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Sample records for sampling expedition northwest

  1. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: northwest Atlantic through eastern tropical Pacific.

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    Douglas B Rusch

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The world's oceans contain a complex mixture of micro-organisms that are for the most part, uncharacterized both genetically and biochemically. We report here a metagenomic study of the marine planktonic microbiota in which surface (mostly marine water samples were analyzed as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition. These samples, collected across a several-thousand km transect from the North Atlantic through the Panama Canal and ending in the South Pacific yielded an extensive dataset consisting of 7.7 million sequencing reads (6.3 billion bp. Though a few major microbial clades dominate the planktonic marine niche, the dataset contains great diversity with 85% of the assembled sequence and 57% of the unassembled data being unique at a 98% sequence identity cutoff. Using the metadata associated with each sample and sequencing library, we developed new comparative genomic and assembly methods. One comparative genomic method, termed "fragment recruitment," addressed questions of genome structure, evolution, and taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity, as well as the biochemical diversity of genes and gene families. A second method, termed "extreme assembly," made possible the assembly and reconstruction of large segments of abundant but clearly nonclonal organisms. Within all abundant populations analyzed, we found extensive intra-ribotype diversity in several forms: (1 extensive sequence variation within orthologous regions throughout a given genome; despite coverage of individual ribotypes approaching 500-fold, most individual sequencing reads are unique; (2 numerous changes in gene content some with direct adaptive implications; and (3 hypervariable genomic islands that are too variable to assemble. The intra-ribotype diversity is organized into genetically isolated populations that have overlapping but independent distributions, implying distinct environmental preference. We present novel methods for measuring the genomic

  2. Rhizon Sampling of Pore Waters on Scientific Drilling Expeditions: An Example from the IODP Expedition 302, Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX

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    Luzie Schnieders

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available For more than 35 years, interstitial water (IW samples have been collected from sediment recovered during marine scientific coring expeditions. Pioneering work of DSDP and ODP quickly demonstrated that pore water chemistry differed from that of overlying seawater and from one location to another for myriad reasons (Sayles and Manheim, 1975. Extraction and analysis of IW samples has now becomeroutine on deep-sea drilling cruises; the ensuing pore water profiles are being used to understand a range of processes, such as subsurface fluid flow (e.g., Brown et al., 2001; Saffer and Screaton, 2003, mineral diagenesis (e.g., Rudnicki et al., 2001; Malone et al., 2002, microbial reactions (e.g., Böttcher and Khim, 2004; D’Hondt et al., 2004, gas hydrate dissociation (e.g., Egeberg and Dickens, 1999; Tréhu et al., 2004, and glacial to interglacial changes in the composition of bottom water (e.g., Paul et al., 2001; Adkins and McIntyre, 2002.

  3. Sampling and Chemical Analysis of Potable Water for ISS Expeditions 12 and 13

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    Straub, John E. II; Plumlee, Deborah K.; Schultz, John R.

    2007-01-01

    The crews of Expeditions 12 and 13 aboard the International Space Station (ISS) continued to rely on potable water from two different sources, regenerated humidity condensate and Russian ground-supplied water. The Space Shuttle launched twice during the 12- months spanning both expeditions and docked with the ISS for delivery of hardware and supplies. However, no Shuttle potable water was transferred to the station during either of these missions. The chemical quality of the ISS onboard potable water supplies was verified by performing ground analyses of archival water samples at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Water and Food Analytical Laboratory (WAFAL). Since no Shuttle flights launched during Expedition 12 and there was restricted return volume on the Russian Soyuz vehicle, only one chemical archive potable water sample was collected with U.S. hardware and returned during Expedition 12. This sample was collected in March 2006 and returned on Soyuz 11. The number and sensitivity of the chemical analyses performed on this sample were limited due to low sample volume. Shuttle flights STS-121 (ULF1.1) and STS-115 (12A) docked with the ISS in July and September of 2006, respectively. These flights returned to Earth with eight chemical archive potable water samples that were collected with U.S. hardware during Expedition 13. The average collected volume increased for these samples, allowing full chemical characterization to be performed. This paper presents a discussion of the results from chemical analyses performed on Expeditions 12 and 13 archive potable water samples. In addition to the results from the U.S. samples analyzed, results from pre-flight samples of Russian potable water delivered to the ISS on Progress vehicles and in-flight samples collected with Russian hardware during Expeditions 12 and 13 and analyzed at JSC are also discussed.

  4. Mineralogical influences on porosity-depth trends of shelf deposits (Miocene-Pleistocene) along the northwest shelf of Australia (IODP Expedition 356)

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    Knierzinger, Wolfgang; Lee, Eun Young; Wagreich, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Porosity in sediments is influenced by various factors such as mineralogical composition, burial depth, connate fluids, and stratigraphic layering. This work focuses on processes underlying porosity anomalies in carbonate shelf deposits along the northwest shelf of Australia by using different techniques (polarization microscopy, electron microscopy, XRD, XRF). IODP expedition 356 recovered cored seven sites (U1458-U1464), covering a latitudinal range of 29°S-18°S on the northwest shelf. Strong negative deviations from general porosity-depth trends for these carbonate rich sediments are clear for samples with higher contents of dolomite, calcium sulfates, and non-skeletal calcite. No significant influence of aragonite on porosity values has yet been detected. However, it is likely that the occurrence of high amounts of aragonite is a crucial element with regard to porosity values in these carbonate rich deposits, since elongated aragonite needles commonly enhance interparticle porosity. Further insight might be gained through the application of electron microscopy. In general, sediments in the northern part of the study area (Sites U1462, U1463, U1464) tend to show slightly higher porosity values compared to sediments form the south (Sites U1459, U1460). This may reflect the influence of calcium sulfate, because mineralogical analyses show, calcium sulfate is relatively rare at the southern sites, whereas higher amounts of calcium sulfates occur in the north. The lack of detrital particles in calcium sulfate components indicates an evaporitic origin. Deposits at Site U 1461 differ from other analyzed sediments insofar as higher amounts of feldspars and micas are apparent. *This research is conducted within the frame of the 'International Ocean Discovery Program', funded by the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, Korea.

  5. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: metagenomic characterization of viruses within aquatic microbial samples.

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    Shannon J Williamson

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on our planet. Interactions between viruses and their hosts impact several important biological processes in the world's oceans such as horizontal gene transfer, microbial diversity and biogeochemical cycling. Interrogation of microbial metagenomic sequence data collected as part of the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Expedition (GOS revealed a high abundance of viral sequences, representing approximately 3% of the total predicted proteins. Cluster analyses of the viral sequences revealed hundreds to thousands of viral genes encoding various metabolic and cellular functions. Quantitative analyses of viral genes of host origin performed on the viral fraction of aquatic samples confirmed the viral nature of these sequences and suggested that significant portions of aquatic viral communities behave as reservoirs of such genetic material. Distributional and phylogenetic analyses of these host-derived viral sequences also suggested that viral acquisition of environmentally relevant genes of host origin is a more abundant and widespread phenomenon than previously appreciated. The predominant viral sequences identified within microbial fractions originated from tailed bacteriophages and exhibited varying global distributions according to viral family. Recruitment of GOS viral sequence fragments against 27 complete aquatic viral genomes revealed that only one reference bacteriophage genome was highly abundant and was closely related, but not identical, to the cyanomyovirus P-SSM4. The co-distribution across all sampling sites of P-SSM4-like sequences with the dominant ecotype of its host, Prochlorococcus supports the classification of the viral sequences as P-SSM4-like and suggests that this virus may influence the abundance, distribution and diversity of one of the most dominant components of picophytoplankton in oligotrophic oceans. In summary, the abundance and broad geographical distribution of viral

  6. Scleractinia (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) from ECOMARG 2003, 2008 and 2009 expeditions to bathyal waters off north and northwest Spain (northeast Atlantic).

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    Altuna, Álvaro

    2013-01-01

    Nineteen species of deep-water scleractinian corals were collected at depths between 488-1222 m during ECOMARG 2003, 2008 and 2009 expeditions to the Avilds Canyon system, Le Danois Bank ('el Cachucho'), and Galicia Bank (northeast Atlantic). Eighteen of them were identified to species. All are previously known from the northeast Atlantic, although several are seldom reported (e.g., Aulocyathus atlanticus, Balanophyllia thalassae, Dendrophyllia alternata, Stephanocyathus crassus). Records of Deltocyathus eccentricus and Flabellum chunii constitute northern range extensions. Six species (Caryophyllia sarsiae, Stephanocyathus crassus, Flabelluin chunii, Flabellun macandrewi, Dendrophyllia alternata, Balanophyllia cellulosa) were recorded outside their previously known bathymetric ranges in the Bay of Biscay and nearby areas. Dendrophyllia alternata, Deltocyathus eccentricus and Stephanocyathus crassus are new to the "West coast of Spain and Portugal" region, here considered of high biodiversity. The bank-building species Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata were abundant on Galicia Bank, and the latter was as well in the Avilés Canyon system. Both were exceedingly rare on Le Danois Bank. Among all species identified, Madrepora oculata was the most common (11 stations). The number of species collected was higher on Le Danois Bank (13 species) than on Galicia Bank (12 species) and in the Avilés Canyon system (3 species), although results may be related to sampling effort. From a literature review and new records presented herein, numbers of species known from each of the three areas total 23, 12, and 18 respectively.

  7. Utilizing the International GeoSample Number Concept during ICDP Expedition COSC

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    Conze, Ronald; Lorenz, Henning; Ulbricht, Damian; Gorgas, Thomas; Elger, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The concept of the International GeoSample Number (IGSN) was introduced to uniquely identify and register geo-related sample material, and make it retrievable via electronic media (e.g., SESAR - http://www.geosamples.org/igsnabout). The general aim of the IGSN concept is to improve accessing stored sample material worldwide, enable the exact identification, its origin and provenance, and also the exact and complete citation of acquired samples throughout the literature. The ICDP expedition COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides, http://cosc.icdp-online.org) prompted for the first time in ICDP's history to assign and register IGSNs during an ongoing drilling campaign. ICDP drilling expeditions are using commonly the Drilling Information System DIS (http://doi.org/10.2204/iodp.sd.4.07.2007) for the inventory of recovered sample material. During COSC IGSNs were assigned to every drill hole, core run, core section, and sample taken from core material. The original IGSN specification has been extended to achieve the required uniqueness of IGSNs with our offline-procedure. The ICDP name space indicator and the Expedition ID (5054) are forming an extended prefix (ICDP5054). For every type of sample material, an encoded sequence of characters follows. This sequence is derived from the DIS naming convention which is unique from the beginning. Thereby every ICDP expedition has an unlimited name space for IGSN assignments. This direct derivation of IGSNs from the DIS database context ensures the distinct parent-child hierarchy of the IGSNs among each other. In the case of COSC this method of inventory-keeping of all drill cores was done routinely using the ExpeditionDIS during field work and subsequent sampling party. After completing the field campaign, all sample material was transferred to the "Nationales Bohrkernlager" in Berlin-Spandau, Germany. Corresponding data was subsequently imported into the CurationDIS used at the aforementioned core storage

  8. Palaeobathymetric Interpretations using Foraminiferal Data from the North-west Continental Shelf off Western Australia, IODP Expedition 356

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    Mamo, B. L.; Renema, W.; Auer, G.; Groeneveld, J.; Gallagher, S. J.; Fulthorpe, C.; Bogus, K.; Expedition 356 Scientists, I.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, Integrated Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 356 drilled along the passive margin off the West Australian coast to investigate the history of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) and its integral role in the development of global thermohaline circulation and climate. Throughout the expedition, a suite of foraminiferal analyses were employed to assess stratigraphy and benthic environments. Planktic foraminifera were primarily used for biostratigraphy and an incredibly diverse benthic fauna ( 260 species) yielded information regarding palaeobathymetric settings and variable conditions at the sediment-water interface. Benthic foraminiferal biofacies are particularly sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and have rapid turnover making them ideal proxies for monitoring physical and chemical changes in marine environments. When these data are combined with a multi-proxy approach incorporating lithostratigraphic and other microfossil data, a robust understanding of past environments can be realised. Stretching from the Northern Carnarvon Basin north to the Roebuck Basin, several distinct biofacies were isolated at sites U1461-U1464 that reveal an array of marine settings and events that span from the Miocene through to the Pleistocene. These features include water depths ranging from Miocene shallows (including larger benthic foraminifera) to Pliocene bathyal depths ( 1000 m), the occurrence of key indicator species for both the Leeuwin Current and the West Pacific Warm Pool (Asterorotalia and Pseudorotalia), and episodes of downslope sediment transport. Here we present the main isolated biofacies, their associated lithofacies and their implications for reconstructing fluctuating sea-level, thermohaline circulation and sediment transport in a changing marine landscape.

  9. Persistent organic pollutants in biota samples collected during the Ymer-80 expedition to the Arctic

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    Henrik Kylin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During the 1980 expedition to the Arctic with the icebreaker Ymer, a number of vertebrate species were sampled for determination of persistent organic pollutants. Samples of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus, n=34, glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus, n=8, common eider (Somateria mollissima, n=10, Brünnich's guillemot (Uria lomvia, n=9, ringed seal (Pusa hispida, n=2 and polar bear (Ursus maritimus, n=2 were collected. With the exception of Brünnich's guillemot, there was a marked contamination difference of birds from western as compared to eastern/northern Svalbard. Samples in the west contained a larger number of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB congeners and also polychlorinated terphenyls, indicating local sources. Brünnich's guillemots had similar pollutant concentrations in the west and east/north; possibly younger birds were sampled in the west. In Arctic char, pollutant profiles from lake Linnévatn (n=5, the lake closest to the main economic activities in Svalbard, were similar to profiles in Arctic char from the Shetland Islands (n=5, but differed from lakes to the north and east in Svalbard (n=30. Arctic char samples had higher concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs than the marine species of birds and mammals, possibly due to accumulation via snowmelt. Compared to the Baltic Sea, comparable species collected in Svalbard had lower concentrations of PCB and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT, but similar concentrations indicating long-range transport of hexachlorobenzene, HCHs and cyclodiene pesticides. In samples collected in Svalbard in 1971, the concentrations of PCB and DDT in Brünnich's guillemot (n=7, glaucous gull (n=2 and polar bear (n=2 were similar to the concentrations found in 1980.

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emissions Units and Sampling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Brown, Jason H.; Walker, Brian A.

    2012-04-01

    Battelle–Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development (R&D) laboratories in Richland, WA, including those associated with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Hanford Site and PNNL Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all emission units that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually by PNNL staff members. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission unit system performance, operation, and design information. For sampled systems, a description of the buildings, exhaust units, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered emission unit. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided. Deregistered emission unit details are provided as necessary for up to 5 years post closure.

  11. A short note on the cephalopods sampled in the Angola Basin during the DIVA I-expedition

    OpenAIRE

    Piatkowski, Uwe; Diekmann, Rabea

    2005-01-01

    Five cephalopods, all belonging to different species, were identified from deep-sea trawl samples conducted during the DIVA 1-expedition of RV “Meteor” in the Angola Basin in July 2000. These were the teuthoid squids Bathyteuthis abyssicola, Brachioteuthis riisei, Mastigoteuthis atlantica, Galiteuthis armata, and the finned deep-sea octopus Grimpoteuthis wuelkeri. The present study contributes information on size, morphometry, biology and distribution of the species form this unique cephalopo...

  12. STP K Basin Sludge Sample Archive at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FY2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Smoot, Margaret R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) currently houses 88 samples (~10.5 kg) of K Basin sludge (81 wet and seven dry samples) on behalf of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), which is managed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). Selected samples are intended to serve, in part, as sentinels to enhance understanding of sludge properties after long-term storage, and thus enhance understanding of sludge behavior following transfer to sludge transfer and storage containers (STSCs) and storage at the Hanford 200 Area central plateau. In addition, remaining samples serve in contingency for future testing requirements. At PNNL, the samples are tracked and maintained under a prescriptive and disciplined monthly sample-monitoring program implemented by PNNL staff. This report updates the status of the K Basin archive sludge sample inventory to April 2014. The previous inventory status report, PNNL 22245 (Fiskum et al. 2013, limited distribution report), was issued in February of 2013. This update incorporates changes in the inventory related to repackaging of 17 samples under test instructions 52578 TI052, K Basin Sludge Sample Repackaging for Continued Long Term Storage, and 52578 TI053, K Basin Sludge Sample Repackaging Post-2014 Shear Strength Measurements. Note that shear strength measurement results acquired in 2014 are provided separately. Specifically, this report provides the following: • a description of the K Basin sludge sample archive program and the sample inventory • a summary and images of the samples that were repackaged in April 2014 • up-to-date images and plots of the settled density and water loss from all applicable samples in the inventory • updated sample pedigree charts, which provide a roadmap of the genesis and processing history of each sample in the inventory • occurrence and deficiency reports associated with sample storage and repackaging

  13. The Northwest Africa 8159 martian meteorite: Expanding the martian sample suite to the early Amazonian

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    Herd, Christopher D. K.; Walton, Erin L.; Agee, Carl B.; Muttik, Nele; Ziegler, Karen; Shearer, Charles K.; Bell, Aaron S.; Santos, Alison R.; Burger, Paul V.; Simon, Justin I.; Tappa, Michael J.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Lagroix, France; Sanborn, Matthew E.; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Cassata, William S.; Borg, Lars E.; Lindvall, Rachel E.; Kruijer, Thomas S.; Brennecka, Gregory A.; Kleine, Thorsten; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko; Caffee, Marc W.

    2017-12-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 8159 is an augite-rich shergottite, with a mineralogy dominated by Ca-, Fe-rich pyroxene, plagioclase, olivine, and magnetite. NWA 8159 crystallized from an evolved melt of basaltic composition under relatively rapid conditions of cooling, likely in a surface lava flow or shallow sill. Redox conditions experienced by the melt shifted from relatively oxidizing (with respect to known Martian lithologies, ∼QFM) on the liquidus to higher oxygen fugacity (∼QFM + 2) during crystallization of the groundmass, and under subsolidus conditions. This shift resulted in the production of orthopyroxene and magnetite replacing olivine phenocryst rims. NWA 8159 contains both crystalline and shock-amorphized plagioclase (An50-62), often observed within a single grain; based on known calibrations we bracket the peak shock pressure experienced by NWA 8159 to between 15 and 23 GPa. The bulk composition of NWA 8159 is depleted in LREE, as observed for Tissint and other depleted shergottites; however, NWA 8159 is distinct from all other martian lithologies in its bulk composition and oxygen fugacity. We obtain a Sm-Nd formation age of 2.37 ± 0.25 Ga for NWA 8159, which represents an interval in Mars geologic time which, until recently, was not represented in the other martian meteorite types. The bulk rock 147Sm/144Nd value of 0.37 ± 0.02 is consistent with it being derived directly from its source and the high initial ε143Nd value indicates this source was geochemically highly depleted. Cr, Nd, and W isotopic compositions further support a unique mantle source. While the rock shares similarities with the 2.4-Ga NWA 7635 meteorite, there are notable distinctions between the two meteorites that suggest differences in mantle source compositions and conditions of crystallization. Nevertheless, the two samples may be launch-paired. NWA 8159 expands the known basalt types, ages and mantle sources within the Mars sample suite to include a second igneous unit from

  14. Coralliidae (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) from the INDEMARES 2010 expedition to north and northwest Spain (northeast Atlantic), with delimitation of a new species using both morphological and molecular approaches.

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    Tu, Tzu-Hsuan; Altuna, Álvaro; Jeng, Ming-Shiou

    2015-03-06

    Three species of deep-water bathyal Coralliidae were collected during the INDEMARES 2010 expedition of the Spanish Institute of Oceanography to the Avilés Canyon System and the Galicia Bank (Spain, northeast Atlantic): Corallium occultum n. sp., Corallium cf. bayeri Simpson & Watling, 2011, and Corallium niobe Bayer, 1964. The new species is supported by both morphological and molecular evidence, and its phylogenetic relationship within the Coralliidae is inferred. Corallium cf. bayeri is first recorded from European waters. Corallium johnsoni Gray, 1860 from off Portugal and Madeira, and Corallium tricolor (Johnson, 1898) from Madeira are redescribed from museum material, and their sclerites first depicted by scanning electron microscopy. The sclerome of C. johnsoni is more complex than previously thought, with occurrence of double clubs, and 6-, 7- and 8-radiates. A key is proposed for the identification of all the Atlantic species of the genus Corallium.

  15. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

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    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  16. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibu Yooseph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  17. [Expedition medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  18. Expedition sol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    2006-01-01

    Tag på expedition sol rundt i museet. Er der nogen, der har taget en bid af solen? Hvorfor bliver der solformørkelse? Kan vi undvære Solen?......Tag på expedition sol rundt i museet. Er der nogen, der har taget en bid af solen? Hvorfor bliver der solformørkelse? Kan vi undvære Solen?...

  19. Analysis of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances in air samples from Northwest Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Jonathan L; Berger, Urs; Chaemfa, Chakra; Huber, Sandra; Jahnke, Annika; Temme, Christian; Jones, Kevin C

    2007-06-01

    Air samples were collected from 4 field sites in Europe: 2 sites from the UK, Hazelrigg (semi-rural) and Manchester (urban); 1 site from Ireland: Mace Head (rural); and 1 site from Norway: Kjeller (rural). Additionally, air samples were taken from indoor locations in Tromsø, Norway. Air samples were collected using high-volume air samplers employing sampling modules containing glass-fibre filters (GFFs, particle phase), and glass columns with a polyurethane foam (PUF)-XAD-2-PUF sandwich (gaseous phase). Typical outdoor air volumes required for the determination of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) ranged from 500-1800 m3. GFFs and PUF-XAD columns were analysed separately to obtain information on phase partitioning. All air samples were analysed for volatile, neutral PFAS, with selected GFF samples halved for analysis of both neutral and airborne particle-bound ionic PFAS. Volatile PFAS were extracted from air samples by cold-column immersion with ethyl acetate, and were analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the positive chemical ionisation mode (GC-PCI-MS). Ionic PFAS were extracted from GFFs by sonication in methanol, and were analysed by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) using electrospray ionisation in the negative ion mode (ESI-). Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) was often the predominant analyte found in the particulate phase at concentrations ranging from 1-818 pg m(-3), and 8:2 fluorotelomer alcohol (FTOH) and 6:2 FTOH were the prevailing analytes found in the gas phase, at 5-243 pg m(-3) and 5-189 pg m(-3), respectively. These three PFAS were ubiquitous in air samples. Many other PFAS, both neutral and ionic, were also present, and levels of individual analytes were in the 1-125 pg m(-3) range. Levels of some PFAS exceeded those of traditional persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In this study, the presence of 12:2 FTOH and fluorotelomer olefins (FTolefins), and ionic PFAS other than perfluorooctane

  20. Underway Sampling of Marine Inherent Optical Properties on the Tara Oceans Expedition as a Novel Resource for Ocean Color Satellite Data Product Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Proctor, Christopher W.; Boss, Emmanuel; Leeuw, Thomas; Ouhssain, Mustapha

    2013-01-01

    Developing and validating data records from operational ocean color satellite instruments requires substantial volumes of high quality in situ data. In the absence of broad, institutionally supported field programs, organizations such as the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group seek opportunistic datasets for use in their operational satellite calibration and validation activities. The publicly available, global biogeochemical dataset collected as part of the two and a half year Tara Oceans expedition provides one such opportunity. We showed how the inline measurements of hyperspectral absorption and attenuation coefficients collected onboard the R/V Tara can be used to evaluate near-surface estimates of chlorophyll-a, spectral particulate backscattering coefficients, particulate organic carbon, and particle size classes derived from the NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer onboard Aqua (MODISA). The predominant strength of such flow-through measurements is their sampling rate-the 375 days of measurements resulted in 165 viable MODISA-to-in situ match-ups, compared to 13 from discrete water sampling. While the need to apply bio-optical models to estimate biogeochemical quantities of interest from spectroscopy remains a weakness, we demonstrated how discrete samples can be used in combination with flow-through measurements to create data records of sufficient quality to conduct first order evaluations of satellite-derived data products. Given an emerging agency desire to rapidly evaluate new satellite missions, our results have significant implications on how calibration and validation teams for these missions will be constructed.

  1. Preliminary results of three-dimensional stress orientation determined by anelastic strain recovery (ASR) measurements of core samples retrieved from IODP Expedition 343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W.; Yamamoto, Y.; Tanikawa, W.

    2013-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST) penetrated to ~850 meter below seafloor (mbsf) in a water depth of 6890 m and passed through the plate boundary fault of the overriding North American Plate and the subducting Pacific plate witch. The fault locates at ~820 mbsf and is preliminarily considered to be the source fault of the 2011 Tohoku-oki Mw 9.0 earthquake. Area of JFAST drilling site (C0019) was in the largest coseismic slip zone where the fault slipped more than 50 m during the earthquake. Hole C0019E dedicated to coring retrieved a total of 21 cores having a total of 51 m long cores from both the hanging wall and the footwall of the plate boundary fault. To determine three-dimensional stress state after the huge earthquake, we collected four whole round core samples and measured anelastic strain recovery (ASR) also called 'relaxation' of the core samples onboard D/V Chikyu. The principle idea behind the ASR method is that stress-induced elastic strain is released first instantaneously (i.e., as time-independent elastic strain), followed by a more gradual or time-dependent recovery of anelastic strain. The ASR method takes advantage of the time-dependent strain and has been successfully applied in IODP expeditions (e.g. Byrne et al., 2009; Yamamoto et al., 2013). The four core samples used for ASR measurements were taken from C0019E-1R1 (~177 mbsf), C0019E-5R1 (~697 mbsf)), C0019E-13R1 (~802 mbsf) and C0019E-19R2 (~828 mbsf). The three core samples at shallower depths were in the hanging wall of the fault; and the deepest one was in the footwall. We started ASR measurements approximate three hours after the core was 'on deck', that is approximate six hours from the in situ stress was released, and keep the measurements for about two weeks. The anelastic strains measured in nine directions including six independent directions were extensional; all of the curves varied smoothly and similarly with

  2. West Indian amphipod families and genera of the Wagenaar Hummelinck expeditions (Amphipoda, Crustacea) List of sampling stations 1930-1973

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Könemann, Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The conservation and scientific evaluation of major zoological collections is a relatively timeconsuming task that crucially depends on regular financial support. In times of low funding and limited grants these activities are often cut back to a minimum. Samples and specimens are stored in

  3. Multi-proxy geochemical analyses of Indus Submarine Fan sediments sampled by IODP Expedition 355: implications for sediment provenance and palaeoclimate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratenkov, Sophia; George, Simon C.; Bendle, James; Liddy, Hannah; Clift, Peter D.; Pandey, Dhananjai K.; Kulhanek, Denise K.; Andò, Sergio; Tiwari, Manish; Khim, Boo-Keun; Griffith, Elizabeth; Steinke, Stephan; Suzuki, Kenta; Lee, Jongmin; Newton, Kate; Tripathi, Shubham; Expedition 355 Scientific Party

    2016-04-01

    The interplay between the development of the Asian summer monsoon and the growth of mountains in South and Central Asia is perhaps the most compelling example of the relationship between climate and the solid Earth. Understanding this relationship is crucial in the context of understanding past changes and for predicting future impacts in the Monsoon region. Both rapid and gradual mountain uplift influence the surrounding environments and regional climate. The sedimentary record of the Indus Fan offers a unique opportunity to study the climatic changes that occurred in South Asia and their link to the intensity of the erosion during the late Cenozoic. Although some paleoclimate reconstructions in the region can be partly addressed by studies onshore, the dominance of erosional processes in such a mountainous region ensures such records are fragmentary and limited in coverage. Thus ocean drilling is the best way to recover long sequences and to test the possible relations among mountain uplift, erosion, sediment deposition and climate (including carbon burial, chemical weathering and CO2 drawdown). The sediments and sedimentary rocks from the Indian continental margin, adjoining the Arabian Sea, were drilled during the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 355. Drilling operations at Site U1456 penetrated through 1109.4 m of sediment and sedimentary rocks. The oldest sediment recovered at this site is dated to 13.5-17.7 Ma, with about 390 m of mass transport deposit. This study provides a multiproxy approach for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions in the Arabian Sea area. We use a wide variety of organic geochemical data coupled with inorganic chemistry, mineralogy, and isotopic analyses. For direct comparison among various data sets, we divided whole round residue from the interstitial water samples among different laboratories, with each receiving 50-300 g (dry mass). The preliminary results include initial sediment provenance data based on bulk

  4. The detection and antimicrobial susceptibility profile of Shigella isolates from meat and swab samples at butchers' shops in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garedew, Legesse; Hagos, Zenabu; Zegeye, Bidir; Addis, Zelalem

    2016-01-01

    Food borne pathogens are major causes of deaths, illnesses and billions of dollars of expenses. The burden of food borne illness is worsened by the ever increasing rate of antimicrobial resistance microbes. Shigella, a bacterial pathogen associated with food, is reported to account for higher prevalence rates of food borne illness in different settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February 10 to June 30, 2013, at the butcher houses of Gondar town in the Northwest of Ethiopia to assess the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Shigella. Cattle raw meat and swab samples from selected critical control points, including knives, chopping boards, and the hands and noses of butchers, were collected and analyzed. The identification of Shigella was carried out using colony characteristics, the Gram reaction, and biochemical tests. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. The overall hygienic status of the butcher shops was also assessed using a checklist. An observational analysis revealed that the sanitary condition of the butcher shops and their premises was poor. Of 306 samples screened, 10.5% were positive for Shigella. Approximately 7.4% of meat samples and 10.2% of swab samples were contaminated with Shigella. Out of the total Shigella isolates, 90.6%, 46.9%, 18.8% and 9.4% were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, ceftriaxone and tetracycline, respectively. A multidrug resistance pattern was recorded in 27.8% of the isolates. In conclusion, the safety of meat sold at Gondar butchers houses was poor. The identified Shigella isolates showed high levels of drug resistance and multidrug resistance patterns for commonly used antimicrobials in veterinary and human medicine. Practicing wise use of antimicrobials and strict sanitary interventions at different critical control points is strongly recommended, in addition to further in-depth studies to prevent unprecedented consequences from

  5. Cellulose degrading bacteria isolated from industrial samples and the gut of native insects from Northwest of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Adriana P; Perotti, Nora I; Martínez, María A

    2015-12-01

    The raw materials used to produce bioethanol mostly are food crops, which has led to conflicts on food security. It is, therefore, recommended the gradual replacement for second generation substrates such as lignocellulosic materials. Herein, cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from the gut content of native larvae from Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and adults of Isoptera. Few environmental samples from the pulp and paper feedstock were also assessed. A total of 233 isolates were obtained using enrichment cultures and classic criteria. Interestingly, several halo-forming colonies were found to be bacterial consortia that presented difficulties to take apart the microbial members. Those pure isolates which hydrolyzed cellulose in larger extend (45 strains) were selected and identified by means of 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Firmicutes was the prevalent phylum (62.2%) being Bacillus spp. the most frequent genus, while Paenibacillus, Brevibacillus, Cohnella, and Staphylococcus species were less frequent. The phylum Actinobacteria (6.7%) was represented by isolates related to Agromyces spp. and Microbacterium spp. Regarding Gram-negative bacteria (31.1%), the more depicted genus was Pseudomonas spp., and members of Achromobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., and Bacteroidetes phylum were also selected. These native bacterial strains are expected to enlarge the cellulolytic toolbox for efficient biomass deconstruction. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Spatial and seasonal variations of pesticide contamination in agricultural soils and crops sample from an intensive horticulture area of Hohhot, North-West China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fujin; He, Jiang; Yao, Yiping; Hou, Dekun; Jiang, Cai; Zhang, Xinxin; Di, Caixia; Otgonbayar, Khureldavaa

    2013-08-01

    The spatial variability and temporal trend in concentrations of the organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), in soils and agricultural corps were investigated on an intensive horticulture area in Hohhot, North-West China, from 2008 to 2011. The most frequently found and abundant pesticides were the metabolites of DDT (p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDD). Total DDT concentrations ranged from ND (not detectable) to 507.41 ng/g and were higher than the concentration of total HCHs measured for the range of 4.84-281.44 ng/g. There were significantly positive correlations between the ∑DDT and ∑HCH concentrations (r (2)>0.74) in soils, but no significant correlation was found between the concentrations of OCPs in soils and clay content while a relatively strong correlation was found between total OCP concentrations and total organic carbon (TOC). β-HCH was the main isomer of HCHs, and was detected in all samples; the maximum proportion of β-HCH compared to ∑HCHs (mean value 54%) was found, suggesting its persistence. The α/γ-HCH ratio was between 0.89 and 5.39, which signified the combined influence of technical HCHs and lindane. Low p,p'-DDE/p,p'-DDT in N1, N3 and N9 were found, reflecting the fresh input of DDTs, while the relatively high o,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDT ratios indicated the agricultural application of dicofol. Ratios of DDT/(DDE+DDD) in soils do not indicate recent inputs of DDT into Hohhot farmland soil environment. Seasonal variations of OCPs featured higher concentrations in autumn and lower concentrations in spring. This was likely associated with their temperature-driven re-volatilization and application of dicofol in late spring.

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT in the Beaufort Sea and Northwest Passage from 1997-08-31 to 1997-09-16 (NODC Accession 0116061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116061 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from LOUIS S. ST. LAURENT in the Beaufort Sea and Northwest Passage...

  8. Expeditions and other exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1964-01-01

    Previous to the 4th UNESCO Expedition, Dr H. Sleumer of the Rijksherbarium made three trips together with Mr Tem Smitinand, first to Doi Chiengdao and Doi Suthep in the North (Aug. 15-21, 1963), then to the Khao Yai National Park in Central Siam (Aug. 28-29), then to Pha Nok Khao and Phu Krading

  9. Temperature and chlorophyll a profile data from bottle samples in the Southern Ocean from the R/V Fuji for the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition, 1968-1969 (NCEI Accession 0001663)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were key entered from analog manuscript "JARE data Reports. Oceanografic Data of the 10th Japanise Antarctic Research Expedition 1968-1969. Kobe...

  10. An Exploration of Canadian Identity in Recent Literary Narratives of the Franklin Expeditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kennedy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Sir John Franklin’s three expeditions to the high Arctic in 1819, 1825, and 1845 have become the stuff of Canadian legend, enshrined in history books, songs, short stories, novels, and web sites. Franklin set out in 1845 to discover the Northwest Passage with the most advanced technology the British Empire could muster, and disappeared forever. Many rescue explorations found only scant evidence of the Expedition, and the mystery was finally solved only recently. This paper will explore four recent fictional works on Franklin’s expeditions, Stan Rogers’ song “Northwest Passage”, Margaret Atwood’s short story “The Age of Lead”, Rudy Wiebe’s A Discovery of Strangers, and John Wilson’s North with Franklin: the Lost Journals of James Fitzjames, to see how Franklin’s ghost has haunted the hopes and values of nineteenth-century, as well as modern, Canada.

  11. A lunar polar expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Thomas

    This paper reviews issues related to a five-person expedition to the lunar north pole which primarily addresses site selection and the requirements for transportation, power, and life support. A one-year stay on the lunar surface is proposed based on available technology, and proposals are detailed for incorporating flight-proven systems, abort or rescue options, and the use of the base as the nucleus for subsequent operations. Specific details are given regarding lunar orbital data, the characteristics of the proposed base, power and consumables requirements, and equipment such as two-person lunar roving vehicles and space suits. During the expedition: (1) water is recycled; (2) Autolanders are used to deliver equipment; (3) two rovers are included in the mass budget; (4) the lunar surface is studied in detail. A polar lunar-base site offers the advantages of unobstructed astronomy, enhanced heat rejection, and the potential for reuse.

  12. Biological results of the Snellius expedition. XXIV. Pelagic Tunicates of the Snellius expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tokioka, T.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven samples of pelagic tunicates were found in the material collected during the Snellius Expedition 1929-30. In these, seven species, viz., two pyrosomas and five salpas, are included. In addition, a few old specimens of another species of Pyrosoma were found in the collection of the Leiden

  13. PACIFIC NORTHWEST CYBER SUMMIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Matlock, Gordon W.; Becker-Dippmann, Angela S.; Smith, Karen S.

    2013-08-07

    On March 26, 2013, the Snohomish County Public Utility District (PUD) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) jointly hosted the Pacific Northwest Cyber Summit with the DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, the White House, Washington State congressional delegation, Washington State National Guard, and regional energy companies.

  14. Detection of human adenovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus in water samples collected on dairy farms from Tenente Portela, Northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rosado Spilki

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral gastroenteritis and other waterborne diseases are a major concern for health in Brazil. A number of studies were conducted about the presence of viruses on water samples from Brazilian areas. However, the knowledge about the occurrence of viral contamination of drinking water sources in rural settings of the country is insufficient. On the present work, 15 samples from 5 dairy farms located at the municipality of Tenente Portela were collected and analysed for the presence of human adenoviruses (HAdV, as well as human enteroviruses (EV and rotaviruses (RV. HAdV was present on 66.66% of the water samples, and have been found in all samples from artesian wells and springs, which are used as sources of drinking water for the individuals inhabiting those farms. EV and RV found only in one sample each. The detection rates of HAdV on the water from these dairy farms are alarming and point towards a situation of elevated environmental contamination by fecal microorganisms of human origin and poor basic sanitation conditions.

  15. Detection of human adenovirus, rotavirus and enterovirus in water samples collected on dairy farms from Tenente Portela, Northwest of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilki, Fernando Rosado; da Luz, Roger Bordin; Fabres, Rafael Bandeira; Soliman, Mayra Cristina; Kluge, Mariana; Fleck, Juliane Deise; Rodrigues, Manoela Tressoldi; Comerlato, Juliana; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Dasso, Maurício Gautério; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2013-01-01

    Viral gastroenteritis and other waterborne diseases are a major concern for health in Brazil. A number of studies were conducted about the presence of viruses on water samples from Brazilian areas. However, the knowledge about the occurrence of viral contamination of drinking water sources in rural settings of the country is insufficient. On the present work, 15 samples from 5 dairy farms located at the municipality of Tenente Portela were collected and analysed for the presence of human adenoviruses (HAdV), as well as human enteroviruses (EV) and rotaviruses (RV). HAdV was present on 66.66% of the water samples, and have been found in all samples from artesian wells and springs, which are used as sources of drinking water for the individuals inhabiting those farms. EV and RV found only in one sample each. The detection rates of HAdV on the water from these dairy farms are alarming and point towards a situation of elevated environmental contamination by fecal microorganisms of human origin and poor basic sanitation conditions.

  16. 45 CFR 303.101 - Expedited processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expedited processes. 303.101 Section 303.101... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.101 Expedited processes. (a) Definition. Expedited processes means... intrastate cases, expedited processes as specified under this section to establish paternity and to establish...

  17. 12 CFR 347.118 - Expedited processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expedited processing. 347.118 Section 347.118... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.118 Expedited processing. (a) Expedited processing of branch applications. An... foreign country, after complying with the expedited processing requirements contained in § 303.182(b) and...

  18. A lunar polar expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Richard; Staehle, Robert L.; Svitek, Tomas

    1992-01-01

    Advanced exploration and development in harsh environments require mastery of basic human survival skill. Expeditions into the lethal climates of Earth's polar regions offer useful lessons for tommorrow's lunar pioneers. In Arctic and Antarctic exploration, 'wintering over' was a crucial milestone. The ability to establish a supply base and survive months of polar cold and darkness made extensive travel and exploration possible. Because of the possibility of near-constant solar illumination, the lunar polar regions, unlike Earth's may offer the most hospitable site for habitation. The World Space Foundation is examining a scenario for establishing a five-person expeditionary team on the lunar north pole for one year. This paper is a status report on a point design addressing site selection, transportation, power, and life support requirements.

  19. Extensive sampling of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Northwest Passage (Canadian Arctic Archipelago) reveals population differentiation across multiple spatial and temporal scales

    OpenAIRE

    Campagna, Leonardo; Van Coeverden de Groot, Peter J.; Saunders, Brenda L; Atkinson, Stephen N; Weber, Diana S.; Dyck, Markus G; Boag, Peter T; Lougheed, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    As global warming accelerates the melting of Arctic sea ice, polar bears (Ursus maritimus) must adapt to a rapidly changing landscape. This process will necessarily alter the species distribution together with population dynamics and structure. Detailed knowledge of these changes is crucial to delineating conservation priorities. Here, we sampled 361 polar bears from across the center of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago spanning the Gulf of Boothia (GB) and M'Clintock Channel (MC). We use DNA ...

  20. ISS Expedition 33 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 33 from 07/2012-11/2012. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  1. ISS Expedition 37 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 37 from 05/2013-11/2013. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  2. ISS Expedition 01 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 01 from 10/2000-03/2001. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  3. ISS Expedition 23 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 23 from 12/2009-09/2010. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  4. ISS Expedition 24 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 24 from 04/2010-11/2010. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  5. ISS Expedition 09 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 09 from 04/2004-10/2004. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  6. ISS Expedition 11 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 11 from 04/2005-10/2005. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  7. ISS Expedition 06 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 06 from 11/2002-05/2003. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  8. ISS Expedition 16 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 16 from 10/2007-04/2008. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  9. ISS Expedition 28 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 28 from 04/2011-11/2011. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  10. ISS Expedition 03 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 03 from 08/2001-12/2001. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  11. ISS Expedition 10 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 10 from 10/2004-04/2005. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  12. ISS Expedition 07 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 07 from 04/2003-10/2003. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  13. ISS Expedition 39 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 39 from 11/2013-05/2014. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  14. ISS Expedition 08 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 08 from 10/2003-04/2004. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  15. ISS Expedition 15 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 15 from 04/2007-10/2007. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  16. ISS Expedition 12 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 12 from 10/2005-04/2006. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  17. ISS Expedition 05 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 05 from 06/2002-12/2002. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  18. ISS Expedition 04 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 04 from 12/2001-06/2002. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  19. ISS Expedition 42 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 42 from 09/2014-03/2015. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  20. ISS Expedition 38 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 38 from 09/2013-03/2014. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  1. ISS Expedition 43 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 43 from 11/2014-06/2015. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  2. ISS Expedition 19 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 19 from 03/2009-05/2009. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  3. ISS Expedition 14 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 14 from 09/2006-04/2007. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  4. ISS Expedition 36 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 36 from 03/2013-09/2013. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  5. ISS Expedition 34 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 34 from 12/2012-03/2013. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and media...

  6. The Indigo V Indian Ocean Expedition: a prototype for citizen microbial oceanography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauro, Frederico; Senstius, Svend Jacob; Cullen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    sample acquisition. The ultimate goal of the Indigo V Expedition is to create a working blue-print for ’citizen microbial oceanography’.We will present the preliminary outcomes of the first Indigo V expedition, from Capetown to Singapore, highlighting the challenges and opportunities of such endeavours....

  7. Syllidae (Annelida: Polychaeta) from Indonesia collected by the Siboga (1899-1900) and Snellius II expeditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguado, M.T.; San Martín, G.; ten Hove, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty seven samples of syllids (Annelida: Polychaeta) from Indonesia collected during the Siboga Expedition (1899-1900) and five during the Snellius II Expedition (1984) have been examined. Material from several other museums and Institutions has also been included. Unpublished identifications of

  8. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  9. Extensive sampling of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Northwest Passage (Canadian Arctic Archipelago) reveals population differentiation across multiple spatial and temporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Leonardo; Van Coeverden de Groot, Peter J; Saunders, Brenda L; Atkinson, Stephen N; Weber, Diana S; Dyck, Markus G; Boag, Peter T; Lougheed, Stephen C

    2013-01-01

    As global warming accelerates the melting of Arctic sea ice, polar bears (Ursus maritimus) must adapt to a rapidly changing landscape. This process will necessarily alter the species distribution together with population dynamics and structure. Detailed knowledge of these changes is crucial to delineating conservation priorities. Here, we sampled 361 polar bears from across the center of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago spanning the Gulf of Boothia (GB) and M'Clintock Channel (MC). We use DNA microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences to quantify genetic differentiation, estimate gene flow, and infer population history. Two populations, roughly coincident with GB and MC, are significantly differentiated at both nuclear (FST = 0.01) and mitochondrial (ΦST = 0.47; FST = 0.29) loci, allowing Bayesian clustering analyses to assign individuals to either group. Our data imply that the causes of the mitochondrial and nuclear genetic patterns differ. Analysis of mtDNA reveals the matrilineal structure dates at least to the Holocene, and is common to individuals throughout the species’ range. These mtDNA differences probably reflect both genetic drift and historical colonization dynamics. In contrast, the differentiation inferred from microsatellites is only on the scale of hundreds of years, possibly reflecting contemporary impediments to gene flow. Taken together, our data suggest that gene flow is insufficient to homogenize the GB and MC populations and support the designation of GB and MC as separate polar bear conservation units. Our study also provide a striking example of how nuclear DNA and mtDNA capture different aspects of a species demographic history. PMID:24102001

  10. Extensive sampling of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in the Northwest Passage (Canadian Arctic Archipelago) reveals population differentiation across multiple spatial and temporal scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Leonardo; Van Coeverden de Groot, Peter J; Saunders, Brenda L; Atkinson, Stephen N; Weber, Diana S; Dyck, Markus G; Boag, Peter T; Lougheed, Stephen C

    2013-09-01

    As global warming accelerates the melting of Arctic sea ice, polar bears (Ursus maritimus) must adapt to a rapidly changing landscape. This process will necessarily alter the species distribution together with population dynamics and structure. Detailed knowledge of these changes is crucial to delineating conservation priorities. Here, we sampled 361 polar bears from across the center of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago spanning the Gulf of Boothia (GB) and M'Clintock Channel (MC). We use DNA microsatellites and mitochondrial control region sequences to quantify genetic differentiation, estimate gene flow, and infer population history. Two populations, roughly coincident with GB and MC, are significantly differentiated at both nuclear (F ST = 0.01) and mitochondrial (ΦST = 0.47; F ST = 0.29) loci, allowing Bayesian clustering analyses to assign individuals to either group. Our data imply that the causes of the mitochondrial and nuclear genetic patterns differ. Analysis of mtDNA reveals the matrilineal structure dates at least to the Holocene, and is common to individuals throughout the species' range. These mtDNA differences probably reflect both genetic drift and historical colonization dynamics. In contrast, the differentiation inferred from microsatellites is only on the scale of hundreds of years, possibly reflecting contemporary impediments to gene flow. Taken together, our data suggest that gene flow is insufficient to homogenize the GB and MC populations and support the designation of GB and MC as separate polar bear conservation units. Our study also provide a striking example of how nuclear DNA and mtDNA capture different aspects of a species demographic history.

  11. Users in Northwest Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and forty-four (49.6%) family planning uSers and 350 (50.4%) non—family planning users were included in a Study to assess the factors that are associated With utilisation of family planning services at different levels of health institutions in northwest ..... of well—spaced children. Improving education of.

  12. Gamma emitters in lichens and mosses from lands along the Northwest Passage (Arctic)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cwanek, A.; Lokas, E.; Mietelski, J.W. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, E. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Olech, M.A. [Institute of Botany, Jagiellonian University, Zdzislaw Czeppe Department of Polar Research and Documentation, Kopernika 27, 31-501 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    The Northwest Passage in the Arctic is a sea rout from Greenland through the straits of the Canadian Arctic to the Bering Strait. The passage can only by navigated during the short polar summer, the rest of the year it is entirely frozen. For many years lands (islands and peninsulas) along it were not accessible from the sea for sampling of lichens and mosses due the ice covering it even in summer or due to serious danger of collision with massive ice pack. In last summers it become available for travel even using small yacht 'Marguerite' with the French-Polish crew (capt. Janusz Kurbiel, Joelle Kurbiel, Maria Olech, Tomasz Kosinski), which crossed the Northern Passage within 28 days, reaching the Bering Strait on 16 September 2012. Samples of lichens and mosses were collected in this expedition from coastal zones of western Greenland, north Canada and Alaska. They were collected in several locations on islands and peninsulas along the rout. After identification of species samples are dried, homogenized and analyzed by means of low background gamma spectrometry in aim of determination of gamma emitters, mostly the {sup 137}Cs, activity. The measurements are in initial state during writing this abstract. They scheduled for first half of 2014. Next we intend to do radiochemical analysis for determination {sup 238,239,240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr. This measurement will start before September 2014, so initial results will be also presented. (authors)

  13. 21 CFR 1401.6 - Expedited process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expedited process. 1401.6 Section 1401.6 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.6 Expedited process. (a) Requests and appeals will be given expedited treatment whenever ONDCP determines either: (1...

  14. 7 CFR 1.9 - Expedited processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expedited processing. 1.9 Section 1.9 Agriculture... processing. (a) A requester may apply for expedited processing at the time of the initial request for records. Within ten calendar days of its receipt of a request for expedited processing, an agency shall decide...

  15. 21 CFR 20.44 - Expedited processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expedited processing. 20.44 Section 20.44 Food and... Procedures and Fees § 20.44 Expedited processing. (a) The Food and Drug Administration will provide expedited processing of a request for records when the requester demonstrates a compelling need, or in other cases as...

  16. 28 CFR 802.8 - Expedited processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited processing. 802.8 Section 802.8... DISCLOSURE OF RECORDS Freedom of Information Act § 802.8 Expedited processing. (a) Requests and appeals will... basis. (b) If you seek expedited processing, you must submit a statement, certified to be true and...

  17. ISS Potable Water Quality for Expeditions 26 through 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, John E., II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Schultz, John R.; McCoy, J. Torin

    2012-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Expeditions 26-30 spanned a 16-month period beginning in November of 2010 wherein the final 3 flights of the Space Shuttle program finished ISS construction and delivered supplies to support the post-shuttle era of station operations. Expedition crews relied on several sources of potable water during this period, including water recovered from urine distillate and humidity condensate by the U.S. water processor, water regenerated from humidity condensate by the Russian water recovery system, and Russian ground-supplied potable water. Potable water samples collected during Expeditions 26-30 were returned on Shuttle flights STS-133 (ULF5), STS-134 (ULF6), and STS-135 (ULF7), as well as Soyuz flights 24-27. The chemical quality of the ISS potable water supplies continued to be verified by the Johnson Space Center s Water and Food Analytical Laboratory (WAFAL) via analyses of returned water samples. This paper presents the chemical analysis results for water samples returned from Expeditions 26-30 and discusses their compliance with ISS potable water standards. The presence or absence of dimethylsilanediol (DMSD) is specifically addressed, since DMSD was identified as the primary cause of the temporary rise and fall in total organic carbon of the U.S. product water that occurred in the summer of 2010.

  18. Rescuing biogeographic legacy data: The "Thor" Expedition, a historical oceanographic expedition to the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavraki, Dimitra; Fanini, Lucia; Tsompanou, Marilena; Gerovasileiou, Vasilis; Nikolopoulou, Stamatina; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Plaitis, Wanda; Faulwetter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the digitization of a series of historical datasets based οn the reports of the 1908-1910 Danish Oceanographical Expeditions to the Mediterranean and adjacent seas. All station and sampling metadata as well as biodiversity data regarding calcareous rhodophytes, pelagic polychaetes, and fish (families Engraulidae and Clupeidae) obtained during these expeditions were digitized within the activities of the LifeWatchGreece Research Ιnfrastructure project and presented in the present paper. The aim was to safeguard public data availability by using an open access infrastructure, and to prevent potential loss of valuable historical data on the Mediterranean marine biodiversity. The datasets digitized here cover 2,043 samples taken at 567 stations during a time period from 1904 to 1930 in the Mediterranean and adjacent seas. The samples resulted in 1,588 occurrence records of pelagic polychaetes, fish (Clupeiformes) and calcareous algae (Rhodophyta). In addition, basic environmental data (e.g. sea surface temperature, salinity) as well as meterological conditions are included for most sampling events. In addition to the description of the digitized datasets, a detailed description of the problems encountered during the digitization of this historical dataset and a discussion on the value of such data are provided.

  19. Polar poisons: did Botulism doom the Franklin expedition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, B Zane

    2003-01-01

    In 1845 the Franklin expedition left London with 2 ships and 134 men on board in an attempt to find the route through the Northwest Passage. The ships were built with state-of-the-art technology for their day, but provisioned with supplies from the lowest bidder. After taking on fresh provisions in the Whalefish Islands, off the coast of Greenland, the entire crew was never heard from again. Graves found on remote Beechey Island indicate that three able-bodied seamen died during the first winter. A note written on a ship's log, later found in a cairn, indicate that the expedition's leader, Sir John Franklin, died during the second winter entrapped on the ice, by which time 24 men had also perished. The remaining crew failed in their attempt to walk out of the Arctic by an overland route. In 1981 Owen Beattie, from the University of Alberta, exhumed the remains of the sailors from the three graves on Beechey Island. Elevated lead levels were found in all three sailors. While lead poisoning has been a leading theory of the cause of the crew's deaths, blamed on the crudely tinned provisions the ships carried with them from England, chronic lead exposure may only have weakened the crew, not necessarily killed them. One of three exhumed sailors also had in his intestine the spores of an unspecified Clostridium species. The theory put forth by this article is that Botulism, type E, which is endemic in the Arctic, may have been responsible for their deaths.

  20. Northwest Area Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Tracy L.; van Heeswijk, Marijke; Grossman, Eric E.

    2010-01-01

    Northwest Area Facts * Population about 12 million * 43 federally recognized Tribes * Hydropower provides about two-thirds of electricity supply * 78 federally listed threatened and endangered species * 12 active or potentially active volcanoes * Columbia River system drains more than 260,000 square miles, an area about the size of Texas * More than 175 square miles covered by glaciers * More than 900 miles of Pacific Ocean coastline * More than 2,300 miles of greater Puget Sound coastline * Some forests store more carbon per unit area than any other area in the world, including the tropics * 51 percent federal lands * Significant lead, zinc, silver, and phosphate deposits

  1. Pacific Northwest: paradise lost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, W.V.

    1980-04-18

    An influx of new residents to the Pacific Northwest is changing social patterns and is endangering the region's valued wilderness and resources. A growing population and a feeling that the national govenment is more exploitive than conserving of its resources combines with a political tension between progressive populism and conservative Mormon influences to make residents wary of either newcomers or new prosperity. The abundant hydro power is threatened as power demand increases and utilities, industries, and the state and local governments compete for their fair share. A plan to restructure the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has been introduced in Congress to give it a single appointed administrator with the authority to decide how power will be distributed and which new power sources to develop. Concern about the two national nuclear waste repositories at Hanford and Idaho Falls led to a six-month moratorium at Hanford to warn the government that the site was not intended to be a permanent solution. A legislative proposal to set up regional nuclear parks will not relieve the Pacific Northwest's problems for some time. Leaders blame the policymakers for looking on the area as too remote and underpopulated to worry about. 18 references (DCK)

  2. 31 CFR 10.82 - Expedited suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited suspension. 10.82 Section... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE Rules Applicable to Disciplinary Proceedings § 10.82 Expedited suspension. (a... suspension. A suspension under this section will commence on the date that written notice of the suspension...

  3. Book Review Expedition Field Techniques: Small Mammals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review. Expedition Field Techniques: Small. Mammals (excluding bats) Second Edition. A. Barnett and J. Dutton. Published and distributed 1995 by the Expedition Advisory. Cenlre, Royal Geographic Society, 1 Kensington Gore,. London, SW7 2AR. 126 pages. Price: £8.50 (softcover). ISBN 0-907649-68-8.

  4. Northwest Africa 8535 and Northwest Africa 10463: New Insights into the Angrite Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. R.; Agee, C. B.; Shearer, C. K.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    The angrite meteorites are valuable samples of igneous rocks formed early in Solar System history (approx.4.56 Ga, summarized in [1]). This small meteorite group (approx.24 individually named specimens) consists of rocks with somewhat exotic mineral compositions (e.g., high Ca olivine, Al-Ti-bearing diopside-hedenbergite, calcium silico-phosphates), resulting in exotic bulk rock compositions. These mineral assemblages remain fairly consistent among angrite samples, which suggests they formed due to similar processes from a single mantle source. There is still debate over the formation process for these rocks (see summary in [1]), and analysis of additional angrite samples may help to address this debate. Toward this end, we have begun to study two new angrites, Northwest Africa 8535, a dunite, and Northwest Africa 10463, a basaltic angrite.

  5. Global warming: A Northwest perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, M.J.; Counts, C.A. (eds.)

    1990-02-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council convened a symposium in Olympia, Washington, on the subject of global climate change ( the greenhouse effect'') and its potential for affecting the Pacific Northwest. The symposium was organized in response to a need by the Power Council to understand global climate change and its potential impacts on resource planning and fish and wildlife planning for the region, as well as a need to understand national policy developing toward climate change and the Pacific Northwest's role in it. 40 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Framing the Arctic: Reconsidering Roald Amundsen’s Gjøa Expedition Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeborg Høvik

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1906 Roald Amundsen’s Gjøa Expedition returned to Norway after three years in the Arctic. The first to complete a Northwest Passage by sea, the expedition also brought back a substantial amount of ethnographic material concerning the Netsilik Inuit, with whom Amundsen and his crew had been in sustained contact during their stay on King William Island in Nunavut between 1903 and 1905. This material included a large number of photographs, forty-two of which were included as illustrations in his expedition narrative, titled Nordvest-passagen and first released in Norwegian in 1907. Focusing on a selection of published and unpublished photographs from Amundsen’s voyage and their interrelationships, this article examines the degree to which the Gjøa Expedition’s use of photography formed part of a planned project that intersected with anthropological concerns and practices of its time. My purpose is further to demonstrate that there is a discernible change in the representation of indigeneity that occurs when particular photographs were selected and then contextually reframed as illustrations in Nordvest-passagen. On the one hand, the extensive body of photographs taken in the field elaborates the close interaction between crew and Inuit recorded in Amundsen’s personal diary and published narrative, testifying to the existence of an active and dynamic contact zone. In this regard, the original photographs could arguably be read as a dialogic portrayal of the unique individuals Amundsen’s crew met while in the Arctic. On the other hand, a peculiar distancing seems to have taken place as the Gjøa Expedition’s photographs were selected and reproduced as illustrations for Amundsen’s expedition narrative. Likely connected to a desire to match his expedition narrative to existing scientific visual and literary conventions, this shift suggests Amundsen’s attempts through textual and visual means to deny the Netsilik Inuit

  7. 29 CFR 1404.20 - Proper use of expedited arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proper use of expedited arbitration. 1404.20 Section 1404... ARBITRATION SERVICES Expedited Arbitration § 1404.20 Proper use of expedited arbitration. (a) FMCS reserves the right to cease honoring request for Expedited Arbitration if a pattern of misuse of this becomes...

  8. ISS Expedition 21/22 Press Kit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Press kit for ISS mission Expedition 21/22 from 10/2009-03/2010. Press kits contain information about each mission overview, crew, mission timeline, benefits, and...

  9. Educational expeditions - et norsk perspektiv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Horgen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe topic of this article is the Norwegian concept of “friluftsliv” (outdoor life, used as a pedagogical tool to support personal growth. While supporting personal growth appears to be a central pedagogical strategy within Anglo-American and British youth expeditions and adventure programming, this does not appear to be case in the Norwegian outdoor tradition. My research question is: Do Norwegian Outdoor Education students experience a learning outcome related to personal growth, and to their abilities as leaders/mentors, during ski expeditions? I have collected data through a three-year period, after three ski expeditions with Outdoor Education students from an outdoor bachelor-programme at Telemark University College.The students have given written answers to questions regarding personal growth in which several informants’ express thoughts about experiences related to “self” and “identity”. They reflect upon experiences related to “mastering” and “performing”, to acceptance of their own strengths and weaknesses, and about developing self-confidence. They also reflect upon learning outcomes related to interpersonal relations and abilities, self-control, communication and caregiving. The informants have experienced, as leaders/mentors, that it is important to be able to, to “read” situations, to make good assessments of the situations, and to make good decisions related to the situations. As a follow up to this, the informants highlight the importance of being aware of each individual in the group, the importance of encouragement, being positive and caregiving. This study has shown that ski expeditions in “a Norwegian tradition” may have a potential when it comes to encouraging reflections related to personal growth and leadership abilities. Hopefully this study can contribute to increased awareness of the pedagogical potential, for personal growth, within the Norwegian concept of

  10. BPA Committed to Northwest Values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-09-01

    The Columbia River has been called the “crown jewel” of the Pacific Northwest. There is no question it is among the region’s greatest assets — supplying low-cost clean hydropower, making deserts bloom thanks to irrigation and providing navigation, recreation and a home for many species of fish and wildlife. The Bonneville Power Administration is proud to be a steward of this great resource. Our mission is to serve the people and environment of the Pacific Northwest. We sell wholesale power from Grand Coulee Dam and 30 other Northwest federal dams to Northwest utilities, including public utility districts, rural electric cooperatives and municipal utility departments, as well as investor-owned utilities. We operate three-fourths of the region’s high voltage transmission system that delivers that power. But, as a federal agency, we are not just a power marketer. We have public responsibilities that include, among many, promoting energy efficiency, facilitating development of renewable power, protecting fish and wildlife affected by hydro development, honoring treaty obligations to tribes and promoting a reliable energy future through collaboration and partnerships. This document describes our responsibilities to citizens in the Pacific Northwest.

  11. Composition and distribution of Munnopsidae (Crustacea, Isopoda, Asellota), collected during the KuramBio expedition 2012 from the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutina, Marina V.; Brandt, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    The abyssal macrobenthos of the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench (KKT) area was sampled for the first time using a fine-meshed camera-epibenthic sledge (C-EBS) during the German-Russian KuramBio expedition 2012 (RV Sonne, 223 cruise). Crustaceans of the order Isopoda were one of the dominant macrobenthic taxa, and the family Munnopsidae was the most abundant and diverse among 17 collected asellotan families, comprising about 48% of all isopods. During the KuramBio expedition no less than 80 species of 28 genera and eight subfamilies of Munnopsidae were collected with 21 EBS hauls at 12 stations. About 80% species are new to science and half of the genera and the subfamily Lipomerinae are recorded for the first time in the Northwest Pacific. The most abundant and speciose subfamily was Eurycopinae (58% of all specimens and 29 % of species), followed by Ilyarachninae (12% and 16%). Most species are rare and occur with low abundance at one or few stations. Ten most numerous species belonging to the genera Eurycope (5 species), Microcope (2), Disconectes (1), Ilyarachna (1) and Aspidarachna (1) comprised 68% of all munnopsids. The species Eurycope sp.1 and Microcope ovata (Birstein, 1970) were the most abundant and frequent species, occurring at all stations. The highest abundance of Munnopsidae and high diversity, with 32 species, occurred at station 3-9 on the western slope of the KKT. The cluster analysis of the Bray-Curtis similarity shows a low similarity between stations. The least similar was station 1-10, with only 26% similarity with other stations. Low similarity also characterized station 3-9 (34%). The comparison with known data revealed differences in species composition of Munnopsidae of the abyssal plain of the KKT area and the fauna of adjacent bathyal and hadal zones. Similar ratios of the munnopsid subfamilies and genera and some similar species have been revealed for the KuramBio and ANDEEP areas.

  12. An account of the Ischnomesidae (Peracarida, Isopoda) from the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and abyssal plain (Northwest Pacific) with the description of two new species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Angelika; Kristin Stüven, Jana; Caurant, Cyril; Oskar Elsner, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    During the German-Russian expedition KuramBio (Kuril-Kamchatka Biodiversity Studies) from board of the RV Sonne to the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and adjacent abyssal plain, benthic samples were taken by means of a camera-epibenthic sledge. Amongst one of the most diverse macrobenthic taxa, the Isopoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca), Ischnomesidae were the fifth most abundant isopod family in the Kuril-Kamchatka area and were sampled with 24 species from 5 genera in 21 hauls at 12 stations. Fortimesus occurs most frequently in the samples (36% of all Ischnomesidae sampled), followed by Stylomesus (26%), Heteromesus (23%), Ischnomesus (10%) and Gracilimesus (4%). Number of ischnomesid individuals is highest at station 10-12 with 35 specimens, followed by station 12-4 (30 ind.), station 6-12 (29 ind.), station 9-9 (28), and station 1-11 (24). At station 4-3 only 1 specimen was found. A key to all genera of Ischnomesidae is provided. Two new species from two genera: StylomesusWolff, 1956 and FortimesusKavanagh and Wilson, 2007 are described from the KuramBio material. Stylomesus malyutinae sp. nov. is distinguished by the smooth body surface, the shape of pleotelson and the length of uropods from other species of the genus from the Northwest Pacific Ocean. Fortimesus trispiculum sp. nov. is characterised by anterolateral projections of pereonites 1-3 which are forming an angle of about 45° with the longitudinal body axis decreasing in length from anterior to posterior.

  13. Request for wood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the wood collection at the Rijksherbarium was greatly expanded following a renewed interest in wood anatomy as an aid for solving classification problems. Staff members of the Rijksherbarium added to the collection by taking interesting wood samples with them from their expeditions

  14. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 2. Technical appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    The technical appendix presents the technical aspects of the Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey: the survey questionnaire, exhibit cards, instructions for interviewers, and a description of the survey plan. A description of the sample plan (method used to determine which 4000 households) is given. (MCW)

  15. 75 FR 23823 - Sixth Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... POWER AND CONSERVATION PLANNING COUNCIL Sixth Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Plan AGENCY: Pacific Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council (Northwest Power and Conservation Council; the Council). ACTION: Notice of adoption of the Sixth Northwest Electric Power and Conservation...

  16. Pacific Northwest Salmon Habitat Project Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the Pacific Northwest Salmon Habitat Project Database Across the Pacific Northwest, both public and private agents are working to improve riverine habitat for a...

  17. Guest editorial: Aquatic science in the Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Ray, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, Northwest Science has seen a significant increase in the number of submissions representing aquatic science. Our region is punctuated by aquatic systems. The current issue in particular, presents a number of new aquatic science contributions. Accordingly, Northwest Science invited the authors of this guest editorial to address the question, why is aquatic science so important in the Northwest?

  18. Solar 78 Northwest conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    Thirty eight papers are included. One was abstracted previously. Separate entries were prepared for thirty-seven. Also included are the conference evaluation summary, Pacific Northwest Solar Energy Association organization information, lists of commercial and non-commercial exhibitors, speakers and stearing committee members, and attendees. (MHR)

  19. Expedition Two crew arrives at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Astronaut James Voss (right) stands with astronaut John Young on the tarmac at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility. Voss is flying on mission STS-102, launching March 8, as part of the Expedition Two crew going to the International Space Station. Young made his fifth flight as Spacecraft Commander of STS-1, the first flight of the Space Shuttle, April 12-14, 1981. His sixth and final flight was as Spacecraft Commander of STS-9, the first Spacelab mission, Nov. 28-Dec. 8, 1983. The other members of the Expedition Two crew are Susan Helms and Yury Usachev. STS-102 will be Helms' and Voss's fifth Shuttle flight, and Usachev's second. They will be replacing the Expedition One crew (Bill Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev), who will return to Earth March 20 on Discovery along with the STS-102 crew.

  20. Greenland Expeditions by Alfred Wegener - A photographic window to past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, M.; Tschürtz, S.; Kirchengast, G.; Kranzelbinder, H.; Prügger, B.; Krause, R. A.; Kalliokoski, M.; Thórhallsdóttir, E.

    2012-04-01

    On several expeditions to Greenland, Alfred Wegener (1880-1930) took pictures on glass plates from landscapes and glaciers, the expedition equipment, the people and animals taking part on the expeditions as well as physical phenomena as dust storm, clouds or spherical light phenomena. Chronologically the plates show the Danmark Expedition 1906-1908, the crossing of Greenland expedition with stop in Iceland 1912-1913, and the German Greenland Expedition 1929-1930. Until the tragic end of the expedition in 1930, Wegener was professor at the University of Graz, and such a stock of about 300 glass plates stayed there. The aim of our work is to digitize all plates for further studies. We present a first selection of Wegener's Greenland expedition pictures. For those made at Iceland in 1912 we will present a comparison of the past with pictures from the same viewing point made in 2011.

  1. Expeditions to Komsomolets in 1993 and 1994; Tokt til Komsomolets i 1993 og 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolstad, A.K.

    1995-09-01

    The Russian nuclear submarine Komsomolets went down about 180 km southwest of the Bear Island in the Norwegian Sea on April 7, 1989. According to Russian information the submarine contains one nuclear reactor and two torpedoes with nuclear warheads. The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has taken part in the Russian expeditions to the accident site since 1991. This is a report from the expeditions in 1993 and 1994. It includes sampling, analysis and results obtained by the Norwegian part. 5 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Expedition Three Crew Onboard Photograph of Sunset

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The setting sun and the thin blue airglow line at Earth's horizon was captured by the International Space Station's (ISS) Expedition Three crewmembers with a digital camera. Some of the Station's components are silhouetted in the foreground. The crew was launched aboard the Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery STS-105 mission, on August 10, 2001, replacing the Expedition Two crew. After marning the orbiting ISS for 128 consecutive days, the three returned to Earth on December 17, 2001, aboard the STS-108 mission Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour.

  3. 20 CFR 404.926 - Agreement in expedited appeals process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determinations, Administrative Review Process, and Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Expedited Appeals Process § 404.926 Agreement in expedited appeals process. If you meet... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agreement in expedited appeals process. 404...

  4. 7 CFR 1703.112 - Expedited telecommunications loans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expedited telecommunications loans 1703.112 Section... § 1703.112 Expedited telecommunications loans RUS will expedite consideration and determination of an application submitted by an RUS telecommunications borrower for a loan under the Act or an advance of such...

  5. Using the Expedition Leader Style Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Maurice L.; Phipps, Cynthia A.

    The Expedition Leader Style Analysis (ELSA) is an inventory designed to measure leadership style adaptability and effectiveness in terms of the situational leadership model. Situational leadership arose from the Experiential Leadership Education model, which is used in business and management, by replacing management jargon and phrases with…

  6. 49 CFR 385.105 - Expedited action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Monitoring System for Mexico-Domiciled Carriers § 385.105 Expedited action. (a) A Mexico-domiciled... driver who tests positive for controlled substances or alcohol or who refuses to submit to required controlled substances or alcohol tests. (6) Operating within the United States a motor vehicle that is not...

  7. Expedition medicine: A southern African perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the death of a celebrity and lack of helicopter rescue during the night on. Mount Kilimanjaro illustrates a pervasive lack of understanding of the local rescue capabilities in that area. The expedition medic must be au fait with available facilities on the ground, and help potential participants to understand the risks in relation to ...

  8. Expedition: Yellowstone! A Cooperative School Outreach Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Golia, Jack; And Others

    Designed to help upper elementary school teachers prepare for a class expedition to Yellowstone National Park, this workbook presents environmental learning activities that are also useful in schools too distant for an actual visit. Either way, the workbook aims to develop student appreciation of Yellowstone, the life in it, and the park's value…

  9. Strategies and Procedures for Expediting Election Petitions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    Strategies and Procedures for Expediting Election Petitions and Appeals. 323. In order to achieve expeditious resolution of electoral disputes, various attempts have been made using the rules of court to fast track election petitions. The most significant of all is the Practice Direction issued by the then president of the. Court of ...

  10. MITAS-2009 Expedition, U.S. Beaufort Shelf and Slope—Lithostratigraphy Data Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.; Johnson, J.E.; Phillips, S.C.; Smith, J.; Reed, A.; Disenhof, C.; Presley, J.

    2012-09-17

    The volume of methane released through the Arctic Ocean to the atmosphere and its potential role in the global climate cycle have increasingly become the focus of studies seeking to understand the source and origin of this methane. In 2009, an international, multi-disciplinary science party aboard the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Sea successfully completed a trans-U.S. Beaufort Shelf expedition aimed at understanding the sources and volumes of methane across this region. Following more than a year of preliminary cruise planning and a thorough site evaluation, the Methane in the Arctic Shelf/Slope (MITAS) expedition departed from the waters off the coast of Barrow, Alaska in September 2009. The expedition was organized with an international shipboard science team consisting of 33 scientists with the breadth of expertise necessary to meet the expedition goals. NETL researchers led the expedition’s initial core processing and lithostratigraphic evaluations, which are the focus of this report. This data report is focused on the lithostratigraphic datasets from the recovered vibra cores and piston cores. Operational information about the piston and vibra cores such as date acquired, core name, total length, water depth, and geographic location is provided. Once recovered, gas samples were immediately collected from cores. In addition, each core was run through the Geotek multi-sensor core logger for magnetic susceptibility, P-wave velocity, resistivity, and gamma-density measurements (Rose et al., 2010). After the samples and measurements were completed, the cores were split into working and archive halves. Visual core descriptions of the archive half was completed for each core. Samples for shipboard smear slides, coarse fractions, and XRD analyses were collected, as well as corresponding samples for post-cruise grain size analysis from the working half of each core. Line scan images of the split core surfaces were collected post-expedition. The methods used to

  11. Alteration of Sedimentary Clasts in Martian Meteorite Northwest Africa 7034

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Tartese, R.; Santos, A. R.; Domokos, G.; Muttik, N.; Szabo, T.; Vazquez, J.; Boyce, J. W.; Keller, L. P.; Jerolmack, D. J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The martian meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 and pairings represent the first brecciated hand sample available for study from the martian surface [1]. Detailed investigations of NWA 7034 have revealed substantial lithologic diversity among the clasts [2-3], making NWA 7034 a polymict breccia. NWA 7034 consists of igneous clasts, impact-melt clasts, and "sedimentary" clasts represented by prior generations of brecciated material. In the present study we conduct a detailed textural and geochemical analysis of the sedimentary clasts.

  12. Expedition Two crew inspects airlock in SSPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Inside the air lock in the Space Station Processing Facility, the Expedition Two crew look at equipment. Seen from left are cosmonaut Yury Usachev, a technician, and astronauts Susan Helms and James Voss. At far right is astronaut John Young, who flew on mission STS-1. Usachev, Helms and Voss will be flying on mission STS-102, launching March 8. The air lock will be carried to the Station during their tenure in space. STS-102 will be Helms' and Voss's fifth Shuttle flight, and Usachev's second. They will be replacing the Expedition One crew (Bill Shepherd, Yuri Gidzenko and Sergei Krikalev), who will return to Earth March 20 on Discovery along with the STS-102 crew.

  13. Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Rios

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The information about the sponges in this dataset is derived from the samples collected during five Spanish Antarctic expeditions: Bentart 94, Bentart 95, Gebrap 96, Ciemar 99/00 and Bentart 2003. Samples were collected in the Antarctic Peninsula and Bellingshausen Sea at depths ranging from 4 to 2044 m using va­rious sampling gears.The Antarctic Porifera database from the Spanish benthic expeditions is unique as it provides in­formation for an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean (Bellingshausen Sea. It fills an information gap on Antarctic deep-sea sponges, for which there were previously very few data.This phylum is an important part of the Antarctic biota and plays a key role in the structure of the Antarctic marine benthic community due to its considerable diversity and predominance in different areas. It is often a dominant component of Southern Ocean benthic communities.The quality of the data was controlled very thoroughly with GPS systems onboard the R/V Hesperides and by checking the data against the World Porifera Database (which is part of the World Register of Marine Species, WoRMS. The data are therefore fit for completing checklists, inclusion in biodivers­ity pattern analysis and niche modelling. The authors can be contacted if any additional information is needed before carrying out detailed biodiversity or biogeographic studies.The dataset currently contains 767 occurrence data items that have been checked for systematic reliability. This database is not yet complete and the collection is growing. Specimens are stored in the author’s collection at the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO in the city of Gijón (Spain. The data are available in GBIF.

  14. Delimiting communities in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen M. Donoghue

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents an approach for delimiting communities in the Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) region of the Pacific Northwest that responds to the need to assess impacts and issues associated with broad-scale ecosystem management. Census block groups are aggregated to provide an alternative to more commonly used geographic delimitations of communities, specifically...

  15. IODP expedition 347: Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrén, T; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Cotterill, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different set- tings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial–interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region...... with changing ice cover and major shifts in temperature, salinity, and biological communities. Using the Greatship Manisha as a European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) mission-specific platform, we recovered 1.6 km of core from nine sites of which four were additionally cored for microbiology...... degassing upon core recovery. The depth distributions of conservative sea water ions still reflected the transition at the end of the last glaciation from fresh-water clays to Holocene brackish mud. High-resolution sampling and analyses of interstitial water chemistry revealed the intensive mineralization...

  16. Fukushima fallout in Northwest German environmental media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittauerova, Daniela, E-mail: pittauerova@iup.physik.uni-bremen.de [University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Hettwig, Bernd; Fischer, Helmut W. [University of Bremen, Institute of Environmental Physics, Otto-Hahn-Allee 1, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Traces of short- and long-lived fallout isotopes ({sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs) were found in environmental samples collected in Northwest Germany (rain water, river sediment, soil, grass and cow milk) from March to May 2011, following the radioactivity releases after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan. The measured concentrations are consistent with reported concentrations in air, amount of rainfall and expected values applying simple radioecological models. The [{sup 134}Cs]/[{sup 137}Cs] ratio reported for air (about 1) allows for discrimination between 'recent' and 'old'{sup 137}Cs. Expected {sup 136}Cs values fell below the detection limits of the instrumentation, despite large sample masses and long counting times. - Highlights: > {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs traces were detected in the environment of NW Germany. > Detected radionuclides were linked to the Fukushima accident releases. > Areal deposition was predicted from air concentrations using radioecological models. > The measured concentrations are consistent with the models. > Based on Cs isotopic ratios, most of the present {sup 137}Cs comes from the 'old' fallout.

  17. John Murray / MABAHISS expedition versus the International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE) in retrospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, A. A.; Morcos, S. A.

    In addition to its scientific achievements, the John Murray/Mabahiss Expedition was a unique experiment in technology transfer and it pioneered bilateral relations in the field of oceanography, at a time when the Law of the Sea was not even an embryonic concept. The Expedition will be remembered for its profound influence on the development of oceanography in Egypt, and subsequently in several Arab and African countries, as well as for its socio-economic impact in Egypt. The International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE) was an elaborate exercise involving both the most sophisticated developments in oceanography of the day and the full complexity of international relations which necessitated the scientific, coordinating and supporting mechanisms of SCOR, IOC and Unesco combined. Each exercise separated by 25 years represented a significant event in the development of oceanography. Each was a natural product of the prevailing state of the art and the international climate. Oceanography had made a quantum jump in technology in the intervening quarter of a century, which had put the cost of deep sea oceanography quite beyond the financial capabilities of many developing countries, an important factor to bear in mind when comparing the impact of the John Murray/Mabahiss Expedition on Egypt with that of the IIOE, on the Indian Ocean countries.

  18. Perfluorinated Chemicals in Surface Waters and Sediments from Northwest Georgia, USA, and Their Bioaccumulation in Lumbriculus variegatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concentrations of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) were measured in surface waters and sediments from the Coosa River watershed in northwest Georgia, USA, to examine their distribution downstream of a suspected source. Samples from eight sites were analyzed using liquid chromatogr...

  19. 8 CFR 235.3 - Inadmissible aliens and expedited removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inadmissible aliens and expedited removal. 235.3 Section 235.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS INSPECTION OF PERSONS APPLYING FOR ADMISSION § 235.3 Inadmissible aliens and expedited removal. (a) Detention...

  20. 12 CFR 229.55 - Expedited recredit for banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expedited recredit for banks. 229.55 Section 229.55 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE... Expedited recredit for banks. (a) Circumstances giving rise to a claim. A bank that has an indemnity claim...

  1. Sequencing at sea: challenges and experiences in Ion Torrent PGM sequencing during the 2013 Southern Line Islands Research Expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Y.W.; Cuevas, D.A.; Silva, G.G.; Aguinaldo, K.; Dinsdale, E.A.; Haas, A.F.; Hatay, M.; Sanchez, S.E.; Wegley-Kelly, L.; Dutilh, B.E.; Harkins, T.T.; Lee, C.C.; Tom, W.; Sandin, S.A.; Smith, J.E.; Zgliczynski, B.; Vermeij, M.J.; Rohwer, F.; Edwards, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Genomics and metagenomics have revolutionized our understanding of marine microbial ecology and the importance of microbes in global geochemical cycles. However, the process of DNA sequencing has always been an abstract extension of the research expedition, completed once the samples were returned

  2. Sequencing at sea : challenges and experiences in Ion Torrent PGM sequencing during the 2013 Southern Line Islands Research Expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Yan Wei; Cuevas, Daniel A; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Haas, Andreas F; Hatay, Mark; Sanchez, Savannah E; Wegley-Kelly, Linda; Dutilh, Bas E; Harkins, Timothy T; Lee, Clarence C; Tom, Warren; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Zgliczynski, Brian; Vermeij, Mark J A; Rohwer, Forest; Edwards, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Genomics and metagenomics have revolutionized our understanding of marine microbial ecology and the importance of microbes in global geochemical cycles. However, the process of DNA sequencing has always been an abstract extension of the research expedition, completed once the samples were returned

  3. Bioenergy possibilities in Northwest Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakitova, O. (The National Bioenergy Union, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)); Mutanen, K. (Joensuu Regional Development Company JOSEK Ltd, Joensuu (Finland))

    2007-07-01

    Russia owns the largest natural gas, the second largest coal and the third largest oil reserves in the world. Russia is the third largest energy user and the largest producer of oil and gas in the world. Export of oil and gas plays a major role in the economic development of the whole Russia. Wood harvesting and processing industry responds only 4,4 % of the industrial production although Russia owns 23 % of the world's forest resources. Biomass represents only 1 % of the total energy consumption including residential use but hydro power represents about 18 % of Russia's electricity generation. Russia needs three times more energy to produce one unit of GDP than e.g. EU. This indicates very poor energy efficiency and poor conditions of the energy and the whole infrastructure as well. Simultaneously the prices of fossil fuels and electricity are heavily subsidized. These basic figures give on idea why utilization of renewable energy and especially biomass play a minor role in Russian energy system. One of the most progressive regions in bioenergy is the Northwest of Russia. The first pellet and briquette plants were installed in this region a few years ago. The region can be regarded as the forerunner in bioenergy in Russia. Federal Region of Northwest Russia consists of City of St.Petersburg, Republics of Karelia and Komi and regions of Leningrad, Arkhangelsk, Kaliningrad, Murmansk, Nenetsk, Novgorod, Pskov and Vologda. The region has 15 million inhabitants and a 2200 km long joint border with the EU, most of that with Finland. N W Russia owns over 14000 million m3 of raw wood that represents 17 % of Russian forests and 60 % of the forests located in the European side. Potential for annual harvesting is over 100 million m3 while harvesting is about 45 million m3. Most of that is exported as a form of raw wood. Wood represents only 2,8 % of the region's energy use including residential usage. Use of peat is marginal representing only 0,1 % of the

  4. Investigation of environmental radioactivity in waste dumping areas of the far eastern seas. JAERI`s activities in the 1st Japanese-Korean-Russian joint expedition 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Hikaru; Matsunaga, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Yabuuchi, Noriaki

    1996-10-01

    Large quantities of radioactive waste have been dumped in the Far Eastern Sea by the former USSR and Russia. In order to survey marine radioactive contamination in the Far Eastern Sea, the first Japanese-Korean-Russian joint expedition was conducted according to the governmental agreement. The joint expedition was conducted at the areas of the Russian radioactive waste dumping site from March 18 1994 to April 6, 1994. JAERI participated in this expedition according to the request from STA Japan, and conducted mainly on-board measurement of marine radioactivities. The results showed that the radionuclides concentrations in seawater and seabed sediment samples from the study site were not different from those in the western North Pacific. This report summarises JAERI`s activities in the expedition. Final report by Japanese-Korean-Russian government and IAEA is annexed. (author)

  5. Social interaction and pain: An arctic expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Per; Heathcote, Lauren C; Burnett Heyes, Stephanie

    2017-11-08

    Complex human behaviour can only be understood within its social environment. However, disentangling the causal links between individual outcomes and social network position is empirically challenging. We present a research design in a closed real-world setting with high-resolution temporal data to understand this interplay within a fundamental human experience - physical pain. Study participants completed an isolated 3-week hiking expedition in the Arctic Circle during which they were subject to the same variation in environmental conditions and only interacted amongst themselves. Adolescents provided daily ratings of pain and social interaction partners. Using longitudinal network models, we analyze the interplay between social network position and the experience of pain. Specifically, we test whether experiencing pain is linked to decreasing popularity (increasing isolation), whether adolescents prefer to interact with others experiencing similar pain (homophily), and whether participants are increasingly likely to report similar pain as their interaction partners (contagion). We find that reporting pain is associated with decreasing popularity - interestingly, this effect holds for males only. Further exploratory analyses suggest this is at least partly driven by males withdrawing from contact with females when in pain, enhancing our understanding of pain and masculinity. Contrary to recent experimental and clinical studies, we found no evidence of pain homophily or contagion in the expedition group. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Northwest Atlantic Regional Climatology (NCEI Accession 0155889)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To provide an improved oceanographic foundation and reference for multi-disciplinary studies of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean, NCEI Regional Climatology Team...

  7. Acid Precipitation in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, John; Kozak, David

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the causes, sources, and problems associated with acid deposition in the Pacific Northwest. Includes a learning activity about acid rain, "Deadly Skies," which was adapted from the Project WILD Aquatic Supplement. (TW)

  8. IODP Expedition 321T: Cementing Operations at Holes U1301A and U1301B, Eastern Flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Fisher

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available IODP Expedition 301 (Fisher et al., 2005a was part of a series of expeditions and experiments to quantify hydrogeologic, lithologic, biogeochemical, and microbiological properties, processes, and linkages on the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, North Pacific (Fig. 1. Operations during Expedition 301 included replacement of one existing subseafloor borehole observatory (“CORK”, Hole 1026B, drilling two basement holes and installing two new long-term observatories (Holes U1301A and U1301B, coring the upper ~300 m of basement and shallow sediments above basement, and collection of in situ hydrogeologic and geophysical data from basement. Subsequent expeditions using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV and submersible have serviced borehole observatories, collected pressure and temperature data and fluid and microbiological samples, and replaced components as needed to maintain these systems for futureuse. Another drilling expedition is planned for 2010 (see backcover for schedule to emplace three more borehole observatories and initiate cross-hole tests, and additional ROV and submersible ex-peditions will conduct long-term experiments and recover subseafloor data and samples.

  9. Power supplies and equipment for military field research: lessons from the British Service Dhaulagiri Research Expedition 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Matt; Bakker-Dyos, J; Gallagher, L; O'Hara, J P; Woods, D; Mellor, A

    2017-12-25

    The British Service Dhaulagiri Research Expedition (BSDMRE) took place from 27 March to 31 May 2016. The expedition involved 129 personnel, with voluntary participation in nine different study protocols. Studies were conducted in three research camps established at 3600, 4600 and 5140 m and involved taking and storing blood samples, cardiac echocardiography and investigations involving a balance plate. Research in this remote environment requires careful planning in order to provide a robust and resilient power plan. In this paper we aim to report the rationale for the choices we made in terms of power supply, the equipment used and potential military applicability. This is a descriptive account from the expedition members involved in planning and conducting the medical research. Power calculations were used to determine estimates of requirement prior to the expedition. The primary sources used to generate power were internal combustion engine (via petrol fuelled electric generators) and solar panels. Having been generated, power was stored using lithium-ion batteries. Special consideration was given to the storage of samples taken in the field, for which electric freezers and dry shippers were used. All equipment used functioned well during the expedition, with the challenges of altitude, temperature and transport all overcome due to extensive prior planning. Power was successfully generated, stored and delivered during the BSDMRE, allowing extensive medical research to be undertaken. The challenges faced and overcome are directly applicable to delivering military medical care in austere environments, and lessons learnt can help with the planning and delivery of future operations, training exercises or expeditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. ISS Expeditions 16 Thru 20: Chemical Analysis Results for Potable Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, John E., II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Schultz, John R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the results of the chemical analysis of the potable water supply from the International Space Station (ISS) expeditions 16 thru 20. Both Russian ground water and shuttle-transferred water are available for the use of the ISS crew's requirements. This is supplemented with condensate water and water form the Water Recovery System (WRS). An overview of the condensate H2O recovery system is given and the WRS is described and diagrammed. The water quality requirements, the handling, and analytical methods for the inorganic and organic tests are reviewed. The chemical analysis results for expeditions 16-20 archival water samples collected from the various water sources indicate that all of the ISS potable water supplies were acceptable for crew consumption.

  11. Pyrethroid insecticides in urban salmon streams of the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weston, D.P., E-mail: dweston@berkeley.edu [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, 3060 Valley Life Sciences Bldg., Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States); Asbell, A.M., E-mail: aasbell@berkeley.edu [Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, 3060 Valley Life Sciences Bldg., Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 (United States); Hecht, S.A., E-mail: scott.hecht@noaa.gov [NOAA Fisheries, Office of Protected Resources, 510 Desmond Drive S.E., Lacey, WA 98503 (United States); Scholz, N.L., E-mail: nathaniel.scholz@noaa.gov [NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, 2725 Montlake Blvd. E., Seattle, WA 98112 (United States); Lydy, M.J., E-mail: mlydy@siu.edu [Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center and Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, 171 Life Sciences II, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Urban streams of the Pacific Northwest provide spawning and rearing habitat for a variety of salmon species, and food availability for developing salmon could be adversely affected by pesticide residues in these waterbodies. Sediments from Oregon and Washington streams were sampled to determine if current-use pyrethroid insecticides from residential neighborhoods were reaching aquatic habitats, and if they were at concentrations acutely toxic to sensitive invertebrates. Approximately one-third of the 35 sediment samples contained measurable pyrethroids. Bifenthrin was the pyrethroid of greatest concern with regards to aquatic life toxicity, consistent with prior studies elsewhere. Toxicity to Hyalella azteca and/or Chironomus dilutus was found in two sediment samples at standard testing temperature (23 deg. C), and in one additional sample at a more environmentally realistic temperature (13 deg. C). Given the temperature dependency of pyrethroid toxicity, low temperatures typical of northwest streams can increase the potential for toxicity above that indicated by standard testing protocols. - Highlights: > Salmon-bearing creeks can be adversely impacted by insecticides from urban runoff. > Pyrethroid insecticides were found in one-third of the creeks in Washington and Oregon. > Two creeks contained concentrations acutely lethal to sensitive invertebrates. > Bifenthrin was of greatest concern, though less than in prior studies. > Standard toxicity testing underestimates the ecological risk of pyrethroids. - Pyrethroid insecticides are present in sediments of urban creeks of Oregon and Washington, though less commonly than in studies elsewhere in the U.S.

  12. Antarctic Starfish (Echinodermata, Asteroidea) from the ANDEEP3 expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Bruno; Jangoux, Michel; Wilmes, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This dataset includes information on sea stars collected during the ANDEEP3 expedition, which took place in 2005. The expedition focused on deep-sea stations in the Powell Basin and Weddell Sea. Sea stars were collected using an Agassiz trawl (3m, mesh-size 500µm), deployed in 16 stations during the ANTXXII/3 (ANDEEP3, PS72) expedition of the RV Polarstern. Sampling depth ranged from 1047 to 4931m. Trawling distance ranged from 731 to 3841m. The sampling area ranges from -41°S to -71°S (latitude) and from 0 to -65°W (longitude). A complete list of stations is available from the PANGAEA data system (http://www.pangaea.de/PHP/CruiseReports.php?b=Polarstern), including a cruise report (http://epic-reports.awi.de/3694/1/PE_72.pdf). The dataset includes 50 records, with individual counts ranging from 1-10, reaching a total of 132 specimens. The andeep3-Asteroidea is a unique dataset as it covers an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean, and that very little information was available regarding Antarctic deep-sea starfish. Before this study, most of the information available focused on starfish from shallower depths than 1000m. This dataset allowed to make unique observations, such as the fact that some species were only present at very high depths (Hymenaster crucifer, Hymenaster pellucidus, Hymenaster praecoquis, Psilaster charcoti, Freyella attenuata, Freyastera tuberculata, Styrachaster chuni and Vemaster sudatlanticus were all found below -3770m), while others displayed remarkable eurybathy, with very high depths amplitudes (Bathybiaster loripes (4842m), Lysasterias adeliae (4832m), Lophaster stellans (4752m), Cheiraster planeta (4708m), Eremicaster crassus (4626m), Lophaster gaini (4560m) and Ctenodiscus australis (4489m)). Even if the number of records is relatively small, the data bring many new insights on the taxonomic, bathymetric and geographic distributions of Southern starfish, covering a very large sampling zone. The dataset also brings

  13. Antarctic Starfish (Echinodermata, Asteroidea from the ANDEEP3 expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Danis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This dataset includes information on sea stars collected during the ANDEEP3 expedition, which took place in 2005. The expedition focused on deep-sea stations in the Powell Basin and Weddell Sea.Sea stars were collected using an Agassiz trawl (3m, mesh-size 500µm, deployed in 16 stations during the ANTXXII/3 (ANDEEP3, PS72 expedition of the RV Polarstern. Sampling depth ranged from 1047 to 4931m. Trawling distance ranged from 731 to 3841m. The sampling area ranges from -41°S to -71°S (latitude and from 0 to -65°W (longitude. A complete list of stations is available from the PANGAEA data system (http://www.pangaea.de/PHP/CruiseReports.php?b=Polarstern, including a cruise report (http://epic-reports.awi.de/3694/1/PE_72.pdf.The dataset includes 50 records, with individual counts ranging from 1-10, reaching a total of 132 specimens.The andeep3-Asteroidea is a unique dataset as it covers an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean, and that very little information was available regarding Antarctic deep-sea starfish. Before this study, most of the information available focused on starfish from shallower depths than 1000m. This dataset allowed to make unique observations, such as the fact that some species were only present at very high depths (Hymenaster crucifer, Hymenaster pellucidus, Hymenaster praecoquis, Psilaster charcoti, Freyella attenuata, Freyastera tuberculata, Styrachaster chuni and Vemaster sudatlanticus were all found below -3770m, while others displayed remarkable eurybathy, with very high depths amplitudes (Bathybiaster loripes (4842m, Lysasterias adeliae (4832m, Lophaster stellans (4752m, Cheiraster planeta (4708m, Eremicaster crassus (4626m, Lophaster gaini (4560m and Ctenodiscus australis (4489m.Even if the number of records is relatively small, the data bring many new insights on the taxonomic, bathymetric and geographic distributions of Southern starfish, covering a very large sampling zone. The dataset also brings to light

  14. Antarctic Starfish (Echinodermata, Asteroidea) from the ANDEEP3 expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danis, Bruno; Jangoux, Michel; Wilmes, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This dataset includes information on sea stars collected during the ANDEEP3 expedition, which took place in 2005. The expedition focused on deep-sea stations in the Powell Basin and Weddell Sea.Sea stars were collected using an Agassiz trawl (3m, mesh-size 500µm), deployed in 16 stations during the ANTXXII/3 (ANDEEP3, PS72) expedition of the RV Polarstern. Sampling depth ranged from 1047 to 4931m. Trawling distance ranged from 731 to 3841m. The sampling area ranges from -41°S to -71°S (latitude) and from 0 to -65°W (longitude). A complete list of stations is available from the PANGAEA data system (http://www.pangaea.de/PHP/CruiseReports.php?b=Polarstern), including a cruise report (http://epic-reports.awi.de/3694/1/PE_72.pdf).The dataset includes 50 records, with individual counts ranging from 1-10, reaching a total of 132 specimens.The andeep3-Asteroidea is a unique dataset as it covers an under-explored region of the Southern Ocean, and that very little information was available regarding Antarctic deep-sea starfish. Before this study, most of the information available focused on starfish from shallower depths than 1000m. This dataset allowed to make unique observations, such as the fact that some species were only present at very high depths (Hymenaster crucifer, Hymenaster pellucidus, Hymenaster praecoquis, Psilaster charcoti, Freyella attenuata, Freyastera tuberculata, Styrachaster chuni and Vemaster sudatlanticus were all found below -3770m), while others displayed remarkable eurybathy, with very high depths amplitudes (Bathybiaster loripes (4842m), Lysasterias adeliae (4832m), Lophaster stellans (4752m), Cheiraster planeta (4708m), Eremicaster crassus (4626m), Lophaster gaini (4560m) and Ctenodiscus australis (4489m)).Even if the number of records is relatively small, the data bring many new insights on the taxonomic, bathymetric and geographic distributions of Southern starfish, covering a very large sampling zone. The dataset also brings to light six

  15. Holocene paleoenviroments of northwest Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.G. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Bettis, E.A. III [Iowa Department of Natural Resources, Iowa City, IA (United States); Schwert, D.P. [North Dakota State Univ., Fargo, ND (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents the biotic, sedimentary, geomorphic, and climatic history of the upper part of the Roberts Creek Basin, northeastern Iowa for the late-glacial and Holocene, and compares these records with a C-O isotopic sequence from Coldwater Cave, 60 km northwest of Roberts Creek. the biotic record (pollen, vascular plant and bryophyte macrofossils, and insects) is preserved in floodplain alluvium that underlies three constructional surfaces separated by low scarps. Each surface is underlain by a lithologically and temporally distinct alluvial fill. The highest surface is underlain by the Gunder Member of the Deforest Formation, dating from 11,000 to 4000 yr BP; beneath the intermediate level is the Roberts Creek Member, dating from 4000 to 400 yr BP; and the lowest level is underlain by the Camp Creek Member, deposited during the last 380 yr. Pollen and plant macrofossils in the alluvial fill show that a typical late-glacial spruce forest was replaced by Quercus and Ulmus in the early Holocene. This early-to-middle Holocene forest became dominated by medic elements such as Acer saccharum, Tila americana, Ostyra virginiana, and Carpinus caroliniana as late as 5500 yr BP; in contrast, the closest sites to the west and north were at their warmest and driest were covered by prairie vegetation between 6500 and 5500 yr BP. After 5500 yr BP, the forest in the roberts Creek area was replaced by prairie, as indicated by a rich assemblage of plant macrofossils, although only Ambrosia and Poaceae became abundant in the pollen record. The return of Quercus {approx} 3000 BP (while nonarboreal pollen percentages remained relatively high) indicates the oak savanna prevailed with little change until settlement time. 83 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Mathematics in narratives of Geodetic expeditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrall, Mary

    2006-12-01

    In eighteenth-century France, geodesy (the measure of the earth's shape) became an arena where mathematics and narrative intersected productively. Mathematics played a crucial role not only in the measurements and analysis necessary to geodesy but also in the narrative accounts that presented the results of elaborate and expensive expeditions to the reading public. When they returned to France to write these accounts after their travels, mathematician-observers developed a variety of ways to display numbers and mathematical arguments and techniques. The numbers, equations, and diagrams they produced could not be separated from the story of their acquisition. Reading these accounts for the interplay of these two aspects--the mathematical and the narrative--shows how travelers articulated the intellectual and physical difficulties of their work to enhance the value of their results for specialist and lay readers alike.

  17. H-Isotopic Composition of Apatite in Northwest Africa 7034

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Barnes, J. J.; Santos, A. R.; Boyce, J. W.; Anand, M.; Franchi, I. A.; Agee, C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 and its pairings comprise a regolith breccia with a basaltic bulk composition [1] that yields a better match than any other martian meteorite to estimates of Mars' bulk crust composition [1]. Given the similarities between NWA 7034 and the martian crust, NWA 7034 may represent an important sample for constraining the crustal composition of components that cannot be measured directly by remote sensing. In the present study, we seek to constrain the H isotopic composition of the martian crust using Cl-rich apatite in NWA 7034.

  18. The Indigo V Indian Ocean Expedition: a prototype for citizen microbial oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, Federico; Senstius, Jacob; Cullen, Jay; Lauro, Rachelle; Neches, Russell; Grzymski, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Microbial Oceanography has long been an extremely expensive discipline, requiring ship time for sample collection and thereby economically constraining the number of samples collected. This is especially true for under-sampled water bodies such as the Indian Ocean. Specialised scientific equipment only adds to the costs. Moreover, long term monitoring of microbial communities and large scale modelling of global biogeochemical cycles requires the collection of high-density data both temporally and spatially in a cost-effective way. Thousands of private ocean-going vessels are cruising around the world's oceans every day. We believe that a combination of new technologies, appropriate laboratory protocols and strategic operational partnerships will allow researchers to broaden the scope of participation in basic oceanographic research. This will be achieved by equipping sailing vessels with small, satcom-equipped sampling devices, user-friendly collection techniques and a 'pre-addressed-stamped-envelope' to send in the samples for analysis. We aim to prove that 'bigger' is not necessarily 'better' and the key to greater understanding of the world's oceans is to forge the way to easier and cheaper sample acquisition. The ultimate goal of the Indigo V Expedition is to create a working blue-print for 'citizen microbial oceanography'. We will present the preliminary outcomes of the first Indigo V expedition, from Capetown to Singapore, highlighting the challenges and opportunities of such endeavours.

  19. The Twelfth Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica: Events and achievements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhargalkar, V.K.

    The twelfth Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica comprising 56 members coming from different scientific organisations/institutions and the logistic contingent from three wings of defense services was flagged off by Shri Ravi Naik, Honourable...

  20. Biological results of the Snellius expedition : XXIX. Echinodermata, Asteroidea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jangoux, M.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight species of starfish were collected during the Snellius Expedition (19291930). The collection contains seven rare or uncommon species, i.e., Astropecten novaeguineae, A. sumbawanus, Celerina heffernani, Fromia eusticha, Disasterina abnormalis, Nepanthia briareus and Echinaster

  1. Field Science Ethnography: Methods For Systematic Observation on an Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, William J.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Haughton-Mars expedition is a multidisciplinary project, exploring an impact crater in an extreme environment to determine how people might live and work on Mars. The expedition seeks to understand and field test Mars facilities, crew roles, operations, and computer tools. I combine an ethnographic approach to establish a baseline understanding of how scientists prefer to live and work when relatively unemcumbered, with a participatory design approach of experimenting with procedures and tools in the context of use. This paper focuses on field methods for systematically recording and analyzing the expedition's activities. Systematic photography and time-lapse video are combined with concept mapping to organize and present information. This hybrid approach is generally applicable to the study of modern field expeditions having a dozen or more multidisciplinary participants, spread over a large terrain during multiple field seasons.

  2. 1996 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1996-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. Aside from these purposes, the White Book is used for input to BPA`s resource planning process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). 11 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Problems in the Optimization of Manned Interplanetary Expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiforenko, B. N.; Vasil'Ev, I. Yu.

    Within the scope of the unified variation problem the authors discuss the optimization of parameters, choosing flight trajectories and optimal flight control as well as control of life support systems in spacecraft in manned interplanetary expeditions. They examine the efficiency of ejecting the life support systems waste by jets from high-thrust rocket engines as compared to partial waste regeneration. They confirm the possibility of manned expeditions to Mars before efficient life support systems based on biological regeneration are developed.

  4. Arctic Collaboration: Developing a Successful Researcher/Teacher Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotnicki, S.; Loranty, M. M.

    2016-12-01

    Are you a researcher working in the polar regions of the world or a K-12 science teacher who would like to be part of a field research expedition in the polar regions? Researchers and K-12 science teachers can apply for funding from PolarTREC, a program that pairs researchers and teachers to conduct field science in Antarctica and the Arctic. Our poster presentation will offer details of one such successful researcher/teacher partnership. During the summer of 2016, Science Teacher Stan Skotnicki (Cheektowaga Central Middle School in Buffalo, NY) was teamed up with Assistant Professor Mike Loranty (Colgate University) to study vegetation and ecosystem impacts on permafrost vulnerability. Stan joined Mike and his research team in Northeastern Siberia preparing field sites, collecting data, processing samples, discussing methods, and planning daily activities. In order to raise awareness and broaden the impact of the research being conducted, Stan communicated the science through a series of journals on the PolarTREC website with his students, staff, and members of the community. Additionally, Mike and Stan held a live webinar from Siberia discussing the content of the research, the nature of the fieldwork, and why it was important to travel so far for this information. This expedition allowed Stan to experience working with a field research team for an extended period of time. Mike benefited from having a team member dedicated to learning about and communicating project details that also provided valuable field assistance. Stan gets to bring his hands-on experience back to his classroom in Buffalo and Mike has the opportunity to share his research with a new and different audience, including presenting to students at Cheektowaga Central with the help of his undergraduate students. This model of collaboration provides a number of valuable benefits for both teachers and researchers. While the PolarTREC program provides necessary logistics and funding to conduct these

  5. Raman Spectroscopy: an essential tool for future IODP expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andò, Sergio; Garzanti, Eduardo; Kulhanek, Denise K.

    2016-04-01

    The scientific drilling of oceanic sedimentary sequences plays a fundamental part in provenance studies, paleoclimate recostructions, and source-to-sink investigations (e.g., France-Lanord et al., 2015; Pandey et al., 2015). When studying oceanic deposits, Raman spectroscopy can and does represent an essential flexible tool for the multidisciplinary approach necessary to integrate the insight provided by different disciplines. This new user-friendly technique opens up an innovative avenue to study in real time the composition of detrital mineral grains of any origin, complementing traditional methods of provenance analysis (e.g., sedimentary petrography, heavy minerals; Andò and Garzanti, 2014). Raman spectra can readily reveal the chemistry of foraminiferal tests, nannofossils and other biogenic debris for the study of ecosystem evolution and paleoclimate, or the Ca/Mg ratio in biogenic or terrigenous carbonates for geological or marine biological applications and oil exploration (Borromeo et al., 2015). For the study of pelagic or turbiditic muds, which represent the bulk of the deep-marine sedimentary record, Raman spectroscopy allows us to identify silt-sized grains down to the size of a few microns with the same precision level required in quantitative provenance analysis of sand-sized sediments (Andò et al., 2011). Silt and siltstone also represent a very conspicuous part of the stratigraphic record onshore and usually preserve original mineralogical assemblages better than more permeable interbedded sand and sandstone (Blatt, 1985). Raman spectra can be obtained on sample volumes of only a few cubic microns by a confocal micro-Raman coupled with a standard polarizing light microscope using a 50× objective. The size of this apparatus can be easily placed onboard an IODP vessel to provide crucial information and quickly solve identification problems for the benefit of a wide range of scientists during future expeditions. Cited references Andò, S., Vignola

  6. Intestinal helminths of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes in north-west Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magi M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 180 foxes (Vulpes vulpes from an area scarcely investigated of north-west Italy, were examined for intestinal helminths using sedimentation and counting technique (SCT. Faecal samples were submitted to centrifugation with 50 % zinc sulphate used as flotation solution.

  7. Northwest Forest Plan—the first 15 years (1994–2008): watershed condition status and trend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven H. Lanigan; Sean N. Gordon; Peter Eldred; Mark Isley; Steve Wilcox; Chris Moyer; Heidi. Andersen

    2012-01-01

    We used two data sets to evaluate stream and watershed condition for sixth-field watersheds in each aquatic province within the Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP) area: stream data and upslope data. The stream evaluation was based on inchannel data (e.g., substrate, pieces of large wood, water temperature, pool frequency, and macroinvertebrates) we sampled from 2002 to 2009...

  8. Increasing Shore-based Participation of Scientists & Students in Telepresence-enabled Nautilus Expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K. L. C.; Raineault, N.; Carey, S.; Eberli, G. P.; John, B. E.; Cheadle, M. J.; German, C. R.; Mirmalek, Z.; Pallant, A.

    2016-02-01

    As the US oceanographic research fleet shrinks, reducing seagoing opportunities for scientists and students, remote participation in cruises via telepresence will become increasingly vital. The Nautilus Exploration Program is improving the experience of shoreside participants through the development of new tools and methodologies for connecting them to expeditions in real time increasing accessibility to oceanographic cruises. The Scientist Ashore Program is a network of scientists around the world who participate in Exploration Vessel Nautilus expeditions from their own labs or homes. We have developed a suite of collaboration tools to allow scientists to view video and data in real time, as well as to communicate with ship-based and other shore-based participants to enable remote participation in cruises. Post-cruise, scientists and students may access digital data and biological and geological samples from our partner shore-based repositories: the University of Rhode Island Inner Space Center, Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology, and URI Marine Geological Samples Lab. We present examples of successful shore-based participation by scientists and students in Nautilus expeditions. In 2013, Drs. Cheadle and John stood watch 24/7 with ten undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Wyoming, recording geologic features and samples, during a cruise to the Cayman Rise. The Straits of Florida & Great Bahama Bank cruise was co-led by Dr. Eberli at the University of Miami in 2014, greatly complementing existing data. That same year, the ISC hosted four early career scientists and their twelve undergraduate students who led dives from shore in collaboration with Dr. Carey, Lead Scientist at sea on the Kick'em Jenny Volcano & the Barbados Mud Volcanoes cruise. In 2015, 12 Scientists Ashore worked in collaboration with the ship-based team on the exploration of Galapagos National Park, and more than 20 are working with OET on post-cruise data & sample analysis.

  9. Validation Efforts of the Pacific Northwest River Restoration Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall, J. M.; Katz, S. L.; Morehead, M. D.

    2005-12-01

    The improvement of science in river restoration relies heavily on the evaluation of previously established projects in order to assess the ecosystem response and project outcome (Bernhard et al, 2005). To facilitate this, there needs to be competent project tracking and documentation of outcomes. In the Pacific Northwest, the National Marine Fisheries Service's Northwest Fisheries Science Center has compiled a database containing over 26,000 restoration actions at 36,000 locations in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana (Katz, et al. in review). Recent efforts have been undertaken to validate this database through selection of random samples for telephone interviews and field site visits. 47 project managers were interviewed via telephone regarding their restoration activities within four project category intents. In addition, six Columbia River sub-basins were selected for site validation sampling of 170 projects. The basins included for site validations are the Lemhi and Pahsimeroi Rivers in Idaho, the Methow and Entiat Rivers in Washington, and the Upper and Lower John Day Rivers in Oregon. Survey results are presented with statistical estimators to validate the database. Regional trends in river restoration were found to exist and differences were found between reporting agencies and on the smaller, local scale. The implementation of restoration activities is examined to see if projects are being instigated as intended and case studies are examined to reveal lessons learned from practitioners. In general, the effectiveness of various river restoration activities in the Pacific Northwest would be better charted through standardization in project tracking and documentation. References Bernhardt, E. S., Palmer, M. A., Allan, J. D., Alexander, G., Barnas, K., Brooks, S., Carr, J., Clayton, S., Dahm, C., Follstad-Shah, J., Galat, D., Gloss, S., Goodwin, P., Hart, D., Hassett, B., Jenkinson, J., Katz, S., Kondolf, G. M., Lake, P. S., Lave, R., Meyer, J. L., O

  10. The German-Tanzanian Tendaguru Expedition 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-D. Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The celebrated fossil locality of Tendaguru (Tanzania, East Africa has been well known for its unique Late Jurassic dinosaur assemblages since the early decades of the 20th century. Recently, within the scope of the German-Tanzanian Tendaguru project, an expedition returned to Tendaguru with the aim of collecting microvertebrates, micro- and macroinvertebrates, plant fossils and new sedimentological and stratigraphical data. Applying a multidisciplinary research approach, the data collected were used to address various controversial issues regarding the Tendaguru Beds. These include their exact age, depositional environments and reconstructions of the palaeoecosystems in which the dinosaurs lived. Field work resulted in a new standard section for the Tendaguru Beds. Preliminary biostratigraphic results, based on ammonites, charophytes and palynomorphs, support a Late Kimmeridgian age for the Nerinea Bed, an early Tithonian age for the Trigonia smeei Bed, and an Early Cretaceous (possibly Valanginian to Hauterivian age for the Trigonia schwarzi Bed. Facies analysis of the Tendaguru Beds indicates environments ranging from storm- and tide-influenced, siliciclastic coastal barrier systems, ooid sand bar complexes and backbarrier tidal flats to sabkha-like coastal plains with brackish lakes and pools. Sedimentological indicators of palaeoclimate and palynological data point to a subtropical to tropical climate with pronounced dry seasons. In concert with sedimentological data, quantitative palaeoecological analysis of macroinvertebrates helped to finetune understanding of environmental factors such as substrate conditions, salinity, sedimentation rate and water depth. Along with abundant microvertebrate remains and fragments of fusain and cuticles, these new data have considerably improved our knowledge of the fauna and flora found in the Tendaguru Beds, and provide a solid basis for developing a better understanding of the Late Jurassic and Early

  11. Sodium dichromate expedited response action assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) perform an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill. The ERA lead regulatory agency is Ecology and EPA is the support agency. The ERA was categorized as non-time-critical, which required preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA). The EE/CA was included in the ERA proposal. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the removal action may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. This ERA process started in March 1992. The ERA proposal went through a parallel review process with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE Richland Operations (RL), EPA, Ecology, and a 30-day public comment period. Ecology and EPA issued an Action Agreement Memorandum in March 1993 (Appendix A). The memorandum directed excavation of all anomalies and disposal of the collected materials at the Hanford Site Central Landfill. Primary field activities were completed by the end of April 1993. Final waste disposal of a minor quantity of hazardous waste was completed in July 1993.

  12. N Springs expedited response action proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Since signing the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) in 1989, the parties to the agreement have recognized the need to modify the approach to conducting investigations, studies, and cleanup actions at Hanford. To implement this approach, the parties have jointly developed the Hanford Past-Practice Strategy. The strategy defines a non-time-critical expedited response action (ERA) as a response action ``needed to abate a threat to human health or welfare or the environment where sufficient time exists for formal planning prior to initiation of response. In accordance with the past-practice strategy, DOE proposes to conduct an ERA at the N Springs, located in the Hanford 100 N Area, to substantially reduce the strontium-90 transport into the river through the groundwater pathway. The purpose of this ERA proposal is to provide sufficient information to select a preferred alternative at N Springs. The nature of an ERA requires that alternatives developed for the ERA be field ready; therefore, all the technologies proposed for the ERA should be capable of addressing the circumstances at N Springs. A comparison of these alternatives is made based on protectiveness, cost, technical feasibility, and institutional considerations to arrive at a preferred alternative. Following the selection of an alternative, a design phase will be conducted; the design phase will include a detailed look at design parameters, performance specifications, and costs of the selected alternative. Testing will be conducted as required to generate design data.

  13. 75 FR 48986 - Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... 1969 (NEPA) on a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Northwest Area Water Supply..., Northwest Area Water Supply Project EIS, Bureau of Reclamation, Dakotas Area Office, P.O. Box 1017, Bismarck...

  14. SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND PACIFIC NORTHWEST SALMON RECOVERY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throughout the Pacific Northwest, since 1850, all wild salmon runs have declined and some have disappeared. Billions of dollars have been spent in a so-far failed attempt to reverse the long-term decline. Each year, hundreds of millions of dollars continue to be spent in variou...

  15. Níveis de cobre em amostras de cachaça produzidas na região noroeste do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil Levels of copper in "cachaça" samples produced in the Northwest region of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Garbin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de conhecer a qualidade, com destaque para os níveis de cobre, foram analisadas 25 amostras de cachaça artesanal, produzidas e comercializadas em 17 municípios pertencentes às microrregiões Ijuí, Cruz Alta, Santa Rosa e Três Passos, que integram o noroeste do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil e, compararam-se os valores encontrados, com aqueles estabelecidos pela Legislação. Para as análises, procedeu-se a avaliação dos aspectos gerais das amostras através de observações visuais e olfativas, conforme as recomendações do Ministério da Agricultura para análise de bebidas alcoólicas destiladas. O teor alcoólico foi determinado utilizando-se método densimétrico e os teores de cobre foram determinados através de espectrofotometria de absorção atômica (EAA. Aplicou-se os testes de ANOVA e Tukey. Foram constatados, a partir da análise dos aspectos gerais, que 72% das amostras apresentaram anormalidades de limpidez. Verificou-se que a Microrregião Três Passos apresentou 42,86% de suas amostras fora dos limites estabelecidos pela legislação para o teor alcoólico, entretanto os valores médios deste mesmo parâmetro, para todas as amostras das quatro microrregiões, situaram-se dentro do que estabelece a legislação. Quanto aos níveis de cobre, a maior concentração média foi observada na Microrregião Três Passos (10,22mg L-1 enquanto que na Microrregião Cruz Alta foram observados os menores níveis médios deste metal (2,95mg L-1. Apenas as microrregiões Ijuí e Três Passos apresentaram diferenças estatisticamente significativas (PWhit objective to know the quality, with prominence for the copper levels, 25 samples of craftwork "cachaça" were analyzed, produced and commercialized in 17 cities from four Microregions: Ijuí, Cruz Alta, Santa Rosa and Três Passos, that integrate the northwest of Rio Grande do Sul Brazil and, were compared the found values with those established by the Legislation. For the

  16. 1991 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-12-01

    This study establishes the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) planning basis for supplying electricity to BPA customers. The Loads and Resources Study is presented in three documents: (1) this summary of federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; (2) a technical appendix detailing forecasted Pacific Northwest economic trends and loads, and (3) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates our 1990 study. BPS's long-range planning incorporates resource availability with a range of forecasted electrical consumption. The forecasted future electrical demands-firm loads--are subtracted from the projected capability of existing resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA can sell to increase revenues. Conversely, if firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity, then additional conservation, contract purchases, or generating resources will be needed to meet load growth. This study analyzes the Pacific Northwest's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional profile, which includes loads and resources in addition to the federal system. This study presents the federal system and regional analyses for five load forecasts: high, medium-high, medium, medium-low, and low. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for 1992- 2012.

  17. Natural incidence of bean viruses in the northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Rastgou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bean is considered as one of the most important legumes around the world. Viral diseases are a major yield reducing factor in bean production. Bean samples with virus-like symptoms like severe or mild mosaic, vein banding, leaf curling, blistering and necrosis were collected from different bean fields in Urmia (Northwest of Iran during the growing seasons of 2013 and 2014. Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV, Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV were detected by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay. Mixed infection of BCMV and BCMNV were found. BCMNV was the most frequent virus in this region whereas BYMV and TYLCV were each detected just in one sample. This is the first report of BCMNV, BCMV, BYMV, TSWV, TMV and TYLCV incidence on bean in Urmia, Iran.

  18. IODP Expeditions 309 and 312 Drill an Intact Section of Upper Oceanic Basement into Gabbros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas S. Wilson

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program’s (IODP Expeditions 309 and 312 successfully completed the first sampling of an intact section of upper oceanic crust, through lavas and the sheeted dikes into the uppermost gabbros. Hole 1256D, which was initiated on the Ocean Drilling Program’s (ODP Leg 206, now penetrates to >1500 mbsf and >1250 m sub-basement. The first gabbroic rocks were encountered at 1407 mbsf. Below this, the hole penetrates ~100 m into a complex zone of fractionated gabbros intruded into contact metamorphosed dikes.

  19. Challenges in determining b value in the Northwest Geysers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saltiel, S.; Boyle, K.; Majer, E.

    2011-02-01

    Past analyses of the Gutenberg-Richter b-value in the Geysers and other geothermal settings have revealed a deviation from the assumed linear relationship in log space between magnitude and the number of earthquakes. In this study of the Northwest Geysers, we found a gently-sloping discontinuity in the b-value curve. This is especially apparent when comparing the least-squares fit (LSQ) of the curve to the fit obtained by the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), a widely-respected method of analyzing magnitude-frequency relationships. This study will describe the assumptions made when using each of these two methods and will also explore how they can be used in conjunction to investigate the characteristics of the observed b-value curve. To understand whether slope-fit differences in the LSQR and MLE methods is due to physical properties of the system or due to artifacts from errors in sampling, it is extremely important to consider the catalog completeness, magnitude bin size, number of events, and differences in source mechanisms for the events comprising the study volume. This work will hopefully lead to informative interpretations of frequency-magnitude curves for the Northwest Geysers, a geothermal area of ongoing high-volume coldwater injection and steam production. Through this statistical investigation of the catalog contents, we hope to better understand the dominant source mechanisms and the role of injected fluids in the creation of seismic clustering around nearly 60 wells of varying depths and injection volumes.

  20. A guide to soil samplng and analysis on the National Forests of the Inland Northwest United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb Page-Dumroese; Al Harvey; Marty Jurgensen

    1995-01-01

    This guide details soil collection methods, sample analysis, and data translation. It outlines what field soil scientists need to make accurate interpretations of site information. Included are instructions for sampling typical Andisols found on National Forests of the Inland Northwest United States.

  1. Lessons from Previous Expeditions for the Human Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuster, J.

    Anecdotal comparisons frequently are made between expeditions of the past and future space missions. From an engineering perspective, the differences between future and past expeditions are considerable. Spacecraft are far more complex than sailing ships, and one of the factors that drives the complexity is the requirement to support the crew in the hostile environment of space. The technological differences are significant, but from a behavioral perspective, are the differences really that great between confinement in a small wooden ship locked in the polar ice cap and confinement in a small high-technology ship hurtling through interplanetary space? The psychological differences probably are few. This paper discusses some of the most salient behavioral and technical lessons from previous expeditions that can be applied to facilitate the human explora- tion of Mars.

  2. Ship Sensor Observations for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly measurements made by selected ship sensors on the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007" expedition sponsored by the...

  3. Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006" expedition, May 7 through June 2, 2006. Additional...

  4. Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Information about dive activities were recorded by personnel during the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2007" expedition, June 4 through July 6, 2007. Additional...

  5. 77 FR 12724 - International Postal Service-Global Expedited Package Services (GEPS) Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... Part 20 International Postal Service--Global Expedited Package Services (GEPS) Contracts AGENCY: Postal... change for the international competitive product Global Expedited Package Services (GEPS) Contracts. The... States Postal Service, International Mail Manual (IMM ) to incorporate a change concerning the...

  6. Sequencing at sea: challenges and experiences in Ion Torrent PGM sequencing during the 2013 Southern Line Islands Research Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wei Lim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Genomics and metagenomics have revolutionized our understanding of marine microbial ecology and the importance of microbes in global geochemical cycles. However, the process of DNA sequencing has always been an abstract extension of the research expedition, completed once the samples were returned to the laboratory. During the 2013 Southern Line Islands Research Expedition, we started the first effort to bring next generation sequencing to some of the most remote locations on our planet. We successfully sequenced twenty six marine microbial genomes, and two marine microbial metagenomes using the Ion Torrent PGM platform on the Merchant Yacht Hanse Explorer. Onboard sequence assembly, annotation, and analysis enabled us to investigate the role of the microbes in the coral reef ecology of these islands and atolls. This analysis identified phosphonate as an important phosphorous source for microbes growing in the Line Islands and reinforced the importance of L-serine in marine microbial ecosystems. Sequencing in the field allowed us to propose hypotheses and conduct experiments and further sampling based on the sequences generated. By eliminating the delay between sampling and sequencing, we enhanced the productivity of the research expedition. By overcoming the hurdles associated with sequencing on a boat in the middle of the Pacific Ocean we proved the flexibility of the sequencing, annotation, and analysis pipelines.

  7. Sequencing at sea: challenges and experiences in Ion Torrent PGM sequencing during the 2013 Southern Line Islands Research Expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Yan Wei; Cuevas, Daniel A; Silva, Genivaldo Gueiros Z; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Haas, Andreas F; Hatay, Mark; Sanchez, Savannah E; Wegley-Kelly, Linda; Dutilh, Bas E; Harkins, Timothy T; Lee, Clarence C; Tom, Warren; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Zgliczynski, Brian; Vermeij, Mark J A; Rohwer, Forest; Edwards, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Genomics and metagenomics have revolutionized our understanding of marine microbial ecology and the importance of microbes in global geochemical cycles. However, the process of DNA sequencing has always been an abstract extension of the research expedition, completed once the samples were returned to the laboratory. During the 2013 Southern Line Islands Research Expedition, we started the first effort to bring next generation sequencing to some of the most remote locations on our planet. We successfully sequenced twenty six marine microbial genomes, and two marine microbial metagenomes using the Ion Torrent PGM platform on the Merchant Yacht Hanse Explorer. Onboard sequence assembly, annotation, and analysis enabled us to investigate the role of the microbes in the coral reef ecology of these islands and atolls. This analysis identified phosphonate as an important phosphorous source for microbes growing in the Line Islands and reinforced the importance of L-serine in marine microbial ecosystems. Sequencing in the field allowed us to propose hypotheses and conduct experiments and further sampling based on the sequences generated. By eliminating the delay between sampling and sequencing, we enhanced the productivity of the research expedition. By overcoming the hurdles associated with sequencing on a boat in the middle of the Pacific Ocean we proved the flexibility of the sequencing, annotation, and analysis pipelines.

  8. FRIENDSHIP AMONG PASTORAL FULBE IN NORTHWEST CAMEROON

    OpenAIRE

    Pelican, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses perceptions and practices of friendship among the Mbororo (pastoral Fulbe) in northwest Cameroon. The concept of friendship is culturally and socially embedded, and the author highlights the flexible and multilayered character of friendship in Cameroon. While in Europe and the U.S. the voluntary and emotional connotations of friendship are stressed, for the Mbororo, it includes a significant economic component and may overlap with other relationships, such as kinship an...

  9. Market Quality of Pacific Northwest Pears

    OpenAIRE

    Gallardo, Rosa Karina; Kupferman, Eugene M.; Beaudry, Randolph M.; Blankenship, Sylvia M.; Mitcham, Elizabeth J; Watkins, Christopher B

    2011-01-01

    This study uses data collected from retail grocery chains during marketing season 2003-2004 to examine the external quality and price variations of Pacific Northwest pears. Quality refers to overall fruit appearance and presence of external disorders. Results from a bivariate probit model show that fruit weight and firmness had a positive effect on overall appearance. Results from a hedonic price model show that the recurrence of external disorders is not necessarily negatively correlated wit...

  10. Navigable windows of the Northwest Passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xing-he; Ma, Long; Wang, Jia-yue; Wang, Ye; Wang, Li-na

    2017-09-01

    Artic sea ice loss trends support a greater potential for Arctic shipping. The information of sea ice conditions is important for utilizing Arctic passages. Based on the shipping routes given by ;Arctic Marine Shipping Assessment 2009 Report;, the navigable windows of these routes and the constituent legs were calculated by using sea ice concentration product data from 2006 to 2015, by which a comprehensive knowledge of the sea ice condition of the Northwest Passage was achieved. The results showed that Route 4 (Lancaster Sound - Barrow Strait - Prince Regent Inlet and Bellot Strait - Franklin Strait - Larsen Sound - Victoria Strait - Queen Maud Gulf - Dease Strait - Coronation Gulf - Dolphin and Union Strait - Amundsen Gulf) had the best navigable expectation, Route 2 (Parry Channel - M'Clure Strait) had the worst, and the critical legs affecting the navigation of Northwest Passage were Viscount Melville Sound, Franklin Strait, Victoria Strait, Bellot Strait, M'Clure Strait and Prince of Wales Strait. The shortest navigable period of the routes of Northwest Passage was up to 69 days. The methods used and the results of the study can help the selection and evaluation of Arctic commercial routes.

  11. Assessing rarity of species with low detectability: Lichens in Pacific Northwest forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, T.C.; Cutler, D.R.; Geiser, L.; Alegria, J.; McKenzie, D.

    2004-01-01

    We show how simple statistical analyses of systematically collected inventory data can be used to provide reliable information about the distribution and habitat associations of rare species. Using an existing design-based sampling grid on which epiphytic macrolichens had been inventoried in the Northwest Forest Plan area of the U.S. Pacific Northwest, we (1) estimate frequencies and standard errors for each of 25 lichen species having special management designation (i.e., Survey and Manage), (2) assess the probability that individual species were associated with specific land allocation and forest stand age classifications, and (3) provide estimates of sample sizes necessary to ensure sufficient detections for these analyses. We conclude with a discussion of management and conservation information needs that extant data can satisfy and identify advantages and limitations of random vs. nonrandom sampling strategies. Combining design-assisted and model-assisted approaches can overcome some of the limitations of either single strategy.

  12. 12 CFR 1202.10 - Will FHFA expedite my request or appeal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Will FHFA expedite my request or appeal? 1202... FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT § 1202.10 Will FHFA expedite my request or appeal? (a) Applications for... application must be in writing. FHFA will grant expedited processing, and give the request or appeal priority...

  13. 20 CFR 404.925 - How to request expedited appeals process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determinations, Administrative Review Process, and Reopening of Determinations and Decisions Expedited Appeals Process § 404.925 How to request expedited appeals process. (a) Time... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How to request expedited appeals process. 404...

  14. Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project, Northwest Geysers, CA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, Mark A.

    2013-04-25

    The purpose of the Caldwell Ranch Exploration and Confirmation Project was to drill, test, and confirm the present economic viability of the undeveloped geothermal reservoir in the 870 acre Caldwell Ranch area of the Northwest Geysers that included the CCPA No.1 steam field. All of the drilling, logging, and sampling challenges were met. Three abandoned wells, Prati 5, Prati 14 and Prati 38 were re-opened and recompleted to nominal depths of 10,000 feet in 2010. Two of the wells required sidetracking. The flow tests indicated Prati 5 Sidetrack 1 (P-5 St1), Prati 14 (P-14) and Prati 38 Sidetrack 2 (P-38 St2) were collectively capable of initially producing an equivalent of 12 megawatts (MWe) of steam using a conversion rate of 19,000 pounds of steam/hour

  15. Sleep during an Antarctic summer expedition: new light on "polar insomnia".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Nathalie; Mairesse, Olivier; Cortoos, Aisha; Marcoen, Nele; Neyt, Xavier; Meeusen, Romain

    2017-04-01

    Sleep complaints are consistently cited as the most prominent health and well-being problem in Arctic and Antarctic expeditions, without clear evidence to identify the causal mechanisms. The present investigation aimed at studying sleep and determining circadian regulation and mood during a 4-mo Antarctic summer expedition. All data collection was performed during the continuous illumination of the Antarctic summer. After an habituation night and acclimatization to the environment (3 wk), ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) was performed in 21 healthy male subjects, free of medication. An 18-h profile (saliva sampling every 2 h) of cortisol and melatonin was assessed. Mood, sleepiness, and subjective sleep quality were assessed, and the psychomotor vigilance task was administered. PSG showed, in addition to high sleep fragmentation, a major decrease in slow-wave sleep (SWS) and an increase in stage R sleep. Furthermore, the ultradian rhythmicity of sleep was altered, with SWS occurring mainly at the end of the night and stage R sleep at the beginning. Cortisol secretion profiles were normal; melatonin secretion, however, showed a severe phase delay. There were no mood alterations according to the Profile of Mood States scores, but the psychomotor vigilance test showed an impaired vigilance performance. These results confirm previous reports on "polar insomnia", the decrease in SWS, and present novel insight, the disturbed ultradian sleep structure. A hypothesis is formulated linking the prolonged SWS latency to the phase delay in melatonin.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The present paper presents a rare body of work on sleep and sleep wake regulation in the extreme environment of an Antarctic expedition, documenting the effects of constant illumination on sleep, mood, and chronobiology. For applied research, these results suggest the potential efficiency of melatonin supplementation in similar deployments. For fundamental research, these results warrant further investigation of the

  16. A New Era of Multidisciplinary Expeditions: Recent Opportunities and Progress to Advance the Telepresence Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantwell, K. L.; Kennedy, B. R.; Malik, M.; Gray, L. M.; Elliott, K.; Lobecker, E.; Drewniak, J.; Reser, B.; Crum, E.; Lovalvo, D.

    2016-02-01

    Since it's commissioning in 2008, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer has used telepresence technology both as an outreach tool and as a new way to conduct interdisciplinary science expeditions. NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) has developed a set of collaboration tools and protocols to enable extensive shore-based participation. Telepresence offers unique advantages including access to a large pool of expertise on shore and flexibility to react to new discoveries as they occur. During early years, the telepresence experience was limited to Internet 2 enabled Exploration Command Centers, but with advent of improved bandwidth and new video transcoders, scientists from anywhere with an internet connection can participate in a telepresence expedition. Scientists have also capitalized on social media (Twitter, Facebook, Reddit etc.) by sharing discoveries to leverage the intellectual capital of scientists worldwide and engaging the general public in real-time. Aside from using telepresence to stream video off the ship, the high-bandwidth satellite connection allows for the transfer of large quantities of data in near real-time. This enables not only ship - shore data transfers, but can also support ship - ship collaborations as demonstrated during the 2015 and 2014 seasons where Okeanos worked directly with science teams onboard other vessels to share data and immediately follow up on features of interest, leading to additional discoveries. OER continues to expand its use of telepresence by experimenting with procedures to offload roles previously tied to the ship, such as data acquisition watch standers; prototyping tools for distributed user data analysis and video annotation; and incorporating in-situ sampling devices. OER has also developed improved tools to provide access to archived data to increase data distribution and facilitate additional discoveries post-expedition.

  17. 8 CFR 1235.3 - Inadmissible aliens and expedited removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inadmissible aliens and expedited removal. 1235.3 Section 1235.3 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS INSPECTION OF PERSONS APPLYING FOR ADMISSION § 1235.3 Inadmissible aliens...

  18. Zoological results of the Dutch Scientific Expedition to Central Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1898-01-01

    In a paper dated April 1897 (Notes from the Leyden Museum, 1897, p. 25) Dr. Büttikofer stated that the work of the expedition was still being continued in Borneo, Dr. Nieuwenhuis having once more started for the Upper-Mahakkam with a staff of collectors, and that, according to the latest news he

  19. Jean-Baptiste Charcot, the French Antarctic expedition and scurvy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During the second expedition to the South Pole, Commander Jean-Baptiste Charcot and some members of the crew of “Pourquoi Pas?” developed symptoms suggestive of scurvy. The clinical picture was totally reversed after dietary changes.

  20. Strategies and Procedures for Expediting Election Petitions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Justice delayed, they say, is justice denied. Delay in the dispensation of electoral disputes in Nigeria has become an albatross to the Nigerian nation. It has become a sour point in our electoral process. In this article, the writer meticulously looked at the various strategies and procedures for expediting election petitions and ...

  1. Recognizing and Developing Adaptive Expertise within Outdoor and Expedition Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozer, Mark; Fazey, Ioan; Fazey, John

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive expertise, an individual's ability to perform flexibly and innovatively in novel and unstructured situations, could have particular relevance for expedition and outdoor leaders. This element may be recognized in leadership practitioners who are able to act more effectively when problem-solving in complex, ambiguous and unpredictable…

  2. Joint pricing and inventory replenishment decisions with returns and expediting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Stuart X.

    2012-01-01

    We study a single-item periodic-review model for the joint pricing and inventory replenishment problem with returns and expediting. Demand in consecutive periods are independent random variables and their distributions are price sensitive. At the end of each period, after the demand is realized, a

  3. IODP expedition 347: Baltic Sea basin paleoenvironment and biosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrén, T.; Barker Jorgensen, B.; Cotterill, C.; Green, S.; Slomp, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) expedition 347 cored sediments from different settings of the Baltic Sea covering the last glacial–interglacial cycle. The main aim was to study the geological development of the Baltic Sea in relation to the extreme climate variability of the region with

  4. 8 CFR 287.10 - Expedited internal review process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Immigration and Customs Enforcement, 425 I Street NW., Washington, DC, 20536. (c) Expedited processing of... Section 287.10 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS FIELD... enforcement activities. Alleged violations of the standards for enforcement activities established in...

  5. 1999 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1999-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands--firm loads--are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and ''contracted for'' resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is

  6. South African Climates: Highlights From International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 361

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, S. R.; Hall, I. R.; LeVay, L.

    2016-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 361 drilled six sites on the southeast African margin and in the Indian-Atlantic ocean gateway, southwest Indian Ocean, from 30 January to 31 March 2016. In total, 5175 m of core was recovered, with an average recovery of 102%, during 29.7 days of on-site operations. The sites, situated in the Mozambique Channel, at locations directly influenced by discharge from the Zambezi and Limpopo River catchments, the Natal Valley, the Agulhas Plateau, and the Cape Basin were targeted to reconstruct the history of the Greater Agulhas Current System over the past 5 Ma. The Agulhas Current transports 70 Sv of warm and saline surface waters from the tropical Indian Ocean along the East African margin to the tip of Africa. Exchanges of heat and moisture with the atmosphere influence southern African rainfall patterns. Recent ocean model and paleoceanographic data further point at a potential role of the Agulhas Current in controlling the strength and mode of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) during the Late Pleistocene. The main objectives of the expedition were to document the oceanographic properties of the Agulhas Current through tectonic and climatic changes during the Plio-Pleistocene, to determine the dynamics of the Indian-Atlantic gateway circulation during this time, to examine the connection of the Agulhas leakage and AMOC, to address the influence of the Agulhas Current on African terrestrial climates and potential links to Human evolution. Additionally, the Expedition set out to fulfill the needs of the Ancillary Project Letter, consisting of high-resolution interstitial water samples that will, and to constrain the temperature and salinity profiles of the ocean during the Last Glacial Maximum. Here we highlight some of the expedition successes and show how it has made major strides toward fulfilling each of these objectives. The recovered sequences allowed complete spliced stratigraphic sections

  7. TCGA Expedition: A Data Acquisition and Management System for TCGA Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Uma R; Medvedeva, Olga P; Barmada, M Michael; Blood, Philip D; Chakka, Anish; Luthra, Soumya; Ferreira, Antonio; Wong, Kim F; Lee, Adrian V; Zhang, Zhihui; Budden, Robert; Scott, J Ray; Berndt, Annerose; Berg, Jeremy M; Jacobson, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Project (TCGA) is a National Cancer Institute effort to profile at least 500 cases of 20 different tumor types using genomic platforms and to make these data, both raw and processed, available to all researchers. TCGA data are currently over 1.2 Petabyte in size and include whole genome sequence (WGS), whole exome sequence, methylation, RNA expression, proteomic, and clinical datasets. Publicly accessible TCGA data are released through public portals, but many challenges exist in navigating and using data obtained from these sites. We developed TCGA Expedition to support the research community focused on computational methods for cancer research. Data obtained, versioned, and archived using TCGA Expedition supports command line access at high-performance computing facilities as well as some functionality with third party tools. For a subset of TCGA data collected at University of Pittsburgh, we also re-associate TCGA data with de-identified data from the electronic health records. Here we describe the software as well as the architecture of our repository, methods for loading of TCGA data to multiple platforms, and security and regulatory controls that conform to federal best practices. TCGA Expedition software consists of a set of scripts written in Bash, Python and Java that download, extract, harmonize, version and store all TCGA data and metadata. The software generates a versioned, participant- and sample-centered, local TCGA data directory with metadata structures that directly reference the local data files as well as the original data files. The software supports flexible searches of the data via a web portal, user-centric data tracking tools, and data provenance tools. Using this software, we created a collaborative repository, the Pittsburgh Genome Resource Repository (PGRR) that enabled investigators at our institution to work with all TCGA data formats, and to interrogate these data with analysis pipelines, and associated tools

  8. TCGA Expedition: A Data Acquisition and Management System for TCGA Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma R Chandran

    Full Text Available The Cancer Genome Atlas Project (TCGA is a National Cancer Institute effort to profile at least 500 cases of 20 different tumor types using genomic platforms and to make these data, both raw and processed, available to all researchers. TCGA data are currently over 1.2 Petabyte in size and include whole genome sequence (WGS, whole exome sequence, methylation, RNA expression, proteomic, and clinical datasets. Publicly accessible TCGA data are released through public portals, but many challenges exist in navigating and using data obtained from these sites. We developed TCGA Expedition to support the research community focused on computational methods for cancer research. Data obtained, versioned, and archived using TCGA Expedition supports command line access at high-performance computing facilities as well as some functionality with third party tools. For a subset of TCGA data collected at University of Pittsburgh, we also re-associate TCGA data with de-identified data from the electronic health records. Here we describe the software as well as the architecture of our repository, methods for loading of TCGA data to multiple platforms, and security and regulatory controls that conform to federal best practices.TCGA Expedition software consists of a set of scripts written in Bash, Python and Java that download, extract, harmonize, version and store all TCGA data and metadata. The software generates a versioned, participant- and sample-centered, local TCGA data directory with metadata structures that directly reference the local data files as well as the original data files. The software supports flexible searches of the data via a web portal, user-centric data tracking tools, and data provenance tools. Using this software, we created a collaborative repository, the Pittsburgh Genome Resource Repository (PGRR that enabled investigators at our institution to work with all TCGA data formats, and to interrogate these data with analysis pipelines, and

  9. Temporal Trends and Future Predictions of Mercury Concentrations in Northwest Greenland Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Hair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, Rune; Born, E.W.; Riget, Frank Farsø

    2011-01-01

    Hair samples from 117 Northwest Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were taken during 1892-2008 and analyzed for total mercury (hereafterHg). The sample represented 28 independent years and the aim of the study was to analyze for temporal Hg trends. Mercury concentrations showed yearly...... significant increases of 1.6-1.7% (p polar bear......-2008 concentrations ofHg in Northwest Greenland polar bear hair exceeded the general guideline values of 20-30 μg/g dry weight for terrestrial wildlife, whereas the neurochemical effect level of 5.4 μg Hg/g dry weight proposed for East Greenland polar bears was exceeded in 93.5% of the cases. These results call...

  10. The Construction of Shared Knowledge in an Internet-based Shared Environment for Expeditions (iExpeditions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minjuan; Laffey, James; Poole, Melissa J.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates how participants (39 teenagers and 10 college-age online mentors) interacted and constructed shared knowledge of concepts, goals, tasks, procedures, and solutions when solving a real-world problem in an Internet-mediated project-based learning environment (iExpeditions). The main focus of the study was on how different patterns of…

  11. BOUND PERIODICAL HOLDINGS BATTELLE - NORTHWEST LIBRARY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1967-05-01

    This report lists the bound periodicals in the Technical Library at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, operated by Battelle Memorial Institute. It was prepared from a computer program and is arranged in two parts. Part one is an alphabetical list of journals by title; part two is an arrangement of the journals by subject. The list headings are self-explanatory, with the exception of the title code, which is necessary in the machine processing. The listing is complete through June, 1966 and updates an earlier publication issued in March, 1965.

  12. Quantitative Analysis and Comparison of BMI among Han, Tibetan, and Uygur University Students in Northwest China

    OpenAIRE

    Jingya, Bai; Ye, He; Jing, Wang; Xi, Huanjiu; Tao, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To fully analyze and compare BMI among Han, Tibetan, and Uygur university students, to discuss the differences in their physical properties and physical health, and thus to provide some theoretical suggestions for the improvement of students’ physical health. Methods. The cross-sectional random cluster sampling was used to investigate 10103 Han, Tibetan, and Uygur university students, aged 20–24 in Northwest China, and their height and weight were measured to calculate BMI. The BM...

  13. Antarctic station life: The first 15 years of mixed expeditions to the Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Aspa

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the experiences of women who lived and worked on remote and isolated Antarctic stations for up to 15 months at a time. The study employed purposeful sampling and a longitudinal - processual approach to study women's experiences over the first 15 years of mixed gender Antarctic expeditions. The retrospective analysis was based on a semi-structured interview administered to 14 women upon their return to Australia. The results showed that women referred to the natural physical Antarctic environment as one of the best aspects of their experience and the reason they would recommend the Antarctic to their friends as a good place to work. In describing the worst aspect of their experience, women referred to aspects of Antarctic station life, including: (i) the male dominated nature of station culture; (ii) the impact of interpersonal conflict, including gender based conflict and friction between scientists and trades workers; and (iii) the lack of anonymity associated with living and working with the same group of individuals, mainly men, for up to 12 months or more. The results are discussed within the context of the evolution of Antarctic station culture and recommendations are made in terms of the demography of expeditions, expeditioner selection and recruitment and the ongoing monitoring of Antarctic station culture. The study presents a framework that can be applied to groups and teams living and working in analogous isolated, confined and extreme work environments, including outer space missions.

  14. IODP Expedition 331: Strong and Expansive Subseafloor Hydrothermal Activities in the Okinawa Trough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the IODP Expedition 331 Scientists

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 331 drilled into the Iheya North hydrothermal system in the middle Okinawa Trough in order to investigate active subseafloor microbial ecosystems and their physical and chemical settings. We drilled five sites during Expedition 331 using special guide bases at three holes for reentry, casing, and capping, including installation of a steel mesh platformwith valve controls for postcruise sampling of fluids. At Site C0016, drilling at the base of the North Big Chimney (NBCmound yielded low recovery, but core included the first Kuroko-type black ore ever recovered from the modern subseafloor. The other four sites yielded interbedded hemipelagic and strongly pumiceous volcaniclastic sediment, along with volcanogenic breccias that are variably hydrothermally altered and mineralized. At most sites, analyses of interstitial water and headspace gas yielded complex patterns withdepth and lateral distance of only a few meters. Documented processes included formation of brines and vapor-rich fluids by phase separation and segregation, uptake of Mg and Na by alteration minerals in exchange for Ca, leaching of K at high temperature and uptake at low temperature, anhydrite precipitation, potential microbial oxidation of organic matter and anaerobic oxidation of methane utilizing sulfate, and methanogenesis. Shipboard analyses have found evidence for microbial activity in sediments within the upper 10–30 m below seafloor (mbsf where temperatures were relativelylow, but little evidence in the deeper hydrothermally altered zones and hydrothermal fluid regime.

  15. Amphibian chytrid fungus and ranaviruses in the Northwest Territories, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schock, Danna M; Ruthig, Gregory R; Collins, James P; Kutz, Susan J; Carrière, Suzanne; Gau, Robert J; Veitch, Alasdair M; Larter, Nicholas C; Tate, Douglas P; Guthrie, Glen; Allaire, Daniel G; Popko, Richard A

    2010-11-01

    Pathogens can cause serious declines in host species, and knowing where pathogens associated with host declines occur facilitates understanding host-pathogen ecology. Suspected drivers of global amphibian declines include infectious diseases, with 2 pathogens in particular, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and ranaviruses, causing concern. We explored the host range and geographic distribution of Bd and ranaviruses in the Taiga Plains ecoregion of the Northwest Territories, Canada, in 2007 and 2008. Both pathogens were detected, greatly extending their known geographic distributions. Ranaviruses were widespread geographically, but found only in wood frogs. In contrast, Bd was found at a single site, but was detected in all 3 species of amphibians in the survey area (wood frogs, boreal chorus frogs, western toads). The presence of Bd in the Northwest Territories is not congruent with predicted distributions based on niche models, even though findings from other studies at northern latitudes are consistent with those same models. Unexpectedly, we also found evidence that swabs routinely used to collect samples for Bd screening detected fewer infections than toe clips. Our use and handling of the swabs was consistent with other studies, and the cause of the apparent lack of integrity of swabs is unknown. The ranaviruses detected in our study were confirmed to be Frog Virus 3 by sequence analysis of a diagnostic 500 bp region of the major capsid protein gene. It is unknown whether Bd or ranaviruses are recent arrivals to the Canadian north. However, the genetic analyses required to answer that question can inform larger debates about the origin of Bd in North America as well as the potential effects of climate change and industrial development on the distributions of these important amphibian pathogens.

  16. Proceedings of the Northwest regional energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, A S; Comstock, D R [eds.

    1978-12-01

    The conference was directed toward two main objectives. First, a major portion of the proceedings were to focus on the policies, programs, and priorities of the new US DOE, and their relationships to the Pacific Northwest region. Second, the conference was to explore specific energy issues of regional significance and provide an opportunity for regional feedback on energy policies. The 10 sessions of the conference are Keynote Session: Congress, and the National Energy Plan Sen. Henry Jackson; National Perspectives on Energy Issues (I): An Overview of the NEP, Programs and Priorities of DOE (Alvin Alm and NEP - Conservation and Solar Applications (Don Beattie); and Luncheon address - Alaska Energy Issues (Robert LeResche); National Perspectives on Energy Issues (II): Utility Rate Reform - National Provisions and Relationships to the Pacific Northwest (David Bardin) and Technology for Energy and Long Term Short Alternatives (Robert Thorne); Concurrent Interest Group Sessions: State and Local Roles in Energy Planning and Decision-Making and Industry and University Roles in DOE Research and Programs; Banquet address. The US Energy Future (James Schlesinger); Regional Perspectives on Energy Issues: DOE-X - Organization and Response to Regional Needs (Randall Hardy). What Comes After Number 13 (Sterling Munro), Hanford 1978 (Alex Fremling), and Low Head Hydro and Geothermal (Richard Wood); Lucheon address - The Washington Perspective on Energy (Dixie Lee Ray); Regional Power Planning (Panel); and Conference Wrap Up Session. (MCW)

  17. Northwest Region Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoding, David [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The main objective of the Northwest Clean Energy Application Center (NW CEAC) is to promote and support implementation of clean energy technologies. These technologies include combined heat and power (CHP), district energy, waste heat recovery with a primary focus on waste heat to power, and other related clean energy systems such as stationary fuel cell CHP systems. The northwest states include AK, ID, MT, OR, and WA. The key aim/outcome of the Center is to promote and support implementation of clean energy projects. Implemented projects result in a number of benefits including increased energy efficiency, renewable energy development (when using opportunity fuels), reduced carbon emissions, improved facility economics helping to preserve jobs, and reduced criteria pollutants calculated on an output-based emissions basis. Specific objectives performed by the NW CEAC fall within the following five broad promotion and support categories: 1) Center management and planning including database support; 2) Education and Outreach including plan development, website, target market workshops, and education/outreach materials development 3) Identification and provision of screening assessments & feasibility studies as funded by the facility or occasionally further support of Potential High Impact Projects; 4) Project implementation assistance/trouble shooting; and 5) Development of a supportive clean energy policy and initiative/financing framework.

  18. 2006 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of both the Federal system and the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This surplus energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These energy deficits will be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation

  19. 77 FR 40565 - Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ...: Notice of Administrative Meetings for the Northwest Forest Plan Provincial Advisory Committees. SUMMARY... up under the Northwest Forest Plan. The PIECs facilitate the successful implementation of the Record... administrative meetings will be to inform the current Provincial Advisory Committee membership of the following...

  20. Marginal thinning in Northwest Greenland during 2002-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjær, K. H.; Wahr, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Many glaciers along the southeast and northwest coast of Greenland have accelerated, increasing the Greenland ice sheet's (GrIS) contribution to global sea-level rise. Here, we map elevation changes in northwest Greenland during 2003-2009 using high-resolution Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satell...

  1. Achievements in emergency medical care service, North-West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To analyse the performance of the Emergency Medical Rescue Service (EMRS) in North-West province. Design. A prospective study of the activity of the EMRS. Setting. North-West province, 2002 - 2004. Results. During this period the EMRS response time tended to decrease (reduction of 8 minutes for rural and ...

  2. 7 CFR 1124.2 - Pacific Northwest marketing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Pacific Northwest marketing area. 1124.2 Section 1124.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order...

  3. 75 FR 49518 - Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Northwest Area Water Supply Project, North Dakota AGENCY: Bureau of Reclamation... 1969 (NEPA) on a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Northwest Area Water Supply... Water Supply Project EIS, Bureau of Reclamation, Dakotas Area Office, P.O. Box 1017, Bismarck, ND 58502...

  4. Expedition 8 Crew Interviews: C. Michael Foale - CDR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    C. Michael Foale, Commander of the Expedition 8 crew to the International Space Station (ISS), answers interview questions in this video. The questions cover: 1) The goals of the Expedition; 2) How his Mir experience prepared him for long-duration spaceflight; 3) The reaction the Columbia accident where he was training in Star City, Russia; 4) Why the rewards of spaceflight are worth the risks; 5) Why he wanted to become an astronaut; 6) His career path; 7) His influences; 8) His path of study; 9) His responsibilities on a mission; 10) What a Soyuz capsule is like; 11) What the oncoming and offgoing ISS crews will do together; 12) How the ISS science mission will be advanced during his stay; 13) Training and plans for extravehicular activity (EVA); 14) Return to Flight of Shuttle; 15) What is needed to make his mission a success; 16) The most valuable contribution of the ISS.

  5. Geothermal policy development program: expediting the local geothermal permitting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    For a number of years, concerns have been raised about the length of time and the complexity involved in obtaining required permits in order to develop the geothermal resource at the Geysers. Perhaps the most important factor is jurisdiction. At the Geysers, all three levels of government - local, state, and federal - exercise significant authority over various aspects of geothermal development. In addition, several agencies within each governmental level play an active role in the permitting process. The present study is concerned primarily with the local permitting process, and the ways in which this process could be expedited. This report begins by looking at the local role in the overall permitting process, and then reviews the findings and conclusions that have been reached in other studies of the problem. This is followed by a case study evaluation of recent permitting experience in the four Geysers-Calistoga KGRA counties, and the report concludes by outlining several approaches to expediting the local permitting process.

  6. Medical Operational Challenges in the Expedition 16 Landing and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, S.; Johnston, S. L.; Ilcus, L. S.; Shevchenko, V.

    2009-01-01

    On April 19, 2008 the crew of Expedition 16 left the International Space Station and returned to earth via their Soyuz TMA-11 capsule after 192 days on orbit. Their capsule experienced the second consecutive and third ballistic reentry in the last 10 TMA recoveries and landed approximately 260 miles (420 km) from the prime landing site. Issues: The purpose of this presentation will be to describe, not only the typical medical operational challenges faced by Flight Surgeons recovering a long duration crew from space, but also address the unique challenges that existed with the Expedition 16 landing and crew recovery. Nominal Soyuz recovery challenges include remote recovery sites with crew exposures to sleep shifting and fatigue, dehydration, hypothermia and hyperthermia, and rotational, sustained, and impact g-forces. These environmental factors coupled with the patho-physiologic neuro-vestibular and orthostatic intolerance changes that occur secondary to the crews reintroduction into the earth s gravity field will be detailed. Additional challenges that were unique to this expedition included a ballistic reentry with higher g-loads, the presence of fire outside of the capsule on landing, a contingency medical event of a ground support personnel, and loss of communications with the crew just prior to landing and during recovery operations. Conclusions: In spite of these unique challenges the Russian Search and Rescue Forces and Medical Support personnel along with U.S. Medical Support performed well together. Possible improvements in training and coordination will be discussed.

  7. Temporal trends and future predictions of mercury concentrations in Northwest Greenland polar bear (Ursus maritimus) hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, R; Born, E W; Rigét, F; Aubail, A; Sonne, C; Drimmie, R; Basu, N

    2011-02-15

    Hair samples from 117 Northwest Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were taken during 1892-2008 and analyzed for total mercury (hereafter Hg). The sample represented 28 independent years and the aim of the study was to analyze for temporal Hg trends. Mercury concentrations showed yearly significant increases of 1.6-1.7% (p polar bear Hg exposure is 95.6-96.2% anthropogenic in its origin. Assuming a continued anthropogenic increase, this model estimated concentrations in 2050 and 2100 will be 40- and 92-fold the baseline concentration, respectively, which is equivalent to a 97.5 and 98.9% man-made contribution. None of the 2001-2008 concentrations of Hg in Northwest Greenland polar bear hair exceeded the general guideline values of 20-30 μg/g dry weight for terrestrial wildlife, whereas the neurochemical effect level of 5.4 μg Hg/g dry weight proposed for East Greenland polar bears was exceeded in 93.5% of the cases. These results call for detailed effect studies in main target organs such as brain, liver, kidney, and sexual organs in the Northwest Greenland polar bears.

  8. Study of Four Common Mutations of Familial Mediterranean Fever in North-West of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Karimi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Familial Mediterranean Fever, an autosomal recessive disorder, is the most common and well known periodical fevers syndrome. Disease is mainly prevalent among non-Ashkenazi Jews, Arabs, Turks and Armenia. According to the geographical location of North-West of Iran, neighboring with two high risk FMF population (Turkey and Armenia, the prevalence of FMF in this region of Iran is not unlikely. The aim of this study was to estimate the carriers rate of FMF common mutations in healthy control people. Results can be potentially useful to estimate prevalence of disease.   Methods : Randomly 200 samples from healthy people [non-FMF] from North-West of Iran selected. After taking consent, DNA was extracted from blood samples of these groups. Then mutations were evaluated using ARMS-PCR and RFLP-PCR techniques.   Results : from 400 studied alleles, 44 and 7 mutant alleles were found for E148Q and V726A respectively. For 2 other mutations, no mutant alleles were found. The total allelic frequency for these four common mutations was 0.132. The carriers rate was 23.4%.   Conclusion : This study showed that E148Q has high mutation frequency relative to other mutations in North-West of Iran.

  9. Petrology of Zircon-Bearing Diogenite Northwest Africa 10666

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, T. B.; Jeffcoat, C. R.; Righter, M.; Berger, E. L.; Lapen, T. J.; Irving, A. J.; Kuehner, S. M.; Fujihara, G.

    2017-01-01

    The howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites are a group of achondrites thought to be derived from the asteroid 4 Vesta, though there is active debate as to whether all diogenites are part of the HED suite. Petrologic investigation of the HED meteorite group provides a means of understanding early planetary differentiation processes and early evolution of planets in our solar system. Diogenites are predominantly coarse grained ortho-pyroxenites with some samples containing appreciable amounts of clinopyroxene, olivine, chromite, and plagioclase. Accessory metal, troilite, and apatite are common. Many diogenites are brecciated, however, there are few poorly to unbrecciated samples. Diogenites are important because they may represent the lower crust of 4 Vesta. Although Mg isotope data indicates that the sources of diogenites are ancient, their crystallization ages are difficult to constrain due to their protracted thermal histories. The limited chronologic data for diogenites also limits the ability to test petrogenetic connections with eucrites and even parent body. A reliable and high closure-temperature isotope system, such as U-Pb in zircon, is needed to address the timing of diogenite igneous crystallization. Description of the textures and mineralogy of diogenites are essential to their classification and understanding their formation, in particular, whether all phases are petrogenetically related. Here, we present detailed petrographic data from a rare zircon-bearing feldspathic diogenite, Northwest Africa (NWA) 10666 and provide textural evidence for igneous crystallization of the zircon.

  10. Gravimetric geoid in the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, A. B.; Leeds, A. R.

    1977-01-01

    A total of 3708 1 x 1 deg free-air gravity anomaly averages have been used to construct a new 1 x 1 deg gravimetric geoid of the Northwest Pacific Ocean. The 1 x 1 deg averages are based on a compilation of 147,000 surface ship and pendulum gravity measurements. Difference geoid undulations range from a maximum of +19 m over the Hawaiian ridge to a minimum of -31 m over the junction of the Kuril and Aleutian trenches. The Hawaiian swell is associated with a geoidal high of up to +15 m with wavelengths of about 2200 km and the topographic rises seaward of deep-sea trenches are associated with geoidal highs of up to 4 m with wavelengths of about 220-900 km. The agreement between the gravimetric geoid and Skylab-4 and Geos-3 altimeter data is close for wavelengths greater than about 300 km but poor for shorter wavelengths.

  11. Sampling methods for terrestrial amphibians and reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Stephen Corn; R. Bruce. Bury

    1990-01-01

    Methods described for sampling amphibians and reptiles in Douglas-fir forests in the Pacific Northwest include pitfall trapping, time-constrained collecting, and surveys of coarse woody debris. The herpetofauna of this region differ in breeding and nonbreeding habitats and vagility, so that no single technique is sufficient for a community study. A combination of...

  12. Early scientific expeditions and local encounters: new perspectives on Carsten Niebuhr and 'The Arabian Journey'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    scholarly expeditions and voyages from the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, placing the Danish expedition in a broad context of early scientific expeditions. This was a time when the coastlines of continents, except in the Pacific and the Polar regions, were reasonably well known. Yet scientific...... and longer encounters with local populations. Most studies in this volume focus on expeditions that involved contacts between local people and travelling European scientists and scholars. Others examine the scholarly questions which the scientific expeditions and travellers were sent out to solve and how......, the papers in these proceedings paint a varied picture of eighteenth and early nineteenth century scientific expeditions and scholarly travel. In the eighteenth century the considerate and careful approach of Niebuhr and Forsskål in their dealing with local people was new or at least not so common...

  13. Studies on thermophysical properties at New Jersey Shallow Shelf (IODP Expedition 313)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, A.; Pechnig, R.; Inwood, J.; LOFI, J.; Bosch, F. P.; Clauser, C.

    2011-12-01

    The IODP drilling expedition 313 New Jersey Shallow Shelf was proposed for obtaining deep sub-seafloor samples and downhole logging measurements in the crucial inner shelf region.The inner to central shelf off-shore New Jersey is an ideal location for studying the history of sea-level changes and its relationship to sequence stratigraphy and onshore/offshore groundwater flows. The region features rapid depositional rates, tectonic stability, and well-preserved, cosmopolitan age control fossils suitable for characterizing the sediments of this margin throughout the time interval of interest. Past sea-level rise and fall is documented in sedimentary layers deposited during Earth's history. In addition, the inner shelf is characterised by relatively fresh pore water intervals alternating vertically with saltier intervals (Mountain et al., 2010). Therefore, three boreholes were drilled in the so-called New Jersey/Mid-Atlantic transect during IODP Expedition 313 New Jersey Shallow Shelf. Numerous questions have arisen concerning the age and origin of the brackish waters recovered offshore at depth. Here we present an analysis of thermophysical properties to be used as input parameters in constructing numerical models for future groundwater flow simulations. Our study is based mainly on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements for inferring porosity and permeability, and thermal conductivity. We performed NMR measurements on samples from boreholes M0027A, M0028A and M0029A and thermal conductivity measurements on the whole round cores prior to the Onshore Party. These results are compared with data from alternative laboratory measurements and with petrophysical properties inferred from downhole logging data.

  14. Detachment Faulting, Serpentinization, Fluids and Life: Preliminary Results of IODP Expedition 357 (Atlantis Massif, MAR 30°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruh-Green, G. L.; Orcutt, B.; Green, S.; Cotterill, C.

    2016-12-01

    We present an overview of IODP Expedition 357, which successfully used two seabed rock drills to core 17 shallow holes at 9 sites across Atlantis Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge 30°N). A major goal of this expedition is to investigate serpentinization processes and microbial activity in the shallow subsurface of highly altered ultramafic and mafic sequences that have been uplifted to the seafloor along a major detachment fault zone. More than 57 m of core were recovered, with borehole penetration ranging from 1.3 to 16.4 meters below seafloor, and core recovery as high as 75% of total penetration. The cores show highly heterogeneous rock type, bulk rock chemistry and alteration that reflect multiple phases of magmatism and fluid-rock interaction within the detachment fault zone. In cores along an E-W transect of the southern wall, recovered mantle peridotites are locally intruded by gabbroic and doleritic dikes and veins. The proportion of mafic rocks are volumetrically less than the amount of mafic rocks recovered previously in the central dome at IODP Site U1309, suggesting a lower degree of melt infiltration into mantle peridotite at the ridge-transform intersection. New technologies were developed and successfully applied for the first time: (1) an in-situ sensor package and water sampling system on each seabed drill measured real-time variations in dissolved methane, oxygen, pH, oxidation reduction potential, temperature, and conductivity during drilling and took water samples after drilling; (2) a borehole plug system to seal the boreholes was successfully deployed at two sites to allow access for future sampling; and (3) delivery of chemical tracers into the drilling fluids for contamination testing. We will provide an overview of the drilling strategy and preliminary results of Expedition 357, and highlight the role of serpentinization in sustaining microbial communities in a region of active serpentinization and low temperature hydrothermal alteration.

  15. Scleractinian corals recorded in the Argentinean Antarctic expeditions between 2012 and 2014, with comments on Flabellum (Flabellum areum Cairns, 1982

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schejter

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we provide a list of the scleractinian corals recorded during the Argentinean Antarctic expeditions on board the oceanographic vessel Puerto Deseado (Argentina in the austral summers in 2012, 2013 and 2014. The identified taxa consist of six solitary species (Flabellum impensum, F. flexuosum, F. areum, Caryophyllia antarctica, Paraconotrochus antarcticus and Javania antarctica, recorded from 19 sampling sites located off the Antarctic Peninsula and South Shetland and South Orkney islands. We also update the information of F. areum, previously known only from south-west Atlantic waters, extending its distribution range to Antarctic waters and its upper bathymetric range to 218 m.

  16. 2004 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2004-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book), which is published annually by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), establishes one of the planning bases for supplying electricity to customers. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues, although the database that generates the data for the White Book analysis contributes to the development of BPA's inventory and ratemaking processes. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions that include expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The load resource balance of BPA and/or the region is determined by comparing resource availability to an expected level of total retail electricity consumption. Resources include projected energy capability plus contract purchases. Loads include a forecast of retail obligations plus contract obligations. Surplus energy is available when resources are greater than loads. This energy could be marketed to increase revenues. Energy deficits occur when resources are less than loads. These deficits could be met by any combination of the following: better-than-critical water conditions, demand-side management and conservation programs, permanent loss of loads due

  17. 77 FR 25742 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ... Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, formerly Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA. The... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA... paragraphs: Determinations Made by the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture Officials of The Northwest Museum...

  18. Are affluent youth truly “at risk”? Vulnerability and resilience across three diverse samples

    OpenAIRE

    Luthar, Suniya S.; BARKIN, SAMUEL H.

    2012-01-01

    Building upon prior findings of elevated problems among East Coast suburban youth through the 11th grade, this study establishes disproportionately high incidence of maladjustment across three disparate samples: East Coast Suburban youth at the end of their senior year in high school, and 11th and 12th graders in (a) a Northwest suburb and (b) an East Coast city. Both East Coast samples showed pronounced elevations in substance use, whereas the Northwest suburban sample showed marked vulnerab...

  19. Effects of Land Use on Soil Quality on the Loessplateau in North-West Shanxi Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Li; Ji, Ruirui; Yang, Zhiping; Zhang, Jianjie

    Northwest Shanxi is located at the eastern border of the Loess Plateau. In order to guard against wind, to conserve water and soil, to fix sand, a large area of Caragana microphylla was planted in the hilly loess plateau in the north-west soil properties and ultimately soil quality, a case study was conducted in Wuzhai (North-west Shanxi Province). Soil samples were collected from adjacent Caragana microphylla land, farm land, poplar forests, fallow land and mixed plantations of Caragana microphylla and poplar. Initially, soil properties under the five land-uses were studied separately. Then an evaluation indicator system was developed according to the principle of evaluation indicator selection. Subsequently, the method of multivariate analysis was used to carry through a complete scientific evaluation. Results showed a highest under the mixed plantation and, compared with the mixed plantation,the SQI of farmland decreased greatly. The SQI of fallow land was the lowest, but considering the soil nutrient content, land fallowing improved soil fertility to some extent. It was further shown that growing Caragana microphylla and mixed polar and Caragana microphylla plantation was the most sustainable ways of developing the loess plateau.

  20. International Safeguards and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Khris B.; Smith, Leon E.; Frazar, Sarah L.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Orton, Christopher R.; Schanfein, Mark J.; Sayre, Amanda M.; Jones, Rebecca L.

    2016-07-21

    Established in 1965, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) strong technical ties and shared heritage with the nearby U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site were central to the early development of expertise in nuclear fuel cycle signatures, separations chemistry, plutonium chemistry, environmental monitoring, modeling and analysis of reactor systems, and nuclear material safeguards and security. From these Hanford origins, PNNL has grown into a multi-program science and engineering enterprise that utilizes this diversity to strengthen the international safeguards regime. Today, PNNL supports the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in its mission to provide assurances to the international community that nations do not use nuclear materials and equipment outside of peaceful uses. PNNL also serves in the IAEA’s Network of Analytical Laboratories (NWAL) by providing analysis of environmental samples gathered around the world. PNNL is involved in safeguards research and development activities in support of many U.S. Government programs such as the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) Office of Research and Development, NNSA Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control, and the U.S. Support Program to IAEA Safeguards. In addition to these programs, PNNL invests internal resources including safeguards-specific training opportunities for staff, and laboratory-directed research and development funding to further ideas that may grow into new capabilities. This paper and accompanying presentation highlight some of PNNL’s contributions in technology development, implementation concepts and approaches, policy, capacity building, and human capital development, in the field of international safeguards.

  1. The Local Residents’ Concerns about Environmental Issues in Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanus A. Aregay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes public awareness and perception about current issues of environmental and water resources in China in comparison to the socio-economic issues. The ranking, Likert scale, and ordered logit analysis were applied to data from 1773 sample residents in northwest China. The results show that the residents rank the degradation of the ecological environment and water resources as the most important issue, and education, political involvement, gender, employment, and residential location play significant roles in explaining the observed differences in concern. Of the possible environmental and water resource restoration policies, residents ranked water quantity and quality, agricultural and industrial water use, erosion control, vegetation restoration, wildlife habitat, animal brooding and migration services, biodiversity landscape, and eco-tourism from one to nine in order of importance, respectively. The results are relevant for policymaking and imply that environmental restoration is a high public demand. Welfare gains from investments in it would be higher or equal to gains from other socio-economic and livelihood activities. Thus, public policies must emphasize restoring and maintaining a sustainable ecological environment.

  2. 2007 Northwest Water Manangement District Lidar: Gadsden County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as bare-earth and canopy (first return) were produced for the 2007 Northwest Florida Water Management...

  3. Pacific Northwest regional assessment program 1975 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-06-01

    The objective of the Pacific Northwest Regional Assessment Program is to establish and exercise an integrated analytical assessment program for evaluation of potential changes that may result from various energy development or conservation scenarios. Such scenarios may themselves result from Federal development policies and programs, from regionally specific actions by the states and energy industries, or from actions taken by international factors currently importing energy resources into the region. After consideration of a variety of approaches to integrated assessment at a regional level, Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW) has concluded that dynamic simulation techniques provide the best available approach to evaluating the issues pertinent to the Northwest. As a result, the Pacific Northwest Regional Assessment Program has been structured in a framework involving ten sectors. Each of these sectors involve their own submodels that receive information either from outside the model as exogenous inputs or from other sector submodels.

  4. The Geology of the North-west Highlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    GEIKIE, ARCH

    1893-01-01

    .... de Lapparent, when alluding to the solution of the problem of the geological structure of the Northwest Highlands, makes no reference to the distinguished part taken in that subject by Prof. Lapworth...

  5. Planning and accomplishment narrative: Northwest Montana Waterfowl Production Area [1973

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This planning and accomplishments narrative report for Northwest Montana Wetland Management District outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1973 calendar year....

  6. 2007 Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Northwest Oregon Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar dataset encompasses two areas in northwest Oregon. The northern area is located in Clatsop County, encompassing Clatsop State Forest ownership; the...

  7. Northwest Montana Wetland Management District : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Northwest Montana WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  8. Northwest Montana Wetland Management District : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Northwest Montana WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1994 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  9. Northwest Montana Wetland Management District : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Northwest Montana WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  10. Northwest Montana Wetland Management District : Annual Narrative : Calendar Year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Northwest Montana WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  11. Arctic wildlife sketches: Bison of the Northwest Territories

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the bison of the northwest territories. Historical range, physical description, reproduction, mortality, distribution, and the future of bison in...

  12. 2007 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) Lidar: Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as bare-earth and canopy (first return) were produced for the 2007/2008 Northwest Florida Water...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, phosphate, silicate, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sample observations using CTD, Niskin bottle and other instruments in the northwest coast of the United States near the Cha Ba mooring off La Push, Washington from 2011-05-22 to 2014-10-24 (NCEI Accession 0145160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains validation samples for moored time-series observations of ocean acidification water chemistry. This data set includes temperature and...

  14. Embark students on geosciences expeditions, across the oceans …

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Marion; Darrieu, Michele; Pointu, Agnes; Maruejol, Patricia; Cooper, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    As teachers we can live and share a fabulous experience of science and research on the scientific drilling vessels and platforms of IODP-ECORD and JAMSTEC consortiums. ECORD offered us the opportunity to embark on the IODP 359, 360 and 362 expeditions as Education Officers. Our task was to communicate about science with the general public and students from 7 to 25 years-old. In this presentation, we will focus on the 360 expedition, South West Indian Ridge-lower crust and Moho. We explain the three steps of the "teacher at sea" experience from the very first idea to the real pedagogical work during and after the expedition. -Apply, get ready and leave… for two months: From the difficulties you may encounter to the most efficient ways to prepare the pedagogical tasks. -Work, live onboard and get back: We will describe the main activities of the Education officers among the Science party and the way all this can become a highly changing-life experience. -Use data, share and inspire: We will detail some strategies we used to catch the attention of the students. They could participate to "live" science and have a better idea of the job of researcher. Now, we have to inspire others teachers to use our data and pedagogical documents, or to get the opportunity to embark ! What gets out of these crossed experiences is that the quality of the human relationships, and the way the students can get closer to the scientists during the interactions, are the keys to motivate students and give them a new vision of the scientific research.

  15. Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (Pre-Flight)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The first segment of this video gives an overview of the Ozone Hole Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, an international effort using balloon payloads, ground based instruments, and airborne instruments to study ozone depletion and the hole in the ozone over Antarctica which occurs every spring. False color imagery taken from NASA's Nimbus 7 satellite which documents daily changes in ozone is also shown. The second segment of this video shows actual take-off and flight footage of the two aircraft used in the experiment: the DC-8 Flying Laboratory and the high flying ER-2.

  16. Community College's CAN do Research A Decade of Eclipse Expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saken, Jon M.

    2006-12-01

    Gale force winds, ravenous Tsetse flies and duct-tape equipment repairs. Now that's science! This talk will describe the triumphs and disasters over almost a decade of world-wide astronomical expeditions involving community college students, faculty and K-12 teachers chasing one of nature's most spectacular shows a total solar eclipse. The impact of this kind of field science on the participants and the wider community, along with other lessons learned along the way, will also be discussed, as we present ideas to encourage others to join in the fun.

  17. Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology Facility Expedites Manufacturing Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    The Composites Manufacturing Education and Technology facility (CoMET) at the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) paves the way for innovative wind turbine components and accelerated manufacturing. Available for use by industry partners and university researchers, the 10,000-square-foot facility expands NREL's composite manufacturing research capabilities by enabling researchers to design, prototype, and test composite wind turbine blades and other components -- and then manufacture them onsite. Designed to work in conjunction with NREL's design, analysis, and structural testing capabilities, the CoMET facility expedites manufacturing innovation.

  18. Monitoring microbial quality of commercial dairy products in West Azerbaijan province, northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Teymori

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the extent of microbial contamination such as coliform, Escherichia coli, positive coagulase Staphylococcus aureus, molds and yeast in cheese, buttermilk, yogurt, and milk in West Azerbaijan province. Methods: Between March and November 2012, 93 samples of cheese, buttermilk, milk, and yogurt were collected from factories of West Azerbaijan province, northwest of Iran. The samples were tested by standard numbers 5486, 5234, 6806, and 10154 for monitoring their microbial quality. Results: The results of this study revealed that 33% of cheese samples were unauthorized. Also, 22% of buttermilk, 23% samples of yogurt, and 15% of milk samples were unauthorized. Other examples of microbial aspects were normal. Conclusions: It is necessary to determine the critical control points inorganizing factories and automated control systems in order to eliminate or minimize the threat of pollution. Microbial quality of the present products was excellent. Meanwhile, training and familiarizing manufacturers of dairy products are very important in terms of health standards.

  19. Feldspar Variability in Northwest Africa 7034

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. R.; Lewis, J. A.; Agee, C. B.; Humayun, M.; McCubbin, F. M.; Shearer, C. K.

    2017-01-01

    The martian meteorite Northwest Africa 7034 (and pairings) is a breccia that provides important information about the rocks and processes of the martian crust (e.g., 1-3). Additional information can be gleaned from the components of the breccia. These components, specifically those designated as clasts, record the history of their parent rock (i.e., the rock that has been physically broken down to produce the clasts). In order to study these parent rocks, we must first determine which clasts within the breccia are de-rived from the same parent. Previous studies have be-gun this process (e.g., 4), but the search for genetic linkages between clasts has not integrated clasts with different grain sizes. We begin to take this approach here, incorporating igneous-textured clasts with both fine and coarse mineral grains. In NWA 7034, almost all materials (clasts and breccia matrix) are composed of the same mineral assemblages (feldspar, pyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides, apatite) with largely the same mineral compositions [1, 4-6]. Bulk breccia Sm-Nd systematics define a single isochron [7]. These observations are consistent with a majority of the components within NWA 7034 originating from the same geochemical source and crystallizing at roughly the same time.

  20. Residential fuel choice in the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.D.; Englin, J.E.; Harkreader, S.A.

    1989-02-01

    In 1983, the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) issued Model Conservation Standards (MCS) designed to improve the efficiency of electrically heated buildings. Since then, the standards have been adopted by numerous local governments and utilities. The Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) has played an active role in marketing residential energy efficiency improvements through the Super Good Cents Program (SGCP) and encouraging the adoption and implementation of the MCS as local codes through the Early Adopter Program (EAP). Since the inception of the MCS, however, questions have arisen about the effect of the code and programs on the selection of heating fuels for new homes. Recently, Bonneville has proposed a gradual reduction in the incentive levels under these two programs prior to 1995 based on several assumptions about the market for MCS homes: builder costs will decline as builders gain experience building them; buyers will seek out MCS homes as their appreciation for their lower energy costs and greater comfort increases; and the resale market will increasingly reflect the greater quality of MCS homes. The growing availability of data from several jurisdictions where the MCS have been implemented has recently made it possible to begin assessing the effect of the MCS programs on residential fuel choice and evaluating assumptions underlying the programs and Bonneville's plans to revise them. This study is the first such assessment conducted for Bonneville.

  1. Unfrozen sea : sailing the northwest passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, M. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). ArcticNet

    2007-05-15

    This article described the author's journey into the Canadian Arctic that documented the shrinking sea of Canada's Arctic region. It emphasized the loss of ecosystem and animal habitat. It addressed issues regarding Canada's claims of Arctic sovereignty over disputed waters, such as the Northwest Passage. In March 2006, the area covered during the winter by sea-ice was at an all-time low, namely 300,000 square kilometres less than the previous year. At this rate the Arctic could lose all of its sea-ice by 2030. The article also discussed phytoplankton in the Arctic which, removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere by photosynthesis. Since the waters they live in are so cold, the phytoplankton sink into the ocean depths when they die, without decomposing. The carbon they removed from the atmosphere remains at the bottom of the sea for hundreds of years. However, as water warms up, the activity of marine bacteria that feed on the dead plankton will increase, releasing carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere. Issues related to international shipping, navigation, ownership of Arctic islands, military presence and boats in the northern channels, and political promises with respect to the Canadian Coast Guard and northern waterways were also discussed. 1 fig.

  2. Non-Dive Activities for Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006 - Office of Ocean Exploration and Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Non-dive activities reported to the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research for the "Expedition to the Deep Slope 2006" expedition, May 7 through June 2, 2006....

  3. Results of the Rumphius Biohistorical Expedition to Ambon . Part 1. General Account and List of Stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strack, H.L.

    1993-01-01

    This report gives a general account of the Rumphius Biohistorical Expedition to Ambon (Moluccas, Indonesia) held in 1990. The primary objective of the expedition was to collect marine invertebrates on the localities mentioned by Rumphius (1627-1702) in his book "D'Amboinsche Rariteitkamer" (1705).

  4. Zoological results of the Dutch Scientific Expedition to Central-Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lidth de Jeude, van Th.W.

    1905-01-01

    The following pages contain an enumeration of the lizards collected in Borneo by the Dutch Borneo-Expedition, of which expedition Mr. J. Büttikofer was the zoologist, and also of the lizards collected by Dr. A. W. Nieuwenhuis during his travels in the interior of this island. The collections made

  5. Zoological results of the Dutch New Guinea expedition, 1939. No. 51) The Birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junge, G.C.A.

    1953-01-01

    The present paper is the report on a collection of birds brought together during the expedition of the "Koninklijk Nederlandsch Aardrijkskundig Genootschap" to the Wissel Lake area in 1939. The zoologist of this expedition Prof. Dr. H. Boschma collected with the assistance of two mantris of the

  6. 42 CFR 422.572 - Timeframes and notice requirements for expedited organization determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Organization Determinations and Appeals § 422.572 Timeframes and notice requirements for expedited organization... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Timeframes and notice requirements for expedited organization determinations. 422.572 Section 422.572 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...

  7. 42 CFR 423.572 - Timeframes and notice requirements for expedited coverage determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and notice requirements for expedited coverage determinations. (a) Timeframe for determination and... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Timeframes and notice requirements for expedited coverage determinations. 423.572 Section 423.572 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...

  8. 75 FR 17453 - International Product Change-Global Reseller Expedited Package Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE International Product Change--Global Reseller Expedited Package Contracts AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice... Global Reseller Expedited Package Contracts to the Competitive Products List pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 3642...

  9. 78 FR 33452 - International Product Change-Global Reseller Expedited Package Contracts 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE International Product Change--Global Reseller Expedited Package Contracts 2 AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION: Notice... Commission to add Global Reseller Expedited Package Contracts 2 to the Competitive Products List. DATES...

  10. 75 FR 26343 - Request for Expedited Certification and Type Approval of Amtrak Advanced Civil Speed Enforcement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Request for Expedited Certification and Type Approval of Amtrak Advanced... for expedited certification and type approval of the Amtrak ACSES. ACSES has been deployed on the... party seeking certification and type approval of ACSES, the regulatory provisions involved, the nature...

  11. Potato germplasm collecting expedition to Mexico in 1997 : taxonomy and new germplasm resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spooner, D.M.; Rivera-Pena, A.; Berg, van den R.G.; Schueler, K.

    2000-01-01

    Wild potato (Solanum sect. Petota) germplasm has been collected in Mexico on nine major expeditions, as determined by 20 collections or more from each expedition currently at the United States potato genebank, the National Research Support Program-6 (NRSP-6). These have resulted in 609 accessions

  12. Protocol for Monitoring Fish Assemblages in Pacific Northwest National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenkman, Samuel J.; Connolly, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    Rivers and streams that drain from Olympic, Mount Rainier, and North Cascades National Parks are among the most protected corridors in the lower 48 States, and represent some of the largest tracts of contiguous, undisturbed habitat throughout the range of several key fish species of the Pacific Northwest. These watersheds are of high regional importance as freshwater habitat sanctuaries for native fish, where habitat conditions are characterized as having little to no disturbance from development, channelization, impervious surfaces, roads, diversions, or hydroelectric projects. Fishery resources are of high ecological and cultural importance in Pacific Northwest National Parks, and significantly contribute to economically important recreational, commercial, and tribal fisheries. This protocol describes procedures to monitor trends in fish assemblages, fish abundance, and water temperature in eight rivers and five wadeable streams in Olympic National Park during summer months, and is based on 4 years of field testing. Fish assemblages link freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. They also serve as focal resources of national parks and are excellent indicators of ecological conditions of rivers and streams. Despite the vital importance of native anadromous and resident fish populations, there is no existing monitoring program for fish assemblages in the North Coast and Cascades Network. Specific monitoring objectives of this protocol are to determine seasonal and annual trends in: (1) fish species composition, (2) timing of migration of adult fish, (3) relative abundance, (4) age and size structure, (5) extent of non-native and hatchery fish, and (6) water temperature. To detect seasonal and annual trends in fish assemblages in reference sites, we rely on repeated and consistent annual sampling at each monitoring site. The general rationale for the repeated sampling of reference sites is to ensure that we account for the high interannual variability in fish

  13. Contaminants in arctic snow collected over northwest Alaskan sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, J.R.; Snyder-Conn, E.; Leiker, T.J.; Hoffman, G.L.

    2002-01-01

    Snow cores were collected over sea ice from four northwest Alaskan Arctic estuaries that represented the annual snowfall from the 1995-1996 season. Dissolved trace metals, major cations and anions, total mercury, and organochlorine compounds were determined and compared to concentrations in previous arctic studies. Traces (<4 nanograms per liter, ng L-1) of cis- and trans-chlordane, dimethyl 2,3,5,6-tetrachloroterephthalate, dieldrin, endosulfan II, and PCBs were detected in some samples, with endosulfan I consistently present. High chlorpyrifos concentrations (70-80 ng L-1) also were estimated at three sites. The snow was highly enriched in sulfates (69- 394 mg L-1), with high proportions of nonsea salt sulfates at three of five sites (9 of 15 samples), thus indicating possible contamination through long-distance transport and deposition of sulfate-rich atmospheric aerosols. Mercury, cadmium, chromium, molybdenum, and uranium were typically higher in the marine snow (n = 15) in relation to snow from arctic terrestrial studies, whereas cations associated with terrigenous sources, such as aluminum, frequently were lower over the sea ice. One Kasegaluk Lagoon site (Chukchi Sea) had especially high concentrations of total mercury (mean = 214 ng L-1, standard deviation = 5 ng L-1), but no methyl mercury was detected above the method detection limit (0.036 ng L-1) at any of the sites. Elevated concentrations of sulfate, mercury, and certain heavy metals might indicate mechanisms of contaminant loss from the arctic atmosphere over marine water not previously reported over land areas. Scavenging by snow, fog, or riming processes and the high content of deposited halides might facilitate the loss of such contaminants from the atmosphere. Both the mercury and chlorpyrifos concentrations merit further investigation in view of their toxicity to aquatic organisms at low concentrations.

  14. Early scientific expeditions and local encounters: new perspectives on Carsten Niebuhr and 'The Arabian Journey'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    scholarly expeditions and voyages from the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, placing the Danish expedition in a broad context of early scientific expeditions. This was a time when the coastlines of continents, except in the Pacific and the Polar regions, were reasonably well known. Yet scientific...... knowledge about natural history and detailed geography of the interior of the continents other than Europe, as well as scholarly understanding of foreign cultures, both ancient and contemporary, was still limited. Increasing focus on land-based travels in the eighteenth century and onwards meant more...... and longer encounters with local populations. Most studies in this volume focus on expeditions that involved contacts between local people and travelling European scientists and scholars. Others examine the scholarly questions which the scientific expeditions and travellers were sent out to solve and how...

  15. Expedition 8 Crew Interviews: Alexander Y. Kaleri - FE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Russian cosmonaut Alexander Y. Kaleri, Flight Engineer on Expedition 8 to the International Space Station (ISS), answers interview questions on this video, either himself or with the help of an interpreter. The questions cover: 1) The goal of the expedition; 2) The place in history of Mir; 3) The reaction to the loss of Columbia in Houston; 4) Why the rewards of spaceflight are worth the risks; 5) Why he decided to become a cosmonaut; 6) His memory of Yuri Gagarin's first flight; 7) What happens on a Soyuz capsule during launch and flight; 8) Are Soyuz maneuvers automatic or manual; 8) How the ISS science mission will be advanced during his stay; 9) The responsibilities of a Flight Engineer onboard the ISS; 10) Extravehicular activity (EVA) plans at that time; 11) The Shuttle Return to Flight and his preference for a Shuttle or Soyuz landing; 12) Why the last Soyuz landing was too rough; 13) The most valueable contribution of the ISS program.

  16. 21 CFR 56.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... categories of research that may be reviewed by the IRB through an expedited review procedure. The list will... uses an expedited review procedure shall adopt a method for keeping all members advised of research... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of...

  17. 49 CFR 11.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk, and for minor... an expedited review procedure shall adopt a method for keeping all members advised of research... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of...

  18. Gas hydrate drilling transect across northern Cascadia margin - IODP Expedition 311

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, M.; Collett, T.; Malone, M.J.; Collett, T.S.; Mitchell, M.; Guerin, G.; Akiba, F.; Blanc-Valleron, M.; Ellis, M.; Hashimoto, Y.; Heuer, V.; Higashi, Y.; Holland, M.; Jackson, P.D.; Kaneko, M.; Kastner, M.; Kim, J.-H.; Kitajima, H.; Long, P.E.; Malinverno, A.; Myers, Gwen E.; Palekar, L.D.; Pohlman, J.; Schultheiss, P.; Teichert, B.; Torres, M.E.; Trehu, A.M.; Wang, Jingyuan; Worthmann, U.G.; Yoshioka, H.

    2009-01-01

    A transect of four sites (U1325, U1326, U1327 and U1329) across the northern Cascadia margin was established during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 311 to study the occurrence and formation of gas hydrate in accretionary complexes. In addition to the transect sites, a fifth site (U1328) was established at a cold vent with active fluid flow. The four transect sites represent different typical geological environments of gas hydrate occurrence across the northern Cascadia margin from the earliest occurrence on the westernmost first accreted ridge (Site U1326) to the eastward limit of the gas hydrate occurrence in shallower water (Site U1329). Expedition 311 complements previous gas hydrate studies along the Cascadia accretionary complex, especially ODP Leg 146 and Leg 204 by extending the aperture of the transect sampled and introducing new tools to systematically quantify the gas hydrate content of the sediments. Among the most significant findings of the expedition was the occurrence of up to 20 m thick sand-rich turbidite intervals with gas hydrate concentrations locally exceeding 50% of the pore space at Sites U1326 and U1327. Moreover, these anomalous gas hydrate intervals occur at unexpectedly shallow depths of 50-120 metres below seafloor, which is the opposite of what was expected from previous models of gas hydrate formation in accretionary complexes, where gas hydrate was predicted to be more concentrated near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone just above the bottom-simulating reflector. Gas hydrate appears to be mainly concentrated in turbidite sand layers. During Expedition 311, the visual correlation of gas hydrate with sand layers was clearly and repeatedly documented, strongly supporting the importance of grain size in controlling gas hydrate occurrence. The results from the transect sites provide evidence for a structurally complex, lithology-controlled gas hydrate environment on the northern Cascadia margin. Local shallow

  19. Implementation and Operational Research: Expedited Results Delivery Systems Using GPRS Technology Significantly Reduce Early Infant Diagnosis Test Turnaround Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Sarang; Crea, Lindy; Quevedo, Jorge; Lehe, Jonathan; Vojnov, Lara; Peter, Trevor; Jani, Ilesh

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of a new technology to communicate the results of an infant HIV diagnostic test on test turnaround time and to quantify the association between late delivery of test results and patient loss to follow-up. We used data collected during a pilot implementation of Global Package Radio Service (GPRS) printers for communicating results in the early infant diagnosis program in Mozambique from 2008 through 2010. Our dataset comprised 1757 patient records, of which 767 were from before implementation and 990 from after implementation of expedited results delivery system. We used multivariate logistic regression model to determine the association between late result delivery (more than 30 days between sample collection and result delivery to the health facility) and the probability of result collection by the infant's caregiver. We used a sample selection model to determine the association between late result delivery to the facility and further delay in collection of results by the caregiver. The mean test turnaround time reduced from 68.13 to 41.05 days post-expedited results delivery system. Caregivers collected only 665 (37.8%) of the 1757 results. After controlling for confounders, the late delivery of results was associated with a reduction of approximately 18% (0.44 vs. 0.36; P GPRS printers) that reduce delays.

  20. Northwest plant names and symbols for ecosystem inventory and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.A. Garrison; J.M. Skovlin; C.E. Poulton; A.H. Winward

    1976-01-01

    This paper is basically an alpha code and name listing of forest and rangeland grasses, sedges, rushes, forbs, shrubs, and trees of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho. The code expedites recording of vegetation inventory data and is especially useful to those processing their data by contemporary computer systems. Editorial and secretarial personnel will find the name and...

  1. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  2. Physical chemical characteristics of oil emulsions of North-West Konys and Zhanaozen oilfields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbota Adilbekova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical chemical properties of oil emulsions of two different oilfields of Kazakhstan - NorthWest Konys and Zhanaozen by their densities related to light and heavy oils, respectively, were studied. Qualitative and quantitative compositions of main stabilizing components of oil emulsions (resins, asphaltenes and high molecular paraffins were determined. The dispersion degree of oil emulsions was determined using optical microscopy. It was found that samples relate to fine dispersed oil emulsions by dispersion, and to poorly stable (Konys and highly stable (Zhanaozen oil emulsions by ability to form emulsions. Light oil of Konys oilfield (ρ = 833 kg/m3 at 20°C contains 11.5% of paraffins, 0.69% resins, 0.19% asphaltenes. The same measurements were carried out for heavy oil of Zhanaozen (943 kg/m3 at 20°C where paraffin content exceeded 30%, amount of resins was 1.5% and asphaltenes – 0.6%. The sample of Zhanaozen oilfield contains 33% of water, 154.8 mg/L chlorides, 5.22 % mechanical impurities, and for oilfield samples of North-West Konys the water content was 7.5%, the content of chloride salts – 18 mg/L, and 0.002% of mechanical impurities.

  3. Risks of carbamate and organophosphate pesticide mixtures to salmon in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dwayne R J; Teed, R Scott

    2013-01-01

    Salmon populations in the Pacific Northwest are being affected by a variety of environmental stressors including intense fishing pressure, parasites and disease, climatic variability and change, land development, hatchery production, hydropower operations, stormwater runoff, and exposure to toxic contaminants. In recent years, there has been much concern that mixtures of pesticides are causing toxic effects to Pacific salmon. In this study, we compared measured stream water concentrations from 2 monitoring studies conducted in the Pacific Northwest with concentration-response curves derived for inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase activity in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) for mixtures of organophosphate (OPs) and carbamate (CBs) pesticides. In the first monitoring study, samples were collected from 2003 to 2007 in salmonid-bearing waters of 5 urban or agricultural watersheds in Washington State. This study was targeted to areas of high pesticide use and generally involved weekly sampling during the pesticide use season. The second monitoring study was the United States Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment that included samples taken from 2003 to 2010 in California, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. OPs and CBs were frequently detected in both studies. The available monitoring data collected since 2003, however, demonstrates that mixtures of OPs and CBs in surface waters rarely occur at levels capable of producing significant physiological and behavioral effects in Pacific salmon. The observed mixtures never reached concentrations capable of causing mortality. We conclude that mixtures of organophosphates and carbamates do not pose a significant direct risk to Pacific salmon. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  4. The Second International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Greg; Hood, Raleigh

    2015-04-01

    The International Indian Ocean Expedition (IIOE) was one of the greatest international, interdisciplinary oceanographic research efforts of all time. Planning for the IIOE began in 1959 and the project officially continued through 1965, with forty-six research vessels participating under fourteen different flags. The IIOE motivated an unprecedented number of hydrographic surveys (and repeat surveys) over the course of the expedition covering the entire Indian Ocean basin. And it was an interdisciplinary endeavor that embraced physical oceanography, chemical oceanography, meteorology, marine biology, marine geology and geophysics. The end of 2015 will mark the 50th Anniversary of the completion of the IIOE. SCOR and the IOC are working to stimulate a new phase of coordinated international research focused on the Indian Ocean for a 5-year period beginning in late 2015 and continuing through 2020. The goal is to help to organize ongoing research and stimulate new initiatives in the 2015-2020 time frame as part of a larger expedition. Several International programs that have research ongoing or planned in the Indian Ocean during this time period and many countries are planning cruises in this time frame as well. These programs and national cruises will serve as a core for the new Indian Ocean research focus, which has been dubbed "IIOE-2." The overarching goal of the IIOE-2 is to advance our understanding of interactions between geological, oceanic and atmospheric processes that give rise to the complex physical dynamics of the Indian Ocean region, and to determine how those dynamics affect climate, extreme events, marine biogeochemical cycles, ecosystems and human populations. This understanding is required to predict the impacts of climate change, pollution, and increased fish harvesting on the Indian Ocean and its nations, as well as the influence of the Indian Ocean on other components of the Earth System. New understanding is also fundamental to policy makers for

  5. Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batten, Belinda [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Polagye, Brian [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); LiVecchi, Al [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-06-30

    In 2008, the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Program issued a funding opportunity announcement to establish university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers. Oregon State University and the University of Washington combined their capabilities in wave and tidal energy to establish the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, or NNMREC. NNMREC’s scope included research and testing in the following topic areas: • Advanced Wave Forecasting Technologies; • Device and Array Optimization; • Integrated and Standardized Test Facility Development; • Investigate the Compatibility of Marine Energy Technologies with Environment, Fisheries and other Marine Resources; • Increased Reliability and Survivability of Marine Energy Systems; • Collaboration/Optimization with Marine Renewable and Other Renewable Energy Resources. To support the last topic, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was brought onto the team, particularly to assist with testing protocols, grid integration, and testing instrumentation. NNMREC’s mission is to facilitate the development of marine energy technology, to inform regulatory and policy decisions, and to close key gaps in scientific understanding with a focus on workforce development. In this, NNMREC achieves DOE’s goals and objectives and remains aligned with the research and educational mission of universities. In 2012, DOE provided NNMREC an opportunity to propose an additional effort to begin work on a utility scale, grid connected wave energy test facility. That project, initially referred to as the Pacific Marine Energy Center, is now referred to as the Pacific Marine Energy Center South Energy Test Site (PMEC-SETS) and involves work directly toward establishing the facility, which will be in Newport Oregon, as well as supporting instrumentation for wave energy converter testing. This report contains a breakdown per subtask of the funded project. Under each subtask, the following

  6. Epilepsy and cysticercosis in Northwest Cameroon: a serological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Irene; Jerome, Ambanibe; Angwafor, Samuel A; Smith, Mary Lou; Takougang, Innocent; Noh, John; Tsang, Victor; Wilkins, Patricia; Cockburn, Lynn; Keystone, Jay; Njamnshi, Alfred K; Snead, O Carter

    2013-05-01

    The prevalence of epilepsy in Cameroon is higher than that of the industrialized world and other developing countries. Neurocysticercosis due to Taenia solium infestation has been reported as a major cause of epilepsy in some parts of Cameroon although there are some conflicting data. The prevalence of epilepsy is especially high in the Momo division of the North-West Province of Cameroon. We hypothesized that individuals with epilepsy in this region have a higher percentage of seropositivity to T. solium than matched controls. We conducted a case-control study in the Momo subdivision of Ngie. Individuals with epilepsy were recruited from the health centers in Ngie. Control subjects were selected from 19 Ngie villages. Potential cases of people with epilepsy (PWE) were identified through a questionnaire applied by trained field workers, using history of epileptic seizures as a key indicator. Blood samples were taken from all consenting individuals by finger prick, stored in StabilZyme Select, and assayed for antibodies to T. solium in an Atlanta based reference laboratory. We accrued 249 patients with epilepsy, of whom 237 met the inclusion criteria, and 245 age-matched controls. There was no significant difference in seropositivity to T. solium between those individuals with epilepsy (5%) and controls (4.9%). Our data do not support the hypothesis that epilepsy is associated with seropositivity to T. solium. It is highly unlikely that cysticercosis plays a causative role in the high prevalence of epilepsy in this region of Cameroon. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Okeanos Explorer 2014 Gulf of Mexico Expedition: engaging and connecting with diverse and geographically dispersed audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. W.; Elliott, K.; Lobecker, E.; McKenna, L.; Haynes, S.; Crum, E.; Gorell, F.

    2014-12-01

    From February to May 2014, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer conducted a telepresence-enabled ocean exploration expedition addressing NOAA and National deepwater priorities in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. The community-driven expedition connected diverse and geographically dispersed audiences including scientists from industry, academia, and government, and educators, students, and the general public. Expedition planning included input from the ocean science and management community, and was executed with more than 70 scientists and students from 14 U.S. states participating from shore in real time. Training the next generation permeated operations: a mapping internship program trained undergraduate and graduate students; an ROV mentorship program trained young engineers to design, build and operate the system; and undergraduate through doctoral students around the country collaborated with expedition scientists via telepresence. Online coverage of the expedition included background materials, daily updates, and mission logs that received more than 100,000 visits by the public. Live video feeds of operations received more than 700,000 views online. Additionally, professional development workshops hosted in multiple locations throughout the spring introduced educators to the Okeanos Explorer Educational Materials Collection and the live expedition, and taught them how to use the website and education resources in their classrooms. Social media furthered the reach of the expedition to new audiences, garnered thousands of new followers and provided another medium for real-time interactions with the general public. Outreach continued through live interactions with museums and aquariums, Exploration Command Center tours, outreach conducted by partners, and media coverage in more than 190 outlets in the U.S. and Europe. Ship tours were conducted when the ship came in to port to engage local scientists, ocean managers, and educators. After the expedition, data and products were

  8. After-effects of a high altitude expedition on blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, D; Maassen, N; Jochum, F; Steinacker, J; Halder, A; Thomas, A; Schmidt, W; Noé, G; Kubanek, B

    1997-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate blood alterations caused by altitude acclimatization which last more than few days after return and might play a role for exercise performance at sea level. Measurements were performed in 12 mountaineers before, during and either 7/8 or 11/12 days after a Himalaya expedition (26-29 days at 4900 to 7600 m altitude). [Erythropoietin] rose only temporarily at altitude (max. +11 +/- 1 [SE] mu/ml serum). After return hemoglobin mass (initially 881 +/- 44 g, CO-Hb method) was increased by 14% (p training, partly in the Alps, and the stay in the Himalaya influenced O2-affinity for a prolonged time. The adaptations might reduce the loss of physical performance capacity at altitude and be part of altitude training effects.

  9. Physiologic adaptation changes of the "Bering Bridge" expedition participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidaraliyev, A A; Maximov, A L; Mala, T

    1993-04-01

    Cardiorespiratory measurements were repeatedly performed on indigenous and Caucasian Soviet and American male team members of the Bering Bridge expedition which covered approximately 1280 km over a 61 day period. Significant baseline differences in cardiorespiratory functions at rest and during submaximal cycle ergometer exercise were noted between racial groups. Indigenous members had significantly lower mean vital lung capacity and oxygen consumption levels during submaximal exercise, but a greater systolic blood pressure response to exercise. The energy cost during submaximal work decreased during the trek in both groups, but was marked in the Caucasians, suggesting that the indigenous subjects were better adapted at baseline to the Arctic environment. Overall, there was stabilization of functional responses in four of seven parameters studied, although differences between racial groups remained the same.

  10. ISS Expedition 1 Crew Interviews: Sergei K. Krikalev

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Flight Engineer Sergei K. Krikalev is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Krikalev became a cosmonaut, the events that led to his interest, the transition from being an engineer to being selected as a Russian cosmonaut. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses are the main goals of the first Expedition Crew, their scheduled docking with the International Space Station (ISS), making the ISS ready for human inhabitance, and all the specifics that will make his living arrangements difficult. Krikalev mentions his responsibilities during the much-anticipated two-day flight to the ISS, as well as the possibility of his space-walk. Krikalev also discusses the crew's first tasks upon entrance including other scheduled tasks for the first week, docking from cargo ships, and spacecraft delivering equipment or performing Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA). He explains his opinion of the implications of having human beings in space.

  11. Expedited Demolition Notification for 2nd Quarter CY 2012 Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, Catherine L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    The National Nuclear Security Administration and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) (collectively the Permittees) are informing the New Mexico Environment Department Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of the need to expedite the demolition of structures summarized in the enclosures. These structures have been identified to receive funding and be demolished prior to the 3rd Quarter Demolition Notification (June 30, 2012). This letter is a follow up to the email that was sent to the NMED-HWB on April 17, 2012. The enclosures attached to this letter satisfy the reporting requirements as outlined in Section 1.17 of the LANL Hazardous Facility Waste Permit (Permit). Demolition of buildings that appear on this list will not occur until 30 days after NMED has received this notification.

  12. Expediting the transfer of evidence into practice: building clinical partnerships*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Tamara; Gagnon, Anita J.

    2000-01-01

    A librarian/clinician partnership was fostered in one hospital through the formation of the Evidence-based Practice Committee, with an ulterior goal of facilitating the transfer of evidence into practice. The paper will describe barriers to evidence-based practice and outline the committee's strategies for overcoming these barriers, including the development and promotion of a Web-based guide to evidence-based practice specifically designed for clinicians (health professionals). Educational strategies for use of the Web-based guide will also be addressed. Advantages of this partnership are that the skills of librarians in meeting the needs of clinicians are maximized. The evidence-based practice skills of clinicians are honed and librarians make a valuable contribution to the knowledgebase of the clinical staff. The knowledge acquired through the partnership by both clinicians and librarians will increase the sophistication of the dialogue between the two groups and in turn will expedite the transfer of evidence into practice. PMID:10928710

  13. The Paran\\'a Ra'anga expedition

    CERN Document Server

    Gangui, Alejandro; Vena, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Paran\\'a Ra'anga (the image of Paran\\'a, in Guaran\\'i) is the name of a cultural and scientific expedition that traveled the rivers: R\\'io de la Plata, Paran\\'a and Paraguay, from Buenos Aires to Asunci\\'on, during March 2010. The project brought together some forty scientists and artists from three countries in a slow and enriching cruise, putting in active contact actors from different backgrounds and disciplines -which usually run separately- in the framework of an unusual space-time experience. The project recovers the historical tradition of the trip as an instrument of knowledge and collaboration between the arts and sciences, necessary to build new ways of seeing and understanding the river and its banks. This article reports on the motivations of this project and its projection.

  14. Expedited partner treatment for sexually transmitted infections: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia; Hogben, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    To date, seven randomized trials have evaluated the efficacy of expedited partner treatment (EPT). These trials have included heterosexual men and women and examine EPT for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, and Trichomonas vaginalis. These studies demonstrated either superiority for percentage of partners being treated, for a reduction in repeat infections, or cost benefit for EPT compared to the standard partner referral method and reported no adverse events. In the United States, although the number of states where EPT is legal continues to grow, adoption of EPT remains low. Provider concerns about liability and payment issues continue to be a barrier to implementation of EPT. More translational research is needed to improve adoption by the players involved: index patients, partners, providers, and payers.

  15. Viral to metazoan marine plankton nucleotide sequences from the Tara Oceans expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Adriana; Poulain, Julie; Engelen, Stefan; Labadie, Karine; Romac, Sarah; Ferrera, Isabel; Albini, Guillaume; Aury, Jean-Marc; Belser, Caroline; Bertrand, Alexis; Cruaud, Corinne; Da Silva, Corinne; Dossat, Carole; Gavory, Frédérick; Gas, Shahinaz; Guy, Julie; Haquelle, Maud; Jacoby, E'krame; Jaillon, Olivier; Lemainque, Arnaud; Pelletier, Eric; Samson, Gaëlle; Wessner, Mark; Acinas, Silvia G; Royo-Llonch, Marta; Cornejo-Castillo, Francisco M; Logares, Ramiro; Fernández-Gómez, Beatriz; Bowler, Chris; Cochrane, Guy; Amid, Clara; Hoopen, Petra Ten; De Vargas, Colomban; Grimsley, Nigel; Desgranges, Elodie; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Poulton, Nicole; Sieracki, Michael E; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Sullivan, Matthew B; Brum, Jennifer R; Duhaime, Melissa B; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Pesant, Stéphane; Karsenti, Eric; Wincker, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    A unique collection of oceanic samples was gathered by the Tara Oceans expeditions (2009-2013), targeting plankton organisms ranging from viruses to metazoans, and providing rich environmental context measurements. Thanks to recent advances in the field of genomics, extensive sequencing has been performed for a deep genomic analysis of this huge collection of samples. A strategy based on different approaches, such as metabarcoding, metagenomics, single-cell genomics and metatranscriptomics, has been chosen for analysis of size-fractionated plankton communities. Here, we provide detailed procedures applied for genomic data generation, from nucleic acids extraction to sequence production, and we describe registries of genomics datasets available at the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA, www.ebi.ac.uk/ena). The association of these metadata to the experimental procedures applied for their generation will help the scientific community to access these data and facilitate their analysis. This paper complements other efforts to provide a full description of experiments and open science resources generated from the Tara Oceans project, further extending their value for the study of the world's planktonic ecosystems.

  16. Fluoride, boron and nitrate toxicity in ground water of northwest Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Veena; Kumar, Mukesh; Sharma, Mukesh; Yadav, B S

    2010-02-01

    The study was carried out to access the fluoride, boron, and nitrate concentrations in ground water samples of different villages in Indira Gandhi, Bhakra, and Gang canal catchment area of northwest Rajasthan, India. Rural population, in the study site, is using groundwater for drinking and irrigation purposes, without any quality test of water. All water samples (including canal water) were contaminated with fluoride. Fluoride, boron, and nitrate were observed in the ranges of 0.50-8.50, 0.0-7.73, and 0.0-278.68 mg/l, respectively. Most of the water samples were in the categories of fluoride 1.50 mg/l, of boron 2.0-4.0 mg/l, and of nitrate < 45 mg/l. There was no industrial pollution in the study site; hence, availability of these compounds in groundwater was due to natural reasons and by the use of chemical fertilizers.

  17. 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study: The White Book.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

  18. Geomagnetic Excursions recorded from a sediment core from the Great Barrier Reef, IODP Expedition 325, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, J. K.; Herrero-Bervera, E.; Jovane, L.

    2010-12-01

    At the end of the Expedition 325, “Great Barrier Reef Environmental Changes” (GBREC), of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, a core 40 m long collected fine sediments from seaward of Noggin Reef, Queensland, Australia. Initial uranium-thorium and radiocarbon measurements give relative ages of ~10 to ~30 ka. The main aim of the expedition was an investigation of the magnitude and nature of sea-level changes in relation to the Last Glacial Maximum. Paleoenvironmental analyses will study the sea-level changes in relation to the glacial-interglacial phases. Recent modeling of the geodynamo and studies of the geomagnetic field show that the inner core imposes a physical constraint on fluid motions in the outer core. As a result, this complex vortex could provoke anomalies in the geomagnetic configuration that might also include complete and “aborted” reversals of the geomagnetic field. These “aborted” reversals can last for a few thousand years, and are called excursions. We present preliminary measurements of the magnetic susceptibility and NRM of U-channels and of discrete samples from Exp. 325 hole M0058A drilled in April 2010 in front of Noggin Reef in a water depth of 172 m. The magnetic susceptibility shows two zones of high susceptibility with respect to the rest of the base values. The first zone is located between 8.63 and 14.80 mbsf and the second one is located from ¬27.00 to 32.60 mbsf with a maximum value of 277.78 x 10-8 m3/kg. Natural remanent magnetization (NRM) and stepwise a.f. demagnetization have been measured for the 40 m long U-channels and for high-resolution 1-cc discrete samples. Some anomalies of the inclination of the NRM at 17-18 and 23-24 mbsf are related to increased intensity of NRM, but there is no variation in the magnetic susceptibility for these intervals. Alternating field (a.f.) stepwise demagnetization shows that these features are recognizable along the demagnetization steps, showing a consistent Characteristic

  19. Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Housing Program Specification Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewes, Tom [Northwest Energy Works of the Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Corvallis, OR (United States); Peeks, Brady [Northwest Energy Works of the Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The DOE research team Building America Partnership for Improved Residential Construction (BA-PIRC), Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), and Northwest Energy Works (NEW), the current Northwest Energy Efficient Manufactured Home Program (NEEM) program administrator, collaborated to research a new specification that would reduce the energy requirements of a NEEM home.This research identified and developed combinations of cost-effective high performance building assemblies and mechanical systems that can readily can be deployed in the manufacturing setting that reduce energy used for space conditioning, water heating and lighting by 50% over the present NEEM specifications.

  20. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisping, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1997 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. In addition, Section 3.0, Biota, also reflects a rotating collection schedule identifying the year a specific sample is scheduled for collection. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The sampling methods will be the same as those described in the Environmental Monitoring Plan, US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, DOE/RL91-50, Rev. 1, US Department of Energy, Richland, Washington.

  1. IODP Expedition 302, Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX: A First Look at the Cenozoic Paleoceanography of the Central Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the IODP Expedition 302 Scientists

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The behavior and inf luence of the A rct ic Oceanthroughout the course of the global Cenozoic climateevolution have been virtually unknown. Only the uppermostfew meters of the Arctic’s sediment record, representingHolocene and late Pleistocene times, have been retrievedfrom ridges through a limited number of short piston,gravity, and box cores. Even less of the thick sedimentsequences, ~6 km in the Canada Basin and ~3 km in theNansen Basin(Grantz et al., 1990; Jokat et al., 1995, restingon the Arctic Ocean’s abyssal plains, have been cored.Prior to the Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX, informationon Neogene or Paleogene conditions in the central Arcticwas limited to a 1.6-m interval in a 3.6-m-long T-3 gravitycore raised from the Alpha Ridge (Clark, 1974, providingthe sole evidence for marine conditions no older than themiddle Eocene in the central Arctic (Bukry, 1984.

  2. Chemical tracers in Northwest Atlantic dogfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Each year, a number of seafood samples are exported from the US to Europe, including edible tissues collected from high trophic level marine fish species such as...

  3. Short communication.Wood identification based on their common name and their transversal surface anatomy. Application to the batch from the expedition of Ruiz and Pavon

    OpenAIRE

    Villasante Plágaro, Antonio M.

    2011-01-01

    Aim of study: To identify species of wood samples based on common names and anatomical analyses of their transversal surfaces (without microscopic preparations).Area of study: Spain and South America.Material and Methods: The test was carried out on a batch of 15 lumber samples deposited in the Royal Botanical Garden in Madrid, from the expedition by Ruiz and Pavón (1777-1811). The first stage of the methodology is to search and to make a critical analysis of the databases which list common n...

  4. Oral hygiene behaviors and caries experience in Northwest PRECEDENT patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Marilynn; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Zhou, Lingmei; Mancl, Lloyd; Jones, Jackie S; Berg, Joel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the association between oral hygiene behaviors (toothbrushing, water rinsing after brushing, interproximal cleaning, and adjunctive use of fluoride products) and recent caries (past 24 months) in a random sample of patients in Northwest PRECEDENT practices. Practitioner-members of Northwest PRECEDENT, a dental practice-based research network, conducted a longitudinal study on caries risk assessment. At baseline, patients completed a questionnaire on oral self-care, snacking, health, and socio-demographics. A dental examination recorded readily visible heavy plaque and decayed, missing, and filled teeth; chart review captured new caries and treatments in the previous 24 months. Bivariate and multiple generalized estimating equations (GEE) log-linear regression models stratified by age-groups were used to relate oral hygiene behaviors to the primary outcome of mean dental caries in the past 24 months on data from 1400 patients in 63 practices. The primary exposure of interest was fluoride toothbrushing frequency. Fluoride toothbrushing once per day or twice or more per day by patients 9-17 was significantly associated with a 50% lower mean caries rate compared with fluoride toothbrushing less than once per day, after adjustment for covariates [rate ratios (RR) = 0.5; 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 0.3-0.8]. After adjustment, for patients 18-64, fluoride toothbrushing two or more times per day was significantly associated with a 40% lower recent mean caries rate (RR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.9); in patients 65+, twice a day or more fluoride toothbrushing was not associated with lower caries rates (RR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.7-1.8). Of the other oral hygiene variables, after adjustment, patients 18-64 who rinsed with water after brushing had a 40% lower mean caries rate compared with no rinsing (RR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.4-0.9) and the presence of readily visible heavy plaque was significantly associated with an increase in the mean caries rate for

  5. Oral Hygiene Behaviors and Caries Experience in Northwest PRECEDENT Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothen, Marilynn; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Zhou, Lingmei; Mancl, Lloyd; Jones, Jackie S.; Berg, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between oral hygiene behaviors (toothbrushing, water rinsing after brushing, interproximal cleaning, and adjunctive use of fluoride products) and recent caries (past 24 months) in a random sample of patients in Northwest PRECEDENT practices. Methods Practitioner-members of Northwest PRECEDENT dental Practice-based Research Network (PBRN) conducted a longitudinal study on caries risk assessment. At baseline patients completed a questionnaire on oral self-care, snacking, health, and socio-demographics. A dental exam recorded readily-visible heavy plaque and DMFT; chart review captured new caries and treatments in the previous 24 months. Bivariate and multiple GEE log-linear regression models stratified by age groups were used to relate oral hygiene behaviors to the primary outcome of mean dental caries in the past 24 months on data from 1400 patients in 63 practices. The primary exposure of interest was fluoride toothbrushing frequency. Results Fluoride toothbrushing once per day or more by patients 9-17 was significantly associated with a 50% lower mean caries rate compared to fluoride toothbrushing less than once per day, after adjustment for age, gender, race, education, income, between-meal carbohydrate snacks, sugar-added beverages, alcohol consumption, smoking, BMI, exercise, stimulated salivary pH, number of teeth, and all other oral hygiene behaviors captured [Rate Ratio (RR)=0.5; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.3-0.8]. After adjustment, for patients 18-64 fluoride toothbrushing two or more times per day was significantly associated with a 40% lower recent mean caries rate (RR=0.6; 95%CI=0.4-0.9); in patients 65+, twice a day or more fluoride toothbrushing was not associated with lower caries rates (RR=1.1; 95%CI=0.7-1.8). Of the other oral hygiene variables, after adjustment, patients 18-64 who rinsed with water after brushing had a 40% lower mean caries rate compared to no rinsing (RR=0.6; 95%CI=0.4-0.9) and the

  6. Climate variability and predictability in Northwest Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, O.; Djellouli, Y.

    2003-04-01

    Northwest Africa defined here as the area including Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, occupies a large territory in North Africa with an area exceeding 3.5 million km2. The geographical contrast is very important: while most of the southern part is desert, the northern and northwestern parts exhibit a contrasting geography including large flat areas in the western part of Morocco, northern Algeria and eastern part of Tunisia and the formidable Atlas mountains barrier extends from south west of Morocco toward north west of Tunisia crossing central Morocco and north Algeria. Agriculture is one of major socio-economic activities in the region with an extensive cash-crop for exporting to Europe especially from Morocco and Tunisia. The influence of the recurring droughts during the 80s and 90s was very crucial for the economic and societal aspects of the region. In Morocco, severe droughts have caused GDP fluctuation within past 20 years from 10% increase down to negative values in some particular years. Recent studies have investigated seasonal rainfall variability and prediction over MOROCCO in the framework of regional and international collaboration. Results from this work has shown that the main general circulation feature associated with the rainfall variability within Morocco is the North Atlantic Oscillation. The relationship is in fact due to the major role played by the AZORES high pressure with its role in modulating the main position of the active synoptic systems in the north Atlantic area and therefore in modulating the frequency and the intensity of the weather systems that impact the western part of the region. Mediterranean sea plays also major role in the mid of the region. In this paper we applied EOF technique on 500 hPa. The data used are monthly reanalysis NCEP/NCAR analyses for November from 1960 to 1990 climatological time series. Correlation analysis is then performed between EOF time series and global 4x4 degre SST anomalies. The results we

  7. SRTM Anaglyph: Northwest of Bhuj, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    On January 26, 2001, the Kachchh region in western India suffered the most deadly earthquake in India's history. Shortly thereafter, geologists traversed the region looking for ground surface disruptions, such as fault breaks, that could provide clues to the tectonic processes here. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) scientists provided stereoscopic images to the geologists, similar to this anaglyph view of the terrain northwest of the city of Bhuj. The geologists reported back that the images were essential in optimizing their field activities. Tectonic landforms are created by ground displacements that are repetitious over geologic time, so these landforms are good places to look for co-seismic faulting and warping. The stereoscopic images showed the geologists where the structures are located and their overall pattern, which could not be seen while standing on any one hill or in any one gully. In general, the field studies found that surface disruptions by the recent earthquake were minimal and that the major landforms are quite old and probably not directly related to ongoing tectonic processes.Features of interest in the view shown here include the largest hill (upper left-center), which is a dome or anticline, upwardly convex layered rocks. Also visible are a possible volcanic plug (lower left-center) and an incised meandering stream (center). Agriculture in this arid region is concentrated on the alluvial fan of the major stream (dark pattern, upper right).The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image (taken just two weeks after the earthquake) over preliminary digital elevation data from the SRTM and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.Landsat has been

  8. SRTM Stereo Pair: Northwest of Bhuj, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    On January 26, 2001, the Kachchh region in western India suffered the most deadly earthquake in India's history. Shortly thereafter, geologists traversed the region looking for ground surface disruptions, such as fault breaks, that could provide clues to the tectonic processes here. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) scientists provided stereoscopic images to the geologists, similar to this 3-D view of the terrain northwest of the city of Bhuj. The geologists reported back that the images were essential in optimizing their field activities. Tectonic landforms are created by ground displacements that are repetitious over geologic time, so these landforms are good places to look for co-seismic faulting and warping. The stereoscopic images showed the geologists where the structures are located and their overall pattern, which could not be seen while standing on anyone hill or in any one gully. In general, the field studies found that surface disruptions by the recent earthquake were minimal and that the major landforms are quite old and probably not directly related to ongoing tectonic processes.Features of interest in the view shown here include the largest hill (upper left-center), which is a dome or anticline, upwardly convex layered rocks. Also visible are a possible volcanic plug (lower left-center) and an incised meandering stream (center). Agriculture in this arid region is concentrated on the alluvial fan of the major stream (green pattern, upper right).This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image (taken just two weeks after the earthquake) over a preliminary SRTM elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view

  9. Restoring the Pacific Northwest: the art and science of ecological restoration in Cascadia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Apostol, D; Sinclair, M

    2006-01-01

    Restoring the Pacific Northwest is a handbook that brings together in a single volume a vast array of information on the science and practice of restoration in a broadly defined Pacific Northwest region...

  10. Particle sizes of Pliocene and Pleistocene core sediments from IODP Expedition 323 in the Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data compilation includes the results of grain size analyses of core sediment collected by IODP during Expedition 323 in the Bering Sea. One dataset is included...

  11. Effects of an Arctic Ocean Ski Traverse on the Protective Capabilities of Expedition Footwear

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Endrusick, Thomas; Frykman, Peter; O'Brien, Catherine; Giblo, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    A traverse of the Arctic Ocean during a 2000-km unsupported ski expedition provided an opportunity to assess the impact of an extreme cold environment on the protective capabilities of a specialized footwear system (FS...

  12. ASTER Expedited L1A Reconstructed Unprocessed Instrument Data V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ASTER Expedited L1A Reconstructed Unprocessed Instrument Data is produced with the express purpose of providing the ASTER Science Team members and others, data...

  13. ASTER Expedited L1B Registered Radiance at the Sensor V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Expedited ASTER Level-1B Registered Radiance at the Sensor data set is produced with the express purpose of providing ASTER Science Team members data of their...

  14. Australian solar eclipse expeditions: the voyage to Cape York in 1871

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomb, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Techniques such as photography and spectroscopy only became available to study solar eclipses in the 1860s. The first subsequent total eclipse of the Sun to be visible from Australia was one in December 1871 that was visible from far north Queensland. Initiated by the Royal Society of Victoria, astronomers in Melbourne and Sydney cooperated to organise the Australian Eclipse Expedition aboard the steamship Governor Blackall to a suitable observing location. Though on the day of the eclipse clouds prevented viewing, this was an important expedition that was complex to organise and involved dealings with colonial Governments and with relatively large sums of money that Australian scientists had not previously experienced. With a newspaper reporter as part of the expedition along with two photographers the expedition was well recorded and provides a clear insight into the activities of late nineteenth century astronomers and other scientists.

  15. Expediting Clinician Adoption of Safety Practices: The UCSF Venous Access Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donaldson, Nancy E; Plank, Rosemary K; Williamson, Ann; Pearl, Jeffrey; Kellogg, Jerry; Ryder, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    ...) Venous Access Device (VAD) Patient Safety Interdisciplinary Education Project was to develop a 30-hour/one clinical academic unit VAD patient safety course with the aim of expediting clinician adoption of critical concepts...

  16. A population-based study examining hepatitis B virus infection and immunization rates in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhaohua; Wang, Tingcai; Shao, Zhongjun; Huang, Dahong; Wang, Anhui; Guo, Zhiwen; Long, Yong; Zhang, Lei; Su, Haixia; Zhang, Qi; Yan, Yongping; Fan, Daiming

    2014-01-01

    Current baseline data regarding the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and the immune status in hyperendemic areas is necessary in evaluating the effectiveness of ongoing HBV prevention and control programs in northwest China. This study aims to determine the prevalence of chronic HBV infections, past exposure rates, and immune response profiles in Wuwei City, northwest China in 2010. Cross-sectional household survey representative of the Wuwei City population. 28,579 participants were interviewed in the seroepidemiological survey ≥1 year of age. House to house screening was conducted using a standard questionnaire. All serum samples were screened by enzyme-linked immunoassays for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen, antibodies against HBV surface antigen, and antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen. Among individuals ≥1 year of age, 7.2% (95%CI: 6.3-8.1%) had chronic HBV infections, 43.9% (CI: 40.4-47.4%) had been exposed to HBV, and 23.49% (CI: 21.6-25.3%) had vaccine-induced immunity. Multi-factor weighted logistic regression analysis showed that having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 2.6, 95%CI: 2.3-3.0) and beauty treatments in public places (OR = 1.2, 95%CI: 1.1-1.3) were the risk factors of HBV infection in whole population. Having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.2-6.5) and lack of hepatitis vaccination (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.4-3.3) were the risk factors for HBV infection in children aged 1-14 years. Hepatitis B infection remains a serious public health problem in northwest China. Having household contact with HBV carriers and beauty treatments in public places represented HBV infection risk factors. Hepatitis B vaccine immunization strategies need further improvement, particularly by targeting the immunization of rural migrant workers.

  17. Balanced sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    In balanced sampling a linear relation between the soil property of interest and one or more covariates with known means is exploited in selecting the sampling locations. Recent developments make this sampling design attractive for statistical soil surveys. This paper introduces balanced sampling

  18. The intertwining paths of the density managment and riparian buffer study and the Northwest Forest Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth J. Ruzicka; Deanna H. Olson; Klaus J. Puettmann

    2013-01-01

    Initiated simultaneously, the Density Management and Riparian Buff er Study of western Oregon and the Northwest Forest Plan have had intertwining paths related to federal forest management and policy changes in the Pacifi c Northwest over the last 15 to 20 years. We briefl y discuss the development of the Northwest Forest Plan and how it changed the way forest policy...

  19. Investigating the role of virtual reality in geography via Google Expeditions

    OpenAIRE

    Tilling, Steve; Tudor, Ana-Despina; Kitchen, Becky; Minocha, Shailey

    2017-01-01

    This workshop-session explored the use of Google Expeditions (GEs), virtual reality-based field trips, to support and encourage outdoor fieldwork and facilitate visualisation of processes and locations. Participants had the opportunity to trial GEs and were invited to discuss and evaluate the outcomes (particularly the educator’s perspective) of a project investigating the role of virtual reality in geography education.\\ud \\ud We first showed several Expeditions to the educators, such as Rio ...

  20. Community Service, Educational Performance and Social Responsibility in Northwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhang, Linxiu; Liu, Chengfang; Li, Hongbin; Rozelle, Scott; Sharbono, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to analyse the effect of high school scholarships tied to community service on the development of secondary school students in Northwest China. Using data from three rounds of surveys of thousands of students in 298 classes in 75 high schools in Shaanxi province, the paper documents the implementation of the…

  1. Employee Retention at ABC & Co. Northwest Arkansas. Research Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Timothy; And Others

    A 7-month research project was conducted by graduate students at a garment manufacturing plant in Fayetteville, Arkansas, to gain information about high employee turnover. Information also was gathered about the employment situation in northwest Arkansas in general, union-labor relationships, and how other companies handled turnover. Data were…

  2. Marginal thinning in Northwest Greenland during 2002-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjær, Kurt H.; Wahr, John M

    catchment-wide ice volume loss (convert is to mass loss) and compare with independent measurements from GPS and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite gravity mission, launched in March, 2002. The GRACE results provide a direct measure of mass loss averaged over the entire northwest...

  3. Interagency strategy for the Pacific Northwest Natural Areas Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd M. Wilson; Reid Schuller; Russ Holmes; Curt Pavola; Robert A. Fimbel; Cynthia N. McCain; John G. Gamon; Pene Speaks; Joan I. Seevers; Thomas E. DeMeo; Steve. Gibbons

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the Pacific Northwest Interagency Natural Areas Committee has promoted the establishment and management of natural areas in Oregon and Washington—protected areas devoted to research, education, and conservation of biodiversity. This growing collection of sites is now unmatched in its diversity and representation of both common and unique natural...

  4. Inventory of North-West European algae initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 an inventory of North-West European (NWE) algae initiatives was carried out to get an impression of the market and research activities on algae production and refinery, especially for bioenergy purposes. A questionnaire was developed that would provide the EnAlgae project with information on

  5. Northwest range-plant symbols adapted to automatic data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George A. Garrison; Jon M. Skovlin

    1960-01-01

    Many range technicians, agronomists, foresters, biologists, and botanists of various educational institutions and government agencies in the Northwest have been using a four-letter symbol list or code compiled 12 years ago from records of plants collected by the U.S. Forest Service in Oregon and Washington, This code has served well as a means of entering plant names...

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory monthly activities report, April 1965

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-05-14

    This report discusses research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory on topics relating to hanford production reactors. The topic deal with: reactor and material technology; reactor physics and instruments; chemistry; biology and medicine; applied mathematics; radiation protection; and test reactor and engineering services.

  7. Energy and water consumption of Pacific Northwest irrigation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, L.D.; Wensink, R.B.; Wolfe, J.W.; Shearer, M.N.

    1977-09-01

    Irrigation in the Pacific Northwest is an energy-intensive process which represents a major part of the total energy used in farm level food production. Since 1950, several major developments have precipitated pronounced increases in irrigation energy requirements. For example, the invention of efficient high-lift pumps, labor-saving equipment, new uses for irrigation sprinklers, and profitable cropping patterns have substantially escalated irrigation energy consumption in the Pacific Northwest in the past 25 years. Until recently, energy prices have remained relatively low and constant. The next 25 years will continue to experience advanced irrigation technologies. In addition to technological development, however, the cost of energy and water will certainly rise while their availabilities become increasingly constrained. The depletion of ground water in several parts of the United States could also potentially increase the irrigation burden of the Pacific Northwest. Lastly, parts of the Pacific Northwest water supply are directly convertible to energy via hydroelectric generation. This study proposes to make realistic projections relative to present and future interactions of the above components.

  8. Silvicultural approaches to animal damage management in Pacific Northwest forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugh C. Black

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the potential of Silvicultural approaches for managing animal damage in forests at two levels: management of free-to-grow stands and sitespecific practices that foster prompt and successful regeneration. Introductory chapters provide a historical perspective of animal damage management in the Pacific Northwest, describe the elements of an integrated...

  9. Agriculture in the Northwest-European delta metropolis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The southern and central regions of The Netherlands are part of the Northwest- European Delta Metropolis. The demands placed by modern, urban society on the agricultural sector are numerous. Not only are the environment, animal welfare, and food hygiene and quality at stake here, but also must these

  10. Fire ecology of Scots pine in Northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: biodiversity, fire ecology, fuel modelling, succession, tree regenerationIn this thesis the ecological consequences of forest fire are studied in North-west European Scots pine {Pinus sylvestris) forests. The focus is on post-fire succession, and the factors and mechanisms that influence

  11. Timber resource of Wisconsin's Northwest Survey Unit, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Brad Smith

    1984-01-01

    The fourth inventory of the timber resource of the Northwest Wisconsin Survey Unit shows a 1.8% decline in commercial forest area and a 36% gain in growing-stock volume between 1968 and 1983. Presented are highlights and statistics on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, and biomass.

  12. Landscape and the intermontane Northwest: an environmental history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Robbins; Donald W. Wolf

    1994-01-01

    Traces the natural and cultural processes involved in shaping the environment in the intermontane northwest from the Indian period of domination to the present. Emphasizes the increasing influence of humans as modifiers of landscapes and ecosystems, especially with the coming of the market system to the region and the onset of the industrial era. Focuses on the unique...

  13. Leveraging Lighting for Energy Savings: GSA Northwest/Artic Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-01-01

    Case study describes how the Northwest/Arctic Region branch of the General Services Administration (GSA) improved safety and energy efficiency in its Fairbanks Federal Building parking garage used by federal employees, U.S. Marshals, and the District Court. A 74% savings was realized by replacing 220 high-pressure sodium fixtures with 220 light-emitting diode fixtures.

  14. 2007 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda. Mazza

    2008-01-01

    As I look back at 2007 for the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Research Station, I am very gratified at the contributions of our scientists and support staff in producing scientific knowledge and tools. This year has brought unprecedented recognition of the contributions of our scientists. Ralph Alig (research forester), Ron Neilson (bioclimatologist), and David L. Peterson (...

  15. Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brubaker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities.In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather-related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local leaders are challenged to identify appropriate adaptation strategies to address climate impacts and related health effects.The tribal health system is combining local observations, traditional knowledge, and western science to perform community-specific climate change health impact assessments. Local leaders are applying this information to develop adaptation responses.The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium will describe relationships between climate impacts and health effects and provide examples of community-scaled adaptation actions currently being applied in Northwest Alaska.Climate change is increasing vulnerability to injury, disease, mental stress, food insecurity, and water insecurity. Northwest communities are applying adaptation approaches that are both specific and appropriate.The health impact assessment process is effective in raising awareness, encouraging discussion, engaging partners, and implementing adaptation planning. With community-specific information, local leaders are applying health protective adaptation measures.

  16. 7 CFR 319.8-13 - From Northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Foreign Cotton and Covers Special Conditions for the Entry of Cotton and Covers from Mexico § 319.8-13 From Northwest Mexico. Contingent upon... and other plant pest conditions that would increase risk of pest introduction into the United States...

  17. 2014 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza

    2015-01-01

    Communicating the scientific knowledge generated by the Pacific Northwest Research Station is integral to our mission. The 2014 Science Accomplishments reports highlights the breadth of the station’s research, the relevance of our science findings, and the application of these findings. The photographs throughout the report showcase the region where we work and how...

  18. 2013 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza

    2014-01-01

    Communicating the scientific knowledge generated by the Pacific Northwest Research Station is integral to our mission. The 2013 Science Accomplishments reports highlights the breadth of the station’s research, the relevance of our science findings, and the application of these findings. The photographs throughout the report showcase the region where we work and how...

  19. 2009 Science Accomplishments Report of the Pacific Northwest Research Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights significant research findings and accomplishments by scientists at the Pacific Northwest (PNW) Research Station during fiscal year 2009. The mission of the PNW Research Station is to generate and communicate scientific knowledge that helps people understand and make informed choices about people, natural resources...

  20. Climate change and health effects in Northwest Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Michael; Berner, James; Chavan, Raj; Warren, John

    2011-01-01

    This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities. In Northwest Alaska, warming is resulting in a broad range of unusual weather and environmental conditions, including delayed freeze-up, earlier breakup, storm surge, coastal erosion, and thawing permafrost. These are just some of the climate impacts that are driving concerns about weather-related injury, the spread of disease, mental health issues, infrastructure damage, and food and water security. Local leaders are challenged to identify appropriate adaptation strategies to address climate impacts and related health effects. IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS: The tribal health system is combining local observations, traditional knowledge, and western science to perform community-specific climate change health impact assessments. Local leaders are applying this information to develop adaptation responses. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium will describe relationships between climate impacts and health effects and provide examples of community-scaled adaptation actions currently being applied in Northwest Alaska. Climate change is increasing vulnerability to injury, disease, mental stress, food insecurity, and water insecurity. Northwest communities are applying adaptation approaches that are both specific and appropriate. The health impact assessment process is effective in raising awareness, encouraging discussion, engaging partners, and implementing adaptation planning. With community-specific information, local leaders are applying health protective adaptation measures.

  1. 2013 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-10-01

    The 2013 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (2013 White Book) is BPA's latest projection of the Pacific Northwest regional retail loads, contract obligations, contract purchases, and resource capabilities. The 2013 White Book is a snapshot of conditions as of October 1, 2013, documenting the loads and resources for the Federal system and region for the 10-year study period OY 2014 through 2023. The White Book contains projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. The White Book also contains information obtained from formalized resource planning reports and data submittals including those from individual utilities, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council), and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). Starting with the 2012 White Book, BPA changed the annual production schedule for future White Books. BPA is scheduled to publish a complete White Book, which includes a Federal System Needs Assessment analysis, every other year (even years). In the odd-numbered years, BPA will publish a biennial summary update (Supplement) that only contains major changes to the Federal System and Regional System analyses that have occurred since the last White Book. http://www.bpa.gov/power/pgp/whitebook/2013/index.shtml.

  2. Geochemistry of Schists of Northwest Obudu Plateau, Southeastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precambrian, highly foliated, fine – medium grained schists, which comprise migmatitic schist (MS), quartz mica schist (QMS), biotite mica schist (BMS) and hornblende biotite schist (HBS) constitute important lithological unit in Northwest Obudu Plateau. The schists are associated with gneisses, amphibolites and ...

  3. North-West Indian fauna of genus Macrobathra Meyrick ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two first representative species of genus Macrobathra Meyrick viz., gentilis Meyrick and ochrefasciata sp. nov. are reported from three inadequately surveyed North-West Indian states, namely Haryana, Himachal Pradesh and Rajasthan. With the addition of another new species, total number of species under the ...

  4. Field Applications of Automated Weed control: Northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstee, J.W.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.T.

    2014-01-01


    In Northwest Europe there is high need for advanced weed control methods. The use of crop protection chemicals has become stricter, and integrated pest management is required by regulations from the European Union. This need has resulted in the development of several advanced weed control

  5. Gender, culture, and astrophysical fieldwork: Elizabeth Campbell and the Lick Observatory-Crocker eclipse expeditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, A. S.-K.

    The article is organized as follows. It begins with an overview of women in nineteenth-century American science. It then describes the culture of mountaintop observatories and life on Mount Hamilton. Elizabeth Campbell's unique role in the Crocker-Lick expeditions drew upon her equally unique role in the observatory, and also on the meaning given to women's work in general on the mountain. The bulk of the article focuses on the Campbells and their expeditions to India in 1898, Spain in 1905, and the South Pacific in 1908. The third section compares the Lick Observatory expeditions to those conducted by David Todd of Amherst College. Todd's wife, Mabel Loomis Todd, went into the field several times with her husband, but her place in the field was radically different from Elizabeth Campbell's, a difference that can be ascribed to a combination of local culture and personality. Finally, it compares American expeditions to British expeditions of the period, to see what the absence of British women on expeditions can tell us about the way national scientific styles and cultures affected gender roles in science.

  6. The expedition to Peru and Chile (1777-1788): inventory of scientific production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, A G; Rodríguez Nozal, R

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an inventory of the scientific corpus produced by the Spanish members of the Expedition to Peru and Chile (1777-1788). This material is divided into six large sections. The first section covers the different versions of the diary of the journey taken by the Expedition. The second section covers the drafts and workbooks used by the Expedition members for the writing of "Flora Peruviana et Chilensis," the manuscripts and published editions of this work, the materials used in the preparation of both the "Prodromus" and the "Systema Vegetabilium," the contributions of the assistants on the Expedition and some monographs of taxonomic interest. The third section is dedicated to quinological studies and other pharmacological works undertaken by Hipólito Ruiz López and José Pavón Jiménez. The fourth section includes the writings concerning Ruiz's dispute with Antonio José Cavanilles. The fifth section contains texts which set forth the botanical thought of the members of the Expedition. The sixth and final section includes the Expedition members' writings on various subjects, from anthropology and ethnography to others of a purely historical nature.

  7. Downhole Logging Measurements from IODP Expedition 313: an Overview and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inwood, J.; Lofi, J.; Scienceparty, E.

    2009-12-01

    Downhole geophysical measurements and images allow the characterization of the lithology and physical properties of the subsurface, thus making a powerful contribution to the evaluation of facies and sediment composition and to the recognition of key surfaces in siliciclastic successions. The mission-specific IODP Expedition 313 (May-July 2009) cored and logged sequences deposited on the New Jersey continental margin during the post-Eocene ice-house world. One of the aims of the Expedition is to evaluate sequence stratigraphic facies models that predict depositional environments, sediment compositions, and stratal geometries in response to sea-level change. 5800 m of wireline logging data were collected in three boreholes drilled to a composite total of 2062 m; here we present an overview of these data. Continuous through-pipe spectral gamma ray logs were acquired in each borehole and repeated in open hole intervals for calibration. Magnetic susceptibility, resistivity, sonic and acoustic image logs were obtained in open hole at key intervals and/or where borehole conditions allowed. Due to space limitations on the offshore platform, Exp313 cores were not split. Samples from core catchers, whole-round multi-sensor track measurements, vertical seismic profiles and these logging data comprise the full data set at the time of this writing. Preliminary analysis shows lateral and vertical changes in the physical properties of the sediments that enable us to distinguish depositional intervals at several scales (cms - tens of meters). Medium to high resolution acoustic images of the borehole walls reveal sedimentary characteristics even within intervals of low core recovery, and provide an accurate core-depth positioning of some key surfaces. Likewise, the continuous spectral gamma logs allow assessment of lithologies in intervals with incomplete core recovery, and show great promise of providing excellent log-core-seismic correlations once the cores are split and fully

  8. Stress magnitude and orientation in deep coalbed biosphere off Shimokita ~IODP Expedition337 drilling project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. Y.; Lin, W.; Yamada, Y.

    2015-12-01

    One of IODP expedition (Borehole C0020A) is located in the forearc basin formed by the subducting between Pacific plate and Eurasian plate off Shimokita Peninsula. This ~2.5km deep scientific drilling collected the high-resolution wire-line resistivity logging, caliper data, Dipole Sonic waveforms; geophysical properties measurements and core samples. The riser drilling operations produced one good conditions borehole even this drilling operation was applied right after 311 Tohoku earthquake. Based on the high-resolutions Formation Micro Imager (FMI) images, both breakout and tensile fractures along the borehole wall indicating the in-situ stress orientation are detected in the unwrapped resistivity images. In this research, a reasonable geomechanical model based on the breakout width and physical properties is constructed to estimate the stress magnitude profile in this borehole. Besides, the openhole leak-off test revealed the information of Shmin magnitude. In general, stress direction along the borehole is slight rotated to east with drilling to the bottom of the borehole. Geomechanical model constarined the principal stresses in Strike-slip stress regime to satisfy the occurrences of borehole enlargements and tensile fractures. Some blank zones with no borehole wall failure and vertical fractures indicated the stress anomaly might be controlled by local lithological facies. Comparing to the JFAST drilling, this site is out of Japan trench slip zone and shows almost parallel stress direcion to the trench (~90 degree apart of Shmin with Site C0019).

  9. Spatial Distribution of Methanesulphonic Acid in the Arctic Aerosol Collected during the Chinese Arctic Research Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Ye

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Methanesulphonic acid (MSA, mainly derived from marine biogenic emissions has been frequently used to estimate the marine biogenic contribution. However, there are few reports on MSA over the Arctic Ocean, especially the central Arctic Ocean. Here, we analyzed MSA in aerosol samples collected over the ocean and seas during the Chinese Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE 2012 using ion chromatography. The aerosol MSA concentrations over the Arctic Ocean varied considerably and ranged from non-detectable (ND to 229 ng/m3, with an average of 27 ± 54 ng/m3 (median: 10 ng/m3. We found the distribution of aerosol MSA exhibited an obvious regional variation, which was affected by biotic and abiotic factors. High values were generally observed in the Norwegian Sea; this phenomenon was attributed to high rates of phytoplankton primary productivity and dimethylsulfide (DMS fluxes in this region. Concentrations over the pack ice region in the central Arctic Ocean were generally lower than over the open waters at the ice edge in the Chukchi Sea. This difference was the mainly caused by sea ice. In addition, we found that higher MSA concentrations were associated with warmer sea surface temperature (SST.

  10. Seroprevalence of Neospora caninum Infection in Dairy Cattle in Tabriz, Northwest Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematollahi, A; Jaafari, R; Moghaddam, Gh

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of antibody to Neospora caninum in healthy and aborted dairy cattle in Tabriz, capital of East-Azarbaijan in northwest of Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study serum samples were collected from 266 healthy and aborted Holestein-Feriesisnc cows from September 2008 to August 2009. The sera were analyzed to detect of antibody against N. caninum using the commercially ELISA kit. Results Seroprevalence of antibody to N. caninum was 10.5% in Tabriz dairy cattle. Also the abortion rate in all cattle sampled was 33.6% but percentage of seropositive aborted cattle was 18.4%. Conclusion Neosporosis could be one of the possible causes of abortion in dairy cattle in Tabriz and regarding the distribution in dogs as definitive host for the parasite, further studies in dog and cattle are recommended. PMID:22347319

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Potential Impact Categories for Radiological Air Emission Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Gervais, Todd L.; Barnett, J. Matthew

    2012-06-05

    In 2002, the EPA amended 40 CFR 61 Subpart H and 40 CFR 61 Appendix B Method 114 to include requirements from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities for major emission points. Additionally, the WDOH amended the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 Radiation protection-air emissions to include ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 requirements for major and minor emission points when new permitting actions are approved. A result of the amended regulations is the requirement to prepare a written technical basis for the radiological air emission sampling and monitoring program. A key component of the technical basis is the Potential Impact Category (PIC) assigned to an emission point. This paper discusses the PIC assignments for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Integrated Laboratory emission units; this revision includes five PIC categories.

  12. Investigation of carbon dioxide in the central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P-16C and P-17C) during the TUNES/2 expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August, 1991. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, T.; Goddard, J.G.; Rubin, S.; Chipman, D.W.; Sutherland, S.C.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of carbon dioxide and associated hydrographic measurements made during the oceanographic expedition, TUNES/2, aboard the R/V Thomas Washington in the central South Pacific Ocean. During the 40 day expedition, the total carbon dioxide concentration in 1000 seawater samples were determined using a coulometer system and the pCO(sub 2) in 940 seawater samples were determined using an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system. The alkalinity values in 900 water samples were computed using these measurements. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements were made for the Certified Reference Solutions (Batch No. 6) and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 +or- 1.5umol/kg. The chemical characteristics for the major water masses have been determined.

  13. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 300 area facility liquid effluent monitoring: 1994 and 1995 field tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, R.G.; Thompson, C.J.; Damberg, E.G.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1997-07-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Effluent Management Services manages liquid waste streams from some of the 300 Area buildings on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, to ensure liquid discharges to the Columbia River are in compliance with permit requirements. The buildings are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In fiscal year (FY) 1994 and FY 1995, three field tests were conducted to gather information that could be used to (1) increase the understanding of 300 Area building liquid waste streams based on the characterization and monitoring data collected during calendar year (CY) 1994 and CY 1995 and (2) establish improved methods for evaluating facility releases. The three field tests were (1) an evaluation of a continuous monitoring/event-triggered sampling system, (2) a volatile organic compound hold-time study, and (3) an investigation of the dilution and retention properties of the 300 Area process sewer. The results from the first field test showed that future characterization and monitoring of 300 Area facility liquid waste streams could benefit significantly from augmenting continuous monitoring with event-triggered sampling. Current continuous-monitoring practices (i.e., monitoring of pH, conductivity, and flow) cannot detect discharges of organic pollutants. Effluent control effectiveness would be enhanced by incorporating a continuous total organic carbon analyzer in the system to detect events involving releases of organic compounds. In the second field test, sample hold times were shown to have a significant effect on volatile organic compound data. Samples analyzed in the field within 1 hour of collection generally had 1.5 to 3 times higher volatile organic compound concentrations than those analyzed 1.5 to 4 weeks later at on-site and off-site laboratories, respectively. The number of volatile organic compounds detected also decreased with increasing hold times.

  14. Spectroscopic studies of terrestrial impact materials: Preparation for Popigai expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evdokimova, N. A.; Rodin, A. V.; Masaitis, V. L.; Timofeev, I. S.; Roste, O. Z.; Korablev, O. I.; Dolnikov, G. G.

    2011-10-01

    Terrestrial craters give us an excellent opportunity of direct analisys as opposed to craters out of the E arth. However, on the Earth there are only few sites where traces of strong impacts event could be studied in the fi eld. The traces of ancient impacts are better preserved in the frozen subsoil at subpolar latitudes. One of such sites is Popigai crater, located in subpolar Siberia, Russia, presumably caused by a giant impactor 35 Ma ago. This astrobleme gives a good chance to observe in situ the asteroid crater, impact materials and other consequenses of great energy deposition. T he crater was thoroughly studied during last few decades due to impact diamond inventories associated with it [1]. However a number of problems remain unresolved and wait for further studies: the physics and chemistry of impactites and impact breccias; mineral components with metamorphic rocks affected by great shock and impactites; material ejecta; structural forms invoked by crater formation; problems of remote sensing studies and problems related to comparative planetology. In the framework o f Europlanet program, we plan the expedition to Popigai site scheduled to 2012.

  15. Antibacterial Compounds from Marine Vibrionaceae Isolated on a Global Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone Gram

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available On a global research expedition, over 500 bacterial strains inhibitory towards pathogenic bacteria were isolated. Three hundred of the antibacterial strains were assigned to the Vibrionaceae family. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the phylogeny and bioactivity of five Vibrionaceae strains with pronounced antibacterial activity. These were identified as Vibrio coralliilyticus (two strains, V. neptunius (two strains, and Photobacterium halotolerans (one strain on the basis of housekeeping gene sequences. The two related V. coralliilyticus and V. neptunius strains were isolated from distant oceanic regions. Chemotyping by LC-UV/MS underlined genetic relationships by showing highly similar metabolite profiles for each of the two V. coralliilyticus and V. neptunius strains, respectively, but a unique profile for P. halotolerans. Bioassay-guided fractionation identified two known antibiotics as being responsible for the antibacterial activity; andrimid (from V. coralliilyticus and holomycin (from P. halotolerans. Despite the isolation of already known antibiotics, our findings show that marine Vibrionaceae are a resource of antibacterial compounds and may have potential for future natural product discovery.

  16. Expeditions to Drill Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Millard F.

    2005-04-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), an international collaboration of Earth, ocean, and life scientists that began in 2003, offers scientists worldwide unprecedented opportunities to address a vast array of scientific problems in all submarine settings. Recently, the scientific advisory structure of the proposal-driven IODP scheduled drilling expeditions, targeting critical scientific problems in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific Ocean, for 2005 and early 2006 (Figure 1, Table 1). The IODP, which is co-led by Japan and the United States, with strong contributions from the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) and China, is guided by an initial science plan, ``Earth, Oceans, and Life'' (www.iodp.org). For the first time, through the IODP, scientists have at their disposal both a riser (drilling vessel which has a metal tube surrounding the drill pipe that enables the return of drilling fluid and cuttings to the drill ship; the ``riser'' is attached to a ``blow-out preventer'' or shut-off device at the seafloor) and riserless drilling vessel (which lacks a riser pipe and blow-out preventer), as well as mission-specific capabilities such as drilling barges and jack-up rigs for shallow-water and Arctic drilling.

  17. Europa’s lost expedition a scientific novel

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This classically styled, chilling murder mystery about an expedition under the ice of Jupiter’s ocean moon Europa, backed up by the latest scientific findings on this icy satellite. The science fiction premise explores real possibilities of exploring other bodies in the Solar System, including probing their possible astrobiology. Now that the most recent world war has concluded on Earth, human explorers are returning to exploration, carrying out a full-court press to journey into the alien abyss using tele-operated biorobotics and human-tended submersibles. Nine scientists head out to Jupiter’s icy ocean-moon. But at Europa’s most remote outpost, one by one, the team members who shared the cruise out begin to die under suspicious circumstances. All was well until humans begin diving into Europa’s subsurface ocean. The deaths have all the symptoms of some sort of plague, despite Europa’s seemingly sterile environment. Besides providing thrills, a science section covers the very latest in undersea rob...

  18. Excess of {sup 236}U in the northwest Mediterranean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamizo, E., E-mail: echamizo@us.es [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Junta de Andalucía, Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Seville (Spain); López-Lora, M., E-mail: mlopezlora@us.es [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Universidad de Sevilla, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Junta de Andalucía, Thomas Alva Edison 7, 41092 Seville (Spain); Bressac, M., E-mail: matthieu.bressac@utas.edu.au [IAEA-Environment Laboratories, Monte Carlo 98000 (Monaco); Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS (Australia); Levy, I., E-mail: I.N.Levy@iaea.org [IAEA-Environment Laboratories, Monte Carlo 98000 (Monaco); Pham, M.K., E-mail: M.Pham@iaea.org [IAEA-Environment Laboratories, Monte Carlo 98000 (Monaco)

    2016-09-15

    In this work, we present first {sup 236}U results in the northwestern Mediterranean. {sup 236}U is studied in a seawater column sampled at DYFAMED (Dynamics of Atmospheric Fluxes in the Mediterranean Sea) station (Ligurian Sea, 43°25′N, 07°52′E). The obtained {sup 236}U/{sup 238}U atom ratios in the dissolved phase, ranging from about 2 × 10{sup −9} at 100 m depth to about 1.5 × 10{sup −9} at 2350 m depth, indicate that anthropogenic {sup 236}U dominates the whole seawater column. The corresponding deep-water column inventory (12.6 ng/m{sup 2} or 32.1 × 10{sup 12} atoms/m{sup 2}) exceeds by a factor of 2.5 the expected one for global fallout at similar latitudes (5 ng/m{sup 2} or 13 × 10{sup 12} atoms/m{sup 2}), evidencing the influence of local or regional {sup 236}U sources in the western Mediterranean basin. On the other hand, the input of {sup 236}U associated to Saharan dust outbreaks is evaluated. An additional {sup 236}U annual deposition of about 0.2 pg/m{sup 2} based on the study of atmospheric particles collected in Monaco during different Saharan dust intrusions is estimated. The obtained results in the corresponding suspended solids collected at DYFAMED station indicate that about 64% of that {sup 236}U stays in solution in seawater. Overall, this source accounts for about 0.1% of the {sup 236}U inventory excess observed at DYFAMED station. The influence of the so-called Chernobyl fallout and the radioactive effluents produced by the different nuclear installations allocated to the Mediterranean basin, might explain the inventory gap, however, further studies are necessary to come to a conclusion about its origin. - Highlights: • First {sup 236}U results in the northwest Mediterranean Sea are reported. • Anthropogenic {sup 236}U dominates the whole seawater column at DYFAMED station. • {sup 236}U deep-water column inventory exceeds by a factor of 2.5 the global fallout one. • Saharan dust intrusions are responsible for an annual

  19. Frequency of Microplastics in Mesopelagic Fishes from the Northwest Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina M. Wieczorek

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Microplastics are a ubiquitous pollutant in our seas today and are known to have detrimental effects on a variety of organisms. Over the past decade numerous studies have documented microplastic ingestion by marine species with more recent investigations focussing on the secondary impacts of microplastic ingestion on ecosystem processes. However, few studies so far have examined microplastic ingestion by mesopelagic fish which are one of the most abundant pelagic groups in our oceans and through their vertical migrations are known to contribute significantly to the rapid transport of carbon and nutrients to the deep sea. Therefore, any ingestion of microplastics by mesopelagic fish may adversely affect this cycling and may aid in transport of microplastics from surface waters to the deep-sea benthos. In this study microplastics were extracted from mesopelagic fish under forensic conditions and analysed for polymer type utilising micro-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (micro-FTIR analysis. Fish specimens were collected from depth (300–600 m in a warm-core eddy located in the Northwest Atlantic, 1,200 km due west of Newfoundland during April and May 2015. In total, 233 fish gut contents from seven different species of mesopelagic fish were examined. An alkaline dissolution of organic materials from extracted stomach contents was performed and the solution filtered over a 0.7 μm borosilicate filter. Filters were examined for microplastics and a subsample originating from 35 fish was further analysed for polymer type through micro-FTIR analysis. Seventy-three percent of all fish contained plastics in their gut contents with Gonostoma denudatum having the highest ingestion rate (100% followed by Serrivomer beanii (93% and Lampanyctus macdonaldi (75%. Overall, we found a much higher occurrence of microplastic fragments, mainly polyethylene fibres, in the gut contents of mesopelagic fish than previously reported. Stomach fullness, species and

  20. Aerobiology of sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) in north-west Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrga, Ivana; Mitić, Bozena; Alegro, Antun; Dragojlović, Dragoslav; Stjepanović, Barbara; Puntarić, Dinko

    2010-06-01

    The aims of the study were to analyse characteristics of the Castanea airborne pollen and to compare aeropalynological data obtained from two sampling stations in north-west Croatia. The study was conducted in Zagreb and Samobor during the 2003-2006 periods, using the seven-day volumetric samplers of the Hirst design. In both study areas, the seasons of chestnut pollination were similar and lasted from June to the end of July, which is comparable to other European cities. A general rule was noticed--the shorter the main pollen season, the higher the pollen peak concentration. Although the pollen season of Fagales pollen is prolonged to summer in the area of inland west-north Croatia due to the genus Castanea summer pollination, the number of days with pollen air concentration higher than 50 per m3 was low and was not likely to have any major effects in allergic individuals. Airborne pollen concentration of Castanea showed positive statistically significant correlation with air temperature and negative non-significant correlation with precipitation. Because of the non-significant differences between the two stations, for a possible long-term forecast model for Fagales airborne pollen for this part of north-west Croatia, aerobiological data obtained from only one station are sufficient.

  1. Seroprevalence of bluetongue disease in sheep in west and northwest provinces of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khezri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe the seroprevalence rates of bluetongue virus (BTV in sheep in west and northwest provinces of Iran. Bluetongue virus, an economically important orbivirus of the Reoviridae family, causes a hemorrhagic disease mainly in sheep and occasionally in cattle and some species of deer. Bluetongue virus is transmitted between its mammalian hosts by certain species of biting midges (Culicoides spp. and it can infect all ruminant species. Overall, 26 serotypes have been reported around the world. Due to its economic impact, bluetongue (BT is an Office of International des Epizooties (OIE-listed disease. A total of 756 sera samples collected during 2007-2008, were available. Sera were tested with competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (C-ELISA. The seroprevalence rate in sheep was 40.87%. The rate of positivity in sheep in west and northwest was 46.10% and 33.75%, respectively. The highest prevalence of antibodies in serum was in West Azerbaijan (64.86%, and lower was in Ardabil (23.77%.

  2. Stratified random sampling plan for an irrigation customer telephone survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, J.W.; Davis, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the procedures used to design and select a sample for a telephone survey of individuals who use electricity in irrigating agricultural cropland in the Pacific Northwest. The survey is intended to gather information on the irrigated agricultural sector that will be useful for conservation assessment, load forecasting, rate design, and other regional power planning activities.

  3. Western pond turtle: Biology, sampling techniques, inventory and monitoring, conservation, and management: Northwest Fauna No. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, R.B.; Welsh, Hartwell H.; Germano, David J.; Ashton, Donald T.

    2012-01-01

    One of only two native, freshwater turtle species in the western United States, western pond turtles are declining in portions of their original range. Declines are mostly due to habitat loss, introduction of non-native species, pollution, and lack of connectivity among populations. USGS zoologist R. Bruce Bury and colleagues from the U.S. Forest Service, California State University, and other agencies compiled and edited a new review and field manual of this charismatic species. Objectives were to determine its current distribution and abundance, summarize and evaluate population features, review techniques to detect population and habitat changes, and improve monitoring for long-term trends. Methods described in the manual should improve consistency, efficiency, and accuracy of survey data, resulting in improved management and conservation efforts.

  4. Expedition 308 synthesis: overpressure, consolidation, and slope stability on the continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Flemings, P. B.; John, C.; Behrmann, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 308 quantified the coupling between sedimentation, consolidation, overpressure, fluid flow, and slope instability in continental margin settings. We summarize and synthesize peer-reviewed hydrogeologic studies published since the end of Expedition 308 that focus on Expedition 308 sites drilled in Ursa Basin: Sites U1322, U1323, and U1324. There is a rich stratigraphic complexity in the Ursa Basin, deepwater Gulf of Mexico. The ...

  5. Enhanced Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is a database of a variety of biological, reproductive, and energetic data collected from fish on the continental shelf in the northwest Atlantic Ocean. Species...

  6. Linking Active Serpentinization with Volatiles and Life: Constraints from IODP Expedition 357 (Atlantis Massif, MAR 30°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruh-Green, G. L.; Rouméjon, S.; Lilley, M. D.; Orcutt, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Atlantis Massif (MAR, 30°N) is one of the best-studied oceanic core complexes, and recently the target of IODP Expedition 357 (late 2015). This expedition successfully used two seabed rock drills to core 17 shallow holes at 9 sites to study serpentinization processes and microbial activity in the shallow subsurface of highly altered ultramafic and mafic rocks that have been uplifted to the seafloor along a major detachment fault zone. An in situ sensor and water sampling system mounted on the drills recorded real-time variations in dissolved methane, oxygen, pH, oxidation reduction potential, temperature and conductivity during drilling and sampled bottom water after drilling, providing evidence for active serpentinization at all sites. The cores have highly heterogeneous rock types, bulk rock chemistry, and alteration that reflect multiple phases of magmatism and fluid-rock interaction. Recovered ultramafic rocks are dominated by harzburgite with intervals of dunite and minor pyroxenite veins; gabbroic rocks occur as melt impregnations and veins. Dolerite dikes and basaltic rocks represent the latest magmatic activity. The ultramafic rocks show a high degree of serpentinization, with a metasomatic talc-amphibole-chlorite overprint and local rodingitization. Serpentinization textures vary between sites and holes, but are characterized by lizardite mesh textures after olivine, recrystallization textures into chrysotile-polygonal serpentine or antigorite, and veins. Monitoring of borehole fluids during drilling recorded numerous excursions in methane, temperature and redox potential that often correlated with each other. The fact that the excursions occurred both while drilling as well as when no coring operations were taking place implies that horizons of hydrogen- and methane-rich fluids must exist in the basement rocks, and that volatiles are continuously being expelled during active serpentinization at Atlantis Massif.

  7. Pollen, mite and mould samplings by a personal collector at high altitude in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorina, A; Legnani, D; Fasano, V; Cogo, A; Basnyat, B; Passalacqua, G; Scordamaglia, A

    1998-01-01

    The new personal portable sampler for detection of environmental biologic particles (Partrap FA52, Coppa, Biella, Italy) was used to evaluate both atmospheric and indoor biologic particles in bedding at high altitudes during two Italian scientific expeditions in Nepal, in 1994 and 1996 respectively. The sampling was performed outdoors and indoors at the following altitudes: Katmandu 1,330 meters (m), LuKla 2,800 m, Namche 3,500 m, Pericle 4,200 m and Piramide 5,050 m. In both expeditions each sample of outdoor and indoor air was obtained by sucking air into the sampler either against the wind during a 6-h period, from 9 am to 3 pm, or from bedding of inhabitants resident at the different altitudes for 5 min. The number of pollens, moulds and mites trapped in each sample were assessed. The statistical analysis of the results by Spearman correlation test revealed a significant inverse correlation (p < 0.02) between altitude and the number of the considered biologic particles for sampling carried out during both the 1994 and 1996 expeditions. Moreover, Wilcoxon paired test showed no significant difference between the biologic sampling obtained in the two expeditions. These results confirm the decrease of the environmental biologic charge in relation to the increase of altitude and prove the efficacy of Partrap FA52 in obtaining reproducible quantitative data.

  8. Biogeography of dinoflagellate cysts in northwest Atlantic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few biogeographic studies of dinoflagellate cysts include the near-shore estuarine environment. We determine the effect of estuary type, biogeography, and water quality on the spatial distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts from the Northeast USA (Maine to Delaware) and Canada (Prince Edward Island). A total of 69 surface sediment samples were collected from 27 estuaries, from sites with surface salinities >20. Dinoflagellate cysts were examined microscopically and compared to environmental parameters using multivariate ordination techniques. The spatial distribution of cyst taxa reflects biogeographic provinces established by other marine organisms, with Cape Cod separating the northern Acadian Province from the southern Virginian Province. Species such as Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Polysphaeridinium zoharyi were found almost exclusively in the Virginian Province, while others such as Dubridinium spp. and Islandinium? cezare were more abundant in the Acadian Province. Tidal range, sea surface temperature (SST), and sea surface salinity (SSS) are statistically significant parameters influencing cyst assemblages. Samples from the same type of estuary cluster together in canonical correspondence analysis when the estuaries are within the same biogeographic province. The large geographic extent of this study, encompassing four main estuary types (riverine, lagoon, coastal embayment, and fjord), allowed us to determine that the type of estuary has

  9. In-stand scenic beauty of variable retention harvests and mature forests in the U.S. Pacific Northwest: the effects of basal area, density, retention pattern and down wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.G. Ribe

    2009-01-01

    Tensions between amenity- and timber-based economies in the U.S. and Canadian Pacific Northwest motivated a study of scenic beauty inside mature forests and timber harvests. A diverse sample of regional forests, measures of forest structure, and large, representative samples of photographs and public judges were employed to measure scenic beauty inside unharvested...

  10. Contamination of tomatoes with coliforms and Escherichia coli on farms and in markets of northwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenge, Kenneth C; Whong, Clement M Z; Yakubu, Lydia L; Omolehin, Raphael A; Erbaugh, J Mark; Miller, Sally A; LeJeune, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    Although recent reports indicated that produce contamination with foodborne pathogens is widespread in Nigeria, the sources and magnitude of microbial contamination of fruits and vegetables on farms and in markets have not been thoroughly identified. To ascertain possible pathways of contamination, the frequency and magnitude of coliform and Escherichia coli contamination of tomatoes produced in northwest Nigeria was assessed on farms and in markets. Eight hundred twenty-six tomato fruit samples and 36 irrigation water samples were collected and assessed for fecal indicator organisms. In addition, the awareness and use of food safety practices by tomato farmers and marketers were determined. Median concentration of coliforms on all field- and market-sourced tomato fruit samples, as well as in irrigation water sources, in Kaduna, Kano, and Katsina states exceeded 1,000 most probable number (MPN) per g. Median E. coli counts from 73 (17%) of 420 field samples and 231 (57%) of 406 market tomato fruit samples exceeded 100 MPN/g. Median E. coli concentrations on tomato fruits were higher (P market tomato fruit samples (2.66 Log MPN/g) were higher (P marketers were generally unaware of the relationship between food safety practices and microbial contamination on fresh produce. Good agricultural practices pertaining to food safety on farms and in local markets were seldom used. Adoption of food safety practices on-farm, during transport, and during marketing could improve the microbial quality of tomatoes available to the public in this region of the world.

  11. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, Suzanne; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Allen, J.; Kascak, A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has the unique responsibility to curate NASA's extraterrestrial samples from past and future missions. Curation includes documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach. Between 1969 and 1972 six Apollo missions brought back 382 kilograms of lunar rocks, core and regolith samples, from the lunar surface. JSC also curates meteorites collected from a US cooperative effort among NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Smithsonian Institution that funds expeditions to Antarctica. The meteorites that are collected include rocks from Moon, Mars, and many asteroids including Vesta. The sample disks for educational use include these different samples. Active relevant learning has always been important to teachers and the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program provides this active style of learning for students and the general public. The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks permit students to conduct investigations comparable to actual scientists. The Lunar Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Basalt, Breccia, Highland Regolith, Anorthosite, Mare Regolith and Orange Soil. The Meteorite Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Chondrite L3, Chondrite H5, Carbonaceous Chondrite, Basaltic Achondrite, Iron and Stony-Iron. Teachers are given different activities that adhere to their standards with the disks. During a Sample Disk Certification Workshop, teachers participate in the activities as students gain insight into the history, formation and geologic processes of the moon, asteroids and meteorites.

  12. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan FY 1997--2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s core mission is to deliver environmental science and technology in the service of the nation and humanity. Through basic research fundamental knowledge is created of natural, engineered, and social systems that is the basis for both effective environmental technology and sound public policy. Legacy environmental problems are solved by delivering technologies that remedy existing environmental hazards, today`s environmental needs are addressed with technologies that prevent pollution and minimize waste, and the technical foundation is being laid for tomorrow`s inherently clean energy and industrial processes. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory also applies its capabilities to meet selected national security, energy, and human health needs; strengthen the US economy; and support the education of future scientists and engineers. Brief summaries are given of the various tasks being carried out under these broad categories.

  13. DYNAMICS ECONOMIC DISPARITIES IN NORTH-WEST REGION OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florea Adrian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Even though over the years has enjoyed wide media coverage, with highlighted aspects, discrepancies and inequalities of economic potential between different regions of the world, or even parts of the same countries always remained topical. Difficulties arising from these differences were always felt, extremely painful by humans. Analyzing distinctly, participation of each county to the GDP of the Northwest Region and the composition of all indicators, we can identify significant discrepancies between counties, regions and municipalities. This is one of the reasons that led us trying to identify the causes that generated the current situation. From the perspective of the contribution of each county in the Northwest Region to Region's domestic product composition, the first place is taken by Cluj county 32.3%, followed by Bihor with 24.3%, Maramures, with 14.9% Satu-Mare, 12.1%, Bistrita-Nasaud, 9.1% and 7.2% Salaj. Consulting of the Regional Operational Programme 2007-2013 indicates that the poorest areas in the Northwest Region are in Maramures and Bistrita-Nasaud. An important part of the active population of North-West Region was employed in public enterprises and an increase of unemployment in the counties of Salaj, Satu Mare and Maramures became predictable, imminent amid restructuring of public enterprises with losses. Studies of employed population by sectors of the economy, shows a high rate of population employed in services in the counties of Cluj and Bihor and high employment in agriculture on other four counties. In a modern market economy, services are most concentrated labors, and how the workforce is distributed in the Northwest region also shows an imbalance. How Northwest Region is participating in international economic cycle has major effects on the population's living standards. Relevant for the inter-district disparities analysis is the human and agents behavior analysis and the savings and loan relationships. How people

  14. Evaluation of electrical power alternatives for the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    This study evaluates the concept of implementation of large-scale energy conservation to reduce end-use demand for electrical energy as an alternative to the need for continued construction of new power plants to meet projected energy requirements for the Pacific Northwest. In particular, the numerical accuracy, economic feasibility, and institutional impact of a conservation-oriented scenario developed by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Inc., is assessed, relative to the energy forecast prepared by the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Commission. The results of this study are presented in four detailed sections following an introductory and summary section: Reconstruction and Numerical Evaluation of Alternative Scenario; Economic Analysis; Institutional Impact; and Impact of New National Energy Policy.

  15. Language sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan; Bakker, Dik

    1998-01-01

    This article has two aims: [1] to present a revised version of the sampling method that was originally proposed in 1993 by Rijkhoff, Bakker, Hengeveld and Kahrel, and [2] to discuss a number of other approaches to language sampling in the light of our own method. We will also demonstrate how our...... sampling method is used with different genetic classifications (Voegelin & Voegelin 1977, Ruhlen 1987, Grimes ed. 1997) and argue that —on the whole— our sampling technique compares favourably with other methods, especially in the case of exploratory research....

  16. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2004-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadrel, Marilyn J.

    2004-04-15

    This Institutional Plan for FY 2004-2008 is the principal annual planning document submitted to the Department of Energy's Office of Science by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. This plan describes the Laboratory's mission, roles, and technical capabilities in support of Department of Energy priorities, missions, and plans. It also describes the Laboratory strategic plan, key planning assumptions, major research initiatives, and program strategy for fundamental science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national security.

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan: FY 1996--2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report contains the operation and direction plan for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory of the US Department of Energy. The topics of the plan include the laboratory mission and core competencies, the laboratory strategic plan; the laboratory initiatives in molecular sciences, microbial biotechnology, global environmental change, complex modeling of physical systems, advanced processing technology, energy technology development, and medical technologies and systems; core business areas, critical success factors, and resource projections.

  18. Pertussis outbreak in northwest Ireland, January - June 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barret, A S

    2010-09-02

    We report a community pertussis outbreak that occurred in a small town located in the northwest of Ireland. Epidemiological investigations suggest that waning immunity and the absence of a booster dose during the second year of life could have contributed to the outbreak. The report also highlights the need to reinforce the surveillance of pertussis in Ireland and especially to improve the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of cases.

  19. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  20. Investigation of carbon dioxide in the South Atlantic and northern Weddell Sea areas (WOCE Sections A-12 and A-21) during the METEOR expedition 11/5, January--March 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Breger, D.; Sutherland, S.C.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of investigation the oceanographic expedition aboard the F/S METEOR in South Atlantic Ocean including the Drake Passage, the northern Weddell Sea and the eastern South Atlantic during the austral summer of January through March 1990. The total CO{sub 2} concentration in about 1300 seawater samples and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (pCO{sub 2}) in about 870 seawater samples collected at 77 stations were determined aboard the ship using a coulometer and equilibrator/gas chromatograph system. The temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and nutrient salt data presented in this report were determined by other participants of the expedition including the members of the Oceanographic Data Facility of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Argentine Hydrographic Office and German institutions.

  1. Investigation of carbon dioxide in the South Atlantic and northern Weddell Sea areas (WOCE Sections A-12 and A-21) during the METEOR expedition 11/5, January--March 1990. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Breger, D.; Sutherland, S.C.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of investigation the oceanographic expedition aboard the F/S METEOR in South Atlantic Ocean including the Drake Passage, the northern Weddell Sea and the eastern South Atlantic during the austral summer of January through March 1990. The total CO{sub 2} concentration in about 1300 seawater samples and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (pCO{sub 2}) in about 870 seawater samples collected at 77 stations were determined aboard the ship using a coulometer and equilibrator/gas chromatograph system. The temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and nutrient salt data presented in this report were determined by other participants of the expedition including the members of the Oceanographic Data Facility of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Argentine Hydrographic Office and German institutions.

  2. Resilience in Pre-contact Pacific Northwest Social Ecological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald L. Trosper

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available If, like other ecosystems, the variable and dynamic ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest exhibited cycles and unpredictable behavior, particularly when humans were present, the indigenous societies of that region had to have been resilient in order to persist for such a long time. They persisted for two millennia prior to contact with people from the "old world." The Resilience Alliance (2002 proposes that social and ecological resilience requires three abilities: the ability to buffer, the ability to self-organize, and the ability to learn. This paper suggests that the characteristics of the potlatch system among Indians on the Northwest Coast, namely property rights, environmental ethics, rules of earning and holding titles, public accountability, and the reciprocal exchange system, provided all three required abilities. The resulting resilience of these societies confirms the validity of many of the ideas now being discussed as important components in providing successful and sustainable relationships between humans and their ecosystems. That so many separate ideas seem to have been linked together into resilient systems in the Pacific Northwest suggests that social ecological resilience is complicated.

  3. [The real philanthropic expedition of the smallpox vaccine: monarchy and modernity in 1803].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigau-Pérez, José G

    2004-09-01

    Smallpox resulted in the death of 30 % of those who acquired it, so the preventive method discovered by Edward Jenner (London, 1798) spread very quickly. At the request in 1803 of Carlos IV, king of Spain, his government evaluated offers to carry smallpox vaccine to the colonies. The selected proposal, by doctor Francisco Xavier de Balmis, sought to take the lymph to America and Asia in a chain of arm to arm vaccination of foundlings. The Expedition set sail from Corunna on November 30, 1803, stopped in the Canary Isles, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela and after Caracas (1804) split in two groups. Balmis led some members of the Expedition to Cuba and Mexico. For the trip to the Philippines, in 1805, parents lent their children in exchange for economic compensation and the promise that the boys would be returned home. The Expedition returned to Mexico in August, 1807, but Balmis separately took vaccine to China and returned to Spain. Another contingent of the Expedition, under vice-director José Salvany, took vaccine to what we know as Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. His assistant Manuel Grajales reached the Chilean Patagonia in 1811. This article also comments on three principal themes - the institutional management of the scientific project, the conflicts that characterized its course, and the children's experience. The Vaccine Expedition was a brave and humanitarian endeavor, but also an extraordinary sanitary and administrative success. It was not until the twentieth century that a global eradication campaign eliminated smallpox in the world.

  4. Revisiting J.M. Gilliss' astronomical expedition to Chile in 1849‒1852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermosilla, Germán Hidalgo

    2017-08-01

    Between 1849 and 1852 the U.S. astronomer J.M. Gilliss led an expedition to Santiago, Chile, aimed at improving the accepted value for the solar parallax. Although this particular research project was not a success, the astronomers did make other useful astronomical contributions, and the expedition was the catalyst that led directly to the founding of the Chilean National Observatory. Meanwhile, Gilliss later went on to achieve further prominence as Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C. The results of the Chilean expedition were published by Gilliss in a six-volume work titled The U.S. Naval Astronomical Expedition to the Southern Hemisphere during the Years 1849-50-51-52 that was issued over a 40-year period. In Volume I (published in 1855) Gilliss presented a 'warts-and-all' account of Chile, its politics and its people, which at the time—and subsequently—created considerable controversy. In this paper, after briefly reviewing Gilliss' Southern Hemisphere expedition we focus on the extensive non-astronomical narrative that Gilliss presents in this first volume.

  5. Northwest Forest Plan: outcomes and lessons learned from the Northwest economic adjustment initiative: Proceedings of a forum; 1997 July 29-30; Portland, OR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriet H. Christensen; Terry L. Raettig; Paul. Sommers; [tech. eds.].

    1999-01-01

    This monograph is an examination of the experience in the Pacific Northwest implementing the Northwest Forest Plan, Economic Adjustment Initiative (NWEAI). First, a brief description of the NWEAI background and framework, and a socioeconomic overview of the region prior to the NWEAI provide the setting. Next, accounts of the NWEAI experience in each of the three states...

  6. Venous Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neck to help locate abnormally functioning glands or pituitary adenoma . This test is most often used after an unsuccessful neck exploration. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling , in which blood samples are taken from veins that drain the pituitary gland to study disorders related to pituitary hormone ...

  7. Sampling Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  8. Language sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan; Bakker, Dik

    1998-01-01

    This article has two aims: [1] to present a revised version of the sampling method that was originally proposed in 1993 by Rijkhoff, Bakker, Hengeveld and Kahrel, and [2] to discuss a number of other approaches to language sampling in the light of our own method. We will also demonstrate how our...

  9. Environmental sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puckett, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    Environmental Sampling (ES) is a technology option that can have application in transparency in nuclear nonproliferation. The basic process is to take a sample from the environment, e.g., soil, water, vegetation, or dust and debris from a surface, and through very careful sample preparation and analysis, determine the types, elemental concentration, and isotopic composition of actinides in the sample. The sample is prepared and the analysis performed in a clean chemistry laboratory (CCL). This ES capability is part of the IAEA Strengthened Safeguards System. Such a Laboratory is planned to be built by JAERI at Tokai and will give Japan an intrinsic ES capability. This paper presents options for the use of ES as a transparency measure for nuclear nonproliferation.

  10. Discoveries From the Cross-Disciplinary, Multi-Institutional South Seas Expedition from Hawaii to New Zealand and Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malahoff, A.; Wiltshire, J. C.; Smith, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory organised an international research team to explore the chemistry, geology, biology, hydrothermal venting processes, mineral deposition, and biodiversity of seamounts extending south from Hawaii to New Zealand, including the submarine volcanoes of the Tonga-Kermadec Island Arc. Research team members came from a Consortium comprising of principal investigators from the NOAA Pacific Marine Environment Lab and VENTS program, the Inst of Geological and Nuclear Sciences and the National Inst of Water and Atmospheric Research both of New Zealand, the Univ of Kiel in Germany, the Univ of Mississippi, Univ of Hawaii, the NOAA Marine Fisheries Service, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Univ of Oregon, Oregon State Univ, Stanford Univ, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Funding came from the member organizations of the Consortium and the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and National Undersea Research Program. The expedition left Hawaii on 18 March 2005 and returned on 05 August, aboard the R/V Ka`imikai-o-Kanaloa with the submersibles Pisces IV and Pisces V and the ROV RCV-150. Sixty-one science dives were executed during the eight legs of the expedition. Twelve active volcanoes in the Samoa to New Zealand legs, one in the Samoan hot spot chain and the flanks of five islands and atolls on the legs between Samoa and Hawaii were investigated. Hundreds of specimens of new and unusual marine life, corals and other benthic organisms, extremophile micro- and macro-organisms, water samples for chemical analysis, polymetallic sulfides and rock samples were collected during the expedition. Unusual processes were observed at the Kermadec submarine volcanoes, including the oozing of liquid sulphur onto the seafloor and profuse carbon dioxide venting into seawater. Extensive submarine hydrothermal venting, black smoker activity and extraordinary chimney formations were studied in the caldera of Brothers Volcano. In addition, extensive

  11. Interaction of Mediterranean Water lenses with Antarctic Intermediate Water off Northwest Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Electronica Machín

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean Water lenses (meddies in the eastern North Atlantic, north of the Canary Islands, appear to often have their salty and nutrient-poor core accompanied by relatively fresh and nutrient-rich waters on top. We describe several occurrences of freshwater halos and berets for meddies sampled north of the Canary Islands—with instrumented moorings, Argo floats and oceanographic cruises—and identify the source of these fresh anomalies as diluted Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW. We propose that this capping takes place off Northwest Africa, as the southward-advected meddy interacts with the northward-advected AAIW. This interpretation is consistent with a simple analysis of the relevant advective-diffusive time scales associated with the passage of meddies under a layer of AAIW, and suggests that meddies may be a mechanism for AAIW export far into the North Atlantic Ocean.

  12. Level of literacy and dementia: A secondary post-hoc analysis from North-West India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Sunil Kumar; Chander, Vishav; Kumar, Dinesh; Raina, Sujeet; Bhardwaj, Ashok

    2014-10-01

    A relation between literacy and dementia has been studied in past and an association has been documented. This is in spite of some studies pointing to the contrary. The current study was aimed at investigating the influence of level of literacy on dementia in a sample stratified by geography (Migrant, Urban, Rural and Tribal areas of sub-Himalayan state of Himachal Pradesh, India). The study was based on post-hoc analysis of data obtained from a study conducted on elderly population (60 years and above) from selected geographical areas (Migrant, Urban, Rural and Tribal) of Himachal Pradesh state in North-west India. Analysis of variance revealed an effect of education on cognitive scores [F = 2.823, P =0.01], however, post-hoc Tukey's HSD test did not reveal any significant pairwise comparisons. The possibility that education effects dementia needs further evaluation, more so in Indian context.

  13. Molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia: new phylogenetic lineages found in Northwest Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Tessema, Belay; Beer, Joerg; Merker, Matthias; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.; Niemann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background Although Ethiopia ranks seventh among the world?s 22 high-burden tuberculosis (TB) countries, little is known about strain diversity and transmission. In this study, we present the first in-depth analysis of the population structure and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Northwest Ethiopia. Methods In the present study, 244 M. tuberculosis isolates where analysed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit - variable number tandem repeat 24-loci typi...

  14. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Sorbitol Negative Shiga Toxigenic Escherichia Coli in Chicken from Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aram Mokarizadeh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractShiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC are food-borne pathogens primarily associated with the consumption of contaminated ground beef and are an important food safety concern worldwide. STEC has been found to produce a family of related cytotoxins known as Shiga toxins (Stxs. Shiga toxins have been classified into two major classes, Stx1 and Stx2. A single strains of STEC can produce Stx1, Stx2 (or its variants or both. The aims of this project were to determine the prevalence and molecular characteristics of STEC isolates from chicken flocks in Northwest of Iran. A total of 350 fecal samples from 28 broiler farms were screened for the presence of STEC by conventional culture methods and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. All samples were initially subjected to phenotypical analysis using the Sorbitol MacConkey agar plate for the detection of the sorbitol negative E. coli, and then for genotypic analysis, by multiplex PCR for detection of stx1and stx2 genes. STEC were isolated from 14 (4 % chicken fecal samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of STEC from poultry in Iran. To conclude, this work revealed the presence STEC strains harboring stx1 and stx2 gene in healthy chicken fecal samples in Northwest of Iran suggesting they can play as an important potential source of contamination for people working on broiler farms or are in contact with chicken carcasses at meat processing plants.

  15. Elevating sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  16. Genetic structure of capelin (Mallotus villosus in the northwest Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen L Kenchington

    Full Text Available Capelin (Mallotus villosus is a commercially exploited, key forage-fish species found in the boreal waters of the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans. We examined the population structure of capelin throughout their range in the Canadian northwest Atlantic Ocean using genetic-based methods. Capelin collected at ten beach and five demersal spawning locations over the period 2002 through 2008 (N = 3,433 fish were genotyped using six polymorphic microsatellite loci. Temporally distinct samples were identified at three beach spawning locations: Chance Cove, Little Lawn and Straitsview, Newfoundland. Four capelin stocks are assumed for fisheries management in the northwest Atlantic Ocean based on meristics, morphometrics, tag returns, and seasonal distribution patterns. Our results suggested groupings that were somewhat different than the assumed structure, and indicate at least seven genetically defined populations arising from two ancestral populations. The spatial mosaic of capelin from each of the two basal cluster groups explains much of the observed geographic variability amongst neighbouring samples. The genetic-defined populations were resolved at Jost's Dest ≥ 0.01 and were composed of fish collected 1 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, 2 along the south and east coasts of Newfoundland, 3 along coastal northern Newfoundland and southern Labrador, 4 along coastal northern Labrador, 5 near the Saguenay River, and at two nearshore demersal spawning sites, 6 one at Grebes Nest off Bellevue Beach on the east coast of Newfoundland, and 7 one off the coast of Labrador at Domino Run. Moreover, the offshore demersal spawners on the Scotian Shelf and Southeast Shoal appeared to be related to the inshore demersal spawners at Grebes Nest and in Domino Run and to beach spawners from the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

  17. The social event of the season. Solar eclipse expeditions and Victorian culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, A. S.-K.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the construction of eclipse expeditions in Victorian and Edwardian Britain. (American expeditions will also be discussed to highlight national styles in organization and fieldwork.) The author begins by examining how expeditions were planned and how choices about observing sites, observers, and travel plans were made. He then follows parties out into the field. He argues that eclipse expeditons were powerfully affected by the practices and culture of tourism and were further shaped by expectations surrounding the encounter of "civilized" and "uncivilized" peoples. Finally, the author examines the crafting of observing practices used during totality. The evolution of astrophotography, the rise of big instruments, and battles between amateurs and professionals all had their effect on eclipse observation, but a close examination of observing practices and instrument design will show that the tools of empire were as important as cameras and telescopes for the production of reliable knowledge about the Sun.

  18. On the Turn of Two Millennia (60 Years of the Mari Archaeological Expedition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikitin Valeriy V.,

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the 60th Anniversary of the Mari Archaeological Expedition and summarizes the two decades of its studies (1996-2016 into the early cultures of the Mari region, starting from the era of the original settlement (Mesolithic, through the Neolithic-Eneolithic, Bronze Age, Early Iron Age and up to the Middle Ages. The expedition studied stations and settlements of primitive cultures, as well as unfortified and fortified settlements and necropolises. Special studies focused on formation and development of the early Mari culture, as well as the material and spiritual culture of the medieval Mari. The expedition continues its survey exploration in order to identify new archaeological sites. During the reported period, twelve monographs were published and three monographs prepared based on the expedition’s materials.

  19. Not Just About the Science: Cold War Politics and the International Indian Ocean Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, K.

    2016-12-01

    The International Indian Ocean Expedition broke ground for a series of multi-national oceanographic expeditions starting in the late 1950s. In and of itself, it would have been historically significant—like the International Geophysical Year (1957-58)—for pulling together the international scientific community during the Cold War. However, US support for this and follow-on Indian Ocean expeditions were not just about the science; they were also about diplomacy, specifically efforts to bring non-aligned India into the US political orbit and out of the clutches of its Cold War enemy, the Soviet Union. This paper examines the behind-the-scenes efforts at the highest reaches of the US government to extract international political gain out of a large-scale scientific effort.

  20. Temperature and salinity profile data from CTD casts from the icebreaker ODEN during the Lomonosov Ridge off Greenland (LOMROG) expedition in 2007 (NODC Accession 0093533)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CTD data were taken during the expedition "Lomonosov Ridge off Greenland" (LOMROG) in summer 2007 with the Swedish icebreaker Oden. The LOMROG expedition...

  1. IODP Expedition 360: Analyzing the Media Coverage of a High Profile Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, L.; Martinez, A. O.; Burgio, M.; Zhang, J.; Expedition 360 Scientists, I.

    2016-12-01

    During Expedition 360 of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), the JOIDES Resolution drilled 789 meters of lower crustal gabbro in the Southwest Indian Ocean. This hole began a multi-expedition project with the goal of one day drilling across the crust-mantle boundary for the first time. This simplified narrative of the research objectives struck a chord with media and the project received worldwide coverage in the form of over 50 stories with a total audience in the millions. This expedition is presented as a case study in science communication. A four-member education and outreach team onboard the ship acted as the point of contact for interested reporters. Major outlets that ran stories include the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, British Broadcasting Corporation, Boston Globe, Daily Express, Fox News, Nature, Smithsonian, and Chinese based Xinhua News Agency who sailed a reporter on the ship for the duration of the expedition. The majority of stories published provided accurate and favourable coverage of the project; however, a few contained critical errors and cast the expedition in a less positive light. Public reaction varied greatly depending on the article. Positive themes include interest in the scientific outcomes and encouragement of human exploration. Negative themes include the project being an inefficient use of money and a perceived risk of the drilling triggering an earthquake or volcano. Through a review of published articles and online comments, the successes and challenges faced by Expedition 360 are identified. Despite minimal preparation for media relations, the team successfully maintained a public profile while working in one of the most remote locations on Earth. Interviews were facilitated and videos, articles, and podcasts were produced onboard the ship. A simple, catchy narrative resulted in a large volume of coverage; however, this simplicity also formed the root of a number of misconceptions and issues of public concern.

  2. 15 CFR 27.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... HUMAN SUBJECTS § 27.110 Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk, and for minor changes in approved research...

  3. 40 CFR 26.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... EPA § 26.110 Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk, and for minor changes in approved research. 26...

  4. 45 CFR 46.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.110 Expedited review procedures... list of categories of research that may be reviewed by the IRB through an expedited review procedure... reviewers may not disapprove the research. A research activity may be disapproved only after review in...

  5. 34 CFR 97.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) § 97.110 Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk, and for minor changes in approved research. 97.110 Section 97...

  6. 7 CFR 1c.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk, and for minor... an expedited review procedure shall adopt a method for keeping all members advised of research... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of...

  7. 38 CFR 16.110 - Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 16.110 Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expedited review procedures for certain kinds of research involving no more than minimal risk, and for minor changes in...

  8. Distributional records of Ross Sea (Antarctica) Tanaidacea from museum samples stored in the collections of the Italian National Antarctic Museum (MNA) and the New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA)

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Piazza; Magdalena Blazewicz-Paszkowycz; Claudio Ghiglione; Maria Chiara Alvaro; Kareen Schnabel; Stefano Schiaparelli

    2014-01-01

    Here we present distributional records for Tanaidacea specimens collected during several Antarctic expeditions to the Ross Sea: the Italian PNRA expeditions (“V”, 1989/1990; “XI”, 1995/1996; “XIV”, 1998/1999; “XIX”, 2003/2004; “XXV”, 2009/2010) and the New Zealand historical (New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, NZOI, 1958-1961) and recent (“TAN0402 BIOROSS” voyage, 2004 and “TAN0802 IPY-CAML Oceans Survey 20/20” voyage, 2008) expeditions. Tanaidaceans were obtained from bottom samples collec...

  9. Wood-destroying soft rot fungi in the historic expedition huts of Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Robert A; Held, Benjamin W; Jurgens, Joel A; McNew, Douglas L; Harrington, Thomas C; Duncan, Shona M; Farrell, Roberta L

    2004-03-01

    Three expedition huts in the Ross Sea region of Antarctica, built between 1901 and 1911 by Robert F. Scott and Ernest Shackleton, sheltered and stored the supplies for up to 48 men for 3 years during their explorations and scientific investigation in the South Pole region. The huts, built with wood taken to Antarctica by the early explorers, have deteriorated over the past decades. Although Antarctica has one of the coldest and driest environments on earth, microbes have colonized the wood and limited decay has occurred. Some wood in contact with the ground contained distinct microscopic cavities within secondary cell walls caused by soft rot fungi. Cadophora spp. could be cultured from decayed wood and other woods sampled from the huts and artifacts and were commonly associated with the soft rot attack. By using internal transcribed spacer sequences of ribosomal DNA and morphological characteristics, several species of Cadophora were identified, including C. malorum, C. luteo-olivacea, and C. fastigiata. Several previously undescribed Cadophora spp. also were found. At the Cape Evans and Cape Royds huts, Cadophora spp. commonly were isolated from wood in contact with the ground but were not always associated with soft rot decay. Pure cultures of Cadophora used in laboratory decay studies caused dark staining of all woods tested and extensive soft rot in Betula and Populus wood. The presence of Cadophora species, but only limited decay, suggests there is no immediate threat to the structural integrity of the huts. These fungi, however, are widely found in wood from the historic huts and have the capacity to cause extensive soft rot if conditions that are more conducive to decay become common.

  10. Methane hydrate formation in turbidite sediments of northern Cascadia, IODP Expedition 311

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, M.E.; Trehu, A.M.; Cespedes, N.; Kastner, M.; Wortmann, U.G.; Kim, J.-H.; Long, P.; Malinverno, A.; Pohlman, J.W.; Riedel, M.; Collett, T.

    2008-01-01

    Expedition 311 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) to northern Cascadia recovered gas-hydrate bearing sediments along a SW-NE transect from the first ridge of the accretionary margin to the eastward limit of gas-hydrate stability. In this study we contrast the gas gas-hydrate distribution from two sites drilled ~ 8??km apart in different tectonic settings. At Site U1325, drilled on a depositional basin with nearly horizontal sedimentary sequences, the gas-hydrate distribution shows a trend of increasing saturation toward the base of gas-hydrate stability, consistent with several model simulations in the literature. Site U1326 was drilled on an uplifted ridge characterized by faulting, which has likely experienced some mass wasting events. Here the gas hydrate does not show a clear depth-distribution trend, the highest gas-hydrate saturation occurs well within the gas-hydrate stability zone at the shallow depth of ~ 49??mbsf. Sediments at both sites are characterized by abundant coarse-grained (sand) layers up to 23??cm in thickness, and are interspaced within fine-grained (clay and silty clay) detrital sediments. The gas-hydrate distribution is punctuated by localized depth intervals of high gas-hydrate saturation, which preferentially occur in the coarse-grained horizons and occupy up to 60% of the pore space at Site U1325 and > 80% at Site U1326. Detailed analyses of contiguous samples of different lithologies show that when enough methane is present, about 90% of the variance in gas-hydrate saturation can be explained by the sand (> 63????m) content of the sediments. The variability in gas-hydrate occupancy of sandy horizons at Site U1326 reflects an insufficient methane supply to the sediment section between 190 and 245??mbsf. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Report on expedited site characterization of the Central Nevada Test Area, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuhr, L. [Technos Inc., Miami, FL (United States); Wonder, J.D.; Bevolo, A.J. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This report documents data collection, results, and interpretation of the expedited site characterization (ESC) pilot project conducted from September 1996 to June 1997 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Nye County, Nevada. Characterization activities were limited to surface sites associated with deep well drilling and ancillary operations at or near three emplacement well areas. Environmental issues related to the underground nuclear detonation (Project Faultless) and hydrologic monitoring wells were not addressed as a part of this project. The CNTA was divided into four functional areas for the purpose of this investigation and report. These areas include the vicinity of three emplacement wells (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4) and one mud waste drilling mud collection location (Central Mud Pit; CMP). Each of these areas contain multiple, potentially contaminated features, identified either from historic information, on-site inspections, or existing data. These individual features are referred to hereafter as ``sites.`` The project scope of work involved site reconnaissance, establishment of local grid systems, site mapping and surveying, geophysical measurements, and collection and chemical analysis of soil and drilling mud samples. Section 2.0 through Section 4.0 of this report provide essential background information about the site, project, and details of how the ESC method was applied at CNTA. Detailed discussion of the scope of work is provided in Section 5.0, including procedures used and locations and quantities of measurements obtained. Results and interpretations for each of the four functional areas are discussed separately in Sections 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0. These sections provide a chronological presentation of data collected and results obtained, followed by interpretation on a site-by-site basis. Key data is presented in the individual sections. The comprehensive set of data is contained in appendices.

  12. Environmental conditions and biological community of the Penzhina and Talovka hypertidal estuary (northwest Kamchatka) in the ice-free season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, M. V.; Gorin, S. L.; Romanenko, F. A.; Lepskaya, E. V.; Polyakova, A. A.; Galyamov, R. A.; Esin, E. V.

    2017-07-01

    New data on the abiotic conditions; species composition; abundance, distribution, and migrations of fauna; and feeding interactions in an estuary ecosystem were obtained during expeditions in the mouths of Penzhina and Talovka rivers (northwest Kamchatka). It is revealed that in the ice-free season, the hydrological regime of the estuary is determined by seasonal fluctuations of river runoff, as well as fortnightly and daily variation of tides. The estuary is characterized by hypertidal fluctuations (up to 10-12 m); strong reverse flows (up to 1.0-1.5 m/s), considerable tidal variations in salinity (from 0 to 6-9‰ at the river boundary and from 6-8 to 14-16‰ at the offshore boundary), and high water turbidity (up to 1 000 NTU or more). Based on the spatial structure of the community, three ecological zones with mobile boundaries are distinguished: freshwater (salinity 0-0.1‰), estuarine (0-12.3‰), and neritic (11.2-18.9‰). High turbidity prevents the development of phytoplankton in the estuarine zone (EZ), and the local benthic community is significantly depleted due to the desalination and wide spread of aleuritic silts. Neritic copepods and nektobenthic brackish- water crustaceans generate the maximum abundance and biomass here. The species that have adapted to the local extreme hydrologic conditions dominate and form the basis of the estuarine food chain. Dominant among the EZ vertebrates are such groups as anadromous fishes (smelts, pacific salmons, charrs, and sticklebacks); waterfowl (terns, kittiwakes, cormorants, fulmars, puffins, guillemots, auklets, and wadepipers); and predatory marine mammals (larga, ringed seal, bearded seal, and white whale). The total abundance and biomass of these animals are much higher in the pelagic EZ in comparison to neighboring zones.

  13. Early Science Results from the Williams College Eclipse Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Person, Michael J.; Dantowitz, Ron; Lockwood, Christian A.; Nagle-McNaughton, Tim; Meadors, Erin N.; Perez, Cielo C.; Marti, Connor J.; Yu, Ross; Rosseau, Brendan; Daly, Declan M.; Ide, Charles A.; Davis, Allen B.; Lu, Muzhou; Sliski, David; Seiradakis, John; Voulgaris, Aris; Rusin, Vojtech; Peñaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.; Roman, Michael; Seaton, Daniel B.; Steele, Amy; Lee, Duane M.; Freeman, Marcus J.

    2018-01-01

    We describe our first cut of data reduction on a wide variety of observations of the solar corona and of the effect of the penumbra and umbra on the terrestrial atmosphere, carried out from our eclipse site on the campus of Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. Our team of faculty, undergraduate students, graduate students, and other colleagues observed the eclipse, taking images and spectra with a variety of sensors and telescopes. Equipment included frame-transfer cameras observing at 3 Hz in 0.3 nm filters at the coronal green and red lines to measure the power spectrum of oscillations in coronal loops or elsewhere in the lower corona; 3 spectrographs; a variety of telescopes and telephotos for white-light imaging; a double Lyot system tuned at Fe XIV 530.3 nm (FWHM 0.4 nm) and Fe X 637.4 nm (FWHM 0.5 nm); and a weather station to record changes in the terrestrial atmosphere. We are comparing our observations with predictions based on the previous mapping of the photospheric magnetic field, and preparing wide-field complete coronal imaging incorporating NOAA/NASA GOES-16 SUVI and NRL/NASA/LASCO for the corona outside our own images (which extend, given the completely clear skies we had, at least 4 solar radii), and NASA SDO/AIA and NOAA/NASA GOES-16 SUVI for the solar disk. One of our early composites appeared as Astronomy Picture of the Day for September 27: https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170927.htmlOur expedition was supported in large part by grants from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society and from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation, with additional student support from the STP/AGS of NSF, the NASA Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium, the Sigma Xi honorary scientific society, the Clare Booth Luce Foundation studentship and the Freeman Foote Expeditionary Fund at Williams College, other Williams College funds, and U. Pennsylvania funds.

  14. Studioantarctica: Embedding Art in a Geophysics Sea Ice Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Gabby; Stevens, Craig

    2017-04-01

    Here we report on a six year collaboration developing new modes of communication using the interconnections between art and science in the context of climate science. We use the polar regions as a context for the collaboration in part because it holds a special place in the imaginations of many people. Not only is it is a part of the planet likely to be never visited be the viewer but there is a growing understanding of the role the poles play in the planet's climate. Motivated by the potential for cross-disciplinary outcomes, an artist was embedded in a science expedition to the fast sea ice around Antarctica. Both the science and art focused on ice crystal formation. Most elements of the art process had three phases, pre, during and post - as with the science. The environment largely dominated the progress and evolution of ideas. The results were multi-material and multiscale and provide a way to entrain a wide range of audiences, while also making non-didactic connections around global climate - and producing art. This built on a continuum of approaches where we have evolved from consideration and debate about synergies in approach, through to cross-fertilisation of ideas, shared labour, trial remote controlling and finally shared field experimentation. Certainly this is ground-breaking in an academic sense, but beyond this, it is proving a powerful attractor in engaging primary school students. In a class room setting we describe our work and experiences, both separately and in combination, as well as our recent experiences seeking to bridge the disciplinary divide. We then ask the students to contribute to the process of creating science-inspired art. There are complementary perspectives on the evolving process, their associated communication strands and how this drives a suite of communication and education outcomes. The need to understand how these systems are changing as the human species modifies its planet is urgent. Science around the connection between

  15. Medical supplies for the expeditions of the heroic age of Antarctic exploration: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guly, H R

    2012-06-01

    During the heroic age of Antarctic exploration (1895-1922) there were at least 18 expeditions to the Antarctic lasting between 18 and 30 months. This is an introduction to a series of articles about the drugs taken and used in the Antarctic at this time. Most of the information relates to the expeditions of Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton and the main supplier of medical equipment was Burroughs Wellcome and Co. This article also describes the medical cases that were taken to the Antarctic.

  16. The Visible Empire: The Expert View and Images in the Scientific Expeditions of the Enlightenment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela BLEICHMAR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the Spanish natural history expeditions to Latin America in the late 18th Century —particularly the Real Expedición Botánica a Nueva Granada, directed by José Celestino Mutis— as an approach to an analysis of the importance of visual culture in European natural history, especially in imperial contexts. It explains the connections between economic botany and taxonomic botany, and highlights the role of visual epistemology in bringing them together. It proposes that the scientific expeditions constituted visualization projects that, through the circulation of images and collections, transformed locally rooted natures into global natures in motion.

  17. Short Communication. Wood identification based on their common name and their transversal surface anatomy. Application to the batch from the expedition of Ruiz and Pavon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Villasante

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To identify species of wood samples based on common names and anatomical analyses of their transversal surfaces (without microscopic preparations.Area of study: Spain and South America.Material and Methods: The test was carried out on a batch of 15 lumber samples deposited in the Royal Botanical Garden in Madrid, from the expedition by Ruiz and Pavón (1777-1811. The first stage of the methodology is to search and to make a critical analysis of the databases which list common nomenclature along with scientific nomenclature. A geographic filter was then applied to the information resulting from the samples with a more restricted distribution. Finally an anatomical verification was carried out with a pocket microscope with a magnification of x40, equipped with a 50 micrometers resolution scale.Main results: The identification of the wood based exclusively on the common name is not useful due to the high number of alternative possibilities (14 for “naranjo”, 10 for “ébano”, etc.. The common name of one of the samples (“huachapelí mulato” enabled the geographic origin of the samples to be accurately located to the shipyard area in Guayaquil (Ecuador. Given that Ruiz y Pavón did not travel to Ecuador, the specimens must have been obtained by Tafalla. It was possible to determine correctly 67% of the lumber samples from the batch. In 17% of the cases the methodology did not provide a reliable identification.Research highlights: It was possible to determine correctly 67% of the lumber samples from the batch and their geographic provenance. The identification of the wood based exclusively on the common name is not useful.Key words: historic wood; Ruiz and Pavon’s expedition; wood anatomy; wood identification; wood nomenclature.

  18. 1998 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (summary)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to the 1981 regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for inventory planning to determine BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. The 1998 White Book is presented in two documents: 1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and 2) a technical appendix detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1997 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. The load forecast is derived by using economic planning models to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract

  19. A systematic surveillance programme for infectious salmon anaemia virus supports its absence in the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, L L; Creekmore, L H; Snekvik, K R; Ferguson, J A; Warg, J V; Blair, M; Meyers, T R; Stewart, B; Warheit, K I; Kerwin, J; Goodwin, A E; Rhodes, L D; Whaley, J E; Purcell, M K; Bentz, C; Shasa, D; Bader, J; Winton, J R

    2018-02-01

    In response to reported findings of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) in British Columbia (BC), Canada, in 2011, U.S. national, state and tribal fisheries managers and fish health specialists developed and implemented a collaborative ISAV surveillance plan for the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Accordingly, over a 3-1/2-year period, 4,962 salmonids were sampled and successfully tested by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The sample set included multiple tissues from free-ranging Pacific salmonids from coastal regions of Alaska and Washington and farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) from Washington, all representing fish exposed to marine environments. The survey design targeted physiologically compromised or moribund animals more vulnerable to infection as well as species considered susceptible to ISAV. Samples were handled with a documented chain of custody and testing protocols, and criteria for interpretation of test results were defined in advance. All 4,962 completed tests were negative for ISAV RNA. Results of this surveillance effort provide sound evidence to support the absence of ISAV in represented populations of free-ranging and marine-farmed salmonids on the northwest coast of the United States. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. A systematic surveillance programme for infectious salmon anaemia virus supports its absence in the Pacific Northwest of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Lori L.; Creekmore, Lynn H.; Snekvik, Kevin R.; Ferguson, Jayde A.; Warg, Janet V.; Blair, Marilyn; Meyers, Theodore R.; Stewart, Bruce; Warheit, Kenneth I.; Kerwin, John; Goodwin, Andrew E.; Rhodes, Linda D.; Whaley, Janet E.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Bentz, Collette; Shasa, Desiree; Bader, Joel; Winton, James R.

    2018-01-01

    In response to reported findings of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) in British Columbia (BC), Canada, in 2011, U.S. national, state and tribal fisheries managers and fish health specialists developed and implemented a collaborative ISAV surveillance plan for the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Accordingly, over a 3-1/2-year period, 4,962 salmonids were sampled and successfully tested by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The sample set included multiple tissues from free-ranging Pacific salmonids from coastal regions of Alaska and Washington and farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) from Washington, all representing fish exposed to marine environments. The survey design targeted physiologically compromised or moribund animals more vulnerable to infection as well as species considered susceptible to ISAV. Samples were handled with a documented chain of custody and testing protocols, and criteria for interpretation of test results were defined in advance. All 4,962 completed tests were negative for ISAV RNA. Results of this surveillance effort provide sound evidence to support the absence of ISAV in represented populations of free-ranging and marine-farmed salmonids on the northwest coast of the United States.

  1. A population-based study examining hepatitis B virus infection and immunization rates in Northwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohua Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Current baseline data regarding the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV infections and the immune status in hyperendemic areas is necessary in evaluating the effectiveness of ongoing HBV prevention and control programs in northwest China. This study aims to determine the prevalence of chronic HBV infections, past exposure rates, and immune response profiles in Wuwei City, northwest China in 2010. METHODS: Cross-sectional household survey representative of the Wuwei City population. 28,579 participants were interviewed in the seroepidemiological survey ≥1 year of age. House to house screening was conducted using a standard questionnaire. All serum samples were screened by enzyme-linked immunoassays for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen, antibodies against HBV surface antigen, and antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen. RESULTS: Among individuals ≥1 year of age, 7.2% (95%CI: 6.3-8.1% had chronic HBV infections, 43.9% (CI: 40.4-47.4% had been exposed to HBV, and 23.49% (CI: 21.6-25.3% had vaccine-induced immunity. Multi-factor weighted logistic regression analysis showed that having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 2.6, 95%CI: 2.3-3.0 and beauty treatments in public places (OR = 1.2, 95%CI: 1.1-1.3 were the risk factors of HBV infection in whole population. Having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.2-6.5 and lack of hepatitis vaccination (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.4-3.3 were the risk factors for HBV infection in children aged 1-14 years. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatitis B infection remains a serious public health problem in northwest China. Having household contact with HBV carriers and beauty treatments in public places represented HBV infection risk factors. Hepatitis B vaccine immunization strategies need further improvement, particularly by targeting the immunization of rural migrant workers.

  2. Prevalence of smoking in northwest Iran: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Moosazadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco addiction is a major cause of preventable death worldwide. Thus, efforts to eliminate its use have the potential of producing significant health benefits. The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of cigarette smoking among people in the age range of 15 to 64. The specific objective of this meta-analysis was to provide valid data that policy makers can use to make evidence-based decisions. Methods: To determine the prevalence of smoking among the adult population in northwest Iran, we used reports published by the surveillance system used to assess the risk factors for non-communicable diseases in different provinces in northwest Iran for the years 2004 and 2006-2009. Several variables were extracted, including the years of study, gender, ages, and smoking prevalence. Based on the heterogeneity of the results, we used fixed or random effects models to estimate the overall prevalence of cigarette smoking. The analyses were performed using Stata 11 software. Results: A total of 28,436 subjects (14,248 males and 14,188 females in five age groups, i.e., 15-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, and 55-64, were interviewed. Meta-analysis in men showed that, across the age groups, the lowest prevalence was 22.9%, the highest prevalence was 26.5%, and the average prevalence was 24.7%. Among women, the lowest prevalence was 0.3%, the highest prevalence was 0.8%, and the average prevalence was 0.5%. Conclusion: We found that approximately one-fourth of males in the age range of 15-64 in northwest Iran smoked cigarettes daily. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct effective interventions to reduce the prevalence of addiction to tobacco in this area.

  3. Synthetic testing of the Pacific Northwest earthquake early warning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, B. W.; Schmidt, D. A.; Bodin, P.; Vidale, J. E.; Gomberg, J. S.; Jamison, D.; Minson, S. E.; Hartog, J. R.; Kress, V. C.; Malone, S. D.; Usher, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone poses one of the greatest risks for a megaquake in the continental United States and, because of this, the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) at the University of Washington is building a joint seismic and geodetic earthquake early warning system. Our two-stage approach to earthquake early warning includes: (1) detection and initial characterization using strong-motion and broadband data from the PNSN with the ElarmS package, and (2) geodetic modeling modules using GPS data from the Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA) and combined seismogeodetic (GPS + strong-motion) data. Because of Cascadia's relatively low seismicity rate and the paucity of data from plate boundary earthquakes, we have prioritized the development of a test system and the creation of several large simulated events. The test system permits us to: (1) replay segments of actual seismic waveform data recorded from the PNSN and neighboring networks to represent both earthquakes and noise conditions, and (2) broadcast synthetic data into the system to simulate signals we anticipate from earthquakes for which we have no actual ground motion recordings. The test system lets us also simulate various error conditions (latent and/or out-of-sequence data, telemetry drop-outs, etc.) and to explore how best to mitigate them. Here, we report on the performance of the joint early warning system and the geodetic modeling modules in a simulated real-time mode using simulated 5-Hz displacements from plausible Cascadian earthquake scenarios. The simulations are created using the FK integration method for hypothetical source models for a wide array of possible faulting types and magnitudes. The results show that the geodetic modeling modules are able to properly characterize the simulated events, and we discuss the limitations with respect to latency, network architecture, and earthquake location throughout the Pacific Northwest.

  4. 2010 Ecological Survey of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Perry, Christopher; Downs, Janelle L.; Powell, Sylvia D.

    2011-02-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL Site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL Site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL Site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL Site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), and the recently completed Physical Sciences Facility (PSF). This report describes the results of the annual survey of the biological resources found on the undeveloped portions of the PNNL Site in 2010. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the surveys and the results of the surveys are presented. Actions taken to fully delineate noxious weed populations discovered in 2009 and efforts in 2010 to control those weeds also are described. Appendix A provides a list of plant and

  5. Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative strategic plan 2015 - 2025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markon, Carl; Schroff, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Northwest Boreal Landscape Conservation Cooperative (NWB LCC) is a voluntary, diverse, self-directed management-science partnership, informing and promoting integrated science, sustainable natural and cultural resource management, and conservation to address impacts of climate change and other stressors within and across ecosystems. The NWB LCC area includes parts of Alaska, Yukon, Northwest Territories, and British Columbia. Our partnership reflects both the broad geographic scope and an extensive array of active and engaged participants including resource management organizations, government representatives, policy makers, Tribes and First Nations, industry leaders, researchers, non-governmental organizations, and research/education institutions. Bringing together diverse partners will help assure the northwest boreal is a functioning, sustainable landscape. We live in an era of profound conservation challenges, including the loss and fragmentation of habitats, genetic isolation, invasive species, and unnatural wildfire. The effects of rapidly changing climate are already evident on the landscape. In these circumstances, it is imperative that natural resource management agencies, science providers, Tribes, First Nations, conservation organizations, and other stakeholders work together to understand the drivers and impacts of landscape change and to determine how best to address those challenges. Further, it is essential that the public and communities receive clear communication about the vision and activities of the NWB LCC. Open public access to NWB LCC activities and products will promote acceptance and support of the science that guides potential changes in management action and conservation strategy. This strategic plan provides a great opportunity for the NWB LCC to share our approach and intentions to the LCC members, collaborators, communities, and the public at large.

  6. Collapse and conservation of shark populations in the Northwest Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Julia K; Myers, Ransom A; Kehler, Daniel G; Worm, Boris; Harley, Shelton J; Doherty, Penny A

    2003-01-17

    Overexploitation threatens the future of many large vertebrates. In the ocean, tunas and sea turtles are current conservation concerns because of this intense pressure. The status of most shark species, in contrast, remains uncertain. Using the largest data set in the Northwest Atlantic, we show rapid large declines in large coastal and oceanic shark populations. Scalloped hammerhead, white, and thresher sharks are each estimated to have declined by over 75% in the past 15 years. Closed-area models highlight priority areas for shark conservation, and the need to consider effort reallocation and site selection if marine reserves are to benefit multiple threatened species.

  7. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-12-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2001-2005 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; managaement procatices and standards; and communications and trust.

  8. Logging and Agricultural Residue Supply Curves for the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstetter, James D.; Lyons, John Kim

    2001-01-01

    This report quantified the volume of logging residues at the county level for current timber harvests. The cost of recovering logging residues was determined for skidding, yearding, loading, chipping and transporting the residues. Supply curves were developed for ten candidate conversion sites in the Pacific Northwest Region. Agricultural field residues were also quantified at the county level using five-year average crop yields. Agronomic constraints were applied to arrive at the volumes available for energy use. Collection costs and transportation costs were determined and supply curves generated for thirteen candidate conversion sites.

  9. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2000-2004 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; management practices and standards; and communications and trust.

  10. Comparative analysis of hospital energy use: pacific northwest and scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burpee, Heather; McDade, Erin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to establish the potential for significant energy reduction in hospitals in the United States by providing evidence of Scandinavian operational precedents with high Interior Environmental Quality (IEQ) and substantially lower energy profiles than comparable U.S. facilities. These facilities set important precedents for design teams seeking operational examples for achieving aggressive energy and interior environmental quality goals. This examination of operational hospitals is intended to offer hospital owners, designers, and building managers a strong case and concrete framework for strategies to achieve exceptionally high performing buildings. Energy efficient hospitals have the potential to significantly impact the U.S.'s overall energy profile, and key stakeholders in the hospital industry need specific, operationally grounded precedents in order to successfully implement informed energy reduction strategies. This study is an outgrowth of previous research evaluating high quality, low energy hospitals that serve as examples for new high performance hospital design, construction, and operation. Through extensive interviews, numerous site visits, the development of case studies, and data collection, this team has established thorough qualitative and quantitative analyses of several contemporary hospitals in Scandinavia and the Pacific Northwest. Many Scandinavian hospitals demonstrate a low energy profile, and when analyzed in comparison with U.S. hospitals, such Scandinavian precedents help define the framework required to make significant changes in the U.S. hospital building industry. Eight hospitals, four Scandinavian and four Pacific Northwest, were quantitatively compared using the Environmental Protection Agency's Portfolio Manager, allowing researchers to answer specific questions about the impact of energy source and architectural and mechanical strategies on energy efficiency in operational hospitals. Specific architectural, mechanical

  11. Grain Size Analyses of Neogene-Quaternary Sediments from the Arctic Coring Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, K.; Lado-Insua, T.; O'Regan, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) recovered the first Cenozoic sediment sequence from the central Arctic Ocean. Results from this expedition indicate that perennial sea ice may have formed in the Arctic at or before the early mid-Miocene. Sea ice formation is an important process in the global climate system, affecting directly the Earth's albedo and indirectly the Meridional Overturning Circulation. The deep Arctic Ocean receives sediment primarily from ice-rafted debris and turbidity currents. Suspension freezing on the shallow continental shelves of the Arctic has generally been considered the major process trapping sediment within sea ice. Sea ice motion is largely driven by wind. The anticyclonic Beaufort Gyre transports sea ice over the Amerasia Basin, while the Transpolar Drift transports it across the Eurasian Basin. The Transpolar Drift is divided into a Siberian and Polar branch, both branches cross the position of the ACEX drilling sites on the Lomonosov Ridge. Grain size analyses of ACEX sediments were obtained with a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser diffraction particle sizing system. Preliminary analyses indicate pulses with a higher percentage of sand between 3.64 Ma ago until the end of the Gelasian (1.8 Ma). The percent sand remained relatively low during the Cenozoic with the exception of two major increases of sand occurring ~6.2 and 9.2 Ma ago and a smaller peak ~8.2 Ma ago. These intervals also show less sorting and lower values for skewness and kurtosis. Increases in the percentage of sand and less sorting at this latitude relate to ice rafted debris, indicating an increase in sea-ice melting during these periods. A Principal Components Analysis and a Maximum Correlation Factor Analysis agree on a correlation between different grain sizes that would divide the grain size in two major distributions (63 to 250 μm portion to represent glacial ice. Based on our data we hypothesize that when sediments exhibit a bimodal distribution with relatively

  12. Prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Fundong Health District, North-West Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrite, Silvia; Mactaggart, Islay; Kuper, Hannah; Oye, Joseph; Polack, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Fundong Health District, North-West Cameroon. We selected 51 clusters of 80 people (all ages) through probability proportionate to size sampling. Initial hearing screening was undertaken through an otoacoustic emission (OAE) test. Participants aged 4+ years who failed this test in both ears or for whom an OAE reading could not be taken underwent a manual pure-tone audiometry (PTA) screening. Cases of hearing impairment were defined as those with pure-tone average ≥41 dBHL in adults and ≥35 dBHL in children in the better ear, or children under age 4 who failed the OAE test in both ears. Each case with hearing loss was examined by an ear, nose and throat nurse who indicated the main likely cause. We examined 3567 (86.9%) of 4104 eligible people. The overall prevalence of hearing impairment was 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.8-4.6). The prevalence was low in people aged 0-17 (1.1%, 0.7-1.8%) and 18-49 (1.1%, 0.5-2.6%) and then rose sharply in people aged 50+ (14.8%, 11.7-19.1%). Among cases, the majority were classified as moderate (76%), followed by severe (15%) and profound (9%). More than one-third of cases of hearing impairment were classified as unknown (37%) or conductive (37%) causes, while sensorineural causes were less common (26%). Prevalence of hearing impairment in North-West Cameroon is in line with the WHO estimate for sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of cases with known causes are treatable, with impacted wax playing a major role. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Moose (Alces alces population size and density in the Inuvik Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Davison

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Responding to community concerns, the Gwich’in Renewable Resources Board (GRRB and the Government of the Northwest Territories Department of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR conducted an aerial moose (Alces alces survey in the Inuvik region of the Northwest Territories, Canada to estimate moose density and distribution. The survey was flown in March 2011 and a random stratified sample design was used. Local knowledge was incorporated in to the stratification of survey cells. Moose density in survey blocks ranged from 9.66 moose/100 km2 in the Ikhil Pipeline block to 0 in the Peel River block with a coarse overall moose density 2.24 moose/100 km2. Densities found were low but within expected range for the species in this region of North America based on past surveys. Normal 0 21 false false false SV X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Normal tabell"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-language:EN-US;}

  14. Early human occupation of a maritime desert, Barrow Island, North-West Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veth, Peter; Ward, Ingrid; Manne, Tiina; Ulm, Sean; Ditchfield, Kane; Dortch, Joe; Hook, Fiona; Petchey, Fiona; Hogg, Alan; Questiaux, Daniele; Demuro, Martina; Arnold, Lee; Spooner, Nigel; Levchenko, Vladimir; Skippington, Jane; Byrne, Chae; Basgall, Mark; Zeanah, David; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra; Bajkan, Szilvia; Bailey, Richard; Placzek, Christa; Kendrick, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Archaeological deposits from Boodie Cave on Barrow Island, northwest Australia, reveal some of the oldest evidence for Aboriginal occupation of Australia, as well as illustrating the early use of marine resources by modern peoples outside of Africa. Barrow Island is a large (202 km2) limestone continental island located on the North-West Shelf of Australia, optimally located to sample past use of both the Pleistocene coastline and extensive arid coastal plains. An interdisciplinary team forming the Barrow Island Archaeology Project (BIAP) has addressed questions focusing on the antiquity of occupation of coastal deserts by hunter-gatherers; the use and distribution of marine resources from the coast to the interior; and the productivity of the marine zone with changing sea levels. Boodie Cave is the largest of 20 stratified deposits identified on Barrow Island with 20 m3 of cultural deposits excavated between 2013 and 2015. In this first major synthesis we focus on the dating and sedimentology of Boodie Cave to establish the framework for ongoing analysis of cultural materials. We present new data on these cultural assemblages - including charcoal, faunal remains and lithics - integrated with micromorphology, sedimentary history and dating by four independent laboratories. First occupation occurs between 51.1 and 46.2 ka, overlapping with the earliest dates for occupation of Australia. Marine resources are incorporated into dietary assemblages by 42.5 ka and continue to be transported to the cave through all periods of occupation, despite fluctuating sea levels and dramatic extensions of the coastal plain. The changing quantities of marine fauna through time reflect the varying distance of the cave from the contemporaneous shoreline. The dietary breadth of both arid zone terrestrial fauna and marine species increases after the Last Glacial Maximum and significantly so by the mid-Holocene. The cave is abandoned by 6.8 ka when the island becomes increasingly distant

  15. Silent film: The Carlsberg Foundation’s Oceanographic Expedition Round the World, 1928–30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Danish marine scientist, Johannes Schmidt was also a pioneer when it comes to popularizing deep-sea marine research through the use of mass media. When Schmidt headed the Carlsberg Foundation’s Oceanographical Expedition Round the World, 1928-1930, he brought along a film camera, documenting...

  16. Seaweeds of the Snellius-II Expedition. Chlorophyta: Caulerpales (except Caulerpa and Halimeda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppejans, E.; Prud’homme van Reine, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper a survey is given of species belonging to the genera Avrainvillea, Chlorodesmis, Rhipilia, Rhipiliopsis, Tydemania, and Udotea collected during the Indonesian-Dutch Snellius- II Expedition (1984) in the Banda, Sawu and Flores Seas. The morphology and anatomy of these seaweeds

  17. Chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora) procured by the CANCAP I-VII expeditions, 1976-86

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaas, P.

    1991-01-01

    The 327 specimens of chitons captured during six out of seven CANCAP Expeditions have been examined. They belong to 26 species, including two recently described ones: Ischnochiton (Stenosemus) substriatus Kaas & Van Belle, 1990 and Ischnochiton (Ischnochiton nicklesi Kaas & Van Belle, 1990.

  18. 42 CFR 405.1206 - Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Hospital Discharges § 405.1206 Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care. (a... discharge, or at any time for good cause. The QIO will issue a decision in accordance with paragraph (d)(6... hospital to demonstrate that discharge is the correct decision, either on the basis of medical necessity...

  19. 77 FR 10774 - Silicon Metal From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Silicon Metal From China; Scheduling of an Expedited Five-Year Review AGENCY: United States...)) (the Act) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on silicon metal from China...

  20. 77 FR 43492 - Expedited Vocational Assessment Under the Sequential Evaluation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... use the same assessment of your residual functional capacity at step five of the sequential evaluation... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404 and 416 RIN 0960-AH26 Expedited Vocational Assessment Under the Sequential Evaluation Process AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Final rules. SUMMARY: We are revising our...

  1. 76 FR 56357 - Expedited Vocational Assessment Under the Sequential Evaluation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... assessment of your residual functional capacity at step five of the sequential evaluation process to decide... ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404 and 416 RIN 0960-AH26 Expedited Vocational Assessment Under the Sequential Evaluation Process AGENCY: Social Security Administration. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM...

  2. Species of Caulerpa (Chlorophyceae) collected on the International Indian Ocean Expedition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Wm. Randolph

    1967-01-01

    One of the major scientific efforts of the decade has been the International Indian Ocean Expedition of 1960—64, involving several institutions and ships and numerous scientists. With an oceanographic focus, not only physical and biological open sea oceanographic studies were carried on, but

  3. Expedition agroparks : research by design into sustainable development and agriculture in network society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This book is the result of several years of expedition into the development of metropolitan FoodClusters. The authors fascination for the agricultural landscapes in and around metropolises led him to the conclusion that improving the efficiency of agriculture is the most effective way to safeguard

  4. 42 CFR 8.28 - Expedited procedures for review of immediate suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Procedures for Review of Suspension or Proposed Revocation of OTP Certification, and of Adverse Action Regarding Withdrawal of Approval of an Accreditation Body § 8.28 Expedited procedures for review of immediate suspension. (a) Applicability. When the...

  5. 77 FR 33254 - Expediting Transition of Government Performed and Sponsored Aeronautics Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... TECHNOLOGY POLICY Expediting Transition of Government Performed and Sponsored Aeronautics Research and... improve future national aeronautics R&D plans and progress assessments, the Council seeks public comment on the utility of certain national aeronautics R&D planning documents for providing transparency of...

  6. 75 FR 8745 - Expedited Review Scheduling Notice; Hand Trucks and Certain Parts Thereof From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... COMMISSION Expedited Review Scheduling Notice; Hand Trucks and Certain Parts Thereof From China AGENCY... concerning the antidumping duty order on hand trucks and certain parts thereof from China. SUMMARY: The... duty order on hand trucks and certain parts thereof from China would be likely to lead to continuation...

  7. Results of the CERPOLEX/Mammuthus Expeditions on the Taimyr Peninsula, Arctic Siberia, Russian Federation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, D.; Tikhonov, A.; van der Plicht, J.; Kahlke, R.D.; Debruyne, R.; van Geel, B.; van Reenen, G.B.A.; Pals, J.P.; de Marliave, C.; Reumer, J.W.F.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract During a series of expeditions organized by CERPOLEX/Mammuthus to the Taimyr region in northern Siberia several mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) carcasses were discovered and subsequently excavated and studied. The oldest specimen is the Arilakh Mammoth (ca. 55,800 BP). Much younger are the

  8. Results of the CERPOLEX/Mammuthus expeditions on the Taimyr peninsula, Arctic Siberia, Russian federation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, D; Tikhonov, A; van der Plicht, J; Kahlke, RD; Debruyne, R; van Geel, B; van Reenen, G; Pals, JP; de Marliave, C; Reumer, JWF; Kahlke, Ralf-Dietrich; Pals, Jan Peter; Reumer, Jelle W.F.

    During a series of expeditions organized by CERPOLEX/Mammuthus to the Taimyr region in northern Siberia several mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) carcasses were discovered and subsequently excavated and studied. The oldest specimen is the Arilakh Mammoth (ca. 55,800 BP). Much younger are the Jarkov

  9. 76 FR 30176 - Expedited Review for New Animal Drug Applications for Human Pathogen Reduction Claims; Withdrawal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... animal drug applications, in support of the review of animal drug products. As a result of these... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration (Formerly Docket No. 2001D-0107) Expedited Review for New...

  10. Satellite Eye for the Galathea 3 ship expedition: Global tour 2006-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Sørensen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Islands, New Zealand, Antarctica, Chile, Galapagos, the Caribbean, the Northeastern USA and finishing in Denmark 25 April 2007. During the entire expedition satellite images were ordered along the ship track, downloaded, processed, archived and used for education. The satellite images are displayed...

  11. 76 FR 78694 - Fresh Garlic From China; Scheduling of an expedited five-year review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... COMMISSION Fresh Garlic From China; Scheduling of an expedited five-year review AGENCY: United States...)) (the Act) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on fresh garlic from China... Commission has found the response submitted by the Fresh Garlic Producers Association and its individual...

  12. Starvation Resulting From Inadequate Dietary Planning for a 50-Day Rowing Expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Hamish A B; Dennison, Nicholas C; Quayle, Jonathan; Preston, Tom

    2017-09-01

    Meeting the energy demands of prolonged arduous expeditions and endurance sport may be a significant barrier to success. Expedition rowing is associated with high levels of body-mass loss, reflecting the challenge of meeting energy expenditure in this exacting environment. To use the doubly labeled water (DLW) technique to calculate the total energy expenditure (TEE) and body-composition changes of two 28-y-old healthy male athletes during a 50-d continuous and unsupported row around Great Britain. A measured dose of DLW was taken at the start of 2 separate study periods (days 5-19 and 34-48) followed by sequential urine collection, which was analyzed on return to land. Mean TEE was 15.3 MJ/d: athlete 1, 16.4 MJ/d; athlete 2, 14.9 MJ/d. Athlete 1 lost 11.2 kg and athlete 2 lost 14.9 kg of body mass during the row. Average energy provision was 19.1 MJ per 24-h ration pack. These results highlight the difficulty of maintaining energy balance during expedition rowing. A starvation state was observed despite dietary provision in excess of estimated energy expenditure, indicating that nutritional strategy rather than caloric availability was at fault. The authors recommend that future expeditions prioritize thorough testing and the individualization of rations to ensure that they are both palatable and practical during the weeks to months at sea.

  13. Molecular epidemiology and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Northwest Ethiopia: new phylogenetic lineages found in Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessema, Belay; Beer, Joerg; Merker, Matthias; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C; Niemann, Stefan

    2013-03-11

    Although Ethiopia ranks seventh among the world's 22 high-burden tuberculosis (TB) countries, little is known about strain diversity and transmission. In this study, we present the first in-depth analysis of the population structure and transmission dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from Northwest Ethiopia. In the present study, 244 M. tuberculosis isolates where analysed by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit - variable number tandem repeat 24-loci typing and spoligotyping methods to determine phylogenetic lineages and perform cluster analysis. Clusters of strains with identical genotyping patterns were considered as an indicator for the recent transmission. Of 244 isolates, 59.0% were classified into nine previously described lineages: Dehli/CAS (38.9%), Haarlem (8.6%), Ural (3.3%), LAM (3.3%), TUR (2.0%), X-type (1.2%), S-type (0.8%), Beijing (0.4%) and Uganda II (0.4%). Interestingly, 31.6% of the strains were grouped into four new lineages and were named as Ethiopia_3 (13.1%), Ethiopia_1 (7.8%), Ethiopia_H37Rv like (7.0%) and Ethiopia_2 (3.7%) lineages. The remaining 9.4% of the isolates could not be assigned to the known or new lineages. Overall, 45.1% of the isolates were grouped in clusters, indicating a high rate of recent transmission. This study confirms a highly diverse M. tuberculosis population structure, the presence of new phylogenetic lineages and a predominance of the Dehli/CAS lineage in Northwest Ethiopia. The high rate of recent transmission indicates defects of the TB control program in Northwest Ethiopia. This emphasizes the importance of strengthening laboratory diagnosis of TB, intensified case finding and treatment of TB patients to interrupt the chain of transmission.

  14. Design and methods of the Pacific Northwest Stream Quality Assessment (PNSQA), 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibley, Rich W.; Morace, Jennifer L.; Journey, Celeste A.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Bell, Amanda H.; Nakagaki, Naomi; Button, Daniel T.; Qi, Sharon L.

    2017-08-25

    In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) project conducted the Pacific Northwest Stream Quality Assessment (PNSQA) to investigate stream quality across the western part of the Pacific Northwest. The goal of the PNSQA was to assess the health of streams in the region by characterizing multiple water-quality factors that are stressors to in-stream aquatic life and by evaluating the relation between these stressors and the condition of biological communities. The effects of urbanization and agriculture on stream quality for the Puget Lowland and Willamette Valley Level III Ecoregions were the focus of this regional study. Findings will help inform the public and policymakers about human and environmental factors that are the most critical in affecting stream quality and, thus, provide insights into possible strategies to protect or improve the health of streams in the region.Land-use data were used in the study to identify and select sites within the region that ranged in levels of urban and agricultural development. A total of 88 sites were selected across the region—69 were on streams that explicitly spanned a range of urban land use in their watersheds, 8 were on streams in agricultural watersheds, and 11 were reference sites with little or no development in their watersheds. Depending on the type of land use, sites were sampled for contaminants, nutrients, and sediment for either a 4- or 10-week period during April, May, and June 2015. This water-quality “index period” was immediately followed with an ecological survey of all sites that included stream habitat, benthic algae, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. Additionally, streambed sediment was collected during the ecological survey for analysis of sediment chemistry and toxicity testing.This report provides a detailed description of the specific study components and methods of the PNSQA, including (1) surveys of stream habitat and aquatic biota, (2) discrete

  15. Migration, Agribusiness and Nutritional Status of Children under Five in Northwest Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Montaño

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the nutritional status of children of Mexican migrant worker families under five years of age within the context of global food markets. The sample included 404 children less than five years old from farms and agricultural communities in northwest Mexico. Prevalence of stunting and underweight of children appeared very similar to that of indigenous children from the national sample survey (difference 0.9 and 1.6 percentage points, respectively. Compared to the national sample of Mexican children, stunting and underweight seemed higher in migrant children (difference 17.7 and 4.5 percentage points, respectively, but wasting, an indicator of both chronic and acute undernutrition, appeared to indicate a process of nutritional recuperation. Migrant children living in poverty and suffering from chronic undernutrition, poor performance and scarce education opportunities, can be expected to eventually become agricultural workers with low productivity and poor general health. Consumer’s demands on social and environmental standards of fresh food production in developed countries could be an opportunity to impact the lives of migrant agricultural workers, their families and communities.

  16. Preliminary survey of domestic animal visceral leishmaniasis and risk factors in north-west Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenubih, Ambaye; Dagnachew, Shimelis; Almaw, Gizat; Abebe, Tamerat; Takele, Yegnasew; Hailu, Asrat; Lemma, Wessensegad

    2015-02-01

    After the epidemics of L. donovani complex in 2004/05 in human patients, to investigate the presence of antibodies against L. donovani in domestic animals in north-west Ethiopia. Two hundred and three domestic animals were screened. Serum and biopsy samples were collected. A modified direct agglutination test (DAT) for canine reservoirs was used to screen serum samples at ≥ 1:320 cut-off titre. Giemsa stain and culture on Novy macNeal Nicolae (NNN) media were used for biopsy samples. Pre-tested questionnaires were used to elicit information on potential risk factors. Antibody against L. donovani in domestic animals was detected in 30.5% of animals. The highest seropositivity rates were 41.9% in cattle, 40% in dogs, 33.3% in donkeys, 10% in goats and 4.8% in sheep. No Leishmania parasite was isolated from spleen, liver, skin snip and exudates, bone marrow or lymph node of dogs. Dogs owned by households with history of kala-azar treatment and humans sharing the house with cattle were more affected by visceral leishmaniasis (P < 0.05). This study showed a high serological prevalence of leishmaniasis in domestic animals. Their role in the epidemiology of visceral leishmaniasis remains unclear. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. CASCADES: An Ultra-Low-Background Germanium Crystal Array at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keillor, M. E.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Erikson, L. E.; Fast, J. E.; Glasgow, B. D.; Hoppe, E. W.; Hossbach, T. W.; Hyronimus, B. J.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Seifert, A.; Stavenger, T. J.

    2011-12-01

    State-of-the-art treaty verification techniques, environmental surveillance, and physics experiments require increased sensitivity for detecting and quantifying radionuclides of interest. This can be accomplished with new detector designs that establish high detection efficiency and reduced instrument backgrounds. Current research is producing an intrinsic germanium (HPGe) array designed for high detection efficiency, ultra-low-background performance, and sensitive γ—γ coincidence detection. The system design is optimized to accommodate filter paper samples, e.g. samples collected by the Radionuclide Aerosol Sampler/Analyzer. The system will provide high sensitivity for weak collections on atmospheric filter samples (e.g.fissions) as well as offering the potential to gather additional information from higher activity filters using gamma cascade coincidence detection. The first of two HPGe crystal arrays in ultra-low-background vacuum cryostats has been assembled, with the second in progress. Traditional methods for constructing ultra-low-background detectors were followed, including use of materials known to be low in radioactive contaminants, use of ultra-pure reagents, and clean room assembly. The cryostat is constructed mainly from copper electroformed into near-final geometry at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Details of the detector assembly and initial background and spectroscopic measurement results are presented; also a description of the custom analysis package used by this project is given.

  18. The Acanthamoeba spp. in Water Sources from Zanjan Province, Northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Haniloo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The genus of Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protozoan parasite with a worldwide distribution where it is able to cause fatal granulomatous amoebic encephalitis (GAE and amoebic keratitis (AK. This organism inhabits in the wide range of natural and man-made aquatic environments. The present study was carried out to evaluate the presence of Acanthamoeba spp. in the various water resources of Zanjan province, northwest Iran, using both morphological and molecular methods. Methods: The Water samples were randomly collected from 30 water sources in different parts of Zanjan, Iran, between April 2015 and May 2016. Then, the samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar and the Acanthamoeba genus identified by morphological characters. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR was performed using the 18S rRNA gene as a molecular marker. Results: The obtained data showed that, out of the 60 water samples collected, 30 (50% were positive for Acanthamoeba spp. According to morphological and molecular approaches. Conclusion: The present investigation is the first report of the distribution of Acanthamoeba spp. in the various water sources of Zanjan province, gives baseline knowledge regarding water contamination with Acanthamoeba spp. in these areas and emphasizes the necessity of more attention to water sources in order to prevent infections associated with Acanthamoeba spp.

  19. Migration, Agribusiness and Nutritional Status of Children under Five in Northwest Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, María-Isabel; Rosales, Cecilia; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Aranda, Patricia; Castañeda, Alejandro; Saucedo, Socorro; Montaño, Cecilia; Contreras, Alma

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the nutritional status of children of Mexican migrant worker families under five years of age within the context of global food markets. The sample included 404 children less than five years old from farms and agricultural communities in northwest Mexico. Prevalence of stunting and underweight of children appeared very similar to that of indigenous children from the national sample survey (difference 0.9 and 1.6 percentage points, respectively). Compared to the national sample of Mexican children, stunting and underweight seemed higher in migrant children (difference 17.7 and 4.5 percentage points, respectively), but wasting, an indicator of both chronic and acute undernutrition, appeared to indicate a process of nutritional recuperation. Migrant children living in poverty and suffering from chronic undernutrition, poor performance and scarce education opportunities, can be expected to eventually become agricultural workers with low productivity and poor general health. Consumer’s demands on social and environmental standards of fresh food production in developed countries could be an opportunity to impact the lives of migrant agricultural workers, their families and communities. PMID:22470276

  20. Arctic data compilation and appraisal. Vol. 13, Northwest passage: biological oceanography-whales, 1920-1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norton, P.; de March, L.; Smiley, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The pace of offshore development in the Canadian Arctic has emphasized the need to review the sufficiency and suitability of available scientific information for design, regulatory, and planning purposes. This report presents part of the results of the first stage of this review process, the compilation and appraisal of existing data sets on whales in the Northwest Passage. Measurements were made of narwhales, white whales, bowhead whales, and killer whales, and most commonly concern numbers, identification, movements, reproduction, food, and color. Overall, 143 data sets are inventoried for the period from 1820 to 1984. Times and locations of sampling efforts are listed in tables and are also shown on computer-drawn maps. Sampling methodology and intensity, whale measurements and observations obtained by species, and concurrent biological, physical, and chemical measurements are described in the tables. A 5-level rating system, based on sampling methodology, is outlined and has been applied to each measurement in each data set as a rough indication of data reliability. Data sets are indexed according to geographic coverage, study methods, species, specific measurements and observations made, and published references. The form, location, and availability of original data are provided if known. 415 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Plasma Vitellogenin in Free-Ranging Loggerhead Sea Turtles (Caretta caretta of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Smelker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitellogenin is the egg yolk precursor protein produced by oviparous vertebrates. As endogenous estrogen increases during early reproductive activity, hepatic production of vitellogenin is induced and is assumed to be complete in female sea turtles before the first nesting event. Until the present study, innate production of vitellogenin has not been described in free-ranging sea turtles. Our study describes circulating concentrations of vitellogenin in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta from the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. We collected blood samples from juveniles and adults via in-water captures off the coast of the Southeast USA from May to August, and from nesting females in June and July at Hutchinson Island, Florida. All samples were analyzed using an in-house ELISA developed specifically to measure Caretta caretta vitellogenin concentration. As expected, plasma vitellogenin declined in nesting turtles as the nesting season progressed, although it still remained relatively elevated at the end of the season. In addition, mean vitellogenin concentration in nesting turtles was 1,000 times greater than that measured in samples from in-water captures. Our results suggest that vitellogenesis may continue throughout the nesting season, albeit at a decreasing rate. Further, vitellogenin detected in turtles captured in-water may have resulted from exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals.

  2. Migration, agribusiness and nutritional status of children under five in Northwest Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, María-Isabel; Rosales, Cecilia; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Aranda, Patricia; Castañeda, Alejandro; Saucedo, Socorro; Montaño, Cecilia; Contreras, Alma

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the nutritional status of children of Mexican migrant worker families under five years of age within the context of global food markets. The sample included 404 children less than five years old from farms and agricultural communities in northwest Mexico. Prevalence of stunting and underweight of children appeared very similar to that of indigenous children from the national sample survey (difference 0.9 and 1.6 percentage points, respectively). Compared to the national sample of Mexican children, stunting and underweight seemed higher in migrant children (difference 17.7 and 4.5 percentage points, respectively), but wasting, an indicator of both chronic and acute undernutrition, appeared to indicate a process of nutritional recuperation. Migrant children living in poverty and suffering from chronic undernutrition, poor performance and scarce education opportunities, can be expected to eventually become agricultural workers with low productivity and poor general health. Consumer's demands on social and environmental standards of fresh food production in developed countries could be an opportunity to impact the lives of migrant agricultural workers, their families and communities.

  3. Circulation in the northwest Laptev Sea in the eastern Arctic Ocean: Crossroads between Siberian River water, Atlantic water and polynya-formed dense water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janout, Markus A.; Hölemann, Jens; Timokhov, Leonid; Gutjahr, Oliver; Heinemann, Günther

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates new observations from the poorly understood region between the Kara and Laptev Seas in the Eastern Arctic Ocean. We discuss relevant circulation features including riverine freshwater, Atlantic-derived water, and polynya-formed dense water, emphasize Vilkitsky Strait (VS) as an important Kara Sea gateway, and analyze the role of the adjacent ˜250 km-long submarine Vilkitsky Trough (VT) for the Arctic boundary current. Expeditions in 2013 and 2014 operated closely spaced hydrographic transects and 1 year-long oceanographic mooring near VT's southern slope, and found persistent annually averaged flow of 0.2 m s-1 toward the Nansen Basin. The flow is nearly barotropic from winter through early summer and becomes surface intensified with maximum velocities of 0.35 m s-1 from August to October. Thermal wind shear is maximal above the southern flank at ˜30 m depth, in agreement with basinward flow above VT's southern slope. The subsurface features a steep front separating warm (-0.5°C) Atlantic-derived waters in central VT from cold (salinities of 34-35. These dense waters are vigorously advected toward the Eurasian Basin and characterize VT as a conduit for near-freezing waters that could potentially supply the Arctic Ocean's lower halocline, cool Atlantic water, and ventilate the deeper Arctic Ocean. Our observations from the northwest Laptev Sea highlight a topographically complex region with swift currents, several water masses, narrow fronts, polynyas, and topographically channeled storms.

  4. Aplasia cutis congenita in a defined population from northwest Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Regueira, Soledad; Vazquez-Lopez, Maria E; Somoza-Rubio, Carlos; Morales-Redondo, Ramon; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita is a rare condition characterized by congenital absence of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue. It may occur as an isolated defect or associated with other anomalies. This study sought to determine the frequency of this condition over a 10-year-period at the single hospital for a well-defined population. A literature review of potential mechanisms implicated in the development of this condition was also conducted. A retrospective review of all case records of patients diagnosed with aplasia cutis congenita between January 1994 and December 2003 at Hospital Xeral-Calde, in the Lugo region of northwest Spain was undertaken. During the period of study four patients were diagnosed with this condition. Three of them were of the gypsy race. These three had aplasia cutis congenita associated with epidermolysis bullosa and deformed nails. The incidence of aplasia cutis congenita in our region was 2.8 cases per 10,000 newborns. It was found that the incidence of this disorder in northwest Spain was similar to that described in the literature. Careful study due to the frequent association of aplasia cutis congenita with other congenital anomalies and a complete obstetric and family history of all affected individuals are required to identify possible specific teratogens, intrauterine infections, chromosomal abnormalities, or history of this condition among relatives.

  5. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  6. Monitoring Groundwater Depletion of Northwest India using SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y.; Kim, J.; Save, H.; Lin, S.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing population and irrigation demand in decades in the states of Punjab and Haryana located at northwest India has been causing significant groundwater depletion (GWD) at Northwest India Aquifer (NWIA). To observe its long-term and seasonal subsidence behavior over wide area, we propose two strips of PALSAR-1 (Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar) images from 2007 to 2011 with NSBAS algorithm to achieve time-series deformation. The maximum cumulative subsidence up to 30 centimeters is observed near Ambala city, which match with the amount of water thickness change estimated by Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites. Furthermore, about two months delay of low subsidence rate after peak of precipitation during monsoon season is also noticed in last two years of study period.We additionally infer the uplift happened surround main subsidence area is induced by the local unloading mechanism derived from alluvium soil water loss, which is proved by geomorphology and soil type data together with micro-seismicity events distribution. Finally the elastic model considered soil type was applied and show agreement with our assumption. Wider area surface deformation is also detected with ASAR ScanSAR interferometry.

  7. Snake bite in Northwest Iran: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Eslamian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: bite affects about 2 million people every year, with more than 100000 mortalities annually. A person bitten by a snake represents a variety of symptoms. Snake bite might be asymptomatic or with mild local symptoms or even could lead to tissue damage and rapid death. This study aimed to investigate characteristics of snake bite in Northwest Iran. Methods: In this retrospective study, medical records of all patients with final diagnosis of snake bite who were admitted to Sina Clinical-Educational Center, the referral center for envenomation in Northwest Iran were investigated from 2002 to 2012. Demographic information and laboratory findings were collected using a checklist. Results: During a 10 year period, 160 individuals with snake bite were admitted, of which 128 (77.6% were male. With regard to occupation, farmers accounted for the largest portion (n = 57, 34.6%. The most prevalent sites bitten by snakes were right hand (25.5% and left leg (24.8%. Fifty-seven patients (34.5% had leukocytosis and four (2.4% had coagulopathy. Pain and swelling were two main complaints, with vomiting, dizziness, and tingling in extremities coming afterwards. Conclusion: Because snake bite is one of the most important emergencies presenting to emergency department and Iran’s geographic status bears wide spectrum of poisonous snakes, this study was performed to further explore the clinical and epidemiologic details of snake bite.

  8. STS-57 Earth observation of King Sound in northwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    STS-57 Earth observation taken aboard Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, is of King Sound in northwest Australia. Roebuck Bay with the city of Broom on its northern shore is south of King Sound. Sediment in the sound is deposited by the Fitzroy River, which is the major body draining the Kimberley Plateau about 200 miles to the west. The extent of the tidal flats around the Sound is indicated by the large white areas covered with a salty residue. According to NASA scientists studying the STS-57 Earth photos, northwest wind gusts are ruffling areas of the water's surface at the mouth of King Sound and in neighboring Collier Bay. Therefore the water is less reflective and dark. The higher reflectance on the brightest areas is caused by biological oils floating on the surface and reducing the capillary wave action. The scientists point out that the oils take the forms of the currents and eddies in the picture. These eddies indicate that the water offshore is moving at a different speed

  9. From Geocaching to Virtual Reality: Technology tools that can transform courses into interactive learning expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Lazar, K.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Sellers, V.

    2016-12-01

    Transforming classrooms into active learning environments is a key challenge in introductory-level courses. The technology explosion over the last decade, from the advent of mobile devices to virtual reality, is creating innumerable opportunities to engage students within and outside of traditional classroom settings. In particular, technology can be an effective tool for providing students with field experiences that would otherwise be logistically difficult in large, introductory earth science courses. For example, we have created an integrated platform for mobile devices using readily accessible "off the shelf" components (e.g., Google Apps, Geocaching.com, and Facebook) that allow individual students to navigate to geologically relevant sites, perform and report on activities at these locations, and share their findings through social media by posting "geoselfies". Students compete with their friends on a leaderboard, while earning incentives for completing extracurricular activities in courses. Thus in addition to exposing students to a wider range of meaningful and accessible geologic field experiences, they also build a greater sense of community and identity within the context of earth science classrooms. Rather than sending students to the field, we can also increasingly bring the field to students in classrooms using virtual reality. Ample mobile platforms are emerging that easily allow for the creation, curation, and viewing of photospheres (i.e., 360o images) with mobile phones and low-cost headsets; Google Street View, Earth, and Expeditions are leading the way in terms of ease of content creation and implementation in the classroom. While these tools are an excellent entry point to show students real-world sites, they currently lack the capacity for students to interact with the environment. We have therefore also developed an immersive virtual reality game that allows students to study the geology of the Grand Canyon using their smartphone and Google

  10. IODP Expedition 317: Exploring the Record of Sea-Level Change off New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Blum

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Expedition 317 investigated the record of global sea-level change (eustasy within continental margin sedimentary sequences and how eustasy interacts with local forcing to produce preserved sedimentary architectures. The Canterbury Basin, on the eastern margin of the South Island of New Zealand, was selected to study these complex interactions because of high rates of Neogene sediment supply fromthe uplifting Southern Alps. This sediment input results in a high-frequency (~0.1–0.5 My periods record of depositional cyclicity that is modulated by the presence of strong ocean currents. The expedition recovered sediments as old as Eocene but focused on the sequence stratigraphy of the late Miocene to Recent, when global sea-level change was dominated by glacioeustasy. A transect of three sites was drilled on the continental shelf (Sites U1353, U1354, and U1351, plus one on the continental slope (Site U1352. The transectsamples the shallow-water environment most directly affected by relative sea-level change. Lithologic boundaries, provisionally correlative with seismic sequence boundaries, have been identified in cores from each site. Continental slope Site U1352 provides a record of ocean circulation and fronts during the last ~35 My. The early Oligocene (~30 MaMarshall Paraconformity was the deepest target ofExpedition 317 and is hypothesized to represent intensified current erosion or non-deposition associated with the initiation of thermohaline circulation in the region. Expedition 317 involved operational challenges for JOIDES Resolution, including shallow-water, continental-shelf drilling and deep penetrations. Despitethese challenges, Expedition 317 set a number of records for scientific ocean drilling penetration and water-depth.

  11. 1999 White Book, Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts.1 Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands—firm loads—are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and “contracted for” resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of

  12. IODP Expedition 362: Initial results from drilling the Sumatra subduction zone - the role of input materials in shallow seismogenic slip and forearc plateau development

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, L. C.; Dugan, B.; Petronotis, K. E.; Expedition 362 Scientists, I.

    2016-12-01

    IODP Expedition 362, August-October, 2016, plans to drill two boreholes within the input section of the Indian oceanic plate entering the North Sumatran subduction zone. In 2004, a Mw 9.2 earthquake ruptured the Sunda subduction zone from North Sumatra to the Andaman Islands, a length of 1500 km. The earthquake and tsunami devastated coastal communities around the Indian Ocean. This earthquake and the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Mw 9.0 earthquake showed unexpectedly shallow megathrust slip. In the case of North Sumatra, this shallow slip was focused beneath a distinctive plateau of the accretionary prism. This intriguing seismogenic behavior and forearc structure are not explained by existing models or by observations at other margins where seismogenic slip typically occurs farther landward. Expedition 362 will use core and log data in conjunction with in situ temperature and pressure measurements to document the lithology, structures, and physical and chemical properties of the input sediments. The input materials of the North Sumatran subduction zone are a distinctive, thick (up to 4-5 km) sequence of primarily Bengal-Nicobar Fan-related sediments. This sequence geophysically shows strong evidence for induration and dewatering and has probably reached the temperatures required for sediment-strengthening diagenetic reactions, and input materials may be key to driving the distinctive slip behavior and long-term forearc structure. The plate boundary fault (décollement) originates within the lower pelagic and submarine fan sediments so sampling this interval will help determine what controls décollement development and how its properties evolve. Initial results from the Expedition and plans for post-expedition experiments and modeling will be presented. These methods will be used to predict physical, thermal, fluid, and mechanical properties and diagenetic evolution of the sediments as stresses and temperatures increase due to burial and subduction. Results will be used to

  13. A research framework for natural resource-based communities in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriet H. Christensen; Ellen M. Donoghue

    2001-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest (PNW) Research Station developed a problem analysis to direct the research on natural resource-based communities in the Pacific Northwest over the next 5 years. The problem analysis identifies four problem areas: (1) social values related to rural peoples, communities, and development, and their ties to resource management are largely unknown; (2...

  14. Highlights of science contributions to implementing the Northwest Forest Plan—1994 to 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy M. Diaz; Richard W. Haynes

    2002-01-01

    During 5 years of research (1994-98) in support of the Northwest Forest Plan (NWFP), Pacific Northwest Research Station scientists and their collaborators have made significant progress in both validating some of the NWFP’s major assumptions and providing research that sets the stage for further evolution of the plan. Studies have provided new information in the areas...

  15. The Northwest Forest Plan as a model for broad-scale ecosystem management: a social perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan. Charnely

    2006-01-01

    I evaluated the Northwest Forest Plan as a model for ecosystem management to achieve social and economic goals in communities located around federal forests in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. My assessment is based on the results of socioeconomic monitoring conducted to evaluate progress in achieving the plan's goals during its past 10 years. The assessment criteria I...

  16. Cognitive styles of Forest Service scientists and managers in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew B. Carey

    1997-01-01

    Preferences of executives, foresters, and biologists of the Pacific Northwest Research Station and executives, District Rangers, foresters, engineers, and biologists of the Pacific Northwest Region, National Forest System (USDA Forest Service), were compared for various thinking styles. Herrmann brain dominance profiles from 230 scientists and managers were drawn from...

  17. Benefits of donkeys in rural and urban areas in northwest Nigeria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, M.R.; Steenstra, F.A.; Udo, H.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the benefits of donkeys for rural and urban smallholder farmers in northwest Nigeria. We visited 112 smallholder donkey farmers located in rural and urban areas from four states in northwest Nigeriathrough four focus group meetings, interviews with

  18. 75 FR 58429 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... & Culture, aka Eastern Washington State Historical Society, Spokane, WA. The human remains and associated... venture involving the Eastern Washington State Historical Society (now Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Spokane, WA...

  19. 78 FR 63501 - Request To Submit a Two-Part Application-Northwest Medical Isotopes, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Request To Submit a Two-Part Application--Northwest Medical Isotopes, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear...-99 and its decay product, technetium-99m, in nuclear medicine procedures. Northwest Medical Isotopes...

  20. The effects of Pleistocene glaciations on the geohydrological system of Northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weert, F.H.A. van; Gijssel, K. van; Leijnse, A.; Boulton, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    A large-scale hydrological model study is carried out to investigate the geohydrological responses to glacial climate conditions in Northwest Europe. The vertically integrated groundwater model is based on a supraregional hydrogeological model of the Cenozoic and Mesozoic subsurface in Northwest

  1. 77 FR 11434 - Safety Zone; Patapsco River, Northwest and Inner Harbors, Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Patapsco River, Northwest and Inner Harbors... proposes to establish a temporary safety zone upon certain waters of the Patapsco River, Northwest Harbor... CONSTELLATION will be towed ``dead ship,'' which means that the vessel will be underway without the benefit of...

  2. Ecological correlates of seed persistence in soil in the north-west European flora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, K; Bakker, JP; Bekker, RM; Hodgson, JG

    I Using the data in a recently published seed bank database for north-west Europe, we describe how a species' seed bank behaviour can be characterized by a single 'longevity index', and investigate how representative the information in the database is of the north-west European flora. We also test

  3. Forest Management Policy and Community Well-Being in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Charnley; Ellen M. Donoghue; Cassandra Moseley

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a multiscale, multimethods approach to examine the effects of declining timber harvests on the well-being of forest communities in the Pacific Northwest as a result of the Northwest Forest Plan (the Plan). We found that the effects of declining timber harvests were variable and depended on the importance of the timber sector in a community in the late...

  4. An effectiveness monitoring program for the northwest forest plan: new approaches to common monitoring problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Palmer; Barry Mulder; Barry Noon

    2000-01-01

    The Northwest Forest Plan is a large-scale ecosystem management plan for federal lands in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. An effectiveness monitoring program has been developed to determine the extent to which the goals and objectives of this Plan are being achieved. Priority resources identified for ecological monitoring include late-successional and old-...

  5. 76 FR 77806 - International Affairs; U.S. Fish Quotas in the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA868 International Affairs; U.S. Fish Quotas in the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization Regulatory Area AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... Northwest Atlantic Fisheries ] Organization (NAFO) Regulatory Area. This action is necessary to make fishing...

  6. 76 FR 72907 - International Affairs; U.S. Fishing Opportunity in the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA845 International Affairs; U.S. Fishing Opportunity in the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization Regulatory Area AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... flounder in Division 3LNO of the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) Regulatory Area during...

  7. Paleolatitudinal Constraints from Eocene to Recent Sediments Cored in the Equatorial Pacific on IODP Expeditions 320 and 321

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, G.; Richter, C.; Yamamoto, Y.; Ohneiser, C.; Yamazaki, T.; Channell, J. E. T.; Evans, H. F.; Petronotis, K. E.; Guidry, E. P.

    2016-12-01

    Sediments cored along a Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT) during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions 320 and 321 record the paleomagnetic field with high fidelity, providing new paleolatitudinal constraints for the Pacific Plate. A total of 6,141 m of core was recovered from 23 holes cored at 8 sites (Sites U1331 through U1338), which are currently located at latitudes between 2.5°N and 12.1°N. Paleomagnetic data were collected from discrete samples (7 cm3 cubes) that were subjected to progressive alternating field (AF) and thermal demagnetization and were collected every 1 cm along U-channel samples (2 cm x 2 cm x 150 cm) and every 5 cm or less along split-core sections that were subjected to progressive AF demagnetization. The age of the sediment is well constrained from unambiguous magnetostratigraphies and from biostratigraphic data, as well as by subsequent astronomical tuning using cyclic variations in the physical, chemical, and magnetic properties of the sediments. The large amount of paleomagnetic data collected within each magnetic chron makes it possible to compute the change in paleolatitude with high temporal resolution and to investigate polarity asymmetries, overprints, and other possible biases. The good spatial (latitudinal) distribution of the sites along with the general northward motion of the Pacific Plate provide observations that help resolve possible biases caused by flattening, which is inherently small for near equatorial sites but, even so, possibly resolvable given the large number of paleomagnetic data.

  8. Marine anthropogenic radiotracers in the Southern Hemisphere: New sampling and analytical strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levy, I.; Povinec, P.P.; Aoyama, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Japan Agency for Marine Earth Science and Technology conducted in 2003–2004 the Blue Earth Global Expedition (BEAGLE2003) around the Southern Hemisphere Oceans, which was a rare opportunity to collect many seawater samples for anthropogenic radionuclide studies. We describe here sampling...... showed a reasonable agreement between the participating laboratories. The obtained data on the distribution of 137Cs and plutonium isotopes in seawater represent the most comprehensive results available for the Southern Hemisphere Oceans....

  9. Genetic Variation of the Endangered Gentiana lutea L. var. aurantiaca (Gentianaceae in Populations from the Northwest Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar González-López

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gentiana lutea L. (G. lutea L. is an endangered plant, patchily distributed along the mountains of Central and Southern Europe. In this study, inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers were used to investigate the genetic variation in this species within and among populations of G. lutea L. var. aurantiaca of the Cantabrian Mountains (Northwest Iberian Peninsula. Samples of G. lutea L. collected at different locations of the Pyrenees and samples of G. lutea L. subsp. vardjanii of the Dolomites Alps were also analyzed for comparison. Using nine ISSR primers, 106 bands were generated, and 89.6% of those were polymorphic. The populations from the Northwest Iberian Peninsula were clustered in three different groups, with a significant correlation between genetic and geographic distances. Gentiana lutea L. var. aurantiaca showed 19.8% private loci and demonstrated a remarkable level of genetic variation, both among populations and within populations; those populations with the highest level of isolation show the lowest genetic variation within populations. The low number of individuals, as well as the observed genetic structure of the analyzed populations makes it necessary to protect them to ensure their survival before they are too small to persist naturally.

  10. Late-Glacial summer temperatures in the Northwest European lowlands: a new chironomid record from Hijkermeer, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiri, O.; Cremer, H.; Engels, S.; Hoek, W.Z.; Peeters, W.; Lotter, A.F.

    2007-01-01

    Lateglacial environments at Hijkermeer, northwest Netherlands, were reconstructed by means of chironomid, diatom and pollen analyses. Diatom assemblages indicate that Hijkermeer was a shallow, oligo- to mesotrophic lake during this period. Pollen assemblages reflect the typical northwest European

  11. [The journey of the vaccine against smallpox: one expedition, two oceans, three continents, and thousands of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuells, José; Duro-Torrijos, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Spain encouraged, during the Bourbon dynasty, the formation of scientific expeditions, among which was the Royal Philanthropic Vaccine Expedition, an example of biopolitics applied by the state in order to protect health. The expedition went all over the world, using children as a reservoir to transport the vaccine fluid. Francisco Xavier Balmis established a human chain that arm-to-arm materialized the success of the mission. The characteristics and difficulties which children had to pass through and their contribution to the spread of the smallpox vaccine are analyzed.

  12. 2011 Annual Ecological Survey: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, James M.; Chamness, Michele A.

    2012-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) oversees and manages the DOE contract for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a DOE Office of Science multi-program laboratory located in Richland, Washington. PNSO is responsible for ensuring that all activities conducted on the PNNL site comply with applicable laws, policies, and DOE Orders. The DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office Cultural and Biological Resources Management Plan (DOE/PNSO 2008) addresses the requirement for annual surveys and monitoring for species of concern and to identify and map invasive species. In addition to the requirement for an annual survey, proposed project activities must be reviewed to assess any potential environmental consequences of conducting the project. The assessment process requires a thorough understanding of the resources present, the potential impacts of a proposed action to those resources, and the ultimate consequences of those actions. The PNNL site is situated on the southeastern corner of the DOE Hanford Site, located at the north end of the city of Richland in south-central Washington. The site is bordered on the east by the Columbia River, on the west by Stevens Drive, and on the north by the Hanford Site 300 Area (Figure 1). The environmental setting of the PNNL site is described in Larson and Downs (2009). There are currently two facilities on the PNNL site: the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory and the Physical Sciences Facility. This report describes the annual survey of biological resources found on the undeveloped upland portions of the PNNL site. The annual survey is comprised of a series of individual field surveys conducted on various days in late May and throughout June 2011. A brief description of the methods PNNL ecologists used to conduct the baseline surveys and a summary of the results of the surveys are presented. Appendix A provides a list of plant and animal species identified in the

  13. ShakeMap at the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, R.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Gustafson, B.; Malone, S.; Palmer, S.; Pratt, T.; Steele, B.; Vidale, J.; Wald, D.; Weaver, C.; Wong, I.

    2007-12-01

    We summarize efforts to tailor ShakeMap to the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN), and to increase the resolution in the major urban areas. Our initial implementation of ShakeMap employed parameters based on data from mostly larger earthquakes outside the Pacific Northwest. The PNSN automatically generates a 45- arcsec ShakeMap for any earthquake of Md ≥ 3.0 in the Puget Sound region and for Md ≥ 4.0 earthquakes in Washington and Oregon. ShakeMap uses 3-component, real-time data from 91 strong motion, 34 broadband, and 70 Earthscope Transportable Array stations. We also automatically incorporate data from dial- up stations of the National Strong Motion Program. High-resolution (7.2 arcsec) ShakeMaps for the Seattle area have just come on-line thanks to the availability of a new, more detailed geologic map. We use data from the PNSN and other sources to derive new region-specific ground motion attenuation relations and site corrections. Preliminary results suggest that default attenuation relations included with the ShakeMap package over-predict Pacific Northwest ground motions, especially at larger distances and for deep (≥ 20km) earthquakes. We will make similar comparisons with the Next Generation Attenuation relations, to be used in future ShakeMap releases, and modify the relations if warranted. To improve site corrections we compared site amplification measurements and local magnitude residuals (available for most of the PNSN stations) to measured values of Vs30 at co-located and nearby sites. These correlate well and thus provide useful proxies for Vs30 for use in ShakeMap. We also found correlations between Vs30 estimates and the age and rock type of mapped geologic units, providing a geologically constrained means of interpolating between sites with more direct Vs30 estimates. Finally, our ShakeMaps will improve because we continue to add stations to the PNSN, providing additional direct measures of ground motion.

  14. Nurse uniform wearing practices and associated factors among nurses working in Northwest Ethiopia: a cross-sectional institution based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desta, Etaferahu Alamaw; Gebrie, Mignote Hailu; Dachew, Berihun Assefa

    2015-01-01

    Wearing uniforms help in the formation of professional identity in healthcare. It fosters a strong self image and professional identity which can lead to good confidence and better performance in nursing practice. However, most nurses in Ethiopia are not wearing nursing uniforms and the reasons remain unclear. Therefore, the aim of this research is to assess nurse uniform wearing practices among nurses and factors associated with such practice in hospitals in Northwest Ethiopia. A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted from March to April, 2014 in five hospitals located in Northwest Ethiopia. A total 459 nurses participated in the study. Data was collected using a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were analyzed in order to characterize the study population. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression models were fitted. Odds ratios with 95 % confidence intervals were computed to identify factors associated with nursing uniform practice. Nurse uniform wearing practice was found to be 49.2 % of the total sample size. Around 35 % of the respondents that did not implement nurse uniform wearing practices stated that there was no specific uniform for nurses recommended by hospital management. In addition to this, nurse uniform wearing practices were positively associated with being female [AOR = 1.58, 95 % CI (1.02, 2.44)], studying nursing by choice [AOR =3.16, 95 % CI (2.03, 4.92)], and the appeal of nursing uniforms to nurses [AOR = 3.43 95 % CI (1.96, 5.98)]. Nurse uniform wearing practices were not exceptionally prevalent in Northwest Ethiopian hospitals. However, encouraging students to pursue interest-based careers and implementing a nurse uniform wearing policy may have the potential to improve such practices.

  15. Ancient individuals from the North American Northwest Coast reveal 10,000 years of regional genetic continuity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindo, John; Achilli, Alessandro; Perego, Ugo A.; Archer, David; Valdiosera, Cristina; Petzelt, Barbara; Mitchell, Joycelynn; Worl, Rosita; Dixon, E. James; Fifield, Terence E.; Rasmussen, Morten; Willerslev, Eske; Cybulski, Jerome S.; Kemp, Brian M.; DeGiorgio, Michael; Malhi, Ripan S.

    2017-01-01

    Recent genomic studies of both ancient and modern indigenous people of the Americas have shed light on the demographic processes involved during the first peopling. The Pacific Northwest Coast proves an intriguing focus for these studies because of its association with coastal migration models and genetic ancestral patterns that are difficult to reconcile with modern DNA alone. Here, we report the low-coverage genome sequence of an ancient individual known as “Shuká Káa” (“Man Ahead of Us”) recovered from the On Your Knees Cave (OYKC) in southeastern Alaska (archaeological site 49-PET-408). The human remains date to ∼10,300 calendar (cal) y B.P. We also analyze low-coverage genomes of three more recent individuals from the nearby coast of British Columbia dating from ∼6,075 to 1,750 cal y B.P. From the resulting time series of genetic data, we show that the Pacific Northwest Coast exhibits genetic continuity for at least the past 10,300 cal y B.P. We also infer that population structure existed in the late Pleistocene of North America with Shuká Káa on a different ancestral line compared with other North American individuals from the late Pleistocene or early Holocene (i.e., Anzick-1 and Kennewick Man). Despite regional shifts in mtDNA haplogroups, we conclude from individuals sampled through time that people of the northern Northwest Coast belong to an early genetic lineage that may stem from a late Pleistocene coastal migration into the Americas. PMID:28377518

  16. Monitoring Annual Urban Changes in a Rapidly Growing Portion of Northwest Arkansas with a 20-Year Landsat Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Reynolds

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Northwest Arkansas has undergone a significant urban transformation in the past several decades and is considered to be one of the fastest growing regions in the United States. The urban area expansion and the associated demographic increases bring unprecedented pressure to the environment and natural resources. To better understand the consequences of urbanization, accurate and long-term depiction on urban dynamics is critical. Although urban mapping activities using remote sensing have been widely conducted, long-term urban growth mapping at an annual pace is rare and the low accuracy of change detection remains a challenge. In this study, a time series Landsat stack covering the period from 1995 to 2015 was employed to detect the urban dynamics in Northwest Arkansas via a two-stage classification approach. A set of spectral indices that have been proven to be useful in urban area extraction together with the original Landsat spectral bands were used in the maximum likelihood classifier and random forest classifier to distinguish urban from non-urban pixels for each year. A temporal trajectory polishing method, involving temporal filtering and heuristic reasoning, was then applied to the sequence of classified urban maps for further improvement. Based on a set of validation samples selected for five distinct years, the average overall accuracy of the final polished maps was 91%, which improved the preliminary classifications by over 10%. Moreover, results from this study also indicated that the temporal trajectory polishing method was most effective with initial low accuracy classifications. The resulting urban dynamic map is expected to provide unprecedented details about the area, spatial configuration, and growing trends of urban land-cover in Northwest Arkansas.

  17. ISS Potable Water Sampling and Chemical Analysis Results for 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, John E., II; Plumlee, Debrah K.; Wallace, William T.; Alverson, James T.; Benoit, Mickie J.; Gillispie, Robert L.; Hunter, David; Kuo, Mike; Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Hudson, Edgar K.; hide

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues the annual tradition, at this conference, of summarizing the results of chemical analyses performed on archival potable water samples returned from the International Space Station (ISS). 2016 represented a banner year for life aboard the ISS, including the successful conclusion for 2 crewmembers of a record 1-year mission. Water reclaimed from urine and/or humidity condensate remained the primary source of potable water for the crewmembers of ISS Expeditions 46-50. The year was also marked by the end of a long-standing tradition of U.S. sampling and monitoring of Russian Segment potable water sources. Two water samples, taken during Expedition 46 and returned on Soyuz 44 in March 2016, represented the final Russian Segment samples to be collected and analyzed by the U.S. side. Although anticipated for 2016, a rise in the total organic carbon (TOC) concentration of the product water from the U.S. water processor assembly due to breakthrough of organic contaminants from the system did not materialize, as evidenced by the onboard TOC analyzer and archival sample results.

  18. Longitudinal changes on grain size and sediments composition in the Baghi River (Northwest of Neyshabur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    حسام کاویان

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Marusk Catchment with an area of 131.87 square kilometers is located in the Northwest of Neyshabur. Baghi River as one of the main tributary of this catchment has been studied with a length of about20.1km.For sedimentological studies a total of 32 sediment samples taken from the active mid-channel of the river that after drying, the granulometry has been analyzed by dry sieving method. After the sample sieving, statistical parameters (median, mean, sorting, skewness and kurtosis were calculated.3 sedimentary discontinuities have been detected in the sediments of the river. First and second discontinuity is due to input of sediments from the alluvial fan and tributary into the main channel, respectively, and third discontinuity is due to changes in lithology. To determine the percentage of erosion in the formations in this region and determine the amount of sediment yield in each of formations, Abrasion Los Angeles Test is done. Based on this method, Dalichai Formation with according to its lithology and also a great expansion in the region is main formation for sediment yield in this area. In the study area, coarse-grained sedimentary facies (Gmg, Gci, medium-grained sedimentary facies (Sm and fine-grained sedimentary facies (Fl were identified. According to sedimentary facies, the architectural elements of SG and FF have been identified. Sedimentary models proposed for this river are including braided gravelly river with sediment gravity flow and shallow braided river with gravel-bed load.

  19. Comparison of electrofishing techniques to detect larval lampreys in wadeable streams in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Jason B.; Chelgren, Nathan D.; Heck, Michael P.; Clark, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the probability of detecting larval lampreys using different methods of backpack electrofishing in wadeable streams in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Our primary objective was to compare capture of lampreys using electrofishing with standard settings for salmon and trout to settings specifically adapted for capture of lampreys. Field work consisted of removal sampling by means of backpack electrofishing in 19 sites in streams representing a broad range of conditions in the region. Captures of lampreys at these sites were analyzed with a modified removal-sampling model and Bayesian estimation to measure the relative odds of capture using the lamprey-specific settings compared with the standard salmonid settings. We found that the odds of capture were 2.66 (95% credible interval, 0.87–78.18) times greater for the lamprey-specific settings relative to standard salmonid settings. When estimates of capture probability were applied to estimating the probabilities of detection, we found high (>0.80) detectability when the actual number of lampreys in a site was greater than 10 individuals and effort was at least two passes of electrofishing, regardless of the settings used. Further work is needed to evaluate key assumptions in our approach, including the evaluation of individual-specific capture probabilities and population closure. For now our results suggest comparable results are possible for detection of lampreys by using backpack electrofishing with salmonid- or lamprey-specific settings.

  20. Schistosoma mansoni Infection and Associated Determinant Factors among School Children in Sanja Town, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligabaw Worku

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intestinal schistosomiasis is one of the most widespread parasitic infections in tropical and subtropical countries. Objective. To determine the prevalence of S. mansoni infection and associated determinant factors among school children in Sanja Town, northwest Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted from February to March, 2013. 385 school children were selected using stratified proportionate systematic sampling technique. Pretested questionnaire was used to collect sociodemographic data and associated determinant factors. Stool samples were examinedusing formol-ether concentration and Kato-Katz technique. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS 20.0 statistical software. Multivariate logistic regression was done for assessing associated risk factors and proportions for categorical variables were compared using chi-square test. P values less than 0.05 were taken as statistically significant. Results. The prevalence of S. mansoni infection was 89.9% (n=346. The overall helminthic infection in this study was 96.6% (n=372. Swimming in the river, washing clothes and utensil using river water, crossing the river with bare foot, and fishing activities showed significant association with the occurrence of S. mansoni infection. Conclusion. Schistosoma mansoni infection was high in the study area. Therefore, mass deworming at least twice a year and health education for community are needed.

  1. Seroprevalence of Neospora Caninum Infection in Dairy Cattle in Tabriz, Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh Moghaddam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of antibody to Neospora can­inum in healthy and aborted dairy cattle in Tabriz, capital of East-Azarbaijan in northwest of Iran.Methods: In this cross-sectional study serum samples were collected from 266 healthy and ab­orted Holestein-Feriesisnc cows from September 2008 to August 2009. The sera were analyzed to de­tect of antibody against N. caninum using the commercially ELISA kit.Results: Seroprevalence of antibody to N. caninum was 10.5% in Tabriz dairy cattle. Also the abortion rate in all cattle sampled was 33.6% but percentage of seropositive aborted cattle was 18.4%.Conclusion: Neosporosis could be one of the possible causes of abortion in dairy cattle in Tabriz and regarding the distribution in dogs as definitive host for the parasite, further studies in dog and cat­tle are recommended.

  2. Rb-Sr And Sm-Nd Ages, and Petrogenesis of Depleted Shergottite Northwest Africa 5990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C. Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Irving, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Northwest Africa (NWA) 5990 is a very fresh Martian meteorite recently found on Hamada du Draa, Morocco and was classified as an olivine-bearing diabasic igneous rock related to depleted shergottites [1]. The study of [1] also showed that NWA 5990 resembles QUE 94201 in chemical, textural and isotopic aspects, except QUE 94201 contains no olivine. The depleted shergottites are characterized by REE patterns that are highly depleted in LREE, older Sm-Nd ages of 327-575 Ma and highly LREE-depleted sources with Nd= +35+48 [2-7]. Age-dating these samples by Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr methods is very challenging because they have been strongly shocked and contain very low abundances of light rare earth elements (Sm and Nd), Rb and Sr. In addition, terrestrial contaminants which are commonly present in desert meteorites will compromise the equilibrium of isotopic systems. Since NWA 5990 is a very fresh meteorite, it probably has not been subject to significant desert weathering and thus is a good sample for isotopic studies. In this report, we present Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic results for NWA 5990, discuss the correlation of the determined ages with those of other depleted shergottites, especially QUE 94201, and discuss the petrogenesis of depleted shergottites.

  3. Natural radioactivity in reservoir sediment near an industrial park of northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinwei; Pan, Huiyun; Ren, Chunhui; Yang, Linna

    2016-06-01

    The activity concentration of natural radionuclides in the sediment of a reservoir near an industrial park of northwest China was determined using gamma ray spectrometry. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the investigated samples range from 30.2 to 37.5, 56.5 to 79.8 and 785.6 to 940.3 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 33.2, 71.8 and 866.2 Bq kg(-1), respectively, which are higher than the corresponding activity concentrations in the control sample. Radium equivalent activity, external hazard index, internal hazard index, indoor air absorbed dose rate and annual effective dose rate were calculated to assess the radiation hazards associated with the use of this sediment in the construction of dwellings. It was concluded that the radiation levels in the reservoir sediment do not give rise to radiological health concerns and the sediment can be safely used in the construction of buildings.

  4. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Chlamydia abortus Infection in Tibetan Sheep in Gansu Province, Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yuan Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia abortus, an important pathogen in a variety of animals, is associated with abortion in sheep. In the present study, 1732 blood samples, collected from Tibetan sheep between June 2013 and April 2014, were examined by the indirect hemagglutination (IHA test, aiming to evaluate the seroprevalence and risk factors of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. 323 of 1732 (18.65% samples were seropositive for C. abortus antibodies at the cut-off of 1 : 16. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk factors associated with seroprevalence, which could provide foundation to prevent and control C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Gender of Tibetan sheep was left out of the final model because it is not significant in the logistic regression analysis (P>0.05. Region, season, and age were considered as major risk factors associated with C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep. Our study revealed a widespread and high prevalence of C. abortus infection in Tibetan sheep in Gansu province, northwest China, with higher exposure risk in different seasons and ages and distinct geographical distribution.

  5. Prevalence of Eimeria macusaniensis and Eimeria ivitaensis in South American camelids of Northwest Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafrune, M M; Marín, R E; Rigalt, F A; Romero, S R; Aguirre, D H

    2009-06-10

    Faecal samples from mostly adult llamas (n=626), vicuñas (n=161) and guanacos (n=4) were obtained between December 2004 and July 2008 in three Provinces of Northwest Argentina in order to study the prevalence of Eimeria macusaniensis and Eimeria ivitaensis. Faeces were examined by a flotation technique using a Cl(2)Zn+ClNa solution (specific gravity=1.59). Oocysts of E. macusaniensis occurred in 88.3% of 77 llama herds and in 50.3% of 626 llamas sampled whereas oocysts of E. ivitaensis occurred in only four llamas (herd and llama prevalence of 5.2% and 0.6%, respectively). The individual prevalence of E. macusaniensis in vicuñas and guanacos were of 14.3% and 25.0%, respectively. E. ivitaensis was not detected in these latter species. The results showed a prevalence of E. macusaniensis higher than previously reported in adult domestic camelids (llamas and alpacas). In contrast, the very low prevalence of E. ivitaensis in llamas and its absence in wild camelids (vicuñas and guanacos) was remarkable. Differences between prevalence of both coccidian species are discussed.

  6. Lamanema chavezi (Nematoda: Molineidae): epidemiological data of the infection in South American camelids of Northwest Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafrune, M M; Marín, R E; Rigalt, F A; Romero, S R; Aguirre, D H

    2009-12-23

    Faecal samples from llamas (n=708), vicuñas (n=171) and guanacos (n=4) were obtained between December 2004 and May 2009 in three Provinces of Northwest Argentina (Jujuy, Salta and Catamarca) to know the distribution, prevalence and intensity of Lamanema chavezi infection in these South American camelid species (SACs). Faeces were examined by a sedimentation-flotation technique using a Cl(2)Zn+ClNa solution (specific gravity=1.59). Eggs of L. chavezi occurred in 30.3% of 89 llama herds and in 18.5% of 708 llamas sampled with a mean intensity of 271.8 eggs/g (EPG) of faeces (range 20-2120). The highest values for all parameters of the infection were registered in llamas from Catamarca Province. Significant differences (Pcamelids of neighbour countries while mean intensity was higher. The individual prevalence of L. chavezi in guanacos was 75.0%, with a mean intensity of 66.0 EPG (range 40-120) while no vicuñas were detected as infected. Most of infected SACs were located at the phytogeographical region of Andean Patagonic Domain with a dispersion ranging between 22 degrees 10' and 26 degrees 40' South latitude.

  7. [Macrobenthos community structure and its relationships with environmental factors in Weihe River basin, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xu-Wang; Xu, Zong-Xue; Gao, Xin; Bai, Hai-Feng; Wu, Wei; Song, Jin-Xi

    2013-01-01

    In October 2011, an investigation was conducted on the macrobenthos at 45 sampling sites in the Weihe River basin of Northwest China. A total of 116 macrobenthos species were collected, of which, 91 species (78.4%) were aquatic insects, 12 species (10.3%) were mollusks, 9 species (7.8%) were annelids, and 4 species (3.4%) were crustaceans. According to the species composition and relative abundance of macrobenthos, the 45 sampling sites could be divided into three groups by using two-way indicator species analysis (TWINSPAN) and detrended correspondence analysis (DCA). In the first group, Serratella sp., Hydropsyche sp., and Antocha sp. were the indicator species. In the second group, Tabanus sp., Alotanypus venustus, one species of Pelecorhynchidae, Liodessus sp., and Limnodrilus hoffmeistteri were the indicator species. In the third group, Ephemera nigroptera and Polypylis hemisphaerula were the indicator species. The canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) indicated that 'cobble + boulder' type substrate, current velocity, water conductivity, water depth, and water total nitrogen content had significant effects on the spatial distribution of macrobenthos in Weihe River basin.

  8. Distribution of fluoride in groundwater of Maku area, northwest of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari Moghaddam, Asghar; Fijani, Elham

    2008-11-01

    High fluoride groundwater occurs in Maku area, in the north of West Azarbaijan province, northwest of Iran. Groundwater is the main source of drinking water for the area residents. Groundwater samples were collected from 72 selected points including 40 basaltic and 32 nonbasaltic springs and wells, in two stages, during June and August 2006. The areas with high fluoride concentrations have been identified, and the possible causes for its variation have been investigated. Regional hydrogeochemical investigation indicates that water-rock interaction is probably the main reason for the high concentration of ions in groundwater. The concentration of F- in groundwater is positively correlated with that of HCO3 - and Na+, indicating that groundwater with high HCO3 - and Na+ concentrations help to dissolve some fluoride-rich minerals. All of the water samples, collected from the basaltic areas do not meet the water quality standards for fluoride concentration and some other parameters. Hence, it is not suitable for consumption without any prior treatment. Inhabitants of the area that obtain their drinking water supplies from basaltic springs and wells are suffering from dental fluorosis. The population of the study area is at a high risk due to excessive fluoride intake especially when they are unaware of the amount of fluoride being ingested due to lack of awareness.

  9. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan FY 1998--2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s core mission is to deliver environmental science and technology in the service of the nation and humanity. Through basic research the lab creates fundamental knowledge of natural, engineered, and social systems that is the basis for both effective environmental technology and sound public policy. They solve legacy environmental problems by delivering technologies that remedy existing environmental hazards, they address today`s environmental needs with technologies that prevent pollution and minimize waste, and they are laying the technical foundation for tomorrow`s inherently clean energy and industrial processes. The lab also applies their capabilities to meet selected national security, energy, and human health needs; strengthen the US economy; and support the education of future scientists and engineers. The paper summarizes individual research activities under each of these areas.

  10. Development of the Coupled Northwest Atlantic Prediction System (CNAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambon, J. B.; He, R.

    2016-02-01

    A 3-dimensioanl marine environmental nowcast/forecast system has been constructed and is running quasi-operationally for the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. This fully coupled modeling accounts for the interactions among Ocean, Atmosphere, Wave, Sediment Transport and the low-trophic marine ecosystem. It is driven by realistic meteorological boundary forcing, tides, river, and deep-ocean boundary conditions provided by a data assimilative global ocean model. Model output from this nowcast/forecast system, including marine weather, ocean wave, ocean circulation and marine ecosystem variable are generated daily and available for public access. The construction of this prediction system, model validations and case studies on air-sea interactions during major tropical and extratropical storms will be discussed in this presentation.

  11. Formative pre-Hispanic agricultural soils in northwest Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampietro Vattuone, María Marta; Roldán, Jimena; Neder, Liliana; Maldonado, Mario Gabriel; Vattuone, Marta Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Our study area is from an early agricultural archaeological site named "El Tolar" (1st to 9th century AD), located in Tafí Valley (Tucumán, northwest Argentina). The objective was to identify geochemical signatures generated by the sustained agrarian use of soils. Chemical and pedological studies were made in different archaeological contexts. Physical and chemical features, such as bulk density, pH, organic and inorganic phosphorus, and available copper, manganese and iron, were taken into account. The results suggested that a buried paleosol identified was contemporary with the occupation of the site. It also showed characteristics clearly related to pre-Hispanic agrarian production. The concentrations of organic phosphorus and iron in agricultural soils probably reflect the use of fertilizers. The application of geoscience techniques allowed us to obtain important information on their behaviour and socio-economic development. This paper constitutes the first pedogeochemical approach to the study of Argentinean pre-Hispanic agricultural soils.

  12. Microsatellite Primers for the Pacific Northwest Conifer Callitropsis nootkatensis (Cupressaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara N. Jennings

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed for Nootka cypress (Callitropsis nootkatensis to provide quantitative measures for gene conservation that can assist in guiding management decisions for a species experiencing climate-induced decline. Methods and Results: Using multiplexed massively parallel sequencing, we identified 136,785 microsatellite-containing sequences from 489,625 Illumina paired-end 80-bp reads. After stringent filtering, we selected 144 primer pairs and screened variation at these loci in five populations of C. nootkatensis. Loci show between three and 36 dinucleotide repeats per locus, with an average of 13. Screening of these markers in the Pacific Northwest relative Chamaecyparis lawsoniana demonstrated no marker transferability. This finding highlights the narrow taxonomic utility of microsatellite markers in Callitropsis. Conclusions: These microsatellites show high polymorphism and can be used for routine screening of natural variation in Callitropsis nootkatensis, and will be particularly helpful in identifying clones and inbred relatives at the stand-level.

  13. Severe tungiasis in northwest Tanzania: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphrey D. Mazigo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tungiasis is caused by infestation with the sand flea (Tunga penetrans. This ectoparasitosis is endemic in economically depressed communities in South American and African countries. However, data on the epidemiology of tungiasis in Tanzania are very limited and the disease does not receive much attention from health care professionals. During a community cross sectional survey in northwest Tanzania, we identified five individuals extremely infested with high number of parasites. A total of 435 lesions were recorded with patients presenting with >75 lesions and showed signs of intense acute and chronic inflammation. Superinfection of the lesions characterized by pustule formation, suppuration and ulceration were common. Loss of nails and walking difficulty was also observed. In Tanzanian communities living under extreme poverty characterized by poor housing condition and inadequate health services, tungiasis may cause severe morbidities. Further studies on risk factors and disease-related behavior of affected populations are needed to design adequate control measures.

  14. Learning from urban growth management in the Pacific Northwest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The development of contemporary urban growth management in the Northwest United States began in the 1970s. The major tool is the implementation of urban containment boundaries, fostering growth within and limiting it outside the boundary. Additionally a set of policies reaching from densification...... Washington and Oregon as e.g. the municipalities in Denmark have strong control options in planning. However, especially the metropolitan co-operation and co-ordination instruments can certainly contribute to the discussion on urban growth management in Denmark and elsewhere....... strategies to the trade of development rights is used to support the growth managements’ goals. The paper reviews the most important elements of the urban growth management in Washington and Oregon State. Based on several semi-structured interviews with planning experts done during a research stay in Seattle...

  15. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ({sup 238}Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  16. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ([sup 238]Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  17. Salmon, Science, and Reciprocity on the Northwest Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bruce Johnsen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe depletion of many genetically distinct Pacific salmon populations has spawned a contentious debate over causation and the efficacy of proposed solutions. No doubt the precipitating factor was overharvesting of the commons beginning along the Northwest Coast around 1860. Yet, for millenia before that, a relatively dense population of Indian tribes managed salmon stocks that have since been characterized as "superabundant." This study investigates how they avoided a tragedy of the commons, where in recent history, commercial ocean fishers guided by scientifically informed regulators, have repeatedly failed. Unlike commercial fishers, the tribes enjoyed exclusive rights to terminal fisheries enforced through rigorous reciprocity relations. The available evidence is compelling that they actively husbanded their salmon stocks for sustained abundance.

  18. PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGIONAL COLLABORATORY ANNUAL REPORT FOR SYNERGY VII (2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagestad, Jerry D.; Bolte, John; Guzy, Michael; Woodruff, Dana L.; Humes, Karen; Walden, Von; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Glenn, Nancy; Ames, Dan; Rope, Ronald; Martin, David; Sandgathe, Scott

    2008-04-01

    During this final year of the Pacific Northwest Regional Collaboratory we focused significantly on continuing the relationship between technical teams and government end-users. The main theme of the year was integration. This took the form of data integration via our web portal and integration of our technologies with the end users. The PNWRC's technical portfolio is based on EOS strategies, and focuses on 'applications of national priority: water management, invasive species, coastal management and ecological forecasting.' The products of our technical approaches have been well received by the community of focused end-users. The objective this year was to broaden that community and develop external support to continue and operationalize product development.

  19. Exiled by Definition:The Salar of Northwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David SG Goodman

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The reform of state socialism came relatively late to Qinghai Province in the Northwest of the People’s Republic of China. One of Qinghai’s most dynamic groups in the social leadership of reform has been the Salar. The Salar were one of the officially recognized nationalities identified in the People’s Republic of China during the 1950s. A relatively small group of some 100,000 currently live along the upper reaches of the Yellow River, on the borders of Qinghai and Gansu Provinces. The Salar are characterised by their commitment to both Islam and China, and by their belief that they live in permanent exile, though there is considerable uncertainty about their origins. The evidence of recent research in Qinghai suggests the perspective of being Chinese citizens, yet a people in exile, significantly shapes recent Salar social and economic activism.

  20. Activity report of the 40th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition wintering party in 1999-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Miyaoka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The 40th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE-40 wintering party, with 40 members, has successfully conducted the third-year project of the Vth five-year JARE program, over the period from 1st February 1999 to 31st January 2000, at Syowa Station, Antarctica.The framework of the JARE-40 wintering party program was the same as those of JARE-38 and JARE-39, comprising three routine observation programs and project/monitoring research observation programs in upper atmospheric physics, atmospheric sciences and glaciology, geophysics, and biology. In addition to many continuing projects, several new observations were started: 50MHz/112MHz aurora radars and a VLF wave receiver as part of the ionosphere program, aerosol sonde observations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs as part of the meteorological program, HF/MF radars as part of the upper atmospheric physics program, frequent VLBI experiments as part of the geophysics program, and biological field surveys (including two dives, including monitoring of the undersea behavior of Weddell seals using bio-logging devices.In terms of inland field surveys, two parties were organized: fuel transportation and glaciological/meteorological observations along the route to Mizuho Station in August-September and to Dome Fuji/Yamato air-basecamp in November-January. These surveys involved snow sampling, precise GPS positioning, and sub-glacial surveys using three types of ice radar.Logistical activities, conducted in cooperation with the JARE-40 summer party, included the construction of a second summer lodge, the startup of a second 300 kVA generator and co-generator system, the development of a sewage plant, solar power panels, an access road to the A-heliport, and the cleanup of disused buildings. During the wintering period, efforts were directed towards the maintenance of all facilities at Syowa Station, safety management, and practical support for field operations.The Antarctic Environmental