuring biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Overall, these results open the possibility that immobilization of the MOCP protein onto sand can provide a simple, locally sustainable process for producing storable drinking water.

  6. Effects of Two Different Influent Distribution Modes on Ammonium Nitrogen Removal from Anaerobically Diges ted Swine Wastewater Using Bio-sand-filter%两种不同布水方式对生物砂滤池去除厌氧消化液氨氮的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊战辉; 邓良伟; 羊依金; 李淑兰; 张国治; 郑丹

    2011-01-01

    A bio-sand-filter column was setup in laboratory to simulate bio-sand-filter system. Under the atomization and droplets mode of influent distribution, the ammonium nitrogen removal efficiency from digested effluent of swine wastewater by bio-sand-filter column was investigated. The results showed, when the influent loading was 0.057 m3 · m-2d-1 and the average influent ammonium nitrogen concentrations were 293.2 mg · L-1, 513.6 mg · L-1, 553.4 mg · L-1, respectively, the average removal rates of ammonium nitrogen by the atomization mode were 98.8% , 87.4% , 75.1% , respectively, and the average effluent ammonium nitrogen concentrations were 3. 61 mg · L-1, 64. 7 mg · L-1, 137. 8mg · L-1, respectively; the average removal loading rates were 16.4 g · m-2d-1, 25.4 g · m-2d-1, 23. 5g · m-2d-1, respectively. By comparison, the average removal rates of ammonium nitrogen by the droplets mode were 77.4% , 71.4% , 59.3% , respectively; the average effluent ammonium nitrogen concentrations were 66. 3 mg · L-1, 146. 9mg · L-1, 225.1 mg · L-1, respectively; and the average removal loading rates were 12.9 g · m-2d-1, 20.7 g · m-2d-1, 18.6g · m-2d-1, respectively. The bio-sand-column with atomization mode can not only improve the ammonium nitrogen removal efficiency and removal loading rate, but also reduce the effluent ammonium nitrogen concentration. When ammonium nitrogen concentrations were 293.2 mg · L-1 for the droplets mode and 293.2 mg · L-1 and 512.6 mg · L-1 for the atomization mode, the effluent ammonium nitrogen concentration could meet the standard for ammonium nitrogen discharging required by " Discharge standard of pollutants for livestock and poultry breeding" (CB 18596 - 2001). Compared with constructed wetlands and lagoon wastewater treatment system, bio-sand-filter largely enhanced ammonium nitrogen removal loading rate.%在实验室条件下,采用试验生物砂滤柱模拟生物砂滤池系统,研究了雾化和滴渗布水方式对生

  7. Sand hazards on tourist beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W

    2013-01-01

    Visiting the beach is a popular tourist activity worldwide. Unfortunately, the beach environment is abundant with hazards and potential danger to the unsuspecting tourist. While the traditional focus of beach safety has been water safety oriented, there is growing concern about the risks posed by the sand environment on beaches. This study reports on the death and near death experience of eight tourists in the collapse of sand holes, sand dunes, and sand tunnels. Each incident occurred suddenly and the complete burial in sand directly contributed to the victims injury or death in each case report.

  8. Moving sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    In several desert areas, the slow motion of sand dunes can be a challenge for modern human activities and a threat for the survival of ancient places or archaeological sites. However, several methods exist for surveying the dune fields and estimate their migration rate. Among these methods, the use of satellite images, in particular of those freely available on the World Wide Web, is a convenient resource for the planning of future human settlements and activities.

  9. Cumulative environmental management and the oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    In response to concerns regarding the cumulative environmental impacts of oil sands development within the Athabasca oil sands deposit, the government of Alberta established a Regional Sustainable Development Strategy (RSDS) to balance development with environmental protection. The environmental issues identified through the RSDS were addressed by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). CEMA's boundary is the Wood Buffalo region of northeastern Alberta. It identifies existing and future environmental effects in the region and proposes recommendations to regulatory bodies for reducing environmental impacts associated with oil sands development. This presentation outlined some of the 55 stakeholder representatives of CEMA, including Alberta government departments associated with resource development, oil sand developers within the region, and Aboriginal communities and First Nations. These stakeholders provide input on sector priorities and agree on environmental thresholds. Established working groups also address technical and scientific research issues identified in the RSDS such as sustainable ecosystems; surface waters; trace metals and air contaminants; nitrogen oxides and sulphur dioxides; and land reclamation. To date, CEMA has submitted more than 50 reports and has made 4 major environmental recommendations for trace metal management, ecosystem management tools, a framework for acid deposition management, and a landscape design checklist. tabs., figs.

  10. Removal and Recovery of Lead from Aqueous Solution by Low Cost Media

    OpenAIRE

    Pappalardo, L; F. Jumean; N. Abdo

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: To remove Pb(II) from wastewater using local UAE sand and then to recover the removed Pb(II). Approach: Removal efficiency of Pb(II) from wastewater was investigated using white, yellow and red United Arab Emirates sand with pore sizes < 300 μm. Two methods were employed: batch equilibrium and column filtration. In the batch equilibrium study, the effect of sand type and dosage on Pb(II) removal efficiency was investigated. In the column filtration&...

  11. The technique of sand control with expandable screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P. [Petrochina, Liaohe (China). Liaohe Oilfield Co.

    2009-07-01

    Sand production in heavy oil reservoirs can limit the normal production of oil wells. In this study, expandable screens were used as a sand control mechanism by filtering the sand as it entered the wellbore. The screen systems consists of an expandable outer housing, an expandable base pipe and a filtering layer. The screen expands radially through an expandable cone and presses into the casing well. Axial tension is used to shrink the screens radially through a fishing anchor in order to remove them from the well. The lack of a sand ring between the screen and the casing increases the flow area of the oil and reduces flow resistance caused by fine silt blockages. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to study the expansion and shrinkage properties of the screens. A field test conducted at a well located in the Liaohe oilfield in China demonstrated that good sand control results can be obtained without the need for pump checking. It was concluded that the sand control method is easy to use and provides good sand control results in large open flow areas. 2 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  12. A Bird's-eye View with X-ray Vision: Remote-sensing tools to Monitor Reach-scale Response to Dam Removal on the Elwha River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Repeat digital surface models, orthoimagery and sidescan sonar data are being generated to monitor river response to the largest dam removal and controlled sediment release in history on the Elwha River, on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. These products are generated using low-cost readily-available tools to collect data at a spatial and temporal scale that provides important insight into effects of base-level change, sediment release, and discrete hydrologic events on erosion of reservoir sediments, downstream sediment transport, and channel evolution above and below the dam sites. In combination, these products provide a view above and below the water surface to changes in sediment composition and morphology that other methods cannot capture at this spatial scale and both spatial and temporal resolution. Orthoimagery is developed from still images collected with a plane-mounted point-and-shoot camera using customized firmware from the open-source Canon Hack Development Kit (CHDK) with a total hardware cost of about $300 USD. Images are processed using structure-from-motion algorithms. Several software options are available. Sonar data are collected from a raft-mounted platform using a high-resolution 990 KHz Starfish sidescan sonar, with a water-resistant topside enclosure holding top-side electronics. A steerable pole-mount was developed for this application to allow the sidescan to to remain oriented in the direction of motion-over-ground.; Surface reconstruction from aerial images collected during Elwha dam removal project. ; bedforms near Elwha Sediment Treatment Plant from sediment released from Lake Aldwell, surveyed 12 July 2012.

  13. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  14. Biodegradation of MIB and geosmin with slow sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shu-Ting; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the biodegradation of MIB (2-methylisoborneol) and geosmin (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans- 9-decalol) in simulated slow sand filtration (SSF) columns and in batch reactors. The results showed that both MIB and geosmin were biodegradable in the two systems. In batch experiments, the overall removals for MIB and geosmin were 50% and 78%, respectively, after 7 days of contact time. Volatilization loss plays an important role for geosmin in batch systems. Simulated SSF column studies also showed that more than 50% of geosmin and MIB were degraded by the microbial on the sand surface of a slow sand filter. With a filtration rate of 5 m/day, the simulated SSF degraded MIB from 48% to 69% and geosmin from 87% to 96%. The rapid biodegradation of MIB and geosmin in SSF column tests was attributed to the use of filter sands from the SSF unit in the Kinmen water treatment plant, where the microbial had been acclimated to both MIB and geosmin. The results also showed that more than 70% of the geosmin was removed in the top portion of the filter ( approximately 10 cm); while the removal of MIB occurred throughout the entire column depth. The results of this study demonstrated that slow flow through preacclimated sand was effective for control of MIB and geosmin in drinking water.

  15. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  16. Aeolian sand transport and its effects on the stability of Miramar-Caranzalem beach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Reddy, G.V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Removal of sand by wind from the beach at Miramar-Caranzalem, Goa, has been found to effect its stability over a relatively longer time scale. This aeolian sand transport has been computed for this strip of the beach utilising the relation between...

  17. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF SAND AND CHITOSAN AS DUAL FILTER MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADHUKAR M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuisance due to suspended and colloidal particles causing turbidity has become widespread, severe problem due to urban population and industrial activities. The consequences of turbidity are presence of microorganisms,reduction of dissolved oxygen, etc. Consumption of such water is known to cause water borne diseases.Available water treatment methods for the removal of turbidity and pathogens are coagulation, filtration and disinfection. The common filter media used are sand, activated carbon etc. Chitosan has been used as acoagulant aid and adsorbent. Chitosan when used as a filter media causes the colloidal particles to bind together and is subsequently removed during the process. The column studies using Chitosan in combination with conventional sand filter was carried out in a borosilicate glass column. Chitosan was placed on top of sand layerand constant down flow pattern of 100mL/min was followed. Dual filter media was effective in the reducing turbidity by 93%.

  18. Amadurecimento de filtros lentos de areia e remoção de microrganismos indicadores de qualidade da água ao longo da profundidade do leito: uma avaliação em instalação piloto Maturation of slow sand filters and removal of microorganisms' indicators of water quality along the media depth: an evaluation in pilot plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Ladeira Alves de Brito

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O potencial da filtração lenta como opção tecnológica para o tratamento de água nos países em desenvolvimento e sua capacidade de remoção de contaminantes, sobretudo patogênicos, são reconhecidos. Contudo, ainda permanece incompleto o conhecimento acerca dos mecanismos que predominantemente atuam na remoção dos microrganismos. Objetivando avançar nessa compreensão, desenvolveu-se uma investigação experimental, em unidades piloto, em filtros lentos de areia com escoamento descendente e ascendente, operados com água sintética e duas taxas de filtração (3 e 6m³/m2.d. A retenção dos microrganismos indicadores foi avaliada em cinco camadas, com 0,15 m de espessura cada, em dois momentos da carreira. A maturidade biológica do leito filtrante foi menos favorecida pela taxa mais alta de filtração e pelo fluxo ascendente. Os 0,45 m iniciais do leito filtrante foram importantes na remoção de microrganismos sob as condições estudadas, mas a remoção não se restringiu a estas camadas, tendo sido observada para todos os indicadores retenção nas camadas de 0,45-0,60 m e de 0,60-0,75 m. A schmutzdecke parece desempenhar papel efetivo na remoção de indicadores microbiológicos apenas quando bem desenvolvida. Há uma indicação de que a camada suporte exerce algum papel na retenção de sólidos e microrganismos no fluxo ascendente.The potential of the slow sand filtration as technological option for drinking-water treatment in developing countries and its capacity of contaminants removal, mainly pathogens, are recognized.However, the knowledge concerning the predominant mechanisms that act in microorganism's removal still remains incomplete. Aiming to advance in the understanding of these themes, an experimental investigation was carried out, working with pilot plants of downflow and upflow slow sand filters, operated with synthetic water and two filtration rates (3 and 6 m³/m².d. The microorganisms indicators removal was

  19. Layers, Landslides, and Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 27 October 2003This image shows the northern rim of one of the Valles Marineris canyons. Careful inspection shows many interesting features here. Note that the spurs and gullies in the canyon wall disappear some distance below the top of the canyon wall, indicating the presence of some smooth material here that weathers differently from the underlying rocks. On the floor of the canyon, there are remains from a landslide that came hurtling down the canyon wall between two spurs. Riding over the topography of the canyon floor are many large sand dunes, migrating generally from the lower right to upper left.Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14.1, Longitude 306.7 East (53.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  1. Sand dollar sites orogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Dee

    2013-04-01

    The determinology of the humble sand dollars habitat changing from inception to the drastic evolution of the zone to that of present day. Into the cauldron along the southern Californian 'ring of fire' lithosphere are evidence of geosynclinals areas, metasedimentary rock formations and hydrothermal activity. The explanation begins with 'Theia' and the Moon's formation, battles with cometary impacts, glacial ages, epochs with evolutionary bottlenecks and plate tectonics. Fully illustrated the lecture includes localised diagrams and figures with actual subject photographic examples of plutonic, granitic, jade and peridodite. Finally, the origins of the materials used in the lecture are revealed for prosecution by future students and the enjoyment of interested parties in general.

  2. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  3. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  4. Use of an integrated approach to characterize the physicochemical properties of foundry green sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnin, Raquel L.P. [Tupy S.A., Rua Albano Schmidt 3.400, Joinville, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Folgueras, Marilena Valadares; Luvizao, Rubia Raquel; Correia, Sivaldo Leite [Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Rua Paulo Malschitzki, s/numero - Campus Universitario Prof. Avelino Marcante, Bairro Zona Industrial Norte, Joinville, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Cunha, Carlos Jorge da [Universidade Federal do Parana, Centro Politecnico, Jardim das Americas, Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Dungan, Robert S., E-mail: robert.dungan@ars.usda.gov [USDA-ARS, Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research Laboratory, 3793 North 3600 East, Kimberly, ID 83341 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physicochemical properties of fresh, spent, and landfilled foundry green sands were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A phase composition model was postulated for each material based on thermogravimetric results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sand from the landfill was determined to be composed of almost pure silica sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weathering is likely responsible for removing the coating materials from the green sands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilled sands may be suitable for reuse within the foundry or beneficial use applications. - Abstract: A fresh green sand, spent green sand, and a weathered spent green sand (wSGS) from a foundry landfill were analyzed using diffractometry, electron microscopy, fluorometry, granulometry, spectrometry, and thermogravimetry (TG). Our objective was to understand how the physicochemical properties of the foundry green sands change from their original form after being subjected to the casting process, then after weathering at the landfill. A quantitative phase composition model was also postulated for each material based on the TG results and it was found to be the most reliable and informative quantitative data for this type of residue. The weathered sample, that remained in a landfill for two years, was found to be composed of almost pure sand. Because of the weathering process, it may be possible to use the wSGS as a virgin sand replacement in the regeneration system or in geotechnical applications where bentonite would affect the properties of the final product.

  5. A family of sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Faulkner, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We study some dynamical properties of a family of two-dimensional cellular automata: those that arise from an underlying one dimensional sand automaton whose local rule is obtained using a latin square. We identify a simple sand automaton G whose local rule is algebraic, and classify this automaton as having equicontinuity points, but not being equicontinuous. We also show it is not surjective. We generalise some of these results to a wider class of sand automata.

  6. Dilatometric Characterization of Foundry Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Břuska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this contribution is summary of physical – chemistry properties of usually used foundry silica and no – silica sands in Czech foundries. With the help of dilatometry analysis theoretical assumptions of influence of grain shape and size on dilatation value of sands were confirmed. Determined was the possibility of dilatometry analysis employment for preparing special (hybrid sands with lower and/or more linear character of dilatation.

  7. Triaxial tests in Fontainebleau sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latini, Chiara; Zania, Varvara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note that the tes......The purpose of this internal report is to examine the influence of relative density on the strength and deformation characteristics of Fontainebleau sand. Compression triaxial tests were performed on saturated sand samples with different densities and initial confining pressure. Note...... that the testing procedure and the data processing were carried out according to the specifications of ETCS-F1.97....

  8. Oil sands to the rescue: oil sand microbial communities can degrade recalcitrant alkyl phenyl alkanoic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, Corinne [University of Essex (Canada)], email: cwhitby@essex.ac.uk

    2011-07-01

    Almost half of all global oil reserves are found as biodegraded heavy oils found in vast tar sand deposits located in North and South America and these account for 47% of Canadian oil production. Oil sand extraction generates large amounts of toxic waste water, known as oil sand process waters (OSPW), that are stored in large tailing ponds that contain toxic compounds like naphthenic acids (NAs). The presence of NAs creates problems like toxicity, corrosion, and the formation of calcium napthenate deposits which block pipelines and other infrastructure and need to be removed. This paper presents oil sand microbial communities that can degrade these NAs. The approach is to apply new aliphatic and aromatic NAs as substrates to supplement and identify NA degrading microbes and also to identify the metabolites produced and explain NA degradation pathways and the functional genes involved. The chemistry and the processes involved are explained. From the results, it is suggested that pure cultures of P. putida KT2440 be used against NAs.

  9. Remoção de atrazina e metabólitos pela filtração lenta com leito de areia e carvão ativado granular Removal of atrazine and metabolites through slow filtration by sand and granular activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edumar Ramos Cabral Coelho

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A atrazina (ATZé um herbicida largamente utilizado no mundo, sendo encontrada associada aos seus produtos de degradação em águas superficiais e subterrâneas. Pertence à classe das s-triazinas e, juntamente com os metabólitos clorados deetilatrazina (DEA e deisopropilatrazina (DIA, possui potencial carcinogênico e toxicidade como disruptores endócrinos. A limitação dos processos que empregam a coagulação química na remoção de ATZ, a conhecida capacidade do carvão ativado em remover microcontaminantes em água e o risco que a ATZ e seus metabólitos apresentam à saúde motivaram o estudo da filtração lenta com leito de areia e carvão ativado granular. Os resultados apontaram a eficiência do processo de filtração lenta com camada intermediária de carvão ativado granular na remoção de ATZ e a limitação deste na remoção dos metabólitos DEA, DIA e deetilhidroxiatrazina (DEHA.Atrazine (ATZ is widely used as herbicide, commonly found in association to its degradation products in surface water and groundwater. It belongs to the class of s-triazines and together with the chlorinated metabolites dieethylatrazine (DEA and deisopropilatrazine (DIA have carcinogenic potential and toxicity as endocrine disruptors. The limitation of the processes employing chemical coagulation in the removal of atrazine, the known ability of activated carbon to remove microcontaminants in water and the risk that atrazine and the potential toxicity to human health of its metabolits motivated the study of slow sand filtration bed combined with granular activated carbon. The results showed the high efficiency of the slow filtration process with intermediate layer of granular activated carbon in the removal of atrazine and its limitation on the removal of the metabolites DEA, DIA and diethylhidroxiatrazine (DEHA.

  10. Aerolian erosion, transport, and deposition of volcaniclastic sands among the shifting sand dunes, Christmas Lake Valley, Oregon: TIMS image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Ramsey, Michael S.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1995-01-01

    Remote sensing is a tool that, in the context of aeolian studies, offers a synoptic view of a dune field, sand sea, or entire desert region. Blount et al. (1990) presented one of the first studies demonstrating the power of multispectral images for interpreting the dynamic history of an aeolian sand sea. Blount's work on the Gran Desierto of Mexico used a Landsat TM scene and a linear spectral mixing model to show where different sand populations occur and along what paths these sands may have traveled before becoming incorporated into dunes. Interpretation of sand transport paths and sources in the Gran Desierto led to an improved understanding of the origin and Holocene history of the dunes. With the anticipated advent of the EOS-A platform and ASTER thermal infrared capability in 1998, it will become possible to look at continental sand seas and map sand transport paths using 8-12 mu m bands that are well-suited to tracking silicate sediments. A logical extension of Blount's work is to attempt a similar study using thermal infrared images. One such study has already begun by looking at feldspar, quartz, magnetite, and clay distributions in the Kelso Dunes of southern California. This paper describes the geology and application of TIMS image analysis of a less-well known Holocene dune field in south central Oregon using TIMS data obtained in 1991.

  11. A sand wave simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, A.A.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Damme, van R.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Sand waves form a prominent regular pattern in the offshore seabeds of sandy shallow seas. A two dimensional vertical (2DV) flow and morphological numerical model describing the behaviour of these sand waves has been developed. The model contains the 2DV shallow water equations, with a free water su

  12. Regeneration of dredged sand waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Knaapen, Michiel; Scholl, Olaf; Scholl, O.; Trenteseaux., A.; Garlan, T.

    2000-01-01

    Sand waves form a wavy pattern in the offshore sandy seabed. Since their crests reduce the navigability, it is important to know their evolution. A simple model is presented to estimate the recovery of sand wave amplitudes. This model is partially based on the similarity with sea ripples and

  13. Namibia : triaxial test on sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenfelt, Jørgen S.; Jacobsen, Kim P.

    In connection with a harbour project the friction angle of a fine sand is required. On Friday 13 March 1998 the Danish Geotechnical Institute (DGI) delivered app. 2.5 kg sand for testing at the Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory, Aalborg University. The present Data Report summarises the results...

  14. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  15. Steam and air co-injection in removing residual TCE in unsaturated layered sandy porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sheng; Wang, Ning; Chen, Jiajun

    2013-10-01

    Steam and air co-injection is a promising technique for volatile and semi-volatile organic contaminant remediation in heterogeneous porous media. In this study, removal of trichloroethene (TCE) with steam-air co-injection was investigated through a series of 2D sandbox experiments with different layered sand structures, and through numerical simulations. The results show that a layered structure with coarse sand, in which steam and air convection are relatively rapid, resulted in a higher removal rate and a larger removal ratio than those observed in an experiment using finer sand; however, the difference was not significant, and the removal ratios from three experiments ranged from 85% to 94%. Slight downward movement of TCE was observed for Experiment 1 (TCE initially in a fine sand zone encased in a coarse sand), while no such movement was observed for Experiment 2 (TCE initially in two fine sand layers encased in a coarse sand) or 3 (TCE initially in a silty sand zone encased in a coarse sand). Simulations show accumulation of TCE at the interface of the layered sands, which indicates a capillary barrier effect in restraining the downward movement of TCE. This effect is illustrated further by a numerical experiment with homogeneous coarse sand, in which continuous downward TCE movement to the bottom of the sandbox was simulated. Another numerical experiment with higher water saturation was also conducted. The results illustrate a complicated influence of water saturation on TCE removal in a layered sand structure.

  16. Sand harm in taklimakan Desert highway and sand control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANZhiwen; WANGTao; SUNQingwei; DONGZhibao; WANGXunming

    2003-01-01

    Reputed as a wonderful achievement of the world’s highway construction history,the Taklimakan Desert highway is nor facing serious sand drift encroachment problems due to its 447-km-long passage of sand sea consisting of crescent dunes,barchan chains,compound transverse dune ridges and complex megadunes.To solve some technical problems in the protection of the highway from sang drift encroachment,desert experts have been conducting the theoretical and applied studies on sand movement laws;causes,severities and time-space differentiation of sand drift damages;and control ways including mechanical,chemical and biological measures.In this paper the authors give an overall summry on the research contents and recent progress in the control of sand drift damages in China and hold that the theoretical researc results and practices in the prevention of sand drift encroachment on the cross-desert highway represnt a breakthrough and has an cpoch-making significance.Since the construction of protective forest along the cross-desert highway requires large amount of ground water,what will be its environmental consequence and whether it can effectively halt sand drift encroachment on the highway forever are the questions to be studied urgently.

  17. A Study of Sugarcane Leaf-Removal Machinery during Harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopa Cansee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Sugarcane leaf-removing tools could help speed up sugarcane harvest and reduce contamination. Moreover, leaf-removal machinery can solve the problems of sugarcane burning and workers can increase sugarcane harvest production too. The purpose of this research was to study the use of leaf-removal machinery in the post-harvest production of sugarcane to reduce harvest production time and contaminant. Approach: This study focused on the LK92-11 variety of sugarcane having a harvesting period of 12 months, a density of 9,387 stems/rai and could produce 14.01 tons/rai including cane top and, leaves and leaf sheaths of 1675.2 and 180 kg/rai. Sugarcane leaf-removal machinery was applied to a small engine power from a grass-cutting machine. A rotate dish applied 4 different materials, tendon string, soft wire, medium wire and sling for sugarcane leaf-removing. The machine was operated at a constant speed. The efficiency of the sugarcane leaf-removal machinery indicated the capacity of sugarcane leaf-removing by area and operation time. Results: The quantity of leaves and leaf sheaths affect the speed of harvest production. Moreover, leaves and leaf sheaths increase the waste material in production and also contaminate the sugar and the sugar production system with clay, sand, and mud from the fields. Traditional methods for sugarcane harvest without removing leaf took 37 h/rai to complete, but sugarcane leaf-removing could reduce the sugarcane harvest process to 11.4 h/rai. Conclusion: The material of the blades in de-leafing machine is crucial to the efficiency of harvest production time. Blades made from poor materials can cause tangling and clogging in the rotator dish, which increases maintenance time. Further developments in sugarcane leaf removal systems will create dramatic improvement in sugarcane production.

  18. Sand resources, regional geology, and coastal processes for shoreline restoration: case study of Barataria shoreline, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Kulp, Mark; Penland, Shea; Britsch, Louis D.

    2002-01-01

    The Louisiana barrier shoreline of Barataria Basin, which lies within the western Mississippi River delta, has undergone significant retreat during the past 100 years. The most practical restoration method to rebuild these shorelines is sand nourishment. Seismic and sonar interpretations verified with geologic samples (vibracores and borings) indicate that there are nine sand targets within the Barataria study area that meet or exceed the minimum criteria for potential resource sites. However, the near surface lithology in the basin is typically silts and clays. Locating suitable sand resources for shoreline restoration is challenging. The sand units are associated with geologic depositional systems such as ebb-tidal deltas, distributary mouth bars, and channel fill (undifferentiated fluvial or tidal inlet channels). The nine potential sand targets consist primarily of fine sand and can be delineated into three surficial and six buried features. The surficial features contain approximately 10% of the total sand resources identified. At least 90% of the sand resources need overburden sediment removed prior to use; almost 570 million yd3 (438.5 mil m3) of overburden will need to be removed if the entire resource is mined. In this study, we identified 396 to 532 mil yd3 (305.8 to 410.8 mil m3) of potential sand deposits for shoreline restoration. Previous studies using less dense survey methods greatly over-estimated sand resources available in this area. Many fluvial channels reported previously as sand-filled are mud-filled. Contrary to these previous studies, few fluvial subsystems in this region have abundant sand resources.

  19. Interactions between microbial activity and distribution and mineral coatings on sand grains from rapid sand filters treating groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Tatari, Karolina; Musovic, Sanin

    Rapid sand filtration is a traditional and widespread technology for drinking water purification which combines biological, chemical and physical processes together. Granular media, especially sand, is a common filter material that allows several oxidized compounds to accumulate on its surface....... Preliminarily, we detected a strong relation between the amount of DNA and mineral coating mass. We hypothesized that the accumulated mineral coatings have a positive effect on amount of bacterial biomass, its spatial distribution and substrate removal rates. In this study, we combined molecular, microscopic...... and abundance indicated that attached minerals are an important factor controlling bacterial colonization, growth, distribution and substrate utilization in these systems....

  20. Application of CFD Modeling to Hydrodynamics of CycloBio Fluidized Sand Bed in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yao; SONG Xiefa; LIANG Zhenlin; PENG Lei

    2014-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of a CycloBio fluidized sand bed (CB FSB) in removal of dissolved wastes in recirculating aquaculture systems, the hydrodynamics of solid-liquid flow was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling tools. The dynamic characteristics of silica sand within the CB FSB were determined using three-dimensional, unsteady-state simula-tions with the granular Eulerian multiphase approach and the RNG k-ε turbulence model, and the simulation results were validated using available lab-scale measurements. The bed expansion of CB FSB increased with the increase in water inflow rate in numerical simulations. Upon validation, the simulation involving 0.55 mm particles, the Gidaspow correlation for drag coefficient model and the Syamlal-O’Brien correlation for kinetic granular viscosity showed the closest match to the experimental results. The volume frac-tion of numerical simulations peaked as the wall was approached. The hydrodynamics of a pilot-scale CB FSB was simulated in or-der to predict the range of water flow to avoid the silica sand overflowing. The numerical simulations were in agreement with the experimental results qualitatively and quantitatively, and thus can be used to study the hydrodynamics of solid-liquid multiphase flow in CB FSB, which is of importance to the design, optimization, and amplification of CB FSBs.

  1. Investigation of Dense Sand Properties in Shallow Depth using CPT and DMT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaydadzhiew, Dimitar Todorov; Puscasu, Ionut; Vaitkunaite, Evelina;

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The present paper is an investigation of the soil parameters of the given Aalborg University Sand No. 1 using the Flat Dilatometer Test (DMT) and the Cone Penetration Test (CPT). This clean sand type is considered to be similar to the sands found in the North Sea area. The research...... is mainly based on experimental laboratory testing, followed by computer assisted data interpretation. The mentioned tools are used in testing the sand properties in shallow depth and examining any occurrence of an effect induced by the limited size of the laboratory set-up....

  2. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  3. Sand engine quells the coast's hunger for sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dijk, T.

    2012-01-01

    An artificial peninsula at Ter Heijde is designed to feed the coast with sediment. Scientists are investigating whether this kind of sand engine could be the Netherlands’ answer to rising sea levels.

  4. Patchy Parasitized Skin Governs Leishmania donovani Transmission to Sand Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Shaden; Serafim, Tiago D

    2017-08-31

    Doehl et al. have combined empirical data with computer simulation to demonstrate that RAG-2 mice intravenously infected with Leishmania donovani form heterogeneous skin parasite patches that govern infectiousness to sand flies. This model provides a much-needed tool to explore the relevance of asymptomatic and symptomatic visceral leishmaniasis patients as infection reservoirs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of a Nigerian standard sand: Igbokoda sand

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ojuri, OO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available the Middle Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone near Ottawa, Illinois, had been picked by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as the reference sand to employ in testing cement and strength of concrete [9]. To the best of our knowledge... and magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques due to its importance in cement, geotechnical/geo-environmental research in Nigeria. This should halt importation of standard silica sand for mortar and concrete testing...

  6. Insights into the sand fly saliva: Blood-feeding and immune interactions between sand flies, hosts, and Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestinova, Tereza; Rohousova, Iva; Sima, Michal; de Oliveira, Camila I; Volf, Petr

    2017-07-01

    Leishmaniases are parasitic diseases present worldwide that are transmitted to the vertebrate host by the bite of an infected sand fly during a blood feeding. Phlebotomine sand flies inoculate into the mammalian host Leishmania parasites embedded in promastigote secretory gel (PSG) with saliva, which is composed of a diverse group of molecules with pharmacological and immunomodulatory properties. In this review, we focus on 3 main aspects of sand fly salivary molecules: (1) structure and composition of salivary glands, including the properties of salivary molecules related to hemostasis and blood feeding, (2) immunomodulatory properties of salivary molecules and the diverse impacts of these molecules on leishmaniasis, ranging from disease exacerbation to vaccine development, and (3) use of salivary molecules for field applications, including monitoring host exposure to sand flies and the risk of Leishmania transmission. Studies showed interesting differences between salivary proteins of Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia species, however, no data were ever published on salivary proteins of Sergentomyia species. In the last 15 years, numerous studies have characterized sand fly salivary proteins and, in parallel, have addressed the impact of such molecules on the biology of the host-sand fly-parasite interaction. The results obtained shall pave the way for the development of field-application tools that could contribute to the management of leishmaniasis in endemic areas.

  7. Insights into the sand fly saliva: Blood-feeding and immune interactions between sand flies, hosts, and Leishmania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Lestinova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniases are parasitic diseases present worldwide that are transmitted to the vertebrate host by the bite of an infected sand fly during a blood feeding. Phlebotomine sand flies inoculate into the mammalian host Leishmania parasites embedded in promastigote secretory gel (PSG with saliva, which is composed of a diverse group of molecules with pharmacological and immunomodulatory properties.In this review, we focus on 3 main aspects of sand fly salivary molecules: (1 structure and composition of salivary glands, including the properties of salivary molecules related to hemostasis and blood feeding, (2 immunomodulatory properties of salivary molecules and the diverse impacts of these molecules on leishmaniasis, ranging from disease exacerbation to vaccine development, and (3 use of salivary molecules for field applications, including monitoring host exposure to sand flies and the risk of Leishmania transmission. Studies showed interesting differences between salivary proteins of Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia species, however, no data were ever published on salivary proteins of Sergentomyia species.In the last 15 years, numerous studies have characterized sand fly salivary proteins and, in parallel, have addressed the impact of such molecules on the biology of the host-sand fly-parasite interaction. The results obtained shall pave the way for the development of field-application tools that could contribute to the management of leishmaniasis in endemic areas.

  8. Saltation of Non-Spherical Sand Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Ren, Shan; Huang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Saltation is an important geological process and the primary source of atmospheric mineral dust aerosols. Unfortunately, no studies to date have been able to precisely reproduce the saltation process because of the simplified theoretical models used. For example, sand particles in most of the existing wind sand movement models are considered to be spherical, the effects of the sand shape on the structure of the wind sand flow are rarely studied, and the effect of mid-air collision is usually neglected. In fact, sand grains are rarely round in natural environments. In this paper, we first analyzed the drag coefficients, drag forces, and starting friction wind speeds of sand grains with different shapes in the saltation process, then established a sand saltation model that considers the coupling effect between wind and the sand grains, the effect of the mid-air collision of sand grains, and the effect of the sand grain shape. Based on this model, the saltation process and sand transport rate of non-spherical sand particles were simulated. The results show that the sand shape has a significant impact on the saltation process; for the same wind speed, the sand transport rates varied for different shapes of sand grains by as much as several-fold. Therefore, sand shape is one of the important factors affecting wind-sand movement. PMID:25170614

  9. Advanced Coating Removal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Jon

    2006-01-01

    An important step in the repair and protection against corrosion damage is the safe removal of the oxidation and protective coatings without further damaging the integrity of the substrate. Two such methods that are proving to be safe and effective in this task are liquid nitrogen and laser removal operations. Laser technology used for the removal of protective coatings is currently being researched and implemented in various areas of the aerospace industry. Delivering thousands of focused energy pulses, the laser ablates the coating surface by heating and dissolving the material applied to the substrate. The metal substrate will reflect the laser and redirect the energy to any remaining protective coating, thus preventing any collateral damage the substrate may suffer throughout the process. Liquid nitrogen jets are comparable to blasting with an ultra high-pressure water jet but without the residual liquid that requires collection and removal .As the liquid nitrogen reaches the surface it is transformed into gaseous nitrogen and reenters the atmosphere without any contamination to surrounding hardware. These innovative technologies simplify corrosion repair by eliminating hazardous chemicals and repetitive manual labor from the coating removal process. One very significant advantage is the reduction of particulate contamination exposure to personnel. With the removal of coatings adjacent to sensitive flight hardware, a benefit of each technique for the space program is that no contamination such as beads, water, or sanding residue is left behind when the job is finished. One primary concern is the safe removal of coatings from thin aluminum honeycomb face sheet. NASA recently conducted thermal testing on liquid nitrogen systems and found that no damage occurred on 1/6", aluminum substrates. Wright Patterson Air Force Base in conjunction with Boeing and NASA is currently testing the laser remOval technique for process qualification. Other applications of liquid

  10. AN ALTERNATE METHOD TO PREVENT SAND ABRASIVE EROSION IN PIPELINES FOR TRANSPORTING HIGH-SPEED NATURAL GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an alternate method to re-move the sand carried by natural gas in the upstream pipelinestherefore preventing sand abrasive erosion in pipelines used intransporting high-speed natural gas. Conventionally, most ex-perts pay much attention to improving the anti-erosion charac-teristics of the pipeline materials to solve the problem of seri-ous abrasive erosion, but without significant success. Basedon the theory of multiphase flow and analysis of the character-istics of sandy jets, a new equipment named "Sand Catcher" isintroduced in this article. Experimental results show that theSand Catcher effectively removes most of the sand in the natu-ral gas and significantly reduces the abrasive erosion of thepipelines. The Sand Catcher can be widely applied in practicein the near future.

  11. Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R.; Griffith, A.

    2009-04-01

    For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of beach (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of beach sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of beach have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by beach sand mining include: destruction of natural beaches and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a

  12. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  13. Characterization of napthenic acids in oil sands process-affected waters using fluorescence technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.; Alostaz, M.; Ulrich, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2009-07-01

    Process-affected water from oil sands production plants presents a major environmental challenge to oil sands operators due to its toxicity to different organisms as well as its corrosiveness in refinery units. This abstract investigated the use of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices to detect and characterize changes in naphthenic acid in oil sands process-affected waters. Samples from oil sands production plants and storage ponds were tested. The study showed that oil sands naphthenic acids show characteristic fluorescence signatures when excited by ultraviolet light in the range of 260 to 350 mm. The signal was a unique attribute of the naphthenic acid molecule. Changes in the fluorescence signature can be used to determine chemical changes such as degradation or aging. It was concluded that the technology can be used as a non-invasive continuous water quality monitoring tool to increase process control in oil sands processing plants.

  14. Do Permethrin-Treated Screens Repel Sand Flies from Entering Houses ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basimike, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of permethrin-treated screens on sand flies entering treated houses were evaluated in Marigat area of Baringo District, Kenya. Screens treated with 0.50 g/m2 a. i. of permethrin 20 % E.C. were fitted inside houses and retreated every 6 months from January 1992 to December 1993. In the treated village, 40.62 % sand flies were caught inside while 67.34 % sand flies were collected outside houses. In the control village, 32.66 % sand flies were collected inside while 59.38 % sand flies were caught outside houses. The number of sand flies collected outside houses in the treated village was higher than those collected inside houses in the same village (X2 = 30.97, df = 11, P = 0.001. Twelve species of sand flies were collected in the area, of which nine species of the Sergentomyia and three species of the Phlebotomus genera. Phlebotomus martini and P. duboscqi, vecfors of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis respectively were collected inside houses in both treated and control villages. Permethrin-treated screens fitted inside houses were effective against sand flies as they reduced the number of flies entering houses. However, the treated screens did not seem to have any effect on sand fly species composition. Permethrin-treated screens are an important tool for controlling sand flies in the communities.

  15. Efficacy of Permethrin Treated Bed Nets Against Leishmania major Infected Sand Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Tobin; Davidson, Silas A; Kobylinski, Kevin; Menses, Claudio; Rowton, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Insecticide treated nets (ITNs) are a potential tool to help control sand flies and prevent Leishmaniasis. However, little is currently known about the response of Leishmania infected sand flies to ITNs. In this study, Phlebotomus duboscqi sand flies were infected with the parasite Leishmania major. Infected and noninfected sand flies were then evaluated against permethrin treated and untreated bed nets in a laboratory assay that required sand flies to pass through suspended netting material to feed on a mouse serving as an attractive host. The number of sand flies passing through the nets and blood feeding was recorded. There was not a significant difference in the ability of infected or noninfected sand flies to move through treated or untreated nets. Fewer sand flies entered the permethrin treated nets compared to the untreated nets, indicating that permethrin creates an effective barrier. The results show that in addition to reducing the nuisance bites of noninfected sand flies, ITNs also protect against Leishmania infected sand flies and therefore can play in key role in reducing the rates of Leishmaniasis. This study is important to the Department of Defense as it continues to develop and field new bed nets to protect service members.

  16. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  17. AEROSOL FILTRATION USING QUARTZ SAND FILTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas H. Sulaymon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry is the major source of cement dust which contains heavy metals like nickel, cobalt, lead, chromium, arsenic and hazardous substances like dioxins and furans. Exposure to these substances can cause health problems to human, animals and vegetation. A continuous pilot scale quartz sand filter was constructed and uses to study the effect of important design parameters (temperature, pre-loaded dust on the collector, diameter of the filter, bed depth, collector size and superficial velocity on its performance for cleaning of cement dust from air. Initial penetration and initial pressure drop (after 180s were measured and compared for different variables used in this study. The dirty bed was cleaned by means of reverse air flow when the pressure drop across the filter rises to 20 cmH2O. A macroscopic model describes the filter clogging was used to predict the effluent histories based on initial collection efficiency (η0exp which was determined from experimental data. A removal efficiency of more than 99% was obtained. The results show that 0.4% of cement dust still adheres on the quartz sand bed after 5 min of cleaning cycle. The presence of 0.4% of pre-load dust on the quartz sand filter enhanced the efficiency and low initial penetration, moderate initial pressure drop was obtained. At given Empty Bed Contact Time (EBCT, with different filter diameters 30 and 15 cm, a sharp decrease in initial penetration from 0.41-0.03 was obtained respectively. A nonlinear relationship between penetration and temperature was found. The initial penetration can be reduced by using smaller filter diameter, small collector size and collector with pre-load dust with 0.4%. The experiment that operates at a filter diameter of 15 cm and temperature of 25°C represent the minimum penetration among all the experiments.

  18. The Condition of Silica Sand Grains Surface Subjected to Reclamation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łucarz, M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations are concerned on evaluation of new silica sand grains surface condition after mechanical reclamation treatment as well as on the conditions of reclaimed sand grains surface subjected to thermal and thermo-mechanical reclamation processes. The purpose of research was to answer the question how the applied methods have influenced the surface condition of reclaimed sand grains which was tested by means of bending strength determination of sand samples prepared with resin binder and reclaimed sand. The immediate aim of the research was to explain the mechanism of impurities cleaning on the sand grains surface after thermal reclamation, when the sand is used several times in preparation of a foundry mixture, and to determine what effect these impurities may have on the technological properties of the ready sand mixture. The task of the additionally applied mechanical reclamation was to remove the accumulated inorganic compounds from the sand grains surface and confirm if further improvement of the reclaim quality is possible.

  19. Pilot Study on Carbon-sand Filter for Sedimentation Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of dual function of integrating with activated carbon adsorption and quartz sand filtration in the carbon-sand filter can collaboratively remove organic matters and turbidity and also protect the bio-security, and the pilot test is carried out to optimize the process parameters. The pilot test results show that the thickness of the filter materials is preferably 1,300mm of the activated carbon, 500mm of uniform quartz sand; filtration rate can be 8-12m/h; filter cycle is 24-48h; when the water temperature is 21°C to 29°C, the biofilm formation period in the carbon-sand filter is 15 to 20 days; removal of the organic matters and nitrogen runs through the entire filter bed, and the nitrite is mainly oxidized on the upper side; when the operation is mature, the layer of filter materials can form the biofilm and zoogloea, with the dual function of micro-biological degradation and activated carbon adsorption.

  20. Chabazite biofilter for enhanced stormwater nitrogen removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel P

    2011-04-01

    Enhanced nitrogen removal from stormwater using chabazite, a natural cation exchanger, was evaluated in a pilot-plant biofilter operated for 216 days. A parallel sand filter served as the control. The biofilters were subject to various operating modes including baseline periods of steady flowrate and loading, simulated high flowrate (storm) events following steady flowrates, high flowrates following extended no-flow periods, and with limited influent dissolved oxygen. Under steady-flow operation, chabazite removed 93% of ammonium and sand removed 87%; total inorganic nitrogen was reduced 35% by chabazite versus 15% by sand. In a simulated storm event following steady-flow operation, 97% of cumulative ammonia mass was retained by the chabazite biofilter versus 70% for sand. Following a 40 day no-flow period, the chabazite biofilter retained 98% of influent ammonium in a storm event while sand exhibited high effluent ammonium. Chabazite ammonium retention was high under limited influent dissolved oxygen, verses significant breakthrough by the sand biofilter. Chabazite media provided superior performance resiliency under dynamic conditions that typify stormwater treatment.

  1. Adsorption of a dye on clay and sand. Use of cyclodextrins as solubility-enhancement agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lisi, Rosario; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefania; Muratore, Nicola

    2007-11-01

    Laboratory-scale studies were aimed at elucidating the physico-chemical aspects on the removal process of crystal violet (CV) from waters and solid substrates. The laponite clay (RD) and sand were chosen for the double aim at investigating them as CV adsorbents for water treatment and as substrates which mime the soil components. Sand is very effective in removing CV from waters. The cyclodextrins (CDs) were exploited as solubility-enhancement agents to remove CV from the solid substrates. They are powerful solvent media because they extract the CV from sand forming water-soluble CV/CD inclusion complexes and do not show affinity for sand. Optimum performance was shown by the modified CDs (i.e. hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin). A linear correlation between the logarithm of the equilibrium constant for the CV/CD inclusion complexes formation (K(cpx)) and the maximum amount of CV extracted from sand in the columns experiments at a flow rate of 1.5 ml min(-1) was drawn. This relationship predicts that CDs with K(cpx)<180 M(-1) are not suitable for CV removal from sand. CDs failed to displace CV from RD because they generate the formation of RD clusters where CV remains entrapped.

  2. Effects of dynamic operating conditions on nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Musovic, Sanin

    2014-01-01

    Biological rapid sand filters are often used to remove ammonium from groundwater for drinking water supply. They often operate under dynamic substrate and hydraulic loading conditions, which can lead to increased levels of ammonium and nitrite in the effluent. To determine the maximum nitrification...... operating conditions. The ammonium removal rate of the filter was determined by the ammonium loading rate, but was independent of both the flow and influent ammonium concentration individually. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea were almost equally abundant in the filter. Both ammonium removal...... rates and safe operating windows of rapid sand filters, a pilot scale rapid sand filter was used to test short-term increased ammonium loads, set by varying either influent ammonium concentrations or hydraulic loading rates. Ammonium and iron (flock) removal were consistent between the pilot...

  3. Pathogen removal using saturated sand columns supplemented with hydrochar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient provision of clean drinking water is an essential need for sustaining human-well being. The majority of people suffering from lack of clean water reside in less developed communities, where the financial and technical barriers hamper the implementation of modern water-sanitation systems.

  4. Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hair Removal KidsHealth > For Teens > Hair Removal A A A ... recommend an electrologist with the proper credentials. Laser Hair Removal How It Works: A laser is directed through ...

  5. Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? Choosing the Right Sport for You Shyness Hair Removal KidsHealth > For Teens > Hair Removal Print A ... you need any of them? Different Types of Hair Before removing hair, it helps to know about ...

  6. Remediation of oil-contaminated sand by coal agglomeration using ball milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yu-Jen; Shen, Yun-Hwei

    2011-10-01

    The mechanical shear force provided by a less energy intensive device (usually operating at 20-200 rpm), a ball mill, was used toperform coal agglomeration and its effects on remediation of a model fuel oil-contaminated sand were evaluated. Important process parameters such as the amount of coal added, milling time, milling speed and the size of milling elements are discussed. The results suggested that highly hydrophobic oil-coal agglomerates, formed by adding suitable amounts of coal into the oil-contaminated sand, could be mechanically liberated from cleaned sand during ball milling and recovered as a surface coating on the steel balls. Over 90% removal of oil from oil-contaminated sand was achieved with 6 wt% of coal addition and an optimum ball milling time of 20 min and speed of 200 rpm. This novel process has considerable potential for cleaning oil-contaminated sands.

  7. Coagulation-flocculation pretreatment of oil sands process affected water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourrezaei, P.; El-Din, M.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-07-01

    This presentation addressed the issue of water use in the oil sands industry and efforts to use this limited resource more efficiently. Three wastewater treatment schemes for oil sands tailings ponds were proposed, notably primary, secondary and tertiary treatment. Primary treatment involves the removal of suspended solids using physical-chemical treatments. Secondary treatment involves the removal of dissolved solids and organics using chemical oxidation, ultrafiltration or nanofiltration. Tertiary treatment involves removal of residual organics/solids using biological activated carbon filtration, sand filtration or reverse osmosis. The composition of oil sands process water (OSPW) was also discussed with reference to suspended solids, salts, hydrocarbons, other dissolved organics (such as naphthenic acids and phenols), ammonia, inorganic compounds and trace elements. The conventional coagulation/flocculation process is essential in industrial wastewater treatment. It is cost effective, easy to operate and energy efficient. The process is used because small suspended and colloidal particles and dissolved constituents cannot be removed quickly by sedimentation. A chemical method must be used. Coagulation/flocculation brings small suspended and colloidal particles into contact so that they collide, stick and grow to a size that settles readily. Alum is the predominant and least expensive water treatment coagulant used for the coagulation/flocculation process. It provides positively charged ions to neutralize the negative charge of colloidal particles resulting in aggregation. It creates big settling flocs that enmesh colloids as it settles. The factors affecting the process include pH, chemical type, chemical concentration, rapid mixing intensity, slow mixing intensity and time. tabs., figs.

  8. Disturbance of the inclined inserting-type sand fence to wind-sand flow fields and its sand control characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jian-jun; Lei, Jia-qiang; Li, Sheng-yu; Wang, Hai-feng

    2016-06-01

    The inclined inserting-type sand fence is a novel sand retaining wall adopted along the Lanxin High-Speed Railway II in Xinjiang for controlling and blocking sand movement. To verify the effectiveness of the new fence structure for sand prevention, a wind tunnel test was used for flow field test simulation of the sand fence. The results indicate that the inclined inserting-type sand fence was able to deflect the flow of the sand and was able to easily form an upward slant acceleration zone on the leeward side of the sand fence. As shown by the percentage change in sand collection rates on the windward side and the leeward side of the sand fence, the sand flux per unit area at 4 m height in the slant upward direction increased on the leeward side of the inclined inserting-type sand fence. By comparing the flow fields, this site is an acceleration zone, which also reaffirms the correspondence of wind-sand flow fields with the spatial distribution characteristic of the wind-carried sand motion. The field sand collection data indicates that under the effects of the inclined inserting-type sand fence, the sandy air currents passing in front and behind the sand fence not only changed in quality, but the grain composition and particle size also significantly changed, suggesting that the inclined inserting-type sand fence has a sorting and filtering effect on the sandy air currents that passed through. The fence retained coarse particulates on the windward side and fine particulates within the shade of the wind on the leeward side.

  9. Optimal array of sand fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Izael A; Araújo, Ascânio D; Parteli, Eric J R; Andrade, José S; Herrmann, Hans J

    2017-03-24

    Sand fences are widely applied to prevent soil erosion by wind in areas affected by desertification. Sand fences also provide a way to reduce the emission rate of dust particles, which is triggered mainly by the impacts of wind-blown sand grains onto the soil and affects the Earth's climate. Many different types of fence have been designed and their effects on the sediment transport dynamics studied since many years. However, the search for the optimal array of fences has remained largely an empirical task. In order to achieve maximal soil protection using the minimal amount of fence material, a quantitative understanding of the flow profile over the relief encompassing the area to be protected including all employed fences is required. Here we use Computational Fluid Dynamics to calculate the average turbulent airflow through an array of fences as a function of the porosity, spacing and height of the fences. Specifically, we investigate the factors controlling the fraction of soil area over which the basal average wind shear velocity drops below the threshold for sand transport when the fences are applied. We introduce a cost function, given by the amount of material necessary to construct the fences. We find that, for typical sand-moving wind velocities, the optimal fence height (which minimizes this cost function) is around 50 cm, while using fences of height around 1.25 m leads to maximal cost.

  10. Mars Rover Curiosity Traverses of Sand Ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, N.; Arvidson, R. E.; Zhou, F.; Heverly, M.; Maimone, M.; Hartman, F.; Bellutta, P.; Iagnemma, K.; Senatore, C.

    2014-12-01

    Martian sand ripples present a challenge for rover mobility, with drives over ripples often characterized by high wheel sinkage and slippage that can lead to incipient embedding. Since landing in Gale Crater, Curiosity has traversed multiple sand ripples, including the transverse aeolian ridge (TAR) straddling Dingo Gap on sols 533 and 535. On sol 672, Curiosity crossed backward over a series of sand ripples before ending its drive after high motor currents initiated visual odometry (VO) processing, which detected 77% slip, well in excess of the imposed 60% slip limit. At the end of the drive, the right front wheel was deeply embedded at the base of a ripple flank with >20 cm sinkage and the rear wheels were near a ripple crest. As Curiosity continues its approach to Mount Sharp it will have to cross multiple ripples, and thus it is important to understand Curiosity's performance on sol 672 and over similar ripples. To this end the sol 672 drive was simulated in ARTEMIS (Adams-Based Rover Terramechanics Interaction Simulator), a software tool consisting of realistic rover mechanical models, a wheel-terrain interaction module for deformable and non-deformable surfaces, and realistic terrain models. ARTEMIS results, Dumont Dunes tests performed in the Mojave Desert using the Scarecrow test rover, and single wheel tests performed at MIT indicate that the high slip encountered on sol 672 likely occurred due to a combination of rover attack angle, ripple geometry, and soil properties. When ripple wavelength approaches vehicle length, the rover can reach orientations in which the leading wheels carry minimal normal loads and the trailing wheels sink deeply, resulting in high slippage and insufficient thrust to propel the rover over ripples. Even on relatively benign (i.e. low tilt) terrains, local morphology can impose high sinkage, thus impeding rover motion. Work is underway to quantify Curiosity's drive performance over various ripple geometries to retrieve soil

  11. Removal Water Turbidity by Crumb Rubber Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer I. Alwared

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The removal of water turbidity by using crumb rubber filter was investigated .The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of variation of influent water turbidity (10, 25 and 50 NTU, media size (0.6and 1.14mm, filtration rate (25, 45 and 65 l/hr and bed depth (30 and 60 cm on the performance of mono crumb rubber filter in response to the effluent filtered water turbidity and head loss development, and compare it with that of conventional sand filter. Results revealed that 25 l/hr flow rate and 25 NTU influent turbidity were the best operating conditions. smaller media size and higher bed depth gave the best removal efficiency while higher media size and small bed depth gave lower head loss. The optimum results show that 92.7% removal efficiency and 8.3 mm head loss. The comparison results show that at constant operating conditions, pressure drop for crumb rubber filter is lower than conventional sand filter; about 42% reduction in pressure drop than sand filter and the conventional sand filter has a little enhancement in removal efficiency than crumb rubber filter, 96.8% for sand while for crumb rubber 92.7%.

  12. Experimental study of optimal self compacting concrete with spent foundry sand as partial replacement for M-sand using Taguchi approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, D. B.; Raviraj, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the application of Taguchi approach to obtain optimal mix proportion for Self Compacting Concrete (SCC) containing spent foundry sand and M-sand. Spent foundry sand is used as a partial replacement for M-sand. The SCC mix has seven control factors namely, Coarse aggregate, M-sand with Spent Foundry sand, Cement, Fly ash, Water, Super plasticizer and Viscosity modifying agent. Modified Nan Su method is used to proportion the initial SCC mix. L18 (21×37) Orthogonal Arrays (OA) with the seven control factors having 3 levels is used in Taguchi approach which resulted in 18 SCC mix proportions. All mixtures are extensively tested both in fresh and hardened states to verify whether they meet the practical and technical requirements of SCC. The quality characteristics considering "Nominal the better" situation is applied to the test results to arrive at the optimal SCC mix proportion. Test results indicate that the optimal mix satisfies the requirements of fresh and hardened properties of SCC. The study reveals the feasibility of using spent foundry sand as a partial replacement of M-sand in SCC and also that Taguchi method is a reliable tool to arrive at optimal mix proportion of SCC.

  13. Plaster core washout tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisman, R. M.; Keir, A. R.; Teramura, K.

    1977-01-01

    Tool powered by pressurized water or air removes water soluble plaster lining from Kevlar/epoxy duct. Rotating plastic cutterhead with sealed end fitting connects flexible shaft that allows tool to be used with curved ducts.

  14. Biodegradation of gasoline compounds (BTEX) in a water works sand filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Engelsen, P.; Sebber, U.

    2004-01-01

    Various chemical compounds including aromatic gasoline compounds frequently contaminate drinking water wells in urban areas. Because ground water treatment is simple, usually consisting of aeration/stripping and sand-filtration, it is of significant interest to know the ability of the conventional...... treatment to remove the chemical contaminants. The removal of gasoline compounds was investigated in a two-stage pilot scale sand filter, each with a filter depth of 0.8-1 m and with a filtration rate of 7.6 m/h. The concentrations of aromatic compounds were in the range 7-15 mu g/L, which are realistically...... sand grains). Influent iron concentrations in the range 0-4 mg/L and backwashing did not adversely affect the biodegradation of hydrocarbons. This study has shown that a conventional biological active sand filter can act as an efficient barrier against gasoline compounds, thereby saving the consumer...

  15. Evolution of the gas atmosphere during filing the sand moulds with iron alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mocek

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Evolution of atmosphere of the mould cavity when pouring the cast iron has been analyzed. It was find that in dry sand mold the cavity is filled by air throughout the casting time. In green sand the air is removed by the water vapor the hydrogen or carbon oxides formed in contact with the liquid metal. The theoretical results have been confirmed experimentally.

  16. Western Gas Sands Project: status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    Progress of the major government sponsored projects undertaken to increase gas production from low permeability gas sands of the western United States during March 1978 is summarized. The Bartlesville Energy Research Center (BERC) and participating National Laboratories, funded by DOE, are continuing their work in the area of research and development. The emphasis is on the development of new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics, mathematical modeling and data analysis. Field Tests and demonstrations active in the Uinta and Piceance Basins include: Gas Producing Enterprises (GPE) Natural Buttes Unit Wells No. 9, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22, Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Well No. F-31-13G, and Rio Blanco Natural Gas Company, Well No. 498-4-1. Gas Producing Enterprises Natural Buttes Unit Well No. 9 was fractured on March 27, 1978. The treatment consisted of 554,000 pounds of sand and 349,000 gallons of gel. Mitchell Energy Corporation of Houston, Texas was awarded Department of Energy Contract EF-78-C-08-1547 on March 15, 1978. Field work under this contract is scheduled to begin on June 15, 1978, with the drilling of a new well.

  17. Three-Dimensional Printing as an Interdisciplinary Communication Tool: Preparing for Removal of a Giant Renal Tumor and Atrium Neoplastic Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golab, Adam; Slojewski, Marcin; Brykczynski, Miroslaw; Lukowiak, Magdalena; Boehlke, Marek; Matias, Daniel; Smektala, Tomasz

    2016-08-22

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing involves preparing 3D objects from a digital model. These models can be used to plan and practice surgery. We used 3D printing to plan for a rare complicated surgery involving the removal of a renal tumor and neoplastic mass, which reached the heart atrium. A printed kidney model was an essential element of communication for physicians with different specializations.

  18. Understanding the fate of organic micropollutants in sand and granular activated carbon biofiltration systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, L., E-mail: lidia.paredes@usc.es; Fernandez-Fontaina, E., E-mail: eduardo.fernandez.fontaina@usc.es; Lema, J.M., E-mail: juan.lema@usc.es; Omil, F., E-mail: francisco.omil@usc.es; Carballa, M., E-mail: marta.carballa@usc.es

    2016-05-01

    In this study, sand and granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilters were comparatively assessed as post-treatment technologies of secondary effluents, including the fate of 18 organic micropollutants (OMPs). To determine the contribution of adsorption and biotransformation in OMP removal, four reactors were operated (two biofilters (with biological activity) and two filters (without biological activity)). In addition, the influence of empty bed contact time (EBCT), ranging from 0.012 to 3.2 d, and type of secondary effluent (anaerobic and aerobic) were evaluated. Organic matter, ammonium and nitrate were removed in both biofilters, being their adsorption higher on GAC than on sand. According to the behaviour exhibited, OMPs were classified in three different categories: I) biotransformation and high adsorption on GAC and sand (galaxolide, tonalide, celestolide and triclosan), II) biotransformation, high adsorption on GAC but low or null adsorption on sand (ibuprofen, naproxen, fluoxetine, erythromycin, roxythromycim, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, bisphenol A, estrone, 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethinylestradiol), and, III) only adsorption on GAC (carbamazepine, diazepam and diclofenac). No influence of EBCT (in the range tested) and type of secondary effluent was observed in GAC reactors, whereas saturation and kinetic limitation of biotransformation were observed in sand reactors. Taking into account that most of the organic micropollutants studied (around 60%) fell into category II, biotransformation is crucial for the elimination of OMPs in sand biofilters. - Highlights: • OMP removal was comparatively assessed in sand and GAC biofilters. • The contribution of adsorption and biotransformation in OMP removal was identified. • The filtering material did not affect the biological activities in biofilters. • There is no direct correlation between EBCT and OMP removal in biofilters. • The type of secondary effluent determines the lifespan of filtering

  19. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper. The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples,which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters,the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed,the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles,respectively. The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic,particle size segregation and stratigraphy,but also in formation stages. In addition,three important speeds can be obtained by this method,which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  20. DPTM simulation of aeolian sand ripple

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG XiaoJing; BO TianLi; XIE Li

    2008-01-01

    Aeolian sand ripple and its time evolution are simulated by the discrete particle tracing method (DPTM) presented in this paper.The difference between this method and the current methods is that the former can consider the three main factors relevant to the formation of natural aeolian sand ripples, which are the wind-blown sand flux above the sand bed formed by lots of sand particles with different di-ameters, the particle-bed collision and after it the rebound and ejection of sand particles in the sand bed, the saltation of high-speed sand particles and the creep of low-speed sand particles, respectively.The simulated aeolian sand ripple is close to the natural sand ripple not only in basic shape and characteristic, particle size segregation and stratigraphy, but also in formation stages.In addition, three important speeds can be obtained by this method, which are the propagation speed of the saturated aeolian sand ripple and the critical frictional wind speeds of emergence and disappearance of sand ripple.

  1. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  2. Sand and Water Table Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Ann H.; White, Mary J.; Stone, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    The authors observed preschoolers engaged at the sand and water table to determine if math could be found within their play. Wanting to understand how children interact with provided materials and what kinds of math ideas they explore during these interactions, the authors offer practical examples of how such play can promote mathematical…

  3. Impact on sand and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann, R.P.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the impact of a body on sand and water. When a body impacts a free surface in the inertial regime the series of events is the following: On impact material is blown away in all directions and an impact cavity forms. Due to the hydrostatic pressure from the sides the cav

  4. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...

  5. A SIMPLE ANALYTICAL MODEL FOR PREDICTING SAND PRODUCTION IN A NIGER DELTA OIL FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isehunwa S.O

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Sand production, which is predominant in the Niger Delta, is a growing concern in the petroleum industry because of the associated technical, operational and economic challenges. The development of sanding predictive tools and effective management strategies has received much attention in literature. However, most of the publishedtheoretical models have been validated with laboratory or data obtained from petroleum provinces other than the Niger Delta. This work developed a simple analytical model for predicting sand production and validated it using 16 wells in a Niger Delta Field. The results confirmed the well-known impact of flow rate, fluid viscosity and grain size and density on sanding rates. It was also observed that at moderate production rates, sanding in the Niger Delta Field has relatively small arch lengths of below 30 feet.

  6. experimental studies of sand production from unconsolidated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ES Obe

    Production of sand during oil and gas exploration causes severe operational prob- ... duction such as risk of well failure, erosion of pipelines and surface facilities, sand separa- tion and disposal ... ment, theoretical and numerical analysis have.

  7. Remoção de matéria orgânica, coliformes totais e nitrificação no tratamento de esgotos domésticos por filtros de areia Organic matter and total coliform removal and nitrification in the treatment of domestic wastewater by sand filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Luiz Tonetti

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Segundo o IBGE (2000, 73% dos municípios brasileiros possuem menos de 20.000 habitantes, que em sua maior parte vive na zona rural ou em pequenos núcleos urbanos. Quase a totalidade dos esgotos destas cidades é lançada nos corpos hídricos, contribuindo com o agravamento dos problemas de saúde pública e ambiental. Esses danos podem ser minimizados com o emprego de sistemas de tratamento simples, eficientes, sustentáveis e economicamente viáveis. O filtro anaeróbio com recheio de bambu combinado com filtros de areia satisfaria estas exigências, propiciando um efluente adequado para disposição nos cursos d'água ou para reúso, resguardando as fontes de água potável. A aplicação piloto deste método demonstrou que no emprego de baixas cargas de efluente anaeróbio nos filtros de areia havia uma remoção superior a 96% da DBO, adequação na emissão de coliformes totais e uma completa nitrificação. Aumentando-se as cargas, ocorria uma pequena redução da eficiência, no entanto os resultados ainda eram satisfatórios.According to IBGE (2000 73% of the Brazilian cities are considered small communities with population smaller than 20,000 inhabitants. The majority of domestic wastewater of these places is normally disposed in rivers with no treatment. As a consequence, the irregular disposal may cause health and environmental problems. To reduce this risk it is necessary to develop treatment systems that are simple, efficient, sustainable and of low cost. The treatment of wastewater using up flow anaerobic filter combined with sand filters would be able to satisfy these exigencies, producing an effluent that could be disposed in rivers or even be reused, safeguarding the sources of potable water. The system achieved BOD removal of 96% and complete nitrification for the application of low loads. The increase of the applied loads caused a reduction in the efficiency; however the final values were still satisfactory.

  8. The Microbial Database for Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal (MiDas-DK) – a tool for understanding activated sludge population dynamics and community stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielczarek, Artur Tomasz; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Larsen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    ecosystems, and, besides many scientific articles on fundamental issues on mixed communities encompassing nitrifiers, denitrifiers, bacteria involved in P-removal, hydrolysis, fermentation, and foaming, the project has provided results that can be used to optimize the operation of full-scale plants and carry...... plants, there seemed to be plant-specific factors that controlled the population composition thereby keeping it unique in each plant over time. Statistical analyses of FISH and operational data revealed some correlations, but less than expected. MiDas-DK (www.midasdk.dk) will continue over the next years...

  9. UK silica sand resources for fracking

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2013-01-01

    UK silica sand resources for fracking Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG Email: Silica sand is high purity quartz sand that is mainly used for glass production, as foundry sand, in horticulture, leisure and other industrial uses. One specialist use is as a ‘proppant’ to enhance oil and gas recovery. This presentation will focus on this application, particularly for shale gas recovery where it is mo...

  10. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  11. Thermochemical method for the treatment of oil contaminated sand; Metodo termoquimico para tratamento de areia contaminada por oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Rosana C.G.M. [Fundacao Gorceix, Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)]|[PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Khalil, Carlos N. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    In January 2000 there was a major oil spill in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, which contaminated 2400 tons of sand. This work, based on NGS (Nitrogen Generating System) technology, was adapted for cleaning contaminated sand and recovering of spilled oil. NGS is a thermochemical method first developed for removal of paraffin deposits in production and export pipelines. The method is based on a strongly exothermic redox chemical reaction between two salts catalyzed in acidic pH. The reaction products are harmless to the environment and consist of nitrogen, sodium chloride, water and heat. By combining simultaneous effects of the treatment such as heating, turbulence and floatation, one can remove, within 98% of efficiency, spilling oil from contaminated sand. After treatment, removed oil can be securely returned to refining process. The method has proved to be efficient, fast, low cost and ecologically correct method for cleaning contaminated sand and can be applied in place right after a contamination event. (author)

  12. Sand Waves. Report 1. Sand Wave Shoaling in Navigation Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    heights range from 0.8 m in the Minas Basin, Bay of Fundy (Dalrymple 1984) to 6.0 m in the Bahia Blanca Estuary, Argentina (Aliotta and Perillo 1987...26 PART IV: SITE-SPECIFIC SAND WAVE SHOALING PROBLEMS .. ........ 30 Columbia River Navigation Channel ........ ............... .. 30 Panama ...problem location discussed in this report is at St. Andrew Bay near Panama City, Florida. A relatively short section of the jettied inlet channel requires

  13. DNA barcoding for the identification of sand fly species (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae) in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Gutiérrez, María Angélica; Vivero, Rafael J; Vélez, Iván D; Porter, Charles H; Uribe, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Sand flies include a group of insects that are of medical importance and that vary in geographic distribution, ecology, and pathogen transmission. Approximately 163 species of sand flies have been reported in Colombia. Surveillance of the presence of sand fly species and the actualization of species distribution are important for predicting risks for and monitoring the expansion of diseases which sand flies can transmit. Currently, the identification of phlebotomine sand flies is based on morphological characters. However, morphological identification requires considerable skills and taxonomic expertise. In addition, significant morphological similarity between some species, especially among females, may cause difficulties during the identification process. DNA-based approaches have become increasingly useful and promising tools for estimating sand fly diversity and for ensuring the rapid and accurate identification of species. A partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase gene subunit I (COI) is currently being used to differentiate species in different animal taxa, including insects, and it is referred as a barcoding sequence. The present study explored the utility of the DNA barcode approach for the identification of phlebotomine sand flies in Colombia. We sequenced 700 bp of the COI gene from 36 species collected from different geographic localities. The COI barcode sequence divergence within a single species was sand flies from Colombia.

  14. Tick Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ticks Tickborne diseases abroad Borrelia miyamotoi Borrelia mayonii Tick Removal Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir If ... a tick quite effectively. How to remove a tick Use fine-tipped tweezers to grasp the tick ...

  15. Removal of broken hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hak, David J; McElvany, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    Despite advances in metallurgy, fatigue failure of hardware is common when a fracture fails to heal. Revision procedures can be difficult, usually requiring removal of intact or broken hardware. Several different methods may need to be attempted to successfully remove intact or broken hardware. Broken intramedullary nail cross-locking screws may be advanced out by impacting with a Steinmann pin. Broken open-section (Küntscher type) intramedullary nails may be removed using a hook. Closed-section cannulated intramedullary nails require additional techniques, such as the use of guidewires or commercially available extraction tools. Removal of broken solid nails requires use of a commercial ratchet grip extractor or a bone window to directly impact the broken segment. Screw extractors, trephines, and extraction bolts are useful for removing stripped or broken screws. Cold-welded screws and plates can complicate removal of locked implants and require the use of carbide drills or high-speed metal cutting tools. Hardware removal can be a time-consuming process, and no single technique is uniformly successful.

  16. RESEARCH ON THE POWER CONSUMPTION IN SANDING PROCESS WITH ABRASIVE BRUSHES, COMPARED TO THE WIDE BELT SANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Anne-Marie BĂDESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling of over-finishing grinding with abrasive brushes and also a comparative study between the absorbed power when over-finishing grinding the beech, the spruce and the MDF with this kind of tools as compared to the absorbed power when over-finishing grinding under similar conditions using the wide belt sanding (grinding technology, presenting the advantages of reconsidering such a technological process.

  17. IMPROVEMENT OF EQUIPMENT FOR EFFECTIVE HARDENING SAND MIXTURE BY VACUUM MOLDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Doroshenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with the design flask tooling and patterns for effective hardening sand mixture in the vacuum molding (V-Process, and molding on a one-off patterns (Lost Foam Casting. Sealing and evacuating sand mixture – two major factors influence the strength of the casting mold and casting quality, management practices which will enable to improve the casting process.

  18. METHOD OF PROCESSING MONAZITE SAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, M.A.; Smutz, M.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for recovering thorium, uranium, and rare earth values from monazite sand. The monazite sand is first digested with sulfuric acid and the resulting "monazite sulfate" solution is adjusted to a pH of between 0.4 and 3.0, and oxalate anions are added causing precipitation of the thorium and the rare earths as the oxalates. The oxalate precipitate is separated from the uranium containing supernatant solution, and is dried and calcined to the oxides. The thorium and rare earth oxides are then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is contacted with tribntyl phosphate whereby an organic extract phase containing the cerium and thorium values is obtained, together with an aqueous raffinate containing the other rare earth values. The organic phase is then separated from the aqueous raffinate and the cerium and thorium are back extracted with an aqueous medium.

  19. Characterization of sand lenses embedded in tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Klint, K.E.S.; Nilsson, B.

    2012-01-01

    of the various types of sand lenses is discussed, primarily in relation to the depositional and glaciotectonic processes they underwent. Detailed characterization of sand lenses facilitates such interpretations. Finally, the observations are linked to a more general overview of the distribution of sand lenses......Tills dominate large parts of the superficial sediments on the Northern hemisphere. These glacial diamictons are extremely heterogeneous and riddled with fractures and lenses of sand or gravel. The frequency and geometry of sand lenses within tills are strongly linked to glaciodynamic processes...... occurring in various glacial environments. This study specifically focuses on the appearance and spatial distribution of sand lenses in tills. It introduces a methodology on how to measure and characterize sand lenses in the field with regard to size, shape and degree of deformation. A set of geometric...

  20. A compact topology for sand automata

    CERN Document Server

    Dennunzio, Alberto; Masson, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we exhibit a strong relation between the sand automata configuration space and the cellular automata configuration space. This relation induces a compact topology for sand automata, and a new context in which sand automata are homeomorphic to cellular automata acting on a specific subshift. We show that the existing topological results for sand automata, including the Hedlund-like representation theorem, still hold. In this context, we give a characterization of the cellular automata which are sand automata, and study some dynamical behaviors such as equicontinuity. Furthermore, we deal with the nilpotency. We show that the classical definition is not meaningful for sand automata. Then, we introduce a suitable new notion of nilpotency for sand automata. Finally, we prove that this simple dynamical behavior is undecidable.

  1. Rheological Characterization of Green Sand Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hovad, Emil

    2016-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to characterize experimentally the flow behaviour of the green sand that is used for casting of sand moulds. After the sand casting process is performed, the sand moulds are used for metal castings. The rheological properties of the green sand is important to quantify...... module for characterizing granular materials. The new module enables viscosity measurements of the green sand as function of the shear rate at different flow rates, i.e. 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 15 L/min. The results show generally that the viscosity decreases with both the shear- and flow rate....... In addition, the measurements show that the green sand flow follows a shear-thinning behaviour even after the full fluidization point....

  2. Silo model tests with sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Andersen, Jørgen

    Tests have been carried out in a large silo model with Leighton Buzzard Sand. Normal pressures and shear stresses have been measured during tests carried out with inlet and outlet geometry. The filling method is a very important parameter for the strength of the mass and thereby the pressures...... as well as the flow pattern during discharge of the silo. During discharge a mixed flow pattern has been identified...

  3. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17.

  4. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  5. Thermal Properties of oil sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, Y.; Lee, H.; Kwon, Y.; Kim, J.

    2013-12-01

    Thermal recovery methods such as Cyclic Steam Injection or Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) are the effective methods for producing heavy oil or bitumen. In any thermal recovery methods, thermal properties (e.g., thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity) are closely related to the formation and expansion of steam chamber within a reservoir, which is key factors to control efficiency of thermal recovery. However, thermal properties of heavy oil or bitumen have not been well-studied despite their importance in thermal recovery methods. We measured thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and volumetric heat capacity of 43 oil sand samples from Athabasca, Canada, using a transient thermal property measurement instrument. Thermal conductivity of 43 oil sand samples varies from 0.74 W/mK to 1.57 W/mK with the mean thermal conductivity of 1.09 W/mK. The mean thermal diffusivity is 5.7×10-7 m2/s with the minimum value of 4.2×10-7 m2/s and the maximum value of 8.0×10-7 m2/s. Volumetric heat capacity varies from 1.5×106 J/m3K to 2.11×106 J/m3K with the mean volumetric heat capacity of 1.91×106 J/m3K. In addition, physical and chemical properties (e.g., bitumen content, electric resistivity, porosity, gamma ray and so on) of oil sand samples have been measured by geophysical logging and in the laboratory. We are now proceeding to investigate the relationship between thermal properties and physical/chemical properties of oil sand.

  6. Effect of texture and blasting pressure on residual stress and surface modifications in wet sand blasted α-Al2O3 coating

    OpenAIRE

    Ekström, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Recently, wet sand blasting on coated cutting tool inserts has drawn interest to the tooling industry due to its positive effects on cutting performance and tool life. This performance boost has partly been attributed to the buildup of compressive residual stresses in the coating during the blasting process. However, the mechanism of forming residual stresses in ceramic coatings during sand blasting is not fully understood. This work utilize x-ray diffraction as the main tool to study the for...

  7. Costs Models in Design and Manufacturing of Sand Casting Products

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Nicolas; Bernard, Alain

    2010-01-01

    In the early phases of the product life cycle, the costs controls became a major decision tool in the competitiveness of the companies due to the world competition. After defining the problems related to this control difficulties, we will present an approach using a concept of cost entity related to the design and realization activities of the product. We will try to apply this approach to the fields of the sand casting foundry. This work will highlight the enterprise modelling difficulties (limits of a global cost modelling) and some specifics limitations of the tool used for this development. Finally we will discuss on the limits of a generic approach.

  8. Material Removal Rate, Electrode Wear Rate, and Surface Roughness Evaluation in Die Sinking EDM with Hollow Tool through Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teepu Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical discharge machining is one of the earliest nontraditional machining, extensively used in industry for processing of parts having unusual profiles with reasonable precision. In the present work, an attempt has been made to model material removal rate, electrode wear rate, and surface roughness through response surface methodology in a die sinking EDM process. The optimization was performed in two steps using one factor at a time for preliminary evaluation and a Box-Behnken design involving three variables with three levels for determination of the critical experimental conditions. Pulse on time, pulse off time, and peak current were changed during the tests, while a copper electrode having tubular cross section was employed to machine through holes on EN 353 steel alloy workpiece. The results of analysis of variance indicated that the proposed mathematical models obtained can adequately describe the performances within the limits of factors being studied. The experimental and predicted values were in a good agreement. Surface topography is revealed with the help of scanning electron microscope micrographs.

  9. Downhole tool with replaceable tool sleeve sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, W. A.

    1985-10-29

    A downhole tool for insertion in a drill stem includes elongated cylindrical half sleeve tool sections adapted to be non-rotatably supported on an elongated cylindrical body. The tool sections are mountable on and removable from the body without disconnecting either end of the tool from a drill stem. The half sleeve tool sections are provided with tapered axially extending flanges on their opposite ends which fit in corresponding tapered recesses formed on the tool body and the tool sections are retained on the body by a locknut threadedly engaged with the body and engageable with an axially movable retaining collar. The tool sections may be drivably engaged with axial keys formed on the body or the tool sections may be formed with flat surfaces on the sleeve inner sides cooperable with complementary flat surfaces formed on a reduced diameter portion of the body around which the tool sections are mounted.

  10. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of benzothiazole aqueous solution promoted by volcanic sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, H. [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Catolica de la Santisima Concepcion, Caupolican 491, Concepcion (Chile)], E-mail: hvaldes@ucsc.cl; Murillo, F.A.; Manoli, J.A.; Zaror, C.A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica (F. Ingenieria), Universidad de Concepcion (Chile)

    2008-05-30

    This paper presents experimental results on the catalytic effect of volcanic sands on benzothiazole ozonation. Experiments were assessed at laboratory scale, in a differential circular flow reactor composed of a volcanic sand fixed bed column of 19 cm{sup 3} and a 1 dm{sup 3} storage tank, operated in batch mode at 20 {sup o}C and pH 2-7. Experimental results show that ozone self-decomposition is enhanced by the presence of volcanic sand at all pH. At pH > pH{sub PZC}, the increase in aqueous ozone decay could be related to ozone interaction with strong Lewis acid on metal oxide surface sites of the volcanic sand. Ozone self-decomposition reactions occurring on the volcanic sand are less affected by the presence of radical scavengers. Benzothiazole removal by ozonation is also enhanced by the presence of volcanic sand. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of free radical scavengers is also impaired by volcanic sand, suggesting that strong Lewis acid surface sites play a key role on the reaction mechanism.

  11. Continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue by engineered graphite oxide coated sand in fixed-bed column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ji-Lai, E-mail: jilaigong@gmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Yong-Liang; Jiang, Yan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Cui, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Ke; Deng, Can-Hui; Niu, Qiu-Ya; Deng, Jiu-Hua [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Huan, Shuang-Yan [State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • GO-sand was prepared by coating GO on the surface of sand. • Pb(II) and MB were efficiently removed by GO-sand filter in column. • The removal of MB was enhanced with the presence of Pb(II). • GO-sand is low-cost and convenient for its application as packed bed filter. - Abstract: The mixture of several effluents, caused by the improper handling and management of effluents, generated multi-component wastewater containing both metals and dyes, leading to the complicated treatment process. In this study, a continuous adsorption of Pb(II) and methylene blue (MB) has been studied in single and binary solutions by using graphite oxide coated sand (GO-sand) as an adsorbent in a fixed-bed column. GO-sand was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after analyte adsorption. Compared with sand filter, adsorption quantity and capacity for Pb(II) and MB by GO-sand filter were greatly increased. In Pb(II) and MB single solutions, the experimental parameters were investigated in detail including initial concentration, flow rate, bed depth and pH. Exhaustion time decreased with increasing initial concentration and flow rate, and increased with increasing bed depth and pH. In the Pb(II)-MB binary solution, exhaustion time significantly decreased for Pb(II) adsorption, but increased for MB adsorption. The reason was explained that the more favorable adsorption for MB onto the surface of GO-sand than that for Pb(II), which was derived from π–π interaction between MB and GO on sand surface in packed filter. The Yoon–Nelson model was applied at different concentration of Pb(II) and MB to predict the breakthrough curves. The experimental data were well fit with the model indicating that it was suitable for this column design.

  12. Submerged Pond Sand Filter-A Novel Approach to Rural Water Supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlæger, Mia; Christensen, Sarah Christine Boesgaard; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the new design and function of a modified version of a traditional slow sand filter. The Submerged Pond Sand Filter is built inside a pond and has a vertical as well as a horizontal flow of water through a sloped filter opening. The filter provides treated drinking water......-depleted area, where only surface water was available. Furthermore, it is a sustainable treatment method due to low maintenance requirements....... to a rural Indian village. The filter has functioned with minimal maintenance for five years without being subject to the typical scraping off and changing of sand as needed in traditional slow sand filters every few months. This five-year study showed bacterial removal efficiency of 97% on average...

  13. Evaluation of Durability Parameters of Concrete with Manufacture Sand and River Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangoju, Bhaskar; Ramesh, G.; Bharatkumar, B. H.; Ramanjaneyulu, K.

    2017-06-01

    Most of the states in our country have banned sand quarrying from the river beds, causing a scarcity of natural river sand for the construction sector. Manufacture sand (M-sand) is one of the alternate solutions to replace the river sand (R-sand) in concrete. The main aim of the present study is to evaluate the durability parameters of concrete with M-sand when compared to that of concrete with R-sand. Corrosion of reinforcement is one of the main deteriorating mechanisms of reinforced concrete due to the ingress of chloride ions or carbon-di-oxide. For comparative evaluation of durability parameters, accelerated tests such as Rapid Chloride Permeability Test, Rapid Chloride Migration Test and accelerated carbonation test were carried out on specimens of R-sand and M-sand. All tests were carried out after 90 days of casting. Test results reveal that the durability parameters of the concrete with M-sand in chloride induced environment is relatively better than that of concrete with R-sand and hence is recommended to use M-sand as a replacement to R-sand.

  14. Sand deposit-detecting method and its application in model test of sand flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎伟; 房营光; 莫海鸿; 谷任国; 陈俊生

    2013-01-01

    Against the background of the sand-flow foundation treatment engineering of Guangzhou Zhoutouzui variable cross-section immersed tunnel, a kind of sand deposit-detecting method was devised on the basis of full-scale model test of sand-flow method. The real-time data of sand-deposit height and radius were obtained by the self-developed sand-deposit detectors. The test results show that the detecting method is simple and has high precision. In the use of sand-flow method, the sand-carrying capability of fluid is limited, and sand particles are all transported to the sand-deposit periphery through crater, gap and chutes after the sand deposit formed. The diffusion range of the particles outside the sand-deposit does not exceed 2.0 m. Severe sorting of sand particles is not observed because of the unique oblique-layered depositing process. The temporal and spatial distributions of gap and chutes directly affect the sand-deposit expansion, and the expansion trend of the average sand-deposit radius accords with quadratic time-history curve.

  15. Removal and Recovery of Lead from Aqueous Solution by Low Cost Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pappalardo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: To remove Pb(II from wastewater using local UAE sand and then to recover the removed Pb(II. Approach: Removal efficiency of Pb(II from wastewater was investigated using white, yellow and red United Arab Emirates sand with pore sizes 3 intervals while continuously injecting 300 ppm Pb(II solution into the column. Pb(II concentrations were determined using inductively coupled plasma- atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES. Measurements were carried out until saturation of the column by Pb(II was attained. Recovery efficiency of Pb(II was initially investigated using distilled water, 0.100 mol dm−3 HNO3 and pH 8.0 aqueous solutions. Recovery via chelation with Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid (EDTA was then attempted. Results: Batch experiments showed that yellow sand was more efficient than either white or red sand in removing Pb(II, with a maximum removal capacity of 0.030 kg Pb(II per kg yellow sand. Accordingly, yellow sand was selected for column filtration experiments. In column filtration, the removal capacity rose to a maximum of 0.086 kg Pb(II per kg sand. When sand containing removed Pb(II in batch experiments was equilibrated overnight with EDTA solutions in stoichiometric excess, 86.6% recovery was observed. By comparison, recovery using EDTA in column filtration was 94.7%. Recovery by injection of either water or 0.100 mol dm−3 HNO3 solution was either negligible or much lower than that obtained with EDTA. Conclusion: Column filtration using UAE yellow sand is an efficient and inexpensive method to remove Pb(II from wastewaters. Pb(II can be efficiently recovered from yellow sand columns by chelation with EDTA.

  16. SAND

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Grete

    Der er udført et konsolideringsforsøg med bakkesand fra Lunds grusgrav, Lund no. O. forsøget er udført i samme konsolideringsapparat, som er anvendt til måling af deformationsegenskaberne af mange forskellige danske jordarter. Forsøgsresultaterne er søgt tolket som ved forsøg med andre jordarter....

  17. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, O.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand / biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  18. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  19. Stratification of nitrification activity in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Musovic, Sanin

    2013-01-01

    Rapid sand filters used in groundwater treatment remove ammonium, iron and manganese from the water. Ammonium is removed biologically by nitrifying microorganisms attached on the sand surface. Nitrification kinetics and activity is strongly affected by filter design and operation, which are the key...... parameters in process optimization. Nitrification optimization needs a detailed insight of the process and the way it takes place in the filter. Filters are often considered in a “black box” approach, where data are only available for influent and effluent and the entire filter is assumed homogenous. The aim...... of this study is to investigate nitrification activity in a rapid sand filter, with focus on its homogeneity and how it relates to filter performance. Two groundwater treatment plants in Denmark were selected for the experimental investigations. Plant 1 operates a single line of pre and after filters and has...

  20. Microbial degradation of pesticides in rapid sand filters for treatment of drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Mathilde Jørgensen; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    to remove pesticides from the water phase and pesticides are detected in 24% of the active Danish waterworks wells. This study aimed at investigating the potential of microbial pesticide removal in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment. Removal of the pesticides MCPP, bentazone, glyphosate...... of pesticides in the water decreased – MCPP decreased to 42-85%, bentazone to 15-35%, glyphosate to 7-14% and p-nitrophenol 1-3% – from the initial concentration over a period of 6-13 days. The largest microbial removal was observed at Sjælsø waterworks Plant II, where the pesticides were partially mineralised......In Denmark drinking water supply is based on groundwater which is treated by aeration followed by filtration in rapid sand filters. Unfortunately pesticide contamination of the groundwater poses a threat to the water supply, since the simple treatment process at the waterworks is not considered...

  1. Liquefaction of Sand under Low Confining Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shaoli; Rolf Sandven; Lars Grande

    2003-01-01

    Undrained behaviour of sand under low cell pressure was studied in static and cyclic triaxial tests. It was found that very loose sand liquefies under static loading with the relative density being a key parameter for the undrained behaviour of sand. In cyclic triaxial tests, pore water pressures built up during the cyclic loading and exceeded the confining cell pressure. This process was accompanied by a large sudden increase in axial deformation. The necessary number of cycles to obtain liquefaction was related to the confining cell pressure, the amplitude of cyclic loading and the relative density of sand.In addition, the patterns of pore water pressure response are different from those of sand samples with different relative densities. The test results are very useful for expounding scour mechanism around coastal structures since they relate to the low stress behaviour of the sand.

  2. Creep Behavior of Frozen Sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    temperature and stress range. There was a 2strong stress dependance to S (r =0.95) for saturated Manchester Fine Sand which does not agree with RPT. The...Curves at High Stress 161 Ratio D/Du = 0.505 for Frozen HF’S at w=10% IV-20 Minimum Strain Rate Dependance on Stress 162 Ratio for Frozen MFS IV-21 Minimum...Strain Rate Dependance on Relative 163 Density for Frozen MFS IV-22 Temperature Stage Test on Frozen Saturated 164 MFS under a Load of D=9.24MPa Fig

  3. TEMPORARY REMOVAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calkins, Hugh; Hindricks, Gerhard; Cappato, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    The publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.e...

  4. Heterogeneous Nitrification in a Full Scale Rapid Sand Filter Treating Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopato, Laure; Röttgers, Nina; Binning, Philip John

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine ammonium removal kinetics in an operating biologically active sand filter at a waterworks treating anaerobic groundwater. The ammonium load varied between 0.7 and 3 g N/h/m2 (concentration ranged from 0.23 to 0.78 mg N/l) and the inlet water flux varied...

  5. Microbial community structure and a core microbiome in biological rapid sand filters at Danish waterworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Musovic, Sanin; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    Rapid sand filtration is a traditional and common technology for drinking water purification from groundwater. Despite its wide scale and long-term use, the diversity and characterization of microbial communities in these engineered systems have remained unexplored and their roles in removal...

  6. Recent advances in waterglass sand technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Chun-xi

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports some new understandings and advances in waterglass sand technologies. The multiple chemical modification process can increase the binding strength of the waterglass sand by up to 50%-70%.Therefore, the additions of the modified waterglass can be decreased to 3.0%-4.0% for CO2 process and to 2.0%-2.5% for organic ester hardening process, and greatly improve the collapsibility and reclaimability of the sand. Based on the new understandings and experimental results reported in this paper, several original ideas, such as nano modification, have been proposed to promote advances of waterglass sand technologies,

  7. PROSPECTS FIXATION DRIFT SANDS PHYSICOCHEMICAL METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maujuda MUZAFFAROVA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the theoretical foundations of secure mobile sand being considered for reducing the negative impact of one of the manifestations of exogenous plains on such an important natural-technical system as a railroad. It suggests practical measures to build a system of design protection against sand drifts. The article also suggests ways to conserve resources and rational use of machinery and performers as well as the consolidation of mobile sand wet with water soluble waste of local production of waste dextrin. Consolidation is exposed on dry and wet sand.

  8. Innovative developments in sand reclamation technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dañko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper sand management and efficient sand reclamation system are two main factors influencing economical and ecological side of modern foundry plant. It is well known fact that the production of 1 metric ton of casting from ferrous alloys generates circa 1 metric ton of waste [1], which due to containing certain amounts of harmful and dangerous compounds should undergo a reclamation – at least of the main component, which means a silica sand grains. The paper present problems of scientific and development research concerning the innovative reclamation technologies of used foundry sands such as: mechanical-cryogenic reclamation and innovative thermal reclamation.

  9. Population differentiation and the effects of herbivory and sand compaction on the subterranean growth of a desert lily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-R, Natalia; Ward, David; Saltz, David

    2006-01-01

    Differences in level of herbivory can select for local adaptation and genetic differentiation of plant populations in different environments. Mean bulb depth of the desert lily Pancratium sickenbergeri, differs considerably among populations differing in the level of herbivory by the dorcas gazelle. The gazelle digs in the sand to remove most of the bulb of the lily. Deeper bulbs have less material removed by herbivory than shallow bulbs and have higher fitness. A possible confounding factor is the degree of sand compaction, which may retard the downward growth of the bulb. We conducted a common garden experiment with 2 sand types with seeds from source populations with different levels of herbivory. There was a large genetic difference among populations. Two of 3 analyses indicated that there was an interaction between population and sand type, indicating that there is a heritable component of plasticity.

  10. Study of thermal reclamation of used hot-box sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Łucarz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to determine the number of cycles of thermal reclamation to which a silica sand grain bonded by differentbinders can be subjected with no significant deterioration in strength. The research was carried out on three resins used in hot-boxtechnology. The cores created in this way were subjected to strength tests and the resulting scrap was crushed and reclaimed thermally.The new core sand and cores needed for strength tests were made on the basis of the reclaimed material. The process was repeated ninetimes. The pH reaction of quartz matrix was analysed after each cycle of thermal reclamation. It was observed that there is an impact of thebinder on a silica sand grain. It was concluded that it cannot be fully eliminated by merely using thermal reclamation. The application of additional mechanical reclamation after heat processing can lead to removing the impurities which gather in the irregularities of thereclaimed material and have a significant influence on its chemical reaction.

  11. Oil sand process-affected water treatment using coke adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamal El-Din, M.; Pourrezaei, P.; Chelme-Ayala, P.; Zubot, W. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Oil sands operations generate an array of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) that will eventually be released to the environment. This water must be evaluated within conventional and advanced water treatment technologies. Water management strategies propose options for increased reuse and recycling of water from settling ponds, as well as safe discharge. This presentation outlined the typical composition of OSPW. Constituents of concern in OSPW include suspended solids, hydrocarbons, salts, ammonia, trace metals, and dissolved organics such as naphthenic acids (NAs). Petroleum coke is one of the by-products generated from bitumen extraction in the oil sands industry and can be used as one of the possible treatment processes for the removal of organic compounds found in OSPW. Activated carbon adsorption is an effective process, able to adsorb organic substances such as oils, radioactive compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, poly aromatic hydrocarbons and various halogenated compounds. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the production of activated carbon from petroleum coke using steam as the activation media; to determine the factors affecting the absorption of NAs; and to evaluate the activated coke adsorption capacity for the reduction of NAs and dissolved organic carbons present in OSPW. It was concluded that petroleum non-activated coke has the ability to decrease COD, alkalinity, and NA concentration. tabs., figs.

  12. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday Isehunwa,; Andrew Farotade

    2010-01-01

    Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field ...

  13. Testing Tools for Glyphosate Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are multiple tools available for testing for glyphosate resistance. Whole plant screens, whether in the field or greenhouse, should be used as an initial method to determine if a biotype is glyphosate resistant. Screening for resistance using seedling assays such as in Petri plates, sand cul...

  14. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  15. Pattern formation - Instabilities in sand ripples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J. L.; v. Hecke, M.; Haaning, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sand ripples are seen below shallow wavy water and are formed whenever water oscillates over a bed of sand. Here we analyse the instabilities that can upset this perfect patterning when the ripples are subjected to large changes in driving amplitude or frequency, causing them to deform both...

  16. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  17. Silica sand resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Westerhoff, W.E.; Menkovic, A.; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Maljers, D.

    2009-01-01

    Silica sand, (almost) pure quartz sand, is a valuable and scarce mineral resource within the shallow Dutch subsurface. High-grade deposits are exploited in the southeastemmost part of the country, as raw material for the glass, ceramic, chemical and other process industries. Dutch land-use policy re

  18. Pilot Project Sand Groynes Delfland Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, R.; Walstra, D.J.R.; Swinkels, C.S.

    2012-01-01

    In October and November 2009 a pilot project has been executed at the Delfland Coast in the Netherlands, constructing three small sandy headlands called Sand Groynes. Sand Groynes are nourished from the shore in seaward direction and anticipated to redistribute in the alongshore due to the impact of

  19. Understanding Colombian Amazonian white sand forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peñuela-Mora, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Although progress has been made in studies on white sand forests in the Amazon, there is still a considerable gap in our knowledge of the unique species composition of white sand forests and their structure and dynamics, especially in Western Amazon. This thesis aims to fill this gap by addressing t

  20. Enhancing the biofiltration of geosmin by seeding sand filter columns with a consortium of geosmin-degrading bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowall, Bridget; Hoefel, Daniel; Newcombe, Gayle; Saint, Christopher P; Ho, Lionel

    2009-02-01

    Geosmin is a secondary metabolite that can be produced by many species of cyanobacteria and Actinomycetes. It imparts a musty/earthy taste and odour to drinking water which can result in consumer complaints and a general perception that there is a problem with the water quality. As geosmin is recalcitrant to conventional water treatment, processes are sought to ensure effective removal of this compound from potable water. Biological filtration (biofiltration) is an attractive option for geosmin removal as this compound has been shown to be biodegradable. However, effective biofiltration of geosmin can be site specific as it is highly dependent upon the types of organism present and there is often an extended acclimation period before efficient removals are achieved. We report here, a novel approach to enhance the biofiltration of geosmin by seeding sand filter columns with a bacterial consortium previously shown to be capable of effectively degrading geosmin. Geosmin removals of up to 75% were evident through sand columns which had been inoculated with the geosmin-degrading bacteria, when compared with non-inoculated sand columns where geosmin removals were as low as 25%. These low geosmin removals through the non-inoculated sand columns are consistent with previous studies and were attributed to physical/abiotic losses. The presence of an existing biofilm was shown to influence geosmin removal, as the biofilm allowed for greater attachment of the geosmin-degrading consortium (as determined by an ATP assay), and enhanced removals of geosmin. Minimal difference in geosmin removal was observed when the geosmin-degrading bacteria were inoculated into the sand columns containing either an active or inactive biofilm.

  1. Tattoo removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adatto, Maurice A; Halachmi, Shlomit; Lapidoth, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Over 50,000 new tattoos are placed each year in the United States. Studies estimate that 24% of American college students have tattoos and 10% of male American adults have a tattoo. The rising popularity of tattoos has spurred a corresponding increase in tattoo removal. Not all tattoos are placed intentionally or for aesthetic reasons though. Traumatic tattoos due to unintentional penetration of exogenous pigments can also occur, as well as the placement of medical tattoos to mark treatment boundaries, for example in radiation therapy. Protocols for tattoo removal have evolved over history. The first evidence of tattoo removal attempts was found in Egyptian mummies, dated to have lived 4,000 years BC. Ancient Greek writings describe tattoo removal with salt abrasion or with a paste containing cloves of white garlic mixed with Alexandrian cantharidin. With the advent of Q-switched lasers in the late 1960s, the outcomes of tattoo removal changed radically. In addition to their selective absorption by the pigment, the extremely short pulse duration of Q-switched lasers has made them the gold standard for tattoo removal.

  2. Sand transportation and reverse patterns over leeward face of sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Dun, Hongchao; Tong, Ding; Huang, Ning

    2017-04-01

    Sand saltation has complex interactions with turbulent flow and dune form. Most models of wind-blown sand consider ideal circumstances such as steady wind velocity and a flat surface, and the bulk of data on wind flow and sand transport over an individual dune has focused mostly on the influence of dune shape or inter-dune space on the wind flow, neglecting the effect of morphology on sand saltation, particularly airflow and sand transportation over the leeward slope. Wind flow structures over the leeward slope of sand dunes have a fundamental influence on the organization of sand dunes. In order to understand sand dune dynamics, lee face airflow and sediment transportation should be paid more attention. Previous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure well because of the limited observation points and the influence of experiment structure on wind field. In addition, the reverse sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand trap in field. Numerous field observations could not measure turbulent flow structure because of the limited observation points and the influence of experimental structures on the wind field. In addition, the reverse transport of sand particles over leeward face could not be collected by sand traps in field. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the turbulent flow structure and sand transport pattern over the leeward slope. A numerical model of sand saltation over slope terrain is constructed, which also considers the coupling effects between air flow and sand particles. The large eddy simulation method is used to model turbulent flow. Sand transport is simulated by tracking the trajectory of each sand particle. The results show that terrain significantly alters the turbulent air flow structure and wind-blown sand movement, especially over the leeward slope. Here, mass flux increases initially and then decreases with height in the reversed flow region in the direction of wind flow, and the mass flux

  3. Choosing an optimum sand control method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Khamehchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Formation sand control is always one of the main concerns of production engineers. There are some different methods to prevent sand production. Choosing a method for preventing formation sand production depends on different reservoir parameters and politic and economic conditions. Sometimes, economic and politic conditions are more effective to choose an optimum than reservoir parameters. Often, simultaneous investigation of politic and economic conditions with reservoir parameters has different results with what is expected. So, choosing the best sand control method is the result of thorough study. Global oil price, duration of sand control project and costs of necessary equipment for each method as economic and politic conditions and well productivity index as reservoir parameter are the main parameters studied in this paper.

  4. Natural breeding places for phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: psychodidae) in a semiarid region of bahia state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangiorgi, Bruno; Miranda, Daniel Neves; Oliveira, Diego Ferreira; Santos, Edivaldo Passos; Gomes, Fernanda Regis; Santos, Edna Oliveira; Barral, Aldina; Miranda, José Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Few microhabitats have been previously identified as natural breeding places for phlebotomine sand flies so far, and little is known about the influence of climate variables in their density. The present study was conducted in a dry region with a semiarid climate, where visceral leishmaniasis occurs in humans and dogs. The occurrence of breeding places in specific microhabitats was investigated in soil samples collected from five houses, which were also the location used for sampling of adults. All the microhabitats sampled by our study were identified as natural breeding places due to the occurrence of immature forms of sand flies. On a weekly basis, the number of adult sand flies captured was positively correlated with the mean temperature from preceding weeks. These results, in addition to promoting an advance in the knowledge of sand flies biology, may furnish a tool for optimizing the control of the sand flies, by indicating the most suitable periods and microhabitats for the application of insecticides.

  5. Altitude of the top of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand in three areas of Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Aaron L.; Westerfield, Paul W.; Gonthier, Gerard; Poynter, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand form the second most productive aquifer in Arkansas. The Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand range in thick- ness from 0 to 900 feet, consisting of fine- to medium-grained sands interbedded with layers of silt, clay, shale, and minor amounts of lignite. Within the three areas of interest, the top surface of the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand dips regionally east and southeast towards the axis of the Mississippi Embayment syncline and Desha Basin. Local variations in the top surface may be attributed to a combination of continued development of structural features, differential compaction, localized faulting, and erosion of the surface prior to subsequent inundation and deposition of younger sediments.

  6. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Isehunwa,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field were evaluated. Sand failure mechanisms and contributing parameters were identified and compared with published profiles. The results showed that cohesive stress is the predominant sand failure mechanism. Water cut, bean size and gas oil ratio (GOR impact sand production in the Niger Delta.

  7. A combination of bioleaching and electromagnetic separation in the treatment of quartz sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovás Michal

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution deals with the treatment of Slovakian eolic quartz sands by bioleaching and magnetic separation with the aim to remove iron. The X-ray study of sand patterns confirms that quartz occurs as a dominant mineral. Accompanying minerals are represented by smectite and feldspars. As to the sample of unground sand, bacterial leaching resulted in a Fe2O3 reduction to the content of 0.13 %. Similarly, in case of ground sample, the Fe2O3 content was decreased to the value of 0.19 %. Thus, biological leaching removed 60 % of Fe and by following leaching by oxalic acid total the iron removal was 70.5 %. Finally, the application of magnetic separation resulted in the total iron removal of 93 % and, in such combined way, the prepared product contained 0.024 % of Fe2O3. Achieved results on the iron removal points to the fact that the combination of leaching and magnetic separation enables to obtain a product usable in glass industry.

  8. Mass spectrometry of oil sands naphthenic acids : degradation in OSPW and wetland plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Water Science and Technology Directorate

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discussed mass spectrometry of oil sands naphthenic acids and the degradation in OSPW and wetland plants. It presented background information on the Athabasca oil sands and naphthenic acids which involve a mixture of alkanes and cycloalkane carboxylic acids with aliphatic side chains. The presentation also discussed mass spectrometry with electrospray operating in negative ion modes. Loop injection, external standard methods and solid phase extraction were reviewed along with improved analysis by removing background ions. Other topics that were presented included hydroponic test systems and wetland plant toxicity, growth and transpiration. It was concluded that dissipation included species containing oxygen, ozone, O{sub 4}, and O{sub 5}. tabs., figs.

  9. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  10. Inexpensive, removable coating for plaster tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimino, J. M.; Martin, R. R.

    1970-01-01

    Procedure for thinning and spaying a vinyl material provides strippable film for plaster surfaces. Coating is low-cost, effective seal against moisture and other sources of damage. Coating consists of a mixture of hot-spray vinyl material and 30 to 50 percent by volume of methyl ethyl ketone.

  11. Impacts of grass removal on wetting and actual water repellency in a sandy soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klaas Oostindie; Louis W. Dekker; Jan G. Wesseling; Violette Geissen; Coen J. Ritsema

    2017-01-01

    Soil water content and actual water repellency were assessed for soil profiles at two sites in a bare and grasscovered plot of a sand pasture, to investigate the impact of the grass removal on both properties...

  12. Adsorption of dyes on Sahara desert sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlikli, Canan; Bekiari, Vlasoula; Kus, Mahmut; Boduroglu, Numan; Oner, Ilker; Lianos, Panagiotis; Lyberatos, Gerasimos; Icli, Siddik

    2009-10-15

    Sahara desert sand (SaDeS) was employed as a mineral sorbent for retaining organic dyes from aqueous solutions. Natural sand has demonstrated a strong affinity for organic dyes but significantly lost its adsorption capacity when it was washed with water. Therefore, characterization of both natural and water washed sand was performed by XRD, BET, SEM and FTIR techniques. It was found that water-soluble kyanite, which is detected in natural sand, is the dominant factor affecting adsorbance of cationic dyes. The sand adsorbs over 75% of cationic dyes but less than 21% for anionic ones. Among the dyes studied, Methylene Blue (MB) demonstrated the strongest affinity for Sahara desert sand (Q(e)=11.98 mg/g, for initial dye solution concentration 3.5 x 10(-5)mol/L). The effects of initial dye concentration, the amount of the adsorbent, the temperature and the pH of the solution on adsorption capacity were tested by using Methylene Blue as model dye. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models were applied. It was concluded that adsorption of Methylene Blue on Sahara desert sand followed pseudo-second order kinetics. Gibbs free energy, enthalpy change and entropy change were calculated and found -6411 J/mol, -30360 J/mol and -76.58 J/mol K, respectively. These values indicate that the adsorption is an exothermic process and has a spontaneous nature at low temperatures.

  13. Critical state of sand matrix soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, λ, and Γ. The range of the value of M, λ, and Γ is 0.803-0.998, 0.144-0.248, and 1.727-2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated.

  14. Sand Flies and Their Control Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Hüseyin; Özbel, Yusuf

    2017-06-01

    The main aim of managing arthropod vectors that carry the disease agents is interrupting the infection cycle. Therefore, the management of the disease implies that all precautions related to all elements (i.e., human, arthropod vector, and reservoir) in the infection cycle need to be taken. There are important points that need to be considered while dealing with sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae), which in many regions worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical areas, are vectors of diseases such as leishmaniasis and sand fly fever and are the arthropods of the infection cycle. Because the larval control of the sand flies is very difficult and almost impossible, the management is mainly conducted for the adults. The most effective strategy for reducing both sand fly fever and leishmaniasis is managing sand flies, particularly in areas where humans are located. In this review, the morphology, biology, and taxonomy of sand flies; the integrated fighting and management methods such as insecticide-impregnated bed nets and use of curtains, zooprophylaxis, indoor and outdoor residual applications, larvicides, repellents, and insecticide-impregnated dog collars; and data regarding many issues such as insecticide resistance in sand flies have been emphasized on in the review.

  15. Critical State of Sand Matrix Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminaton Marto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, λ, and Γ. The range of the value of M, λ, and Γ is 0.803–0.998, 0.144–0.248, and 1.727–2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated.

  16. Invasive plants on disturbed Korean sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kee Dae

    2005-01-01

    The sand dunes in coastal regions of South Korea are important ecosystems because of their small size, the rare species found in this habitat, and the beautiful landscapes they create. This study investigated the current vegetative status of sand dunes on three representative coasts of the Korean peninsula, and on the coasts of Cheju Island, and assessed the conditions caused by invasive plants. The relationships between the degree of invasion and 14 environmental variables were studied. Plots of sand dunes along line transects perpendicular to the coastal lines were established to estimate vegetative species coverage. TWINSPAN (Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis), CCA (Canonical Correspondence Analysis), and DCCA (Detrended Canonical Correspondence Analysis) were performed to classify communities on sand dunes and assess species composition variation. Carex kobomugi, Elymus mollis, and Vitex rotundifolia were found to be the dominant species plotted on the east, the west, and the peripheral coasts of Cheju Island, respectively. Vegetation on the south coast was totally extinct. The 19 communities, including representative C. kobomugi, C. kobomugi- Ixeris repens, C. kobomugi- Oenothera biennis, E. mollis, Lolium multiflorum- Calystegia soldanella, and V. rotundifolia- C. kobomugi, were all classified according to TWINSPAN. Oenothera biennis and L. multiflorum were exotics observed within these native communities. CCA showed that invasive native and exotic species distribution was segregated significantly, according to disturbance level, exotic species number, gravel, sand and silt contents, as well as vegetation size. It further revealed that human disturbance can strongly favor the settlement of invasive and exotic species. Restoration options to reduce exotic plants in the South Korean sand dune areas were found to be the introduction of native plant species from one sand dune into other sand dune areas, prohibition of building and the introduction of exotic

  17. Formation mechanism of cracks in saturated sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobing Lu; Zhemin Zheng; Yongren Wu

    2006-01-01

    The formation mechanism of "water film" (or crack) in saturated sand is analyzed theoretically and numerically.The theoretical analysis shows that there will be no stable "water film" in the saturated sand if the strength of the skeleton is zero and no positions are choked.It is shown by numerical simulation that stable water films initiate and grow if the choking state keeps unchanged once the fluid velocities decrease to zero in the liquefied sand column.The developments of "water film" based on the model presented in this paper are compared with experimental results.

  18. Lund Sand No 0:part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    1996-01-01

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. T...

  19. Lund Sand No 0:part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    1996-01-01

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. T...

  20. Biodegradable materials as foundry moulding sands binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Major - Gabryś

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show the possibility of using biodegradable materials as part of the composition of foundry moulding and core sand binders. Research shows that moulding sands with biodegradable materials selected as binders are not only less toxic but are also better suited to mechanical reclamation than moulding sands with phenol-furfuryl resin. The use of biodegradable materials as additives to typical synthetic resins can result in their decreased toxicity and improved ability to reclamation as well as in accelerated biodegradation of binding material leftovers of mechanical reclamation.

  1. A novel bench-scale column assay to investigate site-specific nitrification biokinetics in biological rapid sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    A bench-scale assay was developed to obtain site-specific nitrification biokinetic information from biological rapid sand filters employed in groundwater treatment. The experimental set-up uses granular material subsampled from a full-scale filter, packed in a column, and operated with controlled....../h could easily be determined at 7.5 g NH4+–N/m3 packed sand/h. This assay, with conditions reflecting full-scale observations, and where the biological activity is subject to minimal physical disturbance, provides a simple and fast, yet powerful tool to gain insight in nitrification kinetics in rapid sand...

  2. A Stream Multimetric Macroinvertebrate Index (MMI) for the Sand Hills Ecoregion of the Southeastern Plains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosnicki, Ely; Sefick, Stephen A.; Paller, Michael H.; Jerrell, Miller S.; Prusha, Blair A.; Sterrett, Sean C.; Tuberville, Tracey D.; Feminella, Jack W.

    2016-10-01

    A macroinvertebrate multimetric index is an effective tool for assessing the biological integrity of streams. However, data collected under a single protocol may not be available for an entire region. We sampled macroinvertebrates from the full extent of the Sand Hills ecoregion Level IV of the Southeastern Plains with a standard protocol during the summers of 2010-2012. We evaluated the performance of 94 metrics through a series of screening criteria and built 48 macroinvertebrate multimetric indexs with combinations of the best performing metrics, representing richness, habit, functional feeding guild, sensitivity, and community composition. A series of narrative-response tests for each macroinvertebrate multimetric index was used to find the best performing macroinvertebrate multimetric index which we called the Sand Hills macroinvertebrate multimetric index. The Sand Hills macroinvertebrate multimetric index consisted of the measures Biotic Index, % Shredder taxa, Clinger taxa2/total taxa, Plecoptera and Trichoptera richness, and Tanytarsini taxa2/Chironomidae taxa. Comparison of the Sand Hills macroinvertebrate multimetric index with existing assessment tools calculated with our data indicated that the Sand Hills macroinvertebrate multimetric index performs at a high level with regard to identifying degraded sites and in its response to stress gradients.

  3. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  4. Oil sands : a teacher's guide[Activities for Ontario junior and intermediate classes : social studies, science and technology, geography, science and language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasetti, C.; Logan, A.; McKay, K. [Inside Education, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This teacher's guide for grades 4 to 9 demonstrates an awareness of how Canada's oil sands are produced, the environmental impacts associated with oil sands development, conservation of the resource, and the future of the oil sands industry in Canada. It presents expectations for the Ontario curriculum and includes several educational tools such as poster quick activities; a reader's theatre script; a newspaper article reporting on how Alberta oil sands has influenced the growth of Fort McMurray; an introductory lesson on how oil is processed from oil sands in northern Alberta; experiments to visualize the viscosity of the oil extracted from the oil sands; and, how to extract the resource. The guide also addresses issues regarding wildlife, land reclamation and climate change. figs.

  5. Effect of Chromite-Silica Sands Characteristics on Performance of Ladle Filler Sands for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Free opening rate is mainly determined by the performance of the ladle filler sand. High free opening rates of ladles are required in steel making to improve steel quality. Chromite ladle filler sands are one of the most widely used ladle filler sand. Several operative variables and materials characteristics affect the performance of the sands. Three sets of chromite ladle filler sands were selected and researches were focused on the sintering hehaviour and per- formance of the sands under operative conditions. The effect of particle size distribution on sintering, microstruc- ture, flowability, and permeability were presented. In all cases, the particle size varies from 0.1 to 1.5 mm corre- sponding to free flowing powders. One of the samples has higher permeability factor in comparison with others due to low particle size distribution. The other sample presents very good free opening due to its very good flowability and permeability factor.

  6. Penggunaan Unit Slow Sand Filter, Ozon Generator dan Rapid Sand Filter Skala Rumah Tangga Untuk Meningkatkan Kualitas Air Sumur Dangkal Menjadi Air Layak Minum (Parameter Zat Organik dan Deterjen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Prawita Sari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Air sumur merupakan air tanah yang sering kali digunakan masyarakat untuk aktivitas sehari-hari. Air sumur dengan kadar organik dan deterjen tinggi tidak layak dikonsumsi masyarakat karena dapat menyebabkan berbagai macam penyakit. Selain itu, adanya zat organik dan deterjen mempengaruhi warna dan bau air sumur sehingga tidak layak konsumsi. Slow sand filter merupakan unit pengolahan yang mampu meremoval zat organik pada air. Slow sand filter dan rapid sand filter tidak menggunakan bahan kimia dalam proses pengolahan sehingga lebih ekonomis dan efektif. Sedangkan ozon, efektif digunakan untuk meremoval zat organik yang ada dalam air dengan mengubah rantai zat organik menjadi lebih sederhana. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui keefektifan penggunaan slow sand filter, ozon generator dan rapid sand filter dalam menyisihkan beban deterjen dan zat organik pada air sumur. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa efisiensi removal pada unit slow sand filter untuk beban organik dan deterjen sebesar 57,6% dan 60,5 %, pada unit ozonasi sebesar 47,4% dan 17,5%, dan pada unit rapid sand filter sebesar 50,0% dan 50,9 %.

  7. Sand Lake WMD vegetation mapping project update

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Final report on the vegetation mapping project at Sand Lake Wetland Management District. This project is being completed by the use of SPRING software and ground...

  8. Bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus

    Global applications of pesticides in agricultural production have led to the detection of trace amounts of pesticides in groundwater resources in levels exceeding the EU threshold limit for drinking water of 0.1 µg L-1. Pesticide-polluted groundwater may be remediated by inoculating waterworks sand...... for degradation performances in flow-through sand columns, with the aim of identifying a suitable inoculant strain for future environmental applications. Another aim was to identify a suitable genetic marker to monitor phenoxy acid degradation in strain Sphingobium sp. PM2. We were not able to link motility...... and biofilm formation to the strains´ ability to adhere to sand. Nevertheless, a correlation was found between cell surface hydrophobicity and adhesion and overall degradation performances in flow-through sand columns. We identified S phingobium sp. PM2 as a promising inoculant strain, displaying efficient...

  9. Petrophysical Analysis of Oil Sand in Athabasca

    Science.gov (United States)

    cheong, S.; Lee, H.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands are the major unconventional energy sources which have great reserves in Alberta, Canada. Recovery techniques such as CSS (Cyclic Steam Stimulation) and SAGD (Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage) enabled to develop deeper bitumen about several hundred meter depth. Before applying CSS and SAGD, reservoir heterogeneity of mud barriers or shale breccias should be clarified to establish injection and production wells successfully. We conducted the integrated petro-physical analysis for oil sands deposits in Athabasca by correlating well logs with seismic data. From 33 well logs and 3D seismic, we have made P-wave impedance by recursive inversion. Target formations of our analysis were the top of Wabiskaw member. Using inverted impedance and multi-attributes, porosity volume was derived at a target depth. Porosity of time slice 375 ms ranged 20 ~ 40 % stretching porous sand body from NE to SW direction. Characteristics of porosity distribution may be useful to design optimum oil sands recovery in Athabasca.

  10. Carbon cycle: New pathways in the sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Organic carbon decomposition in anoxic marine sediments was thought to be dominated by bacteria, but experimental data and microbial culture studies now show that microalgae buried in coastal sands may also play an important role in carbon turnover.

  11. The role of sand, marble chips and Typha latifolia in domestic wastewater treatment - a column study on constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaverugu, Rakesh; Shingare, Rita P; Raghunathan, Karthik; Juwarkar, Asha A; Thawale, Prashant R; Singh, Sanjeev K

    2016-10-01

    The relative importance of sand, marble chips and wetland plant Typha latifolia is evaluated in constructed wetlands (CWs) for the treatment of domestic wastewater intended for reuse in agriculture. The prototype CWs for the experiments are realized in polyvinyl chloride columns, which are grouped into four treatments, viz. sand (<2 mm) + Typha latifolia (cattail), sand, marble chips (5-20 mm) + cattail and marble chips. The removal percentage of organic and nutritional pollutants from the wastewater is measured at varying hydraulic retention time in the columns. The statistical analysis suggests that the main effects of sand and cattail are found to be significant (p < .05) for the removal of biological oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand from the wastewater. The presence of cattail significantly (p < .01) contributes to the conversion of total nitrogen in wastewater into [Formula: see text] by fostering the growth of favorable microbes for the nitrification. The removal of [Formula: see text] and turbidity from the wastewater is significantly (p < .01) influenced by sand than the presence of cattail. The maximum [Formula: see text] adsorption capacity of the sand is estimated to be 2.5 mg/g. Marble chips have significantly (p < .01) influenced the removal of [Formula: see text]and its maximum removal capacity is estimated to be 9.3 mg/g. The negative correlation between the filter media biofilm and column hydraulic conductivity is also reported for all the treatments. Thus, the findings of this study elucidate the role of low-cost and easily available filter media and it will guide the environmental practitioners in designing cost-effective CWs for wastewater treatment.

  12. CRADE OF SAND AND DUST STORM WEATHER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Ruoyun; Tian Cuiying; Bi Baogui; Yang Keming; Wang Youheng; Tuo Ya; Ding Haifang; Zhang Tairen

    2011-01-01

    Background Sand and dust storm,as one of the main disastrous weathers that affect northern China,not only affect the people health and normal life,but cause the short-term climatic changes due to the direct and indirect radiation of the earth-atmosphere system through the dust floating in the sky.The sand end dust weather and its potential harm on the national economy,ecological environment,social activities and other aspects have aroused worldwide concern.

  13. Laboratory evaluation of selected tar sand asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.W.; Epps, J.A.; Gallaway, B.M.

    1980-12-01

    Three tar sand asphalts of similar grades prepared from one syncrude by three different refining methods were characterized by tests commonly used to specify paving asphalts together with certain special tests. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures were prepared using these asphalts and tested in the laboratory to determine strength stiffness stability, tensile properties, temperature effects and water susceptibility. Comparison of the tar sand asphalt properties to conventional petroleum asphalt properties reveal no striking differences.

  14. Response to Oil Sands Products Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Tailings ponds are an operating facility common to all types of surface mining. For oil sands, tailings consisting of water , sand, clay, and residual ...oil, are pumped to these basins—or ponds— where settling occurs and water is recycled for reuse in the process. When the ponds are no longer required...of crude oil transported by tank vessel in Washington waters . In a 2013 Bloomburg Business news article , Dan Murtaugh states, “The dock probably

  15. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  16. Pragmatics of reclaimed sand quality assessment recovered nowadays from various used sand systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the reclamation degree of used sands is not a simple, clearly defined issue. The great variety of technologies ofmoulding and core sands, based on the organic and inorganic binders does not allow the use of a single, universal index assessing thedegree of reclamation. The article presents the problems of research relating to selection of proper criteria for assessing the degree ofreclamation process of used moulding and core sands deriving from different technologies. The most often applied in practice types ofused sands and the most adequate in practice methods of assessing the degrees of their reclamation were characterized.

  17. Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Li Bo; Xiao-Jing Zheng; Shao-Zhen Duan; Yi-Rui Liang

    2013-01-01

    In the research of windblown sand movement,the lift-off and incident velocities of saltating sand particles play a significant role in bridging the spatial and temporal scales from single sand particle's motion to windblown sand flux.In this paper,we achieved wind tunnel measurements of the movement of sand particles near sand bed through improving the wind tunnel experimental scheme of paticle image velocimetry (PIV) and data processing method.And then the influence of observation height on the probability distributions of lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles was analyzed.The results demonstrate that the observation height has no obvious influence on the distribution pattern of the lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles,i.e.,the probability distribution of horizontal and vertical velocities of lift-off and incident sand particles follow a Gaussian distribution and a negative exponential distribution,respectively.However,it influences the center of the Gaussian distribution,the decay constant and the amplitude of the negative exponential distribution.

  18. Hair Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair...... systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type...

  19. Hair removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    and chromophore. Longer wavelengths and cooling are safer for patients with darker skin types. Hair removal with lasers and IPL sources are generally safe treatment procedures when performed by properly educated operators. However, safety issues must be addressed since burns and adverse events do occur. New...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair...... systems. Evidence has been found for long-term hair removal efficacy beyond 6 months after repetitive treatments with alexandrite, diode, and long-pulse Nd:YAG lasers, whereas the current long-term evidence is sparse for IPL devices. Treatment parameters must be adjusted to patient skin type...

  20. Removing Bureaucracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    11 Defense AT&L: July–August 2015 Removing Bureaucracy Katharina G. McFarland McFarland is Assistant Secretary of Defense for Acquisition. I once...managed a new start program to deliver a revolutionary warfighting capability in Battlefield Management/Command and Control . The Service sponsor was...involvement from all of the Service warfighting areas came together to scrub the program requirements due to concern over the “ bureaucracy ” and

  1. Recent Sand Avalanching on Rabe Crater Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Dark streaks on the steep, down-wind slopes of sand dunes in Rabe Crater are seen at several locations in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. These streaks indicate relatively recent (i.e., in the past few years or less) movement of sand down these slopes.Sand dunes move forward by the combined action of wind that drives sand up the shallow slope on the windward side of the dune (in this case, the slopes that face toward the lower right) and the avalanching of this sand down the steeper, lee-side slope. The steep slope is also known as the slip face. The dark streaks indicated by arrows are evidence for sand avalanches that occurred within a few months or years of the time when the picture was taken in March 1999. Other streaks which are seen criss-crossing the dunes may be the result of passing dust devils. This image is illuminated from the upper left and located in Rabe Crater of the Hellespontus-Noachis region near 44.2oS, 325.6oW.

  2. Discrete particle simulation of mixed sand transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengjun Xiao; Liejin Guo; Debiao Li; Yueshe Wang

    2012-01-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian numerical simulation is performed on mixed sand transport.Volume averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate gas motion,and particle motion is calculated using Newton's equation,involving a hard sphere model to describe particle-to-particle and particle-to-wall collisions.The influence of wall characteristics,size distribution of sand particles and boundary layer depth on vertical distribution of sand mass flux and particle mean horizontal velocity is analyzed,suggesting that all these three factors affect sand transport at different levels.In all cases,for small size groups,sand mass flux first increases with height and then decreases while for large size groups,it decreases exponentially with height and for middle size groups the behavior is in-between.The mean horizontal velocity for all size groups well fits experimental data,that is,increasing logarithmically with height in the middle height region.Wall characteristics greatly affects particle to wall collision and makes the flat bed similar to a Gobi surface and the rough bed similar to a sandy surface.Particle size distribution largely affects the sand mass flux and the highest heights they can reach especially for larger particles.

  3. Predicting the occurrence of sand banks in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Henriët H.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sand banks have a wavelength between 1 and 10 km, and they are up to several tens of meters high. Also, sand banks may have an impact on large-scale human activities that take place in the North Sea like sand mining, shipping, offshore wind farms, etc. Therefore, it is important to know where sand b

  4. Transport and retention of bacteria and viruses in biochar-amended sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Salini; Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Kookana, Rai; Page, Declan; Cook, Peter G

    2016-04-01

    The transport and retention of Escherichia coli and bacteriophages (PRD1, MS2 and ФX174), as surrogates for human pathogenic bacteria and viruses, respectively, were studied in the sand that was amended with several types of biochar produced from various feedstocks. Batch and column studies were conducted to distinguish between the role of attachment and straining in microbe retention during transport. Batch experiments conducted at various solution chemistries showed negligible attachment of viruses and bacteria to biochar before or after chemical activation. At any given solution ionic strength, the attachment of viruses to sand was significantly higher than that of biochar, whereas bacteria showed no attachment to either sand or biochar. Consistent with batch results, biochar addition (10% w/w) to sand reduced virus retention in the column experiments, suggesting a potential negative impact of biochar application to soil on virus removal. In contrast, the retention of bacteria was enhanced in biochar-amended sand columns. However, elimination of the fine fraction (bacteria retention. Results from batch and column experiments suggest that land application of biochar may only play a role in microbe retention via straining, by alteration of pore size distribution, and not via attachment. Consequently, the particle size distribution of biochar and sediments is a more important factor than type of biochar in determining whether land application of biochar enhances or diminishes microbial retention.

  5. Submerged Pond Sand Filter—A Novel Approach to Rural Water Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Øhlenschlæger

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the new design and function of a modified version of a traditional slow sand filter. The Submerged Pond Sand Filter is built inside a pond and has a vertical as well as a horizontal flow of water through a sloped filter opening. The filter provides treated drinking water to a rural Indian village. The filter has functioned with minimal maintenance for five years without being subject to the typical scraping off and changing of sand as needed in traditional slow sand filters every few months. This five-year study showed bacterial removal efficiency of 97% on average with a level of faecal coliforms of 2 ± 2 colony forming units (CFU/100 mL measured in the treated water. Turbidity was visibly removed during treatment. When water was retrieved from the filter through a manual pump for long consistent time intervals (60 min, faecal coliform counts increased from four to 10 CFU/100 mL on average compared to shorter pumping intervals (5 min. Though the treated water did not comply with the World Health Organization standards of 0 CFU/100 mL, the filter significantly improved water quality and provided one of the best sources of drinkable water in a water-depleted area, where only surface water was available. Furthermore, it is a sustainable treatment method due to low maintenance requirements.

  6. Development of the Gran Desierto sand sea, northwestern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Grady; Lancaster, Nicholas

    1990-08-01

    Three major eolian sand populations can be recognized in the Gran Desierto sand sea of northwestern Mexico by using spectral data from the Landsat thematic mapper in conjunction with textural and mineralogical studies of surface sands. Each sand population has distinct textural, mineralogic, and spectral properties that can be related to sand-dune morphology and position with reference to source areas and transport paths of the sands. The oldest eolian sediment in the sand sea was derived from the early to middle Pleistocene Colorado River that flowed through the area of the western Gran Desierto. Subsequent inputs of eolian sands came from the area of the present Colorado River valley and the coast south of the sand sea. The spatial and temporal pattern of eolian deposition in the region has been controlled by Quaternary tectonic and climatic changes, resulting in the episodic input and deposition of sand.

  7. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice-age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  8. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  9. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand

  10. Cadmium removal from urban stormwater runoff via bioretention technology and effluent risk assessment for discharge to surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlong; Zhang, Pingping; Yang, Liqiong; Huang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Bioretention technology, a low-impact development stormwater management measure, was evaluated for its ability to remove heavy metals (specifically cadmium, Cd) from urban stormwater runoff. Fine sand, zeolite, sand and quartz sand were selected as composite bioretention media. The effects of these materials on the removal efficiency, chemical forms, and accumulation and migration characteristics of Cd were examined in laboratory scale bioretention columns. Heretofore, few studies have examined the removal of Cd by bioretention. A five-step sequential extraction method, a single-contamination index method, and an empirical migration equation were used in the experiments. The average Cd removal efficiency of quartz sand approached 99%, and removal by the other media all exceeded 90%. The media types markedly affected the forms of Cd found in the columns as well as its vertical migration rate. The Cd accumulated in the four media was mainly in residual form; moreover, accumulation of Cd occurred mainly in the surface layer of the bioretention column. The migration depth of Cd in the four media increased with elapsed time, in the following sequence: zeolite > quartz sand > fine sand > sand. In contrast, the migration rate decreased with elapsed time, and the migration rate of Cd was lowest in sand (0.015 m per annum over the first ten years). The comprehensive risk index analysis indicated that the risk arising from Cd discharge to surface water was "intermediate", and that the degree of risk was lowest in sand, then quartz sand, zeolite, and fine sand in sequence. These results indicate that the adsorption and accumulation of Cd in the four media are more significant than the migration of Cd. In addition, the results of Cd risk assessment for the effluent indicate that each of the four media can serve as long-term adsorption material in a bioretention facility for purifying stormwater runoff.

  11. On the application of heat integration in oil sands processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, A.I.A. [Natural Resources Canada, Devon, AB (Canada). CANMET Western Research Centre

    2005-07-01

    During bitumen recovery, process heat is generated by burning natural gas or by using electrical energy that is also generated from a hydrocarbon source, typically coal. This adds carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions to the atmosphere and contributes to global warming. The Canadian oil sands industry is challenged by stringent environmental regulations, including Kyoto Protocol obligations. In order to address the challenge of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions to the atmosphere, the oil sands industry has adopted more efficient operations, has implemented heat and process integration and efficient energy management into its bitumen recovery operations. In particular, it has targeted the optimal integration of the supply and removal of heat among the process streams. The use of heat integration schemes results in conservation of heat energy and reductions in utility requirements, energy consumption, and production cost per unit of production. This paper described a heat exchanger network (HEN) design automation using pinch technology in which the existing problem table algorithm (PTA) is used to determine the optimal heat energy targets. It then proposed a simple modification of the existing PTA and presented a newly developed and improved algorithm called the simple problem table algorithm (SPTA) that eliminates the lumping stage in the PTA. The algorithm is used to determine the optimal heat energy targets. The main objective of this method is to save expense by maximizing process to-process heat recovery. This also reduces the external utility requirements for steam and cooling water. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  12. Removing Singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Elitzur, Shmuel; Rabinovici, Eliezer; Elitzur, Shmuel; Giveon, Amit; Rabinovici, Eliezer

    2003-01-01

    Big bang/crunch curvature singularities in exact CFT string backgrounds can be removed by turning on gauge fields. This is described within a family of {SL(2)xSU(2)xU(1)_x}/{U(1)xU(1)} quotient CFTs. Uncharged incoming wavefunctions from the ``whiskers'' of the extended universe can be fully reflected if and only if a big bang/crunch curvature singularity, from which they are scattered, exists. Extended BTZ-like singularities remain as long as U(1)_x is compact.

  13. The application of power ultrasound to the surface cleaning of silica and heavy mineral sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, A D; Collings, A F; Jameson, G J

    2000-10-01

    Power ultrasound may be used in the processing of minerals to clean their surfaces of oxidation products and fine coatings, mainly through the large, but very localised, forces produced by cavitation. Results of the application of power ultrasound to remove iron-rich coatings from the surfaces of silica sand used in glass making and to improve the electrostatic separation of mineral sand concentrates through lowering the resistivity of the conducting minerals (ilmenite and rutile) are presented. Parameters affecting ultrasonic cleaning, such as input power and levels of reagent addition, are discussed. In particular, we present data showing the relationship between power input and the particle size of surface coatings removed. This can be explained by the Derjaguin approximation for the energy of interaction between a sphere and a flat surface.

  14. Bright sand/dark dust: The identification of active sand surfaces on the Earth and Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, H. G., II; Greeley, R.; Christensen, P. R.; Arvidson, R.

    1987-05-01

    Field studies and analysis of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper data in the Gran Desierto, Mexico may shed light on a technique to distinguish active from inactive (relict) sand surfaces. Active sand bodies in the study area are consistently brighter (by an average of 20%) at visual and near infrared wavelengths and darker at thermal infrared wavelengths than compositionally similar inactive sands. The reasons for the albedo difference between active and inactive sands are reviewed and the mixing model of Johnson et al. is examined for tracing the provenance of sands based on albedo and spectral variations. Portions of the wavelengths covered by the Mars Orbiter correspond to the Thematic Mapper data. The identification of active sands on Earth, with a priori knowledge of bulk composition and grain size distribution, may allow the remote mapping of active sand surfaces on Mars. In conjuction with thermal infrared remote sensing for composition, it may also provide a method for the remote determination of grain size distributions within sand/silt mixtures.

  15. Probability of rebound and eject of sand particles in wind-blown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xie; Xiaojing Zheng

    2007-01-01

    When incident particles impact into a sand bed in wind-blown sand movement, rebound of the incident particles and eject of the sand particles by the incident particles affect directly the development of wind sand flux. In order to obtain rebound and eject lift-off probability of the sand particles, we apply the particle-bed stochastic collision model presented in our pervious works to derive analytic solutions of velocities of the incident and impacted particles in the postcollision bed. In order to describe randomness inherent in the real particle-bed collision, we take the incident angle, theimpact position and the direction of resultant action of sand particles in sand bed on the impacted sand particle as random variables, and calculate the rebound and eject velocities,angles and coefficients (ratio of rebound and eject velocity to incident velocity). Numerical results are found in accordance with current experimental results. The rebound and eject lift-off probabilities versus the incident and creeping velocities are predicted.

  16. 铸造中的联合工艺%Combined Process of Investment Casting and Sand Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈平; 杨忠耀; 张百堂

    2011-01-01

    采用水玻璃精铸生产销孔座系列产品遇到了烧砂问题(指在焙烧或浇注中模壳局部烧结并鼓胀导致铸件形成不规则的凹缺陷).由于水玻璃精铸中的涂料耐火度低,且涂料为层状、厚度大、易堆积而形成烧砂,但相同条件下水玻璃砂铸的铸件就不易出现烧砂.试验表明,在水玻璃精铸中局部采用水玻璃砂铸的联合工艺能十分有效地、经济地解决销孔座系列产品的烧砂问题.联合工艺经常是一种解决特殊铸件质量问题的有效方法.%The burn sand problem (Burn sand is a common defect in investment casting which means part of the shell mould gets sintered and deformed during the roasting or pouring) was found in investment casting of pinhole seat series products using sodium silicate sand. It is due to the low refractoriness and thick layer of the coating in the sodium silicate sand, which prones to accumulate, and then cause the burn sand easily. But under the same condition, burn sand does not occur in the sand casting process. The experiments show that combining sand casting process with the investment casting process in the production of pinhole seat series products can remove the burn sand defect effectively and economically. Generally, combined process is an effective method in the production of special castings.

  17. Electronmicroscopic Study of Sand Erosion Processes in Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-06-01

    AO—A073 k97 ISRAEL INST OF MEtALS HAIFA - ~ - - — Ffl 11/6 ELECTROI~~ICROSCOPIC STUDY OF SAND EROSION PROCESSES IN METALS, IU) UNCLASSIFIED 79...General Appearance 8 4.2.2 Local Erosion Processes and Hard Phase Par t icles 9 5. Further Discussion 10 S S-_ S _~S _~~SS ~~~ S ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ __SS...research was to ga in addit iona l unders tan di ng of the mechanism of loca l mater ia l removal from eroded compos ite meta l l i c surface

  18. Mitigating in situ oil sands carbon costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theriault, D.J.; Peterson, J. [Laricina Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Heinrichs, H. [Canadian Chemical Technology Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Carbon capture and sequestration is a complex problem with a variety of dimensions that need to be considered. The political, social, and regulatory pressures are forcing carbon costs on the oil sands industry in an effort to reduce the carbon footprint of oil sands operations. This paper reviewed the political, social, and regulatory pressures and obligations for the in-situ oil sands industry. It presented the views and insights of Laricina Energy on the carbon challenge. It also described the initiatives that Laricina Energy is taking to manage these imperatives and outlined the challenges the industry is facing. The purpose of the paper was to encourage dialogue and collaboration by the oil sands industry. The paper also described the dimensions of the carbon problem and how the industry can contribute to a solution. Last, the paper reviewed the parameters of carbon dioxide or greenhouse gas containment and storage issues. It was concluded that the regulatory and policy requirements need to be clarified so that industry understands the new business landscape as well as the requirements that influence the economics of in-situ oil sands development. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Quantifying Sources of Methane in the Alberta Oil Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baray, S.; Darlington, A. L.; Gordon, M.; Hayden, K.; Li, S. M.; Mittermeier, R. L.; O'brien, J.; Staebler, R. M.; McLaren, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the summer of 2013, an aircraft measurement campaign led by Environment Canada with participation from university researchers took place to investigate the sources and transformations of gas pollutants in the Alberta oil sands region close to Fort McMurray, Alberta. Apart from its ability to change the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, methane is also a significant precursor to the formation of formaldehyde, an important radical source. Thus, emissions of methane from facilities need to be understood since they can have air quality implications through alteration of the radical budget and hence, the oxidation capacity of the air mass. Methane was measured, along with other gases, via a cavity ring-down spectroscopy instrument installed on the Convair-580 aircraft. In total, there were 22 flights with 82 hours of measurements in the vicinity of oil sands facilities between August 13 and September 7, 2013. Various tools have been used to visualize the spatial and temporal variation in mixing ratios of methane and other trace gases in order to identify possible sources of methane. Enhancements of methane from background levels of 1.9 ppm up to ~4 ppm were observed close to energy mining facilities in the oil sands region. Sources of methane identified include open pit mining, tailings ponds, upgrader stacks and in-situ mining operations. Quantification of the emission rates of methane from distinct sources has been accomplished from box flights and downwind screen flights by identifying the ratios of trace gases emitted and through use of the Top-down Emission Rate Retrieval Algorithm (TERRA). Methane emission rates for some of these sources will be presented.

  20. Assessing Insecticide Susceptibility of Laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis and Phlebotomus papatasi Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, David S; Lozano-Fuentes, Saul; Lawyer, Phillip G; Black, William C; Bernhardt, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    Chemical insecticides are effective for controlling Lutzomyia and Phlebotomus sand fly (Diptera: Psychodidae) vectors of Leishmania parasites. However, repeated use of certain insecticides has led to tolerance and resistance. The objective of this study was to determine lethal concentrations (LCs) and lethal exposure times (LTs) to assess levels of susceptibility of laboratory Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Nieva) and Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) to 10 insecticides using a modified version of the World Health Organization (WHO) exposure kit assay and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) bottle bioassay. Sand flies were exposed to insecticides coated on the interior of 0.5-gallon and 1,000-ml glass bottles. Following exposure, the flies were allowed to recover for 24 h, after which mortality was recorded. From dose-response survival curves for L. longipalpis and P. papatasi generated with the QCal software, LCs causing 50, 90, and 95% mortality were determined for each insecticide. The LCs and LTs from this study will be useful as baseline reference points for future studies using the CDC bottle bioassays to assess insecticide susceptibility of sand fly populations in the field. There is a need for a larger repository of sand fly insecticide susceptibility data from the CDC bottle bioassays, including a range of LCs and LTs for more sand fly species with more insecticides. Such a repository would be a valuable tool for vector management.

  1. Channel nut tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Marvin

    2016-01-12

    A method, system, and apparatus for installing channel nuts includes a shank, a handle formed on a first end of a shank, and an end piece with a threaded shaft configured to receive a channel nut formed on the second end of the shaft. The tool can be used to insert or remove a channel nut in a channel framing system and then removed from the channel nut.

  2. The Effectiveness of Silica Sand in Semi-Aerobic Stabilized Landfill Leachate Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezlina Othman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the suitability of natural silica sand as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of ammoniacal nitrogen and heavy metals, particularly iron and zinc, from semi-aerobic stabilized landfill leachate. Leachate samples were collected from the Pulau Burung landfill site (PBLS in Penang, Malaysia. The above-mentioned contaminants are highlighted in this study because of their unsafe concentrations at PBLS. The effects of shaking time, settling time, and silica sand dosage on the study parameter removal efficiencies were investigated to predict the performance of the process. The adsorptions of ammoniacal nitrogen, iron, and zinc were judiciously described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The optimum removal efficiencies of ammoniacal nitrogen, iron, and zinc obtained were 51%, 44.4%, and 39.2%, respectively, with a shaking time of 90 min, a settling time of 60 min, and with a dosage of 60 g (0.5 kg/L of silica sand. Based on the coefficient of determination (R2 values obtained from Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models, ammoniacal nitrogen, iron, and zinc adsorption were better fitted to the Freundlich model.

  3. WMO Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and Assessment System (SDS-WAS): Research Implementation Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Barrie, Leonard

    2010-05-01

    Strong winds cause lifting of large amounts of sand and dust from bare, dry soils into the atmosphere. For countries in and downwind of arid regions, airborne sand and dust presents serious risks to the environment, property and human health. Impacts on health include respiratory and cardio-vascular problems, eye infections and in some regions, diseases such as meningitis and valley fever. Dust can efficiently carry irritating spores, bacteria, viruses and persistent organic pollutants. It can also efficiently transport nutrients to parts of the world oceans and affect marine biomass production. Other impacts include negative effects on the ground transport, aviation, agriculture and visibility. The Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recognizes dust as a major component of the atmospheric aerosol that is an essential climate variable. Dust aerosol has important effects on weather through feedback on atmospheric dynamics, clouds and precipitation formation. Approximately 15 centres around the world provide sand and dust research operational forecasts. Many are operated by national meteorological services of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Sand and dust storm models can substantially reduce risk by providing dust concentration predictions for several days in advance. Numerical weather prediction systems that drive these models use complex parameterizations and assimilation of satellite, and surface-based observations to predict winds, clouds, precipitation and dust mobilization, transport, and removal from the atmosphere. Sand and dust forecast products contribute to the mitigation and reduction of risk through research based advances in understanding and forecasting products. Observations of sand and dust are made by many agencies and some of them are being coordinated globally through the WMO Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. In 2006, WMO and partners initiated the implementation of the Sand and Dust Storm Warning Advisory and

  4. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends on the charact......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...... on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between...... void ratio and permeability is established....

  5. Sand Dunes Fixation in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out at Sand Dunes Stabilization Researches Station in Baiji district (230 ln north of Baghdad, Iraq) to evaluate the effects of local soil conditioners manufactured from oil derivatives and plant residuals on sand dunes fixation as the first step for sand dunes stabilization. The results indicate that the fuel oil has the first place in improving wind erosion parameters in the study area, such as increasing mean weight diameter, dry aggregates percentage, the needed time for complete disaggregation by dry sieving, and decreasing the disaggregation rates. Bitumen emulsion occupies the second place, while the plant residuals occupies the third place and has slight effects on the studied parameters. Effects of conditioners on natural vegetation cover are negative in oil derivatives treatments,while positive in plants residuals treatments.

  6. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of Descalvado sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M.I.; Caldas, L.V.E

    2006-07-01

    Sand samples proceeding from Descalvado, Sao Paulo, were studied with regard to their dosimetric properties using the thermoluminescence technique (TL) for high doses. These sand samples present steady physical and chemical characteristics to the end items, and they are used in the glass industry and for casting. The TL curves of the samples were obtained after an irradiation at the Gamma-Cell system ({sup 60} Co), of IPEN. The glow curves present two peaks at 80 C and 220 C approximately. Calibration curves were obtained for doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy. The results indicate that the sand samples can be used for high-doses dosimetry in several areas of applications of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  7. Development tendencies of moulding and core sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw M. Dobosz1

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Further development of the technology for making moulding and core sands will be strictly limited by tough requirements due to protection of the natural environment. These tendencies are becoming more and more tense, so that we will reach a point when even processes, that from technological point of view fulfill high requirements of the foundry industry, must be replaced by more ecologically-friendly solutions. Hence, technologies using synthetic resins as binding materials will be limited. This paper presents some predictable development tendencies of moulding and core sands. The increasing role of inorganic substances will be noticed, including silicate binders with significantly improved properties, such as improved knock-out property or higher reclamation strength. Other interesting solutions might also be moulding sands bonded by geo-polymers and phosphate binders or salts and also binders based on degradable biopolymers. These tendencies and the usefulness of these binders are put forward in this paper.

  8. Planet-wide sand motion on mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.T.; Bourke, M.C.; Geissler, P.E.; Banks, M.E.; Colon, C.; Diniega, S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hansen, C.J.; Mattson, S.; McEwen, A.S.; Mellon, M.T.; Stantzos, N.; Thomson, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data, images of Mars showed no direct evidence for dune and ripple motion. This was consistent with climate models and lander measurements indicating that winds of sufficient intensity to mobilize sand were rare in the low-density atmosphere. We show that many sand ripples and dunes across Mars exhibit movement of as much as a few meters per year, demonstrating that Martian sand migrates under current conditions in diverse areas of the planet. Most motion is probably driven by wind gusts that are not resolved in global circulation models. A past climate with a thicker atmosphere is only required to move large ripples that contain coarse grains. ?? 2012 Geological Society of America.

  9. Preliminary screening of small-scale domestic wastewater treatment systems for removal of pharmaceutical and personal care products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matamoros, Victor; Arias, Carlos Alberto; Brix, Hans

    2009-01-01

    , two biological sand filters, five horizontal subsurface flow and four vertical flow constructed wetlands. As expected, all systems removed TSS and BOD5 efficiently (>95% removal). The PPCP removal efficiencies exceeded 80% with the exception of carbamazepine, diclofenac and ketoprofen because...

  10. Regional sustainable development strategy for the Athabasca oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braat, T.; Barrett, R. [Alberta Environment, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the efforts by Alberta Environment to implement a regional sustainable development strategy for the oil sands industry. Alberta Environment gathers the views from industry, government, First Nations and non-governmental organizations on issues regarding cumulative environmental impacts and sustainable industrial development in Alberta's Athabasca oil sands area. This mandate is carried out through a multi-stakeholder partnership initiative called the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). CEMA develops environmental management tools, guidelines and objectives to address environmental issues such as acid deposition, trace air pollutants and surface water quality. The NOx/SO{sub 2} Working Group and the Trace Metal and Air Contaminants Working Group of CEMA address air emissions issues. Their recommendations are referred to the appropriate regulatory agency for implementation. The Lakeland Industry and Community Association (LICA) was created in response to expansion of oil and gas production in the Cold Lake area. LICA is a not-for-profit organization that addresses the concerns of residents living near the Lakeland area to ensure that development is conducted in an environmentally responsible manner. The organization is developing regional environmental monitoring programs for soil, air and water. tabs., figs.

  11. Undrained Cyclic Behaviour of Dense Frederikshavn Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Sørensen, Kris Wessel

    2013-01-01

    A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series of undra......A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series...

  12. Sand control systems used in completing wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Wittenberger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Expandable Tubular Technology is transforming the face of well completion and construction. This technology provides: a substantially higher hydrocarbon production rates from the reservoir, a reduced well drilling and construction costs, new possibilities for previously unreachable or uneconomic reservoirs, and step a change towards the single diameter well. ESS (Expandable Sand Screen has an unrivalled performance worldwide for delivering a reliable sand control in a wide range of applications. Well costs typically cut by over 20 %, and the productivity increases up to 70 %.

  13. On the Size Distribution of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    -distribution, by taking into account that individual grains do not have the same travel time from the source to the deposit. The travel time is assumed to be random so that the wear on the individual grains vary randomly. The model provides an interpretation of the parameters of the NIG-distribution, and relates the mean......A model is presented of the development of the size distribution of sand while it is transported from a source to a deposit. The model provides a possible explanation of the log-hyperbolic shape that is frequently found in unimodal grain size distributions in natural sand deposits, as pointed out...

  14. George Sand [Reseña

    OpenAIRE

    Jack, Belinda; Thomas, Florence

    2002-01-01

    Belinda Jack nos cuenta en ese libro la vida de George Sand (de su verdadero nombre Aurora Dupin), esa mujer libertaria del siglo XIX, lo años de su nacimiento, su infancia, su adolescencia y su vida adulta. Una vida tan llena tanto por sus luchas interiores -Sand es una mujer que desde su adolescencia tratará de romper los fatalismos ligados a la condición de mujer del siglo XIX, un siglo profundamente familista y maternalista- como por su inmensa obra literaria que cuenta más de cincuenta n...

  15. Investigation of Sand-Cement Grouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-09-01

    the sianAS. Ho-4, VVers thia 𔃽pacification ,Jlowi -inI r.ver,4 e ofl 3 :*- cen~t to be retain(v,- on1 the NO,. 1E6 sieve. 3y * :.Oviiq- (1),, sc...325 material as does the traprock or silica sand. This j J: i3 -robably the reason for the difference in the quantity of sand founud pmrnable. The three...deficient in material assing th.e ±,e h DOsieve, Ath the addition of percentages of fŕ. ash was test-ilwped. in the other to-ts in this phase, tne

  16. TURBULENT COHERENT STRUCTURES IN CHANNELS WITH SAND WAVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sand wave bed is one of the typical shape of complicated boundaries in hydraulics and river dynamics, and sand wave motion is the main form of the bed load motion in-rivers, thence the study of turbulent structures over sand waves is of importance both in theory and practice. In this paper turbulent coherent structures over single-and multi-sand waves were studied experimentally, the formulae for the separation length and vortex shedding period of the turbulent flow over single-sand wave were suggested, and the characteristics of turbulent coherent structures over multi-sand waves were also given.

  17. Threshold for sand mobility on Mars calibrated from seasonal variations of sand flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, F.; Avouac, J.-P.; Newman, C. E.; Richardson, M. I.; Lucas, A.; Leprince, S.; Bridges, N. T.

    2014-09-01

    Coupling between surface winds and saltation is a fundamental factor governing geological activity and climate on Mars. Saltation of sand is crucial for both erosion of the surface and dust lifting into the atmosphere. Wind tunnel experiments along with measurements from surface meteorology stations and modelling of wind speeds suggest that winds should only rarely move sand on Mars. However, evidence for currently active dune migration has recently accumulated. Crucially, the frequency of sand-moving events and the implied threshold wind stresses for saltation have remained unknown. Here we present detailed measurements of Nili Patera dune field based on High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment images, demonstrating that sand motion occurs daily throughout much of the year and that the resulting sand flux is strongly seasonal. Analysis of the seasonal sand flux variation suggests an effective threshold for sand motion for application to large-scale model wind fields (1-100 km scale) of τs=0.01±0.0015 N m-2.

  18. Influence of enterococcal surface protein (esp) on the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanson, Jennifer J; Feriancikova, Lucia; Xu, Shangping

    2012-02-07

    Enterococcus was selected by US EPA as a Gram-positive indicator microorganism for groundwater fecal contamination. It was recently reported that enterococcal surface protein (esp) was more prevalent in Enterococcus from human sources than in Enterococcus from nonhuman sources and esp could potentially be used as a source tracking tool for fecal contamination (Scott et al., 2005). In this research, we performed laboratory column transport experiments to investigate the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands. Particularly, we used a wild type strain (E1162) and a mutant (E1162Δesp) to examine the influence of esp on the transport behavior of E. faecium. Our results showed that esp could significantly enhance the attachment of E. faecium cells onto the surface of silica sands and thus lower the mobility of E. faecium within sand packs. Cell surface properties (e.g., zeta potential) were determined and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory was applied to explain the effects of esp on the retention of E. faecium. Overall, our results suggested that E. faecium strains with esp could display lower mobility within saturated sand packs than E. faecium strains without esp. The disparity in the transport behavior of E. faecium with and without esp could limit the effectiveness of esp as a source tracking tool within the groundwater system.

  19. Hair removal on dermoscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglogiannis, Ilias; Delibasis, Kostantinos

    2015-08-01

    Digital Dermoscopy is a tool commonly used by dermatologists for assisting the diagnosis of skin lesions. The presence of hair in such dermoscopic images frequently occludes significant diagnostic information and reduces their value. In this work we propose algorithms that successfully identify and remove hair from the dermoscopic images. The proposed algorithms consist of two parts; the first deals with the identification of hair, while the second part concerns the image restoration using interpolation. For the evaluation of the algorithms we used ground truth images with synthetic hair and compared the results with the commonly used in the literature DullRazor tool. According to the experimental results the proposed hair removal algorithms can be used successfully in the detection and removal of both dark and light colored hair.

  20. Olive ridley sea turtle hatching success as a function of the microbial abundance in nest sand at Ostional, Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa S Bézy

    Full Text Available Several studies have suggested that significant embryo mortality is caused by microbes, while high microbial loads are generated by the decomposition of eggs broken by later nesting turtles. This occurs commonly when nesting density is high, especially during mass nesting events (arribadas. However, no previous research has directly quantified microbial abundance and the associated effects on sea turtle hatching success at a nesting beach. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the microbial abundance in olive ridley sea turtle nest sand affects the hatching success at Ostional, Costa Rica. We applied experimental treatments to alter the microbial abundance within the sand into which nests were relocated. We monitored temperature, oxygen, and organic matter content throughout the incubation period and quantified the microbial abundance within the nest sand using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR molecular analysis. The most successful treatment in increasing hatching success was the removal and replacement of nest sand. We found a negative correlation between hatching success and fungal abundance (fungal 18S rRNA gene copies g(-1 nest sand. Of secondary importance in determining hatching success was the abundance of bacteria (bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies g(-1 g(-1 nest sand. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that high microbial activity is responsible for the lower hatching success observed at Ostional beach. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism appears to be the deprivation of oxygen and exposure to higher temperatures resulting from microbial decomposition in the nest.

  1. Real-Time Simulation of Aeolian Sand Movement and Sand Ripple Evolution: A Method Based on the Physics of Blown Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Bao-Gang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Simulation and visualization of aeolian sand movement and sand ripple evolution are a challenging subject.In this paper,we propose a physically based modeling and simulating method that can be used to synthesize sandy terrain in various patterns.Our method is based on the mechanical behavior of individual sand grains,which are widely studied in the physics of blown sand.We accounted significant mechanisms of sand transportation into the sand model,such as saltation,successive saltation and collapsing,while simplified the vegetation model and wind field model to make the simulation feasible and affordable.We implemented the proposed method on the programming graphics processing unit (GPU) to get real-time simulation and rendering.Finally,we proved that our method can reflect many characteristics of sand ripple evolution through several demonstrations.We also gave several synthesized desert scenes made from the simulated height field to display its significance on application.

  2. Simulation of aeolian sand saltation with rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Wang, Cong; Pan, Xiying

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we propose a theoretical model based on the distribution functions of initial liftoff velocity and angular velocity of sand grains to describe a sand saltation process in which both wind field-sand grain coupling and the Magnus force experienced by saltating sand grains have been incorporated. The computation results showed that the Magnus force had significant effects on sand grain saltation. In particular, when the Magnus force was incorporated, the calculated sand transport fluxes and sand transport rate per unit width were closer to the experimental value than when this force was excluded. The sand transport flux is enhanced because the Magnus force owing to particle rotation causes the particles to have higher and longer trajectories, so the particles can get more speed and energy from the wind, which leads to a larger sand transport flux. In addition, it was found that when taking the Magnus force into account, the probability density of the impact velocity and angular velocity of saltating sand grains followed an exponential distribution and a unimodal asymmetric distribution, respectively. Moreover, the sand energy flux increased with the height above the sand surface until the energy flux reached its maximum and then decreased. Furthermore, the energy flux near the ground surface decreased as the grain diameter increased, but beyond a specific height the energy flux increased with the grain diameter. Finally, for the same sand grain diameter, the energy flux increased with the friction velocity.

  3. Comparison of LAMP and PCR for molecular mass screening of sand flies for Leishmania martiniquensis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwananthagorn, Saruda; Kato, Hirotomo; Yeewa, Ranchana; Muengpan, Amontip; Polseela, Raxsina; Leelayoova, Saovanee

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania martiniquensis infection has been reported in human and domestic animals of Martinique Island, Germany, Switzerland, USA, Myanmar and Thailand. The peculiar clinical features of disseminated cutaneous and visceral forms co-existence render the urgent need of specific diagnostic tool to identify the natural sand fly vectors for effective prevention and control strategies. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) of 18S rRNA gene as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of minicircle kinetoplast DNA gene (PCR-mkDNA) have never been applied to detect L. martiniquensis and L. siamensis in sand fly vectors. OBJECTIVE The present study was aimed to validate malachite green-LAMP (MG-LAMP) and PCR-mkDNA techniques to detect L. martiniquensis in sand fly vectors, compared with the conventional PCR of internal transcribed spacer 1 (PCR-ITS1). METHODS We compared the validity of LAMP of 18S rRNA gene and PCR-mkDNA, to PCR-ITS1 in simulation model of L. martiniquensis infection in Sergentomyia gemmea sand flies. Attributable to the sensitivity and specificity, PCR-mkDNA was consecutively applied to detect L. martiniquensis in 380 female sand fly individuals captured in the newly identified affected region of Lamphun Province, Thailand. FINDINGS AND MAIN CONCLUSIONS Results showed that PCR-mkDNA could detect at least one promastigote per sand fly, which was 10-time superior to LAMP and PCR-ITS1. In addition, PCR-mkDNA was more specific, able to differentiate L. martiniquensis from other viscerotropic Leishmania species, such as L. siamensis, L. (L.) donovani, and L. (L.) infantum. Consecutively, mass screening of L. martiniquensis in 380 female sand fly individuals by PCR-mkDNA was implemented in a new affected area of Thailand where a patient with leishmaniasis/HIV co-infection resides; however Leishmania DNA was undetected. In conclusion, PCR-mkDNA is a promising tool for molecular mass screening of L. martiniquensis

  4. Manganese Removal from Groundwater: Role of Biological and Physico-Chemical Autocatalytic Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, J.H.

    2016-01-01

    In The Netherlands, Belgium and other European countries, manganese is removed from groundwater by aeration followed by rapid (sand) filtration. Although manganese removal from groundwater has been studied extensively, the mechanisms that control the ripening of filter media are not yet fully

  5. 43 CFR 15.2 - Removal or destruction of natural features and marine life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.2 Removal or destruction of natural features and marine life. No person... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Removal or destruction of natural features... sand, gravel or minerals, corals, sea feathers and fans, shells and shell fish starfishes or other...

  6. Use of biochar amendments for removing bacteria from simulated tile-drainage waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    The addition of biochar has been shown to increase bacterial removal rates by several orders of magnitude in sand-packed columns, suggesting that biochar may be a suitable amendment for use in end-of-tile filter systems to remove indicator and pathogenic microorganisms in tile-drainage waters. Addit...

  7. Comparison of Calculation Models for Bucket Foundation in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitkunaite, Evelina; Molina, Salvador Devant; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    The possibility of fast and rather precise preliminary offshore foundation design is desirable. The ultimate limit state of bucket foundation is investigated using three different geotechnical calculation tools: [Ibsen 2001] an analytical method, LimitState:GEO and Plaxis 3D. The study has focused...... on resultant bearing capacity of variously embedded foundation in sand. The 2D models, [Ibsen 2001] and LimitState:GEO can be used for the preliminary design because they are fast and result in a rather similar bearing capacity calculation compared with the finite element models of Plaxis 3D. The 2D models...... and their results are compared to the finite element model in Plaxis 3D in this article....

  8. Simplified greywater treatment systems: Slow filters of sand and slate waste followed by granular activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipf, Mariah Siebert; Pinheiro, Ivone Gohr; Conegero, Mariana Garcia

    2016-07-01

    One of the main actions of sustainability that is applicable to residential, commercial, and public buildings is the rational use of water that contemplates the reuse of greywater as one of the main options for reducing the consumption of drinking water. Therefore, this research aimed to study the efficiencies of simplified treatments for greywater reuse using slow sand and slow slate waste filtration, both followed by granular activated carbon filters. The system monitoring was conducted over 28 weeks, using analyses of the following parameters: pH, turbidity, apparent color, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), surfactants, total coliforms, and thermotolerant coliforms. The system was run at two different filtration rates: 6 and 2 m(3)/m(2)/day. Statistical analyses showed no significant differences in the majority of the results when filtration rate changed from 6 to 2 m(3)/m(2)/day. The average removal efficiencies with regard to the turbidity, apparent color, COD and BOD were 61, 54, 56, and 56%, respectively, for the sand filter, and 66, 61, 60, and 51%, respectively, for the slate waste filter. Both systems showed good efficiencies in removing surfactants, around 70%, while the pH reached values of around 7.80. The average removal efficiencies of the total and thermotolerant coliforms were of 61 and 90%, respectively, for the sand filter, and 67 and 80%, respectively, for the slate waste filter. The statistical analysis found no significant differences between the responses of the two systems, which attest to the fact that the slate waste can be a substitute for sand. The maximum levels of efficiency were high, indicating the potential of the systems, and suggesting their optimization in order to achieve much higher average efficiencies.

  9. The impact of raindrops on sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Rianne

    2017-01-01

    When a raindrop hits a sand bed, it leaves behind a small crater with a mixture of liquid and grains located at the center. This event is frequently observed in nature, but when absent, sprinklers may artificially produce these impacting drops to facilitate irrigation. Also in industry, the interact

  10. LEARNING ABOUT THE OCEANS FROM SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    As a young geophysicist in the 1980s, Rob Holman attended a conference in San Francisco that included a field trip to a beach. Dr Holman, who grew up inland, stared at the ocean, assessing the strengths of the waves. But when he looked around, everyone else was studying the sand.

  11. Displacement pile installation effects in sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijer-Lundberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    Installation effects govern the post-installation behaviour of displacement piles in sand. These effects are currently not completely understood. Suitable experimental techniques to model these installation effects include field, laboratory and experimental models. In the current thesis a small-scal

  12. Cyclic Triaxial Loading of Cohesionless Silty Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2015-01-01

    To engineer efficient structures offshore, we need to extend our knowledge of soil response. Cyclic loading and high water pressure encountered offshore greatly influence cohesionless soil performance. Silty sand from Frederikshavn wind turbine farm was tested using single diameter height samples...

  13. Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    68 Figure 28. Jetty segment used for computation of aeolian sand transport. Background photograph 22 May 2012...113 Figure 68 . Total shoreline change after 50 years for 500,000 yd3 placed every 2 years in different locations...The berm at Ft. Myers, FL, was constructed with dredged material from Matanzas Pass. The dredged material contained greater than 10% fines, which

  14. Building Whales in Sand and Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Carolyn

    1980-01-01

    Describes two-week summer workshops on evolution, adaptation, and behavior of whales, conducted for children by Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum (New York), and culminating in creation of life-size sand sculptures of whales. Provides selected list of periodicals, teaching materials, identification guides, records, and societies devoted to whales…

  15. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate and impac......The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  16. Sand Waves along the Dutch Coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Sand waves, defined as longshore wave-like movements of the shoreline, measured in a horizontal plane, are described along several stretches of the shoreline of The Netherlands. They have a celerity in the order of 50-200 m/yr, a period of 50- 150 years and an amplitude of 30- 500 m. They are found

  17. Building Whales in Sand and Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Carolyn

    1980-01-01

    Describes two-week summer workshops on evolution, adaptation, and behavior of whales, conducted for children by Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum (New York), and culminating in creation of life-size sand sculptures of whales. Provides selected list of periodicals, teaching materials, identification guides, records, and societies devoted to whales…

  18. Sand and Stone%沙与石

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄川; 孙静

    2006-01-01

    @@ Astory tells that two friends were walking through the desert. During some point of the journey they had an argument, and one friend slapped the other one in the face1. The one who got slapped was hurt, but without saying anything, he wrote in the sand: "TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SLAPPED ME IN THE FACE."

  19. Modeling Cape- and Ridge-Associated Marine Sand Deposits; A Focus on the U.S. Atlantic Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, James D.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Bolm, Karen S.

    2009-01-01

    Cape- and ridge-associated marine sand deposits, which accumulate on storm-dominated continental shelves that are undergoing Holocene marine transgression, are particularly notable in a segment of the U.S. Atlantic Continental Shelf that extends southward from the east tip of Long Island, N.Y., and eastward from Cape May at the south end of the New Jersey shoreline. These sand deposits commonly contain sand suitable for shore protection in the form of beach nourishment. Increasing demand for marine sand raises questions about both short- and long-term potential supply and the sustainability of beach nourishment with the prospects of accelerating sea-level rise and increasing storm activity. To address these important issues, quantitative assessments of the volume of marine sand resources are needed. Currently, the U.S. Geological Survey is undertaking these assessments through its national Marine Aggregates and Resources Program (URL http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/aggregates/). In this chapter, we present a hypothetical example of a quantitative assessment of cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits in the study area, using proven tools of mineral-resource assessment. Applying these tools requires new models that summarize essential data on the quantity and quality of these deposits. Two representative types of model are descriptive models, which consist of a narrative that allows for a consistent recognition of cape-and ridge-associated marine sand deposits, and quantitative models, which consist of empirical statistical distributions that describe significant deposit characteristics, such as volume and grain-size distribution. Variables of the marine sand deposits considered for quantitative modeling in this study include area, thickness, mean grain size, grain sorting, volume, proportion of sand-dominated facies, and spatial density, of which spatial density is particularly helpful in estimating the number of undiscovered deposits within an

  20. Dark grains of sand: a geological storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Maresca, Magda

    2017-04-01

    In the secondary Italian school the Earth science learning begins at first year, in synergy with other natural science subjects such as Astronomy, Chemistry and Biology. Italian teachers have to focus on the landscape geomorphological aspects and often Earth processes are difficult to display since they are related to certain phenomena happened during the past and often far from the involved country. In order to better understand the environment surrounding us, very simple and poor materials, like sands, allow the teachers to create attractive lab experiences. According to the IBSE (Inquiry Based Science Education) approach, a learning unit has been implemented starting from a walking along the light carbonate beaches of the Adriatic sea: a smart look to the sands ("engage step"), stroke the students fantasy pushing them to explore some strange black grains on the sands. Dirty sands? Or rock landscape, soil degradation and Ofanto river and coastal processes (erosion, transportation and deposition)? This was the teaching challenge. Due to the youngest age, a third level, guided inquiry, was adopted so the teacher is the "guide of inquiry" encouraging the students using the research question ("Why is the sand dark?", "Do all sands look the same?", "Where does it come from?") and driving the students around their investigation plans ("How can I measure grain size?"). A procedure to answer the above questions and validate the results and explanations has been implemented to allow the students to be proactive in their study. During the learning activities will be the students to ask for field trip to elaborate their new knowledge, verify and visualize the speculated processes. The teaching skills allow to address several geosciences domains such as mineralogy, petrology, regional geology and geodynamics as well as other scientific disciplines such as mathematics (more specifically statistics), forensic science and even life sciences (the presence of bioclasts might

  1. Assessing environmental impacts of inland sand mining in parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessing environmental impacts of inland sand mining in parts of Ogun State, Nigeria. ... Sand is a valuable resource for construction and other purposes, however ... Natural resources particularly, land, water quality and quantity, air quality, ...

  2. Fiber-reinforced sand strength and dilation characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham M. Eldesouky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Randomly distributed fiber reinforcement is used to provide an isotropic increase in the sand shear strength. The previous studies were not consistent regarding the fibers effect on the volumetric change behavior of fiber-reinforced sand. In this paper, direct shear tests are conducted on 108 specimens to investigate the effects of the fibers content, relative density, normal stress and moisture content on the shear strength and volumetric change behaviors of fiber-reinforced sand. The study investigates also the possibility of using dry fiber-reinforced sand as an alternative to heavily compacted unreinforced moist sand. The results indicate that the fibers inclusion increases the shear strength and dilation of sand. Moisture suppresses the fibers effect on the peak and post-peak shear strengths, and dilation. Dry loose fiber-reinforced sand achieves the same shear strength of heavily compacted unreinforced moist sand, yet at more than double the horizontal displacement.

  3. Gating Technology for Vertically Parted Green Sand Moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per

    Gating technology for vertically parted green sand moulds. Literature study of different ways of designing gating systems.......Gating technology for vertically parted green sand moulds. Literature study of different ways of designing gating systems....

  4. Expandable sand screens: from novel concept to proven sand control technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Paul; Jones, Colin; Ballard, Tracey; Beare, Steve; Hillis, Dave [Weatherford International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Expandable Sand Screens (ESS) have proved a viable alternative to gravel packing for sand control. With over 300 installations worldwide, analysis of their use has confirmed that ESS offers excellent production performance and sand control reliability in Open hole. This paper presents details of a global survey on ESS performance that gives accurate information on production performance, sand exclusion reliability and cost effectiveness in Open hole and cased hole application scenarios. This paper also discusses the role and effect of compliant expansion in observed productivity performance and skin values. The rock mechanical, reservoir characterization and metallurgical requirements of ESS systems are also investigated. Finally, the latest advances of the technology for use within the reservoir are explained. This paper demonstrates how the combination of ESS and Expandable Zonal Isolation devices can offer cased hole functionality (in terms of zonal isolation) in combination with Open hole levels of production performance (from the ESS). (author)

  5. Thermochemical methods for the treatment of oil contaminated sand; Metodo termoquimico para tratamento de areia contaminada por oleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Rosana C.G.M. [Fundacao Jose Bonifacio, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Khalil, Carlos N. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The Nitrogen Generating System (SGN in Portuguese) is a thermochemical method first developed for cleaning and removal of paraffin deposits in production and export pipelines. SGN is based on a redox chemical reaction between two salts which is catalyzed in acidic pH. The reaction is strongly exothermic and its products are nitrogen, sodium chloride, water and heat. All reaction products are harmless to the environment. In January 2000 there was a major oil spill in Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro, which contaminated 2400 tons of sand. This work, developed at PETROBRAS Research Center (CENPES), was based on SGN technology which has been adapted for cleaning contaminated sand and recovering of spilled oil. By combining simultaneous effects of the SGN treatment such as heating, turbulence and floatation, one can remove, within 98% of efficiency, spilling oil from contaminated sand and removed oil can be securely returned to refining process. SGN technology has proved to be efficient, fast, low cost and ecologically correct method for cleaning contaminated sand and can be applied in loco right after a contamination event. (author)

  6. Water management in the oil sands industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauls, R. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Water management issues at Alberta's 4 oil sand deposits were discussed. The 4 deposits include the Peace River, Athabasca, Wabasca and Cold Lake deposits, with the Athabasca deposit being the largest and the only surface-mineable deposit. Large quantities of water are needed to extract bitumen from oil sands. This paper addressed water volume withdrawal from the Athabasca River, the primary source of water for the surface-mining oil sands industry. It also addressed Muskeg River watershed integrity, quality of water withdrawn from reclaimed landscapes, groundwater contamination, and ecological viability of end-pit lakes. Currently, half of Syncrude's oil sand is transported from mine to extraction plant by conveyor belts. The other half is pipelined as a warm water slurry. By 2005, all transport will be by pipeline. The oil sand is mixed with hot water, steam and surfactants to condition it for extraction. Seventy-nine per cent of the water used by Syncrude is recycled water and the remainder comes from the Athabasca River. Syncrude diverts 2.5 to 3 barrels of water from the Athabasca River for every barrel of oil produced. This paper discussed the in-stream flow needs of the Athabasca River based on protection of aquatic ecosystems. Flow needs are addressed by the Cumulative Effects Management Association (CEMA). The paper states that the proportion of annual flow withdrawn from the Athabasca River is too low to have a significant impact on aquatic systems, but the main concern lies in water use during low flow periods, typically during the winter months. Developers will likely come under pressure to develop off-site reservoirs to store water for use during these low-flow periods. tabs., figs.

  7. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  8. Incipient Motion of Sand and Oil Agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, T. R.; Dalyander, S.; Jenkins, R. L., III; Penko, A.; Long, J.; Frank, D. P.; Braithwaite, E. F., III; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Weathered oil mixed with sediment in the surf zone in the northern Gulf of Mexico after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, forming large mats of sand and oil. Wave action fragmented the mats into sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs) with diameters of about 1 to 10 cm. These SOAs were transported by waves and currents along the Gulf Coast, and have been observed on beaches for years following the spill. SOAs are composed of 70%-95% sand by mass, with an approximate density of 2107 kg/m³. To measure the incipient motion of SOAs, experiments using artificial SOAs were conducted in the Small-Oscillatory Flow Tunnel at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory under a range of hydrodynamic forcing. Spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs ranging in size from 0.5 to 10 cm were deployed on a fixed flat bed, a fixed rippled bed, and a movable sand bed. In the case of the movable sand bed, SOAs were placed both proud and partially buried. Motion was tracked with high-definition video and with inertial measurement units embedded in some of the SOAs. Shear stress and horizontal pressure gradients, estimated from velocity measurements made with a Nortek Vectrino Profiler, were compared with observed mobility to assess formulations for incipient motion. For SOAs smaller than 1 cm in diameter, incipient motion of spherical and ellipsoidal SOAs was consistent with predicted critical stress values. The measured shear stress at incipient motion of larger, spherical SOAs was lower than predicted, indicating an increased dependence on the horizontal pressure gradient. In contrast, the measured shear stress required to move ellipsoidal SOAs was higher than predicted, even compared to values modified for larger particles in mixed-grain riverine environments. The laboratory observations will be used to improve the prediction of incipient motion, transport, and seafloor interaction of SOAs.

  9. Sand box experiments with bioclogging of porous media: hydraulic conductivity reductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Dorte; Engesgaard, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Tracer experiments during clogging and de-clogging experiments in a 2D sand box were via an image analysis used to establish a data set on the relation between changes in hydraulic conductivity (K) and relative porosity (β). Clogging appears to create a finger-like tracer transport, which could be caused by an initial heterogeneous distribution of biomass in the sand box. De-clogging occurs at a slower rate possibly due to the presence of inert biomass that is not affected by the starvation conditions by sudden removal of the substrate source. The tracer front was observed to get disturbed closer and closer to the substrate source during the experiments suggesting that the zone of clogging moved upstream. Three clogging models, K(β), from the literature were tested for their ability to describe the temporal changes in clogging at the scale of the sand box; the model of Clement et al. (1996) that makes no assumption on biomass distribution, the plug formation model of Thullner et al. (2002a), and the biofilm-plug formation model of Vandevivere (1995). The plug formation and biofilm-plug formation models both match the observed changes between the hydraulic conductivity of the sand box and the relative porosity. Unfortunately our experiments did not reach low relative porosities where the two models predict different behaviors. The model by Clement et al. (1996) underestimates clogging.

  10. Vulnerability and fate of a coastal sand dune complex, Rosetta-Idku, northwestern Nile Delta, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Banna, Mahmoud M.

    2008-05-01

    Types, distribution, and origin of recent sand dunes between Rosetta and Idku, in the western sector of the Nile Delta, Egypt were investigated. Sand samples from the dunes, beach, and seafloor were studied for grain size distribution and mineralogical composition. It has been found that most of the dunes in the study area have been subjected to deterioration and removal due to the construction of buildings and the International Coastal Highway. The remnant constitutes a damaged belt of foredunes that extends from El Bouseily village to the west of Idku town. The dune’s origin is interpreted to be the result of coastal drifting and the subsequent transport of sediments of the former Canopic Nile branch eastward by the predominant longshore current and by aeolian processes. The blown sand grains accumulated to form a belt of coastal sand dunes of original longitudinal and crescentic forms. Urbanization of the coast has severely altered the landscape. The study area is considered vulnerable to the impacts of climate change and the expected rise in sea level. The outcome of potential sea level rise is serious; erosion problems are expected to be exacerbated and vast areas from land and property would be lost. Thus, protection and preservation the remaining dunes in the study area are vital requirements for shore protection.

  11. The effect of wind and precipitation on vegetation and biogenic crust covers in the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Raz; Kinast, Shai; Tsoar, Haim; Yizhaq, Hezi; Zaady, Eli; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2014-03-01

    Vegetation and biogenic crust covers play an important role in sand dune stabilization, yet there is a lack of high temporal and spatial resolution data on sand dune cover. A field experiment, aimed at measuring the dynamics of biogenic crust and vegetation in sand dunes, was conducted at the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes in the northwestern Negev Desert, Israel, from July 2008 to August 2010. The climate of the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes is arid (the mean annual precipitation over the past 13 years is 61 mm), and the dunes are linear and partially stable, mainly due to the presence of biogenic crust and partially due to the presence of vegetation. In July 2008, 10×10 m plots on the four dune habitats (crest, interdune, north slope, and south slope) were treated as follows: (i) removal of vegetation and biogenic crust, (ii) removal of biogenic crust only, (iii) removal of vegetation only, (iv) partial removal of biogenic crust and vegetation, and (v) control plot. The surface coverage of sand, biogenic crust, and vegetation was monitored on a monthly basis, using a remote-sensing technique especially developed for the Sde-Hallamish sand dunes. It was found that strong wind events, with durations of several days, accounted for the coverage changes in biogenic crust and vegetation. The response to precipitation was much slower. In addition, no rehabilitation of biogenic crust and vegetation was observed within the experiment time period. The changes in biogenic crust cover were not necessarily related to changes in dune dynamics, since often an increase in biogenic crust cover is a result of wind erosion that exposes old crust that was buried under the sand; wind hardly erodes biogenic crust at all due to its high durability to wind action. The Sde-Hallamish dunes seem to have become more active as a result of a prolonged drought during the past several years. The field experiment reported here indicates that biogenic crust cover exhibits large seasonal variations that are

  12. DNA Barcoding of Neotropical Sand Flies (Diptera, Psychodidae, Phlebotominae): Species Identification and Discovery within Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Israel de Souza; Chagas, Bruna Dias das; Rodrigues, Andressa Alencastre Fuzari; Ferreira, Adelson Luiz; Rezende, Helder Ricas; Bruno, Rafaela Vieira; Falqueto, Aloisio; Andrade-Filho, José Dilermando; Galati, Eunice Aparecida Bianchi; Shimabukuro, Paloma Helena Fernandes; Brazil, Reginaldo Peçanha; Peixoto, Alexandre Afranio

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding has been an effective tool for species identification in several animal groups. Here, we used DNA barcoding to discriminate between 47 morphologically distinct species of Brazilian sand flies. DNA barcodes correctly identified approximately 90% of the sampled taxa (42 morphologically distinct species) using clustering based on neighbor-joining distance, of which four species showed comparatively higher maximum values of divergence (range 4.23-19.04%), indicating cryptic diversity. The DNA barcodes also corroborated the resurrection of two species within the shannoni complex and provided an efficient tool to differentiate between morphologically indistinguishable females of closely related species. Taken together, our results validate the effectiveness of DNA barcoding for species identification and the discovery of cryptic diversity in sand flies from Brazil.

  13. Standardization of DNA extraction from sand flies: Application to genotyping by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casaril, Aline Etelvina; de Oliveira, Liliane Prado; Alonso, Diego Peres; de Oliveira, Everton Falcão; Gomes Barrios, Suellem Petilim; de Oliveira Moura Infran, Jucelei; Fernandes, Wagner de Souza; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; Ferreira, Alda Maria Teixeira; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins; de Oliveira, Alessandra Gutierrez

    2017-06-01

    Standardization of the methods for extraction of DNA from sand flies is essential for obtaining high efficiency during subsequent molecular analyses, such as the new sequencing methods. Information obtained using these methods may contribute substantially to taxonomic, evolutionary, and eco-epidemiological studies. The aim of the present study was to standardize and compare two methods for the extraction of genomic DNA from sand flies for obtaining DNA in sufficient quantities for next-generation sequencing. Sand flies were collected from the municipalities of Campo Grande, Camapuã, Corumbá and Miranda, state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Three protocols using a silica column-based commercial kit (ReliaPrep™ Blood gDNA Miniprep System kit, Promega(®)), and three protocols based on the classical phenol-chloroform extraction method (Uliana et al., 1991), were compared with respect to the yield and quality of the extracted DNA. DNA was quantified using a Qubit 2.0 fluorometer. The presence of sand fly DNA was confirmed by PCR amplification of the IVS6 region (constitutive gene), followed by electrophoresis on a 1.5% agarose gel. A total of 144 male specimens were analyzed, 72 per method. Significant differences were observed between the two methods tested. Protocols 2 and 3 of phenol-chloroform extraction presented significantly better performance than all commercial kit extraction protocols tested. For phenol-chloroform extraction, protocol 3 presented significantly better performance than protocols 1 and 2. The IVS6 region was detected in 70 of 72 (97.22%) samples extracted with phenol, including all samples for protocols 2 and 3. This is the first study on the standardization of methods for the extraction of DNA from sand flies for application to next-generation sequencing, which is a promising tool for entomological and molecular studies of sand flies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optical and radiocarbon ages of stacked paleosols and dune sands in the Nebraska Sand Hills, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, R. J.; Mason, Joseph A.; Loope, David B.; Swinehart, James B.

    2004-05-01

    Optical ages for eolian sands from the Nebraska Sand Hills indicate periods of extensive eolian activity at ca 115±25, 840±70, 2300±240, and 3560±340 a. Activity was also noted at single sampling locations at ca 6180±370, 8430±510 and 13110±800 a. Many of these ages are similar to those noted by earlier authors. Optical ages from samples collected within paleosols indicate shorter and possibly less extensive periods of eolian activity at approximately 1220±150, 1590±110, and possibly 1950±150 a, during which the paleosol sands accumulated. What was originally interpreted as a single 1.2 m thick paleosol is shown by optical dating to consist of three or more welded soils developed within eolian sands with optical ages of ca 3800±240, 2740±240, 1560±110, and possibly 1930±140 a, each of which match eolian pulses recognized elsewhere. Scatter in some optical ages is attributable to intersection of sand-filled rodent burrows extending in outcrop 1.5 m below the contact between paleosol and overlying topset beds. A 5310±360 a optical age for one probable intersected burrow provides evidence for upward or lateral transport of older sands.

  15. Yield of a Choctawhatchee Sand Pine Plantation at Age 28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell M. Burns; R.H. Brendemuehl

    1969-01-01

    A little-known tree, Choctawhatchee sand pine (Pinus clausa [Chapm.] Vasey), seems well adapted to the infertile, droughty soils common to the sandhills of Florida which now produce little value. Published yield data based on plantation-grown Choctawhatchee sand pine are not available. One 28-year-old plantation of this race of sand pine, growing...

  16. Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Oude Essink, G.H.P.; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The anticipation of sea-level rise and increases in extreme weather conditions has led to the initiation of an innovative coastal management project called the Sand Engine. In this pilot project a large volume of sand (21.5 million m3) – also called sand replenishment or nourishment – was placed on

  17. 77 FR 75007 - Importation of Sand Pears From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 319 RIN 0579-AD42 Importation of Sand Pears From China AGENCY... and vegetables regulations to allow the importation of sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) from China into the United States. As a condition of entry, sand pears from areas in China in which the Oriental...

  18. Design and management of conventional fluidized-sand biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluidized sand biofilters (FSBs) are relatively compact, efficient, and cost-competitive biofilters, especially in recirculating systems that require maintaining consistently low levels of ammonia and nitrite. Filter sand is low cost (often $70-200/m3 of sand delivered) and has a high specific surf...

  19. Mineral processing of heavy mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1992-01-01

    Processing of heavy mineral sands involves many techniques including gravity, magnetic and electrostatic separation. As part of a laboratory programme to develop effective mineral processing techniques, two mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia were processed using the standard techniques, with emphasis placed on the Carpco electrostatic separator. These sands were initially characterised mineralogically by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA...

  20. Evaluation of zeolite-sand mixtures as reactive materials protecting groundwater at waste disposal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joanna, Fronczyk; Kazimierz, Garbulewski

    2013-09-01

    To recognize properties of a mixture of Vistula sand (medium sand acc. to USCS) with Slovak zeolite as reactive materials suitable for permeable reactive barriers proposed for protection of groundwater environment in vicinity of old landfills comprehensive laboratory investigations were performed. The present study investigates the removal of contaminants specific for landfill leachates onto zeolite-sand mixtures containing 20%, 50% and 80% of zeolite (ZS20, ZS50 and ZS80). Taking into account the results of batch tests it was concluded that the Langmuir isotherm best fitted the data. It was observed that the presence of ammonium, calcium and magnesium decreases the removal efficiency of copper by 32%. Column tests of contaminant migration through the attenuation zone of the reactive materials were interpreted using the software package CXTFIT, which solves a one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Column test results also indicate the strong influence of the presence of interfering substances on copper immobilisation; dynamic sorption capacities decrees twofold. Throughout the landfill leachate flow through ZS80 sample, a constant reduction of NH4+ (at 100%), K+ (at 93%) and Fe(total) (at an average of 86%) were observed. There was no reduction in chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand.

  1. Biodegradation rates of 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin through sand filters and in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lionel; Hoefel, Daniel; Bock, Franziska; Saint, Christopher P; Newcombe, Gayle

    2007-02-01

    Taste and odour (T&O) causing compounds, in particular, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, are a problem for water authorities as they are recalcitrant to conventional water treatment. In this study, biological sand filtration was shown to be an effective process for the complete removal of MIB and geosmin, with removal shown to be predominantly through biodegradation. In addition, MIB and geosmin were also effectively degraded in batch bioreactor experiments using biofilm sourced from one of the sand filters as the microbial inoculum. The biodegradation of MIB and geosmin was determined to be a pseudo-first-order reaction with rate constants ranging between 0.10 and 0.58 d(-1) in the bioreactor experiments. Rate constants were shown to be dependent upon the initial concentration of the microbial inoculum but not the initial concentration of MIB and geosmin when target concentrations of 200 and 50 ng l(-1) were used. Furthermore, rate constants were shown to increase upon re-exposure of the biofilm to both T&O compounds. Enrichment cultures with subsequent community profile analysis using 16S rRNA-directed PCR-DGGE identified four bacteria most likely involved in the biodegradation of geosmin within the sand filters and bioreactors. These included a Pseudomonas sp., Alphaproteobacterium, Sphingomonas sp. and an Acidobacteriaceae member.

  2. The role of biostimulation in iron bioleaching and purification of quartz sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Štyriaková

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The biostimulation for iron mineral dissolution and reduction with chelators and organic source were investigated on ferrihydriteand quartz sands contaminated with iron minerals. The finding that bacteria can donate electrons to chelators has importantimplications for the removal of iron impurities from industrial minerals such as quartz sands. The effect of media composition withchelators (EDTA, NTA, AQDS on the extent of bacterial dissolution of iron mineral was studied under laboratory condition andselected a chelator Na2EDTA was studied under in-situ conditions.A stronger stimulation and continuos Fe dissolution by the form ofEDTA favors its in-situ use. Ultra-fine iron particles coating and impregnating quartz particles are difficult to treat by conventionalmineral processing methods. Biological leaching appears to be the alternative for the effective removal of iron minerals. The in-situremoval of Fe-phases from quartz sands via bioleaching was optimized with regard to the rate of iron reduction and dissolution bybiostimulation with Na2EDTA.

  3. The Rheology of Acoustically Fluidized Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, J. W.; Melosh, J.

    2013-12-01

    The collapse of large craters and the formation of central peaks and peak rings is well modeled by numerical computer codes that incorporate the acoustic fluidization mechanism to temporarily allow the fluid-like flow of rock debris immediately after crater excavation. Furthermore, long runout landslides require a similar mechanism to explain their almost frictionless movement, which is probably also a consequence of their granular composition coupled with internal vibrations. Many different investigators have now confirmed the ability of vibrations to fluidize granular materials. Yet it still remains to fully describe the rheology of vibrated sand as a function of stress, frequency and amplitude of the vibrations in the sand itself. We constructed a rotational viscometer to quantitatively investigate the relation between the stress and strain rate in a horizontal bed of strongly vibrated sand. In addition to the macroscopic stain rate, the amplitude and frequency of the vibrations produced by a pair of pneumatic vibrators were also measured with the aid of miniaturized piezoelectric accelerometers (B&K 4393) whose output was recorded on a digital storage oscilloscope. The initial gathering of the experimental data was difficult due to granular memory, but by having the sand compacted vibrationally for 8 minutes before each run the scatter of data was reduced and we were able to obtain consistent results. Nevertheless, our major source of uncertainty was variations in strain rate from run to run. We find that vibrated sand flows like a highly non-Newtonian fluid, in which the shear strain rate is proportional to stress to a power much greater than one, where the precise power depends on the amplitude and frequency of the applied vibrations. Rapid flow occurs at stresses less than half of the static yield stress (that is, the yield stress when no vibration is applied) when strong vibrations are present. For a Newtonian fluid, such as water, the relation between

  4. Application of sand bailing technique in CBM directional wells%捞砂工艺在煤层气定向井中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李岳栋; 杜长全; 彭波

    2012-01-01

    冲砂存在漏失、污染煤层的问题,煤层气井井筒清砂作业,主要依靠捞砂工艺。但捞砂在定向井的施工比直井的成功率要低。分析捞砂工艺的特点和难点,找出在煤层气斜井捞砂施工中捞砂有进尺却无效果的原因,是上提管柱过程中,捞砂铲的固定凡尔关闭不严,造成砂子漏失。通过使用双固定凡尔,有效地解决砂子的漏失问题,并在后期的生产中取得了很好的效果,提高了定向井捞砂施工的效率。%Since sand washing can easily arouse the problems of sand leakage and coal beds contamination, the most reliable meth-od for sand removal in CBM wells is sand bailing technique. Compared to sand bailing operation in vertical wells, those in direction-al wells face more challenges. Based on the summarization and analysis of the characteristics and difficulties of sand bailing tech-nique, this paper found out the reason that the noncommercial footage of sand bailing in the inclined CBM wells was due to tight-ness failure of the fixed valve in the bailer conductor contributed to the leakage of sand during the process of the column raising. The application of double fixed valve can well solve the problems of sand leakage,obtained good effects during the later production period and highly increased sand bailing operation efficiency in directional wells.

  5. Locomotory transition from water to sand and its effects on undulatory kinematics in sand lances (Ammodytidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidmark, Nicholas J; Strother, James A; Horton, Jaquan M; Summers, Adam P; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2011-02-15

    Sand lances, fishes in the genus Ammodytes, exhibit a peculiar burrowing behavior in which they appear to swim rapidly into the substrate. They use posteriorly propagated undulations of the body to move in both water, a Newtonian fluid, and in sand, a non-Newtonian, granular substrate. In typical aquatic limbless locomotion, undulations of the body push against water, which flows because it is incapable of supporting the static stresses exerted by the animal, thus the undulations move in world space (slipping wave locomotion). In typical terrestrial limbless locomotion, these undulations push against substrate irregularities and move relatively little in world space (non-slipping wave locomotion). We used standard and X-ray video to determine the roles of slipping wave and non-slipping wave locomotion during burrowing in sand lances. We find that sand lances in water use slipping wave locomotion, similar to most aquatic undulators, but switch to non-slipping waves once they burrow. We identify a progression of three stages in the burrowing process: first, aquatic undulations similar to typical anguilliform locomotion (but without head yaw) push the head into the sand; second, more pronounced undulations of the aquatic portion of the body push most of the animal below ground; third, the remaining above-ground portion of the body ceases undulation and the subterranean portion takes over, transitioning to non-slipping wave locomotion. We find no evidence that sand lances use their body motions to fluidize the sand. Instead, as soon as enough of the body is underground, they undergo a kinematic shift and locomote like terrestrial limbless vertebrates.

  6. Clean and Secure Energy from Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinti, Jennifer [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Birgenheier, Lauren [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, Milind [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Facelli, Julio [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hradisky, Michal [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kelly, Kerry [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Miller, Jan [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); McLennan, John [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ring, Terry [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Ruple, John [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Uchitel, Kirsten [Inst. for Clean and Secure Energy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-09-30

    (March, 2012); Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development (May, 2012); Development of CFD-Based Simulation Tools for In Situ Thermal Processing of Oil Shale/Sands (February, 2012); Core-Based Integrated Sedimentologic, Stratigraphic, and Geochemical Analysis of the Oil Shale Bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah (April, 2011); Atomistic Modeling of Oil Shale Kerogens and Asphaltenes Along with their Interactions with the Inorganic Mineral Matrix (April, 2011); Pore Scale Analysis of Oil Shale/Sands Pyrolysis (March, 2011); Land and Resource Management Issues Relevant to Deploying In-Situ Thermal Technologies (January, 2011); Policy Analysis of Produced Water Issues Associated with In-Situ Thermal Technologies (January, 2011); and Policy Analysis of Water Availability and Use Issues for Domestic Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development (March, 2010)

  7. Longshore sediment transport at Golden Sands (Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Nikolov

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the qualitative and quantitative features of the littoral drift at Golden Sands (Bulgaria, carried out jointly by Polish and Bulgarian researchers. The mathematical modelling of physical coastal processes took wave transformation (wave diffraction and refraction; the effects of shoaling and wave breaking and longshore sediment transport into account. The computations were carried out for the mean statistical annual wave climate, determined on the basis of IO BAS wave data, simulated using the WAM method from long-term Black Sea wind data. The results of sediment transport computations clearly show that its direction off the Golden Sands shore is from north to south.

  8. Post-liquefaction reconsolidation of sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamidis, O; Madabhushi, G S P

    2016-02-01

    Loosely packed sand that is saturated with water can liquefy during an earthquake, potentially causing significant damage. Once the shaking is over, the excess pore water pressures that developed during the earthquake gradually dissipate, while the surface of the soil settles, in a process called post-liquefaction reconsolidation. When examining reconsolidation, the soil is typically divided in liquefied and solidified parts, which are modelled separately. The aim of this paper is to show that this fragmentation is not necessary. By assuming that the hydraulic conductivity and the one-dimensional stiffness of liquefied sand have real, positive values, the equation of consolidation can be numerically solved throughout a reconsolidating layer. Predictions made in this manner show good agreement with geotechnical centrifuge experiments. It is shown that the variation of one-dimensional stiffness with effective stress and void ratio is the most crucial parameter in accurately capturing reconsolidation.

  9. Three dimensional fabric evolution of sheared sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Alsidqi; Alshibli, Khalid (UWA)

    2012-10-24

    Granular particles undergo translation and rolling when they are sheared. This paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) experimental assessment of fabric evolution of sheared sand at the particle level. F-75 Ottawa sand specimen was tested under an axisymmetric triaxial loading condition. It measured 9.5 mm in diameter and 20 mm in height. The quantitative evaluation was conducted by analyzing 3D high-resolution x-ray synchrotron micro-tomography images of the specimen at eight axial strain levels. The analyses included visualization of particle translation and rotation, and quantification of fabric orientation as shearing continued. Representative individual particles were successfully tracked and visualized to assess the mode of interaction between them. This paper discusses fabric evolution and compares the evolution of particles within and outside the shear band as shearing continues. Changes in particle orientation distributions are presented using fabric histograms and fabric tensor.

  10. Rational approach to anisotropy of sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    1998-11-01

    The paper presents a constitutive model for the three-dimensional deformation-strength behaviour of inherently anisotropic sand. Based on non-linear tensorial functions, the model is developed without recourse to the concepts in plasticity theory such as yield surface and plastic potential. Benefited from the fact that no decomposition of strain into elastic and plastic parts is assumed, a unified treatment of anisotropic behaviour of deformation and strength is achieved. Anisotropy is characterized by a vector normal to the bedding plane. The extension of the constitutive model is furnished by incorporating the vector under consideration of the principle of objectivity and the condition of material symmetry. Distinct features of the model are its elegant formulation and its simple structure involving few material parameters. Model performance and comparison with experiments show that the model is capable of capturing the salient behaviour of anisotropic sand.

  11. Bioaugmentation of flow-through sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Elin Djurhuus

    Global applications of pesticides in agricultural production have led to the detection of trace amounts of pesticides in groundwater resources in levels exceeding the EU threshold limit for drinking water of 0.1 µg L-1. Pesticide-polluted groundwater may be remediated by inoculating waterworks sand...... filters with specific degrading bacteria. However, degradation efficiency is often hampered by poor adhesion and a lack of sustained catabolic activity of the introduced bacteria. The overall objective of this thesis was to investigate the significance of selected bacterial surface properties...... coincided with efficient mineralisation/degradation, and proposed the tfdC gene as a suitable marker for monitoring phenoxy acid degradation in strain PM2. Furthermore, when testing strain PM2s degradation performance in flow-through sand columns, we found that strain PM2 was able to sustain induced...

  12. Analysis of Wind-blown Sand Movement over Transverse Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Huang, Ning; Zhu, Yuanjian

    2014-12-01

    Wind-blown sand movement often occurs in a very complicated desert environment where sand dunes and ripples are the basic forms. However, most current studies on the theoretic and numerical models of wind-blown sand movement only consider ideal conditions such as steady wind velocity, flat sand surface, etc. In fact, the windward slope gradient plays a great role in the lift-off and sand particle saltation. In this paper, we propose a numerical model for the coupling effect between wind flow and saltating sand particles to simulate wind-blown sand movement over the slope surface and use the SIMPLE algorithm to calculate wind flow and simulate sands transport by tracking sand particle trajectories. We furthermore compare the result of numerical simulation with wind tunnel experiments. These results prove that sand particles have obvious effect on wind flow, especially that over the leeward slope. This study is a preliminary study on windblown sand movement in a complex terrain, and is of significance in the control of dust storms and land desertification.

  13. Discovery and description of complete ammonium oxidizers in groundwater-fed rapid sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palomo, Alejandro

    as biological filtration has long been acknowledged and recently been investigated. Biological filtration technology is widely used around the world and is especially important in Denmark as groundwater is the main source water for drinking water production. Because the groundwater has a relative high...... attention has been paid to the role of microorganisms in drinking water treatment technologies. In contrast, much effort has been devoted to eliminate potential pathogens in the drinking water treatment and supply systems. Nevertheless, the role of microbes in some drinking water treatments systems...... activity and roles in compound removal from the source water. This PhD project focused on a comprehensive investigation of the microbial communities in rapid sand filters beyond their purely taxonomical identification. For this purpose, samples collected from a rapid sand filter were subjected...

  14. Amplitude equation and long-range interactions in underwater sand ripples in one dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnipper, Teis; Mertens, Keith; Ellegaard, Clive;

    2008-01-01

    We present an amplitude equation for sand ripples under oscillatory flow in a situation where the sand is moving in a narrow channel and the height profile is practically one dimensional. The equation has the form h(t)=epsilon-(h-(h) over bar) + ((h(x))(2)-1)h(xx)-h(xxxx) + delta((h(x))(2))(xx) w...... finally present surprising experimental results showing that long-range coupling is indeed seen in the initial details of the doubling transition, where in fact two small ripples are initially formed, followed by global symmetry breaking removing one of them....... in particular on the so-called doubling transition, a secondary instability caused by the sudden decrease in the amplitude of the water motion, leading to the appearance of a new ripple in each trough. This transition is well reproduced for sufficiently large delta (asymmetry between trough and crest). We...

  15. Evaluating the oil sands reclamation process: Assessing policy capacity and stakeholder access for government and non-governmental organizations operating in Alberta's oil sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tyler

    . In an effort to discern the overall status of reclamation in the oil sands this study explores several factors essential to policy capacity: work environment, training, employee attitudes, perceived capacity, policy tools, evidence based work, and networking. Data was collected through key informant interviews with senior policy professionals in government and non-government agencies in Alberta. The following are agencies of interest in this research: Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP); Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development (AESRD); Alberta Energy Regulator (AER); Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA); Alberta Environment Monitoring, Evaluation, and Reporting Agency (AEMERA); Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA). The aim of this research is to explain how and why reclamation policy is conducted in Alberta's oil sands. This will illuminate government capacity, NGO capacity, and the interaction of these two agency typologies. In addition to answering research questions, another goal of this project is to show interpretive analysis of policy capacity can be used to measure and predict policy effectiveness. The oil sands of Alberta will be the focus of this project, however, future projects could focus on any government policy scenario utilizing evidence-based approaches.

  16. Field Measurements of Influence of Sand Transport Rate on Structure of Wind-sand Flow over Coastal Transverse Ridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yuxiang; S L NAMIKAS; P A HESP; MA Jun

    2008-01-01

    The structure of wind-sand flow under different total sand transport rates was measured with field vertical anemometer and sand trap on the crest of typical coastal transverse ridge in Changli Gold Coast of Hebei Province,which is one of the most typical coastal aeolian distribution regions in China and famous for the tall and typical coastal transverse ridges.The measurement results show that,on the conditions of approximate wind velocities and same surface materials and environments,some changes happen to the structure of wind-sand flow with the increase of total sand transport rate on the crest of coastal transverse ridge.First,the sand transport rates of layers at different heights in the wind-sand flow increase,with the maximum increase at the height layer of 4-8cm.Second,the ratios of sand transport rates of layers at different heights to total sand transport rate decrease at the low height layer (0-4cm),but increase at the high height layer (4-60cm).Third,the distribution of the sand transport rate in the wind-sand flow can be expressed by an exponential function at the height layer of 0-40cm,but it changes fi'om power function model to exponential function model in the whole height layer (0-60cm) and changes into polynomial function model at the height layer of 40-60cm with the increase of total sand transport rate.Those changes have a close relationship with the limit of sand grain size of wind flow transporting and composition of sand grain size in the wind-sand flow.

  17. Study of the anti-sand sucker rod pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hangxin; Lv, Bingxin; Xi, Wenkui; Yi, Peng

    2017-06-01

    In order to solve the problem of sand stuck in the sucker rod pump, an anti-sand sucker rod pump is designed. The anti-sand sucker rod pump includes the conventional sucker rod pump and the swirl flow device. The sand particles can be separated from the oil in the swirl flow device, so the plunger of the sucker rod pump cannot be stuck. The motion equation of the sand particles in oil is deduced. The virtual model of the swirl flow device is built in GAMBIT software. And simulation of solid-liquid two phase flow is simulated in software FLUENT. The simulation results show that the swirl flow device can realize the sand particles separation from the oil completely. So the pump can have the effect of anti-sands.

  18. Strength and sintering effects at ejection of explosively driven sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Weckert, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    A description of the response of sand to extreme loads is very important for the evaluation of the sand ejecta impact effects on various targets. Sand is a complex material to simulate because of its porosity where the inter-phase equilibrium is hard to achieve under transient shock wave loading. A previously developed two-phase model with strength has been implemented in CTH and applied to sand. The shock response of the sand, including the Hugoniot abnormality known from the literature for highly porous silica, is adequately described with the material model. The sand unloading effects appearing as the ejecta are observed in the present work using dynamic flash X-ray of an aluminium target plate loaded by limestone sand ejecta from the detonation of a buried high explosive charge. The CTH modelling results compared with the flash X-ray images have demonstrated good agreement, particularly, in the description of momentum transfer to the target.

  19. A transport-rate model of wind-blown sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Sand transport by wind plays an important role in environmental problems.Formulating the sand-transport rate model has been of continuing significance,because the majority of the existing models relate sand-transport rate to the wind-shear velocity.However,the wind-shear velocity readapted to blown sand is difficult to determine from the measured wind profiles when sand movement occurs,especially at high wind velocity.Detailed wind tunnel tests were carried out to reformulate the sand-transport rate model,followed by attempts to relate sand-transport rate to parameters of wind velocity,threshold shear-velocity,and grain size.Finally,we validated the model based on the data from field observations.

  20. Athabasca oil sands development : lessening the footprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R. [Alberta Environment, AB (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    This presentation provided an overview of the oil sands development footprint from the perspectives of industry, environmental associations and regulatory agencies. A map of regional oil sands developments was presented along with details of land disturbance to date. Industry strategies for lessening the impact of land disturbance include compact space-efficient mining operations; good planning; and effective, progressive reclamation. A closure and reclamation model was presented, along with key reclamation challenges such as overburden. Issues concerning tailings sands were examined. Details of Syncrude's closure vision were presented, including details of the Mildred Lake site. Details of the Fort McMurray Environmental Association were presented as well as various regional multi-stakeholder initiatives. A background of Syncrude and Suncor operations was presented as well as development projection forecasts. Impacts to the Boreal region were examined. Details of land reclamation by Syncrude were provided, as well as a chart of cumulative disturbances. It was noted that recent applications have indicated numerous reclamation uncertainties, including long-term performance of landforms and the feasibility of developing trafficable tailings landforms. It was suggested that the ecosystem dynamics of the Boreal are poorly understood. Exacerbating factors include the degraded state of soils; viability of end pit lakes; and climate change. It was suggested that operators are proposing to deal with landscape and technology uncertainty using adaptive management strategies. Government responses to the oil sand development footprint include the encouragement of more research into tailings technologies, end pit lake viability and reclamation; and the identification of regional landscape ecological thresholds by the Cumulative Environmental Management Association (CEMA). It was concluded that uncertainty needs to be addressed via a variety of policy and management options

  1. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21-31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18-75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  2. Kirsten Sand. Arkitekt for sin tid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Seip

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Towards the end of World War II the retreating Germans burnt down nearly all buildings and other constructions in the counties of Finnmark and the northern parts of Troms in North Norway. The population evacuated but many returned as soon as possible, only to find themselves homeless. At this very demanding point Kirsten Sand decided to travel north, and do whatever she could as an architect to help. The pre-war housing situation was generally difficult. Low building standards and lack of money forced families in the cities to live under bad conditions. Kirsten Sand studied these conditions and took part in the efforts to better the situation. This knowledge provided a good starting point for the work she undertook after the war, in particular her profound understanding of the situation of women, their working conditions and positions in the household and society. Houses designed by Sand and her helpmates are simple but adequate, taking into account these women’s point of view. Ingebjørg Hage has thrown light on the work of Kirsten Sand in Finnmark and Troms in several ways. This article aims at describing Sand’s background as an architect before she left Oslo to travel north. It describes how housing and housing policy since long had been central to architects, especially so within the group she belonged to. In pre-war Oslo she had been engaged in planning and designing hospitals. During a period as inspector for the health authorities she learned a lot about the living conditions of people in general. After establishing her own architect’s office she mostly designed family houses, and during the war she engaged in research that further deepened her knowledge in the field. Thus she was particularly well equipped for the demanding tasks she undertook in the summer of 1945.

  3. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Nazir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21–31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18–75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  4. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  5. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, T.K. [ed.

    1996-04-01

    This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

  7. PHYSICAL MODELING OF ODOMETRIC COMPRESSION OF SAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyashenko P. A.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The odometric compression of sand with constant rate of loading (CRL or constant rate of deformation (CRD and continuous registration of the corresponding reaction allows to identify the effect of stepwise changes of deformation (at the CRL and the power reaction (at the CRD. Physical modeling of compression on the sandy model showed the same effect. The physical model was made of fine sand with marks, mimicking large inclusions. Compression of the soil at the CRD was uneven, stepwise, and the strain rate of the upper boundary of the sandy model changed cyclically. Maximum amplitudes of cycles passed through a maximum. Inside of the sand model, the uneven strain resulted in the mutual displacement of the adjacent parts located at the same depth. The growth of external pressure, the marks showed an increase or decrease in displacement and even move opposite to the direction of movement (settlement the upper boundary of the model ‒ "floating" of marks. Marks, at different depths, got at the same time different movements, including mutually contradictory. The mark settlements sudden growth when the sufficiently large pressure. These increments in settlements remained until the end of loading decreasing with depth. They were a confirmation of the hypothesis about the total destruction of the soil sample at a pressure of "structural strength". The hypothesis of the "floating" reason based on the obvious assumption that the marks are moved together with the surrounding sand. The explanation of the effect of "floating" is supported by the fact that the value of "floating" the more, the greater the depth

  8. Sand Ripple Dynamics on the Inner Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Sand Ripple Dynamics on the Inner Shelf Donald N. Slinn Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611...Florida,Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering,Gainesville,FL,32611-6590 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY...2002. 452: p. 1-24. Acrivos, A., Shear-Induced Particle Diffusion in Concentrated Suspensions of Noncolloidal Particles. Journal of Rheology , 1995

  9. Drawing a Line in the Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An Inner Mongolian woman takes on the desert and converts extensive arid regions into arable land by Ni Yanshuo CONVERTING vast tracks of desert into arable land is no easy task, even using the most advanced technology.Yet a woman who hails from north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region met this challenge head on.Using the helping hands of other determined women,she has made remarkable progress in pushing back the sands of time.

  10. Drained Triaxial Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praastrup, U.; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    In the process of understanding and developing models for geomaterials, the stress-strain behaviour is commonly studied by performing triaxial tests. In the present study static triaxial tests have been performed to gain knowledge of the stress-strain behaviour of frictional materials during...... monotonic loading. The tests reported herein are all drained tests, starting from different initial states of stress and following various stress paths. AIl the tests are performed on reconstituted medium dense specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand....

  11. Waste foundry sand: Environmental implication and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Penkaitis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of analyses using Scanning Electron Microscopy in field samples of waste foundry sand, as well as the results of granulometric, chemical and groundwater analyses. Field data allowed to characterize waste foundry sand and showed that there are elevated concentrations of metals in the groundwater (iron, manganese, boron and selenium, in addition to other potentially toxic elements (chromium, copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc, aluminum, iron, manganese, which are present in the waste and are considered not hazardous by current standards. Even if these elements are not considered hazardous, their concentrations above the permissible limit compromise the environmental quality of the site, posing risks to the local population, since they work in agriculture and use groundwater. Two different types of waste foundry sands were identified using granulometric analyses. Electron microscopy showed features related to morphological, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of grains that make up the waste. Quartz was the dominant mineral. Waste foundry sand is composed of two types of grains: a rounded grain with almost no incrustations formed during alloy production, and a second type of grain, which is not rounded, has incrustations, and always has several metals derived from alloys and associated with these incrustations. Chemical elements detected in groundwater with concentrations above the limits established by the regulatory bodies were found in wells located in the landfill area. Most of these elements show higher concentrations downstream, some of them with concentrations above the regulatory limit, and others show an increase in concentration upstream, indicating that the landfill may be impacting the local environment.

  12. American Las Vegas Sands Corp. Visiting Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yinghong; Liu Jinliang

    2006-01-01

    @@ On August 29, Wan Jifei, Chairman of CCPIT, meets the visiting delegation led by Sheldon G. Adelson,Chairman of the Board and principal owner of Las Vegas Sands Corp. in CCPIT. Zhao Zhenge, Vice Director of International Connection Department of CCPIT, Luo Guoxiong from Beijing China Exhibition Investment Company, Xu Jingyi, Assistant Director of American and Oceanian Affairs Division of CCPIT, also attended the meeting.

  13. MONITOIRNG OF A CONTROLLED DNAPL SPILL USING A PROTOTYPE DIELECTRIC LOGGING TOOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) utilized their prototype dielectric logging tool to monitor a controlled Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) spill into a large tank located at the University of California Richmond Field Station (RFS) containing multiple sand and clayey sand...

  14. Oil sands mining water use and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Long, D.; Fitch, M. [Golder Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    There are currently 4 bitumen mining operations operating along the Athabasca River in northern Alberta. This paper presented details of the water licences, historical water use, present water use, and future plans for water management in relation to oil sands mining operations. The study was based on work currently conducted for the Oil Sands Developers Group (OSDG) and Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), as well as on mine site water balance analyses for proposed mines in the region. Typical mine site water balances were discussed, and water use rates for the mining operations were reviewed. The new Athabasca River water management framework may require that mines provide additional water storage or delayed reclamation of mine areas in order to offset water losses during winter low-flow periods. New regulations may also reduce the requirement for make-up water. The study also noted that release criteria are still being developed for on-site water within closed-loop mine operations. The oil sands industry will need to balance various factors related to water use in the future. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  15. DYNAMIC EFFECTIVE SHEAR STRENGTH OF SATURATED SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵生俊; 谢定义

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic effective shear strength of saturated sand under cyclic loading is discussed in this paper. The discussion includes the transient time dependency behaviors based on the analysis of the results obtained in conventional cyclic triaxial tests and cyclic torsional shear triaxial tests. It has been found that the dynamic effective shear strength is composed of effective frictional resistance and viscous resistance, which are characterized by the strain rate dependent feature of strength magnitude, the coupling of consolidation stress with cyclic stress and the dependency of time needed to make the soil strength suffciently mobilized, and can also be expressed by the extended Mohr-Coulomb's law. The two strength parameters of the dynamic effective internal frictional angle φd and the dynamic viscosity coefficient η are determined. The former is unvaried for different number of cyclic loading, dynamic stress form and consolidation stress ratio. And the later is unvaried for the different dynamic shear strain rate γt developed during the sand liquefaction, but increases with the increase of initial density of sand. The generalization of dynamic effective stress strength criterion in the 3-dimensional effective stress space is studied in detail for the purpose of its practical use.

  16. Collaborative production management for oil sands operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Andrew [Matrikon (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper gives an overview of the collaborative production management of oil sands operations. Some characteristics of oil sands operations include oil treatment, hydro treating, diluent addition, logistics, and environmental impact assessments. Some of the business challenges include regulatory uncertainty, a fluid workforce and a technology still in the process of being developed. Improvement is only possible when process is assessed and measured; hence, production data management is very important. Production data measurements encompass such areas as planning, documentation and transactions. Regulatory data reporting is represented using a flow chart. The concepts of business application architecture and functional reference modeling are also explained. Benchmarking plays a vital role, some aspects of which would be technology, automation and integration. Certain advantages of timely assessment are increased production, equity, and goodwill as well as reduction in costs, risk, and capital requirements. The relevance and importance of collaboration, awareness of web technology and aggregate information are also explained. From the study, it can be concluded that the key to overall improvement in the oil sands industry will be improved production management.

  17. Recycled sand in lime-based mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidou, M; Anastasiou, E; Georgiadis Filikas, K

    2014-12-01

    The increasing awareness of the society about safe guarding heritage buildings and at the same time protecting the environment promotes strategies of combining principles of restoration with environmentally friendly materials and techniques. Along these lines, an experimental program was carried out in order to investigate the possibility of producing repair, lime-based mortars used in historic buildings incorporating secondary materials. The alternative material tested was recycled fine aggregates originating from mixed construction and demolition waste. Extensive tests on the raw materials have been performed and mortar mixtures were produced using different binding systems with natural, standard and recycled sand in order to compare their mechanical, physical and microstructure properties. The study reveals the improved behavior of lime mortars, even at early ages, due to the reaction of lime with the Al and Si constituents of the fine recycled sand. The role of the recycled sand was more beneficial in lime mortars rather than the lime-pozzolan or lime-pozzolan-cement mortars as a decrease in their performance was recorded in the latter cases due to the mortars' structure.

  18. Permeability Tests on Silkeborg Sand No. 0000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Willy; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends on the charact......The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...... on the characteristics of the soil matrix, the permeability is determined for different void ratios. All tests are performed on reconstituted specimens of Silkeborg Sand No. 0000. The permeability is determined by use of a falling head apparatus. The apparatus, test procedures and the analysis method are described...... in the succeeding sections. Finally the test results are briefly summarised and a relationship between void ratio l and permeability is established....

  19. The bituminous sands : a Canadian mirage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousse, D.R. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Appliquees; Nasr, G.J. [Lebanese Univ., Roumieh (Lebanon). Faculty of Engineering; Turcotte, S.F. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Centre d' Etudes Internationales et Mondialisation; Salah, N.B. [Ecole Superieure des Sciences et Techniques De Tunis, Tunis (Tunisia). LMMP

    2009-07-01

    This paper examined the controversy about the potential role of a significant increase in Canadian oil sands production in order to bridge the upcoming gap between the world's increasing energy demand and the total recoverable oil supply. The paper presented the actual potential of different scenarios and considered the prediction cost forecasts. A brief overview of environmental impacts and the real return on investments were also provided. Environmental impacts that were considered included land degradation; water contamination; ecosystem damage; and air pollution. Nuclear energy was also presented as a possible solution. The paper demonstrated that even in a very optimistic scenario, Canada's oil sands accelerated production has a negligible effect on the aforementioned gap, has a considerable impact on environment that has yet to be accounted for. Energy ratios that were presented included energy return on energy investment; energy available on energy used; and energy payback. It was concluded that enhanced recovery techniques are clearly needed for future sustainable exploitation of these bituminous sands. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Summertime View of North Polar Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    10 October 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a suite of dunes in one of the several north polar dune fields. The bright surfaces adjacent to some of the dunes are patches of frost. These dunes spend much of the autumn, winter, and spring seasons covered with carbon dioxide frost. Only in late spring and in summer are the dark windblown sands fully exposed. Over the course of the 9+ years of the MGS mission, the MOC team has sought evidence that sand dunes may be migrating downwind over time. However, no clear examples of the movement of a whole dune have been identified. On Earth, such movement is typically detectable in air photos of the smallest active dunes over periods of a few years. Owing to the fact that the north polar dunes spend much of each martian year under a cover of frost, perhaps these move much more slowly than their frost-free, terrestrial counterparts. The sand may also be somewhat cemented by ice or minerals, likewise preventing vigorous dune migration in the present environment. This view covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left. The dunes are located near 79.8oN, 127.1oW, and the picture was acquired on 11 September 2006.

  1. The sedimentary structure of linear sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow; Bailey; Lancaster

    2000-07-06

    Linear sand dunes--dunes that extend parallel to each other rather than in star-like or crescentic forms--are the most abundant type of desert sand dune. But because their development and their internal structure are poorly understood, they are rarely recognized in the rock record. Models of linear dune development have not been able to take into account the sub-surface structure of existing dunes, but have relied instead either on the extrapolation of short-term measurements of winds and sediment transport or on observations of near-surface internal sedimentary structures. From such studies, it has not been clear if linear dunes can migrate laterally. Here we present images produced by ground penetrating radar showing the three-dimensional sedimentary structure of a linear dune in the Namib sand sea, where some of the world's largest linear dunes are situated. These profiles show clear evidence for lateral migration in a linear dune. Moreover, the migration of a sinuous crest-line along the dune produces divergent sets of cross-stratification, which can become stacked as the dune height increases, and large linear dunes can support superimposed dunes that produce stacked sets of trough cross-stratification. These clear structural signatures of linear dunes should facilitate their recognition in geological records.

  2. Enhanced ex situ bioremediation of crude oil contaminated beach sand by supplementation with nutrients and rhamnolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, M; Pasadakis, N; Norf, H; Kalogerakis, N

    2013-12-15

    Mediterranean coastal regions are particularly exposed to oil pollution due to extensive industrialization, urbanization and transport of crude and refined oil to and from refineries. Bioremediation of contaminated beach sand through landfarming is both simple and cost-effective to implement compared to other treatment technologies. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of alternative nutrients on biodegradation of crude oil contaminated beach sand in an effort to reduce the time required for bioremediation employing only indigenous hydrocarbon degraders. A natural sandy soil was collected from Agios Onoufrios beach (Chania, Greece) and was contaminated with weathered crude oil. The indigenous microbial population in the contaminated sand was tested alone (control treatment) or in combination with inorganic nutrients (KNO3 and K2HPO4) to investigate their effects on oil biodegradation rates. In addition, the ability of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids), in the presence of organic nutrients (uric acid and lecithin), to further stimulate biodegradation was investigated in laboratory microcosms over a 45-day period. Biodegradation was tracked by GC/MS analysis of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons components and the measured concentrations were corrected for abiotic removal by hopane normalizations. It was found that the saturated fraction of the residual oil is degraded more extensively than the aromatic fraction and the bacterial growth after an incubation period of approximately 3 weeks was much greater from the bacterial growth in the control. The results show that the treatments with inorganic or organic nutrients are equally effective over almost 30 days where C12-C35n-alkanes were degraded more than 97% and polyaromatic hydrocarbons with two or three rings were degraded more than 95% within 45 days. The results clearly show that the addition of nutrients to contaminated beach sand significantly enhanced the activity of

  3. Shaly sand formation evaluation in tight gas sands using electrochemical potential measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, M. M.; Jin, M.

    1991-08-01

    Equations are developed that directly relate the shaly conductivity to the electrochemical (membrane) potential (EP). The model is applied to both fully and partially saturated sands. The relationship between the resistivity index and the water saturation is also expressed in terms of a single membrane potential measurement. The Ep measured at different salinities are compared with model prediction using a single membrane potential measurement. Sigma (sub 0) versus Sigma (sub w) curves are then generated using the model equations and compared with measured curves. Experimental results are presented for electrochemical potential measurement made in the lab on 50 tight gs sand samples. It is shown that the measurements can be correlated with CEC although the CEC measured by grinding up the samples was always higher than that estimated from Ep measurements. The Ep measurements are combined with the equations for partial saturation developed in the report to obtain water saturations in a tight gas sand well. Through the example it is shown that it is possible to determine the water saturation in Shaly sands from one membrane potential measurement at a known salinity together with a set of resistivity logs. The results clearly demonstrate the applicability of the method as a practical procedure for Shaly sand information evaluation.

  4. Cell abundance and microbial community composition along a complete oil sand mining and reclamation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappé, M.; Schneider, B.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbons constitute an important energy source for microbes but can also be of environmental concern. Microbial activity causes hydrocarbon degradation and thereby loss of economical value, but also helps to remove hydrocarbons from the environment. The present study characterizes the abundance of microbes along the oil sand mining process in Alberta, Canada, as a first approach to assess the impact of mining and oil extraction on the microbial population. After mining the oil is extracted from the sediment by a hot-water extraction (50-60°C), resulting in three major fractions: crude oil, tailings sand and fine tailings. The tailings sand is used as substratum for newly developing soils on the reclamation areas. The very liquid fine tailings still have a TOC content of about 4.3% and are pumped into tailings ponds, where they need up to three decades to settle and solidify. After deposition, these mature fine tailings (MFTs) are enriched in organics (TOC content between 9.6 and 16.8%) and dredged out of the ponds and put on dumps for several years for dewatering. Finally they are brought out onto the reclamation sites and deposited below the sand layer. Cells were extracted from oily sediments according to the protocol of Lappé and Kallmeyer (2011), stained with SYBR Green I and counted by fluorescence microscopy. Cell abundance in the unprocessed oil sand is around 1.6 x 107 cells cm-3. After processing the fresh fine tailings still contain around 1.6 x 107 cells cm-3. Cell counts in the processed MFTs are 5.8 x 107 cells cm-3, whereas in the sand used as substratum for newly developing soils, they are twice as high (1.4 x 108). In root-bearing horizons, cell counts reach 1.1 x 109 cell cm-3. Cell numbers calculated from cultivation experiments are in the same range. Higher cell counts in the tailings sand are probably due to a higher nitrogen supply through the addition of a 35 cm top layer of a peat-mineral mix. In the sand nitrate concentrations are high

  5. Effect of operating conditions in soil aquifer treatment on the removals of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kai; Echigo, Shinya; Itoh, Sadahiko

    2016-09-15

    Soil aquifer treatment (SAT) is an alternative advanced treatment for wastewater reclamation, and it has the potential to control micropollutants including pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). However, the relationship of operating conditions in SAT and removals of micropollutants was not clear. In this study, the effects of operating conditions on the removals of PPCPs were evaluated by using lab-scale columns and plant pilot-scale reactors under different operating conditions. Firstly, weathered granite soil (WGS), standard sand (SAND) and Toyoura standard sand (TS) have different soil characteristics such as total organic carbon (TOC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). In the columns with these packing materials, the removals of carboxylic analgesics and antilipidemics were effective regardless packing materials. The removals of antibiotics were more effective in WGS than in TS and SAND, indicating high TOC and CEC enhance the sorption in SAT. Secondly, with the extension of hydraulic retention time (HRT), the removals of sulfamethoxazole, acetaminophen, crotamiton, and antipyrine were improved in WGS columns, and adaptable biodegradation for moderately removable PPCPs was formed. Thirdly, the removal efficiencies of sulfamethoxazole and crotamiton were higher in the WGS column under vadose condition than in the WGS column under saturated condition, because of aerobic condition in WGS column under vadose condition. Though long HRT and vadose condition had positive influence on the removals of several PPCPs such as sulfamethoxazole, WGS column with an HRT of 7days under saturated condition removed most PPCPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A new GIS-based model for automated extraction of Sand Dune encroachment case study: Dakhla Oases, western desert of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghadiry

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The movements of the sand dunes are considered as a threat for roads, irrigation networks, water resources, urban areas, agriculture and infrastructures. The main objectives of this study are to develop a new GIS-based model for automated extraction of sand dune encroachment using remote sensing data and to assess the rate of sand dune movement. To monitor and assess the movements of sand dunes in Dakhla oases area, multi-temporal satellite images and a GIS-developed model, using Python script in Arc GIS, were used. The satellite images (SPOT images, 1995 and 2007 were geo-rectified using Erdas Imagine. Image subtraction was performed using spatial analyst in Arc GIS, the result of image subtraction obtains the sand dune movement between the two dates. The raster and vector shape of sand dune migration was automatically extracted using spatial analyst tools. The frontiers of individual dunes were measured at different dates and movement rates were analyzed in GIS. The ModelBuilder in Arc GIS was used in order to create a user friendly tool. The custom built model window is easy to handle by any user who wishes to adapt the model in his work. It was found that the rate of sand dune movement ranged between 3 and 9 m per year. The majority of sand dunes have a rate movement between 0 and 6 m and very few dunes had a movement rate between 6 and 9 m. Integrating remote sensing and GIS provided the necessary information for determining the minimum, maximum, mean, rate and area of sand dune migration.

  7. STUDY ON HOT SAND COOLING EQUIPMENT WITH DAMPING SAND CASCADE AND VERTICAL SPOUTED-FLUIDIZED BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.C. Wang; F. Wang; X.H. You

    2005-01-01

    A new kind of hot sand cooling equipment with vertical spouted-fluidized bed is developed in this paper. It is similar to the traditional horizontal vibrating fluidized boiling cooler in principle but different from it in structure. The processing principle of the cooler is analyzed. The influence of main structural and processing parameters on the cooling effect and its mechanism are researched. Other characteristics of the cooler are discussed also. Experiment results show that the cooling efficiency η is equal to or larger than 83%, the temperature of output sand is less than 40℃ with the temperature of input sand is about between 80 and 90℃, and the productivity is 5t/(h·m)

  8. Small Strain Behaviour and Viscous Effects on Sands and Sand-Clay Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Benedetto, H.

    This lecture paper focuses on sands and sand-clay mixtures behaviour in the small strain domain. Non viscous and viscous components are measured, identified and modelled within the framework of a 3 component model. Two precision prototype devices (triaxial and hollow cylinder) both equipped with piezoelectric sensors are used. Non viscous measured behaviour considering small quasi-static cycles and wave properties are compared with simulations obtained from 2 recently formulated anisotropic hypoelastic models (DBGS and DBGSP). Then, viscous experimental part is compared with the proposed model prediction. This model is an asymptotic expression, for the small strain domain, of a viscous evanescent formalism proposed by the author. It takes into account very peculiar behaviour observed on sands. Simulation for loadings with and without rotation of axes and for different rate histories, are quite satisfactory.

  9. Parathyroid gland removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Removal of parathyroid gland; Parathyroidectomy; Hyperparathyroidism - parathyroidectomy; PTH - parathyroidectomy ... and pain-free) for this surgery. Usually the parathyroid glands are removed using a 2- to 4-inch ( ...

  10. Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-09-01

    For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

  11. Cytotoxicity of yellow sand in lung epithelial cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y H Kim; K S Kim; N J Kwak; K H Lee; S A Kweon; Y Lim

    2003-02-01

    The present study was carried out to observe the cytotoxicity of yellow sand in comparison with silica and titanium dioxide in a rat alveolar type II cell line (RLE-6TN). Yellow sand (China Loess) was obtained from the loess layer in the Gunsu Province of China. The mean particle diameter of yellow sand was about 0.003 ± 0.001 mm. Major elements of yellow sand were Si(27.7 ± 0.6%), Al(6.01 ± 0.17%), and Ca(5.83 ± 0.23%) in that order. Silica and yellow sand significantly decreased cell viability and increased [Ca2+]i. All three particles increased the generation of H2O2. TiO2 did not change Fenton activity, while silica induced a slight increase of Fenton activity. In contrast, yellow sand induced a significant increase of Fenton activity. Silica, yellow sand and TiO2 induced significant nitrite formations in RLE-6TN cells. Silica showed the highest increase in nitrite formation, while yellow sand induced the least formation of nitrite. Silica and yellow sand increased the release of TNF-. Based on these results, we suggest that yellow sand can induce cytotoxicity in RLE-6TN cells and reactive oxygen species, Fenton activity and reactive nitrogen species might be involved in this toxicity.

  12. Application of the ERICA Integrated Approach to the Drigg coastal sand dunes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, M.D. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: mwood@liv.ac.uk; Marshall, W.A. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom); Beresford, N.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Jones, S.R. [Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3LN (United Kingdom); Howard, B.J. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D. [Environment Agency, P.O. Box 12, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Latchford, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 1HG (United Kingdom); Leah, R.T. [Institute for Sustainable Water Integrated Management and Ecosystem Research (SWIMMER)/School of Biological Sciences, Nicholson Building, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 3GP (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    The EC-funded project 'Environmental Risks from Ionising Contaminants: Assessment and Management' (ERICA) developed an 'Integrated Approach' for assessing the impact of ionising radiation on ecosystems. This paper presents the application of the ERICA Integrated Approach, supported by a software programme (the ERICA Tool) and guidance documentation, to an assessment of the Drigg coastal sand dunes (Cumbria, UK). Targeted sampling provided site-specific data for sand dune biota, including amphibians and reptiles. Radionuclides reported included {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. Site-specific data were compared to predictions derived using the ERICA Tool. Some under- and over-predictions of biota activity concentrations were identified but can be explained by the specific ecological characteristics and contamination mechanism of the dunes. Overall, the results indicated no significant impact of ionising radiation on the sand dune biota and the Integrated Approach was found to be a flexible and effective means of conducting a radiation impact assessment.

  13. Enhanced flushing of polychlorinated biphenyls contaminated sands using surfactant foam: effect of partition coefficient and sweep efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Jiajun

    2012-01-01

    Foam flushing is an in situ soil remediation technology based on the traditional surfactant flushing method. The contribution of mobility control to contaminant removal by foam is helpful for improving this technology. Foam flushing of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated unconsolidated media was performed to evaluate the effect of the partition coefficient (PC) and sweep efficiency (SE) on PCB removal. Column flushing with surfactant solution and foam with different types and concentrations of surfactant was carried out for PCB removal. Two types of quartz sand were investigated to evaluate the Jamin effect on the SE value of the washing agent. The results demonstrate that a small PC value and large SE value are necessary to achieve high PCB removal for foam flushing. Compared with solution flushing, the introduction of foam can effectively control the mobility of the washing agent. Similar to solution flushing, solubilization is a key factor which dominates the removal of PCBs in foam flushing. In addition, the SE value and PCB removal by foam flushing is less affected by particle size. Therefore, foam flushing was proved to be more effective in porous media with low hydraulic conductivity and high porosity. An integrated flushing with water, surfactant solution and foam was performed and the results prove that this technology successfully combines the advantages of solution solubilization and mobility control by foam, and thus further increases the remediation efficiency of PCBs to 94.7% for coarse sand.

  14. Enhanced flushing of polychlorinated biphenyls contaminated sands using surfactant foam: Effect of partition coefficient and sweep efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wang; Jiajun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Foam flushing is an in situ soil remediation technology based on the traditional surfactant flushing method.The contribution of mobility control to contaminant removal by foam is helpful for improving this technology.Foam flushing of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated unconsolidated media was performed to evaluate the effect of the partition coefficient (PC) and sweep efficiency (SE) on PCB removal.Column flushing with surfactant solution and foam with different types and concentrations of surfactant was carried out for PCB removal.Two types of quartz sand were investigated to evaluate the Jamin effect on the SE value of the washing agent.The results demonstrate that a small PC value and large SE value are necessary to achieve high PCB removal for foam flushing.Compared with solution flushing,the introduction of foam can effectively control the mobility of the washing agent.Similar to solution flushing,solubilization is a key factor which dominates the removal of PCBs in foam flushing.In addition,the SE value and PCB removal by foam flushing is less affected by particle size.Therefore,foam flushing was proved to be more effective in porous media with low hydraulic conductivity and high porosity.An integrated flushing with water,surfactant solution and foam was performed and the results prove that this technology successfully combines the advantages of solution solubilization and mobility control by foam,and thus further increases the remediation efficiency of PCBs to 94.7% for coarse sand.

  15. Biofilm systems for the removal of micro-pollutants from wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escola, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Among the different technologies available to improve the removal of organic micropollutants in wastewater, biofilms (a microbial community founded on a surface) have been envisioned as a promising solution. Different processes involving the degradation of micro-pollutants by biofilms were studied....... First, the usage of slow sand-filtration for the removal of micro-pollutants was tested and showed to slowly remove micro-pollutants that are otherwise recalcitrant. It was demonstrated that slow sand-filtration is a simple and robust technology for the removal of micropollutants. Second, moving bed...... and identification of enantiomers of the fungicide imazalil were achieved, allowing further studies on enantioselective toxicity and degradation. Testing the performance of different biofilm reactors for the removal of micro-pollutants provided a first insight on the efficiency of biofilms for micro...

  16. On Treating Sand--Flowed Wells in Jianghan Oil Field%江汉油区出砂油井治理技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨君; 龚兵; 张建国; 刘影

    2012-01-01

    Four decades of exploration has exposed the stratum of Jianghan Oil Field to increasingly severe sand flows which results in more times of well maintenance each year, seriously undermining the regular oil production. This paper demonstrates the studies and infield experiments of sand removal of sand well shafts and lifting by sand carrying techniques according to the geological features of sand production reservoirs and the production status of wells plagued by sand production in Jianghan. The results show that adopting those techniques has achieved some improvement in sand control and mitigate sand flows' impact on oil production, throwing light on future technique development for sand flow wells treatment.%经过40年的开发,江汉油区地层出砂越来越严重,致使作业维护井次逐年上升,严重影响了油井的正常生产。根据江汉油区出砂储层地质特征和出砂井生产现状,有针对性地开展出砂井井筒清砂和携砂举升采油技术研究或矿场试验,使出砂井治理收到了一定效果,缓解了地层出砂对油井生产的影响,为进一步开展出砂油井治理指明了主攻技术方向。

  17. Western Gas Sands Project status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, C.H.

    1978-09-30

    The status of government sponsored projects undertaken to increase gas production from low-permeability gas sands of the western United States during August 1978 is summarized. Background information is given in the September 1977 Status Report, NVO/0655-100. One of the largest massive Hydraulic Fracture (MHF) treatment to date was performed on Gas Producing Enterprises Well No. CIGE 2-29. C.H. Atkinson, Western Gas Sands Project (WGSP) Manager and D.C. Bleakly, CER Corporation were observers. Oriented coring operations on the Mitchell Energy well, Muse-Duke No. 1 were observed by Atkinson and Bleakly near Mexia, Texas. The Fourth Annual Department of Energy Symposium on Enhanced Oil and Gas Recovery and Improved Drilling Methods was held on August 29-31, 1978 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The USGS continued geological and geophysical studies in the four primary study areas. Low-level oblique photography of Tertiary and Cretaceous rocks exposed in the Rock Springs Uplift area was completed, and core from the J.C. Paine well in Montana was sampled for petrograhic analysis. Bartlesville Energy Technology Center continued work on the improved pressure coring system and anticipates completion of the project by September 30, 1978. Preliminary work began on the Parametric Analysis of MHF Test Data, an Engineering Study of Western Gas Sands, by Intercomp. The National Laboratories, funded by DOE are continuing their work in the area of research and development. The emphasis is on instrumentation systems, rock mechanics, mathematical modeling, and data analysis. The Mitchell Energy well, Muse Duke No. 1, has reached total depth and was logged on August 31, 1978. The DOE well test facility was moved from the RB-MHF 3 well in Colorado to Vernal, Utah for trailer modifications and checkout.

  18. Western Gas Sands Project status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, C.H.

    1978-11-30

    Progress of government-sponsored projects directed toward increasing gas production from the low-permeability gas sands of the western United States is summarized. A Technology Implementation Plan (TIP) meeting was held at the CER office in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 16--19 to initiate the implementation phase of the Enhanced Gas Recovery (EGR) working group activities. A WGSP Logging Program meeting was conducted on October 24, 1978, at CER offices to define the problems associated with logs in tight gas sands. CER personnel and the project manager attended a two-day course on the fundamentals of core and reservoir analysis in Denver, Colorado, and met with USGS personnel to discuss USGS work on the WGSP. A meeting was held to discuss a contract for coring a Twin Arrow well on the Douglas Creek Arch, Colorado. CER Corporation personnel attended the Geological Society of America Annual Meeting held in Toronto, Canada, October 23--27 and a Gas Stimulation Workshop at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, October 11 and 12 to discuss recent mineback experiments conducted at the Nevada Test Site. Fiscal year 1979 projects initiated by USGS and the Energy Technology Centers and National Laboratories are progressing as scheduled. Mobil Research and Development Corporation fractured zone 8 of the F-31-13G well in Rio Blanco County, Colorado. Colorado Interstate Gas Company poured the concrete pad for the compresser expected to be delivered in December and were laying pipeline between the wells at month end. The Mitchell Energy well, Muse Duke No. 1 was flowing on test at a rate of 2,100 Mcfd and preparations proceeded to fracture the well on November 15 with approximately 1,000,000 gal of fluid and 3,000,000 lb of sand. Terra Tek completed laboratory analyses of cores taken from the Mitchell Energy well.

  19. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal

    KAUST Repository

    Moed, David H.

    2012-06-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L -1phosphate, 0.2 mmol L -1 silicate, and 1 mmol L -1 nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L -1 calcium and 0.06 mmol L -1 manganese. © IWA Publishing 2012.

  20. TECHNIQUES ABOUT DIRECT OPTIMIZING CONTROL OF GREEN SAND QUALITY*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Green sand casting is still a main method in the world at present and it is very significant to develop the technology of controlling green sand quality. A new concept, from contents test to contents control, is advanced. In order to realize the new idea, a new method to on-line test active clay and moisture of green sand - double powers energizing alternately (DPEA) method is put forwards. The principle of the new method is to energize standard sand sample with AC and DC powers and to test the electric parameters, and then, to calculate active clay and moisture of green sand by using artificial neural network (ANN). Based on this new method, a direct optimizing system for controlling green sand quality is developed. Techniques about testing and controlling methods, hardware and software are discussed.