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Sample records for samples utilizing complementary

  1. Complementary and alternative medicine utilization by a sample of infertile couples in Jordan for infertility treatment: clinics-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Shehadeh, Mayadah; Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Kilani, Maria-Vanessa Z

    2013-02-16

    Although there is little information available to quantify the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), growing evidence suggests that CAM prevalence among patients seeking infertility treatment is increasing worldwide. There are many products available on the market and many infertile patients demand information about CAM from their health care providers. This paper investigates the prevalence of CAM use among infertile couples in Jordan. Additionally, trends and factors contributing to CAM use for infertility treatment among these couples have been evaluated. A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information, use of CAM for medical conditions, in general, and types of CAM used for infertility treatment, in specific, was completed by one thousand twenty one infertile patients attending at two types of facilities; in vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers at both public and private hospitals and infertility private clinics. Both types of facilities were distributed in different areas of Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between May and August 2012. Our results show that CAM therapies for infertility treatment were encountered in 44.7% of the study sample. The vast majority of CAM users were females. The most commonly used CAM therapies were herbs and spiritual healing. A clear correlation between the use of CAM for infertility versus the use of CAM for other chronic medical conditions has been found. The prevalence of CAM use for infertility treatment in Jordan is relatively high, particularly among young females, well educated and with a low income, in consistence with the studies reported elsewhere. Herbs and spiritual healing are widely used among patients in adjunct to conventional medical interventions. As CAM use is prevalent among patients, there is a clear need for health providers to become more aware of this phenomenon and for further research in this field.

  2. Efficient retrograde neuronal transduction utilizing self-complementary AAV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Edmund R; Kadoya, Ken; Hirsch, Matthew; Samulski, Richard J; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2008-02-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is frequently used for gene transfer into the central nervous system (CNS). Similar to adenovirus and rabies virus, AAV can be taken up by axons and retrogradely transported, resulting in neuronal gene expression distant from the injection site. We investigated the retrograde transport properties of self-complementary AAV (scAAV) serotypes 1-6 following peripheral injection. Injection of scAAV into either rat extensor carpi muscle or sciatic nerve resulted in detectable retrograde vector transport and reporter gene expression in spinal cord motor neurons (MNs). Serotype 1 resulted in the highest level of retrograde transport, with 4.1 +/- 0.3% of cervical MNs projecting to the extensor carpi transduced following intramuscular injection, and 7.5 +/- 3.1% of lumbar MNs transduced after sciatic nerve injection. In contrast to scAAV1, retrograde transduction with scAAV2 was undetectable following intramuscular injection, and was detected in only 0.81 +/- 0.15% of MNs projecting to the sciatic nerve following intranerve injection. Furthermore, sciatic injection of single-stranded AAV1 required injection of tenfold higher numbers of viral particles for detectable transgene expression compared to scAAV1, and then only 0.91 +/- 0.24% of lumbar MNs were transduced. Our data provide the basis for increased retrograde transduction efficiency using peripheral injections of scAAV1 vectors for therapeutic gene delivery to the spinal cord.

  3. Optimal Design and Purposeful Sampling: Complementary Methodologies for Implementation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Naihua; Bhaumik, Dulal K; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2015-09-01

    Optimal design has been an under-utilized methodology. However, it has significant real-world applications, particularly in mixed methods implementation research. We review the concept and demonstrate how it can be used to assess the sensitivity of design decisions and balance competing needs. For observational studies, this methodology enables selection of the most informative study units. For experimental studies, it entails selecting and assigning study units to intervention conditions in the most informative manner. We blend optimal design methods with purposeful sampling to show how these two concepts balance competing needs when there are multiple study aims, a common situation in implementation research.

  4. Generation of complementary sampled phase-only holograms.

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    Tsang, P W M; Chow, Y T; Poon, T-C

    2016-10-03

    If an image is uniformly down-sampled into a sparse form and converted into a hologram, the phase component alone will be adequate to reconstruct the image. However, the appearance of the reconstructed image is degraded with numerous empty holes. In this paper, we present a low complexity and non-iterative solution to this problem. Briefly, two phase-only holograms are generated for an image, each based on a different down-sampling lattice. Subsequently, the holograms are displayed alternately at high frame rate. The reconstructed images of the 2 holograms will appear to be a single, densely sampled image with enhance visual quality.

  5. Determining sample size for tree utilization surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service has conducted many studies to determine what proportion of the timber harvested in the South is actually utilized. This paper describes the statistical methods used to determine required sample sizes for estimating utilization ratios for a required level of precision. The data used are those for 515 hardwood and 1,557...

  6. Utilization and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, Judith; Oberwittler, Christoph; Jackson, Didi; Berger, Klaus

    2004-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing worldwide, especially by patients with chronic diseases. To date, no data are available about utilization and perceived effectiveness of CAM in patients with dystonia. A questionnaire survey on utilization and costs of CAM was completed by 180 members of the German Dystonia Society, a patient advocate group. In total, 131 dystonia patients (73%) were current or former users of CAM, 55 patients used CAM in addition to botulinum toxin A injections, and 86 patients had experience with three or more CAM methods. The options used most widely were acupuncture (56%), relaxation techniques (44%), homeopathy (27%), and massages (26%). Among users of specific CAM methods, breathing therapy, Feldenkrais, massages, and relaxation techniques were perceived as most effective. On average, patients spent 1,513 Euro on CAM without reimbursement. There was no correlation between costs and perceived effectiveness of different methods. In line with other studies on chronically ill patients, our results show that dystonia patients frequently utilize CAM methods, often in addition to conventional treatment. There is a growing need to evaluate scientifically the effect of CAM methods on symptom severity and quality of life in dystonia, to prevent utilization of costly and ineffective CAM treatments.

  7. A personal ammonia monitor utilizing permeation sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, A.F. (Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Baton Rouge, LA); Reiszner, K.D.; West, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of the time-weighted-average personal exposure to ammonia. Sample collection was achieved by permeation through a silicone membrane into a boric acid solution. The trapped ammonia was then determined spectrophotometrically with Nessler's reagent or potentiometrically with an ion selective electrode. The device may be used for sampling periods as short as 5 minutes and was not affected by changes in the environmental parameters normally encountered at industrial locations. The detection limit is 0.4 ppm for an 8 hr sampling period and the monitor responds linearly to at least 150 ppm. The Nessler's method may be utilized in industrial environments containing monoethanol amine in conjunction with ammonia with no significant interference. Although some interference was observed from ethylenediamine with the Nessler's technique, little interference was found with the potentiometric determination.

  8. Complementary and alternative medical therapy utilization by people with chronic fatiguing illnesses in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ann-Britt

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatiguing illnesses, including chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, pose a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Previous clinical reports addressed the utilization of health care provided to patients with CFS by a variety of practitioners with other than allopathic training, but did not examine the spectrum of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies used. This study was designed to measure CAM therapy use by persons with fatiguing illnesses in the United States population. Methods During a random-digit dialing survey to estimate the prevalence of CFS-like illness in urban and rural populations from different geographic regions of the United States, we queried the utilization of CAM including manipulation or body-based therapies, alternative medical systems, mind-body, biologically-based, and energy modalities. Results Four hundred forty fatigued and 444 non-fatigued persons from 2,728 households completed screening. Fatigued subjects included 53 persons with prolonged fatigue, 338 with chronic fatigue, and 49 with CFS-like illness. Mind-body therapy (primarily personal prayer and prayer by others was the most frequently used CAM across all groups. Among women, there was a significant trend of increasing overall CAM use across all subgroups (p-trend = 0.003. All categories of CAM use were associated with significantly poorer physical health scores, and all but one (alternative medicine systems were associated with significantly poorer mental health scores. People with CFS-like illness were significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (chiropractic and massage than non-fatigued participants (OR = 2.52, CI = 1.32, 4.82. Use of body-based therapies increased significantly in a linear trend across subgroups of non-fatigued, prolonged fatigued, chronic fatigued, and CFS-like subjects (p-trend = 0.002. People with chronic fatigue were also significantly more likely to use body-based therapy (OR = 1.52, CI = 1

  9. Health Care Utilization Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Underweight 191 (57.7) 96 (29.0) 106 (32.0) White et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2011, 11:27 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472...8217 . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ . ’ ’ ’ lf ealJh Care lJ.tilization a~ng Complementary· and Alternative Medicine Vsefs in a Large ·~ . Military Cohort...140 SylveSt~ Road . ... Stm Diego, Caljfomia 92106-3521 . . ~ White et a/. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 201 1, 11:27 http

  10. Bayesian stratified sampling to assess corpus utility

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    Hochberg, J.; Scovel, C.; Thomas, T.; Hall, S.

    1998-12-01

    This paper describes a method for asking statistical questions about a large text corpus. The authors exemplify the method by addressing the question, ``What percentage of Federal Register documents are real documents, of possible interest to a text researcher or analyst?`` They estimate an answer to this question by evaluating 200 documents selected from a corpus of 45,820 Federal Register documents. Bayesian analysis and stratified sampling are used to reduce the sampling uncertainty of the estimate from over 3,100 documents to fewer than 1,000. A possible application of the method is to establish baseline statistics used to estimate recall rates for information retrieval systems.

  11. Health Care Utilization Among Complementary and Alternative Medicine Users in a Large Military Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    acupuncture , biofeedback, chiropractic care, energy healing, folk medicine , hypnosis, and massage therapy were grouped together as practitioner-assisted...Shuval J: Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Israel: 2000 vs . 1993. Isr Med Assoc J 2004, 6(1):3-8. 31. Artus M, Croft P, Lewis M: The use... medicine (CAM) therapies include acupuncture , biofeedback, chiropractic care, energy healing, folk remedies, hypnosis, and massage. *† Self

  12. Core and Complementary Chiropractic: Lowering Barriers to Patient Utilization of Services.

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    Triano, John J; McGregor, Marion

    2016-12-01

    The use of chiropractic services has stalled while interest in accessing manipulation services is rising. The purpose of this paper is to consider this dilemma in the context of the dynamics of professional socialization, surveys of public attitudes, and a potential strategic action. This is a reflection work grounded in the literature on professional socialization and the attitudes held regarding chiropractic in modern society, to include its members, and in original data on training programs. Data were interpreted on the background of the authors' cross-cultural experiences spanning patient care, research, education, and interprofessional collaboration. Recommendation on a strategic action to counter barriers in patient referrals was synthesized. Professional socialization is the process by which society enables professional privilege. Illustration of typical and divergent professional socialization models emerged that explain cognitive dissonance toward the profession. Questions of trust are commensurate with the experiences during patient encounters rather than with a common identity for the profession. Diversity among encounters perpetuates the uncertainty that affects referral sources. Commonality as an anchor for consistent professional identity and socialization through the content of core chiropractic, defined by training and practice, offers a means to offset uncertainty. Complementary chiropractic, analogous to complementary medicine, provides an outlet under professional socialization for the interests to explore additional methods of care. The practice workplace is an effective lever for altering barriers to the use of services. Clarifying rhetoric through conceptualization of core and complementary practices simplifies the socialization dynamic. Further, it takes advantage of accepted cultural semantics in meaningful analogy while continuing to empower practical diversity in care delivery in response to evolving scientific evidence.

  13. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among a sample of Canadian menopausal-aged women.

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    Lunny, Carole A; Fraser, Shawn N

    2010-01-01

    Despite questionable efficacy and safety, many women use a variety of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to relieve menopause symptoms. We examined the determinants and use of CAM therapies among a sample of menopausal-aged women in Canada by using a cross-sectional Web-based survey. Four hundred twenty-three women who were contacted through list serves, e-mail lists, and Internet advertisements provided complete data on demographics, use of CAM, therapies, and menopausal status and symptoms. Ninety-one percent of women reported trying CAM therapies for their symptoms. Women reported using an average of five kinds of CAM therapies. The most common treatments were vitamins (61.5%), relaxation techniques (57.0%), yoga/meditation (37.6%), soy products (37.4%), and prayer (35.7%). The most beneficial CAM therapies reported were prayer/spiritual healing, relaxation techniques, counseling/therapy, and therapeutic touch/Reiki. Demographic factors and menopausal symptoms contributed to 14% of the variance (P menopausal women have high user rates of CAM therapy and show that specific demographic factors and somatic symptomatology relate to use of CAM therapies. Health care providers can benefit from understanding the determinants and use of CAM by women during the menopause transition if they are to help and provide quality care for this population. Copyright 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Quality of Life of Cancer Patients: Turkish Samples.

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    Korkmaz, Medet; Tavsanli, Nurgul Gungor; Ozcelik, Hanife

    2016-01-01

    A large proportion of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to extend their quality of life. The purpose of this study was to determine the level of CAM use by patients undergoing cancer treatment. The study was conducted in Turkey at a large state university hospital and a government hospital between March and December 2013. The research sample consisted of a total of 147 cancer patients undergoing either chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Data collection was performed using a Patient Description Form and the EUROHIS (WHOQOL-8.Tr) quality-of-life scale through face-to-face interviews. The use of CAM, green tea (28.00 ± 4.24), and garlic (29.00 ± 0.00), as well as the use of a combination of plant products such as pomegranate juice, pollen, and herbal tea (31.25 ± 5.96), not feeling the need to inform the physician of the use of CAM, regular use of CAM, finding CAM use effective, and suggesting CAM use to others were found to have a statistically significant relationship to average quality-of-life scores (P cancer treatment.

  15. The Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Endometriosis: A Review of Utilization and Mechanism

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    Sai Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis (EM is one of the common gynecological conditions causing menstrual and pelvic pain and affects 10%–15% of women of reproductive age. In recent years, the complementary and alternative medical (CAM treatment for EM has become popular due to the few adverse reactions reported. The CAM therapy for EM includes several different treatments such as herbs (herbal prescription, extract, and patent, acupuncture, microwave physiotherapy, and Chinese herb medicine enema (CHM enema. These CAM therapies are effective at relieving dysmenorrhoea, shrinking adnexal masses, and promoting pregnancy, with less unpleasant side effects when compared to hormonal and surgical treatments. In this review, we focus on the status quo of CAM on EM and try to identify therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms based on some clinical and experimental studies. We hope to provide some instructive suggestions for clinical treatment and experimental research in the future.

  16. Complementary Actions

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    Luisa eSartori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Complementary colors are color pairs which, when combined in the right proportions, produce white or black. Complementary actions refer here to forms of social interaction wherein individuals adapt their joint actions according to a common aim. Notably, complementary actions are incongruent actions. But being incongruent is not sufficient to be complementary (i.e., to complete the action of another person. Successful complementary interactions are founded on the abilities: (i to simulate another person’s movements, (ii to predict another person’s future action/s, (iii to produce an appropriate incongruent response which differ, while interacting, with observed ones, and (iv to complete the social interaction by integrating the predicted effects of one’s own action with those of another person. This definition clearly alludes to the functional importance of complementary actions in the perception–action cycle and prompts us to scrutinize what is taking place behind the scenes. Preliminary data on this topic have been provided by recent cutting-edge studies utilizing different research methods. This mini-review aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the processes and the specific activations underlying complementary actions.

  17. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) - National Inpatient Sample

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 forward. The National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) is part of a family of databases and software tools developed for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization...

  18. The Utility of IRT in Small-Sample Testing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, Stephen G.

    The utility of modified item response theory (IRT) models in small sample testing applications was studied. The modified IRT models were modifications of the one- and two-parameter logistic models. One-, two-, and three-parameter models were also studied. Test data were from 4 years of a national certification examination for persons desiring…

  19. Complementary analysis of the hard and soft protein corona: sample preparation critically effects corona composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzen, S.; Schoettler, S.; Baier, G.; Rosenauer, C.; Mailaender, V.; Landfester, K.; Mohr, K.

    2015-02-01

    Here we demonstrate how a complementary analysis of nanocapsule-protein interactions with and without application media allows gaining insights into the so called hard and soft protein corona. We have investigated how both human plasma and individual proteins (human serum albumin (HSA), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I)) adsorb and interact with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) nanocapsules possessing different functionalities. To analyse the hard protein corona we used sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and a protein quantitation assay. No significant differences were observed with regards to the hard protein corona. For analysis of the soft protein corona we characterized the nanocapsule-protein interaction with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). DLS and ITC measurements revealed that a high amount of plasma proteins were adsorbed onto the capsules' surface. Although HSA was not detected in the hard protein corona, ITC measurements indicated the adsorption of an HSA amount similar to plasma with a low binding affinity and reaction heat. In contrast, only small amounts of ApoA-I protein adsorb to the capsules with high binding affinities. Through a comparison of these methods we have identified ApoA-I to be a component of the hard protein corona and HSA as a component of the soft corona. We demonstrate a pronounced difference in the protein corona observed depending on the type of characterization technique applied. As the biological identity of a particle is given by the protein corona it is crucial to use complementary characterization techniques to analyse different aspects of the protein corona.Here we demonstrate how a complementary analysis of nanocapsule-protein interactions with and without application media allows gaining insights into the so called hard and soft protein corona. We have investigated how both human plasma and individual proteins (human serum albumin (HSA), apolipoprotein A

  20. Complementary analysis of the hard and soft protein corona: sample preparation critically effects corona composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzen, S; Schoettler, S; Baier, G; Rosenauer, C; Mailaender, V; Landfester, K; Mohr, K

    2015-02-21

    Here we demonstrate how a complementary analysis of nanocapsule-protein interactions with and without application media allows gaining insights into the so called hard and soft protein corona. We have investigated how both human plasma and individual proteins (human serum albumin (HSA), apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I)) adsorb and interact with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) nanocapsules possessing different functionalities. To analyse the hard protein corona we used sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and a protein quantitation assay. No significant differences were observed with regards to the hard protein corona. For analysis of the soft protein corona we characterized the nanocapsule-protein interaction with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). DLS and ITC measurements revealed that a high amount of plasma proteins were adsorbed onto the capsules' surface. Although HSA was not detected in the hard protein corona, ITC measurements indicated the adsorption of an HSA amount similar to plasma with a low binding affinity and reaction heat. In contrast, only small amounts of ApoA-I protein adsorb to the capsules with high binding affinities. Through a comparison of these methods we have identified ApoA-I to be a component of the hard protein corona and HSA as a component of the soft corona. We demonstrate a pronounced difference in the protein corona observed depending on the type of characterization technique applied. As the biological identity of a particle is given by the protein corona it is crucial to use complementary characterization techniques to analyse different aspects of the protein corona.

  1. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Ma Shuangge [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Higgins, Susan A. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut (United States); Weidhaas, Joanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Lloyd, Shane [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Peschel, Richard [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Gaudreau, Bryant [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Rockwell, Sara [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  2. Frequency of complementary and alternative medicine utilization in hypertensive patients attending an urban tertiary care centre in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okubadejo Njideka U

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the frequency and pattern of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in patients with essential hypertension attending a tertiary hypertension clinic. Methods Two hundred and twenty-five consecutive hypertensive patients attending the hypertension clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital over a 3-month period were interviewed. Socio-demographic data, duration of hypertension, clinic attendance, current blood pressure, and compliance to conventional medications was documented. CAM utilization was explored using both structured and open-ended questions. Results There were 90 (40% male and 135 (60% female patients with mean age ± SD overall was 55.1 ± 12.4 years. 88 (39.1% of the respondents used CAM. Herbal products were the most commonly used CAM type. Amongst the CAM users, the most common herbal product used was garlic (69.3%. Others were native herbs (25%, ginger (23.9%, bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina (9.1%, and aloe vera (4.5%. 2.5% used spiritual therapy. There was no difference in the clinical characteristics, socio-economic status, and blood pressure control of CAM users and non-users. Patients who utilized CAM had higher BMI compared with those who did not, but the difference was not statistically significant (mean BMI ± SD of 29.1 ± 5.6 vs 27.1 ± 5.9 kg/m2; P = 0.05. Conclusion A significant proportion of hypertensive patients attending our tertiary facility and receiving conventional treatment also use CAM therapies. Clinicians need to be aware of this practice, understand the rationale for this health-seeking behaviour, proactively enquire about their use, and counsel patients regarding the potential of some of the therapies for adverse reactions and drug interactions.

  3. Efficient free energy calculations by combining two complementary tempering sampling methods

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    Xie, Liangxu; Shen, Lin; Chen, Zhe-Ning; Yang, Mingjun

    2017-01-01

    Although energy barriers can be efficiently crossed in the reaction coordinate (RC) guided sampling, this type of method suffers from identification of the correct RCs or requirements of high dimensionality of the defined RCs for a given system. If only the approximate RCs with significant barriers are used in the simulations, hidden energy barriers with small to medium height would exist in other degrees of freedom (DOFs) relevant to the target process and consequently cause the problem of insufficient sampling. To address the sampling in this so-called hidden barrier situation, here we propose an effective approach to combine temperature accelerated molecular dynamics (TAMD), an efficient RC-guided sampling method, with the integrated tempering sampling (ITS), a generalized ensemble sampling method. In this combined ITS-TAMD method, the sampling along the major RCs with high energy barriers is guided by TAMD and the sampling of the rest of the DOFs with lower but not negligible barriers is enhanced by ITS. The performance of ITS-TAMD to three systems in the processes with hidden barriers has been examined. In comparison to the standalone TAMD or ITS approach, the present hybrid method shows three main improvements. (1) Sampling efficiency can be improved at least five times even if in the presence of hidden energy barriers. (2) The canonical distribution can be more accurately recovered, from which the thermodynamic properties along other collective variables can be computed correctly. (3) The robustness of the selection of major RCs suggests that the dimensionality of necessary RCs can be reduced. Our work shows more potential applications of the ITS-TAMD method as the efficient and powerful tool for the investigation of a broad range of interesting cases.

  4. Beyond simple small-angle X-ray scattering: developments in online complementary techniques and sample environments

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    Wim Bras

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, WAXS are standard tools in materials research. The simultaneous measurement of SAXS and WAXS data in time-resolved studies has gained popularity due to the complementary information obtained. Furthermore, the combination of these data with non X-ray based techniques, via either simultaneous or independent measurements, has advanced understanding of the driving forces that lead to the structures and morphologies of materials, which in turn give rise to their properties. The simultaneous measurement of different data regimes and types, using either X-rays or neutrons, and the desire to control parameters that initiate and control structural changes have led to greater demands on sample environments. Examples of developments in technique combinations and sample environment design are discussed, together with a brief speculation about promising future developments.

  5. Sampling Participants' Experience in Laboratory Experiments: Complementary challenges for more complete data collection

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    Alan eMcAuliffe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Speelman and McGann's (2013 examination of the uncritical way in which the mean is often used in psychological research raises questions both about the average's reliability and its validity. In the present paper, we argue that interrogating the validity of the mean involves, amongst other things, a better understanding of the person's experiences, the meaning of their actions, at the time that the behaviour of interest is carried out. Recently emerging approaches within Psychology and Cognitive Science have argued strongly that experience should play a more central role in our examination of behavioural data, but the relationship between experience and behaviour remains very poorly understood. We outline some of the history of the science on this fraught relationship, as well as arguing that contemporary methods for studying experience fall into one of two categories. Wide approaches tend to incorporate naturalistic behaviour settings, but sacrifice accuracy and reliability in behavioural measurement. Narrow approaches maintain controlled measurement of behaviour, but involve too specific a sampling of experience, which obscures crucial temporal characteristics. We therefore argue for a novel, mid-range sampling technique, that extends Hurlburt's Descriptive Experience Sampling, and adapts it for the controlled setting of the laboratory. This Controlled Descriptive Experience Sampling may be an appropriate tool to help calibrate both the mean and the meaning of an experimental situation with one another.

  6. The perceived and actual diagnostic utility of veterinary cytological samples.

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    Skeldon, N; Dewhurst, E

    2009-04-01

    To establish the proportion of cytology samples sent to a commercial veterinary laboratory that yields diagnostically useful information in the context of current use and perceptions of cytology. Nine hundred and forty-five cytology submissions were retrospectively collected and categorised according to diagnostic utility. A survey into the use and perceptions of cytology was distributed at the British Small Animal Veterinary Association Congress 2008. A specific diagnosis was reached in 23.1 per cent of samples and a cytological diagnosis in 35.3 per cent. 22.4 per cent of samples yielded some useful information, but 19.2 per cent were unacceptable. Seventy-four participants in the survey took an average of 3.9 cytological samples per week, of which they examined 27.0 per cent in-house only, 21.6 per cent in-house before sending to an external laboratory and 51.4 per cent were sent externally without prior examination. "To obtain a definitive diagnosis" was the principal reason cited for performing cytology. Results suggest that cytology is underused and may be applied in an inappropriate context in the UK. It is hoped that illustrating the diagnostic outcome of samples received by a commercial laboratory will encourage increased, appropriate use of cytology.

  7. Complementary data on four methods for sampling free-living ticks in the Brazilian Pantanal.

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    Ramos, Vanessa do Nascimento; Osava, Carolina Fonseca; Piovezan, Ubiratan; Szabó, Matias Pablo Juan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, four methods for sampling free-living ticks that are used in ecological and human tick-bite risk studies were evaluated. Cloth dragging, carbon dioxide traps and visual searches and inspection of plant litter on the ground were used in field and forest areas within the Brazilian Pantanal. Among the three tick species collected, Amblyomma sculptum predominated, followed by Amblyomma parvum and Amblyomma ovale. Dragging, a cheap and simple technique, yielded the highest numbers of ticks, particularly nymphs. The visual search detected a high number of adult ticks and provided information on tick questing height. Even though laborious, plant litter examination showed that large numbers of ticks may use this stratum. Carbon dioxide (CO2) traps are expensive and difficult to handle, but they are highly efficient for adult ticks, especially A. parvum. These data indicate that one method alone is incapable of providing a representative sample of the tick fauna in a particular area and that multiple techniques should be used for tick population studies.

  8. Mars sample return mission architectures utilizing low thrust propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derz, Uwe; Seboldt, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    The Mars sample return mission is a flagship mission within ESA's Aurora program and envisioned to take place in the timeframe of 2020-2025. Previous studies developed a mission architecture consisting of two elements, an orbiter and a lander, each utilizing chemical propulsion and a heavy launcher like Ariane 5 ECA. The lander transports an ascent vehicle to the surface of Mars. The orbiter performs a separate impulsive transfer to Mars, conducts a rendezvous in Mars orbit with the sample container, delivered by the ascent vehicle, and returns the samples back to Earth in a small Earth entry capsule. Because the launch of the heavy orbiter by Ariane 5 ECA makes an Earth swing by mandatory for the trans-Mars injection, its total mission time amounts to about 1460 days. The present study takes a fresh look at the subject and conducts a more general mission and system analysis of the space transportation elements including electric propulsion for the transfer. Therefore, detailed spacecraft models for orbiters, landers and ascent vehicles are developed. Based on that, trajectory calculations and optimizations of interplanetary transfers, Mars entries, descents and landings as well as Mars ascents are carried out. The results of the system analysis identified electric propulsion for the orbiter as most beneficial in terms of launch mass, leading to a reduction of launch vehicle requirements and enabling a launch by a Soyuz-Fregat into GTO. Such a sample return mission could be conducted within 1150-1250 days. Concerning the lander, a separate launch in combination with electric propulsion leads to a significant reduction of launch vehicle requirements, but also requires a large number of engines and correspondingly a large power system. Therefore, a lander performing a separate chemical transfer could possibly be more advantageous. Alternatively, a second possible mission architecture has been developed, requiring only one heavy launch vehicle (e.g., Proton). In that

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography as Complementary Methods for the Analysis of Beer Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Johnson

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis of the organic components in beer has applications to quality control, authenticity and improvements to the flavor characteristics and brewing process. This study aims to show the complementary nature of two instrumental techniques which, in combination, can identify and quantify a number of organic components in a beer sample. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR was used to provide concentrations of 26 different organic compounds including alcohols, organic acids, carbohydrates, and amino acids. Calorie content was also estimated for the samples. NMR data for ethanol concentrations were validated by comparison to a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR method. Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS was used to identify a range of volatile compounds such as alcohols, esters and hop-derived aroma compounds. A simple and inexpensive conversion of a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC FID instrument to allow the use of Solid-Phase Microextraction was found to be useful for the quantification of volatile esters.

  10. Complementary Sample Preparation Strategies for Analysis of Cereal β-Glucan Oxidation Products by UPLC-MS/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Boulos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of cereal (1→3,1→4-β-D-glucan can influence the health promoting and technological properties of this linear, soluble homopolysaccharide by introduction of new functional groups or chain scission. Apart from deliberate oxidative modifications, oxidation of β-glucan can already occur during processing and storage, which is mediated by hydroxyl radicals (HO• formed by the Fenton reaction. We present four complementary sample preparation strategies to investigate oat and barley β-glucan oxidation products by hydrophilic interaction ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS, employing selective enzymatic digestion, graphitized carbon solid phase extraction (SPE, and functional group labeling techniques. The combination of these methods allows for detection of both lytic (C1, C3/4, C5 and non-lytic (C2, C4/3, C6 oxidation products resulting from HO•-attack at different glucose-carbons. By treating oxidized β-glucan with lichenase and β-glucosidase, only oxidized parts of the polymer remained in oligomeric form, which could be separated by SPE from the vast majority of non-oxidized glucose units. This allowed for the detection of oligomers with mid-chain glucuronic acids (C6 and carbonyls, as well as carbonyls at the non-reducing end from lytic C3/C4 oxidation. Neutral reducing ends were detected by reductive amination with anthranilic acid/amide as labeled glucose and cross-ring cleaved units (arabinose, erythrose after enzyme treatment and SPE. New acidic chain termini were observed by carbodiimide-mediated amidation of carboxylic acids as anilides of gluconic, arabinonic, and erythronic acids. Hence, a full characterization of all types of oxidation products was possible by combining complementary sample preparation strategies. Differences in fine structure depending on source (oat vs. barley translates to the ratio of observed oxidized oligomers, with in-depth analysis corroborating a

  11. A form of two-phase sampling utilizing regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael A. Fiery; John R. Brooks

    2007-01-01

    A two-phase sampling technique was introduced and tested on several horizontal point sampling inventories of hardwood tracts located in northern West Virginia and western Maryland. In this sampling procedure species and dbh are recorded for all “in-trees” on all sample points. Sawlog merchantable height was recorded on a subsample of intensively measured (second phase...

  12. A LARGE-SAMPLE SURVEY OF FIRST- AND SECOND-YEAR MEDICAL STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARD COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IN THE CURRICULUM AND IN PRACTICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaterji, Ranjana; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Amri, Hakima; Lumpkin, Michael; Amorosi, Sharon B. W.; Haramati, Aviad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and its place in the medical school curriculum and medical practice among preclinical students at Georgetown University School of Medicine (GUSOM), Washington, DC. Method Two-hundred sixty-six first-year (n=111) and second-year (n=155) medical students rated their attitudes toward CAM and 15 CAM modalities in terms of personal use, inclusion in the curriculum, and use/utility in clinical practice. Results Nearly all (91%) students agreed that “CAM includes ideas and methods from which Western medicine could benefit”; more than 85% agreed that “knowledge about CAM is important to me as a student/future practicing health professional”; and more than 75% felt that CAM should be included in the curriculum. Among all students, the most frequently indicated level of desired training was “sufficient to advise patients about use,” for 11 of the 15 modalities. The greatest level of training was wanted for acupuncture, chiropractic, herbal medicine, and nutritional supplements. The descriptions of CAM in future clinical practice that occurred most frequently were endorsement, referral, or provision of acupuncture, biofeedback, chiropractic, herbal medicine, massage, nutritional supplements, prayer, and meditation. Conclusions Interest in and enthusiasm about CAM modalities was high in this sample; personal experience was much less prevalent. Students were in favor of CAM training in the curriculum to the extent that they could provide advice to patients; the largest proportions of the sample planned to endorse, refer patients for, or provide 8 of the 15 modalities surveyed in their future practice. PMID:17283739

  13. Orthogonal identification of gunshot residue with complementary detection principles of voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy: sample, screen, and confirm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Aoife M; Samek, Izabela A; Sattayasamitsathit, Sirilak; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-19

    Field-deployable voltammetric screening coupled with complementary laboratory-based analysis to confirm the presence of gunshot residue (GSR) from the hands of a subject who has handled, loaded, or discharged a firearm is described. This protocol implements the orthogonal identification of the presence of GSR utilizing square-wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV) as a rapid screening tool along with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to confirm the presence of the characteristic morphology and metal composition of GSR particles. This is achieved through the judicious modification of the working electrode of a carbon screen-printed electrode (CSPE) with carbon tape (used in SEM analysis) to fix and retain a sample. A comparison between a subject who has handled and loaded a firearm and a subject who has had no contact with GSR shows the significant variations in voltammetric signals and the presence or absence of GSR-consistent particles and constituent metals. This initial electrochemical screening has no effect on the integrity of the metallic particles, and SEM/EDX analysis conducted prior to and postvoltammetry show no differences in analytical output. The carbon tape is instrumental in retaining the GSR sample after electrochemical analysis, supported by comparison with orthogonal detection at a bare CSPE. This protocol shows great promise as a two-tier detection system for the presence of GSR from the hands of a subject, whereby initial screening can be conducted rapidly onsite by minimally trained operators; confirmation can follow at the same substrate to substantiate the voltammetric results.

  14. Low Cost Mars Sample Return Utilizing Dragon Lander Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Carol R.

    2014-01-01

    We studied a Mars sample return (MSR) mission that lands a SpaceX Dragon Capsule on Mars carrying sample collection hardware (an arm, drill, or small rover) and a spacecraft stack consisting of a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) and Earth Return Vehicle (ERV) that collectively carry the sample container from Mars back to Earth orbit.

  15. Patterns and predictors of health service utilization in adolescents with pain: comparison between a community and a clinical pain sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliver-Sokol, Marisol; Murray, Caitlin B; Wilson, Anna C; Lewandowski, Amy; Palermo, Tonya M

    2011-07-01

    There is limited research describing the patterns of healthcare utilization in adolescents with chronic pain. This study describes healthcare utilization in a clinical chronic pain sample, and compares the patterns of service use of this group to a community sample with intermittent pain complaints. We also investigated demographic and clinical factors that predicted healthcare visits and medication use in the clinical sample. Data on 117 adolescents (aged 12-18; n = 59 clinical pain sample, n = 58 community) were collected. Caregivers and adolescents reported on sociodemographics, medical visits, current medications, pain, activity limitations, and depression. As hypothesized, the clinical pain sample had higher rates of healthcare consultation on all types of medical visits (general, specialty care, complementary medicine, mental health, OT/PT), and higher medication use compared to the community sample. Regression analyses revealed that higher annual income, greater pain frequency, and higher levels of caregiver-reported activity limitations were associated with a greater number of healthcare visits for the total sample. Within the clinical pain sample, higher pain frequency and greater activity limitations (caregiver report) predicted more specialty care visits. Additionally, higher income and greater levels of depressive symptoms predicted a higher number of prescribed medications. This study contributes to the limited available data on health service and medication use in a clinical chronic pain sample versus a community sample of adolescents. We also identify clinical factors (pain frequency, parent-reported activity limitations, depressive symptoms) and demographic factors (gender, income) associated with healthcare utilization. Copyright © 2011 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Utilizing mobile networks for the detection of clinically relevant interactions between chemotherapy regimens and complementary and alternative medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern; See, Cheng Shang; Kuo, En Yi; Chui, Wai Keung; Chan, Alexandre

    2012-02-01

    Patients with cancer who use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) in conjunction with chemotherapy treatment are at risk of manifesting anticancer drug-CAM interactions (DCIs), which may lead to negative therapeutic outcomes. This article describes a novel iPhone application developed for the Mobile Internet, called OncoRx-MI, which identifies DCIs of single-agent and multiple-agent chemotherapy regimen (CReg) prescriptions. Drug-, CAM-, and DCI-related information was compiled from various hardcopy and softcopy sources, and published literature from PubMed. Overall management plans for the CRegs were then developed. The iPhone Web documents were constructed using Adobe software and programming scripts, and mounted onto a third-party server. DCI searches are based on CReg acronyms, and OncoRx-MI is designed to fit the iPhone screen configuration for improved usability. A small usability study was also carried out and the user feedback presented. OncoRx-MI is able to detect over 2700 interactions between 256 CRegs and 166 CAMs, making up a total of over 4400 DCI pairs. The CAMs are classified into seven categories based on their uses in supportive care, and non-cancer-related CAMs are also included. The majority of the DCIs are pharmacokinetic in nature (79%), involving the induction and inhibition of the cytochrome P450 isozymes and p-glycoprotein. Pharmacodynamic DCIs include hepatotoxicity (39%), altered corticosteroid efficacies (30%), and increased risks of hypoglycemia (4%), hypertensive crisis (2%), bleeding, and serotonin syndrome (1% each). OncoRx-MI is the first mobile application of its kind that allows searching of DCIs for CRegs through 3G networks, and is intended to improve pharmaceutical care of patients with cancer by assisting health care practitioners in managing CReg interactions in their clinical practices.

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicines by a sample of Turkish women for infertility enhancement: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolusari Ali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infertility patients are a vulnerable group that often seeks a non-medical solution for their failure to conceive. World-wide, women use CAM for productive health, but only a limited number of studies report on CAM use to enhance fertility. Little is known about traditional and religious forms of therapies that are used in relation to conventional medicine in Turkey. We investigated the prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM used by infertile Turkish women for fertility enhancement. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information and types of CAM used for fertility enhancement were completed by hundred infertility patients admitted to a primary care family planning centre in Van, Turkey between January and July 2009. Results The vast majority of infertile women had used CAM at least once for infertility. CAM use included religious interventions, herbal products and recommendations of traditional "hodja's" (faith healers. Of these women, 87.8% were abused in the last 12 months, 36.6% felt not being supported by her partner and 80.5% had never spoken with a physician about CAM. Conclusions Infertile Turkish women use complementary medicine frequently for fertility enhancement and are in need of information about CAM. Religious and traditional therapies are used as an adjunct to, rather than a substitute for, conventional medical therapy. Physicians need to approach fertility patients with sensitivity and should be able to council their patients about CAM accordingly.

  18. Utilization patterns of conventional and complementary/alternative treatments in children with autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities in a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Roger S; Krakowiak, Paula; Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hansen, Robin L

    2014-01-01

    To compare the utilization of conventional treatments and utilization of complementary and alternative medicine in preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities (DD). Participants were 578 children who were part of an ongoing population-based, case-control study of 2- to 5-year olds with ASD, DD, and the general population. Parents completed an interview on past and current services. Four hundred fifty-three children with ASD and 125 DD children were included. ASD families received more hours of conventional services compared with DD families (17.8 vs 11; p ASD (39%) versus DD (30%). Hispanic families in both groups used CAM less often than non-Hispanic families. Variables such as level of function, immunization status, and the presence of an identified neurogenetic disorder were not predictive of CAM use. A higher level of parental education was associated with an increased CAM use in ASD and DD. Families who used >20 hours per week of conventional services were more likely to use CAM, including potentially unsafe or disproven CAM. Underimmunized children were marginally more likely to use CAM but not more likely to have received potentially unsafe or disproven CAM. Use of CAM is common in families of young children with neurodevelopmental disorders, and it is predicted by higher parental education and non-Hispanic ethnicity but not developmental characteristics. Further research should address how health care providers can support families in making decisions about CAM use.

  19. Utility of magnetic susceptibility values for the petrographic analysis of weathering crust basement samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Hernández-Ramsay

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article exposes the resolving power of the magnetic susceptibility measurements in basement minerals samples of the lateritic weathering profile as an element of complementary analysis in the petrographic characterization of the rocks, and useful in the mapping of the magnetic heterogeneities of the basement. The comparison of the magnetic susceptibility data with the petrographic data of different samples revealed that even in samples that correspond to homogeneous lithotypes, great heterogeneities and differences can be manifested from the physical-mineralogical point of view. In general, a high concordance was observed between the intensity of the weathering processes in the rock samples, and the values of the magnetic susceptibility of such samples. The results support the possibility of extrapolating the composition information to samples with magnetic susceptibility measurements and without petrographic studies.

  20. Comprehensive workflow for wireline fluid sampling in an unconsolidated formations utilizing new large volume sampling equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvinnsland, S.; Brun, M. [TOTAL EandP Norge (Norway); Achourov, V.; Gisolf, A. [Schlumberger (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Precise and accurate knowledge of fluid properties is essential in unconsolidated formations to the design of production facilities. Wireline formation testers (WFT) have a wide range of applications and the latest WFT can be used to define fluid properties in the wells drilled with oil based mud (OBM) by acquiring PVT and large volume samples. To use these technologies, a comprehensive workflow has to be implemented and the aim of this paper is to present such a workflow. A sampling was conducted in highly unconsolidated sand saturated with biodegradable fluid in the Hild filed in the North Sea. Results showed the use of comprehensive workflow to be successful in obtaining large volume samples with the contamination level below 1%. Oil was precisely characterized thanks to these samples and design updates to the project were made possible. This paper highlighted that the use of the latest WFT technologies can help better characterize fluids in unconsolidated formations and thus optimize production facilities design.

  1. Multicentric study of the effect of pre-analytical variables in the quality of plasma samples stored in biobanks using different complementary proteomic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Jesús; Carneiro, Isabel; Corrales, Fernando; Elortza, Felix; Paradela, Alberto; Del Pino, Manuel Sánchez; Iloro, Ibon; Marcilla, Miguel; Mora, Maria Isabel; Valero, Luz; Ciordia, Sergio; Fernández, Verónica; Fortuño, Maria Antonia; García-Sánchez, Isabel; Martínez, Rosario; Muñoz, Maria Angeles; Rodriguez, Clara; Doménech, Nieves

    2017-01-06

    Analytical proteomics has experienced exponential progress in the last decade and can be expected to lead research studies on diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in the near future. Because the development of this type of analysis requires the use of a large number of human samples with a minimum of quality requirements, our objective was to identify appropriate indicators for quality control of plasma samples stored in biobanks for research in proteomics. To accomplish this, plasma samples from 100 healthy donors were obtained and processed according to the pre-analytical variables of: a) time delay for the first centrifugation of the original blood sample (4 or 24h) and b) number of freeze/thaw cycles (1, 2 or 3) of the processed plasma samples. The analyses of samples were performed by different and complementary methods such as SPE MALDI-TOF, DIGE, shotgun (iTRAQ, nLC MALDI TOF/TOF) and targeted nLC MS/MS proteomic techniques (SRM). In general, because the distribution of proteins in all samples was found to be very similar, the results shown that delayed processing of blood samples and the number of freeze/thaw cycles has little or no effect on the integrity of proteins in the plasma samples. The results of the present work indicate that blood proteins in plasma are broadly insensitive to such preanalytical variables as delayed processing or freeze/thaw cycles when analyzed at the peptide level. Although there are other studies related to protein stability of clinical samples with similar results, what is remarkable about our work is the large number of plasma samples examined and that our analyses assessed protein integrity by combining a wide set of complementary proteomic approaches performed at different proteomic platform participating laboratories that all yielded similar results. We believe our study is the most comprehensive performed to date to determine the changes in proteins induced by delayed sample processing and plasma freeze/thaw cycles

  2. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) - National Inpatient Sample - CVD Indicators

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 forward. The National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) is part of a family of databases and software tools developed for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization...

  3. Deconvolution of mixture spectra and increased throughput of Peptide identification by utilization of intensified complementary ions formed in tandem mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryuchkov, Fedor; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Hansen, Thomas Aarup

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of mass spectrometry based proteomics is to relate with high statistical significance experimentally obtained tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data to peptide sequences from a protein database. Most sequence specific fragment ions in MS/MS spectra are represented by a subset...... of complementary ion pairs. Here, we investigated the reliabilities of complementary ion pairs formed in CAD and CAD/ETD MS/MS and developed a reliability-based approach of intensification of ion signals of complementary pairs prior to database searching. In a large-scale proteomics experiment using high......-resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry, an increase in the number of peptide identifications was obtained relative to the original CAD MS/MS spectra when intensified golden complementary (+18.6%) and CAD complementary pairs (+17.2%) were submitted to the Mascot search engine. This also exceeded the results obtained...

  4. Complementary and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    {Research Paper. ISSN 0189-6016O20Ц6. Afr. J, Traditional,. Complementary and. Alternative Medicines www.africanethnomedicines.net. THE EFFECT OF A LOCAL MINERAL KADOSERO TOWARDS THE ..... Their targets for inhibition include the cytoplasmic membrane, DNA replication, protein synthesis and various.

  5. Determining the general utilization and characteristics of orthopedic complementary and alternative medicine using a self-administered online questionnaire in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Horiguchi, Istuko; Hayasaka, Shinya; Hagiwara, Kayo; Sugawara, Ryo; Inoue, Hirokazu; Takeshita, Katsushi; Marui, Eiji; Kikkawa, Ichiro

    2015-05-01

    Acupuncture and moxibustion, massage, bone-setting, manual therapy, and chiropractic treatments are representative components of orthopedic complementary and alternative medicine (OCAM) in Japan. However, the state of their utilization and characteristics are unclear, and have yet to be thoroughly surveyed. The objective of this study was to survey the utilization and characteristics of OCAM in the general public. In January 2011, we conducted a self-administered online questionnaire survey with 10,400 members of the general public, who were registered as consumer reviewers at the internet survey company. Survey topics were the use of OCAM within one month prior to the survey, the objective of using OCAM, and the presence or absence of consultation with and recommendation or referral by a physician. The subjects were divided into those who used and did not use OCAM as user and non-user groups, respectively, and the age, sex, and prevalence of past treatment for orthopedic diseases at medical institutions were compared between the groups. Data of 3,211 subjects (1,611 males and 1,600 females, mean age: 44.7 years old) were analyzed. Four hundred and thirty-eight subjects (13.6%) used OCAM within one month prior to the survey. The subjects in their forties used OCAM most frequently, followed by those in their twenties. The most frequent objective of OCAM usage was treatment, accounting for 63% (275 subjects) of the subjects. Fifty-three subjects (12.1%) consulted a physician, and 48 (11%) were recommended or referred by a physician. Upon logistic regression analysis, significant differences were detected in age, sex, and prevalence of treatment at a medical institution in the user group. A decreasing trend in the odds ratio correlated with subjects having received previous treatment at a medical institution, female subjects, and subjects of a younger age (p = 0.01; odds ratio = 4.33, 1.43, and 1.01, respectively), and these factors were independent. It was determined

  6. Tick (Ixodes ricinus) abundance and seasonality at recreational sites in the UK: hazards in relation to fine-scale habitat types revealed by complementary sampling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Andrew D M; Taylor, Jennifer L; Randolph, Sarah E

    2011-06-01

    The seasonal risk to humans of picking up Ixodes ricinus ticks in different habitats at 3 recreational sites in the UK was assessed. A comprehensive range of vegetation types was sampled at 3-weekly intervals for 2 years, using standard blanket-dragging complemented by woollen leggings and square 'heel flags'. Ticks were found in all vegetation types sampled, including short grass close to car parks, but highest densities were consistently found in plots with trees present. Blankets picked up the greatest number of ticks, but heel flags provided important complementary counts of the immature stages in bracken plots; they showed clearly that the decline in tick numbers on blankets in early summer was due to the seasonal growth of vegetation that lifted the blanket clear of the typical questing height, but in reality ticks remained abundant through the summer. Leggings picked up only 11% of the total nymphs and 22% of total adults counted, but this still represented a significant hazard to humans. These results should prompt a greater awareness of the fine-scale distribution of this species in relation to human activities that determines the most likely zones of contact between humans and ticks. Risk communication may then be designed accordingly. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Complementary Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Bent

    2009-01-01

    The Danish language debate is dominated by two key concepts: ‘domain loss' and its opposite, ‘parallel languages' (parallelsproglighed). The under­stood reference is to the relationship between Danish and English - i.e. the spread of English at the expense of Danish vs. the coexistence of Danish...... society is everywhere unproblematic. A case in point is Higher Education. I will also argue that the recently proposed solution to ‘domain loss' - Danish and English used ‘in parallel', ‘parallel languages' - because it is unrealistic as well as undesirable as a consistent principle - should be replaced...... by an alternative concept that more adequately describes the realities of what adherents of ‘parallel languages' can hope for. The new concept I have dubbed ‘complementary languages' (komplementær­sproglighed). I will explain this concept in the following and contrast it both with ‘parallel languages...

  8. Validation of two complementary oral-health related quality of life indicators (OIDP and OSS 0-10 in two qualitatively distinct samples of the Spanish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albaladejo A

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral health-related quality of life can be assessed positively, by measuring satisfaction with mouth, or negatively, by measuring oral impact on the performance of daily activities. The study objective was to validate two complementary indicators, i.e., the OIDP (Oral Impacts on Daily Performances and Oral Satisfaction 0–10 Scale (OSS, in two qualitatively different socio-demographic samples of the Spanish adult population, and to analyse the factors affecting both perspectives of well-being. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed, recruiting a Validation Sample from randomly selected Health Centres in Granada (Spain, representing the general population (n = 253, and a Working Sample (n = 561 randomly selected from active Regional Government staff, i.e., representing the more privileged end of the socio-demographic spectrum of this reference population. All participants were examined according to WHO methodology and completed an in-person interview on their oral impacts and oral satisfaction using the OIDP and OSS 0–10 respectively. The reliability and validity of the two indicators were assessed. An alternative method of describing the causes of oral impacts is presented. Results The reliability coefficient (Cronbach's alpha of the OIDP was above the recommended 0.7 threshold in both Validation and Occupational samples (0.79 and 0.71 respectively. Test-retest analysis confirmed the external reliability of the OSS (Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, 0.89; p Conclusion OIDP and OSS are valid and reliable subjective measures of oral impacts and oral satisfaction, respectively, in an adult Spanish population. Exploring simultaneously these issues may provide useful insights into how satisfaction and impact on well-being are constructed.

  9. Utilization of traditional, complementary and alternative medicine and mental health among patients with chronic diseases in primary health care settings in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Ngin, Chanrith; Tuot, Sovannary; Chhoun, Pheak; Fleming, Tyler; Brody, Carinne

    2017-01-01

    Coping with chronic illnesses often involves major lifestyle changes that may lead to poor mental health. Furthermore, in order to treat the chronic conditions, many sufferers in Asia turn to traditional, complementary and alternative medicines (TCAM). This study explores prevalence of TCAM use and factors associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms among patients with chronic diseases in Cambodia. In 2015, this cross-sectional study was conducted with outpatients receiving treatment and care for chronic diseases in two urban and two rural primary health centers. Every eligible patient was randomly selected at the health centers using a systematic sampling procedure. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed by using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to explore factors associated with anxiety and depressive symptoms. The study participants included 1528 patients, of whom 77.2% were female, with a mean age of 46.5 years (SD = 15.3). After adjustment, patients with depressive symptoms remained significantly more likely to be in the age groups between 41 and 60 years old and to be married, separated/divorced or widowed compared to those without depressive symptoms. Regarding the use of TCAM, patients with depressive symptoms remained significantly more likely to report using an herbalist, practicing visualization and praying for own health, but less likely to report using vitamins or supplements in the past 12 months. For quality of life, patients with depressive symptoms remained significantly less likely to agree that they had enough energy for their everyday life and had enough money to meet their daily needs. Similar risk factors were also found to be significantly associated with anxiety symptoms. Cambodian patients with chronic diseases who experienced symptoms of anxiety or depression were more likely to report reduced quality of life, greater chronic disease-related stigma

  10. [Complementary and alternative medicine: use in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Joao Felício Rodrigues; Faria, Anderson Antônio de; Figueiredo, Maria Fernanda Santos

    2009-01-01

    To determine prevalence of utilization and social and economic profile of those using complementary and alternative medicine in the medium sized Brazilian city of Montes Claros, MG. A transversal descriptive study was conducted. The sample of 3090 people was probabilistic, by clusters using the household as the sample unit for interview of both genders, older than 18 years. Data were collected by semi-structured questionnaires. Utilization of complementary and alternative medicine was of 8.9% when only those involving costs such as homeopathy, acupuncture, chiropractics, techniques of relaxation/ meditation and massage are considered and of 70.0%, when all therapies found were included. Prevalent were prayers to God (52.0%), popular medicines (30.9%), physical exercises (25.5%), faith healers (15.0%), popular diets (7.1%), massage (4.9%), relaxation/meditation (2.8%), homeopathy (2.4%), and groups of self-help (1.9%), chiropractics (1.7%), acupuncture (1.5%) and orthomolecular medicine (0.2%). Women, Catholic, married of higher income and education were positively associated with utilization of therapies involving expenses. Complementary and alternative medicine is used by a significant number of those interviewed. Gender, religion, marital status, income and education were positively associated with utilization of complementary and alternative medicine. Access of those with less income and education could increase the utilization of the options that involve expenses.

  11. Complementary treatment of the common cold and flu with medicinal plants--results from two samples of pharmacy customers in Estonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ain Raal

    Full Text Available The aim of the current survey was to investigate the complementary self-treatment of the common cold and flu with medicinal plants among pharmacy customers in Estonia. A multiple-choice questionnaire listing 10 plants and posing questions on the perceived characteristics of cold and flu, the effectiveness of plants, help-seeking behaviour, self-treatment and sources of information, was distributed to a sample of participants in two medium size pharmacies. The participants were pharmacy customers: 150 in Tallinn (mostly Russian speaking and 150 in Kuressaare (mostly Estonian speaking. The mean number of plants used by participants was 4.1. Of the respondents, 69% self-treated the common cold and flu and 28% consulted with a general practitioner. In general, medicinal plants were considered effective in the treatment of the above-mentioned illnesses and 56% of the respondents had used exclusively medicinal plants or their combination with OTC medicines and other means of folk medicine for treatment. The use of medicinal plants increased with age and was more frequent among female than male respondents. Among Estonian-speaking customers lime flowers, blackcurrant and camomile were more frequently used, and among Russian speaking customers raspberry and lemon fruits. Regardless of some statistically significant differences in preferred species among different age, education, sex and nationality groups, the general attitude towards medicinal plants for self-treatment of the common cold and flu in Estonia was very favourable.

  12. Complementary Treatment of the Common Cold and Flu with Medicinal Plants – Results from Two Samples of Pharmacy Customers in Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raal, Ain; Volmer, Daisy; Sõukand, Renata; Hratkevitš, Sofia; Kalle, Raivo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the current survey was to investigate the complementary self-treatment of the common cold and flu with medicinal plants among pharmacy customers in Estonia. A multiple-choice questionnaire listing 10 plants and posing questions on the perceived characteristics of cold and flu, the effectiveness of plants, help-seeking behaviour, self-treatment and sources of information, was distributed to a sample of participants in two medium size pharmacies. The participants were pharmacy customers: 150 in Tallinn (mostly Russian speaking) and 150 in Kuressaare (mostly Estonian speaking). The mean number of plants used by participants was 4.1. Of the respondents, 69% self-treated the common cold and flu and 28% consulted with a general practitioner. In general, medicinal plants were considered effective in the treatment of the above-mentioned illnesses and 56% of the respondents had used exclusively medicinal plants or their combination with OTC medicines and other means of folk medicine for treatment. The use of medicinal plants increased with age and was more frequent among female than male respondents. Among Estonian-speaking customers lime flowers, blackcurrant and camomile were more frequently used, and among Russian speaking customers raspberry and lemon fruits. Regardless of some statistically significant differences in preferred species among different age, education, sex and nationality groups, the general attitude towards medicinal plants for self-treatment of the common cold and flu in Estonia was very favourable. PMID:23484045

  13. Utilization of substrates by bacterial communities (biofilm) as they develop on stored chicken meat samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, D D; Arnold, J W; Chew, V

    1999-12-01

    Understanding and controlling the metabolic processes of microorganisms associated with chicken meat can lead to safer poultry products with a longer shelf life. The objective of the present study was threefold: 1) to determine the feasibility of using 96-well Biolog GN microtiter plates to assess substrate utilization profiles of bacterial communities (biofilm) as they develop on poultry products, 2) to identify substrates metabolized by microbial populations associated with stored chicken meat, and 3) to compare the substrate utilization profiles of biofilm communities as they develop on meat stored at 4 C (refrigeration temperature) for up to 5 d or at 13 C (a temperature common in poultry processing areas) for 2 d. The protocol used herein for preparing inocula for microplates was acceptable for the collection of optical density values (590 nm) in microplate wells as an indicator of microbial substrate utilization over time. Data from treatment of chicken meat samples using this protocol indicate that most of the 95 substrates tested were metabolized by microbial communities present as early as 1 d after storage at 4 or at 13 C. However, the rapidity (incubation time required for initial substrate utilization) and frequency (percentage of plates positive for transformation of an individual substrate) of metabolism of the substrates by the biofilm communities varied from 4 to 164 h of plate incubation and from 17 to 100% of microplates, respectively. At 13 C, polymers were the most rapidly metabolized substrate group, followed by carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, miscellaneous or amino acids, and amides or amines. Initial utilization of these substrate groups at 4 C occurred within a consistently shorter period (24 h of plate incubation). The frequency of metabolism of each individual substrate group varied only 3 to 16% between samples stored at 4 and 13 C. However, a greater difference in frequency of utilization of some individual substrates was noted. Such

  14. Health care utilization in a sample of Canadian lesbian women: predictors of risk and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Sherry; Senn, Charlene Y

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to test an exploratory path model predicting health care utilization by lesbian women. Using structural equation modeling we examined the joint influence of internalized homophobia, feminism, comfort with health care providers (HCPs), education, and disclosure of sexual identity both in one's life and to one's HCP on health care utilization. Surveys were completed by 254 Canadian lesbian women (54% participation rate) recruited through snowball sampling and specialized media. The majority (95%) of women were White, 3% (n = 7) were women of colour, and the remaining six women did not indicate ethnicity. Participants ranged in age from 18 to 67 with a mean age of 38.85 years (SD = 9.12). In the final path model, higher education predicted greater feminism, more disclosure to HCPs, and better utilization of health services. Feminism predicted both decreased levels of internalized homophobia and increased disclosure across relationships. Being more open about one's sexual identity was related to increased disclosure to HCPs, which in turn, led to better health care utilization. Finally, the more comfortable women were with their HCP the more likely they were to seek preventive care. All paths were significant at p < .01. The path model offers insight into potential target areas for intervention with the goal of improving health care utilization in lesbian women.

  15. Role of Breastfeeding and Complementary Food on Hemoglobin and Ferritin Levels in a Cambodian Cross-Sectional Sample of Children Aged 3 to 24 Months.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Reinbott

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency derives from a low intake of dietary iron, poor absorption of iron, and high requirements due to growth as well as blood loss. An estimated number of about 50% of all anemia may be attributed to iron deficiency among young children in Cambodia.A cross-sectional survey was conducted in rural Cambodia in September 2012. Villages in pre-selected communes were randomly chosen using stunting as a primary indicator of nutritional status. In total, 928 randomly selected households with children aged 3-23 months were included. Hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, and retinol binding protein (RBP were assessed from capillary blood samples. In addition, length/height and weight of mothers and children were taken and data on dietary diversity was collected. A child feeding index (CFI was created. Associations between biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and nutritional status or food intake were explored.Anemia prevalence was highest among 6- to 12-months-olds (71%. Ferritin and sTfR inversely correlated and were significantly associated with hemoglobin concentrations. The consumption of animal source foods (ASF significantly impacts on the interaction between ferritin, sTfR and hemoglobin. Concentrations of RBP were significantly higher in children who had received a vitamin A supplement. The CFI was associated with sTfR and hemoglobin. Lower length and weight were associated with lower ferritin levels and showed an indirect effect on hemoglobin through ferritin.Nutrition programs targeting children under 2 years of age need to focus on the preparation of complementary foods with high nutrient density to sustainably prevent micronutrient deficiency and generally improve nutritional status. Future assessments of the micronutrient status should include identification of hemoglobinopathies and parasitic infections to better understand all causes of anemia in Cambodian infants and young children.German Clinical Trials

  16. Role of Breastfeeding and Complementary Food on Hemoglobin and Ferritin Levels in a Cambodian Cross-Sectional Sample of Children Aged 3 to 24 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinbott, Anika; Jordan, Irmgard; Herrmann, Johannes; Kuchenbecker, Judith; Kevanna, Ou; Krawinkel, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency derives from a low intake of dietary iron, poor absorption of iron, and high requirements due to growth as well as blood loss. An estimated number of about 50% of all anemia may be attributed to iron deficiency among young children in Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in rural Cambodia in September 2012. Villages in pre-selected communes were randomly chosen using stunting as a primary indicator of nutritional status. In total, 928 randomly selected households with children aged 3-23 months were included. Hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and retinol binding protein (RBP) were assessed from capillary blood samples. In addition, length/height and weight of mothers and children were taken and data on dietary diversity was collected. A child feeding index (CFI) was created. Associations between biomarkers of iron and vitamin A status and nutritional status or food intake were explored. Anemia prevalence was highest among 6- to 12-months-olds (71%). Ferritin and sTfR inversely correlated and were significantly associated with hemoglobin concentrations. The consumption of animal source foods (ASF) significantly impacts on the interaction between ferritin, sTfR and hemoglobin. Concentrations of RBP were significantly higher in children who had received a vitamin A supplement. The CFI was associated with sTfR and hemoglobin. Lower length and weight were associated with lower ferritin levels and showed an indirect effect on hemoglobin through ferritin. Nutrition programs targeting children under 2 years of age need to focus on the preparation of complementary foods with high nutrient density to sustainably prevent micronutrient deficiency and generally improve nutritional status. Future assessments of the micronutrient status should include identification of hemoglobinopathies and parasitic infections to better understand all causes of anemia in Cambodian infants and young children. German Clinical Trials Register

  17. Clinical utility and performance of sock sampling in weaner pig diarrhoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ken Steen; Okholm, Elisabeth; Johansen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Low pathogen diarrhoea is a group-level diagnosis, characterised by non-haemorrhagic diarrhoea. In the current study, the apparent prevalence of low pathogen diarrhoea outbreaks in Danish herds was investigated along with the clinical utility of a laboratory examination for intestinal disease......, agreement between three consecutive herd examinations from the same herd and agreement between quantitative PCR results from pooled faecal samples and sock samples.Twenty-four veterinarians submitted faecal and sock samples for quantitative PCR testing from outbreaks of diarrhoea in nursery pigs (n=38 herds.......18–0.50) of the herds, changes were related to the diagnostic results from the laboratory examination performed in the study.In 0.16 (95% CL: 0.05–0.36) of the herds, the same infections were demonstrated at all three consecutive examinations. No herds had three consecutive diarrhoea outbreaks classified as low...

  18. Utilization of composite fecal samples for detection of anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Melissa M; Paras, Kelsey L; Howell, Sue B; Kaplan, Ray M

    2017-06-15

    Recent reports indicate that anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle is becoming increasingly prevalent worldwide. Presently, the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) is the only means available for detection of resistance to anthelmintics in cattle herds at the farm level. However, the FECRT is labor and cost intensive, and consequently is only rarely performed on cattle farms unless for research purposes. If costs could be reduced, cattle producers might be more likely to pursue drug resistance testing on their farms. One approach to reducing the cost of the FECRT, is the use of composite fecal samples for performing fecal egg counts (FEC), rather than conducting FEC on fecal samples from 15 to 20 individual animals. In this study FECRT were performed on 14 groups of cattle using both individual and composite FEC methods To measure how well the results of composite sampling reproduce those of individual sampling, Lin's Concordance Correlation Coefficient was utilized to describe both the linear relationship between methods and the slope and y-intercept of the line relating the data sets. There was little difference between the approaches with 98% agreement in mean FEC found between methods Mean FEC based on individual counts ranged between 0 and 670.6 eggs per gram of feces, indicating that the results of this study are applicable to a wide range of FEC levels. Standard error of the mean FEC and range of FEC are reported for each group prior to and following treatment to describe the variability of the data set. There was greater than 95% agreement in drug efficacy between individual and composite sampling methods, demonstrating composite sampling is appropriate to evaluate drug efficacy. Notably, for all groups tested the efficacy calculated by composite sampling was within the 95% confidence interval for efficacy calculated using individual sampling. The use of composite samples was shown to reduce the number of FEC required by 79

  19. Equity in the Utilization of Healthcare Services in India: Evidence from National Sample Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitra Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The pursuit of equity in health and healthcare has been the key feature of health policy in India. However, despite the policy significance, the volume of literature available on this issue is scarce. Therefore, this paper is an attempt to examine the horizontal inequities in healthcare utilization, consisting of outpatient and inpatient care in 15 major states and north-eastern region of India. Methods Cross-sectional data were taken from the National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO 60th round (2004, the survey on ‘morbidity and healthcare’. While outpatient care was assessed using the probability of outpatient visit 15 days prior to the survey date, the indicators of inpatient care utilization were based on the following variables: the probability of hospital admission and length of stay in hospital over a 12-month period. All these measures of healthcare utilization were standardized for need differences and controlled for socio-economic factors. Need standardized concentration indices were used to measure interstate and intrastate income-related inequities in healthcare utilization. Results Absolute inequalities were found between states in the proportion of the population reporting a visit to an outpatient provider, in the range of 4.42% to 21.72%. Similarly, inpatient care varied from 1% to 10%. The magnitude of inequity for both outpatient and inpatient care was pro-rich across rural and urban areas of India and in majority of the states. In fact, in majority of the states, the horizontal inequity across types of curative care was noticeably higher within the rural population than in the urban population. The analysis demonstrated that high per capita government health spending was significantly associated with low inequity in utilization of inpatient care. Conclusion The study concludes that it would be necessary to address the prevailing inequities in healthcare by substantially scaling up the public spending on health

  20. Development and utilization of complementary communication channels for treatment decision making and survivorship issues among cancer patients: The CIS Research Consortium Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Linda; Wen, Kuang Yi; Miller, Suzanne M; Diefenbach, Michael; Stanton, Annette L; Ropka, Mary; Morra, Marion; Raich, Peter C

    2015-11-01

    Cancer patients and survivors are assuming active roles in decision-making and digital patient support tools are widely used to facilitate patient engagement. As part of Cancer Information Service Research Consortium's randomized controlled trials focused on the efficacy of eHealth interventions to promote informed treatment decision-making for newly diagnosed prostate and breast cancer patients, and post-treatment breast cancer, we conducted a rigorous process evaluation to examine the actual use of and perceived benefits of two complementary communication channels -- print and eHealth interventions. The three Virtual Cancer Information Service (V-CIS) interventions were developed through a rigorous developmental process, guided by self-regulatory theory, informed decision-making frameworks, and health communications best practices. Control arm participants received NCI print materials; experimental arm participants received the additional V-CIS patient support tool. Actual usage data from the web-based V-CIS was also obtained and reported. Print materials were highly used by all groups. About 60% of the experimental group reported using the V-CIS. Those who did use the V-CIS rated it highly on improvements in knowledge, patient-provider communication and decision-making. The findings show that how patients actually use eHealth interventions either singularly or within the context of other communication channels is complex. Integrating rigorous best practices and theoretical foundations is essential and multiple communication approaches should be considered to support patient preferences.

  1. Utility of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFI to Detect Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patpong Rongkard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Culture is the gold standard for the detection of environmental B. pseudomallei. In general, soil specimens are cultured in enrichment broth for 2 days, and then the culture broth is streaked on an agar plate and incubated further for 7 days. However, identifying B. pseudomallei on the agar plates among other soil microbes requires expertise and experience. Here, we evaluate a lateral flow immunoassay (LFI developed to detect B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS in clinical samples as a tool to detect B. pseudomallei in environmental samples.First, we determined the limit of detection (LOD of LFI for enrichment broth of the soil specimens. Soil specimens (10 grams/specimen culture negative for B. pseudomallei were spiked with B. pseudomallei ranging from 10 to 105 CFU, and incubated in 10 ml of enrichment broth in air at 40°C. Then, on day 2, 4 and 7 of incubation, 50 μL of the upper layer of the broth were tested on the LFI, and colony counts to determine quantity of B. pseudomallei in the broth were performed. We found that all five soil specimens inoculated at 10 CFU were negative by LFI on day 2, but four of those five specimens were LFI positive on day 7. The LOD of the LFI was estimated to be roughly 3.8x106 CFU/ml, and culture broth on day 7 was selected as the optimal sample for LFI testing. Second, we evaluated the utility of the LFI by testing 105 soil samples from Northeast Thailand. All samples were also tested by standard culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR targeting orf2. Of 105 soil samples, 35 (33% were LFI positive, 25 (24% were culture positive for B. pseudomallei, and 79 (75% were qPCR positive. Of 11 LFI positive but standard culture negative specimens, six were confirmed by having the enrichment broth on day 7 culture positive for B. pseudomallei, and an additional three by qPCR. The LFI had 97% (30/31 sensitivity to detect soil specimens culture positive for B. pseudomallei.The LFI can be used to detect B

  2. Utilization of professional psychological care in a large German sample of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Hermann; Weis, Joachim; Koch, Uwe; Brähler, Elmar; Härter, Martin; Keller, Monika; Schulz, Holger; Wegscheider, Karl; Boehncke, Anna; Hund, Bianca; Reuter, Katrin; Richard, Matthias; Sehner, Susanne; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Mehnert, Anja

    2017-04-01

    Although one-third of cancer patients are perceived to have a need for psychological support based on the percentage of mental disorders, little is known about the actual utilization of psychological care in cancer. We aimed to assess cancer patients' reported use of psychological care and its correlates in a large, representative sample. In a multicenter, cross-sectional study in Germany, 4020 cancer patients (mean age 58 years, 51% women) were evaluated. We obtained self-reports of use of psychotherapy and psychological counseling. We measured distress with the Distress Thermometer, symptoms of depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire, anxiety with the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and social support with the Illness-specific Social Support Scale. In a subsample of 2141, we evaluated the presence of a mental disorder using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. In total, 28.9% (95% confidence interval 27.4%-30.4%) reported having used psychotherapy or psychological counseling or both because of distress due to cancer. Independent correlates of utilization included age (odds ratio [OR] = 0.97 per year], sex (male, OR = 0.55), social support (OR = 0.96), symptoms of depression (OR = 1.04) and anxiety (OR = 1.08), the diagnosis of a mental disorder (OR = 1.68), and a positive attitude toward psychosocial support (OR = 1.27). Less than half of those currently diagnosed with a mental disorder reported having taken up psychological support offers. Special efforts should be made to reach populations that report low utilization of psychological care in spite of having a need for support. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. BLASST: Band Limited Atomic Sampling With Spectral Tuning With Applications to Utility Line Noise Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Kenneth Ray; Hairston, W David; Franaszczuk, Piotr J; Robbins, Kay A

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present and test a new method for the identification and removal of nonstationary utility line noise from biomedical signals. The method, band limited atomic sampling with spectral tuning (BLASST), is an iterative approach that is designed to 1) fit nonstationarities in line noise by searching for best-fit Gabor atoms at predetermined time points, 2) self-modulate its fit by leveraging information from frequencies surrounding the target frequency, and 3) terminate based on a convergence criterion obtained from the same surrounding frequencies. To evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, we generate several simulated and real instances of nonstationary line noise and test BLASST along with alternative filtering approaches. We find that BLASST is capable of fitting line noise well and/or preserving local signal features relative to tested alternative filtering techniques. BLASST may present a useful alternative to bandpass, notch, or other filtering methods when experimentally relevant features have significant power in a spectrum that is contaminated by utility line noise, or when the line noise in question is highly nonstationary. This is of particular significance in electroencephalography experiments, where line noise may be present in the frequency bands of neurological interest and measurements are typically of low enough strength that induced line noise can dominate the recorded signals. In conjunction with this paper, the authors have released a MATLAB toolbox that performs BLASST on real, vector-valued signals (available at https://github.com/VisLab/blasst).

  4. Sex Differences in rt-PA Utilization at Hospitals Treating Stroke: The National Inpatient Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia K. Boehme

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposeSex and race disparities in recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA use have been reported. We sought to explore sex and race differences in the utilization of rt-PA at primary stroke centers (PSCs compared to non-PSCs across the US.MethodsData from the National (Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS 2004–2010 was utilized to assess sex differences in treatment for ischemic stroke in PSCs compared to non-PSCs.ResultsThere were 304,152 hospitalizations with a primary diagnosis of ischemic stroke between 2004 and 2010 in the analysis: 75,160 (24.7% patients were evaluated at a PSC. A little over half of the patients evaluated at PSCs were female (53.8%. A lower proportion of women than men received rt-PA at both PSCs (6.8 vs. 7.5%, p < 0.001 and non-PSCs (2.3 vs. 2.8%, p < 0.001. After adjustment for potential confounders the odds of being treated with rt-PA remained lower for women regardless of presentation to a PSC (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.81–0.94 or non-PSC (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.82–0.94. After stratifying by sex and race, the lowest absolute treatment rates were observed in black women (4.4% at PSC, 1.9% at non-PSC. The odds of treatment, relative to white men, was however lowest for white women (PSC OR = 0.85, 95% CI 0.78–0.93; non-PSC OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.75–0.85. In the multivariable model, sex did not modify the effect of PSC certification on rt-PA utilization (p-value for interaction = 0.58.ConclusionWomen are less likely to receive rt-PA than men at both PSCs and non-PSCs. Absolute treatment rates are lowest in black women, although the relative difference in men and women was greatest for white women.

  5. Complementary and Integrative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medical treatments that are not part of mainstream medicine. When you are using these types of care, it may be called complementary, integrative, or alternative medicine. Complementary medicine is used together with mainstream medical ...

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Parents - or Other Adults Complementary and Alternative Medicine KidsHealth > For Teens > Complementary and Alternative Medicine Print ... replacement. continue How Is CAM Different From Conventional Medicine? Conventional medicine is based on scientific knowledge of ...

  7. Compliments for the complementary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Christine

    1994-07-27

    We read with interest the news item 'Complementary therapy first' (June 15) regarding another centre for complementary therapies and research and would like to draw attention to the services offered at The Royal London Homeopathic Hospital NHS Trust. Based in Great Ormond Street, homeopathy and complementary therapies are and have been available on the NHS for many years.

  8. Diagnostic utility of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised in two samples of survivors of war

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, N.; Ehring, T.; Priebe, S.

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at examining the diagnostic utility of the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) as a screening tool for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in survivors of war. The IES-R was completed by two independent samples that had survived the war in the Balkans: a sample of randomly

  9. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT as a complementary tool in the follow-up of low-grade glioma: diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Rio, Manuel; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Antonio; Llamas-Elvira, Jose M. [Instituto de Investigacion Biosanitaria de Granada, Granada (Spain); University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Granada (Spain); Testart Dardel, Nathalie [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Nuclear Medicine, Granada (Spain); Santiago Chinchilla, Alicia [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Radiology, Granada (Spain); Olivares Granados, Gonzalo [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Neurosurgery, Granada (Spain); Luque Caro, Raquel [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Medical Oncology, Granada (Spain); Zurita Herrera, Mercedes [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, Granada (Spain); Chamorro Santos, Clara E. [University Hospital ' ' Virgen de las Nieves' ' , Department of Pathology, Granada (Spain); Lardelli-Claret, Pablo [Instituto de Investigacion Biosanitaria de Granada, Granada (Spain); Centros de Investigacion Biomedica en Red de Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP), Granada (Spain); University of Granada, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, Granada (Spain)

    2015-05-01

    The follow-up of treated low-grade glioma (LGG) requires the evaluation of subtle clinical changes and MRI results. When the result is inconclusive, additional procedures are required to assist decision-making, such as the use of advanced MRI (aMRI) sequences and nuclear medicine scans (SPECT and PET). The aim of this study was to determine whether incorporating {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT in the follow-up protocol for treated LGG improves diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility. This was a prospective case-series study in patients with treated LGG during standard follow-up with indeterminate clinical and/or radiological findings of tumour activity. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, aMRI, {sup 201}Tl-SPECT and {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT. Images were interpreted by visual evaluation complemented with semiquantitative analysis. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 18 patients were included in this study. The final diagnosis was established by histology (five surgical specimens, one biopsy specimen) or by consensus of the Neuro-Oncology Group (11 patients) after a follow-up of >6 months (mean 14.9 ± 2.72 months). The global diagnostic accuracies were 90.9 % for aMRI (38.8 % inconclusive), 69.2 % for {sup 201}Tl-SPECT (11.1 % inconclusive), and 100 % for {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT. {sup 201}Tl-SPECT led correctly to a change in the initial approach in 38.9 % of patients but might have led to error in 27.8 %. The use of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT alone rather than {sup 201}Tl-SPECT led correctly to a change in the approach suggested by routine follow-up in 72.2 % of patients and endorsed the approach in the remaining 27.8 %. Our results support the need to complement structural MRI with aMRI and nuclear medicine procedures in selected patients. {sup 18}F-Fluorocholine PET/CT can be useful in the individualized management of patients with treated LGG with uncertain clinical and/or radiological evidence of tumour activity. (orig.)

  10. Utilization of industrial enzymes in the evaluation of neutral detergent insoluble fiber content in high-starch samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiany Íris Gomes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It were performed two experiments to evaluate the utilization of industrial enzymes in the evaluation of NDF contents in high-starch materials. In the first experiment, it was verified the accuracy of estimates of neutral detergent fiber (NDF obtained with the utilization of three industrial enzymes (Termamyl 2X, Liquozyme Supra 2.2.X, and Amylase AG 300L at different volumes (50, 100, 250 or 500 mL/ sample. Samples were simulated to contain starch at 0, 100, 300, 500 and 1000 g/kg using purified cellulose and starch (n = 240. In the second experiment, samples of corn grain and sorghum grain were evaluated considering the same enzyme types and volumes used in the first experiment adding aliquots without using enzyme (n = 104. There was no significant bias of NDF recovery for simulated samples containing starch up to 300 g/kg. Considering those samples, none difference among enzymes was observed. It was observed a more intense decrease in NDF content according to each enzyme unit added on corn when compared to sorghum. Considering NDF evaluation in samples with mass of 0.7 to 1.0 g, it can be recommended the utilization of 250 mL the ?-amylases Termamyl and 2X Liquozyme 2.2X with activities of 240 and 300 KNU/g, respectively.

  11. Fruiting body and soil rDNA sampling detects complementary assemblage of Agaricomycotina (Basidiomycota, Fungi) in a hemlock-dominated forest plot in southern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Teresita M; Skillman, Jane E; Moncalvo, Jean-Marc

    2008-07-01

    This is the first study to assess the diversity and community structure of the Agaricomycotina in an ectotrophic forest using above-ground fruiting body surveys as well as soil rDNA sampling. We recovered 132 molecular operational taxonomic units, or 'species', from fruiting bodies and 66 from soil, with little overlap. Fruiting body sampling primarily recovered fungi from the Agaricales, Russulales, Boletales and Cantharellales. Many of these species are ectomycorrhizal and form large fruiting bodies. Soil rDNA sampling recovered fungi from these groups in addition to taxa overlooked during the fruiting body survey from the Atheliales, Trechisporales and Sebacinales. Species from these groups form inconspicuous, resupinate and corticioid fruiting bodies. Soil sampling also detected fungi from the Hysterangiales that form fruiting bodies underground. Generally, fruiting body and soil rDNA samples recover a largely different assemblage of fungi at the species level; however, both methods identify the same dominant fungi at the genus-order level and ectomycorrhizal fungi as the prevailing type. Richness, abundance, and phylogenetic diversity (PD) identify the Agaricales as the dominant fungal group above- and below-ground; however, we find that molecularly highly divergent lineages may account for a greater proportion of total diversity using the PD measure compared with richness and abundance. Unless an exhaustive inventory is required, the rapidity and versatility of DNA-based sampling may be sufficient for a first assessment of the dominant taxonomic and ecological groups of fungi in forest soil.

  12. Exploring the Utility of the NEO-PI-R in a Sample of South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A non-experimental cross-sectional design was used to determine which items of the NEO-PI-R are culturally and linguistically inappropriate. ... A thematic content analysis conducted on the focus group session revealed 6 themes in terms of the utility of the NEO-PI-R, namely, language, culture, psychometric testing, ...

  13. An improved technique for soil solution sampling in the vadose zone utilizing real-time data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, J. H.; Seaman, J. C.; Aburime, S. A.; Harris, J.; Karapatakis, D.

    2005-12-01

    The vadose zone is an area of ongoing concern because of its role in the fate and transport of chemicals resulting from waste disposal and agricultural practices. The degree of contamination and movement of solutes in soil solution are often difficult to assess due to temporal variability in precipitation or irrigation events and spatial variability in soil physical properties. For this reason, modeling groundwater and contaminant flow in unsaturated soil is crucial in determining the extent of the contamination. Unfortunately, manual methods used to sample soil solutions and validate model results are often difficult due to the variable nature of unsaturated soil systems. Manual techniques are traditionally performed without specific knowledge of the conditions in the soil at the time of sampling. This hit or miss approach can lead to missed samples, unsuccessful sampling, and samples that are not representative of the event of interest. In an effort to target specific soil conditions at the point of sampling that are conducive to successful sample acquisition, an automated lysimeter sampling and fraction collector system was developed. We demonstrate an innovative technique coupling real-time data with soil solution sampling methods which will improve the efficiency and accuracy of contaminant sampling in the field. The infrastructure of this system can also be implemented in a laboratory setting which adds to its practicality in model development.

  14. Formulation and utilization of choline based samples for dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Sean; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Hyperpolarization by the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) technique permits the generation of high spin polarization of solution state. However, sample formulation for dissolution-DNP is often difficult, as concentration and viscosity must be optimized to yield a dissolved sample...

  15. Utilization of Tabu search heuristic rules in sampling-based motion planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksar, Weria; Hong, Tang Sai; Sahari, Khairul Salleh Mohamed; Khaksar, Mansoor

    2015-05-01

    Path planning in unknown environments is one of the most challenging research areas in robotics. In this class of path planning, the robot acquires the information from its sensory system. Sampling-based path planning is one of the famous approaches with low memory and computational requirements that has been studied by many researchers during the past few decades. We propose a sampling-based algorithm for path planning in unknown environments using Tabu search. The Tabu search component of the proposed method guides the sampling to find the samples in the most promising areas and makes the sampling procedure more intelligent. The simulation results show the efficient performance of the proposed approach in different types of environments. We also compare the performance of the algorithm with some of the well-known path planning approaches, including Bug1, Bug2, PRM, RRT and the Visibility Graph. The comparison results support the claim of superiority of the proposed algorithm.

  16. Streamline-based purification of bacterial samples from liquefied sputum utilizing microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tian; Shao, Changjun; Li, Lingjun; Wang, Shujing; Ouyang, Qi; Kang, Yu; Luo, Chunxiong

    2017-10-25

    The separation or purification of bacterial samples from a mixed cell suspension is critical in a variety of biomedical applications, such as sputum diagnostics and cell biology studies. We propose a streamline-based microfluidic filtration device for highly efficient purification of bacterial samples from a mixed cell suspension. The device is composed of tens of repeated streamline-based separation units that continuously filter the solution. By injecting a liquid sample such as liquefied human sputum solution through the device, approximately 50% of the injected sample solution can be collected from the filtration collection channels, which filter approximately 99.9% of the mammalian cells but retain approximately 60% to 90% of the bacteria. Different injection rates (0.2 ml h-1 to 30 ml h-1), different sample viscosities, and different initial bacterial densities were tested and confirmed that our separation method was robust. The easy operation, robustness and high efficiency indicate that our method may be useful for the separation or purification of bacterial samples from a mixed cell suspension, such as bacterial samples for sputum diagnostics.

  17. Robotic, MEMS-based Multi Utility Sample Preparation Instrument for ISS Biological Workstation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a multi-functional, automated sample preparation instrument for biological wet-lab workstations on the ISS. The instrument is based on a...

  18. Utilizing the International GeoSample Number Concept during ICDP Expedition COSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conze, Ronald; Lorenz, Henning; Ulbricht, Damian; Gorgas, Thomas; Elger, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    The concept of the International GeoSample Number (IGSN) was introduced to uniquely identify and register geo-related sample material, and make it retrievable via electronic media (e.g., SESAR - http://www.geosamples.org/igsnabout). The general aim of the IGSN concept is to improve accessing stored sample material worldwide, enable the exact identification, its origin and provenance, and also the exact and complete citation of acquired samples throughout the literature. The ICDP expedition COSC (Collisional Orogeny in the Scandinavian Caledonides, http://cosc.icdp-online.org) prompted for the first time in ICDP's history to assign and register IGSNs during an ongoing drilling campaign. ICDP drilling expeditions are using commonly the Drilling Information System DIS (http://doi.org/10.2204/iodp.sd.4.07.2007) for the inventory of recovered sample material. During COSC IGSNs were assigned to every drill hole, core run, core section, and sample taken from core material. The original IGSN specification has been extended to achieve the required uniqueness of IGSNs with our offline-procedure. The ICDP name space indicator and the Expedition ID (5054) are forming an extended prefix (ICDP5054). For every type of sample material, an encoded sequence of characters follows. This sequence is derived from the DIS naming convention which is unique from the beginning. Thereby every ICDP expedition has an unlimited name space for IGSN assignments. This direct derivation of IGSNs from the DIS database context ensures the distinct parent-child hierarchy of the IGSNs among each other. In the case of COSC this method of inventory-keeping of all drill cores was done routinely using the ExpeditionDIS during field work and subsequent sampling party. After completing the field campaign, all sample material was transferred to the "Nationales Bohrkernlager" in Berlin-Spandau, Germany. Corresponding data was subsequently imported into the CurationDIS used at the aforementioned core storage

  19. Decision rules and associated sample size planning for regional approval utilizing multiregional clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Nelson; Nair, Rajesh; Xu, Yunling; Kang, Cailian; Huang, Qin; Li, Ning; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2012-09-01

    Multiregional clinical trials provide the potential to make safe and effective medical products simultaneously available to patients globally. As regulatory decisions are always made in a local context, this poses huge regulatory challenges. In this article we propose two conditional decision rules that can be used for medical product approval by local regulatory agencies based on the results of a multiregional clinical trial. We also illustrate sample size planning for such trials.

  20. Utilization of Capsules for Negative Staining of Viral Samples within Biocontainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Monninger, Mitchell K; Nguessan, Chrystal A; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Rossi, Cynthia A; Olschner, Scott P; Williams, Priscilla L; Goodman, Steven L; Sun, Mei G

    2017-07-19

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to observe the ultrastructure of viruses and other microbial pathogens with nanometer resolution. Most biological materials do not contain dense elements capable of scattering electrons to create an image; therefore, a negative stain, which places dense heavy metal salts around the sample, is required. In order to visualize viruses in suspension under the TEM they must be applied to small grids coated with a transparent surface only nanometers thick. Due to their small size and fragility, these grids are difficult to handle and easily moved by air currents. The thin surface is easily damaged, leaving the sample difficult or impossible to image. Infectious viruses must be handled in a biosafety cabinet (BSC) and some require a biocontainment laboratory environment. Staining viruses in biosafety levels (BSL)-3 and -4 is especially challenging because these environments are more turbulent and technicians are required to wear personal protective equipment (PPE), which decreases dexterity. In this study, we evaluated a new device to assist in negative staining viruses in biocontainment. The device is a capsule that works as a specialized pipette tip. Once grids are loaded into the capsule, the user simply aspirates reagents into the capsule to deliver the virus and stains to the encapsulated grid, thus eliminating user handling of grids. Although this technique was designed specifically for use in BSL-3 or -4 biocontainment, it can ease sample preparation in any lab environment by enabling easy negative staining of virus. This same method can also be applied to prepare negative stained TEM specimens of nanoparticles, macromolecules and similar specimens.

  1. Depression literacy: rates and relation to perceived need and mental health service utilization in a rural American sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Tisha L; Bridges, Ana J

    2011-01-01

    Mental health literacy assists patients to recognize, manage and prevent emotional disorders such as depression. Depression literacy is a specific type that varies among populations; however, there is a paucity of research on the depression literacy of rural Americans. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the depression literacy of a rural American sample, and to examine the relationship of depression literacy with perceived need for and utilization of different types of services for those with emotional problems. Participants were recruited outside grocery stores in rural towns by consenting to be contacted and providing contact information. They were contacted via telephone to complete a survey of 15 min duration. Depression literacy was measured by assessing participants' ability to correctly label a vignette that depicted depressive symptoms. Demographic data, psychiatric symptoms, perceived need for seeking services (primary care, counselor and religious leader), and lifetime utilization of services (medical, specialty mental health and religious leader) for emotional problems were also assessed in the survey. High depression literacy (i.e., able to correctly label the vignette) was found in 53% of the sample. Men had lower depression literacy than women (35% vs 68%) and this effect remained after controlling for demographic and symptom variables. Multivariable regression analyses revealed that, after including demographic and symptoms variables in the regression equation, depression literacy did not significantly predict perceived need for a doctor, counselor, or religious leader, but depression literacy did significantly predicted utilization of a religious leader (but not a doctor or counselor). The rate of depression literacy in this sample was lower than the rates in other samples, especially among men. The disparity in depression literacy among men in this sample is consistent with the literature. Differences in utilization of a religious leader

  2. Hypertension management: Perspectives of complementary and al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information available on the various forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) used in the management of hypertension is inadequate and conflicting. The primary objective of this study was to assess the use of CAM in the management of hypertension by CAM practition-ers. A qualitative study utilizing ...

  3. Homelessness among a nationally representative sample of US veterans: prevalence, service utilization, and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jack; Link, Bruce; Rosenheck, Robert A; Pietrzak, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    To examine the prevalence of lifetime homelessness among veterans and use of Veterans Affairs (VA) homeless services, as well as their association with sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. A nationally representative sample of 1533 US veterans was surveyed July-August 2015. Among all veterans, 8.5 % reported any lifetime homelessness in their adult life, but only 17.2 % of those reported using VA homeless services. Prevalence of homelessness and VA homeless service use did not significantly differ by gender. Being low income, aged 35-44, and having poor mental and physical health were each independently associated with lifetime homelessness. Veterans who were White or lived in rural areas were significantly less likely to have used VA homeless services. Homelessness remains a substantial problem across different generations of veterans. The low reported uptake of VA homeless services suggests there are barriers to care in this population, especially for veterans who live in rural areas. Governmental resources dedicated to veteran homelessness should be supported, and obtaining accurate prevalence estimates are important to tracking progress over time.

  4. Sampling strategy and potential utility of indels for DNA barcoding of closely related plant species: a case study in taxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Provan, Jim; Gao, Lian-Ming; Li, De-Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Although DNA barcoding has become a useful tool for species identification and biodiversity surveys in plant sciences, there remains little consensus concerning appropriate sampling strategies and the treatment of indels. To address these two issues, we sampled 39 populations for nine Taxus species across their entire ranges, with two to three individuals per population randomly sampled. We sequenced one core DNA barcode (matK) and three supplementary regions (trnH-psbA, trnL-trnF and ITS) for all samples to test the effects of sampling design and the utility of indels. Our results suggested that increasing sampling within-population did not change the clustering of individuals, and that meant within-population P-distances were zero for most populations in all regions. Based on the markers tested here, comparison of methods either including or excluding indels indicated that discrimination and nodal support of monophyletic groups were significantly increased when indels were included. Thus we concluded that one individual per population was adequate to represent the within-population variation in these species for DNA barcoding, and that intra-specific sampling was best focused on representing the entire ranges of certain taxa. We also found that indels occurring in the chloroplast trnL-trnF and trnH-psbA regions were informative to differentiate among for closely related taxa barcoding, and we proposed that indel-coding methods should be considered for use in future for closed related plant species DNA barcoding projects on or below generic level.

  5. Utility of manual liquid-based cytology and conventional smears in the evaluation of various fine-needle aspiration samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Arul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liquid-based cytology (LBC preparation is a way to improve and refine the fine-needle aspiration (FNA samples. There are a few studies comparing LBC with conventional smear (CS. Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of manual LBC (MLBC and CS preparations in various FNA samples. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a total of 100 FNA samples from various anatomical sites were evaluated using MLBC and CS preparations. Cellularity, blood, informative background, monolayers, cell architecture, cytoplasmic, and nuclear preservation were compared with MLBC and CS preparations by Wilcoxon signed rank test. P < 0.05 is considered statistically significant. Results: MLBC preparations were superior to CS preparations in view of absence of blood and debris (P = 0.001, presence of monolayers (P < 0.001, and preservation of cytoplasmic (P = 0.001 and nuclear details (P = 0.001. However, no statistically significant differences were found between MLBC and CS preparations with regard to cellularity (P = 0.157, informative background (P = 0.083, and architecture (P = 0.739. Conclusion: MLBC preparations in FNAC are a safe, easy, and less time-consuming procedure, and it may have promising diagnostic value in the evaluation of FNA samples from various anatomical sites. However, the use of both MLBC and CS preparations is recommended to achieve optimal diagnostic yield.

  6. Utilization of breast cancer screening methods in a developing nation: results from a nationally representative sample of Malaysian households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2011-01-01

    As is the case in many developing nations, previous studies of breast cancer screening behavior in Malaysia have used relatively small samples that are not nationally representative, thereby limiting the generalizability of results. Therefore, this study uses nationally representative data from the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 to investigate the role of socio-economic status on breast cancer screening behavior in Malaysia, particularly differences in screening behaviour between ethnic groups. The decisions of 816 women above age 40 in Malaysia to screen for breast cancer using mammography, clinical breast exams (CBE), and breast self-exams (BSE) are modeled using logistic regression. Results indicate that after adjusting for differences in age, education, household income, marital status, and residential location, Malay women are less likely than Chinese and Indian women to utilize mammography, but more likely to perform BSE. Education level and urban residence are positively associated with utilization of each method, but these relationships vary across ethnicity. Higher education levels are strongly related to using each screening method among Chinese women, but have no statistically significant relationship to screening among Malays. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Validation of a web-based questionnaire for pregnant women to assess utilization of internet: survey among an Italian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliquini, R; Saulle, R; Rabacchi, G; Bert, F; Massimi, A; Bulzomì, V; Boccia, A; La Torre, G

    2012-01-01

    Objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of the web-based questionnaire in pregnant women as a tool to examine prevalence, knowledge and attitudes about internet utilization for health-related purposes, in a sample of Italian pregnant women. The questionnaire was composed by 9 sections for a total of 73 items. Reliability analysis was tested and content validity was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha to check internal consistency. Statistical analysis was performed through SPSS 13.0. Questionnaire was administered to 56 pregnant women. The higher value of Cronbach's alpha resulted on 61 items: alpha = 0.786 (n. 73 items: alpha = 0.579). High rate of pregnant women generally utilized internet (87.5%) and the 92.1% confirmed to use internet with the focus to acquire information about pregnancy (p good reliability property in the pilot study. In terms of internal consistency and validity appeared to have a good performance. Given the high prevalence of pregnant women that use internet to search information about their pregnancy status, professional healthcare workers should give advice regarding official websites where they could retrieve safe information and learn knowledge based on scientific evidence.

  8. Utilization of group-based, community acupuncture clinics: a comparative study with a nationally representative sample of acupuncture users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Maria T; Tippens, Kimberly M; Connelly, Erin

    2012-06-01

    Acupuncture utilization in the United States has increased in recent years, but is less common among racial/ethnic minorities and those of low socioeconomic status. Group-based, community acupuncture is a delivery model gaining in popularity around the United States, due in part to low-cost treatments provided on a sliding-fee scale. Affordable, community-based acupuncture may increase access to health care at a time when increasing numbers of people are uninsured. To assess the population using local community acupuncture clinics, sociodemographic factors, health status, and utilization patterns compared to national acupuncture users were examined. Data were employed from (1) a cross-sectional survey of 478 clients of two community acupuncture clinics in Portland, Oregon and (2) a nationally representative sample of acupuncture users from the 2007 National Health Interview Survey. Portland community acupuncture clients were more homogeneous racially, had higher educational attainment, lower household income, and were more likely to receive 10 or more treatments in the past 12 months (odds ratio=5.39, 95% confidence interval=3.54, 8.22), compared to a nationally representative sample of U.S. acupuncture users. Self-reported health status and medical reasons for seeking acupuncture treatment were similar in both groups. Back pain (21%), joint pain (17%), and depression (13%) were the most common conditions for seeking treatment at community acupuncture clinics. Study findings suggest that local community acupuncture clinics reach individuals of a broad socioeconomic spectrum and may allow for increased frequency of treatment. Limited racial diversity among community acupuncture clients may reflect local demographics of Portland. In addition, exposure to and knowledge about acupuncture is likely to vary by race and ethnicity. Future studies should examine access, patient satisfaction, frequency of treatment, and clinical outcomes of group-based models of community

  9. Exploring prenatal outdoor air pollution, birth outcomes and neonatal health care utilization in a nationally representative sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasande, Leonardo; Wong, Kendrew; Roy, Angkana; Savitz, David A.; Thurston, George

    2015-01-01

    The impact of air pollution on fetal growth remains controversial, in part, because studies have been limited to sub-regions of the United States with limited variability. No study has examined air pollution impacts on neonatal health care utilization. We performed descriptive, univariate and multivariable analyses on administrative hospital record data from 222,359 births in the 2000, 2003 and 2006 Kids Inpatient Database linked to air pollution data drawn from the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Aerometric Information Retrieval System. In this study, air pollution exposure during the birth month was estimated based on birth hospital address. Although air pollutants were not individually associated with mean birth weight, a three-pollutant model controlling for hospital characteristics, demographics, and birth month identified 9.3% and 7.2% increases in odds of low birth weight and very low birth weight for each µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (both Ppollutant multivariable model indicated a 0.05 days/p.p.m. NO2 decrease in length of the birth hospitalization (P=0.0061) and a 0.13 days increase/p.p.m. CO (P=0.0416). A $1166 increase in per child costs was estimated for the birth hospitalization per p.p.m. CO (P=0.0002) and $964 per unit increase in O3 (P=0.0448). A reduction from the 75th to the 25th percentile in the highest CO quartile for births predicts annual savings of $134.7 million in direct health care costs. In a national, predominantly urban, sample, air pollutant exposures during the month of birth are associated with increased low birth weight and neonatal health care utilization. Further study of this database, with enhanced control for confounding, improved exposure assessment, examination of exposures across multiple time windows in pregnancy, and in the entire national sample, is supported by these initial investigations. PMID:23340702

  10. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  11. Ibuanyidanda (Complementary Reflection), Communalism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Prof. Asouzu

    Complementary Reflection, Communalism and Theory Formulation in African Philosophy 9. Ibuanyidanda (Complementary ...... Metaphysics,. Phenomenology and African Philosophy. Lagos: FADEC Publishers, pp.337-355. Van Steenberghen, Fernand. 1952. Ontology. Flynn, Martin J. trans. London: Joseph F. Wagner.

  12. Impact of prevalent and incident vertebral fractures on utility: results from a patient-based and a population-based sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoor, van N.; Ewing, S.; O’Neill, T.; Lunt, M.; Smit, J.; Lips, P.

    2007-01-01

    Data are scarce on the impact of vertebral fractures (VFX) on utility. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of prevalent and incident VFX on utility in both a patient-based and population-based sample. Data from the Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation (MORE) study (n = 550

  13. Pain and Complementary Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Amy S; Robertson, T Michelle

    2017-12-01

    Treatment of both acute and chronic pain typically involves a combination of pharmacologic and provider-based interventions, which is effective for some patients but not for others. Use of pain medications, especially repeated and frequent usage, involves the risk of adverse reactions, overuse, and dependency. Complementary and alternative therapies (CAT) offer an alternative or adjunctive method to decrease the pain experience and enhance function and quality of life. Various evidence-based CAT methods have been proved to be effective in the management of both acute and chronic pain. Nurses are well placed to implement various CAT modalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Culture and complementary therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Joan

    2002-11-01

    Complementary therapies are becoming increasingly popular in cultures dominated by biomedicine. Modalities are often extracted from various healing systems and cultural contexts and integrated into health care, expanding the focus from treatment of disease to the promotion of health. The cultural aspects of biomedicine are presented and compared and contrasted with other healing systems. Three healing systems; traditional Chinese medicine, Yoga, with roots in Ayurvedic medicine and Shamanic healing illustrate these fundamental differences in approaches to healing. A reverse example of isolating one healing intervention from biomedicine and interpreting it through other cultural lenses is presented. Implications are drawn for practice and research.

  15. The awareness and utilization levels of bibliotherapy by medical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the findings of a study that examined the awareness and utilization levels of bibliotherapy by medical and library personnel in Yaba Psychiatric Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria. Sample of 100 respondents was randomly selected from the hospital. Three complementary methods were used for collecting primary ...

  16. Sample preconcentration utilizing nanofractures generated by junction gap breakdown assisted by self-assembled monolayer of gold nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ping Jen

    Full Text Available The preconcentration of proteins with low concentrations can be used to increase the sensitivity and accuracy of detection. A nonlinear electrokinetic flow is induced in a nanofluidic channel due to the overlap of electrical double layers, resulting in the fast accumulation of proteins, referred to as the exclusion-enrichment effect. The proposed chip for protein preconcentration was fabricated using simple standard soft lithography with a polydimethylsiloxane replica. This study extends our previous paper, in which gold nanoparticles were manually deposited onto the surface of a protein preconcentrator. In the present work, nanofractures were formed by utilizing the self-assembly of gold-nanoparticle-assisted electric breakdown. This reliable method for nanofracture formation, involving self-assembled monolayers of nanoparticles at the junction gap between microchannels, also decreases the required electric breakdown voltage. The experimental results reveal that a high concentration factor of 1.5×10(4 for a protein sample with an extremely low concentration of 1 nM was achieved in 30 min by using the proposed chip, which is faster than our previously proposed chip at the same conditions. Moreover, an immunoassay of bovine serum albumin (BSA and anti-BSA was carried out to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed chip.

  17. Tuberous Sclerosis Health Care Utilization Based on the National Inpatient Sample Database: A Review of 5655 Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Taylor A; Rodgers, Shaun; Tanweer, Omar; Agarwal, Prateek; Lieber, Bryan A; Agarwal, Nitin; McDowell, Michael; Devinsky, Orrin; Weiner, Howard; Harter, David H

    2016-07-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) has an incidence of 1/6000 in the general population. Overall care may be complex and costly. We examine trends in health care utilization and outcomes of patients with TSC over the last decade. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for inpatient hospitalizations was searched for admission of patients with TSC. During 2000-2010, the NIS recorded 5655 patients with TSC. Most patients were admitted to teaching hospitals (71.7%). Over time, the percentage of craniotomies performed per year remained stable (P = 0.351). Relevant diagnoses included neuro-oncologic disease (5.4%), hydrocephalus (6.5%), and epilepsy (41.2%). Hydrocephalus significantly increased length of stay and hospital charges. A higher percentage of patients who underwent craniotomy had hydrocephalus (29.8% vs. 5.3%; P epilepsy (61.4% vs. 40.1%; P length of stay, increased hospital cost, and increased in-hospital mortality, which can inform strategies to reduce costs and improve care of patients with TSC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Utility of the MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in a sample of Lithuanian male offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurinaitytė, Ilona; Laurinavičius, Alfredas; Ustinavičiūtė, Laura; Wygant, Dustin B; Sellbom, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the construct validity of the Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory [MMPI]-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011) in a correctional setting. More specifically, we examined the associations between MMPI-2-RF scales with external variables relevant for sentence planning as well as the relationship with risk of reconviction assessed with the Offender Assessment System (OASys; Home Office, 2002). A random sample of 228 male offenders from Lithuanian custodial institutions was selected for the study. The results revealed that MMPI-2-RF scale scores differentiated offender groups classified on the basis of external variables, such as history of suicide attempts, violent offending, use of drugs, violence under the influence of alcohol, and early criminal onset, in a manner consistent with conceptual expectations. Moreover, Behavior/Externalizing Dysfunction (BXD), Antisocial Behavior (RC4), Juvenile Conduct Problems (JCP), Substance Abuse (SUB), and Disconstraint-Revised (DISC-r) scale scores evinced correlations with OASys scores that were moderate in magnitude. Results from regression analyses showed that MMPI-2-RF scale scores accounted for approximately 21% of variance of OASys risk of reconviction scores. Overall, the findings provide support for the utility of the MMPI-2-RF in Lithuanian correctional institutions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Nutrient composition of commonly used complementary foods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Studies on the nutrient composition of commonly used complementary foods in North Western Nigeria were carried out using Kaduna, Kebbi and Niger states as case studies. Ready to eat complementary food samples were collected from mothers with children older than 6 months but younger than 24.

  20. Trends in Adult Cancer-Related Emergency Department Utilization: An Analysis of Data From the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Donna R; Gallicchio, Lisa; Brown, Jeremy; Liu, Benmei; Kyriacou, Demetrios N; Shelburne, Nonniekaye

    2017-10-12

    The emergency department (ED) is used to manage cancer-related complications among the 15.5 million people living with cancer in the United States. However, ED utilization patterns by the population of US adults with cancer have not been previously evaluated or described in published literature. To estimate the proportion of US ED visits made by adults with a cancer diagnosis, understand the clinical presentation of adult patients with cancer in the ED, and examine factors related to inpatient admission within this population. Nationally representative data comprised of 7 survey cycles (January 2006-December 2012) from the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample were analyzed. Identification of adult (age ≥18 years) cancer-related visits was based on Clinical Classifications Software diagnoses documented during the ED visit. Weighted frequencies and proportions of ED visits among adult patients with cancer by demographic, geographic, and clinical characteristics were calculated. Weighted multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the associations between inpatient admission and key demographic and clinical variables for adult cancer-related ED visits. Adult cancer-related ED utilization patterns; identification of primary reason for ED visit; patient-related factors associated with inpatient admission from the ED. Among an estimated 696 million weighted adult ED visits from January 2006 to December 2012, 29.5 million (4.2%) were made by a patient with a cancer diagnosis. The most common cancers associated with an ED visit were breast, prostate, and lung cancer, and most common primary reasons for visit were pneumonia (4.5%), nonspecific chest pain (3.7%), and urinary tract infection (3.2%). Adult cancer-related ED visits resulted in inpatient admissions more frequently (59.7%) than non-cancer-related visits (16.3%) (P cancer were the most common cancer diagnoses presenting to the ED. Pneumonia was the most common reason for adult cancer-related ED

  1. Complementary Barrier Infrared Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2009-01-01

    The complementary barrier infrared detector (CBIRD) is designed to eliminate the major dark current sources in the superlattice infrared detector. The concept can also be applied to bulk semiconductor- based infrared detectors. CBIRD uses two different types of specially designed barriers: an electron barrier that blocks electrons but not holes, and a hole barrier that blocks holes but not electrons. The CBIRD structure consists of an n-contact, a hole barrier, an absorber, an electron barrier, and a p-contact. The barriers are placed at the contact-absorber junctions where, in a conventional p-i-n detector structure, there normally are depletion regions that produce generation-recombination (GR) dark currents due to Shockley-Read- Hall (SRH) processes. The wider-bandgap complementary barriers suppress G-R dark current. The barriers also block diffusion dark currents generated in the diffusion wings in the neutral regions. In addition, the wider gap barriers serve to reduce tunneling dark currents. In the case of a superlattice-based absorber, the superlattice itself can be designed to suppress dark currents due to Auger processes. At the same time, the barriers actually help to enhance the collection of photo-generated carriers by deflecting the photo-carriers that are diffusing in the wrong direction (i.e., away from collectors) and redirecting them toward the collecting contacts. The contact layers are made from materials with narrower bandgaps than the barriers. This allows good ohmic contacts to be made, resulting in lower contact resistances. Previously, THALES Research and Technology (France) demonstrated detectors with bulk InAsSb (specifically InAs0.91Sb0.09) absorber lattice-matched to GaSb substrates. The absorber is surrounded by two wider bandgap layers designed to minimize impedance to photocurrent flow. The wide bandgap materials also serve as contacts. The cutoff wavelength of the InAsSb absorber is fixed. CBIRD may be considered as a modified

  2. Complementary spin transistor using a quantum well channel

    OpenAIRE

    Youn Ho Park; Jun Woo Choi; Hyung-jun Kim; Joonyeon Chang; Suk Hee Han; Heon-Jin Choi; Hyun Cheol Koo

    2017-01-01

    In order to utilize the spin field effect transistor in logic applications, the development of two types of complementary transistors, which play roles of the n- and p-type conventional charge transistors, is an essential prerequisite. In this research, we demonstrate complementary spin transistors consisting of two types of devices, namely parallel and antiparallel spin transistors using InAs based quantum well channels and exchange-biased ferromagnetic electrodes. In these spin transistors,...

  3. [Integrating complementary medicines into care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    More and more research is being carried out into complementary medicines. It is no longer possible to say that these treatments have no scientific basis, as for some, their efficacy has been proven by clinical studies. Health services must move beyond ideological arguments and integrate safe and cost-effective complementary medicines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification and utilization of inter-species conserved (ISC probesets on Affymetrix human GeneChip® platforms for the optimization of the assessment of expression patterns in non human primate (NHP samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Alma

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While researchers have utilized versions of the Affymetrix human GeneChip® for the assessment of expression patterns in non human primate (NHP samples, there has been no comprehensive sequence analysis study undertaken to demonstrate that the probe sequences designed to detect human transcripts are reliably hybridizing with their orthologs in NHP. By aligning probe sequences with expressed sequence tags (ESTs in NHP, inter-species conserved (ISC probesets, which have two or more probes complementary to ESTs in NHP, were identified on human GeneChip® platforms. The utility of human GeneChips® for the assessment of NHP expression patterns can be effectively evaluated by analyzing the hybridization behaviour of ISC probesets. Appropriate normalization methods were identified that further improve the reliability of human GeneChips® for interspecies (human vs NHP comparisons. Results ISC probesets in each of the seven Affymetrix GeneChip® platforms (U133Plus2.0, U133A, U133B, U95Av2, U95B, Focus and HuGeneFL were identified for both monkey and chimpanzee. Expression data was generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 12 human and 8 monkey (Indian origin Rhesus macaque samples using the Focus GeneChip®. Analysis of both qualitative detection calls and quantitative signal intensities showed that intra-species reproducibility (human vs. human or monkey vs. monkey was much higher than interspecies reproducibility (human vs. monkey. ISC probesets exhibited higher interspecies reproducibility than the overall expressed probesets. Importantly, appropriate normalization methods could be leveraged to greatly improve interspecies correlations. The correlation coefficients between human (average of 12 samples and monkey (average of 8 Rhesus macaque samples are 0.725, 0.821 and 0.893 for MAS5.0 (Microarray Suite version 5.0, dChip and RMA (Robust Multi-chip Average normalization method, respectively. Conclusion It is

  5. A Note on Complementary Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock Herbal supplements, meditation, chiropractic manipulation, and acupuncture are types of complementary and ... useful to include acupuncture along with standard care. Chiropractic provides some benefit for low back pain, however ...

  6. Fibromyalgia and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Fibromyalgia: In Depth Share: On This Page What’s the ... about the effectiveness of complementary health approaches for fibromyalgia? Although some studies of tai chi , yoga , mindfulness ...

  7. Emerging issues in complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelsen, Kim F.; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence; Bégin, France

    2017-01-01

    The complementary feeding period (6-24 months) is a window of opportunity for preventing stunting, wasting, overweight, and obesity and for improving long-term development and health. Because WHO published its guiding principles for complementary feeding in 2003, new knowledge and evidence have...... addressed these issues. There are several emerging research areas that are likely to provide a better understanding of how complementary feeding influences growth, development, and health. These include the effect of the young child's diet on body composition, gastrointestinal microbiota, and environmental...... enteric dysfunction. However, at present, findings from these research areas are not likely to influence guidelines. Several emerging issues will be relevant to address when complementary feeding guidelines will be updated. With the increasing prevalence of obesity globally, it is important...

  8. Clinical utility and validity of the Functional Disability Inventory (FDI) among a multicenter sample of youth with chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Flowers, Stacy R.; Claar, Robyn Lewis; Guite, Jessica W.; Logan, Deirdre E.; Lynch-Jordan, Anne M; Palermo, Tonya M.; Wilson, Anna C.

    2011-01-01

    The Functional Disability Inventory (FDI) is a well-established and commonly used measure of physical functioning and disability in youth with chronic pain. Further validation of the measure has been called for, in particular, examination of the clinical utility and factor structure of the measure. To address this need, we utilized a large multicenter dataset of pediatric patients with chronic pain who had completed the FDI and other measures assessing pain and emotional functioning. Clinical reference points to allow for interpretation of raw scores were developed to enhance clinical utility of the measure and exploratory factor analysis was performed to examine its factor structure. Participants included 1300 youth ages 8 to 18 years (M=14.2 years; 76% female) with chronic pain. Examination of the distribution of FDI scores and validation with measures of depressive symptoms and pain intensity yielded three distinct categories of disability: No/Minimal Disability, Moderate Disability and Severe Disability. Factor analysis of FDI scores revealed a two-factor solution representing vigorous Physical Activities and non-physically strenuous Daily Activities. The three-level classification system and factor structure were further explored via comparison across the four most commonly encountered pain conditions in clinical settings (head, back, abdominal and widespread pain). Our findings provide important new information regarding the clinical utility and validity of the FDI. This will greatly enhance the interpretability of scores for research and clinical use in a wide range of pediatric pain conditions. In particular these findings will facilitate use of the FDI as an outcome measure in future clinical trials. PMID:21458162

  9. Family strategies for managing childhood cancer: using complementary and alternative medicine in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudimat, Mohammad R; Rozmus, Cathy L; Farhan, Nemah

    2011-03-01

    This paper is a report of a study that examined the use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies among children with cancer in Jordan. Complementary and alternative medicine use by oncology patients has been gaining acceptance in the developed countries and developing countries. Healthcare professionals are becoming increasingly aware that patients use complementary and alternative medicine either covertly or overtly. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used with parents of children with cancer under treatment and follow-up in a paediatric oncology department in Jordan between August 2007 and April 2008. Parents of 69 children with cancer in Jordan were surveyed for their use of complementary and alternative medicine with their children. A total of 65.2% of the sample had used at least one type of complementary and alternative medicine during the course of their child's treatment. The use of biological and nutritional complementary and alternative medicine was 70.5% among the users. Use of body and soul complementary and alternative medicine strategies was reported for 22.2% of the children using complementary and alternative medicine. Twenty per cent of the sample used body movement complementary and alternative medicine for their children. A total of 45.5% of complementary and alternative medicine users perceived benefits in using complementary and alternative medicine for their children with cancer. However, 40% of complementary and alternative medicine users had stopped using complementary and alternative medicine for multiple reasons. Parents used complementary and alternative medicine to support their children's medical treatment and to use all possible methods to cure their children. The reason for parents not using complementary and alternative medicine included not being aware of complementary and alternative medicine. Most of the patients have not discussed the issue of using complementary and alternative medicine with the medical staff.

  10. A cross-sectional study about associations between personality characteristics and mental health service utilization in a Korean national community sample of adults with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Lee, Yeeun; Seong, Su Jeong; Chang, Sung Man; Lee, Jun Young; Hahm, Bong Jin; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2017-05-05

    Personality traits are not only associated with psychiatric symptoms, but also with treatment seeking behavior. Our purpose was to examine the relationship between mental health service utilization and personality characteristics in a nationwide community sample of Korean adults. Of the 6022 subjects aged 18-74 years who participated in the Korean Epidemiologic Catchment Area study, 1544 (25.6%) with a lifetime diagnosis of any DSM-IV psychiatric disorder were analyzed. Diagnostic assessments were based on the Composite International Diagnostic Interview and personality constructs were measured by Big Five Personality Inventory-10. Of the 1544 participants, 275 (17.8%) had used mental health services. Multivariate analyses revealed positive associations between mental health service utilization and both neuroticism and openness, and an inverse association between mental health service utilization and agreeableness. These findings suggest that specific personality traits may have a role in treatment-seeking behaviors for mental health problems independent of the psychiatric disorder.

  11. Osteoarthritis: quality of life, comorbidities, medication and health service utilization assessed in a large sample of primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szecsenyi Joachim

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the gender related impact of osteoarthritis (OA on quality of life (QoL and health service utilization (HSU of primary care patients in Germany. Methods Cross sectional study with 1250 OA patients attending 75 primary care practices from March to May 2005. QoL was assessed using the GERMAN-AIMS2-SF. Data about comorbidities, prescriptions, health service utilization, and physical activity were obtained by questioning patients or from the patients' medical files. Depression was assessed by means of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9. Results 1021 (81.7% questionnaires were returned. 347 (34% patients were male. Impact of OA on QoL was different between gender: women achieved significantly higher scores in the AIMS 2-SF dimensions lower body (p Conclusion The extent to which OA impacts men and women differs in primary care patients. This might have resulted in the revealed differences in the pharmacological treatment and the HSU. Further research is needed to confirm our findings and to assess causality.

  12. Classification of Parkinson's disease utilizing multi-edit nearest-neighbor and ensemble learning algorithms with speech samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He-Hua; Yang, Liuyang; Liu, Yuchuan; Wang, Pin; Yin, Jun; Li, Yongming; Qiu, Mingguo; Zhu, Xueru; Yan, Fang

    2016-11-16

    The use of speech based data in the classification of Parkinson disease (PD) has been shown to provide an effect, non-invasive mode of classification in recent years. Thus, there has been an increased interest in speech pattern analysis methods applicable to Parkinsonism for building predictive tele-diagnosis and tele-monitoring models. One of the obstacles in optimizing classifications is to reduce noise within the collected speech samples, thus ensuring better classification accuracy and stability. While the currently used methods are effect, the ability to invoke instance selection has been seldomly examined. In this study, a PD classification algorithm was proposed and examined that combines a multi-edit-nearest-neighbor (MENN) algorithm and an ensemble learning algorithm. First, the MENN algorithm is applied for selecting optimal training speech samples iteratively, thereby obtaining samples with high separability. Next, an ensemble learning algorithm, random forest (RF) or decorrelated neural network ensembles (DNNE), is used to generate trained samples from the collected training samples. Lastly, the trained ensemble learning algorithms are applied to the test samples for PD classification. This proposed method was examined using a more recently deposited public datasets and compared against other currently used algorithms for validation. Experimental results showed that the proposed algorithm obtained the highest degree of improved classification accuracy (29.44%) compared with the other algorithm that was examined. Furthermore, the MENN algorithm alone was found to improve classification accuracy by as much as 45.72%. Moreover, the proposed algorithm was found to exhibit a higher stability, particularly when combining the MENN and RF algorithms. This study showed that the proposed method could improve PD classification when using speech data and can be applied to future studies seeking to improve PD classification methods.

  13. The Utility of the Structured Interview of Reported Symptoms in a Sample of Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Rebecca A.; Rosenfeld, Barry; Farkas, Melanie R.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges of accurate forensic assessment are aggravated when evaluatees have intellectual disabilities. Few studies have addressed the efficacy of forensic assessment in samples diagnosed with an intellectual disability, and those that have typically focus on measures of cognitive effort rather than on feigned psychiatric symptoms. This…

  14. Utility of solid phase spectrophotometry for the modified determination of trace amounts of cadmium in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Alaa S; Gouda, Ayman A

    2012-05-01

    A modified selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of cadmium which reacts with 1-(2-benzothiazolylazo)-2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid (BTAHNA) to give a deep violet complex with high molar absorptivity (7.05×10(6)Lmol(-1) cm(-1), 3.92×10(7)Lmol(-1)cm(-1), 1.78×10(8)Lmol(-1)cm(-1), and 4.10×10(8)Lmol(-1)cm(-1)), fixed on a Dowex 1-X8 type anion-exchange resin for 10mL, 100mL, 500mL, and 1000mL, respectively. Calibration is linear over the range 0.2-3.5μgL(-1) with RSD of ⩽1.14% (n=10). The detection and quantification limits were calculated. Increasing the sample volume can enhance the sensitivity. The method has been successfully applied for the determination of Cd(II) in food samples, water samples and some salts samples without interfering effect of various cations and anions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Negative thoughts and health: associations among rumination, immunity, and health care utilization in a young and elderly sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung; Hokland, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the present study, it was tested whether rumination-negative, recurrent thoughts-would be associated with immune parameters and health care utilization. Because rumination has been associated with sadness and subjective sleep quality, it was tested whether these factors mediated...... questionnaire measures of rumination, sadness, and subjective sleep quality. Immune measures included leukocyte counts, lymphocyte subsets, natural killer cell activity, and T-cell proliferation. Contacts with primary care physicians were registered for 1 year through central registers. RESULTS: Rumination...... displayed a positive association with total leukocyte count, total lymphocyte count, and number of B cells among the elderly, and this was not mediated by sadness or subjective sleep quality. Rumination was also positively associated with number of telephone consultations during the follow...

  16. Complementary and alternative medical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Steven C

    2008-04-01

    Complementary and alternative medical therapies include herbs, acupuncture, and mind-body therapies. This review highlights the findings of recently published studies of complementary and alternative medical therapies and epilepsy, and provides an update of the US Food and Drug Administration's role in regulating herbal products. Complementary and alternative medical therapies are often tried by patients with epilepsy, frequently without physician knowledge. Many modalities have been evaluated in patients with epilepsy, though methodological issues preclude any firm conclusions of efficacy or safety. Some herbal medicines have been shown experimentally to have mechanisms of action relevant to epilepsy and promising actions in animal models. There is currently a paucity of credible evidence to support the use of complementary and alternative medical therapies in patients with epilepsy. Herbal medicines traditionally used for epilepsy and compounds isolated from them, as well as other herbal medicines and their constituent compounds that have been shown experimentally to have mechanisms of action relevant to epilepsy, should undergo further preclinical evaluation with a view towards clinical development under the new US Food and Drug Administration guidelines. Additional studies of other, nonherbal complementary and alternative medical therapies are also warranted based on anecdotal observations or pilot studies that suggest a favorable risk-benefit ratio.

  17. Complementary therapy use in HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulkins, Andrea; Morse, Janice M; Best, Allan

    2002-01-01

    To examine the social psychological aspects of complementary therapy use in HIV/AIDS health care and to identify what happens in a person's illness management process when incorporated into their care for HIV-related symptoms. Grounded theory research method guided sampling, data collection and analysis with 21 males at various AIDS service organizations. A grounded theory model Finding a Way to Live was developed. Participants experienced a six-stage process whereby the HIV served as a precondition for a profound self-transformation; a commitment to and rediscovery of the meaning of life. Complementary therapies, referred to as 'tools' by the participants, were cited as an integral part of how people living with HIV found wellness within their illness. The type of therapy, meanings attached to them, intention for and frequency of use corresponded to where individuals were in the six-stage process. As participants began to experience personal growth, the nature of the therapies shifted from those being highly tangible and focusing on the physical self to those facilitating inner awareness, such as meditation. The process of integration was a complex, ongoing process wherein complementary therapies were an integral part of facilitating learning, self-discovery and ultimately, healing.

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Diabetes Mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), an emerging aspect of the management of chronic diseases worldwide is not widely studied in Nigerian patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and pattern of CAM utilization in people with DM . METHODS: This was a ...

  19. Phthalocyanine-BODIPY dye: synthesis, characterization, and utilization for pattern recognition of CYFRA 21-1 in whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Yanık, Hülya; Göksel, Meltem; Alexandru, Anghel; Durmuş, Mahmut

    2017-08-29

    Phthalocyanine-BODIPY dye (BODIPY = boron dipyrromethene) was synthesized, fully characterized, and used for molecular recognition of CYFRA 21-1, a lung cancer biomarker, from whole blood samples. Thin films of three magnesium oxides ((MgO) n , where n = 8, 9, or 10)) were deposited on a paper substrate, and they were immersed in a solution of phthalocyanine-BODIPY dye (1.17 × 10(-3) mol/L) for the design of stochastic sensors. Limits of determination of picograms per milliliter magnitude order were recorded for the proposed stochastic sensors. CYFRA 21-1 was reliably identified and determined with recoveries higher than 95% and RSD lower than 1% in whole blood samples.

  20. Stratigraphy of a proposed wind farm site southeast of Block Island: Utilization of borehole samples, downhole logging, and seismic profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Dane P. H.

    Seismic stratigraphy, sedimentology, lithostratigraphy, downhole geophysical logging, mineralogy, and palynology were used to study and interpret the upper 70 meters of the inner continental shelf sediments within a proposed wind farm site located approximately two to three nautical miles to the southeast of Block Island, Rhode Island. Core samples and downhole logging collected from borings drilled for geotechnical purposes at proposed wind turbine sites along with seismic surveys in the surrounding area provide the data for this study. Cretaceous coastal plain sediments that consist of non-marine to marine sand, silt, and clay are found overlying bedrock at a contact depth beyond the sampling depth of this study. The upper Cretaceous sediments sampled in borings are correlated with the Magothy/Matawan formations described regionally from New Jersey to Nantucket. An unconformity formed through sub-aerial, fluvial, marine, and glacial erosion marks the upper strata of the Cretaceous sediments separating them from the overlying deposits. The majority of Quaternary deposits overlying the unconformity represent the advance, pulsing, and retreat of the Laurentide ice sheet that reached its southern terminus in the area of Block Island approximately 25,000 to 21,000 years before present. The sequence consists of a basal glacial till overlain by sediments deposited by meltwater environments ranging from deltaic to proglacial lakefloor. A late Pleistocene to early Holocene unconformity marks the top of the glacial sequence and was formed after glacial retreat through fluvial and subaerial erosion/deposition. Overlying the glacial sequence are sediments deposited during the late Pleistocene and Holocene consisting of interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Sampling of these sediments was limited and surficial reflectors in seismic profiles were masked due to a hard bottom return. However, two depositional periods are interpreted as representing fluvial and estuarine

  1. An evaluation of service utilization among male to female transgender youth: qualitative study of a clinic-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, Heather L; Belzer, Marvin; Forbes, Catherine; Wilson, Erin C

    2007-01-01

    This qualitative study examined experiences with health and social service institutions and experiences related to education, employment, and other social networks among 18 ethnically diverse, male to female (MTF) transgender youth aged 16 to 24 years. Participants were recruited from a youth health clinic where they were receiving services for their transgender/transsexual identity. In-depth, semi-structured interviews explored youths' patterns of service utilization, reasons for seeking care, beliefs about the usefulness of services received, experiences with service providers, barriers to care, and suggestions for improving services tailored to them. Similar to other studies with this population, participants described a multitude of health and social risk experiences as well as complex needs related to healthcare, education, employment, housing, personal relationships, and safety. Results suggest a mixed pattern of both positive and negative experiences within the medical, social and mental health services arenas. To improve support for transgender youth and assist in their positive development, it is essential to improve and expand the availability of culturally competent and effective services for this population.

  2. Preparation of viral samples within biocontainment for ultrastructural analysis: Utilization of an innovative processing capsule for negative staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monninger, Mitchell K; Nguessan, Chrystal A; Blancett, Candace D; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Rossi, Cynthia A; Olschner, Scott P; Williams, Priscilla L; Goodman, Steven L; Sun, Mei G

    2016-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy can be used to observe the ultrastructure of viruses and other microbial pathogens with nanometer resolution. In a transmission electron microscope (TEM), the image is created by passing an electron beam through a specimen with contrast generated by electron scattering from dense elements in the specimen. Viruses do not normally contain dense elements, so a negative stain that places dense heavy metal salts around the sample is added to create a dark border. To prepare a virus sample for a negative stain transmission electron microscopy, a virus suspension is applied to a TEM grid specimen support, which is a 3mm diameter fragile specimen screen coated with a few nanometers of plastic film. Then, deionized (dI) water rinses and a negative stain solution are applied to the grid. All infectious viruses must be handled in a biosafety cabinet (BSC) and many require a biocontainment laboratory environment. Staining viruses in biosafety levels (BSL) 3 and 4 is especially challenging because the support grids are small, fragile, and easily moved by air currents. In this study we evaluated a new device for negative staining viruses called mPrep/g capsule. It is a capsule that holds up to two TEM grids during all processing steps and for storage after staining is complete. This study reports that the mPrep/g capsule method is valid and effective to negative stain virus specimens, especially in high containment laboratory environments. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors influencing the intention to utilize out-of-pocket health checkup services: A sample of citizens from 12 townships of Taichung County in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Chiu, Yen-Lin; Liao, Hui-Ling; Chen, Jin-Tang; Lee, Fu-Chun

    2010-05-01

    Taiwan started its National Health Insurance (NHI) system in 1995. However, until now, most cancer screening tests and preventive care have been out-of-pocket (OOP) medical items excluded from the coverage of NHI. The aim of this study was to explore the factors influencing an individual's intention to utilize OOP health checkups. A cross-sectional research method was adopted in this study. Based on the theory of planned behavior, a questionnaire was developed and used to survey purposively sampled residents (n = 940) from 12 randomly selected townships in Taichung County, Taiwan, from August to September 2006. Descriptive statics and linear regression were conducted to analyze the collected data. Our results showed that result evaluation (beta = 0.092), behavioral beliefs (beta = 0.088), behavioral norms of people with experience in utilizing OOP health checkups (beta = 0.116), perceived convenience (beta = 0.273), and worry about illness and perceived health (beta = 0.110) were important factors influencing the intention to utilize OOP health checkups. Age, education and acceptable health checkup charges were also related. Reinforcing disease- and health checkup-related knowledge may positively influence an individual's intention to utilize OOP health checkups. In addition, improving perceived convenience and reducing disease-screening barriers can intensify the individual's intention to use OOP health checkups. The influence of age, education level and OOP checkup charges should also be taken into consideration when related policies are formulated. Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Utilizing the partitioning properties of silicone for the passive sampling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in indoor air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Odsbjerg, Lisbeth; Langeland, Majbrith

    2016-01-01

    followed first order kinetics and confirmed air-side rate-limited mass transfer. Logarithmic elimination rate constants decreased linearly with the logKOA values of the PCB congeners, but varied in a non-linear way with air velocity. Linear uptake of PCBs was found for silicone disks (0.5 mm thickness......) in a petri dish, while PCBs reached equilibrium in silicone-coated paper sheets (0.001 mm silicone on each side) exposed to indoor air for 1–2 weeks. The ratios of equilibrium concentrations in silicone and conventionally measured air concentrations were roughly comparable with silicone-air partition...... suitable, non-hazardous PRCs. Equilibrium sampling indicated promising alternatives....

  5. BASED COMPLEMENTARY FOODS USING GERMINAT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-08-08

    Aug 8, 2010 ... Sensory evaluation. Gruels of the five formulated complementary foods were prepared by mixing 15 g of sorghum flour with 100 ml water and cooked for 25 minutes at 92. 0. C. Panelists were ... instructed to rank the gruels on the basis of appearance (color), taste, odor and texture. (mouth feel) using a nine ...

  6. Industrial Evolution Through Complementary Convergence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev Christensen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The article addresses the dynamics through which product markets become derailed from early product life cycle (PLC)-tracks and engaged in complementary convergence with other product markets or industries. We compare and contrast the theories that can explain, respectively, the PLC...

  7. A needle extraction utilizing a molecularly imprinted-sol-gel xerogel for on-line microextraction of the lung cancer biomarker bilirubin from plasma and urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moein, Mohammad Mahdi; Jabbar, Dunia; Colmsjö, Anders; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2014-10-31

    In the present work, a needle trap utilizing a molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel was prepared for the on-line microextraction of bilirubin from plasma and urine samples. Each prepared needle could be used for approximately one hundred extractions before it was discarded. Imprinted and non-imprinted sol-gel xerogel were applied for the extraction of bilirubin from plasma and urine samples. The produced molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel polymer showed high binding capacity and fast adsorption/desorption kinetics for bilirubin in plasma and urine samples. The adsorption capacity of molecularly imprinted sol-gel xerogel polymer was approximately 60% higher than that of non-imprinted polymer. The effect of the conditioning, washing and elution solvents, pH, extraction time, adsorption capacity and imprinting factor were investigated. The limit of detection and the lower limit of quantification were set to 1.6 and 5nmolL(-1), respectively using plasma or urine samples. The standard calibration curves were obtained within the concentration range of 5-1000nmolL(-1) in both plasma and urine samples. The coefficients of determination values (R(2)) were ≥0.998 for all runs. The extraction recovery was approximately 80% for BR in the human plasma and urine samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Rapid determination of rat plasma uridine levels by HPLC-ESI-MS utilizing the Captiva plates for sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marta G; Palandra, Joe; Shobe, Eric M

    2003-06-01

    A rapid, accurate and precise HPLC-ESI-MS method for the determination of rat plasma uridine concentrations was developed and is described here. Sample preparation involves methanol precipitation of plasma proteins in a 96-well Captiva protein precipitation filter plate. A clear extract is drawn through the filter plate with vacuum, followed by evaporation of the extract and subsequent reconstitution prior to chromatography on a reversed-phase column with an aqueous mobile phase [0.1% (v/v) glacial acetic acid]. Detection was accomplished by positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A calibration curve ranging in concentration from 0.78 to 25 microM was constructed by best-fit, 1/x weighting linear regression analysis of the calibration standard concentrations vs peak height ratios of analyte with internal standard. The correlation coefficient was >0.995. The overall assay accuracy as shown by the back-calculated concentrations of the calibration curve ranged from 96.6 to 103% with RSD ranging from 4.5 to 20%. While this assay method was developed for the determination of uridine in rat plasma, it could be readily adapted for determination of uridine in plasma from other species, such as human. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Methylene chloride intoxication in a furniture refinisher. A comparison of exposure estimates utilizing workplace air sampling and blood carboxyhemoglobin measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shusterman, D; Quinlan, P; Lowengart, R; Cone, J

    1990-05-01

    A 35-year-old furniture refinisher came to the occupational medicine clinic with complaints of upper respiratory irritation, fatigue, and lightheadedness occurring on a daily basis after using a methylene chloride-containing paint stripper. Determinations of blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) on three occasions showed an apparently linear elevation of COHb as a function of hours worked on the day of sampling. COHb levels predicted from spot industrial hygiene measurements were in close concordance with those observed in the patient, indicating the potential usefulness of COHb monitoring in estimating airborne exposure levels. Methylene chloride (or dichloromethane) is an organic solvent that has found wide use as a degreaser, paint remover, aerosol propellant, and a blowing agent for polyurethane foams, and as a solvent in food processing, photographic film production, and plastics manufacturing. Discovery of its unusual metabolic fate--conversion to carbon monoxide in vivo--has earned the compound a special place in the solvent toxicology literature. Demonstration of oncogenicity in experimental animals has occasioned a reconsideration of exposure limits, with emphasis upon stricter controls. In some workplaces, conditions prevail in which controls are inadequate to prevent even acute toxicity, much less long-term exposure risks.

  10. Clinical utility of subtyping binge eating disorder by history of anorexia or bulimia nervosa in a treatment sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzinger, Linsey M; Mitchell, James E; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2015-09-01

    This study examined whether having a history of anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) is associated with response to treatment in adults with binge eating disorder (BED). Data from 189 adults diagnosed with BED who were randomly assigned to one of three group cognitive-behavioral (CBT) treatments were analyzed to compare those with and without a history of AN/BN. A total of 16% of the sample had a history of AN/BN. The BED subgroup with a history of AN/BN presented with higher rates of mood disorders and greater eating-related symptom severity at baseline. Participants with a history of AN/BN also had higher global eating disorder (ED) symptoms at end of treatment (EOT), and more frequent objective binge-eating episodes at EOT and 12-month follow-up. These findings suggest that in adults with BED, a history of AN/BN is predictive of greater eating-related symptom severity following group-based CBT and poorer short- and long-term binge-eating outcomes. These findings suggest that considering ED history in the treatment of adults with BED may be clinically useful. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. CO2 utilization via a novel anaerobic bioprocess configuration with simulated gas mixture and real stack gas samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daglioglu, S Tugce; Karabey, Burcin; Ozdemir, Guven; Azbar, Nuri

    2017-11-28

    CO2, which is considered to be one of the major causes of climate change, has reached to critical levels in the atmosphere due to tremendous consumption of fossil fuels all over the world. In this study, anaerobic bioconversion of CO2 into bio-methane using a novel bioprocess configuration (HYBRID bioreactor) was studied under mesophilic conditions. Varying ratios of H2/CO2 gas mixture and volumetric feeding rates were investigated and no additional organic matter and trace element were needed throughout the study. The maximum methane production of 19 m3 CH4/m3reactor/d was achieved at a H2/CO2 ratio of 4:1 and feeding rate of 24 m3 gas/m3reactor/d. It was determined that H2 conversion rate is about 96%. For demonstration purpose, real stack gas sample from a petrochemical industry was also tested under optimized operational conditions. No inhibitory effect from stack gas mixture was observed. This study provided an environmentally friendly and sustainable solution for industries such as petrochemical industry in order to produce extra energy while capturing their waste CO2. Thereby, a sustainable and environmentally friendly model solution was presented for industries with high CO2 emissions. COV: coefficient of variation; Gt: gigatone; IEA: International Energy Agency; IPCC: International Panel on Climate Change; MBBR: moving bed biofilm reactor; MJ: Megajoule; UASB: upflow anaerobic sludge blanket; VFR: volumetric feeding rate.

  12. Rapid detection and typing of live bacteria from human joint fluid samples by utilizing an integrated microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chih-Lin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Mel S; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-04-15

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most dreading complications that hinder the merits of an arthroplasty. A prerequisite for treatment of the above procedure is rapid detection of live bacteria to prevent its recurrence and proper choice of antibiotics. Conventional culture methods are time-consuming and associated with a high false negative rate. Amplification of bacterial genetic materials requires a tedious process but is associated with a high false positive rate. An integrated microfluidic system capable of molecular diagnosis for detecting live bacteria was reported in our previous work. However, the system could not provide detailed information about infectious bacteria for the subsequent antibiotic choices. Furthermore, it took at least 55min to finish the entire process. In this work, a microfluidic platform using ethidium monoazide (EMA) which can only penetrate into dead bacteria is presented for live bacteria detection and typing within a short period of time (30min for the detection of live bacteria and another 40min for the typing of bacteria strains). We tested the proposed system by using human joint fluid samples and found its limit of detection for bacterial detection equal to 10(2)CFU (colony formation unit) for live bacteria detection with gold nanoparticle probes and 10(2)-10(4)CFU for typing bacteria by an on-chip polymerase chain reaction. The whole procedure of the integrated microfluidic system is automated with little human intervention. Moreover, this is the first time that sequential live bacteria detection and typing are demonstrated on the same microfluidic platform. Based on the promising results, the proposed system may become in the near future an auxiliary tool for immediate medical decision and choice of antibiotics in routine arthroplasties or PJI's. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Complementary spin transistor using a quantum well channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youn Ho; Choi, Jun Woo; Kim, Hyung-jun; Chang, Joonyeon; Han, Suk Hee; Choi, Heon-Jin; Koo, Hyun Cheol

    2017-01-01

    In order to utilize the spin field effect transistor in logic applications, the development of two types of complementary transistors, which play roles of the n- and p-type conventional charge transistors, is an essential prerequisite. In this research, we demonstrate complementary spin transistors consisting of two types of devices, namely parallel and antiparallel spin transistors using InAs based quantum well channels and exchange-biased ferromagnetic electrodes. In these spin transistors, the magnetization directions of the source and drain electrodes are parallel or antiparallel, respectively, depending on the exchange bias field direction. Using this scheme, we also realize a complementary logic operation purely with spin transistors controlled by the gate voltage, without any additional n- or p-channel transistor. PMID:28425459

  14. Complementary spin transistor using a quantum well channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youn Ho; Choi, Jun Woo; Kim, Hyung-Jun; Chang, Joonyeon; Han, Suk Hee; Choi, Heon-Jin; Koo, Hyun Cheol

    2017-04-20

    In order to utilize the spin field effect transistor in logic applications, the development of two types of complementary transistors, which play roles of the n- and p-type conventional charge transistors, is an essential prerequisite. In this research, we demonstrate complementary spin transistors consisting of two types of devices, namely parallel and antiparallel spin transistors using InAs based quantum well channels and exchange-biased ferromagnetic electrodes. In these spin transistors, the magnetization directions of the source and drain electrodes are parallel or antiparallel, respectively, depending on the exchange bias field direction. Using this scheme, we also realize a complementary logic operation purely with spin transistors controlled by the gate voltage, without any additional n- or p-channel transistor.

  15. Sampling Strategy and Potential Utility of Indels for DNA Barcoding of Closely Related Plant Species: A Case Study in Taxus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Ming Gao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Although DNA barcoding has become a useful tool for species identification and biodiversity surveys in plant sciences, there remains little consensus concerning appropriate sampling strategies and the treatment of indels. To address these two issues, we sampled 39 populations for nine Taxus species across their entire ranges, with two to three individuals per population randomly sampled. We sequenced one core DNA barcode (matK and three supplementary regions (trnH-psbA, trnL-trnF and ITS for all samples to test the effects of sampling design and the utility of indels. Our results suggested that increasing sampling within-population did not change the clustering of individuals, and that meant within-population P-distances were zero for most populations in all regions. Based on the markers tested here, comparison of methods either including or excluding indels indicated that discrimination and nodal support of monophyletic groups were significantly increased when indels were included. Thus we concluded that one individual per population was adequate to represent the within-population variation in these species for DNA barcoding, and that intra-specific sampling was best focused on representing the entire ranges of certain taxa. We also found that indels occurring in the chloroplast trnL-trnF and trnH-psbA regions were informative to differentiate among for closely related taxa barcoding, and we proposed that indel-coding methods should be considered for use in future for closed related plant species DNA barcoding projects on or below generic level.

  16. American Academy of Pediatrics. The use of complementary and alternative medicine in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Vohra, Sunita; Walls, Richard

    2008-12-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to optimizing the well-being of children and advancing family-centered health care. Related to these goals, the American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and, as a result, the need to provide information and support for pediatricians. From 2000 to 2002, the American Academy of Pediatrics convened and charged the Task Force on Complementary and Alternative Medicine to address issues related to the use of complementary and alternative medicine in children and to develop resources to educate physicians, patients, and families. One of these resources is this report describing complementary and alternative medicine services, current levels of utilization and financial expenditures, and associated legal and ethical considerations. The subject of complementary and alternative medicine is large and diverse, and consequently, an in-depth discussion of each method of complementary and alternative medicine is beyond the scope of this report. Instead, this report will define terms; describe epidemiology; outline common types of complementary and alternative medicine therapies; review medicolegal, ethical, and research implications; review education and training for complementary and alternative medicine providers; provide resources for learning more about complementary and alternative medicine; and suggest communication strategies to use when discussing complementary and alternative medicine with patients and families.

  17. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information. Outreach. The Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) was established in October 1998 to coordinate ... Institute (NCI) in the arena of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). More about us. CAM at the NCI ...

  18. Compressed sensing MRI exploiting complementary dual decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suhyung; Park, Jaeseok

    2014-04-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) MRI exploits the sparsity of an image in a transform domain to reconstruct the image from incoherently under-sampled k-space data. However, it has been shown that CS suffers particularly from loss of low-contrast image features with increasing reduction factors. To retain image details in such degraded experimental conditions, in this work we introduce a novel CS reconstruction method exploiting feature-based complementary dual decomposition with joint estimation of local scale mixture (LSM) model and images. Images are decomposed into dual block sparse components: total variation for piecewise smooth parts and wavelets for residuals. The LSM model parameters of residuals in the wavelet domain are estimated and then employed as a regional constraint in spatially adaptive reconstruction of high frequency subbands to restore image details missing in piecewise smooth parts. Alternating minimization of the dual image components subject to data consistency is performed to extract image details from residuals and add them back to their complementary counterparts while the LSM model parameters and images are jointly estimated in a sequential fashion. Simulations and experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method in preserving low-contrast image features even at high reduction factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Your Laptop to the Rescue: Using the Child Language Data Exchange System Archive and CLAN Utilities to Improve Child Language Sample Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Nan Bernstein; MacWhinney, Brian

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we review the advantages of language sample analysis (LSA) and explain how clinicians can make the process of LSA faster, easier, more accurate, and more insightful than LSA done "by hand" by using free, available software programs such as Computerized Language Analysis (CLAN). We demonstrate the utility of CLAN analysis in studying the expressive language of a very large cohort of 24-month-old toddlers tracked in a recent longitudinal study; toddlers in particular are the most likely group to receive LSA by clinicians, but existing reference "norms" for this population are based on fairly small cohorts of children. Finally, we demonstrate how a CLAN utility such as KidEval can now extract potential normative data from the very large number of corpora now available for English and other languages at the Child Language Data Exchange System project site. Most of the LSA measures that we studied appear to show developmental profiles suggesting that they may be of specifically higher value for children at certain ages, because they do not show an even developmental trajectory from 2 to 7 years of age. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Parental concerns about complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette; Michaelsen, Kim F.; Holm, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    of the family's food, and the mother's focus was on the immediate well-being and safety of the child. In the later phase, health concerns shifted towards a longer-term perspective, and the aim of integrating the child into the family's social world became as important as concerns about well-being and safety......Background/objectives:To investigate and analyze differences in parental concerns during earlier and later phases of complementary feeding.Subject/methods:Eight focus group interviews were conducted with 45 mothers of children aged 7 or 13 months. Deductive and inductive coding procedures were...

  1. Assessment of the Essential and Toxic Elements in Complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the commonly used complementary foods (Unga wa Lishe) for children 0-5 years in Tanzania were analyze for essential and toxic elements in order to assess their nutritional levels. 60 samples were purchased from shops in Dar es Salaam, Moshi and Arusha regions and analyzed using Energy Dispersive ...

  2. Utilization of vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty procedures throughout the United States over a recent decade: an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillingford, Jamal N.; Lombardi, Joseph M.; Mueller, John D.; Reddy, Hemant; Saifi, Comron; Fischer, Charla R.; Ludwig, Steven C.; Lenke, Lawrence G.; Lehman, Ronald A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Given the increasing societal focus on health care utilization and value-based care, it is essential to understand the demographic and economic data surrounding percutaneous vertebral augmentation procedures performed in the United States. Double-blinded prospective randomized controlled trials have shown no benefit to the use of vertebroplasty over a sham procedure in the treatment of vertebral fractures. Contrastingly, kyphoplasty may be beneficial when appropriately indicated. Methods The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database was queried for patients who underwent either kyphoplasty (ICD-9-CM 81.66) or vertebroplasty (ICD-9-CM 81.65) procedures between 2006 and 2014 across 44 states. Demographic and economic data were obtained which included the annual number of surgeries, age, sex, insurance type, location, and frequency of routine discharge. The NIS database represents a 20% sample of discharges from U.S. hospitals, which is weighted to provide national estimates. Results In 2014, an estimated total number of 19,420 kyphoplasty and 6,130 vertebroplasty procedures were performed across the United States. The number of vertebroplasty procedures decreased 53% from 13,128 in 2008. Similarly, the number of kyphoplasty procedures decreased 17% from 23,320 in 2007. Based on payer, Medicare patients comprised 83% of those billed for kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty, and 75% of procedures were utilized in areas designated as “not low income”. In 2014, patients in the South Atlantic region comprised 24% of vertebroplasty and 28% of kyphoplasty cases, far more than any other region. Additionally, kyphoplasty and vertebroplasty were more often performed in teaching facilities rather than community hospitals (60% and 67%, respectively). Conclusions Since the publication of two double-blind, prospective randomized controlled trials showed no benefit of vertebroplasty over a sham procedure, there has been a significant decrease in both kyphoplasty and

  3. Agroforestry and conservation agriculture: Complementary practices for sustainable development

    OpenAIRE

    Sims, B; Friedrich, Theodor; Kassam, Amir H.; Kienzle, J.

    2009-01-01

    Metadata only record This paper explores how conservation agriculture and agroforestry can be complementary approaches for increasing agricultural sustainability. Developing a discussion of how both systems are designed to mimic the natural environment through the maintenance of a 'natural' ground cover and the complimentary production of crops which utilize different soil nutrients. Benefits of conservation agriculture and agroforestry systems are accrued in several primary areas: efficie...

  4. Middlesex Sampling Plant environmental report for calendar year 1992, 239 Mountain Avenue, Middlesex, New Jersey. Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report describes the environmental surveillance program at the Middlesex Sampling Plant (MSP) and provides the results for 1992. The site, in the Borough of Middlesex, New Jersey, is a fenced area and includes four buildings and two storage piles that contain 50,800 m{sup 3} of radioactive and mixed hazardous waste. More than 70 percent of the MSP site is paved with asphalt. The MSP facility was established in 1943 by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) to sample, store, and/or ship uranium, thorium, and beryllium ores. In 1955 the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), successor to MED, terminated the operation and later used the site for storage and limited sampling of thorium residues. In 1967 AEC activities ceased, onsite structures were decontaminated, and the site was certified for unrestricted use under criteria applicable at that time. In 1980 the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a multiphase remedial action project to clean up several vicinity properties onto which contamination from the plant had migrated. Material from these properties was consolidated into the storage piles onsite. Environmental surveillance of MSP began in 1980 when Congress added the site to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. The environmental surveillance program at MSP includes sampling networks for radon and thoron in air; external gamma radiation exposure; and radium-226, radium-228, thorium-230, thorium-232, and total uranium in surface water, sediment, and groundwater. Additionally, chemical analyses are performed to detect metals and organic compounds in surface water and groundwater and metals in sediments. This program assists in fulfilling th DOE policy of measuring and monitoring effluents from DOE activities and calculating hypothetical doses.

  5. Utilizing Estimated Creatinine Excretion to Improve the Performance of Spot Urine Samples for the Determination of Proteinuria in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ke Wang

    Full Text Available Agreement between spot and 24-hour urine protein measurements is poor in kidney transplant recipients. We investigated whether using formulae to estimate creatinine excretion rate (eCER, rather than assuming a standard creatinine excretion rate, would improve the estimation of proteinuria from spot urine samples in kidney transplant recipients.We measured 24 hour urine protein and albumin and spot albumin:creatinine (ACR and spot protein:creatinine (PCR in 181 Kidney transplant recipients." We utilized 6 different published formulae (Fotheringham, CKD-EPI, Cockcroft-Gault, Walser, Goldwasser and Rule to estimate eCER and from it calculated estimated albumin and protein excretion rate (eAER and ePER. Bias, precision and accuracy (within 15%, 30% and 50% of ACR, PCR, eAER, ePER were compared to 24-hour urine protein and albumin.ACR and PCR significantly underestimated 24-hour albumin and protein excretion (ACR Bias (IQR, -5.9 mg/day; p< 0.01; PCR Bias, (IQR, -35.2 mg/day; p<0.01. None of the formulae used to calculate eAER or ePER had a bias that was significantly different from the 24-hour collection (eAER and ePER bias: Fotheringham -0.3 and 7.2, CKD-EPI 0.3 and 13.5, Cockcroft-Gault -3.2 and -13.9, Walser -1.7 and 3.1, Goldwasser -1.3 and -0.5, Rule -0.6 and 4.2 mg/day respectively. The accuracy for ACR and PCR were lower (within 30% being 38% and 43% respectively than the corresponding values estimated by utilizing eCER (for eAER 46% to 49% and ePER 46-54%.Utilizing estimated creatinine excretion to calculate eAER and ePER improves the estimation of 24-hour albuminuria/proteinuria with spot urine samples in kidney transplant recipients.

  6. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-01-02

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparing Trauma Exposure, Mental Health Needs, and Service Utilization Across Clinical Samples of Refugee, Immigrant, and U.S.-Origin Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Theresa S; Newnham, Elizabeth A; Birman, Dina; Lee, Robert; Ellis, B Heidi; Layne, Christopher M

    2017-06-01

    Most mental health services for trauma-exposed children and adolescents were not originally developed for refugees. Information is needed to help clinicians design services to address the consequences of trauma in refugee populations. We compared trauma exposure, psychological distress, and mental health service utilization among children and adolescents of refugee-origin, immigrant-origin, and U.S.-origin referred for assessment and treatment by U.S. providers in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN). We used propensity score matching to compare trauma profiles, mental health needs, and service use across three groups. Our sample comprised refugee-origin youth (n = 60, 48.3% female, mean age = 13.07 years) and propensity-matched samples of immigrant-origin youth (n = 143, 60.8% female, mean age = 13.26 years), and U.S.-origin youth (n = 140, 56.1% female, mean age = 12.11 years). On average, there were significantly more types of trauma exposure among refugee youth than either U.S.-origin youth (p origin youth, refugee youth had higher rates of community violence exposure, dissociative symptoms, traumatic grief, somatization, and phobic disorder.  In contrast, the refugee group had comparably lower rates of substance abuse and oppositional defiant disorder (ps ranging from .030 to origin youth presented with distinct patterns of trauma exposure, distress symptoms, and service needs that merit consideration in services planning. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  8. Narrative journalism as complementary inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen Jeppesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Narrative journalism is a method to craft stories worth reading about real people. In this article, we explore the ability of that communicative power to produce insights complementary to those obtainable through traditional qualitative and quantitative research methods. With examples from a study of journalistic narrative as patient involvement in professional rehabilitation, interview data transcribed as stories are analyzed for qualities of heterogeneity, sensibility, transparency, and reflexivity. Building on sociological theories of thinking with stories, writing as inquiry, and public journalism as ethnography, we suggest that narrative journalism as a common practice might unfold dimensions of subjective otherness of the self. Aspiring to unite writing in both transparently confrontational and empathetically dialogic ways, the narrative journalistic method holds a potential to expose dynamics of power within the interview.

  9. On complementary channels and the additivity problem

    OpenAIRE

    Holevo, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    We explore complementarity between output and environment of a quantum channel (or, more generally, CP map), making an observation that the output purity characteristics for complementary CP maps coincide. Hence, validity of the mutiplicativity/additivity conjecture for a class of CP maps implies its validity for complementary maps. The class of CP maps complementary to entanglement-breaking ones is described and is shown to contain diagonal CP maps as a proper subclass, resulting in new clas...

  10. Utilização do sorgo sacarino como matéria-prima complementar à cana-de-açúcar para obtenção de etanol em microdestilaria Sweet sorghum utilization as complementary raw material of sugar cane for ethanol production in microdistillery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyro Gonçalves TEIXEIRA

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available O sorgo sacarino tem sido motivo de investigação como fonte complementar de matéria-prima para a produção de etanol em microdestilaria. Os seus colmos podem ser processados na mesma instalação destinada à produção de etanol de cana-de-açúcar, oferecendo também uma quantidade de resíduo fibroso (bagaço para gerar o vapor necessário para a operação industrial. Os resultados obtidos em dois anos de experimento mostraram que o sorgo sacarino cultivar Br 505 pode ser uma cultura complementar à cana-de-açúcar para produção de etanol. Os teores de açúcares redutores totais nos colmos não foi significativamente diferente do encontrado nos colmos de cana-de-açúcar cortados antecipadamente. Os colmos apresentaram um conteúdo em açúcares redutores totais de 33 a 40%, em base seca. Assim, o sorgo sacarino pode ser colhido na entressafra da cana-de-açúcar reduzindo o período de ociosidade da indústria e favorecendo o corte da matéria-prima após maturação completa. Além disso, os grãos e os resíduos e subprodutos da microdestilaria podem ser destinados a outras finalidades voltadas para a produção de alimentos na propriedade rural. A utilização das duas culturas, como matéria-prima para a produção de álcool, pode permitir um melhor uso dos colmos da cana-de-açúcar após atingirem a maturação completa, o que representa teores mais elevados de açúcares.Sweet Sorghum has been evaluated as a complementary source of raw material for ethanol production in microdistillery. Sorghum culms can be processed in the same installation utilized for the production of ethanol from sugar cane, giving an ample fiber residue (bagasse to generate enough steam for industrial operation. The results obtained in a two years experimental work showed that sweet sorghum cultivar Br 505 could be a recommendable alternate crop to complement sugar cane in the production of ethanol in microdistillery. The total reducing sugar content

  11. Psychostimulant use among college students during periods of high and low stress: an interdisciplinary approach utilizing both self-report and unobtrusive chemical sample data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David R; Burgard, Daniel A; Larson, Ramsey G; Ferm, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    This study quantified psychostimulant use patterns over periods of high and low stress from both self-report measures and chemical wastewater analyses and identified possible predictors of psychostimulant abuse on a college campus. Self-report data were collected at three times of varying stress levels throughout one college semester: during the first week of school (N=676), midterms (N=468), and shortly before final exams (N=400). Campus wastewater samples were collected over 72-hour periods during the same time frames as the surveys. The metabolites of Adderall and Ritalin were quantified through solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Samples were normalized with creatinine. Evidence was found to suggest an increase in psychostimulant use during periods of stress, with significant differences found from self-report data between the first week and midterms and from chemical data between these same two assessment periods as well as between the first week of classes and finals. Key predictors of lifetime non-prescriptive psychostimulant use included self-reported procrastination and poor time-management, use of other substances (especially nicotine/tobacco, alcohol, and cocaine), and students' perception of non-prescriptive psychostimulant use as normative on campus. The findings shed further light on psychostimulant use patterns among college students, particularly as a function of stress; the study also highlights the benefit of utilizing an interdisciplinary approach that uses both subjective and objective empirical data. The results have implications for prevention/intervention programs on college campuses designed to reduce stress and facilitate healthier coping. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Chorionic villus sampling in the cell-free DNA aneuploidy screening era: careful selection criteria can maximise the clinical utility of screening and invasive testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Stefan C; Reidy, Karen L; Norris, Fiona; Nisbet, Deborah L; Kornman, Louise H; Palma-Dias, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    To quantify the impact of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) screening on chorionic villus sampling (CVS) test indications and outcomes in a tertiary maternity service. Retrospective cohort study of all CVS procedures performed for any indication on singleton pregnancies at The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, and at Women's Ultrasound Melbourne, Australia, between August 2008 and February 2015. Karyotypes were classified according to pathogenicity and detectability by standard cfDNA screening panels. A total of 2051 CVS procedures, 25 373 twelve-week scans and 2394 cfDNA tests were performed. The CVS rate per 12-week scan fell from 9.8 to 3.9% following introduction of cfDNA screening. The yield of pathogenic chromosomal anomalies per CVS increased from 12.9 to 25.2%, with 70% of pathogenic results now comprising T21, up from 52%. Sixteen (5.3%) of the pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities identified on CVS would not have been predicted by current cfDNA tests. There is an evolving tension between improved screening performance for common aneuploidies offered by cfDNA testing, and the increasing diagnostic utility of molecular karyotyping. However, the risk of not identifying pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities is low if cfDNA screening is offered in the absence of a structural fetal anomaly, increased nuchal translucency or relevant family history. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Complementary Meta-Analytic Methods for the Quantitative Review of Research: 1. A Theoretical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelio José Figueredo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Contents Meta-Analysis is a procedure designed to quantitatively analyze the methodological characteristics in studies sampled in conventional meta-analyses to assess the relationship between methodologies and outcomes. This article presents the rationale and procedures for conducting a Contents Meta-Analysis in conjunction with conventional Effects Meta-analysis. We provide an overview of the pertinent limitations of conventional meta-analysis from methodological and meta-scientific standpoint. We then introduce novel terminology distinguishing different kinds of complementary meta-analyses that address many of the problems previously identified for conventional meta-analyses. We would also like to direct readers to the second paper in this series (Figueredo, Black, & Scott, this issue, which demonstrates the utility of Contents Meta-Analysis with an empirical example and present findings regarding the generalizability of the effect sizes estimated. DOI: 10.2458/azu_jmmss.v4i2.17935

  14. Factors related to complementary/alternative medicine use among cancer patients in central Anatolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Ozlem; Mistik, Selcuk; Ozkan, Metin; Ozturk, Ahmet; Altinbas, Mustafa

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of and factors related to the use of complementary/alternative medicine among cancer patients undergoing or following conventional treatment at the Erciyes University Oncology Hospital in Central Anatolia. Face-to-face interview and a questionnaire were carried out with cancer patients attending the outpatient clinic of Medical Oncology. Questionnaire items included patients' demographic data, treatment, use of complementary/alternative medicine and possible related factors. Multivariate analysis was performed to compare the factors related to use of complementary/alternative medicine. A total of 268 consecutive cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Overall, 43% of the patients were using or had used complementary/alternative medicine. Totally, 90% of the patients using complementary/alternative medicine utilized herbs, and most of the herbs used were stinging nettle. Nearly half of the patients using complementary/alternative medicine (46.1%) were aiming to fight the disease. Among users, nearly half of them regarded the method used as effective and 54 (50.5%) suggested the use of complementary/alternative medicine to other patients. Only 23.1% of the patients discussed the use of complementary/alternative medicine with their physician. In logistic regression analysis, younger age, higher educational status, advanced stage of the disease, longer duration of the disease and current treatment status were significantly associated with the use of complementary/alternative medicine. In our regression model, the predictivity rate of these variables was 72.2% for use of complementary/alternative medicine according to the backward Wald test. Use of complementary/alternative medicine among cancer patients in our center is modestly high, and the most common method is herbal therapy. Communication between the patient and the physician should be improved on this subject.

  15. Improved sample utilization in thermal ionization mass spectrometry isotope ratio measurements: refined development of porous ion emitters for nuclear forensic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruzzini, Matthew Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-08

    The precise and accurate determination of isotopic composition in nuclear forensic samples is vital for assessing origin, intended use and process history. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is widely accepted as the gold standard for high performance isotopic measurements and has long served as the workhorse in the isotopic ratio determination of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensic and safeguard specialists have relied heavily on such methods for both routine and atypical e orts. Despite widespread use, TIMS methods for the assay of actinide systems continue to be hindered by poor ionization e ciency, often less than tenths of a percent; the majority of a sample is not measured. This represents a growing challenge in addressing nextgeneration nuclear detection needs by limiting the ability to analyze ultratrace quantities of high priority elements that could potentially provide critical nuclear forensic signatures. Porous ion emitter (PIE) thermal ion sources were developed in response to the growing need for new TIMS ion source strategies for improved ionization e ciency, PIEs have proven to be simple to implement, straightforward approach to boosting ion yield. This work serves to expand the use of PIE techniques for the analysis of trace quantities of plutonium and americium. PIEs exhibited superior plutonium and americium ion yields when compared to direct lament loading and the resin bead technique, one of the most e cient methods for actinide analysis, at similar mass loading levels. Initial attempts at altering PIE composition for the analysis of plutonium proved to enhance sample utilization even further. Preliminary investigations of the instrumental fractionation behavior of plutonium and uranium analyzed via PIE methods were conducted. Data collected during these initial trial indicate that PIEs fractionate in a consistent, reproducible manner; a necessity for high precision isotope ratio measurements. Ultimately, PIEs methods were applied for

  16. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  17. Food allergy and complementary feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreffler, Wayne G; Radano, Marcella

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between complementary feeding and the development of atopic disease is the source of significant interest and debate in both the scientific and lay communities. A small number of early studies, which had considerable influence on recommended feeding practices, reported protective effects associated with delaying the introduction of commonly allergenic foods such as cow's milk, egg, and nuts. Despite more conservative recommendations, however, food allergy prevalence has continued to rise. Our understanding of the development of food allergy, its relationship with IgE sensitization and atopic dermatitis, and the relationship of each of these outcomes with the timing of food introduction has evolved considerably. Based on multiple observational studies, and extrapolating from immunotherapy trials and animal models of mucosal immunity, there is mounting evidence that delayed introduction or avoidance of commonly allergenic foods is at best neutral and may be detrimental with regard to atopic outcomes. There is an obvious and critical need for additional high-caliber studies to further evaluate this connection. In the meantime, multiple health considerations, not allergy alone, should be involved in decisions regarding nutritional intake, including common allergenic foods, during the period of transition to the family diet. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative medicines (AJTCAM), a new broad-based journal, is founded on two key tenets: To publish exciting research in all areas of applied medicinal plants, Traditional medicines, Complementary Alternative Medicines, food and agricultural ...

  19. Qualitative content analysis of complementary topical therapies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to alleviate diabetic foot problems, patients sometimes seek complementary therapies outside the professional context. This paper describes the use of complementary remedies as a topical treatment for diabetic foot ulcers among Jordanians. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse written responses of 68 ...

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine: challenge and change

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wellman, Beverly Sheila; Kelner, Merrijoy; Saks, Mike; Pescosolido, Bernice A

    2000-01-01

    ... for those who would like to see a greater integration of social science research into CAM research funding portfolios.' The Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Title PageComplementary and Alternative Medicine: Challenge and Change Editors Merrijoy Kelner and Beverly Wellman University of Toronto, Canada Associate Editors Bernice Pescosolid...

  1. Complementary Feeding Practices And Nutrient Intake From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary Feeding Practices And Nutrient Intake From Habitual Complementary Foods Of Infants And Children Aged 6-18 Months Old In Lusaka, Zambia. ... Compared with the recommended daily allowance (RDA) at 6-8, 9-11 and 12-18 months of age, the daily nutrient intakes were 88%, 121% and 94% for energy ...

  2. Willingness to Pay for Complementary Health Care Insurance in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosratnejad, Shirin; Rashidian, Arash; Akbari Sari, Ali; Moradi, Najme

    2017-09-01

    Complementary health insurance is increasingly used to remedy the limitations and shortcomings of the basic health insurance benefit packages. Hence, it is essential to gather reliable information about the amount of Willingness to Pay (WTP) for health insurance. We assessed the WTP for health insurance in Iran in order to suggest an affordable complementary health insurance. The study sample consisted of 300 household heads all over provinces of Iran in 2013. The method applied was double bounded dichotomous choice and open-ended question approach of contingent valuation. The average WTP for complementary health insurance per person per month by double bounded dichotomous choice and open-ended question method respectively was 199000 and 115300 Rials (8 and 4.6 USD, respectively). Household's heads with higher levels of income and those who worked had more WTP for the health insurance. Besides, the WTP increased in direct proportion to the number of insured members of each household and in inverse proportion to the family size. The WTP value can be used as a premium in a society. As an important finding, the study indicated that the households were willing to pay higher premiums than currently collected for the complementary health insurance coverage in Iran. This offers the policy makers the opportunity to increase the premium and provide good benefits package for insured people of country then better risk pooling.

  3. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-19

    Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014,Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included

  4. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Background Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. Objectives To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. Search methods We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. Selection criteria We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Data collection and analysis Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. Main results We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four

  5. Cerebral asymmetries: complementary and independent processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gjurgjica Badzakova-Trajkov

    Full Text Available Most people are right-handed and left-cerebrally dominant for speech, leading historically to the general notion of left-hemispheric dominance, and more recently to genetic models proposing a single lateralizing gene. This hypothetical gene can account for higher incidence of right-handers in those with left cerebral dominance for speech. It remains unclear how this dominance relates to the right-cerebral dominance for some nonverbal functions such as spatial or emotional processing. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging with a sample of 155 subjects to measure asymmetrical activation induced by speech production in the frontal lobes, by face processing in the temporal lobes, and by spatial processing in the parietal lobes. Left-frontal, right-temporal, and right-parietal dominance were all intercorrelated, suggesting that right-cerebral biases may be at least in part complementary to the left-hemispheric dominance for language. However, handedness and parietal asymmetry for spatial processing were uncorrelated, implying independent lateralizing processes, one producing a leftward bias most closely associated with handedness, and the other a rightward bias most closely associated with spatial attention.

  6. [Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and risk of childhood obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval Jurado, Luis; Jiménez Báez, María Valeria; Olivares Juárez, Sibli; de la Cruz Olvera, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the pattern of breastfeeding and weaning as a risk of obesity in pre-school children from a Primary Care Unit. Cross-sectional analytical study LOCATION: Cancun, Quintana Roo (Mexico). Children from 2-4 years of age from a Primary Care Unit. Duration of total and exclusive breastfeeding, age and food utilized for complementary feeding reported by the mother or career of the child and nutritional status assessment evaluated by body mass index (BMI) ≥ 95 percentile. Determination of prevalence ratio (PR), odds ratio (OR), chi squared (x2), and binary logistic regression. The study included 116 children (55.2% girls) with a mean age of 3.2 years, with obesity present in 62.1%, Exclusive breastfeeding in 72.4% with mean duration of 2.3 months, and age at introducing solids foods was 5.0 months. There was a difference for breastfeeding and complementary feeding by gender sex (Pobesity. The model showed no association between these variables and obesity in children CONCLUSIONS: Exclusive breastfeeding of less than three months is associated with almost 4 more times in obese children. There was a difference in age of complementary feeding, duration of breastfeeding, and formula milk consumption time for obese and non-obese children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complementary and alternative medications for chronic pelvic pain. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America. 2014;41( ... a systematic review of their effects on clinical outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis. British Journal of Nutrition. 2012; ...

  8. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Go Back Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Email Print + Share Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ... Energy Medicine, and Biologically-Based Practices. Mind-Body Medicine Mind-body medicine is a set of interventions ...

  9. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM), a new broad-based journal, is founded on two key tenets: To publish exciting research in all areas of applied medicinal plants, Traditional medicines, Complementary Alternative Medicines, food and agricultural technologies, and ...

  10. Complementary medicines: When regulation results in revolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezl Fourie

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Medicines have evolved over time and so has the realisation of the importance of quality control and regulatory processes. The regulatory practices include all the steps from the development and manufacture of the active ingredients until the medicines reach the consumer. The Medicines Control Council (MCC is mandated to regulate medicines in South Africa. Complementary medicines were previously perceived to be unregulated, although the Medicines Act does not distinguish between allopathic and complementary medicine. As the era of unregulated complementary medicine ended, the requirements in terms of dossier content left many role-players at odds. However, the MCC has a mandate to ensure that the registration of a medicine is in the interest of the public and that complementary medicine is manufactured in a facility adhering to good manufacturing practice, according to which efficacy and safety are supported by reliable data with a known shelf-life.

  11. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Chronic Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjun Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation, an ancient disease, is prevalent, and costly in the general population. Complementary and alternative therapies are frequently used for constipation. This review introduces various methods of complementary and alternative therapies, including acupuncture, moxibustion, massage, and herbal medicine. Efficacy, safety, influence factors, sham control design, and mechanisms of these therapies are discussed and evaluated. Acupuncture or electroacupuncture was found to be most commonly used for constipation among these complementary and alternative therapies, followed by herbal medicine. Although only a small number of clinical studies are flawless, our review of the literature seems to suggest that acupuncture or electroacupuncture and herbal medicine are effective in treating constipation, whereas findings on massage and moxibustion are inconclusive. More well-designed clinical trials are needed to improve and prove the efficacy of the complementary and alternative therapies for constipation; mechanistic studies that would lead to wide spread use and improvement of the methods are also discussed in this review.

  12. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their FAMILIES COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE FOR MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS This fact sheet is provided to help you ... and alternative medicine (CAM) for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is ...

  13. Detraditionalisation, gender and alternative and complementary medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sointu, Eeva

    2011-03-01

    This article is premised on the importance of locating the appeal and meaning of alternative and complementary medicines in the context of gendered identities. I argue that the discourse of wellbeing--captured in many alternative and complementary health practices--is congruent with culturally prevalent ideals of self-fulfilling, authentic, unique and self-responsible subjectivity. The discourse of wellbeing places the self at the centre, thus providing a contrast with traditional ideas of other-directed and caring femininity. As such, involvement in alternative and complementary medicines is entwined with a negotiation of shifting femininities in detraditionalising societies. Simultaneously, many alternative and complementary health practices readily tap into and reproduce traditional representations of caring femininity. It is through an emphasis on emotional honesty and intimacy that the discourse of wellbeing also captures a challenge to traditional ideas of masculinity. Expectations and experiences relating to gender add a further level of complexity to the meaningfulness and therapeutic value of alternative and complementary medicines and underlie the gender difference in the utilisation of holistic health practices. I draw on data from a qualitative study with 44, primarily white, middle-class users and practitioners of varied alternative and complementary medicines in the UK. © 2010 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2010 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Asteroid models from photometry and complementary data sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Mikko [Department of Mathematics, Tampere University of Technology (Finland)

    2016-05-10

    I discuss inversion methods for asteroid shape and spin reconstruction with photometry (lightcurves) and complementary data sources such as adaptive optics or other images, occultation timings, interferometry, and range-Doppler radar data. These are essentially different sampling modes (generalized projections) of plane-of-sky images. An important concept in this approach is the optimal weighting of the various data modes. The maximum compatibility estimate, a multi-modal generalization of the maximum likelihood estimate, can be used for this purpose. I discuss the fundamental properties of lightcurve inversion by examining the two-dimensional case that, though not usable in our three-dimensional world, is simple to analyze, and it shares essentially the same uniqueness and stability properties as the 3-D case. After this, I review the main aspects of 3-D shape representations, lightcurve inversion, and the inclusion of complementary data.

  15. [Complementary and alternative medicine in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, J

    2013-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine are frequently used by cancer patients. The main benefit of complementary medicine is that it gives patients the chance to become active. Complementary therapy can reduce the side effects of conventional therapy. However, we have to give due consideration to side effects and interactions: the latter being able to reduce the effectiveness of cancer therapy and so to jeopardise the success of therapy. Therefore, complementary therapy should be managed by the oncologist. It is based on a common concept of cancerogenesis with conventional therapy. Complement therapy can be assessed in studies. Alternative medicine in contrast rejects common rules of evidence-based medicine. It starts from its own concepts of cancerogenesis, which is often in line with the thinking of lay persons. Alternative medicine is offered as either "alternative" to recommended cancer treatment or is used at the same time but without due regard for the interactions. Alternative medicine is a high risk to patients. In the following two parts of the article, the most important complementary and alternative therapies cancer patients use nowadays are presented and assessed according to published evidence.

  16. Comparison of EQ-5D-5L health state utilities using four country-specific tariffs on a breast cancer patient sample in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liu; Li, Shunping; Wang, Min; Chen, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the differences in the five-level EuroQol-5 dimensions (EQ-5D-5L) health state utility scores derived from Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and UK tariffs. Six hundred and twenty-one breast cancer patients were invited for a face-to-face interview in Qingdao Municipal Hospital, China. EQ-5D-5L was scored using tariffs from China, Japan, Korea, and the UK. The null hypothesis of normal distribution of the EQ-5D-5L utility score was tested by the Shapiro-Wilk test. Nonparametric Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to determine the difference among the four tariffs. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots were used to study the agreement among the four EQ-5D-5L scores. Known-groups validity was studied using a regression framework. There were 608 participants in the final analysis, with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 48.0±9.6 years. EQ-5D-5L utility scores were non-normally distributed. The means (median) ± SD of EQ-5D-5L utilities derived from Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and UK tariffs were 0.828 (0.879) ±0.184, 0.802 (0.823) ±0.164, 0.831 (0.829) ±0.137, and 0.838 (0.866) ±0.154, respectively. Among pairwise comparisons, the difference of median EQ-5D-5L utility scores was only insignificant between Chinese and UK tariffs. Excellent agreements (with ICCs >0.9) were found among the four tariffs albeit the limits of agreement between each pair of tariffs were wide. Known-groups validity was supported. Although four country-specific EQ-5D-5L tariffs have shown an overall high level of correlation and agreement, none of them could be regarded as interchangeable. The higher correlation and agreement between Chinese and UK tariffs may be due to the similar functions that were used in the tariff development. In the absence of Chinese-specific tariff, the UK tariff is the second-best option to be applied in the Chinese population. Results of this study further contribute to

  17. Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Residents of Wayu Town, Western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belachew, Negash; Tadesse, Tarekegne; Gube, Addisu Alemayehu

    2017-10-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine covers a wide variety of therapies and practices, which vary from country to country and region to region. The study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of complementary and alternative medicine among the residents of Wayu town, Western Ethiopia. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 302 residents. A systematic sampling was used to select households. Data were entered in SPSS (version 20; IBM Corp) and descriptive statistics was carried out. Of 302 participants, 51.65% have a good knowledge, 78.6% were aware of complementary and alternative medicine, and 74.22% used it in the past 2 years. A total of 23.83% believe that complementary and alternative medicine is more effective than modern medicine and 28.8% preferred complementary and alternative medicine to modern medicine. This study revealed that in Wayu town, there is relatively high public interest in complementary and alternative medicine practices and a significant number has a good knowledge but generally the attitude toward complementary and alternative medicine is relatively low.

  18. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  19. Complementary therapies for cancer-related symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie R; Yeung, K Simon

    2004-01-01

    Relief of cancer-related symptoms is essential in the supportive and palliative care of cancer patients. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture, mind-body techniques, and massage therapy can help when conventional treatment does not bring satisfactory relief or causes undesirable side effects. Controlled clinical trials show that acupuncture and hypnotherapy can reduce pain and nausea. Meditation, relaxation therapy, music therapy, and massage mitigate anxiety and distress. Pilot studies suggest that complementary therapies may treat xerostomia, hot flashes, and fatigue. Botanicals or dietary supplements are popular but often problematic. Concurrent use of herbal products with mainstream medical treatment should be discouraged.

  20. The comparative utility of oral swabs and probang samples for detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in cattle and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Lohse, Louise; Belsham, Graham J

    2013-03-23

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) RNA was measured using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) assays in oral swab and probang samples collected from cattle and pigs during experimental infections with serotype O FMDV. During acute infection, FMDV RNA was measurable in oral swabs as well as in probang samples from both species. FMDV RNA could be detected in oral swabs and probang samples from a time point corresponding to the onset of viremia in directly inoculated animals, whereas animals which were infected through contact exposure had low levels of FMDV RNA in oral swabs before viral RNA could be measured in serum. Analysis of samples collected from cattle persistently infected with FMDV showed that it was not possible to detect FMDV RNA in oral swabs harvested beyond 10 days post infection (dpi), despite the presence of FMDV RNA in probang samples that had been collected as late as 35 dpi. An interesting feature of the persistent infection in the cattle was the apparent decline in the level of FMDV RNA in probang samples after the acute phase of infection, which was followed by a marked rise again (in all the carrier animals) by 28 dpi. Results from this study indicate that qRT-PCR analysis of oral swabs is a useful approach in order to achieve a time efficient and reliable initial diagnosis of acute FMD in cattle and pigs, whereas probang sampling is essential for the detection of cattle that are persistently infected "carriers" of FMDV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerefat, Nicida L.; Parmeswar, Ravi; Brinkmeyer, Alan D.; Honarpour, Mehdi

    1994-01-01

    A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

  2. "Proof of concept" pilot study: bioprocess chain of custody and bioresource sample management temperature observations. Sample level temperature trends and stability data obtained via utilization of bluechiip(®) temperature tracking technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Lisa B; Wyatt, Kathleen; Johnston, Ian; Milljanic, Miroslav; Chaffey, Jason

    2013-04-01

    Preservation and optimization of biosample integrity to foster relevant research results and outcomes is a guiding principle of sample management. Tracking pre-analytical biospecimen lifecycle variables and bioprocessing chain of custody data enables documentation of adherence to best, regulatory and quality biobanking practices. Knowledge of individual sample and sample set temperature variability is believed to enhance delineation of artifacts during downstream analysis. Analysis of temperature responses may elucidate understanding of temperature trends which can aid downstream interpretation and provide an empirical foundation for "fit for purpose" sample management protocols and evidence-based biobanking practices. Bluechiip and the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) conducted a pilot to test the bluechiip technology(®) performance and validate key proofs of concept for tracking temperature of biological samples. One hundred six (106) Corning(®) cryovials with bluechiip(®) buttons and one hundred six (106) standard Corning(®) cryovials labeled with 1-dimensional (1D) barcoded labels were evaluated. Identifiers were tracked and temperature data recorded in corresponding environments ranging from -192°C to +57°. Nine of ten proof of concepts, defined in collaboration with ATCC successfully demonstrated functional capabilities of the bluechiip(®) technology. Bar-code label read performance was compared, producing evidence demonstrating a high rate of failure on the bar-code arm. Temperature data collected heightened observations of sample temperature variability. Prevalence of bar-code label read failure and issues affecting reliability of barcode performance may be under-reported and unrecognized in sample management practice, particularly when the temperatures are lower than -60°C. It appears the bluechiip(®) tracking technology may offer increased reliability over one-dimensional (1D) bar-coding technology; however while promising these findings

  3. Complementary and alternative medicine use in dermatology in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Erin T; Davis, Scott A; Feldman, Steven R; Taylor, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has an increasing presence in dermatology. Complementary therapies have been studied in many skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. This study sought to assess oral CAM use in dermatology relative to medicine as a whole in the United States, using the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Variables studied include patient demographic characteristics, diagnoses, and CAM documented at the visits. A brief literature review of the top 5 CAM treatments unique to dermatology visits was performed. Most CAM users in both dermatology and medicine as a whole were female and white and were insured with private insurance or Medicare. Fish oil, glucosamine, glucosamine chondroitin, and omega-3 were the most common complementary supplements used in both samples. CAM use in dermatology appears to be part of a larger trend in medicine. Knowledge of common complementary therapies can help dermatologists navigate this expanding field.

  4. A survey of the use of complementary and alternative medicine in Illinois hospice and palliative care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hyfte, Gregory J; Kozak, Leila E; Lepore, Michael

    2014-08-01

    This research assesses complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and administration for patients and family caregivers in Illinois hospice and palliative care organizations. An online survey was administered to a sample of 108 contacts of Illinois organizations listed in the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization website, and 90.3% of the responding organizations offered some type of CAM. The top 5 most frequently offered CAM modalities to patients were pet therapy (64.5%), music therapy (61.3%), massage therapy (54.8%), art therapy (29.0%), and energy therapies (25.8%); these were the same top 5 offered to families but with different frequencies. Findings regarding utilization, administration, financing, and spiritual/cultural competency are discussed with policy recommendations for data collection, administrative improvements, and integration of CAM providers into service delivery. © The Author(s) 2013.

  5. The health care and productivity costs of back and neck pain in a multi-employer sample of utility industry employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Debra; Rogers, William H; Chang, Hong; Rodday, Angie Mae; Greenhill, Annabel; Villagra, Victor G; Antetomaso, James R; Patel, Aarti A; Vo, Lien

    2015-01-01

    To determine the cost of back and/or neck (B/N) pain among predominantly rural employees insured through an employee benefits trust. Eligible employees had 1 year or more of medical coverage and completed a survey subsequently linked to their claims data. B/N pain costs consisted of medical and pharmacy claims, over-the-counter expenses, and presenteeism and absenteeism costs valued according to median occupational earnings. Of 1342 eligible employees, 52.7% currently had B/N pain of which 87.9% was chronic. The average annualized cost of B/N pain per employee was $1727; 56.1% was due to lost productivity. Covered medical care was utilized by 35.6% of employees, 55.7% used pharmacy care, and 71.6% purchased uncovered over-the-counter pain medication. Many covered employees did not use formal care. The effect of care choices on productivity costs requires closer scrutiny.

  6. Development of a methodology utilizing gas chromatography ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of low levels of caffeine in surface marine and freshwater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenitch, Sergei S; Mazumder, Asit

    2008-08-01

    A methodology for monitoring low level of caffeine in aqueous samples via gas chromatography coupled with an ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry detection system (IT-MS/MS) was developed. Four IT-MS/MS operating parameters, including the collision-induced dissociation (CID) voltage, the excitation time (ET), the isolation time (IT) and the maximum ionization time (MIT) were optimized in order to maximize the sensitivity of the IT-MS/MS technique towards the analyte and its isotope-labeled standard. After optimization, a limit of detection of 500 fg microl(-1) with S/N = 3 was achieved. Taking into account blank values and the matrix background, a method detection limit of 1.0-2.0 ng l(-1) was derived and applied to all of the samples analyzed in the study. Various mass spectrometric conditions have been applied to caffeine and its trimethyl-(13)C-labeled standard to elucidate fragmentation pathways for new and commonly occurring product ions observed in the collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra produced by the ion trap. Ion structures and fragmentation pathway mechanisms have been proposed and compared with previously published data. An isotope dilution method using (13)C-labeled caffeine as a surrogate internal standard was employed to determine and correct the recovery of native caffeine in water samples. The developed methodology has been applied for the determination of caffeine in surface marine and freshwater samples collected on the west coast of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. The results obtained for the marine water samples indicated a wide variation in the level of caffeine, ranging from 4.5 to 149 ng l(-1), depending on the location of the sampling site within the inlet. The concentrations of caffeine in samples from lakes associated with various residential densities ranged from ND to 6.5, 1.8 to 10.4 and 6.1 to 21.7 ng l(-1) for low, moderate and high residential densities, respectively.

  7. INFLUENCE OF COMPLEMENTARY FOODS ON THE GROWTH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most common complementary foods and fluids in this population were sorghum porridges, ultra high temperature pasteurised (UHT) cow milk, infant formula, tea and other types of milk from domestic animals. Between four and six months of age, sorghum porridges, ultra high temperature pasteurised (UHT) cow milk, ...

  8. Polish Complementary Schools in Iceland and England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinska, Malgorzata; Kowzan, Piotr; Ragnarsdóttir, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Since 2004, the opening of labour markets has spurred a considerable number of Poles to emigrate e.g. to Iceland and England. Families with school age children have had the challenge of adapting to foreign environments and school systems. Polish complementary schools have played an important, albeit ambivalent, role in this process. Through focus…

  9. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of complementary and alternative therapies in childhood cancer: a questionnaire based on a descriptive survey from the western black sea region of Turkey · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ... Karl Peltzer, Win Myint Oo, Supa Pengpid, 150-155.

  10. (COPD) on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of complementary and alternative medicine usage in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients living in the eastern part of Turkey. In this study a descriptive design was used. The study was conducted with 216 patients who were present at the clinic.

  11. Mental disorders frequency alternative and complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental disorders frequency alternative and complementary medicine usage among patients with hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus. ... the study were administered the sociodemographic data form, the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME‑MD) questionnaire and the alternative medicine inquiry form.

  12. Food preferences during complementary feeding period among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About two-thirds of these deaths occur in the first year of life with inappropriate transition between breastfeeding and family diets being mostly implicated. This study was carried out to ascertain the complementary food preferences of nursing mothers attending the immunization clinic at a secondary health care facility in ...

  13. Determining Complementary Properties with Quantum Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Saaltink, R. Y.; Giner, L.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2017-08-01

    In a classical world, simultaneous measurements of complementary properties (e.g., position and momentum) give a system's state. In quantum mechanics, measurement-induced disturbance is largest for complementary properties and, hence, limits the precision with which such properties can be determined simultaneously. It is tempting to try to sidestep this disturbance by copying the system and measuring each complementary property on a separate copy. However, perfect copying is physically impossible in quantum mechanics. Here, we investigate using the closest quantum analog to this copying strategy, optimal cloning. The coherent portion of the generated clones' state corresponds to "twins" of the input system. Like perfect copies, both twins faithfully reproduce the properties of the input system. Unlike perfect copies, the twins are entangled. As such, a measurement on both twins is equivalent to a simultaneous measurement on the input system. For complementary observables, this joint measurement gives the system's state, just as in the classical case. We demonstrate this experimentally using polarized single photons.

  14. CT Colonography - competition or complementary?: guest editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CT Colonography - competition or complementary?: guest editorial. DJ Soloman. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sagr.v2i2.30713 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors ...

  15. Prevalence and Correlates of Complementary and Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Background: The rate of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients is on the ... technique from July to September 2016. Data were collected using a semi‑ ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ¦ Volume 20 ¦ Issue 12 ¦ December 2017 medicine. Therefore, CAM is an ...

  16. Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Knowledge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traditional complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) has been reported to be commonly used among individuals with HIV and AIDS disease. However a lack of communication between health care workers (HCWs) and patients as well as between HCWs and TCAM practitioners has been identified as one of the ...

  17. Evidence Based Complementary Intervention for Insomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Dr. Hassen H.; Bracha, Adam S.; Bracha, Dr. Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Increasing scientific evidence point to a non-pharmacological complementary treatment for insomnia: white noise. Its presentation has been shown to induce sleep in human neonates and adults, probably by reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of ambient sound. White noise may be a simple, safe, cost-effective alternative to hypnotic medication in many psychiatric disorders, especially acute stress disorder and PTSD.

  18. Evidence based complementary intervention for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Hassan H; Bracha, Adam S; Bracha, H Stefan

    2002-09-01

    Increasing scientific evidence point to a non-pharmacological complementary treatment for insomnia: white noise. Its presentation has been shown to induce sleep in human neonates and adults, probably by reducing the signal-to-noise ratio of ambient sound. White noise may be a simple, safe, cost-effective alternative to hypnotic medication in many psychiatric disorders, especially acute stress disorder and PTSD.

  19. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... approaches for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2008;23(3):284–292. Wu JC. Complementary and alternative medicine modalities for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: facts or myths? Gastroenterology & Hepatology. 2010;6(11):705–711. Yoon ...

  20. Optimizing Usability Studies by Complementary Evaluation Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmettow, Martin; Bach, Cedric; Scapin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines combinations of complementary evaluation methods as a strategy for efficient usability problem discovery. A data set from an earlier study is re-analyzed, involving three evaluation methods applied to two virtual environment applications. Results of a mixed-effects logistic

  1. Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roizen, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    In their role as committed advocates, parents of children with Down syndrome have always sought alternative therapies, mainly to enhance cognitive function but also to improve their appearance. Nutritional supplements have been the most frequent type of complementary and alternative therapy used. Cell therapy, plastic surgery, hormonal therapy,…

  2. Complementary Theories to Supply Chain Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldorsson, Arni; Hsuan, Juliana; Kotzab, Herbert

    Borrowing from complementary theories has become an important part of theorizing SCM. We build upon principal-agent theory (PAT), transaction cost analysis (TCA), network theory (NT), and resource-based view (RBV) to provide insights on how to structure a supply chain and manage it. Through......: theory application, new theoretical combinations and sensitivity to managerial practice....

  3. Hydrogen analysis in solid samples by utilizing He metastable atoms induced by TEA CO{sub 2} laser plasma in He gas at 1 atm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Muliadi [Program of Nuclear Power and Energy Safety Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Idris, Nasrullah [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh, Aceh 23111 (Indonesia); Fukumoto, Kenichi; Niki, Hideaki [Program of Nuclear Power and Energy Safety Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Sakan, Fujio [Department of Material Science, Faculty of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Maruyama, Tadashi [Integrated Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education and Regional Studies, University of Fukui (Japan)], E-mail: kagawa@edu00.f-edu.fukui-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-15

    A TEA CO{sub 2} laser (350 mJ-1.5 J, 10.6 {mu}m, 200 ns, 10 Hz) was focused onto a metal sub-target under He as host gas at 1 atmospheric pressure with a small amount of impurity gas, such as water and ethanol vapors. It was found that the TEA CO{sub 2} laser with the help of the metal sub-target is favorable for generating a strong, large volume helium gas breakdown plasma at 1 atmospheric pressure, in which the helium metastable-excited state was then produced overwhelmingly. While the metal sub-target itself was never ablated. The helium metastable-excited state produced after the strong helium gas breakdown plasma was considered to play an important role in exciting the atoms. This was confirmed by the specific characteristics of the detected H{alpha} emission, namely the strong intensity with low background, narrow spectral width, and the long lifetime. This technique can be used for gas and solid samples analysis. For nonmetal solid analysis, a metal mesh was introduced in front of the nonmetal sample surface to help initiation of the helium gas breakdown plasma. For metal sample, analysis can be carried out by combining the TEA CO{sub 2} laser and an Nd-YAG laser where the Nd-YAG laser is used to ablate the metal sample. The ablated atoms from the metal sample are then sent into the region of helium gas breakdown plasma induced by the TEA CO{sub 2} laser to be excited through the helium metastable-excited state. This technique can be extended to the analysis of other elements, not limited only to hydrogen, such as halogens.

  4. Molecular testing guidelines for lung adenocarcinoma: Utility of cell blocks and concordance between fine-needle aspiration cytology and histology samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymann, Jonas J.; Bulman, William A.; Maxfield, Roger A.; Powell, Charles A.; Halmos, Balazs; Sonett, Joshua; Beaubier, Nike T.; Crapanzano, John P.; Mansukhani, Mahesh M.; Saqi, Anjali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is a leading cause of mortality, and patients often present at a late stage. More recently, advances in screening, diagnosing, and treating lung cancer have been made. For instance, greater numbers of minimally invasive procedures are being performed, and identification of lung adenocarcinoma driver mutations has led to the implementation of targeted therapies. Advances in molecular techniques enable use of scant tissue, including cytology specimens. In addition, per recently published consensus guidelines, cytology-derived cell blocks (CBs) are preferred over direct smears. Yet, limited comparison of molecular testing of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) CBs and corresponding histology specimens has been performed. This study aimed to establish concordance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) virus homolog testing between FNA CBs and histology samples from the same patients. Materials and Methods: Patients for whom molecular testing for EGFR or KRAS was performed on both FNA CBs and histology samples containing lung adenocarcinoma were identified retrospectively. Following microdissection, when necessary, concordance of EGFR and KRAS molecular testing results between FNA CBs and histology samples was evaluated. Results: EGFR and/or KRAS testing was performed on samples obtained from 26 patients. Concordant results were obtained for all EGFR (22/22) and KRAS (17/17) mutation analyses performed. Conclusions: Identification of mutations in lung adenocarcinomas affects clinical decision-making, and it is important that results from small samples be accurate. This study demonstrates that molecular testing on cytology CBs is as sensitive and specific as that on histology. PMID:24987443

  5. Micro contactor based on isotachophoretic sample transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goet, Gabriele; Baier, Tobias; Hardt, Steffen

    2009-12-21

    It is demonstrated how isotachophoresis (ITP) in a microfluidic device may be utilized to bring two small sample volumes into contact in a well-controlled manner. The ITP contactor serves a similar purpose as micromixers that are designed to mix two species rapidly in a microfluidic channel. In contrast to many micromixers, the ITP contactor does not require complex channel architectures and allows a sample processing in the spirit of "digital microfluidics", i.e. the samples always remain in a compact volume. It is shown that the ITP zone transport through microchannels proceeds in a reproducible and predictable manner, and that the sample trajectories follow simple relationships obtained from Ohm's law. Firstly, the micro contactor can be used to synchronize two ITP zones having reached a channel at different points in time. Secondly, fulfilling its actual purpose it is capable of bringing two samples in molecular contact via an interpenetration of ITP zones. It is demonstrated that the contacting time is proportional to the ITP zone extension. This opens up the possibility of using that type of device as a special type of micromixer with "mixing times" significantly below one second and an option to regulate the duration of contact through specific parameters such as the sample volume. Finally, it is shown how the micro contactor can be utilized to conduct a hybridization reaction between two ITP zones containing complementary DNA strands.

  6. Responsive complementary feeding in rural Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anna C; Akhter, Sadika; Aboud, Frances E

    2006-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that malnutrition can partly be attributed to caregiver-child interaction during feeding episodes. Current conceptual frameworks emphasize the importance of responsiveness (including active and social behaviour), psychomotor abilities of the child to self-feed, and a non-distracting feeding environment. The present observational study had three main objectives: (1) to define operationally key terms such as responsive and active feeding and observe their frequency in a rural Bangladesh sample; (2) to examine whether self-feeding, responsive and active behaviours of the mother and child varied with child's age and amounts eaten; and (3) to determine associations between mother and child behaviours. Fifty-four mother-child pairs were observed during one feeding episode and behaviours were coded for 5 categories, namely self-feeding, responsive, active, social and distracting behaviours. Children were between 8 and 24 months of age. Results indicated that the five behaviours could be observed and reliably coded. Two-thirds of mothers had an active feeding style but only a third were responsive; the two styles did not overlap. With older children, mothers encouraged more eating and more self-feeding, but children did not feed themselves more; instead older children were more negatively responsive (refusing offered food). Positively responsive mothers tended to have active children who explicitly signaled their desire for food or water, and who ate more mouthfuls of food. Positively active mothers adopted different strategies to encourage eating, such as verbally directing the child to eat, focusing, and temporarily diverting. These mothers tended to have children who were negatively responsive and refused food. Children accepted on average 5.31 mouthfuls of food and rejected 2.13. Mothers who used intrusively active strategies (e.g. force feeding) tended to have children who were both positively and negatively responsive, thus partially

  7. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

  8. A Prorating Method for Estimating MMPI-2-RF Scores From MMPI Responses: Examination of Score Fidelity and Illustration of Empirical Utility in the PERSEREC Police Integrity Study Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarescavage, Anthony M; Corey, David M; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to identify Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) correlates of police officer integrity violations and other problem behaviors in an archival database with original MMPI item responses and collateral information regarding integrity violations obtained for 417 male officers. In Study 1, we estimated MMPI-2-RF scores from the MMPI item pool (which includes approximately 80% of the MMPI-2-RF items) in a normative sample, a psychiatric inpatient sample, and a police officer sample, and conducted analyses that demonstrated the comparability of estimated and full scale scores for 41 of the 51 MMPI-2-RF scales. In Study 2, we correlated estimated MMPI-2-RF scores with information about subsequent integrity violations and problem behaviors from the integrity violation data set. Several meaningful associations were obtained, predominately with scales from the emotional, thought, and behavioral dysfunction domains of the MMPI-2-RF. Application of a correction for range restriction yielded substantially improved validity estimates. Finally, we calculated relative risk ratios for the statistically significant findings using cutoffs lower than 65T, which is traditionally used to identify clinically significant elevations, and found several meaningful relative risk ratios. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Family Culture in Mental Health Help-Seeking and Utilization in a Nationally Representative Sample of Latinos in the United States: The NLAAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatoro, Alice P.; Morales, Eduardo S.; Mays, Vickie M.

    2014-01-01

    Considering the central role of familismo in Latino culture, it is important to assess the extent to which familismo affects mental health help-seeking. This study examined the role of behavioral familismo, the level of perceived family support, in the use of mental health services of Latinos in the United States. Data come from the National Latino and Asian American Study (NLAAS), a representative household survey examining the prevalence of mental disorders and services utilization among Latinos and Asian Americans. Analyses were limited to Latino adults with a clinical need for mental health services, indexed by meeting DSM–IV diagnostic criteria for any mood, anxiety, or substance use disorder during the past 12 months (N = 527). One-third of Latinos with a clinical need used any type of service in the past year, including specialty mental health, general medical, and informal or religious services. High behavioral familismo was significantly associated with increased odds of using informal or religious services, but not specialty or medical services. Self-perceived need and social perceptions of need for care within close networks (i.e., told by family/friends to seek professional help) also were significant predictors of service use. These results carry important implications toward expansions of the mental health workforce in the informal and religious services settings. PMID:24999521

  10. Utilization of large volume zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography for the analysis of polar pharmaceuticals in aqueous environmental samples: Benefits and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulard, Lise; Dierkes, Georg; Ternes, Thomas

    2017-12-11

    Benefits and limitations of HILIC were studied for the analysis of extreme polar organic contaminants in aqueous environmental matrices. A sensitive analytical method was developed and validated for the detection of 11 pharmaceuticals, 15 pharmaceutical metabolites and transformation products and the artificial sweetener acesulfame in aqueous environmental samples. The analytical method consisted of a simple and non-specific sample preparation based on freeze-drying followed by detection with large injection volume (70 μL) zwitterionic HILIC-ESI-MS/MS. Robustness studies showed a high sensitivity of the retention times and peak shapes to variations of the acetonitrile/water ratio of both the eluent and the diluent. Thus, a thorough sample and eluent preparation is required to obtain reproducible results. Extreme matrix effects of >200% were observed for emtricitabine and acyclovir, which could be traced to the co-elution of nitrate and chloride, respectively. These matrix effects and those of other analytes could be efficiently compensated by using deuterated, 13C and 15N-labeled internal standards. The developed method was able to detect the selected 27 analytes in treated wastewater, surface water and groundwater down to limit of quantification (LOQ) in the lower ng/L range. Appreciable concentrations were detected, ranging up to 110 μg/L (guanyl urea) in treated wastewater, up to 5.1 μg/L (oxipurinol) in surface water and up to 6.1 μg/L (acesulfame) in groundwater. In a German drinking water, only the X-ray contrast medium diatrizoate and the artificial sweetener acesulfame were quantified above LOQ with 0.19 μg/L and 0.35 μg/L, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Utility of ultrasound assisted-cloud point extraction and spectophotometry as a preconcentration and determination tool for the sensitive quantification of mercury species in fish samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Nail

    2018-01-01

    The current study reports, for the first time, the development of a new analytical method employing ultrasound assisted-cloud point extraction (UA-CPE) for the extraction of CH3Hg+ and Hg2 + species from fish samples. Detection and quantification of mercury species were performed at 550 nm by spectrophotometry. The analytical variables affecting complex formation and extraction efficiency were extensively evaluated and optimized by univariate method. Due to behave 14-fold more sensitive and selective of thiophene 2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H2TDC) to Hg2 + ions than CH3Hg+ in presence of mixed surfactant, Tween 20 and SDS at pH 5.0, the amounts of free Hg2 + and total Hg were spectrophotometrically established at 550 nm by monitoring Hg2 + in the pretreated- and extracted-fish samples in ultrasonic bath to speed up extraction using diluted acid mixture (1:1:1, v/v, 4 mol L- 1 HNO3, 4 mol L- 1 HCl, and 0.5 mol L- 1 H2O2), before and after pre-oxidation with permanganate in acidic media. The amount of CH3Hg+ was calculated from difference between total Hg and Hg2 + amounts. The UA-CPE method showed to be suitable for the extraction and determination of mercury species in certified reference materials. The results were in a good agreement (with Student's t-test at 95% confidence limit) with the certified values, and the relative standard deviation was lower than 3.2%. The limits of detection have been 0.27 and 1.20 μg L- 1, for Hg2 + from aqueous calibration solutions and matrix-matched calibration solutions spiked before digestion, respectively, while it is 2.43 μg L- 1 for CH3Hg+ from matrix-matched calibration solutions. A significant matrix effect was not observed from comparison of slopes of both calibration curves, so as to represent the sample matrix. The method was applied to fish samples for speciation analysis of Hg2 + and CH3Hg+. In terms of speciation, while total Hg is detected in range of 2.42-32.08 μg kg- 1, the distribution of mercury in fish were in

  12. High-gain inverters based on WSe2 complementary field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Mahmut; Chuang, Steven; Fang, Hui; Sachid, Angada B; Hettick, Mark; Lin, Yongjing; Zeng, Yuping; Javey, Ali

    2014-05-27

    In this work, the operation of n- and p-type field-effect transistors (FETs) on the same WSe2 flake is realized,and a complementary logic inverter is demonstrated. The p-FET is fabricated by contacting WSe2 with a high work function metal, Pt, which facilities hole injection at the source contact. The n-FET is realized by utilizing selective surface charge transfer doping with potassium to form degenerately doped n+ contacts for electron injection. An ON/OFF current ratio of >10(4) is achieved for both n- and p-FETs with similar ON current densities. A dc voltage gain of >12 is measured for the complementary WSe2 inverter. This work presents an important advance toward realization of complementary logic devices based on layered chalcogenide semiconductors for electronic applications.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use for vasomotor symptoms among women who have discontinued hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferer, Elizabeth M; Dormire, Sharon L; Becker, Heather

    2009-01-01

    To explore the use and perceived usefulness of complementary and alternative medicine therapies and nonhormonal conventional medicine alternatives to treat vasomotor symptoms occurring after withdrawal from hormone therapy. Retrospective, single cross sectional descriptive study. Study volunteers were recruited via a direct mailed questionnaire sent to a sample of women throughout the United States. Additional respondents were recruited through flyers and postcards advertising the study placed with permission at several health care provider offices and other locations. A sample of 563 menopausal women who had discontinued the use of hormone therapy completed a questionnaire describing their experiences with the use of complementary and alternative medicine. Responses to an investigator developed survey. Nearly half of the women surveyed used complementary and alternative medicine. The most common choices of complementary and alternative medicine were (a) multivitamins and calcium, (b) black cohosh, (c) soy supplements and food, (d) antidepressants, (e) meditation and relaxation, (f) evening primrose oil, (g) antihypertensives, and (h) homeopathy. Of the alternative therapies that were used by at least 5% of the sample, antidepressants were perceived as the most useful. With the increased adoption of complementary and alternative medicine, it is important for health care providers to be familiar with the various methods so they are comfortable discussing the benefits and risks with their patients to assist them in making informed decisions.

  14. Learning from nature: binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bin; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    In this Review, nature-inspired binary cooperative complementary nanomaterials (BCCNMs), consisting of two components with entirely opposite physiochemical properties at the nanoscale, are presented as a novel concept for the building of promising materials. Once the distance between the two nanoscopic components is comparable to the characteristic length of some physical interactions, the cooperation between these complementary building blocks becomes dominant and endows the macroscopic materials with novel and superior properties. The first implementation of the BCCNMs is the design of bio-inspired smart materials with superwettability and their reversible switching between different wetting states in response to various kinds of external stimuli. Coincidentally, recent studies on other types of functional nanomaterials contribute more examples to support the idea of BCCNMs, which suggests a potential yet comprehensive range of future applications in both materials science and engineering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Complementary Theories to Supply Chain Management Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halldorsson, Arni; Hsuan, Juliana; Kotzab, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to identify ways by which the theorizing of supply chain management (SCM) takes place, with particular attention to complementary theories. SCM suffers as well as benefits from a “conceptual slack”. Design/methodology/approach – The nature of SCM is discussed...... complementary theories to advancing understanding of SCM can benefit from the five building blocks of theorizing SCM proposed in the paper. Practical implications – Theoretical principles in SCM are not only used to describe practical problems but also to “produce the world”; supply chains can be seen...... as organizational units that act or consummate an action that delivers a particular performance. Originality/value – This paper portrays SCM sensitivity to managerial challenges by moving from borrowing to a more bilateral view on theorizing of SCM, reflecting the nature of SCM....

  16. ZEROES OF GENERALIZED FRESNEL COMPLEMENTARY INTEGRAL FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Lobo Segura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical upper and lower bounds are established for zeroes of a parametric family of functions which are defined by integrals of the same type as the Fresnel complementary integral. Asymptotic properties for these bounds are obtained as well as monotony properties of the localization intervals. Given the value of the parameter an analytical-numerical procedure is deduced to enclose all zeros of a given function with an a priori error.

  17. Complementary and Integrative Medicine for Neurologic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Rebecca Erwin; Baute, Vanessa; Wahbeh, Helané

    2017-09-01

    Although many neurologic conditions are common, cures are rare and conventional treatments are often limited. Many patients, therefore, turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The use of selected, evidence-based CAM therapies for the prevention and treatment of migraine, carpal tunnel syndrome, and dementia are presented. Evidence is growing many of modalities, including nutrition, exercise, mind-body medicine, supplements, and acupuncture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilizing quantitative certificate of analysis data to assess the amount of excipient lot-to-lot variability sampled during drug product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Understanding variability in excipient physico-chemical properties is becoming an important aspect of Quality-by-Design drug product development. However, present experimental methods have only been able to study a few physico-chemical properties for a few excipient lots due to time, cost, and sample gathering considerations. An alternative analysis method is proposed here that shows how quantitative physico-chemical property data reported in vendor certificates of analysis can evaluate excipient lot-to-lot variability in a comprehensive and low cost manner. Microcrystalline cellulose, spray-dried lactose, and magnesium stearate were selected as commonly-used excipients for this demonstration. The proposed analysis method offers drug product developers several advantages over present experimental methods, including the ability to: (1) examine excipient products for manufacturing site and/or year-to-year variations, (2) quantify a domain of prior experience for each excipient by determining the percentage of excipient lots contained within a multi-dimensional ellipsoid described by the excipient lots used during drug product development, and (3) rationally select excipient lots from the vendors inventory to maximize the domain of prior experience throughout the drug development process. For cases where certificate of analysis data may contain insufficient information, drug product developers and excipient vendors should work together to identify more appropriate datasets for analysis.

  19. Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Mothers in Kosova About Complementary Feeding for Infant and Children 6-24 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisha, Merita; Ramadani, Naser; Hoxha, Rina; Gashi, Sanije; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Zajmi, Drita; Begolli, Ilir

    2017-02-01

    This cross sectional study assessed knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding complementary feeding among mothers with children between 6-24 months at the national level. The sample of 492 mothers with children between 6-24 months, with a confidence level of 95%, the acceptable margin of 5%, the expected prevalence of 50% knowledge and effect of 1.3, were interviewed from all regions, in all Kosovo. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17.0 and presented using descriptive and inferential statistics such as Chi-square with significance level set at 5%. Overall, 88.4% of respondents had good knowledge of complementary feeding, while only 38.4% of mothers had good practices regarding time for starting complementary feeding. We found association between maternal knowledge and level of education for complementary feeding. There is a need to further explore the factors responsible to improving practices for complementary feeding.

  20. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  1. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X Y Z The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States Share: On This Page ... new findings on Americans' use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The findings are from the 2007 National ...

  2. Interest in and Willingness to Use Complementary, Alternative and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interest in and Willingness to Use Complementary, Alternative and Traditional Medicine among Academic and Administrative University Staff in Bloemfontein, South ... African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines ... The respondents wanted alternatives to certain medications, such as antibiotics.

  3. Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine Small Text Medium Text Large Text Mind-Body Medicine Practices in Complementary and Alternative Medicine YESTERDAY ...

  4. Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches : What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Integrative Health NCCIH Clinical Digest for health professionals Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches: What the Science ... 2014 Clinical Guidelines, Scientific Literature, Info for Patients: Sleep Disorders and Complementary Health Approaches Mind and Body ...

  5. Psychosocial stressors contributing to emergency psychiatric service utilization in a sample of ethno-culturally diverse clients with psychosis in Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberg, Martin; Tuck, Andrew; McKenzie, Kwame

    2017-09-02

    Understanding the psychosocial stressors of people with psychoses from minority ethnic groups may help in the development of culturally appropriate services. This study aimed to compare psychosocial factors associated with attendance at an emergency department (ED) for six ethnic groups. Preventing crises or supporting people better in the community may decrease hospitalization and improve outcomes. A cohort was created by retrospective case note analysis of people of East-Asian, South-Asian, Black-African, Black-Caribbean, White-North American and White-European origin groups attending a specialized psychiatric ED in Toronto with a diagnosis of psychosis between 2009 and 2011. The psychological or social stressors which were linked to the presentation at the ED that were documented by the attending physicians were collected for this study. Logistic regression models were constructed to analyze the odds of presenting with specific stressors. Seven hundred sixty-five clients were included in this study. Forty-four percent of the sample did not have a psychiatrist, and 53% did not have a primary care provider. Social environmental stressors were the most frequent psychosocial stressor across all six groups, followed by issues in the primary support group, occupational and housing stressors. When compared to White-North American clients, East-Asian and White-European origin clients were less likely to present with a housing stressor, while Black-African clients had decreased odds of presenting with primary support group stressor. Having a primary care provider or psychiatrist were predominantly protective factors. In Toronto, moving people with chronic mental health conditions out of poverty, increasing the social safety net and improving access to primary care and community based mental health services may decrease many of the stressors which contribute to ED attendance.

  6. A case report demonstrating the utility of next generation sequencing in analyzing serial samples from the lung following an infection with influenza A (H7N9) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Xianwen; Liu, Yingmei; Xiao, Yan; Li, Li; Yang, Fan; Su, Haoxiang; Liu, Feng; Liu, Haiying; Cao, Bin; Jin, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a well-recognized sequela of patient suffering from influenza, and a key factor, with cytokine dysregulation, that contribute to severe disease and mortality. To obtain a comprehensive assessment of lung microbial community dynamics in a fatal influenza H7N9 case during the whole clinical course, we undertook a longitudinal study. Serial bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples were collected from a H7N9 patient after illness onset, and the microbiome was characterized by using next-generation sequencing and microbiological approaches. Furthermore, the kinetics of circulating cytokine storms related to viral and secondary bacterial infection were analyzed. Within complex and dynamic communities, the lung microbiome with H7N9 infection were dominated by gram-negative bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii after the viral invasion and during the whole clinical course. Sputum and blood culture confirmed the secondary bacterial infection with multidrug-resistant A. baumannii 9 days later. The dynamics of the bacterial infection with carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii correlated with antibiotic therapy. Our observations also indicated that sustained high levels of host inflammatory factors, consisting of a set of distinct cytokines associated with disease stage, may contribute to disease progression and death. This study demonstrates an initial attempt to explore the dynamic microbiome involved inH7N9 infection and its response to antimicrobial therapy, as well as host cytokine response to infection by using next-generation sequencing. These type of investigations with longitudinal follow-up to understand dynamics of microbial community and cytokines involved in lung infection may provide opportunities for development and optimization of targeted antimicrobial therapy and even new therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Are Users of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Sicker than Non-Users?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Shmueli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Higher utilization of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, both in cross-sections and over time, is commonly related to better socioeconomic status and to increased dissatisfaction with conventional medicine and its values. Little is known about health differences between users and non-users of CAM. The objective of the paper is to explore the difference in health measured by the SF-36 instrument between users and non-users of CAM, and to estimate the relative importance of the SF-36 health domains scales to the likelihood of consulting CAM providers. Interviews were used to collect information from a sample of 2000 persons in 1993 and 2500 persons in 2000, representing the Israeli Jewish urban population aged 45–75 in those years. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were used to explore the above associations. The results show that while users of CAM enjoy higher socioeconomic status and younger age, they tend to report worse health than non-users on the eight SF-36 health domains scales in both years. However, controlling for personal characteristics, lower scores on the bodily pain, role-emotional and vitality scales are related to greater likelihood of CAM use in 2000. In 1993, no scale had a significant adjusted association with the use of CAM. The conclusions are that CAM users tend to report worse health. With CAM becoming a mainstream, though somewhat luxurious, medical practice, pain and affective-emotional distress are the main drivers of CAM use.

  8. Complementary feeding practices and nutritional status of children 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Inappropriate complementary feeding practices among children aged 6-23 months is major cause of under nutrition. There is scarce information on the relationship between complementary feeding practices and nutritional status. This study aimed to determine the factors contributing to the complementary ...

  9. The effect of using complementary medicine on the infertility-specific quality of life of women undergoing in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porat-Katz, Anat; Paltiel, Ora; Kahane, Arik; Eldar-Geva, Talia

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate associations between the use of complementary medicine, quality of life (QoL), and lifestyle habits among women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF). In a cross-sectional study, women aged 18-44 years undergoing an IVF cycle at a large IVF center in Israel between February 1, 2013 and April 30, 2015 were invited to complete a self-administered questionnaire. Patients who reported using of at least one complementary medicine intervention to treat infertility prior to IVF treatment were considered complementary-medicine users. Fertility QoL and lifestyle behaviors were compared between complementary-medicine users and non-users with the FertiQoL tools. Of 381 patients eligible to participate in the study, 323 completed the questionnaire; 110 (34.1%) participants were complementary-medicine users. Complementary-medicine users demonstrated higher scores for the FertiQol relational domain (P=0.005) and lower scores for the social domain (P=0.010). Complementary-medicine users reported greater utilization of psychosocial support (Pinfertility could be useful in identifying patients who could benefit from psychosocial interventions or lifestyle recommendations. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Complementary Feeding, Micronutrients and Developmental Outcomes of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Jacqueline F

    2017-01-01

    The period of complementary feeding (6-24 months of age) can be a challenging and vulnerable time for infant nutrition due to disproportionately high requirements for metabolic processes, rapid developmental processes, and limited gastric capacity. This is a period of crucial brain development where high caloric intake is necessary to allow synaptogenesis (creation of channels between neurons for communication), and maintenance of established synapses, myelination (laying the myelin sheath around neuronal axons) and everyday psychological functioning. Key nutrients needed for infant brain development include iron (required for oxygen provision to metabolize energy), fatty acids (for cellular membranes and myelin) and protein (for structural support, such as in myelin). Deficiencies in key nutrients during the complementary feeding period have been consistently linked to child development outcomes. Observational studies have consistently demonstrated links between nutrient deficiencies and impairments in intellectual abilities, work capacity, behavioral functioning and even delayed mental and motor development. Yet results from a number of interventions using food, individual nutrients or multiple micronutrients with child development assessments are mixed, possibly partly due to differences in interventions (nutrients and timing), populations, baseline nutrient status, sample sizes, attrition and method of assessment. © 2017 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Use of complementary and alternative medicine among women in New York City: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor-Litvak, P; Cushman, L F; Kronenberg, F; Wade, C; Kalmuss, D

    2001-12-01

    This study documents the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), among White, African American, and Hispanic/Latina women living in New York City. A pilot to a national survey of CAM use among American women, this study explores women's use of categories of CAM and various CAM practitioners, racial and ethnic differences in CAM use, and women's perceptions regarding the effectiveness of CAM. DESIGN AND LOCATION: Data were collected from women residing in New York City using random digit dialing/computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). The sample of 300 had equal numbers of women (n = 100) who self-identified as White, Hispanic/Latina, and African American, equally stratified by age (below and above age 40). Eligibility requirements included self-identification as Anglo/white, African American, or Hispanic/Latina and between ages 18 and 80. Three distinct categories of CAM were explored: (1) medicinal teas, homeopathic remedies, herbs, vitamins; (2) yoga, meditation, spiritual practices; and (3) manual therapies including chiropractic, massage, acupressure. Health concerns of interest were those frequently described in prior focus groups, and included reproductive health issues (e.g., pregnancy, menstruation, menopause) as well as other common women's health problems (e.g., heart disease, high blood pressure, headaches). More than half the sample has used a CAM treatment or remedy, and 40% have visited a CAM practitioner. Among users, half have used only one of the CAM categories, approximately one third have used two, and 16% used all three. The category of CAM used most often was medicinal tea/herbs/vitamins; the practitioners visited most frequently were chiropractors (18%) and nutritionists (17%). Racial and ethnic differences in CAM use were minimal, and approximately one third of all treatments used were rated "very effective" by users. Substantial utilization of CAM remedies and treatments for a variety of women's health concerns is

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine for rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Sophia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of complementary and alternative medicine is not uncommonly encountered in our patients. This manuscript reviewed the latest evidence on other modalities in treating rheumatic diseases. Treatments that are found to be helpful for rheumatoid arthritis include herbs, fish oil, and acupuncture. Fish oil, vitamin D, N-acetylcysteine, and cognitive behavior treatments are helpful for systemic lupus erythematosus. Hydrotherapy and massage are potentially beneficial for fibromyalgia patients. Diet supplement is not found to be beneficial for osteoarthritis. CAM modalities will need further studies.

  13. Biodiverse food solutions to enhance complementary feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robertson, Aileen; Parlesak, Alexandr; Greiner, Ted

    2016-01-01

    that lipidbased nutrient supplements (LNS) and ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) may thus be ineffective, de Pee advocates research to improve compliance, assuming effectiveness has been demonstrated. We highlight four additional problems: inappropriateness, cost, lack of sustainability and potential adverse...... help combat global malnutrition by using practical solutions that can be rolled out as public health strategies. Culturally-sensitive, cost-effective, sustainable complementary foods have the potential to increase nutrition security and sovereignty, reduce poverty, hunger and levels of chronic...... undernutrition while conserving biodiversity and respecting indigenous knowledge....

  14. Complementary and Alternative Therapies in ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedlack, Richard S.; Joyce, Nanette; Carter, Gregory T.; Pagononi, Sabrina; Karam, Chafic

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Given the severity of their illness and lack of effective disease modifying agents, it is not surprising that most patients with ALS consider trying complementary and alternative therapies. Some of the most commonly considered alternative therapies include special diets, nutritional supplements, cannabis, acupuncture, chelation and energy healing. This chapter reviews these in detail. We also describe 3 models by which physicians may frame discussions about alternative therapies: paternalism, autonomy and shared decision making. Finally, we review a program called ALSUntangled which using shared shared decision making to review alternative therapies for ALS. PMID:26515629

  15. [Complementary treatment of pneumonia with pleural effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampp, Thomas; Michalsen, Andreas

    2006-04-01

    A 43-year-old male patient was diagnosed with acute sinistral pleuropneumonia and a pronounced thoracic pain syndrome. Despite of his painful ailments the patient refused antibiotic treatment. A complementary therapy comprising physiotherapy, hydrotherapy, herbal therapy and vitamin C, cupping and QiGong was initiated. A cantharidin blister was applied topically to the left thorax in order to treat the pain syndrome. The multimodal CAM treatment resulted in a rapid clinical and x-ray resolution of pneumonia, and cantharidin treatment effectively relieved pain. The case and the potential of topical cantharidin in pain syndromes are discussed.

  16. The Perils of Complementary Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Bayme

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available More than 11,000 articles lauding alternative medicine appear in the PubMed database, but there are only a few articles describing the complications of such care. Two patients suffering from complications of alternative medicine were treated in our hospital: one patient developed necrotizing fasciitis after acupuncture, and the second developed an epidural hematoma after chiropractic manipulation. These complications serve as a clarion call to the Israeli Health Ministry, as well as to health ministries around the world, to include complementary medicine under its inspection and legislative authority.

  17. Complementary and alternative treatments in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Michael A; Gloyer, Kathryn

    2013-12-01

    Many patients suffering from pain and dysfunction attributable to musculoskeletal conditions will use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Unfortunately, there is a paucity of both the quantity and quality of CAM treatments for specific musculoskeletal conditions. Many CAM treatments are used for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, but may be more commonly used for specific conditions. This article addresses the use of CAM for specific musculoskeletal conditions, followed by a review of other CAM treatments and their potential indications for a multitude of conditions, based on the current medical literature and traditional use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Minority and Medically Underserved Oncology Patients: Assessment and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Desiree; Cohen, Lorenzo; Rieber, Alyssa G; Urbauer, Diana; Fellman, Bryan; Fisch, Michael J; Nazario, Arlene

    2017-10-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in minority and medically underserved oncology patients is not well documented. We assessed knowledge and utilization of CAM in a sample of these patients receiving treatment at an urban community hospital. Patients with cancer were interviewed using an electronic application that depicted specific CAM therapies. Patients were questioned on their knowledge and utilization of therapies, deterrents to use, and interest in using these therapies if they were made available. Patients (n = 165) reported a high awareness and use of CAM therapies. CAM use was highest for prayer (85%), relaxation (54%), special diet (29%), meditation (19%), and massage (18%). Patients' interest in using CAM was high for nearly all therapies. Lack of adequate knowledge and cost of use were reported as deterrents to use. Female patients reported higher use of aromatherapy relative to males (37.1% vs 19.4%, P = .02); those with higher education reported greater use of relaxation (60.8% vs 28.6%, P = .02); non-Hispanics reported higher use of relaxation relative to Hispanics (63.5% vs 44.2%, P = .03), and African American patients reported higher use of relaxation relative to White patients (69.2% vs 50%, P = .03). CAM use in minority and medically underserved cancer patients is common, but not professionally guided; thus, concerns remain regarding its safe use. Our data underscore the importance of patient-physician dialogue regarding CAM use in this patient population, and interest in access to the medically guided integration of evidence-based CAM therapies.

  19. Labview utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-30

    The software package provides several utilities written in LabView. These utilities don't form independent programs, but rather can be used as a library or controls in other labview programs. The utilities include several new controls (xcontrols), VIs for input and output routines, as well as other 'helper'-functions not provided in the standard LabView environment.

  20. Determining the Status of Organizational Agility Capabilities in complementary and convertor Agricultural Industries using the Fuzzy Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Manufacturing industries of agricultural products, which constitute a considerable part of different countries’ economies, are seeking new profitable opportunities by increasing competition at the international level. Organizational agility is new method and philosophy of production that seeks to react effectively to the variable and unpredictable environment and to utilize the changes as chances for organizational progress and profitability. In this regard, the present research aims to survey the capabilities of organizational agility in complementary and convertor agricultural industries. For this purpose, based on organizational agility literature, four variables- responsiveness, competency, flexibility, and quickness- were examined as the agility capabilities. The research method was descriptive, and the statistical population included 142 managers of Agricultural industries in East Azarbaijan Province during the year 2012. The study sample was calculated 117 using simple random sampling technique. For data collection, the questionnaire was designed by some scholars. The data was analyzed by means of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics and fuzzy set theory. The results showed that the complementary and the convertor agricultural industries of the province have obtained scores higher than the average for the capabilities of responsiveness, flexibility, and quickness but a lower one for the capability of the competency. With regard to the fact that compiling the strategic vision, technological ability, and introducing the new products are among the main components of achieving competency, it is suggested that managers of this sector should, in order to reinforce competency in agricultural industries, pay special attention to compiling the strategic vision, making use of information technology, and using the new opportunities of the market to introduce the new products.

  1. Expectations and responsibilities regarding the sale of complementary medicines in pharmacies: perspectives of consumers and pharmacy support staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Priya; McFarland, Reanna; La Caze, Adam

    2017-08-01

    Most sales of complementary medicines within pharmacies are conducted by pharmacy support staff. The absence of rigorous evidence for the effectiveness of many complementary medicines raises a number of ethical questions regarding the sale of complementary medicines in pharmacies. Explore (1) what consumers expect from pharmacists/pharmacies with regard to the sale of complementary medicines, and (2) how pharmacy support staff perceive their responsibilities when selling complementary medicines. One-on-one semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of pharmacy support staff and consumers in pharmacies in Brisbane. Consumers were asked to describe their expectations when purchasing complementary medicines. Pharmacy support staff were asked to describe their responsibilities when selling complementary medicines. Interviews were conducted and analysed using the techniques developed within Grounded Theory. Thirty-three consumers were recruited from three pharmacies. Consumers described complementary medicine use as a personal health choice. Consumer expectations on the pharmacist included: select the right product for the right person, expert product knowledge and maintaining a wide range of good quality stock. Twenty pharmacy support staff were recruited from four pharmacies. Pharmacy support staff employed processes to ensure consumers receive the right product for the right person. Pharmacy support staff expressed a commitment to aiding consumers, but few evaluated the reliability of effectiveness claims regarding complementary medicines. Pharmacists need to respect the personal health choices of consumers while also putting procedures in place to ensure safe and appropriate use of complementary medicines. This includes providing appropriate support to pharmacy support staff. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  2. Complementary and Alternative Exercises for Management of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chien Chyu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic condition characterized by degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint. With no cure currently available, the goals of treating OA are to alleviate pain, maintain, or improve joint mobility, increase the muscle strength of the joints, and minimize the disabling effects of the disease. Recent research has suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM exercises may improve OA symptoms. This paper covers CAM mind-body exercises—Tai Chi, qigong, and yoga—for OA management and evaluates their benefits in pain reduction, muscle strength, physical function, stiffness, balance, fear of falling, self-efficacy, quality of life, and psychological outcomes in patients with OA, based on randomized controlled trials published. Findings from the literature suggest that CAM exercises demonstrate considerable promise in the management of OA. Future studies require rigorous randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes.

  3. Complementary and alternative exercises for management of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; von Bergen, Vera; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Yan; Yeh, James K; Shen, Chwan-Li

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic condition characterized by degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint. With no cure currently available, the goals of treating OA are to alleviate pain, maintain, or improve joint mobility, increase the muscle strength of the joints, and minimize the disabling effects of the disease. Recent research has suggested that complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) exercises may improve OA symptoms. This paper covers CAM mind-body exercises-Tai Chi, qigong, and yoga-for OA management and evaluates their benefits in pain reduction, muscle strength, physical function, stiffness, balance, fear of falling, self-efficacy, quality of life, and psychological outcomes in patients with OA, based on randomized controlled trials published. Findings from the literature suggest that CAM exercises demonstrate considerable promise in the management of OA. Future studies require rigorous randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes.

  4. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially...

  5. Television Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosh, O.; Wright, E. N.

    The utilization of educational television (ETV) in schools can be ascertained by considering the teacher training in ETV, the extent of access to ETV, the student reaction, and the programing. Using a questionnaire survey method combined with detailed ETV logs, this study was able to analyze both ETV and film utilization in 13 elementary and…

  6. Complementary and Alternative Medicine and Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Ramadevi; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2017-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been in use among cancer patients for a long time. There are several types of CAM that are practiced in various parts of the world. For example, traditional medicinal practices followed in India and China are frequently used by cancer patients. CAM is broadly classified into five different categories: (1) traditional medicines, (2) mind-body interventions, (3) biology-based practices, (4) manipulative body-based practices, and (5) energy medicine. In this review, we have compiled data from the available literature regarding CAM use in breast cancer patients. We have highlighted the current concepts and the need for more structured studies to facilitate the implementation of CAM as a mainstream option for cancer patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Threefold Complementary Approach to Holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); de Teramond, Guy F. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Dosch, Hans Gunter [Inst. for Theoretical Physics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-12-27

    A complementary approach, derived from (a) higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, (b) light-front quantization and (c) the invariance properties of the full conformal group in one dimension leads to a nonperturbative relativistic light-front wave equation which incorporates essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics. The fundamental conformal symmetry of the classical QCD Lagrangian in the limit of massless quarks is encoded in the resulting effective theory. The mass scale for confinement emerges from the isomorphism between the conformal group andSO(2,1). This scale appears in the light-front Hamiltonian by mapping to the evolution operator in the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan, which retains the conformal invariance of the action. Remarkably, the specific form of the confinement interaction and the corresponding modification of AdS space are uniquely determined in this procedure.

  8. Complementary and Integrative Approaches for Pediatric Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Sita

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the use of complementary and integrative medicine for the management of pediatric headache is reviewed. Despite limited numbers of studies for pediatric headaches, children and families seek these services. Integrative medicine focuses on treating the whole person, integrating conventional medicine with mind-body-spirit methods. Nutriceuticals include dietary supplements in the form of vitamins (vitamin D), minerals (magnesium), coenzyme Q, butterbur, and melatonin. Acupuncture, stimulation, physical therapy and Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulations (TENS) or Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) may also be useful in selected patients. The efficacy of all these therapeutic alternatives in pediatric headache is presented here. Primary care providers, neurologists, and headache specialists alike need to be informed of such interventions and integrate these approaches, when appropriate, in the management of children with headaches. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Complementary medicine--Jewish medical ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Yisrae; Schiff, Elad

    2011-08-01

    In Israel, as in the Western world, the use of different methods of complementary and alternative medicine ICAM) is spreading. CAM raises ethical questions of concern to healthcare providers and to the public: Can physicians recommend a treatment that has no scientific evidence? Should the government include such therapies in the health budget? Can complementary therapists receive protection against lawsuits if their treatment is recognized? The purpose of this article is to present a Jewish perspective on these issues. The fundamental sources that deal with the subject are based on the approach of rabbinic authorities toward unproven medicine, as expressed in the "Mishnah" and "Talmud" (200-500 C.E). The great Jewish scholar who discusses the subject in detail is Maimonides (1135-1204), who defines what "medicine" is and claims that medicine has to rely on reason or experience. Contemporary Jewish commentators present their position based on the interpretation of Maimonides' texts. In this article we claim that treatments can be divided into four groups, each group having a different halachic status: (1) Treatment that might be dangerous--should not be used. (2) Treatment that is safe--can be used, but has no other special status. (3) Treatment recognized by alternative therapists--has consequences for the observant Jew, such as laws of Kashrut and Shabbat. (4) Treatment that was tested and proven using modern medical methods has public significance--the therapist is entitled to legal defense if he made a reasonable mistake; the government can consider funding such treatment using public money. This article presents the Jewish halachic sources upon which we propose an ethical-practical approach to CAM.

  10. Marketing complementary foods and supplements in Burkina Faso, Madagascar, and Vietnam: lessons learned from the Nutridev program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyeron, Olivier; Denizeau, Mirrdyn; Berger, Jacques; Trèche, Serge

    2010-06-01

    Sustainable approaches to improving infant and young child feeding are needed. The Nutridev program worked in Vietnam, Madagascar, and Burkina Faso to test different strategies to improve complementary feeding using fortified products sold to families. To review the experiences of programs producing and marketing fortified complementary foods and to report on the feasibility of local production and marketing of fortified complementary foods to increase usage of high-quality foods among children of low-income families in a self-sustaining manner. Project documents, surveys of mothers, and production and sales reports were reviewed. Nutridev experience in Vietnam, Madagascar, and Burkina Faso demonstrates that it is possible to produce affordable, high-quality complementary foods and supplements locally in developing countries. Strategies to make products readily available to the targeted population and to convince this population to consume them yielded mixed results, varying greatly based on the strategy utilized and the context in which it was implemented. In several contexts, the optimal approach appears to be strengthening the existing food distribution network to sell complementary foods and supplements, with the implementation of a temporary promotion and nutrition education network in partnership with local authorities (e.g., health services) to increase awareness among families about the fortified complementary food product and optimal feeding practices. In urban areas, where the density of the population is high, design and implementation of specific networks very close to consumers seems to be a good way to combine economic sustainability and good consumption levels.

  11. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing the SNOX innovative clean coal technology demonstration. Volume 1, Sampling/results/special topics: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    This study was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE during 1993. The motivation for those assessments was the mandate in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments that a study be made of emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from electric utilities. The report is organized in two volumes. Volume 1: Sampling describes the sampling effort conducted as the basis for this study; Results presents the concentration data on HAPs in the several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations conducted with those data; and Special Topics report on issues such as comparison of sampling methods and vapor/solid distributions of HAPs. Volume 2: Appendices include quality assurance/quality control results, uncertainty analysis for emission factors, and data sheets. This study involved measurements of a variety of substances in solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at the Innovative Clean Coal Technology Demonstration (ICCT) of the Wet Sulfuric Acid-Selective Catalytic Reduction (SNOX) process. The SNOX demonstration is being conducted at Ohio Edison`s Niles Boiler No. 2 which uses cyclone burners to burn bituminous coal. A 35 megawatt slipstream of flue gas from the boiler is used to demonstrate SNOX. The substances measured at the SNOX process were the following: 1. Five major and 16 trace elements, including mercury, chromium, cadmium, lead, selenium, arsenic, beryllium, and nickel; 2. Acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate); 3. Ammonia and cyanide; 4. Elemental carbon; 5. Radionuclides; 6. Volatile organic compounds (VOC); 7. Semi-volatile compounds (SVOC) including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); and 8. Aldehydes.

  12. Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    Utility Energy Services Contracts: Enabling Documents provides materials that clarify the authority for Federal agencies to enter into utility energy services contracts (UESCs), as well as sample documents and resources to ease utility partnership contracting.

  13. Managing Bilingual Interaction in a Gujarati Complementary School in Leicester

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Peter; Bhatt, Arvind; Bhojani, Nirmala; Creese, Angela

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on teacher–student interaction in two Gujarati complementary school classrooms in one school in the East Midlands city of Leicester, UK. To date, little work has been published on interaction in complementary schools, and little is therefore known about the cultures of learning and teaching in such contexts. Our study of complementary schools in Leicester has shown how the classroom participants manage bilingualism and bilingual learning and teaching. One of the most notice...

  14. Thermal property measurement of thin fibers by complementary methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Troy Robert

    To improve measurement reliability and repeatability and resolve the orders of magnitude discrepancy between the two different measurements (via reduced model transient electrothermal and lock-in IR thermography), this dissertation details the development of three complementary methods to accurately measure the thermal properties of the natural and synthetic Nephila (N.) clavipes spider dragline fibers. The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the dragline silk of the (N.) clavipes spider has been characterized by one research group to be 151-416 W m-1 K-1 and 6.4-12.3 x 10-5 m2 s -1, respectively, for samples with low to high strains (zero to 19.7%). Thermal diffusivity of the dragline silk of a different spider species, Araneus diadematus, has been determined by another research group as 2 x 10-7 m2 s-1 for un-stretched silk. This dissertation seeks to resolve this discrepancy by three complementary methods. The methods detailed are the transient electrothermal technique (in both reduced and full model versions), the 3o method (for both current and voltage sources), and the non-contact, photothermal, quantum-dot spectral shape-based fluorescence thermometry method. These methods were also validated with electrically conductive and non-conductive fibers. The resulting thermal conductivity of the dragline silk is 1.2 W m-1 K-1, the thermal diffusivity is 6 x 10-7 m2 s -1 and the volumetric heat capacity is 2000 kJ m-3 K-1, with an uncertainty of about 12% for each property.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education for Medical Profession: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana K. Quartey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To help integrate traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM into health systems, efforts are being made to educate biomedical doctors (BMD and medical students on TCAM. We systematically evaluated the effect of TCAM education on BMD and medical students' attitude, knowledge, and behavior towards TCAM utilization and integration with biomedical medicine. Methods. Evaluative studies were identified from four databases. Methodological quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI. Study outcomes were classified using Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Results. 3122 studies were identified and 12 studies of mediocre quality met inclusion criteria. Qualitative synthesis showed usage of diverse approaches including didactic, experiential learning, varying length, teacher background and intensity of exposure. More positive attitudes and improved knowledge after intervention were noted especially when teachers were BM trained. However, few studies assessed behavior change objectively. Finally, longer-term objective outcomes such as impact on patient care were not assessed. Conclusions. Lack of use of objective and reliable instruments preclude firm conclusion on the effect of TCAM education on study participants. However, positive changes, although mostly subjectively reported, were noted in most studies. Future evaluation should use validated or objective outcome assessments, and the value of using dual trained instructors.

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine education for medical profession: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartey, Nana K; Ma, Polly H X; Chung, Vincent C H; Griffiths, Sian M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To help integrate traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) into health systems, efforts are being made to educate biomedical doctors (BMD) and medical students on TCAM. We systematically evaluated the effect of TCAM education on BMD and medical students' attitude, knowledge, and behavior towards TCAM utilization and integration with biomedical medicine. Methods. Evaluative studies were identified from four databases. Methodological quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Study outcomes were classified using Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Results. 3122 studies were identified and 12 studies of mediocre quality met inclusion criteria. Qualitative synthesis showed usage of diverse approaches including didactic, experiential learning, varying length, teacher background and intensity of exposure. More positive attitudes and improved knowledge after intervention were noted especially when teachers were BM trained. However, few studies assessed behavior change objectively. Finally, longer-term objective outcomes such as impact on patient care were not assessed. Conclusions. Lack of use of objective and reliable instruments preclude firm conclusion on the effect of TCAM education on study participants. However, positive changes, although mostly subjectively reported, were noted in most studies. Future evaluation should use validated or objective outcome assessments, and the value of using dual trained instructors.

  17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Pakistan: Prospects and Limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar T. Shaikh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite all the marvelous advancements in modern medicine, traditional medicine has always been practiced. More than 70% of the developing world's population still depends on the complementary and alternative systems of medicine (CAM. Cultural beliefs and practices often lead to self-care or home remedies in rural areas and consultation with traditional healers. Evidence-based CAM therapies have shown remarkable success in healing acute as well as chronic diseases. Alternative therapies have been utilized by people in Pakistan who have faith in spiritual healers, clergymen, hakeems, homeopaths or even many quacks. These are the first choice for problems such as infertility, epilepsy, psychosomatic troubles, depression and many other ailments. The traditional medicine sector has become an important source of health care, especially in rural and tribal areas of the country. The main reasons for consulting a CAM healer is the proximity, affordable fee, availability, family pressure and the strong opinion of the community. Pakistan has a very rich tradition in the use of medicinal plants for the treatment of various ailments. It necessitates the integration of the modern and CAM systems in terms of evidence-based information sharing. The health-seeking behavior of the people especially in developing countries calls for bringing all CAM healers into the mainstream by providing them with proper training, facilities and back-up for referral. A positive interaction between the two systems has to be harnessed to work for the common goal of improving health of the people.

  18. Complementary power output characteristics of electromagnetic generators and triboelectric generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Feng-Ru; Tang, Wei; Yao, Yan; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-04-04

    Recently, a triboelectric generator (TEG) has been invented to convert mechanical energy into electricity by a conjunction of triboelectrification and electrostatic induction. Compared to the traditional electromagnetic generator (EMG) that produces a high output current but low voltage, the TEG has different output characteristics of low output current but high output voltage. In this paper, we present a comparative study regarding the fundamentals of TEGs and EMGs. The power output performances of the EMG and the TEG have a special complementary relationship, with the EMG being a voltage source and the TEG a current source. Utilizing a power transformed and managed (PTM) system, the current output of a TEG can reach as high as ∼3 mA, which can be coupled with the output signal of an EMG to enhance the output power. We also demonstrate a design to integrate a TEG and an EMG into a single device for simultaneously harvesting mechanical energy. In addition, the integrated NGs can independently output a high voltage and a high current to meet special needs.

  19. Chinese medicine as complementary therapy for female infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ju-Feng; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Wang, Ling; Song, Pei-Pei

    2017-04-01

    Chinese medicine (CM) has been used in clinical treatment for thousands of years in China, Japan, Korea, and other countries. CM is at present attracting many attentions around the world for reproductive health care and disease prevention, including treatment of female infertility. This review focuses on the CM treatment for female infertility patients, and supplies a summary on the efficacy, safety, and mechanism of some Chinese herbal medicines, herbal medicine-derived active compounds, and acupuncture. A large number of researches have reported that CM could alleviate or even cure female infertility by regulating hormone, improving reproductive outcome of in vivo fertilization, affecting embryonic implantation, curing polycystic ovarian syndrome, endometriosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, relieving mental stress, and regulating immune system. Meanwhile, a few studies claimed that there was little adverse reaction of CM in randomized controlled trials. However, up to present there is a lack of adequate evidences with molecular mechanistic researches and randomized controlled trials to prove the CM as an effective and safe treatment for infertility. Thus, utility of CM as a complementary medicine will be a feasible method to improve the outcome of female infertility treatment.

  20. Exclusive Breastfeeding Rate and Complementary Feeding Indicators in China: A National Representative Survey in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Duan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate infant and young child feeding could reduce morbidity and mortality and could improve cognitive development of children. However, nationwide data on exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding status in China are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess current exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding status in China. A national representative survey (Chinese National Nutrition and Health Survey of children aged under 6 years was done in 2013. Stratified multistage cluster sampling was used to select study participants. World Health Organization (WHO infant and young child feeding indicators were firstly used to assess exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding practice nationwide. In total, 14,458 children aged under two years (0 to <730 days were studied from 55 counties in 30 provinces in China. The crude exclusive breastfeeding rate under 6 months was 20.7% (908/4381 and the weighted exclusive breastfeeding rate was 18.6%. The crude prevalence of minimum dietary diversity, minimum meal frequency and minimum acceptable diet were 52.5% (5286/10,071, 69.8% (7027/10,071, and 27.4% (2764/10,071 among children aged 6–23 months, respectively. The weighted rate was 53.7%, 69.1%, and 25.1%, respectively. Residential area, household income and maternal education were positively associated with the three complementary feeding indicators. The exclusive breastfeeding rate under 6 months was low and complementary feeding practice was not optimal in China. Residential area, household income and maternal education might be used to target infants and young children to improve complementary feeding practice.

  1. Racial and Ethnic Profiles of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Among Young Adults in the United States: Findings From the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upchurch, Dawn M; Wexler Rainisch, Bethany K

    2012-10-01

    This study describes complementary and alternative medicine use among a national sample of young adults, with an emphasis on characterizing racial and ethnic differences, highlighting variation across subgroups of Hispanics. The authors examined young adults ages 18 to 27 years (n = 14 128) from wave III (2001-2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Prevalence estimates and logistic regression results were weighted and adjusted for complex sample design. The study examined recent complementary and alternative medicine use in the past 12 months, recent use for each of 15 specific complementary and alternative medicine modalities, and the 5 most commonly used modalities (herbs, massage, chiropractic, relaxation, and vitamins). Results showed that 29% of young adults aged 18 to 27 years recently used complementary and alternative medicine. Prevalence was highest among Cuban Americans (42%) and lowest among blacks (22%). Young adults used a diversity of complementary and alternative medicine modalities and there were substantial differences in use across racial and ethnic groups.

  2. Performance of an alternative HIV diagnostic algorithm using the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and potential utility of sample-to-cutoff ratio to discriminate primary from established infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Swenson, Paul; Stekler, Joanne D; Coombs, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    The ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay has a wide dynamic range for determining the sample-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) values compared to other diagnostic HIV antibody assays. Determine the performance of an HIV testing algorithm that uses the ARCHITECT combo assay in the clinical setting and explore the utility of the signal-to-cutoff (S/CO) ratio to predict acute HIV-1 infection status. A retrospective analysis of clinical samples from a hospital and referral population screened for HIV-1 infection between May 2011 and March 2013. Repeatedly reactive samples were tested using the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test and depending on that result, confirmatory orthogonal testing used the Western blot (WB) for HIV-1, Immunoblot for HIV-2 and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for HIV RNA. A total of 21,317 test results were evaluated of which 509 were ARCHITECT repeatedly reactive; of these, 422 were Multispot-reactive only for HIV-1 (413 WB-positive; 9 indeterminate), 4 were Multispot-reactive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 (one HIV-2 immunoblot-positive with 17 HIV-2 RNA copies/mL) and 83 were Multispot-non-reactive of which 15 were HIV-1 RNA positive and represented acute HIV-1 infection. There was an association among the ARCHITECT S/CO (median; IQR) values for antibody-negative (0.14; 0.11-0.16), acute infection (33; 2.1-76) and established HIV-1 infection (794; 494-1,029) (Kruskal-Wallis, pARCHITECT combo assay with Multispot confirmation and reserved use of HIV-1 WB, HIV-2 Immunoblot and HIV NAAT for Multispot dual HIV-1/2 infection, and NAAT alone for Multispot-negative specimens, had a suitable test performance for detecting acute and established HIV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Performance of an alternative HIV diagnostic algorithm using the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and potential utility of sample-to-cutoff ratio to discriminate primary from established infection☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M.; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Swenson, Paul; Stekler, Joanne D.; Coombs, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay has a wide dynamic range for determining the sample-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) values compared to other diagnostic HIV antibody assays. Objectives Determine the performance of an HIV testing algorithm that uses the ARCHITECT combo assay in the clinical setting and explore the utility of the signal-to-cutoff (S/CO) ratio to predict acute HIV-1 infection status. Study design A retrospective analysis of clinical samples from a hospital and referral population screened for HIV-1 infection between May 2011 and March 2013. Repeatedly reactive samples were tested using the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test and depending on that result, confirmatory orthogonal testing used the Western blot (WB) for HIV-1, Immunoblot for HIV-2 and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for HIV RNA. Results A total of 21,317 test results were evaluated of which 509 were ARCHITECT repeatedly reactive; of these, 422 were Multispot-reactive only for HIV-1 (413 WB-positive; 9 indeterminate), 4 were Multispot-reactive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 (one HIV-2 immunoblot-positive with 17 HIV-2 RNA copies/mL) and 83 were Multispot-non-reactive of which 15 were HIV-1 RNA positive and represented acute HIV-1 infection. There was an association among the ARCHITECT S/CO (median; IQR) values for antibody-negative (0.14; 0.11–0.16), acute infection (33; 2.1–76) and established HIV-1 infection (794; 494–1,029) (Kruskal–Wallis, p ARCHITECT combo assay with Multispot confirmation and reserved use of HIV-1 WB, HIV-2 Immunoblot and HIV NAAT for Multispot dual HIV-1/2 infection, and NAAT alone for Multispot-negative specimens, had a suitable test performance for detecting acute and established HIV infection. PMID:24029686

  4. Optimal model of PDIG based microgrid and design of complementary stabilizer using ICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, R Mohammad; Safari, A; Ravadanegh, S Najafi

    2016-09-01

    The generalized Heffron-Phillips model (GHPM) for a microgrid containing a photovoltaic (PV)-diesel machine (DM)-induction motor (IM)-governor (GV) (PDIG) has been developed at the low voltage level. A GHPM is calculated by linearization method about a loading condition. An effective Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT) approach for PV network has been done using sliding mode control (SMC) to maximize output power. Additionally, to improve stability of microgrid for more penetration of renewable energy resources with nonlinear load, a complementary stabilizer has been presented. Imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) is utilized to design of gains for the complementary stabilizer with the multiobjective function. The stability analysis of the PDIG system has been completed with eigenvalues analysis and nonlinear simulations. Robustness and validity of the proposed controllers on damping of electromechanical modes examine through time domain simulation under input mechanical torque disturbances. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Complementary therapy use by patients and parents of children with asthma and the implications for NHS care: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Debbie

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients are increasingly using complementary therapies, often for chronic conditions. Asthma is the most common chronic condition in the UK. Previous research indicates that some asthma patients experience gaps in their NHS care. However, little attention has been given to how and why patients and parents of children with asthma use complementary therapies and the implications for NHS care. Methods Qualitative study, comprising 50 semi-structured interviews with a purposeful sample of 22 adults and 28 children with asthma (plus a parent, recruited from a range of NHS and non-NHS settings in Bristol, England. Data analysis was thematic, drawing on the principles of constant comparison. Results A range of complementary therapies were being used for asthma, most commonly Buteyko breathing and homeopathy. Most use took place outside of the NHS, comprising either self-treatment or consultation with private complementary therapists. Complementary therapies were usually used alongside not instead of conventional asthma treatment. A spectrum of complementary therapy users emerged, including "committed", "pragmatic" and "last resort" users. Motivating factors for complementary therapy use included concerns about conventional NHS care ("push factors" and attractive aspects of complementary therapies ("pull factors". While participants were often uncertain whether therapies had directly helped their asthma, breathing techniques such as the Buteyko Method were most notably reported to enhance symptom control and enable reduction in medication. Across the range of therapies, the process of seeking and using complementary therapies seemed to help patients in two broad ways: it empowered them to take greater personal control over their condition rather than feel dependant on medication, and enabled exploration of a broader range of possible causes of their asthma than commonly discussed within NHS settings. Conclusion Complementary therapy

  6. Informed Consent in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opher Caspi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to examine complementary and alternative medicine (CAM practitioners’ (i attitudes toward informed consent and (ii to assess whether standards of practice exist with respect to informed consent, and what these standards look like. The design and setting of the study constituted face-to-face qualitative interviews with 28 non-MD, community-based providers representing 11 different CAM therapeutic modalities. It was found that there is great deal of variability with respect to the informed consent process in CAM across providers and modalities. No unique profession-based patterns were identified. The content analysis yielded five major categories related to (i general attitude towards the informed consent process, (ii type and amount of information exchange during that process, (iii disclosure of risks, (iv discussions of alternatives, and (v potential benefits. There is a widespread lack of standards with respect to the practice of informed consent across a broad range of CAM modalities. Addressing this problem requires concerted and systematic educational, ethical and judicial remedial actions. Informed consent, which is often viewed as a pervasive obligation is medicine, must be reshaped to have therapeutic value. Acknowledging current conceptions and misconception surrounding the practice of informed consent may help to bring about this change. More translational research is needed to guide this process.

  7. Fusing complementary images for pavement cracking measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ming; Zhao, Zuyun; Yao, Xun; Xu, Bugao

    2015-02-01

    Cracking is a major pavement distress that jeopardizes road serviceability and traffic safety. Automated pavement distress survey (APDS) systems have been developed using digital imaging technology to replace human surveys for more timely and accurate inspections. Most APDS systems require special lighting devices to illuminate pavements and prevent shadows of roadside objects that distort cracks in the image. Most artificial lighting devices are laser based, and are either hazardous to unprotected people or require dedicated power supplies on the vehicle. This study was aimed to develop a new imaging system that can scan pavement surface at highway speed and determine the level of severity of pavement cracking without using any artificial lighting. The new system consists of dual line-scan cameras that are installed side by side to scan the same pavement area as the vehicle moves. Cameras are controlled with different exposure settings so that both sunlit and shadowed areas can be visible in two separate images. The paired images contain complementary details useful for reconstructing an image in which the shadows are eliminated. This paper intends to present (1) the design of the dual line-scan camera system, (2) a new calibration method for line-scan cameras to rectify and register paired images, (3) a customized image-fusion algorithm that merges the multi-exposure images into one shadow-free image for crack detection, and (4) the results of the field tests on a selected road over a long period.

  8. Coordinating Complementary Waveforms for Sidelobe Suppression

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, Wenbing; Howard, Stephen; Moran, William; Calderbank, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We present a general method for constructing radar transmit pulse trains and receive filters for which the radar point-spread function in delay and Doppler, given by the cross-ambiguity function of the transmit pulse train and the pulse train used in the receive filter, is essentially free of range sidelobes inside a Doppler interval around the zero-Doppler axis. The transmit pulse train is constructed by coordinating the transmission of a pair of Golay complementary waveforms across time according to zeros and ones in a binary sequence P. The pulse train used to filter the received signal is constructed in a similar way, in terms of sequencing the Golay waveforms, but each waveform in the pulse train is weighted by an element from another sequence Q. We show that a spectrum jointly determined by P and Q sequences controls the size of the range sidelobes of the cross-ambiguity function and by properly choosing P and Q we can clear out the range sidelobes inside a Doppler interval around the zero- Doppler axis...

  9. Risk, pregnancy and complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Since the 1990's sociologists such as Giddens and Beck have highlighted the complexities of contemporary western societies in relation to risk. The "risk society" is one in which the advantages of scientific and technological developments are overshadowed with risks and dangers: leading to a world dominated by anxiety and uncertainty. Although a complex set of interrelated phenomena the risk society can be summarised under three main changes: including globalisation, scepticism about expert knowledge, Thompson: 27 and the degree of autonomy individuals have in our detraditionalised society to determine their own life choices (Beck: 13). The discourses of the "risk society" inevitably impact on women during pregnancy and the potential influence this discourse may have in relation to healthcare choices, particularly in the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are explored. In this paper it is argued that the apparently growing use of CAM during pregnancy and childbirth could be interpreted as a response by women to these discourses, that decisions made with regard to CAM may signify a desire for personal fulfilment and a need for autonomy and active participation in healthcare during pregnancy and childbirth. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Medicina complementar e alternativa: utilização pela comunidade de Montes Claros, Minas Gerais Complementary and alternative medicine: use in Montes Claros, Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Felício Rodrigues Neto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência de utilização e o perfil socioeconômico do usuário de medicina complementar e alternativa pela população de Montes Claros (MG. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, analítico. A amostra foi probabilística, por conglomerados, sendo a unidade amostral o domicílio e os entrevistados de ambos os sexos e maiores de 18 anos. Os dados foram coletados em uma cidade de porte médio de Minas Gerais utilizando formulários semi-estruturados. RESULTADOS: Foram entrevistadas 3.090 pessoas. A prevalência de uso de medicina complementar e alternativas foi, quando consideradas somente as que envolvem custos, como homeopatia, acupuntura, quiropraxia, medicina ortomolecular, técnicas de relaxamento/meditação e massagem, de 8,93% e 70%, quando incluímos todas as terapias arguidas. As prevalências foram: oração a Deus (52%, remédios populares (30,9%, exercícios físicos (25,5%, benzedeiras (15%, dietas populares (7,1%, massagem (4,9%, relaxamento/meditação (2,8%, homeopatia (2,4%, grupos de autoajuda (1,9%, quiropraxia (1,7%, acupuntura (1,5% e medicina ortomolecular (0,2%. Mulheres, católicos, casados, melhor renda e escolaridade estiveram associados de forma positiva com a utilização das terapias que envolvem custos. CONCLUSÃO: Medicina complementar e alternativa é utilizada por número significativo da população. Gênero, religião, estado civil, renda e escolaridade estiveram associados positivamente com utilização de terapias alternativas. O acesso das pessoas de menor renda e escolaridade à medicina complementar e alternativa poderia aumentar a prevalência de utilização daquelas formas que envolvem custos.OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence of utilization and social and economic profile of those using complementary and alternative medicine in the medium sized Brazilian city of Montes Claros, MG. METHODS: A transversal descriptive study was conducted. The sample of 3090 people was probabilistic, by

  11. Reconfigurable Complementary Logic Circuits with Ambipolar Organic Transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoo, H.; Ghittorelli, M.; Smits, E.C.P.; Gelinck, G.H.; Lee, H.K.; Torricelli, F.; Kim, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Ambipolar organic electronics offer great potential for simple and low-cost fabrication of complementary logic circuits on large-area and mechanically flexible substrates. Ambipolar transistors are ideal candidates for the simple and low-cost development of complementary logic circuits since they

  12. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Work Related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Complementary and alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work disruptions and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffer from work-related musculoskeletal disorders. It is important that dentists incorporate complementary and alternative medicine strategies into practice to ...

  13. Breastfeeding, complementary feeding and nutritional status of 6 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine breastfeeding, complementary feeding and nutritional status of 6 - 12-month-old rural infants. Study design. A cross-sectional survey was done. Breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices were determined by questionnaire; an unquantified food frequency questionnaire was used to ...

  14. Managing Bilingual Interaction in a Gujarati Complementary School in Leicester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Peter; Bhatt, Arvind; Bhojani, Nirmala; Creese, Angela

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on teacher-student interaction in two Gujarati complementary school classrooms in one school in the East Midlands city of Leicester, UK. To date, little work has been published on interaction in complementary schools, and little is therefore known about the cultures of learning and teaching in such contexts. Our study of…

  15. Adoption of Enriched Local Complementary Food in Osun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locally processed complementary foods, appropriately enriched can complement breast milk and traditional foods during the nutritionally vulnerable periods of a child life. The study therefore examines the adoption of enriched local complementary foods in Osun State Nigeria. Structured interview schedule was used to ...

  16. Complementary feeding: a commentary by the ESPGHAN Committee on Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agostoni, Carlo; Decsi, Tamas; Fewtrell, Mary; Goulet, Olivier; Kolacek, Sanja; Koletzko, Berthold; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischer; Moreno, Luis; Puntis, John; Rigo, Jacques; Shamir, Raanan; Szajewska, Hania; Turck, Dominique; van Goudoever, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    This position paper on complementary feeding summarizes evidence for health effects of complementary foods. It focuses on healthy infants in Europe. After reviewing current knowledge and practices, we have formulated these conclusions: Exclusive or full breast-feeding for about 6 months is a

  17. Formulation and proximate evaluation of complementary diets from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Complementary foods in Nigeria among low-income households are based on staple cereals. Malnutrition among the affected infants could be attributed to unfortified or poorly-fortified cereal-based complementary foods. The present study was conducted to formulate composite blends using locally available but ...

  18. Determinants of timely initiation of complementary feeding among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-05-26

    May 26, 2014 ... Results: Of 156 children, 41%, 53.8%, and 5.1% had timely, early and delayed initiation of complementary feeding. ... care, exclusive breastfeeding and no siblings as independent predictors of timely initiation of complementary feeding. .... unorthodox (residential, traditional or spiritual birth homes).

  19. Discovering Complementary Colors from the Perspective of STEAM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabey, Burak; Koyunkaya, Melike Yigit; Enginoglu, Turan; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2018-01-01

    This study explored the theory and applications of complementary colors using a technology-based activity designed from the perspective of STEAM education. Complementary colors and their areas of use were examined from the perspective of physics, mathematics and art, respectively. The study, which benefits from technology, makes the theory of…

  20. ICT, complementary investment, and firm performance in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Linlin; Ding, Juan; Fan, Maoqing

    2011-12-01

    Using China firm data about ICT, we provide some insight into the link between ICT, productivity and complementary investment. The results show that the contribution of ICT capital deepening is raised when firms combine ICT use and some complementary investment (human capital, innovation and organization change).

  1. Use of traditional and complementary/alternative medicine (TCAM) in children with cancer in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, Elena J; Rivas, Silvia; Ndao, Deborah; Damoulakis, Doree; Bao, Yuan Yuan; Cheng, Bin; Kelly, Kara M; Antillon, Federico

    2014-04-01

    International surveys have demonstrated that use of traditional and complementary/alternative medicine (TCAM) is highly prevalent among children with cancer; however, little is known about its use among children with cancer in Latin America. As part of a regional initiative, we present the results of the first survey exploring use of TCAM among children with cancer residing in Latin America. A cross-sectional sample of 100 parents whose children received treatment in Guatemala City were interviewed from May 2008 to February 2010. Upon consent, an in-person interview was performed during a routine clinical visit. Information on the form, duration, cost, and satisfaction of TCAM was collected. Approval from the institutional review board was obtained. The median age of patients was 9.2 years with 63% undergoing treatment. Use of TCAM was reported by 90% of parents. Most often, more than one type of therapy was utilized. Most patients (67%) relied on TCAM for supportive care indications; however, a significant percentage (34%) used TCAM for curative purposes. The most commonly reported form was the use of oral supplements with the majority perceiving TCAM as effective for the intended purpose. Use of TCAM was highly prevalent among children with cancer residing in Guatemala. Most importantly, TCAM was used alongside conventional therapy for supportive care indications. These findings underscoring the need for open lines of communication between clinicians and families. Future research may consider exploring the role of TCAM within the scope of supportive care and its effect on existing supportive care interventions. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Woman to woman. Complementary therapy use in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Constance I; Fowles, Willa

    2003-12-01

    Many women are turning to herbal, homeopathic, dietary, and other complementary therapies for relief of stressful aspects of menopause. Several questions related to complementary therapy use are not, however, well addressed in current research literature. Why do women seek out complementary therapies? Which therapies do they choose and why? What is the nature of their experiences using complementary therapies? In this qualitative study, 19 Caucasian women, who identified themselves as using or having used complementary therapies during menopause were interviewed in one of four focus groups. Findings revealed a wide variety of therapies, such as vitamin, mineral, and herbal preparations and lifestyle and behavioral initiatives, used to address distressing aspects of menopause. Also identified was lack of family and professional support for women who are seeking complements or alternatives to conventional treatment.

  3. Male Adolescent Contraceptive Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Madelon Lubin; Finkel, David J.

    1978-01-01

    The contraceptive utilization of a sample of sexually active, urban, high school males (Black, Hispanic, and White) was examined by anonymous questionnaire. Contraceptive use was haphazard, but White males tended to be more effective contraceptors than the other two groups. Reasons for nonuse were also studied. (Author/SJL)

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazi, Zahra Alsadat; Namjooyan, Forough; Khanifar, Marjan

    2016-05-01

    A systemic skeletal disease is characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. Asia has the highest increment in the elderly population; therefore, osteoporotic fracture should be a noticeable health issue. The incidence rate of hip fractures in Asia could rise to 45% by the year 2050. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of various medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered as part of formal medicine. CAMs have been described as "diagnosis, treatment, and/or prevention which complements mainstream medicine as a holistic, subjective and various natural approaches to medical problems by contributing to a common whole, satisfying claims not met by orthodoxy, or diversifying the conceptual frameworks of medicine". Peer-reviewed publications were identified through a search in Scopus, Science Direct, Cochrane, PubMed, and Google scholar using keywords "osteopenia", "osteoporosis", "menopause", "CAM", "phytoestrogens", "phytotherapy" and "herbal medicine". The search was completed in July 2015 and was limited to articles published in English. Relevant articles were identified based on the expertise and clinical experience of the authors. We categorized our results in different classifications including: lifestyle modifications (cigarette, alcohol, exercise and food regimen), supportive cares (intake supplements including vitamin D, C and K), treatments synthetic (routine and newer options for hormone replacement and none hormonal therapies) and natural options (different types of CAM including herbal medicines, yoga and chiropractic). Established osteoporosis is difficult to treat because bone density has fallen below the fracture threshold and trabecular elements may have been lost. Antiresorptive agents can be used to prevent further bone loss and stimulation of new bone formation by the use of anabolic

  5. Abrasive water jet: a complementary tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte, J. P.

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The abrasive water jet is a powerful cutting tool, whose main advantages lie in the absence of thermal effects and the capability of cutting highly thick materials. Compared with Laser, the abrasive water jet allows the cutting of a larger range of thicknesses and a wider variety of materials such as: ornamental stones, metals, polymers, composites, wood, glass and ceramics. The application of this technology has suffered an extensive growth, with successful applications in varied industrial sectors like the automotive, aerospace, textile, metalworking, ornamental stones, etc. The present communication aims at introducing the abrasive water jet as a complementary tool to laser cutting, presenting its advantages by showing some documented examples of pieces cut for different industries.

    O jacto de água abrasivo é uma poderosa ferramenta de corte, tendo como principais vantagens a ausência de processo térmico e permitir o corte de elevadas espessuras. Comparativamente com o laser o jacto de água abrasivo permite cortar uma maior gama de espessuras, e uma maior diversidade de materiais: rochas ornamentais, metais, polimeros, compósitos, madeiras, vidro e cerâmicos. A aplicação desta tecnologia tem sofrido um crescimento acentuado, existindo aplicações de sucesso nos mais variados sectores industriáis como a indústria automóvel, aeroespacial, têxtil, metalomecânica e rochas ornamentáis. Esta comunição pretende apresentar o corte por jacto de agua abrasivo como uma ferramenta de corte complementar ao corte por laser, apresentando as suas vantagens documentadas através de alguns exemplos de peças executadas para as diferentes indústrias.

  6. Introduction of Complementary Foods to Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Christina

    2017-01-01

    While earlier food allergy prevention strategies implemented avoidance of allergenic foods in infancy, the current paradigm is shifting from avoidance to controlled exposure. This review focuses on the outcome of recent randomized controlled trials, which have examined the early introduction of allergenic foods for allergy prevention, and discusses the implementation of results in clinical practice. In infants at high risk of allergic disease, there is now direct evidence that regular early peanut consumption will reduce the prevalence of peanut allergy, compared to avoidance. Many international infant feeding guidelines already recommend complementary foods, including allergenic foods, to be introduced from 4 to 6 months of age irrespective of family history risk. Interim guidelines from 10 International Pediatric Allergy Associations state that healthcare providers should recommend the introduction of peanut-containing products into the diets of infants at high risk of allergic disease in countries where peanut allergy is prevalent. Direct translation of the results obtained from a cohort of high-risk infants to the general population has proved difficult, and issues regarding feasibility, safety, and cost-effectiveness have been raised. Five randomized placebo-controlled trials have assessed the effects of early egg exposure in infancy with varying results. In a recent comprehensive meta-analysis, there was moderate-certainty evidence that early versus late introduction of egg was associated with a reduced egg allergy risk. Although promising, optimal timing, doses, and if the feeding regimen should be stratified according to infant allergy risk remain to be determined. The single study that assessed introduction of multiple foods from 3 months whilst breastfeeding compared with exclusive breastfeeding until 6 months of age showed no reduction in food allergy prevalence. Future research should aim at optimizing infant feeding regimens and support a tolerogenic

  7. Rational Design for Complementary Donor-Acceptor Recognition Pairs Using Self-Complementary Hydrogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikder, Amrita; Ghosh, Boyli; Chakraborty, Saptarshi; Paul, Ankan; Ghosh, Suhrit

    2016-02-01

    An adaptable and efficient molecular recognition pair has been established by taking advantage of the complementary nature of donor-acceptor interactions together with the strength of hydrogen bonds. Such distinct molecular recognition propagates in orthogonal directions to effect extended alternating co-assembly of two different appended molecular entities. The dimensions of the assembled structures can be tuned by stoichiometric imbalance between the donor and acceptor building blocks. The morphology of the self-assembled material can be correlated with the ratio of the two building blocks. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Contribution of complementary food nutrients to estimated total nutrient intakes for rural Guatemalan infants in the second semester of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Raquel; Hernandez, Liza; Soto-Mendez, Maria Jose; Vossenaar, Marieke; Solomons, Noel W

    2010-01-01

    In developing countries, complementary foods are often introduced earlier or later than appropriate and the quality is frequently insufficient, particularly in rural areas where complementary foods have traditionally been based on starchy gruels. Adequate intakes of a number of nutrients are recognized to be problematic in traditional complementary feeding regimens in developing societies. To determine the contribution of the complementary feeding nutrients to the estimated total nutrient intake in Guatemalan infants. Three non-consecutive 24-hr recalls were collected from a convenience sample of mothers of 64 infants, aged 6-12 month on enrolment, in the rural Guatemalan highland village of Santo Domingo Xenacoj. Additional information on early introduction of pre- and post-lacteal feeds and on first foods and beverages was included. Human milk intakes were estimated by a model based on assumptions regarding satisfaction of weight-based daily energy needs by the combined diet. The 2004 WHO/FAO recommended nutrient intakes were used as the standard for adequate nutrient consumption. We observed that exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 month is rare. Mean nutrient intakes and densities were above recommended intakes for all nutrients examined, except calcium, iron and zinc. Intakes of most nutrients were greater from the complementary feeding component of the diet. Vitamin A intake was excessive due to consumption of fortified sugar. We conclude that intakes of most micronutrients were near recommendation levels, unusual within the complementary feeding experience in scientific literature. Calcium, iron and zinc were identified as "problem nutrients" as persistently reported in developing countries.

  9. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote cell surface proteins by two complementary methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien; Motta, Flávia N

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, a neglected infectious illness that affects millions of people, mostly in Latin America. Here, the cell surface subproteome of the T. cruzi epimastigote life form was characterized. In order to prepare samples enriched in epimastigote...... of the labeled proteins. Both T. cruzi subproteomes were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The results showed that the methodologies offered comprehensive and complementary information about the parasite's plasma membrane subproteome....

  10. Determinants of public trust in complementary and alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schee, Evelien; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2010-03-12

    In the Netherlands, public trust in conventional medicine is relatively high. There is reason to believe that public trust in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is rated lower. The aim of this study is to gain insight into public trust in CAM and the determinants that lie at the root of it. We hypothesized that public trust in CAM is related to (perceived) institutional guarantees, media information on CAM, information from people's social network, personal experiences, the role of general practitioners (GPs) and trust in conventional medicine. A postal questionnaire on public trust in CAM was mailed to 1358 members of the Health Care Consumer Panel. 65% of the questionnaires were returned. Data were analysed using frequencies, ANOVA, post hoc testing and linear regression analyses. In the total sample, the level of public trust in CAM was a 5.05 on average on a scale of 1-10. 40.7% was CAM user (current or past) and displayed significantly higher levels of trust toward CAM than CAM non users. In the total sample, public trust in CAM was related to institutional guarantees, negative media information, positive and negative information reported by their social network and people's personal experiences with CAM. For non users, trust is mostly associated with institutional guarantees. For users, personal experiences are most important. For both users and non users, trust levels in CAM are affected by negative media information. Public trust in CAM is for CAM users related to positive information and for non users to negative information from their network. In the Netherlands, CAM is trusted less than conventional medicine. The hypotheses on institutional guarantees, media information, information from the network and people's personal experiences are confirmed by our study for the total sample, CAM non users and users. The other hypotheses are rejected.

  11. Complementary Safety Margin Assessment. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-10-15

    On March 11, 2011, a large part of the Japanese eastern coastal area was devastated by an earthquake, followed by an immense tsunami. As a result, thousands of people were killed, injured or made homeless. In the days that followed, the situation was further complicated because of the failing nuclear reactors on the Fukushima coast. The local environment suffered from radioactive releases, requiring evacuation zones, and generating international concerns about nuclear safety. In the wake of this disaster the European Union decided to assess safety on all operating nuclear reactors in its member states. This safety evaluation initiated by the European Union focusses on extreme natural hazards, beyond the standard safety evaluations which regularly have to be performed to demonstrate the safety of a nuclear power plant. Consequences of these extreme hazards for the Borssele NPP have been evaluated based on available safety analyses, supplemented by engineering judgement. In this way, the robustness of the existing plant has been assessed and possible measures to further increase the safety margins have been identified. This document presents the results of the Complementary Safety margin Assessment (CSA) performed for the NPP Borssele. The distinct difference between this report and former risk analysis reports in general and the existing Safety Report of the NPP Borssele is that the maximum resistance of the plant against redefined and more challenging events has been investigated, whereas traditionally the plant design is investigated against certain events that are determined on a historical basis. This different approach requires different analyses and studies, which in turn presents new insights into the robustness of the plant. This document has been prepared in the short time period between June 1 and October 31, 2011. If more time had been granted for this study, some of the subjects could have been pursued in greater depth. The EPZ project team has been

  12. A Complementary Alternative Medicine Questionnaire for Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Patterson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited information exists on how adolescents decide to use complementary/alternative medicine (CAM. There are also no instruments specific to CAM, for the young adult population, which makes it difficult to explore knowledge in this area. The purpose of this study was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the CAM Questionnaire for Young Adults which measures young adults’ attitudes about CAM. Participants for this cross-sectional survey were selected from enrolled undergraduate students at an urban university. Factor analysis identified three subscales: 1 positive beliefs about CAM; 2 environmental influence; and 3 psychological comfort. The scale has good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.79 and shows beginning demonstration of validity. Its use in this sample revealed that young adults who are female and have used CAM in the past for preventing or treating illness have the most positive attitude towards CAM and the greatest likelihood for continued use. The implication that prevention may play a role in young adults’ attitudes about CAM is a potential focus for future research.

  13. A Complementary Alternative Medicine Questionnaire for Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Patterson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited information exists on how adolescents decide to use complementary/alternative medicine (CAM. There are also no instruments specific to CAM, for the young adult population, which makes it difficult to explore knowledge in this area. The purpose of this study was to develop and examine the psychometric properties of the CAM Questionnaire for Young Adults which measures young adults’ attitudes about CAM. Participants for this cross-sectional survey were selected from enrolled undergraduate students at an urban university. Factor analysis identified three subscales: 1 positive beliefs about CAM; 2 environmental influence; and 3 psychological comfort. The scale has good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.79 and shows beginning demonstration of validity. Its use in this sample revealed that young adults who are female and have used CAM in the past for preventing or treating illness have the most positive attitude towards CAM and the greatest likelihood for continued use. The implication that prevention may play a role in young adults’ attitudes about CAM is a potential focus for future research.

  14. Complementary Cognitive Capabilities, Economic Decision-Making, and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Baldassi, Martine; Johnson, Eric J.; Weber, Elke U.

    2014-01-01

    Fluid intelligence decreases with age, yet evidence about age declines in decision-making quality is mixed: Depending on the study, older adults make worse, equally good, or even better decisions than younger adults. We propose a potential explanation for this puzzle, namely that age differences in decision performance result from the interplay between two sets of cognitive capabilities that impact decision making, one in which older adults fare worse (i.e., fluid intelligence) and one in which they fare better (i.e., crystallized intelligence). Specifically, we hypothesized that older adults’ higher levels of crystallized intelligence can provide an alternate pathway to good decisions when the fluid intelligence pathway declines. The performance of older adults relative to younger adults therefore depends on the relative importance of each type of intelligence for the decision at hand. We tested this complementary capabilities hypothesis in a broad sample of younger and older adults, collecting a battery of standard cognitive measures and measures of economically important decision-making “traits”—including temporal discounting, loss aversion, financial literacy, and debt literacy. We found that older participants performed as well as or better than younger participants on these four decision-making measures. Structural equation modeling verified our hypothesis: Older participants’ greater crystallized intelligence offset their lower levels of fluid intelligence for temporal discounting, financial literacy, and debt literacy, but not for loss aversion. These results have important implications for public policy and for the design of effective decision environments for older adults. PMID:24040999

  15. Complementary cognitive capabilities, economic decision making, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Baldassi, Martine; Johnson, Eric J; Weber, Elke U

    2013-09-01

    Fluid intelligence decreases with age, yet evidence about age declines in decision-making quality is mixed: Depending on the study, older adults make worse, equally good, or even better decisions than younger adults. We propose a potential explanation for this puzzle, namely that age differences in decision performance result from the interplay between two sets of cognitive capabilities that impact decision making, one in which older adults fare worse (i.e., fluid intelligence) and one in which they fare better (i.e., crystallized intelligence). Specifically, we hypothesized that older adults' higher levels of crystallized intelligence can provide an alternate pathway to good decisions when the fluid intelligence pathway declines. The performance of older adults relative to younger adults therefore depends on the relative importance of each type of intelligence for the decision at hand. We tested this complementary capabilities hypothesis in a broad sample of younger and older adults, collecting a battery of standard cognitive measures and measures of economically important decision-making "traits"--including temporal discounting, loss aversion, financial literacy, and debt literacy. We found that older participants performed as well as or better than younger participants on these four decision-making measures. Structural equation modeling verified our hypothesis: Older participants' greater crystallized intelligence offset their lower levels of fluid intelligence for temporal discounting, financial literacy, and debt literacy, but not for loss aversion. These results have important implications for public policy and for the design of effective decision environments for older adults.

  16. How to implement complementary therapies for laboring women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwelling, Elaine; Johnson, Kitti; Allen, Jonell

    2006-01-01

    Complementary therapies have been a part of nursing practice for centuries and are supported today as a part of nursing practice by many state boards of nursing. Some of these modalities can be used by nurses as a part of their comprehensive plan of labor support for women during the childbirth experience. This article describes five complementary therapies (aromatherapy, massage, use of birth balls, music therapy, and hydrotherapy), and how one large Midwestern hospital system implemented an educational program for nurses that helped them integrate complementary therapies into their nursing care for laboring women.

  17. Adult Use of Complementary and Integrative Approaches to Improve Athletic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marion Willard; Ndetan, Harrison; Ka Sekhon, Vishaldeep; Williams, Ronald; Oliver, Brittney; Perko, Michael; Woolsey, Conrad; Singh, Karan P

    2017-10-02

    Context • In the United States in 2007, approximately 38% of adults, or 4 in 10, used some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). An area in which little is known is the personal integration of CAM therapies by those individuals seeking to improve athletic performance. Objectives • The study intended to assess the use of integrative care by adult athletes in the United States as well as their satisfaction with it, as reported in the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). Design • A secondary analysis of the data from the Adult Alternative Health/Complementary Medicine file of the 2012 NHIS was performed. The analysis was performed at the Research Institute of Parker University (Dallas, TX, USA). Participants • The NHIS survey was a representative sample of Americans, with more than 30 000 respondents. Outcome Measures • National population estimates were generated for all related variables. The study assessed the likelihood that a respondent who reported use of a specific complementary and integrative therapy as their first top therapeutic modality to enhance sport or athletic performance had perceived it helpful compared with those who used it for other non-sport-related reasons. Results • Complementary and integrative therapies were used by more than 14 million adults (20.5%) to improve athletic performance, with 97.6% of them perceiving therapies as helpful. The most used therapies were yoga, herbal supplements, manipulation, and massage. The median age of those reporting specific use to improve athletic performance was slightly less than 38 y, and women were almost 3 times as likely as men to report therapies as helpful. Conclusions • Complementary and integrative therapies were used for improvement of athletic performance by respondents of the 2012 NHIS, with high satisfaction among users. Future research could evaluate athletic-specific use, adverse effects, physiological mechanisms that may exist for the modalities, and

  18. Evaluation of programs to improve complementary feeding in infants and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frongillo, Edward A

    2017-10-01

    Evaluation of complementary feeding programs is needed to enhance knowledge on what works, to document responsible use of resources, and for advocacy. Evaluation is done during program conceptualization and design, implementation, and determination of effectiveness. This paper explains the role of evaluation in the advancement of complementary feeding programs, presenting concepts and methods and illustrating them through examples. Planning and investments for evaluations should occur from the beginning of the project life cycle. Essential to evaluation is articulation of a program theory on how change would occur and what program actions are required for change. Analysis of program impact pathways makes explicit the dynamic connections in the program theory and accounts for contextual factors that could influence program effectiveness. Evaluating implementation functioning is done through addressing questions about needs, coverage, provision, and utilization using information obtained from process evaluation, operations research, and monitoring. Evaluating effectiveness is done through assessing impact, efficiency, coverage, process, and causality. Plausibility designs ask whether the program seemed to have an effect above and beyond external influences, often using a nonrandomized control group and baseline and end line measures. Probability designs ask whether there was an effect using a randomized control group. Evaluations may not be able to use randomization, particularly for programs implemented at a large scale. Plausibility designs, innovative designs, or innovative combinations of designs sometimes are best able to provide useful information. Further work is needed to develop practical designs for evaluation of large-scale country programs on complementary feeding. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for the anesthesiologist and pain practitioner: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Anna; Soong, Stephen Neal; Fishman, David; García, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    This narrative review provides an overview of the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies that anesthesiologists and pain management practitioners commonly encounter along with recommendations for evaluation and implementation. A literature search of PubMed was performed using the comprehensive MeSH term, "Complementary Therapies OR Dietary Supplements", and a search was conducted of the various licensing organizations and books published on the topics of CAM and integrative medicine. In North America, the most commonly encountered CAM therapies include 1) manipulation and procedural therapies; 2) herbs, nutritional supplements (nutraceuticals), and dietary therapies; and 3) mind-body and energy therapies. Controversy exists regarding many of these therapies, particularly those with a higher risk of harm, such as chiropractic manipulation, acupuncture, and nutraceutical use. Several well-conducted studies were analyzed to show how research in CAM can control for placebo responses. Practical considerations are provided for patients and practitioners interested in pursuing or already employing CAM in perioperative and chronic pain management settings. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies in general may provide a useful adjunct in the management of chronic pain. Nevertheless, many patients are not aware of the risks and benefits of individual therapies. In the perioperative setting, the most concerning CAM therapy is the use of herbs and other supplements that may produce physiologic and metabolic derangements and may interact with prescription medications. Resources exist to aid pain specialists, anesthesiologists, and patients in the evidence-based utilization of CAM therapies.

  20. Self-reported history of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and STI-related utilization of the German health care system by men who have sex with men: data from a large convenience sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Axel J; Marcus, Ulrich

    2011-05-18

    In Germany, testing and treatment of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) services are not provided by one medical discipline, but rather dispersed among many different providers. Common STIs like gonorrhoea or Chlamydia infection are not routinely reported. Although men who have sex with men (MSM) are particularly vulnerable to STIs, respective health care utilization among MSM is largely unknown. A sexual behaviour survey among MSM was conducted in 2006. Questions on self-reported sexual behaviour, STI-related health care consultation and barriers to access, coverage of vaccination against hepatitis, screening for asymptomatic STIs, self-reported history of STIs, and partner notification were analysed. Analysis was stratified by HIV-serostatus (3,511 HIV-negative/unknown versus 874 positive). General Practitioners, particularly gay doctors, were preferred for STI-related health care. Low threshold testing in sex-associated venues was acceptable for most respondents. Shame and fear of homophobic reactions were the main barriers for STI-testing. More than half of the respondents reported vaccination against hepatitis A/B. HIV-positive MSM reported screening offers for STIs three to seven times more often than HIV-negative or untested MSM. Unlike testing for syphilis or hepatitis C, screening for asymptomatic pharyngeal and rectal infections was rarely offered. STIs in the previous twelve months were reported by 7.1% of HIV-negative/untested, and 34.7% of HIV-positive respondents. Self-reported histories of STIs in MSM convenience samples differ significantly by HIV-serostatus. Higher rates of STIs among HIV-positive MSM may partly be explained by more testing. Communication between health care providers and their clients about sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual risks should be improved. A comprehensive STI screening policy for MSM is needed.

  1. Self-reported history of sexually transmissible infections (STIs and STI-related utilization of the German health care system by men who have sex with men: data from a large convenience sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, testing and treatment of sexually transmissible infections (STIs services are not provided by one medical discipline, but rather dispersed among many different providers. Common STIs like gonorrhoea or Chlamydia infection are not routinely reported. Although men who have sex with men (MSM are particularly vulnerable to STIs, respective health care utilization among MSM is largely unknown. Methods A sexual behaviour survey among MSM was conducted in 2006. Questions on self-reported sexual behaviour, STI-related health care consultation and barriers to access, coverage of vaccination against hepatitis, screening for asymptomatic STIs, self-reported history of STIs, and partner notification were analysed. Analysis was stratified by HIV-serostatus (3,511 HIV-negative/unknown versus 874 positive. Results General Practitioners, particularly gay doctors, were preferred for STI-related health care. Low threshold testing in sex-associated venues was acceptable for most respondents. Shame and fear of homophobic reactions were the main barriers for STI-testing. More than half of the respondents reported vaccination against hepatitis A/B. HIV-positive MSM reported screening offers for STIs three to seven times more often than HIV-negative or untested MSM. Unlike testing for syphilis or hepatitis C, screening for asymptomatic pharyngeal and rectal infections was rarely offered. STIs in the previous twelve months were reported by 7.1% of HIV-negative/untested, and 34.7% of HIV-positive respondents. Conclusions Self-reported histories of STIs in MSM convenience samples differ significantly by HIV-serostatus. Higher rates of STIs among HIV-positive MSM may partly be explained by more testing. Communication between health care providers and their clients about sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual risks should be improved. A comprehensive STI screening policy for MSM is needed.

  2. Self-reported history of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) and STI-related utilization of the German health care system by men who have sex with men: data from a large convenience sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background In Germany, testing and treatment of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) services are not provided by one medical discipline, but rather dispersed among many different providers. Common STIs like gonorrhoea or Chlamydia infection are not routinely reported. Although men who have sex with men (MSM) are particularly vulnerable to STIs, respective health care utilization among MSM is largely unknown. Methods A sexual behaviour survey among MSM was conducted in 2006. Questions on self-reported sexual behaviour, STI-related health care consultation and barriers to access, coverage of vaccination against hepatitis, screening for asymptomatic STIs, self-reported history of STIs, and partner notification were analysed. Analysis was stratified by HIV-serostatus (3,511 HIV-negative/unknown versus 874 positive). Results General Practitioners, particularly gay doctors, were preferred for STI-related health care. Low threshold testing in sex-associated venues was acceptable for most respondents. Shame and fear of homophobic reactions were the main barriers for STI-testing. More than half of the respondents reported vaccination against hepatitis A/B. HIV-positive MSM reported screening offers for STIs three to seven times more often than HIV-negative or untested MSM. Unlike testing for syphilis or hepatitis C, screening for asymptomatic pharyngeal and rectal infections was rarely offered. STIs in the previous twelve months were reported by 7.1% of HIV-negative/untested, and 34.7% of HIV-positive respondents. Conclusions Self-reported histories of STIs in MSM convenience samples differ significantly by HIV-serostatus. Higher rates of STIs among HIV-positive MSM may partly be explained by more testing. Communication between health care providers and their clients about sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual risks should be improved. A comprehensive STI screening policy for MSM is needed. PMID:21592342

  3. Safe Use of Complementary Health Products and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appropriately. Natural products such as herbal medicines or botanicals are often sold as dietary supplements and are ... products, and other alerts and advisories For Consumers General Safety Information Are You Considering a Complementary Health ...

  4. Complementary, Alternative, or Integrative Health: What's In a Name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... example, researchers have done many studies on acupuncture, yoga, spinal manipulation, and meditation, but there have been fewer studies on some other practices. Other Complementary Health Approaches The two broad areas discussed above—natural products ...

  5. Complementary Channel Use and the Role of Social Competence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruppel, Erin K; Burke, Tricia J

    2015-01-01

    ...‐mail, text messaging, and Facebook). We looked at daily channel use among 136 participants and demonstrated complementary channel use among most combinations of channels, excluding face‐to‐face...

  6. Have complementary therapies demonstrated effectiveness in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llanio Comella, Nagore; Fernández Matilla, Meritxell; Castellano Cuesta, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has improved thanks to the use of highly effective drugs. However, patients usually require long term therapy, which is not free of side effects. Therefore RA patients often demand complementary medicine, they seek additional sources of relief and/or less side effects. In fact 30-60% of rheumatic patients use some form of complementary medicine. Therefore, from conventional medicine, if we want to optimally treat our patients facilitating communication with them we must know the most commonly used complementary medicines. The aim of this review is to assess, based on published scientific research, what complementary therapies commonly used by patients with RA are effective and safe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health NCCIH Clinical Digest for health professionals High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says ... chemically identical to the active ingredient in the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Available evidence on the cholesterol- ...

  8. Infant Feeding Practices and the Effect of Early Complementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infant Feeding Practices and the Effect of Early Complementary Feeding on Child Nutritional Status in Makada, Sabon Gari Local Government Area, Kaduna State, Nigeria. E Okwori, R Onu, GI Onagwa, M Waziri ...

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efe, Emine; Işler, Ayşegül; Sarvan, Süreyya; Başer, Hayriye; Yeşilipek, Akif

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) determine the types of complementary and alternative medicine use among children with thalassaemia as reported by parents and (2) describe sociodemographic and medical factors associated with the use of such treatments in families residing in southern Turkey. Thalassaemia is one of the most common human genetic diseases. Despite the therapeutic efforts, patients will encounter a variety of physical and psychological problems. Therefore, the use of complementary and alternative medicines among children thalassaemia is becoming increasingly popular. This is a descriptive study of complementary and alternative medicine. This study was conducted in the Hematology Outpatient Clinic at Akdeniz University Hospital and in the Thalassemia Centre at Ministry of Health Antalya Education and Research Hospital, Antalya, Turkey, between January 2010-December 2010. Parents of 97 paediatric patients, among 125 parents who applied to the haematology outpatient clinic and thalassaemia centre between these dates, agreed to take part in the study with whom contact could be made were included. Data were collected by using a questionnaire. The proportion of parents who reported using one or more of the complementary and alternative medicine methods was 82·5%. Of these parents, 61·8% were using prayer/spiritual practice, 47·4% were using nutritional supplements and 35·1% were using animal materials. It was determined that a significant portion of the parents using complementary and alternative medicine use it to treat their children's health problems, they were informed about complementary and alternative medicine by their paediatricians and family elders, and they have discussed the use of complementary and alternative medicine with healthcare professionals. To sustain medical treatment and prognosis of thalassaemia, it is important for nurses to consult with their patients and parents regarding the use and potential risks of some complementary

  10. Complementary Medicine Journal of Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery

    OpenAIRE

    Seraji; Vakilian

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Half of the pregnant women suffer from the excruciating degrees of labor pain. Nowadays, however, the use of painkillers for decreasing labor pain due to their adverse effects on the mother and child is less common and attention has been shifted towards non-medical methods and complementary medicine such as message therapy, acupuncture, hydrotherapy, and herbal medicine. One of the branches of complementary medicine is hydrotherapy with herbal essences. Breathing techniques, on ...

  11. Supramolecular Assembly of Complementary Cyanine Salt J-Aggregates

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Zhong’an

    2015-09-09

    An understanding of structure–property relationships in cyanine dyes is critical for their design and application. Anionic and cationic cyanines can be organized into complementary cyanine salts, offering potential building blocks to modulate their intra/intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate how the structures of these complementary salts can be tuned to achieve highly ordered J-type supramolecular aggregate structures of heptamethine dyes in crystalline solids.

  12. 78 FR 21381 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine...

  13. 76 FR 17140 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated...

  14. 75 FR 57970 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707...

  15. 75 FR 35075 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401...

  16. 76 FR 10913 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy...

  17. 76 FR 59707 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel...

  18. 78 FR 47328 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-08-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy...

  19. 75 FR 26260 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) ] Dated: May 4, 2010. Jennifer...

  20. 76 FR 12744 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National...

  1. 78 FR 34664 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy...

  2. 75 FR 63498 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health...

  3. 75 FR 6041 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative...

  4. 77 FR 24971 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-04-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... . Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel...

  5. 76 FR 35227 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-06-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary, and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401...

  6. 76 FR 38404 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-06-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Shau, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine...

  7. 76 FR 27651 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401...

  8. 77 FR 10540 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Shau, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine...

  9. 75 FR 26780 - Request for Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Strategic Planning White Papers ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) was established in 1998 with the mission of...

  10. 75 FR 65498 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 15, 2010. Jennifer S...

  11. 76 FR 16433 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 17, 2011. Jennifer S...

  12. 78 FR 66755 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary, & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401, Bethesda...

  13. 78 FR 37836 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2013-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 18, 2013. Michelle Trout...

  14. 76 FR 6806 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-02-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy...

  15. 77 FR 52751 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 23, 2012. Jennifer S...

  16. 76 FR 30735 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ] Special... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, 6707 Democracy...

  17. 77 FR 58402 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-09-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special...., Scientific Review Officer, National Center For Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of...

  18. 76 FR 79201 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-12-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707...

  19. 77 FR 28396 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 8, 2012...

  20. 75 FR 6039 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special.... 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of...

  1. 77 FR 1940 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine...

  2. 77 FR 31862 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special..., National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401, Bethesda...

  3. Complementary Hand Responses Occur in Both Peri- and Extrapersonal Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim W Faber

    Full Text Available Human beings have a strong tendency to imitate. Evidence from motor priming paradigms suggests that people automatically tend to imitate observed actions such as hand gestures by performing mirror-congruent movements (e.g., lifting one's right finger upon observing a left finger movement; from a mirror perspective. Many observed actions however, do not require mirror-congruent responses but afford complementary (fitting responses instead (e.g., handing over a cup; shaking hands. Crucially, whereas mirror-congruent responses don't require physical interaction with another person, complementary actions often do. Given that most experiments studying motor priming have used stimuli devoid of contextual information, this space or interaction-dependency of complementary responses has not yet been assessed. To address this issue, we let participants perform a task in which they had to mirror or complement a hand gesture (fist or open hand performed by an actor depicted either within or outside of reach. In three studies, we observed faster reaction times and less response errors for complementary relative to mirrored hand movements in response to open hand gestures (i.e., 'hand-shaking' irrespective of the perceived interpersonal distance of the actor. This complementary effect could not be accounted for by a low-level spatial cueing effect. These results demonstrate that humans have a strong and automatic tendency to respond by performing complementary actions. In addition, our findings underline the limitations of manipulations of space in modulating effects of motor priming and the perception of affordances.

  4. Closed-form mismatched filter synthesis for complementary range response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The combined response of a pair of complementary waveforms has zero range sidelobes and could significantly improve synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image quality by reducing multiplicative noise. However, complementary waveforms may not be practical for SAR imaging for reasons such as Doppler tolerance and unimodular waveform constraints. By using mismatched filters to achieve either a complementary or near-complementary response, two or more practical waveforms could be employed and SAR image quality improved. A closed-form approach was developed that calculates mismatched filters so that the coherent sum of the range responses from each waveform and its corresponding mismatched filter is complementary. A second approach reduced sidelobes while retaining a frequency response close to the waveforms' frequency responses. Images processed using X-band radar data collected under the Air Force Gotcha program exhibited improvements in image quality over those processed using matched filters. The closed-form approach is presented for both complementary and reduced-sidelobe mismatched filters and image quality is quantified. The approach developed in this work offers improved image quality, is suitable for near real-time operation, and is independent of the waveforms.

  5. Error suppression via complementary gauge choices in Reed-Muller codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberland, Christopher; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas

    2017-09-01

    Concatenation of two quantum error-correcting codes with complementary sets of transversal gates can provide a means toward universal fault-tolerant quantum computation. We first show that it is generally preferable to choose the inner code with the higher pseudo-threshold to achieve lower logical failure rates. We then explore the threshold properties of a wide range of concatenation schemes. Notably, we demonstrate that the concatenation of complementary sets of Reed-Muller codes can increase the code capacity threshold under depolarizing noise when compared to extensions of previously proposed concatenation models. We also analyze the properties of logical errors under circuit-level noise, showing that smaller codes perform better for all sampled physical error rates. Our work provides new insights into the performance of universal concatenated quantum codes for both code capacity and circuit-level noise.

  6. Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use among Ivy League College Students: Implications for Student Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.; DeGise, Joe; Daugherty, Amanda; O'Keefe, Richard; Seward, Samuel, Jr.; Setty, Suma; Tang, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Determine prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used and test the significance of demographics and social cognitive constructs as predictors of CAM use in a college sample. Secondary purpose was to guide the integration of CAM therapies into college health services. Participants: Random,…

  7. Queering Sex Education: Young Adult Literature with LGBT Content as Complementary Sources of Sex and Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the nature of young adult texts as complementary sources of informal queer sex and sexuality education, along with a close reading of a sample of this young adult (YA) literature. LGBT teens are often left out of discussions in sex education classrooms in the United States because of discriminatory curricula, ignorance on the…

  8. Scleroderma, Stress and CAM Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kit Hui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease influenced by interplay among genetic and environmental factors, of which one is stress. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used to treat stress and those diseases in which stress has been implicated. Results are presented from a survey of patients with scleroderma. Respondents were a convenient sample of those attending a national conference in Las Vegas in 2002. Findings implicate stress in the onset, continuation and exacerbation of scleroderma. The implication is that CAM providers may be filling an important patient need in their provision of services that identify and treat stress and its related disorders.

  9. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with autism and other developmental disabilities: associations with ethnicity, child comorbid symptoms, and parental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valicenti-McDermott, Maria; Burrows, Bethany; Bernstein, Leora; Hottinger, Kathryn; Lawson, Katharine; Seijo, Rosa; Schechtman, Merryl; Shulman, Lisa; Shinnar, Shlomo

    2014-03-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine by children with autism and the association of its use with child comorbid symptoms and parental stress was studied in an ethnically diverse population, in a cross-sectional study with structured interviews. The sample included 50 families of children with autism and 50 families of children with other developmental disabilities, matched by age/gender. Interview included the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire, Gastrointestinal Questionnaire, Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire, Aberrant Behavior Checklist, and Parenting Stress Index. In this ethnically diverse sample, the use of complementary and alternative medicine was significantly higher for the autism group. In the autism group, use was significantly related to child's irritability, hyperactivity, food allergies, and parental stress; in the developmental disabilities group, there was no association with child comorbid symptoms or parental stress. The results contribute information to health care providers about families of children with autism who are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine.

  10. [Alternative and complementary medicine from the primary care physician's viewpoint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soós, Sándor Árpád; Eőry, Ajándék; Eőry, Ajándok; Harsányi, László; Kalabay, László

    2015-07-12

    The patients initiate the use of complementary and alternative medicine and this often remains hidden from their primary care physician. To explore general practitioners' knowledge and attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine, and study the need and appropriate forms of education, as well as ask their opinion on integration of alternative medicine into mainstream medicine. A voluntary anonymous questionnaire was used on two conferences for general practitioners organized by the Family Medicine Department of Semmelweis University. Complementary and alternative medicine was defined by the definition of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences and certified modalities were all listed. 194 general practitioners answered the questionnaire (39.8% response rate). 14% of the responders had licence in at least one of the complementary and alternative therapies, 45% used complementary and alternative therapy in their family in case of illness. It was the opinion of the majority (91.8%) that it was necessary to be familiar with every method used by their patients, however, 82.5% claimed not to have enough knowledge in complementary medicine. Graduate and postgraduate education in the field was thought to be necessary by 86% of the responders; increased odds for commitment in personal education was found among female general practitioners, less than 20 years professional experience and personal experience of alternative medicine. These data suggest that general practitioners would like to know more about complementary and alternative medicine modalities used by their patients. They consider education of medical professionals necessary and a special group is willing to undergo further education in the field.

  11. A utility analysis of drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchlow, B

    1987-01-01

    In a study applying a utility analysis to drinking behavior, a questionnaire on beliefs about the effects of alcohol and the desirability of those effects was administered to a sample of college students and a sample drawn from the population. Measures of the expected utility of drinking were calculated. Utility scores were positively related to drinking habits, due to heavier drinkers' increased expectations of positive consequences of drinking and more positive evaluation of all consequences. It is suggested that studies on expectancies about drinking should include not only measures of behavioral expectations but measures of the desirability of alcohol effects.

  12. Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Full-Young Chang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic objectives for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS patients are to improve their functioning in society. Accordingly, recommended management is to develop a logical strategy including a positive diagnosis, consideration of the patient's agenda and emotional state, critical appraisal of the efficacies of various drugs and a graded therapeutic response. Unfortunately, none of the currently available drugs (e.g. antispasmodics, antidiarrheals, osmotics, cathartics, bulking agents, tranquilizers, sedatives are globally effective in treating all IBS symptoms, and the advanced receptor-targeted drugs are not always successfully and safely marketed. Consequently, more than half of patients may seek complementary and alternative medicine (CAM to treat the annoying bowel symptoms. Physicians have considered these CAM measures to have an ‘enhanced placebo effect’. For example, many herbal medicine and plant products are globally used to treat IBS, whereas their efficacies are often inconclusive because of small sample sizes, inadequate data analyses and lack of standardized preparations. Meta-analyses do not establish their true efficacy. Acupuncture has long been employed by patients themselves to treat functional gastrointestinal disorders with satisfactory response, but its effect on IBS does not seem to be promising. Peppermint oil, melatonin and clay-like materials are effective in treating some IBS symptoms, while their true pharmacology remains enigmatic. In conclusion, IBS treatment is usually tailored to the individual's manifestations, ranging from reassurance to psychotherapy. Apart from conventional medications, CAM may be considered individually as a supplement or alternative to treat IBS patients that is at least equal in effect to placebo if patients do not exhibit any intolerable or serious side effects.

  13. Design of organic complementary circuits and systems on foil

    CERN Document Server

    Abdinia, Sahel; Cantatore, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    This book describes new approaches to fabricate complementary organic electronics, and focuses on the design of circuits and practical systems created using these manufacturing approaches. The authors describe two state-of-the-art, complementary organic technologies, characteristics and modeling of their transistors and their capability to implement circuits and systems on foil. Readers will benefit from the valuable overview of the challenges and opportunities that these extremely innovative technologies provide. ·         Demonstrates first circuits implemented using specific complementary organic technologies, including first printed analog to digital converter, first dynamic logic on foil and largest complementary organic circuit ·         Includes step-by-step design from single transistor level to complete systems on foil ·         Provides a platform for comparing state-of-the-art complementary organic technologies and for comparing these with other similar technologies, spec...

  14. Protein profile study of clinical samples using laser induced fluorescence as the detection method: case of malignant and normal cervical tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karemore, Gopal; Raja, Sujatha N.; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2009-02-01

    Protein profiles of tissue homogenates were recorded using HPLC separation and LIF detection method. The samples were collected from volunteers with clinically normal or cervical cancer conditions. It is shown that the protein profile can be classified as belonging to malignant or normal state by using hard and Fuzzy clustering methods. The study was performed to test the utility of the HPLC-LIF protein profiling method for classification of tissue samples as well as to establish a complementary method for histopathology for clinical diagnosis of the tissue as normal or malignant.

  15. [The regulatory framework for complementary and alternative medicines in Europe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöss, Werner; Stolte, F; Reh, K

    2008-07-01

    Medicinal products from complementary and alternative medicine are in Germany a regular part of the health care system. Herbal, homeopathic, anthroposophic and traditional medicinal products are highly accepted by the population. The German Medicines Act obliged the competent authorities to consider the particular characteristics of complementary and alternative medicines. The European regulatory framework defined the status of herbal medicinal products, traditional herbal medicinal products and homeopathic medicinal products within the directive 2001/83/EC. The committee for herbal medicinal products (HMPC) was established at the European Medicines Agency in London (EMEA); for homeopathic medicinal products there is a specific working group established by the Heads of Medicines Agencies. Harmonisation of medicinal products from complementary and alternative and traditional medicine in Europe was enforced by implementation of directive 2001/83/EC in national legislations of member states. The provisions of this directive will substantially influence the development of the European market during the forthcoming years.

  16. Review article: complementary and alternative therapies for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmead, L; Rampton, D S

    2006-02-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine includes a wide range of practices and therapies outside the realms of conventional western medicine. Despite a lack of scientific data in the form of controlled trials for either efficacy or safety of complementary and alternative medicine, use by patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly of herbal therapies, is widespread and increasing. There is limited controlled evidence indicating efficacy of traditional Chinese medicines, aloe vera gel, wheat grass juice, Boswellia serrata and bovine colostrum enemas in ulcerative colitis. Encouraging results have also been reported in small studies of acupuncture for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Contrary to popular belief, natural therapies are not necessarily safe: fatal hepatic and irreversible renal failure have occurred with some preparations and interactions with conventional drugs are potentially dangerous. There is a need for further controlled clinical trials of the potential efficacy of complementary and alternative approaches in inflammatory bowel disease, together with enhanced legislation to maximize their quality and safety.

  17. Publishing scientifically sound papers in Traditional and Complementary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isidoro, Ciro; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Non-conventional medical practices that make use of dietary supplements, herbal extracts, physical manipulations, and other practices typically associated with folk and Traditional Medicine are increasingly becoming popular in Western Countries. These practices are commonly referred to by the generic, all-inclusive term "Complementary and Alternative Medicine." Scientists, practitioners, and medical institutions bear the responsibility of testing and proving the effectiveness of these non-conventional medical practices in the interest of patients. In this context, the number of peer-reviewed journals and published articles on this topic has greatly increased in the recent decades. In this editorial article, we illustrate the policy of the Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine for publishing solid and scientifically sound papers in the field of Traditional and Complementary Medicine.

  18. Physician perspectives on education, training, and implementation of complementary and alternative medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel SJ

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sejal J Patel,1 Kathi J Kemper,2 Joseph P Kitzmiller3 1College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, 2Center for Integrative Health and Wellness, The Ohio State Wexner University Medical Center, 3Department of Biological Chemistry and Pharmacology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Over recent decades, the demand for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM has continued to rise in the US. Like the practice of traditional Western medicine, CAM is associated with not only significant health benefits but also significant risks. Unlike traditional Western medicine, however, much of CAM use is less regulated and often occurs unbeknownst to a patient’s medical doctor. The use of herbals, dietary supplements, and over-the-counter (OTC medications can result in adverse effects, and many significant interactions can occur when their use is combined with allopathic medications. Even the more peripheral CAM practices (eg, acupuncture, massage, yoga, and Reiki have associated risk (eg, adverse effects or worsening of physical injury and conditions. There is, however, impetus for change: both patients and physicians favor increasing physician knowledge of CAM and the synergistic implementation of CAM into routine clinical practice. Although improvement has been achieved from contemporary physician educational efforts, recently published results from patient and physician surveys strongly indicate that additional effort to increase physician knowledge of CAM is needed. Utilizing a 37-item survey and convenience-sampling methodology, we collected detailed information from 114 physicians, fellows, and residents from the Ohio State University Medical Center regarding impediments to increasing physician knowledge of CAM and its implementation in routine clinical practice. The aggregate results of our survey data showed that most physicians 1 desired to increase their knowledge of CAM, 2 believed that less

  19. Complementary feeding practices: Current global and regional estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jessica M; Bégin, France; Kumapley, Richard; Murray, Colleen; Krasevec, Julia

    2017-10-01

    Insufficient quantities and inadequate quality of complementary foods, together with poor feeding practices, pose a threat to children's health and nutrition. Interventions to improve complementary feeding are critical to reduce all forms of malnutrition, and access to data to ascertain the status of complementary feeding practices is essential for efforts to improve feeding behaviours. However, sufficient data to generate estimates for the core indicators covering the complementary feeding period only became available recently. The current situation of complementary feeding at the global and regional level is reported here using data contained within the UNICEF global database. Global rates of continued breastfeeding drop from 74.0% at 1 year of age to 46.3% at 2 years of age. Nearly a third of infants 4-5 months old are already fed solid foods, whereas nearly 20% of 10-11 months old had not consumed solid foods during the day prior to their survey. Of particular concern is the low rate (28.2%) of children 6-23 months receiving at least a minimally diverse diet. Although rates for all indicators vary by background characteristics, feeding behaviours are suboptimal even in richest households, suggesting that cultural factors and poor knowledge regarding an adequate diet for young children are important to address. In summary, far too few children are benefitting from minimum complementary feeding practices. Efforts are needed not only to improve children's diets for their survival, growth, and development but also for governments to report on progress against global infant and young child feeding indicators on a regular basis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Complementary Therapies – a spiritual resource in recovery-processes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Dürr, Dorte Wiwe; Johannessen, Helle

    of complementary therapies in residential homes within social psychiatry. Methods: The study includes participant observation, interviews, questionnaires and focus groups in four psychiatric residential home in the regions of Southern Denmark and Mid-Jutland. Data are collected from January 2017 to October 2017......Background: Studies show that spirituality is an important issue for alternative and complementary practitioners and their treatment practice. In social psychiatry in Denmark, several residential homes have implemented various therapies such as massage and ear acupuncture, which along with other...

  1. Gamete Recognition and Complementary Haplotypes in Sexual Penna Ageing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    In simulations of sexual reproduction with diploid individuals, we introduce female haploid gametes that recognize one specific allele of the genomes as a marker of the male haploid gametes. They fuse to zygotes preferably with male gametes having a different marker than their own. This gamete recognition enhances the advantage of complementary bit-strings in the simulated diploid individuals, at low recombination rates. Thus with rare recombinations the bit-strings evolve to be complementary; with recombination rates above approximately 0.1 they instead evolve under Darwinian purification selection, with few bits mutated.

  2. Timing of Introduction of Complementary Foods to US Infants, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Chloe M; Hamner, Heather C; Perrine, Cria G; Scanlon, Kelley S

    2017-12-26

    Although there has been inconsistency in recommendations regarding the optimal time for introducing complementary foods, most experts agree that introduction should not occur before 4 months. Despite recommendations, studies suggest that 20% to 40% of US infants are introduced to foods at younger than 4 months. Previous studies focused on the introduction of solid foods and are not nationally representative. Our aims were to provide a nationally representative estimate of the timing of introduction of complementary foods and to describe predictors of early (<4 months) introduction. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 2009-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. The study included 1,482 children aged 6 to 36 months. Timing of first introduction to complementary foods (anything other than breast milk or formula) was analyzed. Prevalence estimates of first introduction to complementary foods are presented by month. Logistic regression was used to assess characteristics associated with early (<4 months) introduction. In this sample, 16.3% of US infants were introduced to complementary foods at <4 months, 38.3% between 4 and <6 months, 32.5% between 6 and <7 months, and 12.9% at ≥7 months of age. In unadjusted analyses, early introduction varied by breastfeeding status; race/Hispanic origin; Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children participation; and maternal age. In adjusted analyses, only breastfeeding status remained significant; infants who never breastfed or stopped at <4 months were more likely (odds ratio 2.27; 95% CI 1.62 to 3.18) to be introduced to complementary foods early than infants who breastfed ≥4 months. Despite using a broader definition of complementary foods, this analysis found a lower prevalence of early introduction in this nationally representative sample than previous studies that included only solids. However, many young children were still introduced to complementary foods earlier

  3. Using Religious Songs as an Integrative and Complementary Therapy for the Management of Psychological Symptoms Among African American Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jill B; Worthy, Valarie C; Kurtz, Melissa J; Cudjoe, Joycelyn; Johnstone, Peter A

    Acupuncture, acupressure, yoga, meditation, cognitive-behavioral techniques, and, to a lesser extent, music are among those integrative and complementary therapies with known beneficial effects on psychological symptoms. However, noticeably absent from this research is the use of religious song as a type of integrative and complementary therapy. The aim of this study was to explore how religious songs were used to alleviate psychological symptoms associated with a cancer diagnosis among a sample of older African American cancer survivors. Thirty-one older African American cancer survivors residing in the Southeastern US participated in a qualitative descriptive study involving criterion sampling, open-ended semistructured interviews, and qualitative content analysis. Participants used religious songs in response to feeling depressed, low, or sad; feeling weak and seeking strength to endure treatment; and feeling worried, anxious, or fearful. Religious songs were also a source of support and hope. Types of religious songs included instructive, thanksgiving and praise, memory of forefathers, communication with God, and life after death. Religious songs appear to be an important form of religious expression in this population and used to manage psychological symptoms. Integrative and complementary oncology therapy has generally focused on yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and cognitive-behavioral techniques. However, religious songs are an important strategy used among older African American cancer patients. Religious songs can be readily integrated into cancer care. The incorporation of religious songs into spiritually based support groups and other integrative and complementary therapies might enhance health outcomes among this medically underserved cancer population.

  4. Complementary methods for nondestructive testing of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigmann, R.; Iftimie, N.; Sturm, R.; Vizureanu, P.; Savin, A.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents complementary methods used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of composite materials reinforced with carbon woven fibers as two electromagnetic methods using sensor with orthogonal coils and sensor with metamaterials lens as well as ultrasound phased array method and Fiber Bragg gratings embedded instead of a carbon fiber for better health monitoring. The samples were impacted with low energy in order to study delamination influence. The electromagnetic behavior of composite was simulated by finite- difference time-domain (FDTD) software, showing a very good concordance with electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation tests.

  5. The effectiveness of complementary manual therapies for pregnancy-related back and pelvic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Helen; Cramer, Holger; Sundberg, Tobias; Ward, Lesley; Adams, Jon; Moore, Craig; Sibbritt, David; Lauche, Romy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Low back pain and pelvic girth pain are common in pregnancy and women commonly utilize complementary manual therapies such as massage, spinal manipulation, chiropractic, and osteopathy to manage their symptoms. Objective: The aim of this systematically review was to critically appraise and synthesize the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of manual therapies for managing pregnancy-related low back and pelvic pain. Methods: Seven databases were searched from their inception until April 2015 for randomized controlled trials. Studies investigating the effectiveness of massage and chiropractic and osteopathic therapies were included. The study population was pregnant women of any age and at any time during the antenatal period. Study selection, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias were conducted by 2 reviewers independently, using the Cochrane tool. Separate meta-analyses were conducted to compare manual therapies to different control interventions. Results: Out of 348 nonduplicate records, 11 articles reporting on 10 studies on a total of 1198 pregnant women were included in this meta-analysis. The therapeutic interventions predominantly involved massage and osteopathic manipulative therapy. Meta-analyses found positive effects for manual therapy on pain intensity when compared to usual care and relaxation but not when compared to sham interventions. Acceptability did not differ between manual therapy and usual care or sham interventions. Conclusions: There is currently limited evidence to support the use of complementary manual therapies as an option for managing low back and pelvic pain during pregnancy. Considering the lack of effect compared to sham interventions, further high-quality research is needed to determine causal effects, the influence of the therapist on the perceived effectiveness of treatments, and adequate dose–response of complementary manual therapies on low back and pelvic pain outcomes during

  6. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is garnering increasing interest and acceptance among the general population throughout the world. The use of CAM by cancer patients is very common in China. The referenced English literature has no rural community-based study from China on this subject. This study ...

  7. Complementary Feeding Pattern in a Population of Pre-school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: It has been postulated that offering bland diets to infants could habituate to food refusal during early childhood. To investigate the complementary feeding pattern in Nigerian preschool children and a possible association with their current feeding habits, a cross-sectional study of two hundred (200) children was ...

  8. The Problem of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use Today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacArtney, John; Wahlberg, Ayo

    2014-01-01

    Commentators like Goldacre, Dawkins, and Singh and Ernst are worried that the rise in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) represents a flight from science propagated by enemies of reason. We outline what kind of problem CAM use is for these commentators and find that users of CAM...

  9. Complementary Alternative Medicine for Children with Autism: A Physician Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golnik, Allison E.; Ireland, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest over half of children with autism are using complementary alternative medicine (CAM). In this study, physicians responded (n = 539, 19% response rate) to a survey regarding CAM use in children with autism. Physicians encouraged multi-vitamins (49%), essential fatty acids (25%), melatonin (25%) and probiotics (19%) and…

  10. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage in Cancer Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) methods and clinical characteristics in cancer patients in southeast of Turkey. A total of 324 patients (173 female) were enrolled to this study. Questionnaire was applied to all patients individually for approximately 15 ...

  11. Complementary Lagrangians in infinite dimensional symplectic Hilbert spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Paolo; Tausk, Daniel V

    2005-12-01

    We prove that any countable family of Lagrangian subspaces of a symplectic Hilbert space admits a common complementary Lagrangian. The proof of this puzzling result, which is not totally elementary also in the finite dimensional case, is obtained as an application of the spectral theorem for unbounded self-adjoint operators.

  12. Target food sources for formulating complementary/supplementary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It considers the process of formulating complementary and supplementary foods and identifies staple foods as the target sources used for the purpose. It views the issues of relative local availability as a function of certain rather compelling determinants that facilitate both inter- and intra- zonal transfer substitution of target ...

  13. Growth, yield and NPK uptake by maize with complementary organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High and sustainable crop yields in the tropics have been reported to be only possible with judicious combination of mineral fertilizers and organic amendments. Fertilizing croppings to achieve this has usually been a difficult task to achieve. The growth and yield of maize cultivated with a complementary application of ...

  14. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group.

  15. Contextualising complementary feeding in a broader framework for stunting prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Christine P; Iannotti, Lora; Dewey, Kathryn G; Michaelsen, Kim F; Onyango, Adelheid W

    2013-09-01

    An estimated 165 million children are stunted due to the combined effects of poor nutrition, repeated infection and inadequate psychosocial stimulation. The complementary feeding period, generally corresponding to age 6-24 months, represents an important period of sensitivity to stunting with lifelong, possibly irrevocable consequences. Interventions to improve complementary feeding practices or the nutritional quality of complementary foods must take into consideration the contextual as well as proximal determinants of stunting. This review presents a conceptual framework that highlights the role of complementary feeding within the layers of contextual and causal factors that lead to stunted growth and development and the resulting short- and long-term consequences. Contextual factors are organized into the following groups: political economy; health and health care systems; education; society and culture; agriculture and food systems; and water, sanitation and environment. We argue that these community and societal conditions underlie infant and young child feeding practices, which are a central pillar to healthy growth and development, and can serve to either impede or enable progress. Effectiveness studies with a strong process evaluation component are needed to identify transdisciplinary solutions. Programme and policy interventions aimed at preventing stunting should be informed by careful assessment of these factors at all levels. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Functions of Turkish complementary schools in the UK: Official vs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary schools in the United Kingdom (UK) are community organised schools with the general aim of teaching younger generations their 'native' languages and cultures. However, the aims and practices of these schools are predominantly dependent on changes in the social and political contexts both in the host ...

  17. History and Social Science: Complementary Approaches to Adult Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert A.

    The author expresses the view that historical and social science research in adult education should be complementary but separate. He asserts that interpretive, humanistic adult education history should be oriented toward "the unique, the particular, and the individual," with statistical analysis and other scientific methodology preferably…

  18. Functions of Turkish complementary schools in the UK: Official vs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complementary schools in the United Kingdom (UK) are community organised schools with the general aim of teaching younger generations their 'native' languages and cultures. However, the aims and practices of these schools are pre- dominantly dependent on changes in the social and political contexts both in the host ...

  19. Complementary and alternative therapies for low back pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tulder, M.; Furlan, A.D.; Gagnier, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The support for the principles of evidence-based medicine has increased within the field of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The objective of this chapter is to determine the effectiveness of CAM therapies compared to placebo, no intervention, or other interventions for acute/subacute

  20. On the front line. Nursing and complementary therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Wide-range of complementary therapies are being used by nurses to deal with the health issues encountered in standard nursing practice. The Lamp looks at some hands-on examples-the soothing jets of the hydrobath, the healing power of music, the pain relief given by therapeutic massage and the efficacy of essential oils.

  1. Belief in complementary and alternative medicine in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for treatment of chronic diseases has been on the increases globally. This is an important risk factor in the pathogenesis of kidney injury. Identifying patients who believe in their use for treatment of kidney disease will assist in targeted surveillance and ...

  2. Negotiating Language, Culture and Pupil Agency in Complementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytra, Vally

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the teaching of language and culture and in particular the use of songs as curriculum in two London Turkish complementary schools. Drawing on a series of interconnected classroom vignettes, I look at how children weave together their semiotic resources to negotiate and transform two songs and the talk and action around…

  3. Governance and sustainability of the Argentine Complementary Currency Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.M. Gómez (Georgina)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Redes de Trueque (RT) thrived during the economic crisis of 2001 – 2002 in Argentina and still stand out as one of the largest Complementary Currency System in the world. These local exchange networks reach a large scale during times of severe economic distress, but as large

  4. Acceptance of a complementary food prepared with yellow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-13

    Jun 13, 2014 ... effective for various reasons.13,14 Biofortification is an emerging complementary strategy that involves enhancing staple crops with vitamins and ..... supermarkets, as it would then be perceived as being fit for human consumption. ... Modernisation and market availability influences preferences, and the ...

  5. Inverse design of nanophotonic structures using complementary convex optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jesse; Vucković, Jelena

    2010-02-15

    A computationally-fast inverse design method for nanophotonic structures is presented. The method is based on two complementary convex optimization problems which modify the dielectric structure and resonant field respectively. The design of one- and two-dimensional nanophotonic resonators is demonstrated and is shown to require minimal computational resources.

  6. The scientific basis of alternative and complementary intervention in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus the orthodox psychiatric practice that regulates neurotransmitter functions among others simply employs energy also. Both systems employ energy though the different groups of therapists may not be aware of this. This is a point of convergence between the two systems. Thus the alternative or complementary system of ...

  7. Diagnoses and visit length in complementary and mainstream medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Groot, J. de; Koster, D.; Dulmen, S. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The demand for complementary medicine (CM) is growing worldwide and so is the supply. So far, there is not much insight in the activities in Dutch CM practices nor in how these activities differ from mainstream general practice. Comparisons on diagnoses and visit length can offer an

  8. Developing a Culture of Readers: Complementary Materials That Engage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailors, Misty; Kaambankadzanja, Davie

    2017-01-01

    Many professionals, including members of the International Literacy Association, are concerned with the lack of reading materials in classrooms across the world. In this paper, the authors present the creation of high-quality, locally produced, complementary reading materials in Malawi, where there are very few children's books and few…

  9. Technological aspects of preparing affordable fermented complementary foods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, M.J.R.; Ngoddy, P.O.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements and manufacturing procedure of complementary (weaning) foods is discussed. Nutritional requirements for infants (aged 6-12 months) include approx. 3 MJ energy and 14 g digestible protein per litre, of a semi-liquid porridge. Microbiological safety is enhanced by biological

  10. Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a Foundation for a Viable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper on “Asouzu's Complementary Ontology as a foundation for a viable Ethic of the Environment”, posits that an ethic of the environment can be seen as viable if it considers the whole of reality as ontologically relevant. This point of view would free environmental ethics of anthropocentric bias and its attendant ...

  11. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Social Unity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    We examine how different forms of co-action (uniform vs. complementary co-action) give rise to feelings of solidarity. Five studies reveal that both forms of co-action increase solidarity, but have different consequences for the role of the individual within the group.

  12. Child factors associated with complementary feeding practices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of teeth influences when to introduce complementary feeding, but the process typically leads to a loss of appetite which affects food intake. Secondary analysis of Demographic and Health. Surveys in Ethiopia conducted by Melkam et al.19 and in Nepal by. Khana et al.20 indicated that as children grow older their diets.

  13. Contextualising complementary feeding in a broader framework for stunting prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stewart, Christine P; Iannotti, Lora; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2013-01-01

    the role of complementary feeding within the layers of contextual and causal factors that lead to stunted growth and development and the resulting short- and long-term consequences. Contextual factors are organized into the following groups: political economy; health and health care systems; education...

  14. Determinants of public trust in complementary and alternative medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schee, E. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, public trust in conventional medicine is relatively high. There is reason to believe that public trust in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is rated lower. The aim of this study is to gain insight into public trust in CAM and the determinants that lie at

  15. Determinants of public trust in complementary and alternative medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schee, E. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the Netherlands, public trust in conventional medicine is relatively high. There is reason to believe that public trust in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is rated lower. The aim of this study is to gain insight into public trust in CAM and the determinants that lie at

  16. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  17. Traditional, complementary and alternative medicine use of chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine's (TCAM) use of chronic disease patients in a community setting in Myanmar. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional community survey was conducted in the Kyauk Tan ...

  18. Complementary and alternative therapies for back pain II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Furlan, Andrea D.; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Tsertsvadze, Alexander; Gross, Anita; Van Tulder, Maurits; Santaguida, Lina; Cherkin, Dan; Gagnier, Joel J.; Ammendolia, Carlo; Ansari, Mohammed T.; Ostermann, Thomas; Dryden, Trish; Doucette, Steve; Skidmore, Becky; Daniel, Raymond; Tsouros, Sophia; Weeks, Laura; Galipeau, James

    2010-01-01

    Back and neck pain are important health problems with serious societal and economic implications. Conventional treatments have been shown to have limited benefit in improving patient outcomes. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies offer additional options in the management of low

  19. Letters to the Editor: Poor complementary feeding practices among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Letters to the Editor: Poor complementary feeding practices among young children in Cameroon. Samuel Nambile Cumber, Nancy Bongkiynuy, Shalom Jaila, Joyce Mahlako Tsoka-Gwegweni. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  20. Formulation of a complementary food fortified with broad beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty percent of mothers did not provide bean-based food for their children, with the most frequently reported reason being lack of knowledge of its nutrient value for young children. To a typical complementary food of barley-maize porridge, 10, 20 and 30% of cereal was replaced by processed broad beans (Vicia faba), ...

  1. Home-based practices of complementary foods improvement are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items related to the early and current breastfeeding patterns and the mode of complementary feeding were recorded by interview of the mothers. Fortified cereals were defined as home-based improved flours by mixing “soumbala,” fishmeal, toasted groundnut, or several of these local foods with cereal. Soumbala is a ...

  2. Changes in complementary feeding practices and nutrition status in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-31

    Dec 31, 2012 ... Changes in complementary feeding practices and nutrition status in returnee children aged 6-23 months in northern Uganda. Introduction. Northern Uganda was the most politically instable region in the country for 25 years until 2008, when the government and the Lord's. Resistance Army signed an ...

  3. Young children feeding and Zinc levels of complementary foods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malnutrition among young children in Cameroon starts during complementary feeding or the transition period. Last nutritional surveys indicated high prevalence of protein energy malnutrition, iron deficiency anemia and Vitamin A deficiency in children aged 6 to 59 months. No data on appropriate feeding and zinc content in ...

  4. Poor complementary feeding practices among young children in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quantities and inadequate quality of complementary foods, poor child-feeding practices and high rates of infections have a detrimental impact on health and growth during the first two years of life.5 Children, even after receiving optimum breastfeeding, will become stunted if they do not receive sufficient quantities of quality ...

  5. Complementary feeding: a critical window of opportunity from six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-12

    Apr 12, 2013 ... Paediatric Food-Based Dietary Guidelines for South Africa: Complementary feeding: a critical window of opportunity from six months onwards. S129 2013 .... nutritional value to the food. • “Fortification” means the addition of ..... heat-treated before being offered to young children in small amounts, bearing in ...

  6. Polarization dependent enhanced infrared transmission through complementary nanostructured gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Gangadhar; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2016-05-01

    A pair of complementary-structured gold films, with periodic rectangular nanoscale patches and rectangular holes in the complementary layer arranged in a stretched hexagonal lattice and spaced apart by 200 nm of a photoresist film, were fabricated by laser interference lithography and subsequent physical vapor deposition of gold. The pair of complementary films showed a polarization-dependent extraordinary transmission (EOT) at mid-infrared frequencies, evidenced by a resonant dip in reflectance and strong enhancement of the transmittance for light polarized perpendicular to the long axis of the rectangular structures. Numerical simulations confirm the enhanced transmission and indicate the involvement of the TE01 wave-guide mode resonance of the rectangular structures in the resonant transmittance. The enhanced transmittance in the complementary pair of structured films separated by sub-wavelength distances, which is otherwise be expected to be opaque, is surprising. The Poynting vector maps show that the energy flow weaves across the openings in the two structured films. Dependence on the metal thickness and period of the structures have been investigated. Sensitivity of the EOT peak to the surrounding medium's refractive index is studied by simulations to reveal its potential for sensor applications.

  7. A complementary model for medical subspecialty training in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    could also be applied to other disciplines and where the need exists to complement other subspecialist education. The model envisages that all stakeholders in the training of subspecialists need to make a paradigm shift to facilitate changes to accommodate the complementary system, which will benefit both the private and ...

  8. Complementary feeding: A critical window of opportunity from six ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The typical maize-based feeding pattern is low in food sourced from animals, vegetables and fruit and omega-3 fatty acids. Efforts by ... These could include nutrition education to improve caregiver practices, the use of high-quality, locally available foods, the use of enriched complementary foods, and exceptional support of ...

  9. Viewpoints of Patients in Qazvin Towards Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barikani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background We have little information on the degree of individuals’ in Iran and their use of complementary and alternative medicine, its variations and the causes of people’s tendency towards the treatments used in the methods mentioned above. Objectives In 2012, we set out to study the viewpoints of patients in Qazvin, Iran, examining how they feel about complementary and alternative medicine. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study, data were collected through the use of a questionnaire. A total of 293 patients who had been referred to the complementary and alternative medicine centers were surveyed. These centers practice methods such as cupping, homeopathy and acupuncture. The questionnaire was divided in two parts, demographic questions and main questions, in this particular study. The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 19 with P < 0.05. Results The mean age of the participants was 37.2 ± 13.3, and 60.8 percent of them were men. In all, 70.6 percent and 24.4 percent of respondents were married and single, respectively. About 58 percent had completed their undergraduate education. The cause of 31.3 percent of the participants’ visits was mental sicknesses, 20.2 percent attended due to rheumatologic diseases, and 8.2 percent applied to the mentioned treatment centers seeking relief from skin-related diseases. Ninety-one percent of the participants reported using alternative and complementary medicine for its efficiency. The levels of high satisfaction they reported gaining from the center’s homeopathy, acupuncture, and phlebotomy services were 17.2%, 16.5%, and 18.2%, respectively. In addition, 70 percent of the patients found the new treatment method to be quite successful, while 27 percent found it to be less effective than other approaches they had tried. Conclusions The people were receptive to the use of alternative and complementary medicine and their satisfaction level was high.

  10. Complementary feeding practices among children aged 6–23 months in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istiyaq Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Complementary feeding practices play an important role in the growth and development of the children. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of complementary feeding practices among children aged 6–23 months and its association with various sociodemographic factors. Settings and Design: The study was a community-based, cross-sectional study conducted at field practice area of Urban Health Training Centre and Rural Health Training Centre, Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh. Materials and Methods: Mothers of children aged 6–23 months of age interviewed using the infant and young child feeding questionnaire for complimentary feeding indicators, namely, minimum dietary diversity (MDD, minimum meal frequency (MMF, and minimum acceptable diet (MAD. The sample size drawn was 326 using systematic random sampling with probability proportionate to size. Statistical Analysis Used: Wald's statistics, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: MDD was adequate in 42.6% children, MMF in 50.9% children, and MAD in 35.6% children. MDD was significantly associated with area of residence, birth order of child, and Standard of living index (SLI; MMF was significantly associated with area of residence, sex of child, and literacy status of mother; MAD was significantly associated with area of residence, sex of child, birth order of child, and SLI. Conclusion: The study revealed that approximately 50% of mothers practiced inadequate complementary feeding. The feeding practices were found to be significantly associated with various sociodemographic factors highlighting the importance of addressing these factors if we aim an improvement in feeding practices.

  11. The meaning of complementary, alternative and traditional medicine among the Indonesian psychology community: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Rahmawati, Kuncoro Dewi

    2017-07-01

    Complementary, alternative and traditional medicine (CATM) is a new field, as well as a promising area of study and practice in psychology. It is important to research the cultural context and meaning of CATM, including its definitions and examples, among different communities of psychology because CATM's use is dependent on how it is understood by the members. The aim of this pilot study is to provide an interpretation of the Indonesian psychology community's understanding of CATM through a qualitative approach. Online interviews with open-ended questions and purposive sampling were used. Participants were dominantly psychologists or lecturers in clinical psychology area. Ten males and 12 females with an average age of 28.0 ± 2.5 years voluntarily participated in this study. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed and analysed by the two authors to ensure accuracy of interpretation. It was found that there was no single meaning of CATM among the Indonesian community of psychology. Participants were not familiar enough with the terms and tended to use them with overlap. It can be suggested that "complementary medicine" and "alternative medicine" or "complementary-alternative medicine" combined provides more suitable terminology for use among Indonesian psychology community when communicating with other health care professionals. The understanding of the terms and examples of CATM were diverse and were often used interchangeably in the projects/interviews. It was also found that Indonesian psychologists required more education regarding CATM. In addition, future studies with more participants from various aspects of the psychology community should be conducted to capture a more representative sample.

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine use by visitors to rural Japanese family medicine clinics: results from the international complementary and alternative medicine survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumer, Gregory; Warber, Sara; Motohara, Satoko; Yajima, Ayaka; Plegue, Melissa; Bialko, Matthew; Iida, Tomoko; Sano, Kiyoshi; Amenomori, Masaki; Tsuda, Tsukasa; Fetters, Michael D

    2014-09-25

    There is growing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) throughout the world, however previous research done in Japan has focused primarily on CAM use in major cities. The purpose of this study was to develop and distribute a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to assess the use of CAM among people who visit rural Japanese family medicine clinics. Using a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q), a cross-sectional survey was conducted in three rural family medicine clinics. All patients and those accompanying patients who met inclusion criteria were eligible to participate. Data were entered into SPSS Statistics and analyzed for use by age, gender, and location. Of the 519 respondents who participated in the project, 415 participants reported CAM use in the past 12 months (80.0%). When prayer is excluded, the prevalence of CAM use drops to 77.3% in the past year, or 403 respondents. The most common forms of CAM used by respondents were pain relief pads (n = 170, 32.8%), herbal medicines/supplements (n = 167, 32.2%), and massage by self or family (n = 166, 32.0%). Female respondents, individuals with higher levels of education, and those with poorer overall health status were more likely to use CAM than respondents without these characteristics. Only 22.8% of CAM therapies used were reported to physicians by survey participants. These data indicate that CAM use in rural Japan is common. The results are consistent with previous studies that show that Japanese individuals are more interested in forms of CAM such as pain relief pads and massage, than in mind-body forms of CAM like relaxation and meditation. Due to the high utilization of certain CAM practices, and given that most CAM users do not disclose their CAM use to their doctors, we conclude that physicians in rural Japan would benefit by asking about CAM use

  13. Community pharmacists' knowledge, practices and beliefs about complementary and alternative medicine in Palestine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shraim, Naser Y; Shawahna, Ramzi; Sorady, Muna A; Aiesh, Banan M; Alashqar, Ghadeer Sh; Jitan, Raghad I; Abu Hanieh, Waed M; Hotari, Yasmeen B; Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2017-08-29

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization is dramatically increasing among patients. As community pharmacies are a major provider of CAM products, community pharmacists need to have the sufficient knowledge and information to advice their patients, answer their inquiries and to be proactive in the healthcare process to ensure optimal therapy outputs and minimize both drug-drug and drug-herb interactions. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to assess the knowledge, beliefs, and practices of community pharmacists in Palestine about CAM. The study was conducted in a cross-sectional design in which a questionnaire was administered on a sample of licensed community pharmacists from Palestine. The questionnaire was of 5 sections: demographic and practice details of the participants, practice, beliefs, and knowledge about CAM. Mann-Whitney-U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to comparison of different issues as appropriate. P-values of <0.05 were considered significant. A total of 284 community pharmacists were surveyed, however, 281 were included in the analysis as they met inclusion criteria. Out of the 281, 149 (53.0%) of the participants were males and the rest were females. About 40% of the participants were between 20 to 29 years old. Pharmacists frequently recommended CAM modalities. Exercises (84.0%) and food supplements (82.6%) were the most commonly recommended modalities. In the last year, vitamin B12 was the most frequently prescribed supplement. The median knowledge score was 5 out of 8 and the median beliefs about CAM score was 4.0 out of 7.0. CAM recommendations by pharmacists appear to be commonplace. Although their knowledge scores were fair to average, pharmacists still need more education and training about CAM in order to be more qualified to provide better pharmaceutical care and improve their patient's outcome.

  14. Review of Efficacy of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments for Menopausal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thea R; Franks, Rachel B; Fox, Carol

    2017-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been used for thousands of years around the world. There has been increased interest in utilizing CAM for menopausal symptoms since the release of results of the Women's Health Initiative elucidated long-term adverse effects associated with hormone therapy. Women looking for more natural or safer means to treat hot flushes, night sweats, and other menopausal symptoms often turn to CAM such as yoga, phytoestrogens, or black cohosh. Yet there have been few well-conducted studies looking at the efficacy of these treatments. This review examines randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses evaluating the effectiveness of commonly used CAM for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. © 2017 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine use among military family medicine patients in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jeremy B; Oh, Robert C

    2010-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a growing component of medicine within the U.S. civilian and military populations. Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) Family Medicine Clinic represents an overseas medical facility stationed among a diverse ethnic population. The impact that local cultures have on CAM utilization in the military population in overseas medical facilities is unknown. Cross-sectional survey. The authors surveyed all volunteer soldiers, family members, and retirees 18 years old or greater enrolled at TAMC Family Medicine Clinic with appointments between September 1 and September 25, 2008. 503 volunteers were surveyed with a response rate of 73% (n = 369). A total of 50.7% reported using at least one CAM therapy within the last year. CAM use was significantly higher among women, Caucasians, and a college level education or greater. Prevalence of CAM use is higher within a military family medicine clinic in Hawaii than the prevalence among mainland civilian or other military populations.

  16. Maqasid al-shariah as a complementary framework to conventional bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifuddeen, Shaikh Mohd; Rahman, Noor Naemah Abdul; Isa, Noor Munirah; Baharuddin, Azizan

    2014-06-01

    With the rapid advancements made in biotechnology, bioethical discourse has become increasingly important. Bioethics is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary field that goes beyond the realm of natural sciences, and has involved fields in the domain of the social sciences. One of the important areas in bioethical discourse is religion. In a country like Malaysia, where Muslims make up the majority of the population, Islam plays a crucial role in providing the essential guidelines on the permissibility and acceptability of biotechnological applications in various fields such as medicine, agriculture, and food processing. This article looks at the framework of a complementary model of bioethics derived from the perspective of Islam. The framework is based on 'maqasid al-shariah' (purposes or objectives of Islamic law) which aims to protect and preserve mankind's faith, life, intellect, progeny, and property. It is proposed that 'maqasid al-shariah' be used as a pragmatic checklist that can be utilized in tackling bioethical issues and dilemmas.

  17. The union of narrative and executive function: different but complementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Margaret; Bates, Raven Phoenix

    2014-01-01

    Oral narrative production develops dramatically from 3 to 5 years of age, and is a key factor in a child's ability to communicate about the world. Concomitant with this are developments in executive function (EF). For example, executive attention and behavioral inhibition show marked development beginning around 4 years of age. Both EF and oral narrative abilities have important implications for academic success, but the relationship between them is not well understood. The present paper utilizes a cross-lagged design to assess convergent and predictive relations between EF and narrative ability. As a collateral measure, we collected a Language Sample during 10 min of free play. Language Sample did not share significant variance with Narrative Production, thus general language growth from Wave 1 to Wave 2 cannot account for the predictive relations between EF and Narrative. Our findings suggest that although EF and Narrative ability appear independent at each Wave, they nevertheless support each other over developmental time. Specifically, the ability to maintain focus at 4 years supports subsequent narrative ability and narrative ability at 4 years supports subsequent facility and speed in learning and implementing new rules. PMID:24872811

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine among veterans and military personnel: a synthesis of population surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Margot T; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Larson, Mary Jo; Hoover, Ronald; Mauch, Danna

    2014-12-01

    Recent reports reinforce the widespread interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), not only among military personnel with combat-related disorders, but also among providers who are pressed to respond to patient demand for these therapies. However, an understanding of utilization of CAM therapies in this population is lacking. The goals of this study are to synthesize the content of self-report population surveys with information on use of CAM in military and veteran populations, assess gaps in knowledge, and suggest ways to address current limitations. The research team conducted a literature review of population surveys to identify CAM definitions, whether military status was queried, the medical and psychological conditions queried, and each specific CAM question. Utilization estimates specific to military/veterans were summarized and limitations to knowledge was classified. Seven surveys of CAM utilization were conducted with military/veteran groups. In addition, 7 household surveys queried military status, although there was no military/veteran subgroup analysis. Definition of CAM varied widely limiting cross-survey analysis. Among active duty and Reserve military, CAM use ranged between 37% and 46%. Survey estimates do not specify CAM use that is associated with a medical or behavioral health condition. Comparisons between surveys are hampered due to variation in methodologies. Too little is known about reasons for using CAM and conditions for which it is used. Additional information could be drawn from current surveys with additional subgroup analysis, and future surveys of CAM should include military status variable.

  19. Systems-level Proteomics of Two Ubiquitous Leaf Commensals Reveals Complementary Adaptive Traits for Phyllosphere Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel B; Schubert, Olga T; Röst, Hannes; Aebersold, Ruedi; Vorholt, Julia A

    2016-10-01

    Plants are colonized by a diverse community of microorganisms, the plant microbiota, exhibiting a defined and conserved taxonomic structure. Niche separation based on spatial segregation and complementary adaptation strategies likely forms the basis for coexistence of the various microorganisms in the plant environment. To gain insights into organism-specific adaptations on a molecular level, we selected two exemplary community members of the core leaf microbiota and profiled their proteomes upon Arabidopsis phyllosphere colonization. The highly quantitative mass spectrometric technique SWATH MS was used and allowed for the analysis of over two thousand proteins spanning more than three orders of magnitude in abundance for each of the model strains. The data suggest that Sphingomonas melonis utilizes amino acids and hydrocarbon compounds during colonization of leaves whereas Methylobacterium extorquens relies on methanol metabolism in addition to oxalate metabolism, aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis and alkanesulfonate utilization. Comparative genomic analyses indicates that utilization of oxalate and alkanesulfonates is widespread among leaf microbiota members whereas, aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis is almost exclusively found in Methylobacteria. Despite the apparent niche separation between these two strains we also found a relatively small subset of proteins to be coregulated, indicating common mechanisms, underlying successful leaf colonization. Overall, our results reveal for two ubiquitous phyllosphere commensals species-specific adaptations to the host environment and provide evidence for niche separation within the plant microbiota. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Prevalence of allergic diseases and their association with breastfeeding and initiation of complementary feeding in school-age children of Ciudad Guzmán, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Romero, C Jaime; Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; López-Vargas, Laura; Romero-Velarde, C Enrique

    2015-08-01

    The effect that breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices have on the prevalence of allergic diseases has shown inconsistent results. To assess the effect of breastfeeding and the initiation of complementary feeding on the prevalence of allergic disease. Analytical, crosssectional population-based study conducted in 6-12 year old children attending primary school and selected through a multistage sampling technique. A structured questionnaire was administered to parents or tutors to identify allergic diseases (asthma, allergic rhinitis, or atopic dermatitis), a history of prolonged breastfeeding and age at initiation of complementary feeding. A logistic regression analysis was used to establish associations among variables. A total of 740 children were included. The frequency of breastfeeding for >6 months was 73.4%, and of complementary feeding at <4 months old was 31.9%. Prolonged breastfeeding showed no effect on the prevalence of allergic diseases. A protective effect was observed on the frequency of atopic dermatitis when complementary feeding was initiated late, adjusted OR= 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1-0.8 (p 0.019). The protective effect of breastfeeding against the prevalence of allergic diseases has not been demonstrated. There is a reduction in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis when complementary feeding is started late.

  1. Innovative recruitment using online networks: lessons learned from an online study of alcohol and other drug use utilizing a web-based, respondent-driven sampling (webRDS) strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, José A; Zimmerman, Marc A; Johns, Michelle M; Glowacki, Pietreck; Stoddard, Sarah; Volz, Erik

    2012-09-01

    We used a web version of Respondent-Driven Sampling (webRDS) to recruit a sample of young adults (ages 18-24) and examined whether this strategy would result in alcohol and other drug (AOD) prevalence estimates comparable to national estimates (National Survey on Drug Use and Health [NSDUH]). We recruited 22 initial participants (seeds) via Facebook to complete a web survey examining AOD risk correlates. Sequential, incentivized recruitment continued until our desired sample size was achieved. After correcting for webRDS clustering effects, we contrasted our AOD prevalence estimates (past 30 days) to NSDUH estimates by comparing the 95% confidence intervals of prevalence estimates. We found comparable AOD prevalence estimates between our sample and NSDUH for the past 30 days for alcohol, marijuana, cocaine, Ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, or MDMA), and hallucinogens. Cigarette use was lower than NSDUH estimates. WebRDS may be a suitable strategy to recruit young adults online. We discuss the unique strengths and challenges that may be encountered by public health researchers using webRDS methods.

  2. Utilizing the Zero-One Linear Programming Constraints to Draw Multiple Sets of Matched Samples from a Non-Treatment Population as Control Groups for the Quasi-Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan H.; Yang, Yu N.; Tompkins, Leroy J.; Modarresi, Shahpar

    2005-01-01

    The statistical technique, "Zero-One Linear Programming," that has successfully been used to create multiple tests with similar characteristics (e.g., item difficulties, test information and test specifications) in the area of educational measurement, was deemed to be a suitable method for creating multiple sets of matched samples to be…

  3. The Construction and Performance of a Novel Intergroup Complementary Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Wenzhun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the analyses for intergroup complementary (IGC code and zero correlation zone complementary code, a novel IGC code has been proposed to adapt M-ary orthogonal code spreading spectrum system or quasi-synchronous CDMA system. The definition and construction methods of the new IGC codes are presented and an applied example is given in this paper. Theoretical research and simulation results show that the main advantages of the novel IGC code are as following: The code sets of the novel IGC code is more than IGC code under the same code length. The zero correlation zone length is longer than the intergroup IGC code, but shorter than the intergroup IGC code. Under the same code length, the auto-correlation performance of the novel IGC code is better than that of the IGC code, and both are of similar cross-correlation performance.

  4. Complementary and Alternative Approaches to Pain Relief during Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Tournaire

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluated the effect of complementary and alternative medicine on pain during labor with conventional scientific methods using electronic data bases through 2006 were used. Only randomized controlled trials with outcome measures for labor pain were kept for the conclusions. Many studies did not meet the scientific inclusion criteria. According to the randomized control trials, we conclude that for the decrease of labor pain and/or reduction of the need for conventional analgesic methods: (i There is an efficacy found for acupressure and sterile water blocks. (ii Most results favored some efficacy for acupuncture and hydrotherapy. (iii Studies for other complementary or alternative therapies for labor pain control have not shown their effectiveness.

  5. Toward a Complementary Neuroscience: Metastable Coordination Dynamics of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, J. A. Scott; Tognoli, Emmanuelle

    Metastability has been proposed as a new principle of behavioral and brain function and may point the way to a truly complementary neuroscience. From elementary coordination dynamics we show explicitly that metastability is a result of a symmetry-breaking caused by the subtle interplay of two forces: the tendency of the components to couple together and the tendency of the components to express their intrinsic independent behavior. The metastable regime reconciles the well-known tendencies of specialized brain regions to express their autonomy (segregation) and the tendencies for those regions to work together as a synergy (integration). Integration ~ segregation is just one of the complementary pairs (denoted by the tilde [~] symbol) to emerge from the science of coordination dynamics. We discuss metastability in the brain by describing the favorable conditions existing for its emergence and by deriving some predictions for its empirical characterization in neurophysiological recordings.

  6. Complementary and alternative exercise for fibromyalgia: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mist SD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Scott David Mist, Kari Firestone, Kim Dupree Jones Fibromyalgia Research and Treatment Group, School of Nursing, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Complementary and alternative medicine includes a number of exercise modalities, such as tai chi, qigong, yoga, and a variety of lesser-known movement therapies. A meta-analysis of the current literature was conducted estimating the effect size of the different modalities, study quality and bias, and adverse events. The level of research has been moderately weak to date, but most studies report a medium-to-high effect size in pain reduction. Given the lack of adverse events, there is little risk in recommending these modalities as a critical component in a multimodal treatment plan, which is often required for fibromyalgia management. Keywords: fibromyalgia, exercise, complementary and alternative, efficacy, safety

  7. Polarization-independent transparency window induced by complementary graphene metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei Bing; Liu, Ji Long; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Jian; Liu, Zhen Guo

    2017-01-01

    A fourfold symmetric graphene-based complementary metasurface featuring a polarization-independent transparency window is proposed and numerically analysed in this paper. The unit cell of the metamaterial consists of a monolayer graphene perforated with a cross and four identical split-ring resonators deposited on a substrate. Our analysis shows that the transparency window can be interpreted as a plasmonic analogy of Autler-Townes splitting. The polarization independence is achieved due to the fourfold symmetry of graphene’s complementary structure. In addition, the frequency range of the transparency window can be dynamically tuned over a broad band by changing the chemical potential of graphene, and the width of the transparency window can also be controlled by changing the split-gap orientation. This work may lead to potential applications in many area, such as slow-light devices and optical sensing.

  8. Physical Exercise as complementary treatment in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Serdà Ferrer, Bernat; Monreal Bosch, Pilar; Del Valle, Arantza

    2010-01-01

    This article presents how physical exercise can be considered as a complementary treatment in prostate cancer. The article presents the design and implementation of a strength-endurance physical exercise program adapted to prostate cancer. The initial model corresponds to the guidelines of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM 1998). Adapting and transforming the program included the most common symptoms relating to the illness and its treatments.

  9. New constructions of MDS codes with complementary duals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bocong; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-01-01

    Linear complementary-dual (LCD for short) codes are linear codes that intersect with their duals trivially. LCD codes have been used in certain communication systems. It is recently found that LCD codes can be applied in cryptography. This application of LCD codes renewed the interest in the construction of LCD codes having a large minimum distance. MDS codes are optimal in the sense that the minimum distance cannot be improved for given length and code size. Constructing LCD MDS codes is thu...

  10. Personal health budgets: a new way of accessing complementary therapies?

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The popularity and use of complementary and alternative therapies and medicines (CAM) has remained high in the UK and many other countries over at least the last two decades. Access to such modalities via publicly funded health and welfare systems has remained very limited over the same period. Personal health budgets, designed to offer significant control and personal choice over health care, offer a potential mechanism for some individuals to access publicly funded CAM treatments more direc...

  11. The leadership team: complementary strengths or conflicting agendas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Stephen A; Watkins, Michael D

    2007-04-01

    Senior leadership teams whose members play complementary roles have been chronicled as far back as Homer's account of the Trojan War: Although King Agamemnon commanded the Greek army, Achilles, Odysseus, and Nestor each played a distinct role in defeating Troy. Today, complementary-leadership structures are common and, in some cases, even institutionalized. Think of a CEO concerned mainly with external issues and a COO who focuses internally. The authors describe four kinds of complementarity: task, expertise, cognitive, and role. The two top executives at the software company Adobe Systems, for example, represent the second kind. As CEO, Bruce Chizen draws on his sales and marketing knowledge, while COO Shantanu Narayen adds his engineering and product development expertise. Roberto Goizueta, formerly the CEO of Coca-Cola, and Douglas Ivester, his COO (who later became CEO), were famous examples of the fourth type: Goizueta, the diplomat, maintained good relations with external stakeholders; Ivester, the warrior, drove the company to defeat the competition. Bringing together two or more people with complementary strengths can compensate for the natural limitations of each. But with the benefits comes the risk of confusion, disagreement about priorities, and turf battles. Leadership succession also presents substantial challenges, especially when a COO or president who has worked in a complementary fashion with the CEO moves into the top role. An organization's board of directors and CEO can manage the risks by fostering a shared vision, common incentives, communication, and trust. They can also ensure smooth succession processes in various ways, such as brokering a gradual transfer of responsibilities or allowing the CEO and the COO to share duties as long as they maintain the logic of complementarity.

  12. Lead poisoning from complementary and alternative medicine in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, A; Le Couteur, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    A patient with multiple sclerosis is described who was treated for neurological symptoms thought to be a progression of his disease but subsequently found to be caused by lead poisoning secondary to the use of alternative medicine. His clinical signs improved with oral chelation therapy. Neurologists should consider asking about the use of complementary and alternative medicine before simply attributing symptoms and signs to exacerbation of multiple sclerosis.



  13. The bioinformatics of psychosocial genomics in alternative and complementary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, E

    2003-06-01

    The bioinformatics of alternative and complementary medicine is outlined in 3 hypotheses that extend the molecular-genomic revolution initiated by Watson and Crick 50 years ago to include psychology in the new discipline of psychosocial and cultural genomics. Stress-induced changes in the alternative splicing of genes demonstrate how psychosomatic stress in humans modulates activity-dependent gene expression, protein formation, physiological function, and psychological experience. The molecular messengers generated by stress, injury, and disease can activate immediate early genes within stem cells so that they then signal the target genes required to synthesize the proteins that will transform (differentiate) stem cells into mature well-functioning tissues. Such activity-dependent gene expression and its consequent activity-dependent neurogenesis and stem cell healing is proposed as the molecular-genomic-cellular basis of rehabilitative medicine, physical, and occupational therapy as well as the many alternative and complementary approaches to mind-body healing. The therapeutic replaying of enriching life experiences that evoke the novelty-numinosum-neurogenesis effect during creative moments of art, music, dance, drama, humor, literature, poetry, and spirituality, as well as cultural rituals of life transitions (birth, puberty, marriage, illness, healing, and death) can optimize consciousness, personal relationships, and healing in a manner that has much in common with the psychogenomic foundations of naturalistic and complementary medicine. The entire history of alternative and complementary approaches to healing is consistent with this new neuroscience world view about the role of psychological arousal and fascination in modulating gene expression, neurogenesis, and healing via the psychosocial and cultural rites of human societies. Copyright 2003 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  14. Complementary and alternative exercise for fibromyalgia: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mist, Scott; Firestone,Kari; Jones,Kim Dupree

    2013-01-01

    Scott David Mist, Kari Firestone, Kim Dupree Jones Fibromyalgia Research and Treatment Group, School of Nursing, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Complementary and alternative medicine includes a number of exercise modalities, such as tai chi, qigong, yoga, and a variety of lesser-known movement therapies. A meta-analysis of the current literature was conducted estimating the effect size of the different modalities, study quality and bias, and adverse events....

  15. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

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    Pasha Omrana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months; neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months; and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will

  16. Complementary Health Approaches Used in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, Zeynep; Atik, Derya

    Intensive care units are care centers where, in order to provide the maximum benefit to individuals whose life is in danger, many lifesaving technological tools and devices are present, and morbidity and mortality rates are high. In the intensive care unit, when classic treatments fail or become unbearable because of side effects, complementary methods have been suggested to be the best alternative. Complementary health approaches are methods that are used both for the continuation and the improvement of the well-being of an individual and as additions to medical treatments that are based on a holistic approach. These applications are especially helpful in the treatment of the stresses, anxieties, and other symptoms of unstable patients in the intensive care unit who do not tolerate traditional treatment methods well, increasing their psychological and physiological well-being, helping them sleep and rest. In intensive care patients, in order to decrease the incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation, antiemetic and medicine needs, mechanical ventilation duration, and the intensity of the disease as well as to cope with symptoms such as pain, anxiety, physiological parameters, dyspnea, and sleep problems, body-mind interventions such as massage, reflexology, acupressure, aromatherapy, music therapy, energy therapies (healing touch, therapeutic touch, the Yakson method), and prayer are used as complementary health approaches.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine in US medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowen VS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Virginia S Cowen,1 Vicki Cyr2 1Rutgers School of Health Related Professions Institute for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Newark, NJ, USA; 2Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at the Rutgers University School of Health Related Professions, Newark, NJ, USA Abstract: An analysis of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in US medical school curriculum was undertaken. Websites for 130 US medical schools were systematically analyzed for course listings and content. Half of the schools (50.8% offered at least one CAM course or clerkship. A total of 127 different course listings were identified, embracing a range of topics and methods of instruction. The most frequently listed topics were traditional medicine, acupuncture, spirituality, and herbs, along with the general topic of CAM. Nearly 25.0% of the courses referenced personal growth or self-care through CAM practices, while only 11.0% referenced inter-professional education activities involving interaction with CAM providers. The most frequently reported instructional methods were lectures, readings, and observation of, or receiving a CAM treatment. The findings of this analysis indicated fewer medical schools offered instruction in CAM than previously reported and a wide range of approaches to the topic across the schools where CAM is taught. Keywords: complementary and alternative medicine, CAM, medical education, curriculum

  18. Micro-electro-mechanically switchable near infrared complementary metamaterial absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Pei Ho, Chong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Institute of Microelectronics (IME), 11 Science Park Road, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Kropelnicki, Piotr; Singh, Navab; Kwong, Dim-Lee [Institute of Microelectronics (IME), 11 Science Park Road, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Lee, Chengkuo, E-mail: elelc@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-05-19

    We experimentally demonstrate a micro-electro-mechanically switchable near infrared complementary metamaterial absorber by integrating the metamaterial layer to be the out of plane movable microactuator. The metamaterial layer is electrostatically actuated by applying voltage across the suspended complementary metamaterial layer and the stationary bottom metallic reflector. Thus, the effective spacing between the metamaterial layer and bottom metal reflector is varied as a function of applied voltage. With the reduction of effective spacing between the metamaterial and reflector layers, a strong spectral blue shift in the peak absorption wavelength can be achieved. With spacing change of 300 nm, the spectral shift of 0.7 μm in peak absorption wavelength was obtained for near infrared spectral region. The electro-optic switching performance of the device was characterized, and a striking switching contrast of 1500% was achieved at 2.1 μm. The reported micro-electro-mechanically tunable complementary metamaterial absorber device can potentially enable a wide range of high performance electro-optical devices, such as continuously tunable filters, modulators, and electro-optic switches that form the key components to facilitate future photonic circuit applications.

  19. [Complementary treatment methods for depression in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolle, Kathrin; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Depressive disorders are among the more common mental illnesses around the world, about 1- 3% of prepubertal children and 6% of postpubertal children and adolescents are affected. They markedly impair psychosocial development and are associated with higher rate of morbidity and mortality throughout life. Many physicians are unsure about which treatment approaches are effective and how the treatment should be planned. A systematic literature search was carried out in electronic databases and study registries and as a manual search. More than 450 studies (mostly randomized controlled trials = RCTs) were identified and summarized in evidence tables. The ensuing recommendations were agreed upon in a consensus conference. The review summarizes the evidence of complementary treatment methods. The evidence for complementary treatment methods (art and music therapy, sleep deprivation, exercise, electroconvulsive therapy, massage, transcranial magnetic stimulation, relaxation, bibliotherapy, computer based therapy, light therapy, omega-3 treatment) is low or there is no evidence due to missing studies or studies of poor quality. For some methods, i. e. light therapy, relaxation and stress reduction and sleep deprivation there is limited indication for effectiveness without sufficient evidence for a practical guidance. There is an urgent need for adequately informative comparative studies on treatment of depression in children and adolescents considering also complementary methods.

  20. Complementary filter implementation in the dynamic language Lua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Damian; Sawicki, Aleksander; Lukšys, Donatas; Slanina, Zdenek

    2017-08-01

    The article presents the complementary filter implementation, that is used for the estimation of the pitch angle, in Lua script language. Inertial sensors as accelerometer and gyroscope were used in the study. Methods of angles estimation using acceleration and angular velocity sensors were presented in the theoretical part of the article. The operating principle of complementary filter has been presented. The prototype of Butterworth's analogue filter and its digital equivalent have been designed. Practical implementation of the issue was performed with the use of PC and DISCOVERY evaluation board equipped with STM32F01 processor, L3GD20 gyroscope and LS303DLHC accelerometer. Measurement data was transmitted by UART serial interface, then processed with the use of Lua software and luaRS232 programming library. Practical implementation was divided into two stages. In the first part, measurement data has been recorded and then processed with help of a complementary filter. In the second step, coroutines mechanism was used to filter data in real time.

  1. Treatment of Diabetic Gastroparesis by Complementary and Alternative Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastroparesis is a common gastrointestinal complication in diabetes, induced by hyperglycemia and characterized by delayed gastric emptying and upper abdominal symptoms, such asnausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating and epigastric pain. Diabetic gastroparesis (DGP affects life quality and glycemic control, and is a challenge to treat in both Western and Eastern medicine. Routine treatment in Western medicine includes gastric emptying promoted by prokinetic agents, gastric pacemaking, or surgery combined with lifetime hormono-therapy, all of which have unavoidable side effects and limitations, and are very expensive. Complementary and alternative medical treatments like acupuncture, moxibustion, and massage are becoming more and more attractive because of their effectiveness, fewer side effects, and reliable safety. This article aims to introduce representative methods of complementary and alternative medicine to treat DGP, which were searched in English through Pubmed and in Chinese through CNKI (China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database. Several lines of evidence demonstrated the effects of single or combined complementary alternative therapies on DGP outcomes; however, the mechanisms were rarely investigated. Randomized controlled trials are undoubtedly required in future studies.

  2. Prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis among patients consulting complementary medicine practitioners in the British Isles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, H; Jackson, R S

    2009-02-01

    A high prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis is reported in faecal samples collected from patients attending complementary medicine practitioners in the British Isles. Specimens were collected directly after passing into sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF). During two observation periods in 2002-04 and 2005-07, a D fragilis prevalence of 14.6% (n = 543) and 16.9% (n = 421), respectively, was recorded. These results confirm a surprisingly high prevalence of D fragilis among a selected population. Clinical information was only available for half of the patients with D fragilis; 50% of requests with clinical information reported gastrointestinal symptoms. For further work on its pathogenic role and prevalence among patients with gastrointestinal symptoms, immediate collection in SAF should be considered the optimal sampling modality for UK based laboratories.

  3. Two phase sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Hanif, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The development of estimators of population parameters based on two-phase sampling schemes has seen a dramatic increase in the past decade. Various authors have developed estimators of population using either one or two auxiliary variables. The present volume is a comprehensive collection of estimators available in single and two phase sampling. The book covers estimators which utilize information on single, two and multiple auxiliary variables of both quantitative and qualitative nature. Th...

  4. Canadian infants' nutrient intakes from complementary foods during the first year of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prowse Daniel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary feeding is currently recommended after six months of age, when the nutrients in breast milk alone are no longer adequate to support growth. Few studies have examined macro- and micro-nutrient intakes from complementary foods (CF only. Our purpose was to assess the sources and nutritional contribution of CF over the first year of life. Methods In July 2003, a cross-sectional survey was conducted on a nationally representative sample of mothers with infants aged three to 12 months. The survey was administered evenly across all regions of the country and included a four-day dietary record to assess infants' CF intakes in household (tablespoon measures (breast milk and formula intakes excluded. Records from 2,663 infants were analyzed for nutrient and CF food intake according to 12 categories. Mean daily intakes for infants at each month of age from CF were pooled and compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes for the respective age range. Results At three months of age, 83% of infants were already consuming infant cereals. Fruits and vegetables were among the most common foods consumed by infants at all ages, while meats were least common at all ages except 12 months. Macro- and micro-nutrient intakes from CF generally increased with age. All mean nutrient intakes, except vitamin D and iron, met CF recommendations at seven to 12 months. Conclusions Complementary foods were introduced earlier than recommended. Although mean nutrient intakes from CF at six to 12 months appear to be adequate among Canadian infants, further attention to iron and vitamin D intakes and sources may be warranted.

  5. Balanced sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    In balanced sampling a linear relation between the soil property of interest and one or more covariates with known means is exploited in selecting the sampling locations. Recent developments make this sampling design attractive for statistical soil surveys. This paper introduces balanced sampling

  6. Systematic reviews of complementary therapies - an annotated bibliography. Part 2: herbal medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, K.; ter Riet, G.; Hondras, M.; Vickers, A.; Saller, R.; Melchart, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with herbal medicine.

  7. 76 FR 29773 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 17, 2011. Jennifer S. Spaeth, Director...

  8. Systematic reviews of complementary therapies - an annotated bibliography. Part 3: homeopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, K.; Hondras, M.; Vickers, A.; ter Riet, G.; Melchart, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with homeopathy.

  9. Knowledge Accession and Knowledge Acquisition in Strategic Alliances: The Impact of Supplementary and Complementary Dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckley, P.J.; Glaister, K.W.; Klijn, E.; Tan, H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper advances the concepts of knowledge accession and knowledge acquisition in strategic alliances by identifying supplementary and complementary dimensions to these knowledge transfer modes. Complementary knowledge transfer reflects the similarity of knowledge that the partners have and is

  10. Development of a nutrient‐dense complementary food using amaranth‐sorghum grains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okoth, Judith Kanensi; Ochola, Sophie Atieno; Gikonyo, Nicholas K; Makokha, Anselimo

    2017-01-01

    ...‐dense complementary food from amaranth and sorghum grains. Amaranth grain, a pseudocereal, though rarely used as a complementary food in Kenya has a higher nutritional quality than other staples. Plant...

  11. Systematic reviews of complementary therapies - an annotated bibliography. Part 1: acupuncture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, K.; Vickers, A.; Hondras, M.; ter Riet, G.; Thormählen, J.; Berman, B.; Melchart, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with acupuncture.

  12. Bibliometric and content analysis of the Cochrane Complementary Medicine Field specialized register of controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieland, L. Susan; Manheimer, Eric; Sampson, Margaret; Barnabas, Jabez Paul; Bouter, Lex M.; Cho, Kiho; Lee, Myeong Soo; Li, Xun; Liu, Jianping; Moher, David; Okabe, Tetsuro; Pienaar, Elizabeth D.; Shin, Byung Cheul; Tharyan, Prathap; Tsutani, Kiichiro; van der Windt, Daniëlle A.; Berman, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The identification of eligible controlled trials for systematic reviews of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions can be difficult. To increase access to these difficult to locate trials, the Cochrane Collaboration Complementary Medicine Field (CAM Field) has

  13. 5 Things You Should Know: The Science of Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6 Things You Should Know: The Science of Chronic Pain and Complementary Health Practices Share: Reviews of research ... a complementary health practice to help manage your chronic pain, talk with your health care providers first. You ...

  14. Tem holder for sample transfer under reaction conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    and temperature, which usually are far from the operando conditions of e.g. heterogeneous catalysis. Our efforts focus on bridging these gaps by establishing in situ sample transfer between complementary measurement techniques. To fully exploit the capabilities of ETEM complementary experiments...... and characterization techniques are beneficial. Normally, the complementary measurements are done in parallel with experiments separated in time and space [3] or by mimicking a reactor bed by changing the feed gas composition according to reactivity and conversion measured in dedicated catalyst set-ups [4......]. Furthermore, dedicated transfer holders have been used to transfer catalyst samples between reactor set-ups and TEM at room temperature in inert atmosphere [5]. To take the full advantage of complementary in situ techniques, transfer under reactions conditions is essential. This study introduces the in situ...

  15. Psychological comorbidity and health-related quality of life and its association with awareness, utilization, and need for psychosocial support in a cancer register-based sample of long-term breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, Anja; Koch, Uwe

    2008-04-01

    Psychosocial comorbidity and quality of life (QOL) and its association with knowledge, utilization, and need for psychosocial support have been studied in long-term breast cancer survivors. One thousand eighty-three patients were recruited through a population-based cancer registry an average of 47 months following diagnosis (66% response rate). Self-report measures (e.g., Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist--Civilian Version, and Short-Form Health Survey) were used. Thirty-eight percent of patients had moderate to high anxiety, and 22% had moderate to high depression; posttraumatic stress disorder was observed in 12%. The overall psychological comorbidity was 43% and 26% for a possible and probable psychiatric disorder. Disease progress, detrimental interactions, less social support, a lower educational level, and younger age were predictors of psychological comorbidity (Ppsychological comorbidity as well as QOL. Forty-six percent of women felt insufficiently informed about support offers. Insufficient knowledge was associated with older age and lower education (Ppsychological interventions tailored in particular for older women.

  16. Determinants of inappropriate complementary feeding practices in young children in Nepal: secondary data analysis of Demographic and Health Survey 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nira; Agho, Kingsley E; Dibley, Michael J; Senarath, Upul; Tiwari, Kalpana

    2012-01-01

    Inappropriate complementary feeding increases the risk of undernutrition, illness and mortality in infants and children. This study uses a subsample of 1428 children of 6-23 months from Nepal Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS), 2006. The 2006 NDHS was a multistage cluster sample survey. The complementary feeding indicators were estimated according to the 2008 World Health Organization recommendations. The rate of introduction of solid, semi-solid or soft foods to infants aged 6-8 months was 70%. Minimum meal frequency and minimum dietary diversity rates were 82% and 34%, respectively, and minimum acceptable diet for breastfed infants was 32%. Multivariate analysis indicated that working mothers and mothers with primary or no education were significantly less likely to give complementary foods, to meet dietary diversity, minimum meal frequency and minimum acceptable diet. Children living in poor households were significantly less likely to meet minimum dietary diversity and minimum acceptable diet. Mothers who had adequate exposure to media, i.e. who watch television and who listen to radio almost every day, were significantly more likely to meet minimum dietary diversity and meal frequency. Infants aged 6-11 months were significantly less likely to meet minimum acceptable diet [adjusted odds ratio (OR)=3.13, confidence interval (CI)=2.16-4.53] and to meet minimum meal frequency (adjusted OR=4.46, CI=2.67-7.46). In conclusion, complementary feeding rates in Nepal are inadequate except for minimum meal frequency. Planning and promotion activities to improve appropriate complementary feeding practices should focus on illiterate mothers, those living in poor households, and those not exposed to media. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A novel pseudo-complementary PNA G-C base pair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne G.; Dahl, Otto; Petersen, Asger Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    Pseudo-complementary oligonucleotide analogues and mimics provide novel opportunities for targeting duplex structures in RNA and DNA. Previously, a pseudo-complementary A-T base pair has been introduced. Towards sequence unrestricted targeting, a pseudo-complementary G-C base pair consisting...... of the unnatural nucleobases n6-methoxy-2,6-diaminopurine (previously described in a DNA context) and N4-benzoylcytosine is now presented for design of pseudo-complementary PNA oligomers (pcPNAs)....

  18. 75 FR 52357 - Request for Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Draft Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... for Comment: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Draft Strategic Plan ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is developing its... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) was established in 1998 with the mission of...

  19. 75 FR 30039 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel; RFA AT-01-001 ``Translational Tools For Clinical...

  20. 77 FR 69869 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel, PAR 12-151: Centers of Excellence for Research on Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM...

  1. 75 FR 54161 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of... for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special Emphasis Panel; NCCAM Education Panel. Date... in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 30, 2010...

  2. 75 FR 1796 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Complementary, and Alternative Medicine, NIH, 6707 Democracy Blvd., Suite 401, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-402-1030...

  3. 78 FR 56238 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative...

  4. Background complementary hydrogeochemical studies. SDM-Site Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinowski, Birgitta E. (ed.)

    2008-08-15

    in geochemistry, hydrochemistry, hydrogeochemistry, microbiology, geomicrobiology, analytical chemistry etc. The resulting site descriptive model version, mainly based on 2.2 data and complementary 2.3 data, was carried out during September 2006 to December 2007. Several groups within ChemNet were involved and the evaluation was conducted independently using different approaches ranging from expert knowledge to geochemical and mathematical modelling including transport modelling. During regular ChemNet meetings the results have been presented and discussed. This report is a compilation of different projects that have been finished independently of each other. Section 1: M3 modelling and 2D visualisation of the hydrochemical parameters by Ioana Gurban. The focus of this part is on updating the hydrochemical model, to make uncertainty tests and to present the final models that can be integrated better with the hydrodynamic models. M3 modelling helps to summarise and understand the measured data, by using the major elements and the isotopes delta18O and delta2H as variables. The visualisation of the mixing proportions along the boreholes helps to understand the distribution of the data in the domain and to check and compare the results of different models; and therefore to choose the model which best describes the measured data. Section 2: Coupled hydrogeological and solute transport, visualisation and supportive detailed reaction modelling by Jorge Molinero, David Arcos, Lara Duro. Reactive mixing and reactive solute transport models are used as quantitative tools in order to evaluate how much disturbance can be allowed for a given groundwater sample at repository depth and still meet the SKB suitability criteria. Spatial analysis and 3D visualisation of available representative samples in Forsmark was performed. The computed M3 mixing fractions show a spatial distribution qualitatively correlated with key hydrochemical signatures, such as strontium (for Deep Saline

  5. Identification of novel endogenous antisense transcripts by DNA microarray analysis targeting complementary strand of annotated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohama Chihiro

    2009-08-01

    of cellular events and in pathological conditions. Conclusion Our microarray platform targeting the complementary strand of annotated genes successfully identified novel NATs that could not be identified by publically available cDNA data, and as such could not be detected by the usual "sense-targeting" microarray approach. Differentially expressed NATs monitored by this platform may provide candidates for investigations of gene function. An advantage of our microarray platform is that it can be applied to any genes and target samples of interest.

  6. Complementary feeding practices among mothers in selected slums of Dhaka city: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Farzana; Ara, Ferdous; Hoque, Md Asirul; Alam, Md Safiul

    2014-03-01

    Improper complementary feeding (CF) practice is one of the main reasons for malnutrition among Bangladeshi children aged less than two years. In this context, using the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO), this study assessed the CF practices among mothers in four selected slums (Tejgoan, Rayerbazar, Beribadh, and Jafrabad) of Dhaka city. This descriptive study, conducted during January-June 2010, included 120 mother-child pairs from the selected slums. Samples were selected conveniently, and the sociodemographic profiles of mothers in the four slums were similar. The mean (standard deviation) age of the children was 14.68 +/- 5.55 months. A questionnaire, developed following the guidelines of WHO for CF practices, was used for collecting data. Twenty-seven (23%) mothers were exclusively breastfeeding (EBF) their children. Among non-EBF mothers, 15 (16%) started CF after the recommended time. At 6-8 months of age, 2 (40%) of the EBF and 12 (67%) of the non-EBF mothers gave complementary foods twice a day to their children. In both the groups--9-11 months of age--about 70% mothers gave complementary foods twice a day to their children. The frequency of CF was acceptable (3 times a day) in 13 (81%) of the EBF and 32 (56%) of the non-EBF children at 12-23 months of age. Complementary foods given by 24 (89%) of the EBF and 86 (93%) of the non-EBF mothers to their children were not adequate in energy contents. Two (7%) EBF and 16 (17%) non-EBF mothers did not wash their hands after defaecation. Three (11%) EBF and 24 (26%) non-EBF mothers did not properly clean their hands and utensils before feeding. Nine (33%) EBF mothers did not wash their children's hands. Fifty (54%) non-EBF mothers also did not do this. Feeding with psychosocial care practices was not perfect in either of the groups. The findings showed that, according to the WHO guidelines, the CF practices among mothers of children aged less than two years were very poor in the selected slums of

  7. Cancer-Related Stress and Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita D. Chandwani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A cancer diagnosis elicits strong psychophysiological reactions that characterize stress. Stress is experienced by all patients but is usually not discussed during patient-healthcare professional interaction; thus underdiagnosed, very few are referred to support services. The prevalence of CAM use in patients with history of cancer is growing. The purpose of the paper is to review the aspects of cancer-related stress and interventions of commonly used complementary and alternative techniques/products for amelioration of cancer-related stress. Feasibility of intervention of several CAM techniques and products commonly used by cancer patients and survivors has been established in some cancer populations. Efficacy of some CAM techniques and products in reducing stress has been documented as well as stress-related symptoms in patients with cancer such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, yoga, Tai Chi Chuan, acupuncture, energy-based techniques, and physical activity. Much of the research limitations include small study samples and variety of intervention length and content. Efficacy and safety of many CAM techniques and some herbs and vitamin B and D supplements need to be confirmed in further studies using scientific methodology. Several complementary and alternative medicine therapies could be integrated into standard cancer care to ameliorate cancer-related stress.

  8. Complementary medicine for children and young people who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skokauskas, Norbert; McNicholas, Fiona; Masaud, Tawfik; Frodl, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Despite effectiveness of medication in treating children and young people who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), concerns about the effects of medication on children's developing brains, adverse side-effects, possibility of long-term use, and compliance issues have all contributed to the continuing search for alternative therapies. This article reviews the latest scientific evidence of the effectiveness and safety of these treatments in ADHD. Although there is evidence from a large randomized controlled study that neurofeedback has positive effects on reducing children's symptoms of ADHD, most recent randomized controlled trials have generally yielded negative results. Some positive results exist from a pilot study of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, the sample size was far too small to enable any conclusions to be drawn about the evidence. Findings from the recent randomized controlled trials of supplements of essential fatty acids in children who have ADHD clearly demonstrated lack of superiority compared with placebo. Notwithstanding efforts made to increase the scientific rigor of previous studies, more recent studies have generally been unsuccessful in demonstrating adequate treatment effects of complementary medicine on children who have ADHD. Currently, there is no proof that complementary medicine provides a better alternative for children who have ADHD than treatments that are currently available within multimodal therapy.

  9. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  10. Impact of maternal education about complementary feeding and provision of complementary foods on child growth in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imdad, Aamer; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2011-04-13

    Childhood undernutrition is prevalent in low and middle income countries. It is an important indirect cause of child mortality in these countries. According to an estimate, stunting (height for age Z score education to mothers about practices of complementary feeding on growth. Recommendations have been made for input to the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) model by following standardized guidelines developed by Child Health Epidemiology Reference Group (CHERG). We conducted a systematic review of published randomized and quasi-randomized trials on PubMed, Cochrane Library and WHO regional databases. The included studies were abstracted and graded according to study design, limitations, intervention details and outcome effects. The primary outcomes were change in weight and height during the study period among children 6-24 months of age. We hypothesized that provision of complementary food and education of mother about complementary food would significantly improve the nutritional status of the children in the intervention group compared to control. Meta-analyses were generated for change in weight and height by two methods. In the first instance, we pooled the results to get weighted mean difference (WMD) which helps to pool studies with different units of measurement and that of different duration. A second meta-analysis was conducted to get a pooled estimate in terms of actual increase in weight (kg) and length (cm) in relation to the intervention, for input into the LiST model. After screening 3795 titles, we selected 17 studies for inclusion in the review. The included studies evaluated the impact of provision of complementary foods (± nutritional counseling) and of nutritional counseling alone. Both these interventions were found to result in a significant increase in weight [WMD 0.34 SD, 95% CI 0.11 - 0.56 and 0.30 SD, 95 % CI 0.05-0.54 respectively) and linear growth [WMD 0.26 SD, 95 % CI 0.08-0.43 and 0.21 SD, 95 % CI 0.01-0.41 respectively]. Pooled results for

  11. Scalable Asset Discovery, Vulnerability Scanning, and Penetration Testing for Remote Sites and Wireless Spectrums Utilizing an Embedded Linux Plug - PwniPlug and the Raspberry Pi B+ as a Sample Pen Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzy, Ethan G.

    2014-01-01

    All devices attached to the NASA KSC network are subject to security vulnerability scanning and/or penetration testing. In today's changing environment, vulnerable and/or unprotected systems can easily be overlooked. Systems that are not properly managed can become a potential threat to the operational integrity of our systems and networks. This includes all NASA (internal and external) information systems within NASA KSC Internet Protocol (IP) address space, and NASA KSC facilities. The Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO) recommends that all NASA Centers and information systems be subject to penetration testing on a regular interval in accordance with the guidelines identified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). (ITS-HBK-2810.04-02A) Protecting information and equipment at NASA is an area of increasing concern. In addition to the CPU's on the network; Supervisory, Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are especially vulnerable because these systems have lacked standards, use embedded controllers with little computational power and informal software, are connected to physical processes, have few operators, and are increasingly also being connected to corporate networks. The scope of work is comprised of several individual components which together build upon previous work by Drew Branch, NASA KSC Intern. The Pwn Plug is the selected COTS (Commercial-Off-The-Shelf) device chosen to test simplification of mandatory IT Security tasks. The device will be utilized to provide services to NASA KSC and enable an assessment of infrastructure soundness and regulatory compliance in an efficient, economical, and business responsive manner. The Pwn Plug is designed as a pen testing appliance which provides a hardware platform that can support commercial penetration testing efforts at significantly reduced costs. The expected outcomes are: 1) External Penetration Testing, 2) Social Engineering, 3) Procedural Documentation, 4

  12. Behavioral Change Strategies for Improving Complementary Feeding and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osendarp, Saskia J M; Roche, Marion L

    2016-01-01

    Improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices, including breastfeeding and complementary feeding, has been identified as one of the most effective interventions to improve child survival, stunting and wasting. Evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that effective promotion of breastfeeding and complementary feeding, with or without food provision, has the potential to improve IYCF practices and child nutrition. However, in many countries, breastfeeding practices and complementary feeding practices are still far from optimal. The lack of implementation of available, effective, affordable interventions in scale-up programs is in part attributed to a lack of innovative, creative and effective behavioral change strategies that enable and encourage caregivers. Successful behavioral change strategies should be based on a rigorous situational analysis and formative research, and the findings and insights of formative research should be used to further design interventions that address the identified barriers and enablers, to select delivery channels, and to formulate appropriate and effective messages. In addition, successful behavioral change interventions should a priori define and investigate the program impact pathway to target behavioral change and should assess intermediary behavioral changes and indicators to learn why the expected outcome was achieved or not achieved by testing the program theory. The design of behavioral change communication must be flexible and responsive to shifts in societies and contexts. Performance of adequate IYCF also requires investments to generate community demand through social mobilization, relevant media and existing support systems. Applying these principles has been shown to be effective in improving IYCF practices in Vietnam, Bangladesh and Ethiopia and is recommended to be adopted by other programs and countries in order to accelerate progress in improving child nutrition. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Evaluating complementary and alternative therapies for cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassileth, B R

    1999-01-01

    "Complementary and alternative" therapies are actually a vast collection of disparate, unrelated regimens and products, ranging from adjunctive modalities that effectively enhance quality of life and promising antitumor herbal remedies now under investigation, to bogus therapies that claim to cure cancer and that harm not only directly, but also indirectly by encouraging patients to avoid or postpone effective cancer care. Complementary therapies such as music and massage, herbal teas to aid digestion and relieve nausea, yoga, tai chi, meditation, and the many other well-documented techniques that relieve stress and enhance well-being should be made available to patients to augment and ease the experience of cancer treatment and recovery. Many time-tested herbal and diet-based remedies are now being studied for their abilities to induce or extend remission without toxicity. At the same time, lack of government regulatory authority leaves consumers at the mercy of those who promote unproved remedies, scores of which the grocery store and pharmacy shelves. Many of these over-the-counter products contain harmful ingredients. Herb-drug interactions, only some of which are documented, occur with frequency and are sufficiently problematic to require that patients stop taking herbal remedies prior to surgery (to prevent interactions with anesthetics and anticoagulant effects); before radiation (due to potential for increased photosensitivity); and during courses of chemotherapy (to prevent product-drug interactions). Moreover, both good information and misinformation that appear in printed materials and on the Internet appeal to better educated consumers, who are, in fact, the most likely to try complementary and alternative methods.

  14. Maternal prepregnant body mass index, duration of breastfeeding, and timing of complementary food introduction are associated with infant weight gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jennifer Lyn; Michaelsen, Kim F; Rasmussen, Kathleen M

    2004-01-01

    later in life. OBJECTIVE: We examined how maternal prepregnant body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) and infant feeding pattern are associated with infant weight gain. DESIGN: In this prospective, observational study, we used multiple regression analyses adjusted for potential confounding factors to examine...... these associations among 3768 mother-infant dyads from the Danish National Birth Cohort. RESULTS: In multiple regression analyses, increasing maternal prepregnant BMI, decreasing durations of breastfeeding, and earlier complementary food introduction were associated with increased infant weight gain. An interaction......). In this sample, prepregnant obesity (BMI > or = 30.0), short durations of breastfeeding, and earlier introduction of complementary food were associated with 0.7 kg of additional weight gain during infancy. CONCLUSIONS: Infant weight gain is associated with maternal prepregnant BMI and with an interaction between...

  15. Speciation and bioavailability of lead in complementary medicines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolan, S., E-mail: Shiv.Bolan@UON.edu.au [School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Naidu, R. [Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Kunhikrishnan, A. [Chemical Safety Division, Department of Agro–Food Safety, National Academy of Agricultural Science, Wanju-gun, Jeollabuk-do, 565-851 (Korea, Republic of); Seshadri, B. [Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Ok, Y.S. [Korea Biochar Research Center & Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Palanisami, T.; Dong, M. [Global Centre for Environmental Remediation (GCER), University of Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Clark, I. [School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia)

    2016-01-01

    Complementary medicines have associated risks which include toxic heavy metal(loid) and pesticide contamination. The objective of this study was to examine the speciation and bioavailability of lead (Pb) in selected complementary medicines. Six herbal and six ayurvedic medicines were analysed for: (i) total heavy metal(loid) contents including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), Pb and mercury (Hg); (ii) speciation of Pb using sequential fractionation and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) techniques; and (iii) bioavailability of Pb using a physiologically-based in vitro extraction test (PBET). The daily intake of Pb through the uptake of these medicines was compared with the safety guidelines for Pb. The results indicated that generally ayurvedic medicines contained higher levels of heavy metal(loid)s than herbal medicines with the amount of Pb much higher than the other metal(loid)s. Sequential fractionation indicated that while organic-bound Pb species dominated the herbal medicines, inorganic-bound Pb species dominated the ayurvedic medicines. EXAFS data indicated the presence of various Pb species in ayurvedic medicines. This implies that Pb is derived from plant uptake and inorganic mineral input in herbal and ayurvedic medicines, respectively. Bioavailability of Pb was higher in ayurvedic than herbal medicines, indicating that Pb added as a mineral therapeutic input is more bioavailable than that derived from plant uptake. There was a positive relationship between soluble Pb fraction and bioavailability indicating that solubility is an important factor controlling bioavailability. The daily intake values for Pb as estimated by total and bioavailable metal(loid) contents are likely to exceed the safe threshold level in certain ayurvedic medicines. This research demonstrated that Pb toxicity is likely to result from the regular intake of these medicines which requires further investigation. - Highlights: • Pb species in complementary medicines was

  16. Complementary terrain/single beacon-based AUV navigation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maurya, P.; Curado, T.F.; António, P.

    Complementary Terrain/Single Beacon-Based AUV Navigation � Pramod Maurya ∗,∗∗ Francisco Curado Teixeira ∗∗∗ Anto´nio Pascoal ∗ ∗ Laboratory for Robotics and Systems in Engineering and Science, Instituto Superior Te´cnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa... new architecture that brings together TAN and SBN whereby a TAN algorithm is also fed with the ranges between the marine robot and an underwater transponder installed at a known location. Our aim is to show analytically, via the computation...

  17. Alternative, Complementary, and Forgotten Remedies for Atopic Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L. Goddard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis, perhaps more than other dermatologic diseases, has garnered much attention in the realm of alternative medicine. This may be because its etiopathogenesis is incompletely understood, it is increasingly common, and it waxes and wanes often without clear precipitants, opening up many opportunities for misinterpretation. Herein we explore the evidence for a number of different alternative and complementary therapies, from textiles to vitamin supplements. By definition, none have enough data to be deemed “effective” in a conventional sense, but it is hopeful that some show promising evidence that may one day lead to mainstream acceptance with further research.

  18. Geology - Background complementary studies. Forsmark modelling stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, Michael B. [Geological Survey of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden); Skagius, Kristina [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)] (eds.)

    2007-09-15

    During Forsmark model stage 2.2, seven complementary geophysical and geological studies were initiated by the geological modelling team, in direct connection with and as a background support to the deterministic modelling of deformation zones. One of these studies involved a field control on the character of two low magnetic lineaments with NNE and NE trends inside the target volume. The interpretation of these lineaments formed one of the late deliveries to SKB that took place after the data freeze for model stage 2.2 and during the initial stage of the modelling work. Six studies involved a revised processing and analysis of reflection seismic, refraction seismic and selected oriented borehole radar data, all of which had been presented earlier in connection with the site investigation programme. A prime aim of all these studies was to provide a better understanding of the geological significance of indirect geophysical data to the geological modelling team. Such essential interpretative work was lacking in the material acquired in connection with the site investigation programme. The results of these background complementary studies are published together in this report. The titles and authors of the seven background complementary studies are presented below. Summaries of the results of each study, with a focus on the implications for the geological modelling of deformation zones, are presented in the master geological report, SKB-R--07-45. The sections in the master report, where reference is made to each background complementary study and where the summaries are placed, are also provided. The individual reports are listed in the order that they are referred to in the master geological report and as they appear in this report. 1. Scan line fracture mapping and magnetic susceptibility measurements across two low magnetic lineaments with NNE and NE trend, Forsmark. Jesper Petersson, Ulf B. Andersson and Johan Berglund. 2. Integrated interpretation of surface and

  19. Thermal stresses in composite tubes using complementary virtual work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Cooper, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    This paper addresses the computation of thermally induced stresses in layered, fiber-reinforced composite tubes subjected to a circumferential gradient. The paper focuses on using the principle of complementary virtual work, in conjunction with a Ritz approximation to the stress field, to study the influence on the predicted stresses of including temperature-dependent material properties. Results indicate that the computed values of stress are sensitive to the temperature dependence of the matrix-direction compliance and matrix-direction thermal expansion in the plane of the lamina. There is less sensitivity to the temperature dependence of the other material properties.

  20. Alternative, Complementary, and Forgotten Remedies for Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Allison L; Lio, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis, perhaps more than other dermatologic diseases, has garnered much attention in the realm of alternative medicine. This may be because its etiopathogenesis is incompletely understood, it is increasingly common, and it waxes and wanes often without clear precipitants, opening up many opportunities for misinterpretation. Herein we explore the evidence for a number of different alternative and complementary therapies, from textiles to vitamin supplements. By definition, none have enough data to be deemed "effective" in a conventional sense, but it is hopeful that some show promising evidence that may one day lead to mainstream acceptance with further research.

  1. Complementary and alternative exercise for fibromyalgia: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mist, Scott David; Firestone, Kari A; Jones, Kim Dupree

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine includes a number of exercise modalities, such as tai chi, qigong, yoga, and a variety of lesser-known movement therapies. A meta-analysis of the current literature was conducted estimating the effect size of the different modalities, study quality and bias, and adverse events. The level of research has been moderately weak to date, but most studies report a medium-to-high effect size in pain reduction. Given the lack of adverse events, there is little risk in recommending these modalities as a critical component in a multimodal treatment plan, which is often required for fibromyalgia management. PMID:23569397

  2. Silicon-on-insulator-based complementary metal oxide semiconductor integrated optoelectronic platform for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujeeb-U-Rahman, Muhammad; Scherer, Axel

    2016-12-01

    Microscale optical devices enabled by wireless power harvesting and telemetry facilitate manipulation and testing of localized biological environments (e.g., neural recording and stimulation, targeted delivery to cancer cells). Design of integrated microsystems utilizing optical power harvesting and telemetry will enable complex in vivo applications like actuating a single nerve, without the difficult requirement of extreme optical focusing or use of nanoparticles. Silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based platforms provide a very powerful architecture for such miniaturized platforms as these can be used to fabricate both optoelectronic and microelectronic devices on the same substrate. Near-infrared biomedical optics can be effectively utilized for optical power harvesting to generate optimal results compared with other methods (e.g., RF and acoustic) at submillimeter size scales intended for such designs. We present design and integration techniques of optical power harvesting structures with complementary metal oxide semiconductor platforms using SOI technologies along with monolithically integrated electronics. Such platforms can become the basis of optoelectronic biomedical systems including implants and lab-on-chip systems.

  3. Complementary symmetry nanowire logic circuits: experimental demonstrations and in silico optimizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheriff, Bonnie A; Wang, Dunwei; Heath, James R; Kurtin, Juanita N

    2008-09-23

    Complementary symmetry (CS) Boolean logic utilizes both p- and n-type field-effect transistors (FETs) so that an input logic voltage signal will turn one or more p- or n-type FETs on, while turning an equal number of n- or p-type FETs off. The voltage powering the circuit is prevented from having a direct pathway to ground, making the circuit energy efficient. CS circuits are thus attractive for nanowire logic, although they are challenging to implement. CS logic requires a relatively large number of FETs per logic gate, the output logic levels must be fully restored to the input logic voltage level, and the logic gates must exhibit high gain and robust noise margins. We report on CS logic circuits constructed from arrays of 16 nm wide silicon nanowires. Gates up to a complexity of an XOR gate (6 p-FETs and 6 n-FETs) containing multiple nanowires per transistor exhibit signal restoration and can drive other logic gates, implying that large scale logic can be implemented using nanowires. In silico modeling of CS inverters, using experimentally derived look-up tables of individual FET properties, is utilized to provide feedback for optimizing the device fabrication process. Based upon this feedback, CS inverters with a gain approaching 50 and robust noise margins are demonstrated. Single nanowire-based logic gates are also demonstrated, but are found to exhibit significant device-to-device fluctuations.

  4. Metadata, Identifiers, and Physical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arctur, D. K.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Hills, D. J.; Jenkyns, R.; Stroker, K. J.; Todd, N. S.; Dassie, E. P.; Bowring, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    Physical samples are integral to much of the research conducted by geoscientists. The samples used in this research are often obtained at significant cost and represent an important investment for future research. However, making information about samples - whether considered data or metadata - available for researchers to enable discovery is difficult: a number of key elements related to samples are difficult to characterize in common ways, such as classification, location, sample type, sampling method, repository information, subsample distribution, and instrumentation, because these differ from one domain to the next. Unifying these elements or developing metadata crosswalks is needed. The iSamples (Internet of Samples) NSF-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is investigating ways to develop these types of interoperability and crosswalks. Within the iSamples RCN, one of its working groups, WG1, has focused on the metadata related to physical samples. This includes identifying existing metadata standards and systems, and how they might interoperate with the International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) schema (schema.igsn.org) in order to help inform leading practices for metadata. For example, we are examining lifecycle metadata beyond the IGSN `birth certificate.' As a first step, this working group is developing a list of relevant standards and comparing their various attributes. In addition, the working group is looking toward technical solutions to facilitate developing a linked set of registries to build the web of samples. Finally, the group is also developing a comparison of sample identifiers and locators. This paper will provide an overview and comparison of the standards identified thus far, as well as an update on the technical solutions examined for integration. We will discuss how various sample identifiers might work in complementary fashion with the IGSN to more completely describe samples, facilitate retrieval of contextual information, and

  5. Terapias complementarias en los cuidados: Humor y risoterapia Complementary therapies in the cares: humour and laugh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carmen Ruiz Gómez

    2005-06-01

    we can state that humour is utilized and applied in several professional environments, apart from the health one. This therapy is widely spread in the communication area. We have found few publications on nurse literature although they are high valuable since they work in the fields of research and education. It would be interesting that nurse professionals use this complementary therapy that enhance the quality of cares and offers an independent field favourable for research.

  6. Patterns and determinants of breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices in urban informal settlements, Nairobi Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutua Martin K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organisation (WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding during the first six months of life for optimal growth, development and health. Breastfeeding should continue up to two years or more and nutritionally adequate, safe, and appropriately-fed complementary foods should be introduced at the age of six months to meet the evolving needs of the growing infant. Little evidence exists on breastfeeding and infant feeding practices in urban slums in sub-Saharan Africa. Our aim was to assess breastfeeding and infant feeding practices in Nairobi slums with reference to WHO recommendations. Methods Data from a longitudinal study conducted in two Nairobi slums are used. The study used information on the first year of life of 4299 children born between September 2006 and January 2010. All women who gave birth during this period were interviewed on breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices at recruitment and this information was updated twice, at four-monthly intervals. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to determine factors associated with cessation of breastfeeding in infancy and early introduction of complementary foods. Results There was universal breastfeeding with almost all children (99% having ever been breastfed. However, more than a third (37% were not breastfed in the first hour following delivery, and 40% were given something to drink other than the mothers' breast milk within 3 days after delivery. About 85% of infants were still breastfeeding by the end of the 11th month. Exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months was rare as only about 2% of infants were exclusively breastfed for six months. Factors associated with sub-optimal infant breastfeeding and feeding practices in these settings include child's sex; perceived size at birth; mother's marital status, ethnicity; education level; family planning (pregnancy desirability; health seeking behaviour (place of delivery and; neighbourhood

  7. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Europe: Health-related and sociodemographic determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemppainen, Laura M; Kemppainen, Teemu T; Reippainen, Jutta A; Salmenniemi, Suvi T; Vuolanto, Pia H

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research was to study health-related and sociodemographic determinants of the use of different complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments in Europe and differences in CAM use in various European countries. The study was based on a design-based logistic regression analysis of the European Social Survey (ESS), Round 7. We distinguished four CAM modalities: manual therapies, alternative medicinal systems, traditional Asian medical systems and mind-body therapies. In total, 25.9% of the general population had used CAM during the last 12 months. Typically, only one CAM treatment had been used, and it was used more often as complementary rather than alternative treatment. The use of CAM varied greatly by country, from 10% in Hungary to almost 40% in Germany. Compared to those in good health, the use of CAM was two to fourfold greater among those with health problems. The health profiles of users of different CAM modalities varied. For example, back or neck pain was associated with all types of CAM, whereas depression was associated only with the use of mind-body therapies. Individuals with difficult to diagnose health conditions were more inclined to utilize CAM, and CAM use was more common among women and those with a higher education. Lower income was associated with the use of mind-body therapies, whereas the other three CAM modalities were associated with higher income. Help-seeking differed according to the health problem, something that should be acknowledged by clinical professionals to ensure safe care. The findings also point towards possible socioeconomic inequalities in health service use.

  8. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  9. Complementary Feeding: Review of Recommendations, Feeding Practices and Adequacy of Homemade Complementary Food Preparations in Developing Countries – lessons from Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motuma A Abeshu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding provides the ideal food during the first 6 months of life. Complementary feeding is the process starting when breast milk alone is no longer sufficient, the target age being between 6 to 23 months. The gap between nutritional requirement and amount obtained from breast milk increases with age. For energy, 200kcal, 300kcal and 550kcal per day is expected to be covered by complementary foods at 6-8, 9-11 and 12-23 months, respectively. In addition, the complementary foods must provide relatively large proportions of micronutrients such as: iron, zinc, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium and vitamin B6. In several parts of the developing world, complementary feeding continues as a challenge to good nutrition in children. In Ethiopia, only 4.2% of breastfed children of 6–23 months of age have a minimum acceptable diet. The gaps are mostly attributed to either poor dietary quality or poor feeding practices, if not both. Commercial fortified foods are often beyond the reach of the poor. Thus, homemade complementary foods remain commonly used. However, unfortified complementary foods that are predominantly plant-based provide insufficient amounts of key nutrients (particularly iron, zinc and calcium during the age of 6 – 23 months even, when based on an improved recipe. This review thus assessed complementary feeding practice and recommendation and reviewed the level of adequacy of homemade complementary foods.

  10. The Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Jonas; Källman, Mikael; Östlund, Ulrika; Holgersson, Georg; Bergqvist, Michael; Bergström, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is widely used among patients with cancer. This usage may have potentially harmful effects, especially when combined with anticancer drugs. However, some complementary methods may benefit patients. This review investigated the prevalence of CAM use among patients with cancer in Scandinavia and secondly studied the educational levels of CAM users compared to non-users. A systematic search of the PubMed library was carried out to locate articles published between January 2000 and October 2015 that investigated prevalence of CAM use among Scandinavian patients with cancer. Twenty-two articles were found, of which nine were included in the review. The prevalence of CAM use was 7.9% to 53%, with an average of 36.0% across all studies. Use of CAM is widespread among patients with cancer. Knowledge about CAM should be disseminated to both patients and staff in order to optimise discussions about CAM in clinical practice. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, B J; Grasso, T

    2001-10-01

    Interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has grown dramatically over the past several years. Cancer patients are always looking for new hope, and many have turned to nontraditional means. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in cancer patients and what if any agents are being used. Approximately, 100 adult cancer patients in a private nonprofit South Florida hospital completed a descriptive cross-sectional survey questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 59 years; 42 patients were male and 58, female. According to survey results, 80% of patients reported using some type of CAM; 81% took vitamins, 54% took herbal products, 30% used relaxation techniques, 20% received massages, and 10% used home remedies. Among patients who took vitamins, 65% said they took a multivitamin, 39% took vitamin C, and 31%, vitamin E. The most common herbal remedies used were green tea, echinacea, shark cartilage, grape seed extract, and milk thistle. Meditation and deep breathing were the two most common relaxation techniques practiced. A large majority of cancer patients are using CAM. In light of the growing interest in CAM, health-care professionals need to be educated about the most common therapies used.

  12. [Touching cancer: shiatsu as complementary treatment to support cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argash, Oz; Caspi, Opher

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the interest of cancer patients in receiving complementary medicine therapies as supportive measures to cure the disease. In response, medical units that combine conventional and complementary medicine (integrative medicine) have been established in leading cancer centers worldwide. In Israel, a special integrative medicine unit that combines mind-body, Chinese medicine, nutrition, herbs, supplements, and manual therapies (such as shiatsu) before, during and after conventional anti-cancer therapies has been established as an integral part of the Davidoff Comprehensive Cancer Center in 2006. Shiatsu represents a group of manual therapeutic techniques, including acupressure. Shiatsu offers cancer patients a non-pharmacologic method to relieve symptoms and improve quality of life throughout the course of illness. Research indicates that acupressure is relatively effective and safe for common cancer-related symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and insomnia. In our experience, shiatsu is also relatively effective and safe for other common symptoms such as fatigue, muscular pain and body image dissatisfaction. Yet, insufficient evidence exists to delineate the best means by which shiatsu and other manual therapies could or should be integrated into routine cancer care. The purpose of the present paper is to describe what is currently known about this topic in order to support decision-making that is based on facts, rather than on myths and misconceptions. We call for more research that examines the effectiveness and safety of shiatsu and other manual therapies in the care of cancer patients.

  13. Complementary Special Relativity Theory and Some of Its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Pavol

    2007-12-01

    This article introduces a mathematical model for the Complementary Special Relativity Theory (CSRT) in relation to Einstein's Special Relativity Theory (SRT). The CSRT is technically derived following criterion of the logical independence of the Einstein's postulates. The epithet "Complementary" was selected in order to distinguish the CSRT theory from alternative theories. The mission of the CSRT is not to replace the Einstein's Special Relativity. Both of them must coexist and must have physical applications. Forasmuch as the CSRT postulates do not embody constant velocity of the light by the Einstein's way, the CSRT need not have 4-dimensional symmetry of the Lorentz and Poincare group. Existence of the CSRT transverse Doppler effect formula and the time dilation formula for moving clocks, which are different from Einstein's, are crucial moments of the new theory. Moreover, the article demonstrates some physical applications of the CSRT on the John D. Anderson's discovery of a quasi acceleration of the Pioneer 10 spacecraft. It will be shown that the Pioneer 10 does not accelerate, but it moves with predicted velocity, and that the DSN (Deep Space Network) data remarkably well fit the predictions of the CSRT theory in range, Doppler, annual, and diurnal periodicity of the phenomenon.

  14. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Calogero M; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M D; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-04-04

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models.

  15. Complementary and integrative medicine in the management of headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millstine, Denise; Chen, Christina Y; Bauer, Brent

    2017-05-16

    Headaches, including primary headaches such as migraine and tension-type headache, are a common clinical problem. Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM), formerly known as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), uses evidence informed modalities to assist in the health and healing of patients. CIM commonly includes the use of nutrition, movement practices, manual therapy, traditional Chinese medicine, and mind-body strategies. This review summarizes the literature on the use of CIM for primary headache and is based on five meta-analyses, seven systematic reviews, and 34 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The overall quality of the evidence for CIM in headache management is generally low and occasionally moderate. Available evidence suggests that traditional Chinese medicine including acupuncture, massage, yoga, biofeedback, and meditation have a positive effect on migraine and tension headaches. Spinal manipulation, chiropractic care, some supplements and botanicals, diet alteration, and hydrotherapy may also be beneficial in migraine headache. CIM has not been studied or it is not effective for cluster headache. Further research is needed to determine the most effective role for CIM in patients with headache. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Toward a Scalable and Sustainable Intervention for Complementary Food Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Musarrat J; Nizame, Fosiul A; Nuruzzaman, Mohammad; Akand, Farhana; Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Parvez, Sarker Masud; Stewart, Christine P; Unicomb, Leanne; Luby, Stephen P; Winch, Peter J

    2016-06-01

    Contaminated complementary foods are associated with diarrhea and malnutrition among children aged 6 to 24 months. However, existing complementary food safety intervention models are likely not scalable and sustainable. To understand current behaviors, motivations for these behaviors, and the potential barriers to behavior change and to identify one or two simple actions that can address one or few food contamination pathways and have potential to be sustainably delivered to a larger population. Data were collected from 2 rural sites in Bangladesh through semistructured observations (12), video observations (12), in-depth interviews (18), and focus group discussions (3). Although mothers report preparing dedicated foods for children, observations show that these are not separate from family foods. Children are regularly fed store-bought foods that are perceived to be bad for children. Mothers explained that long storage durations, summer temperatures, flies, animals, uncovered food, and unclean utensils are threats to food safety. Covering foods, storing foods on elevated surfaces, and reheating foods before consumption are methods believed to keep food safe. Locally made cabinet-like hardware is perceived to be acceptable solution to address reported food safety threats. Conventional approaches that include teaching food safety and highlighting benefits such as reduced contamination may be a disincentive for rural mothers who need solutions for their physical environment. We propose extending existing beneficial behaviors by addressing local preferences of taste and convenience. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Artificial spatiotemporal touch inputs reveal complementary decoding in neocortical neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Calogero M.; Mazzoni, Alberto; Spanne, Anton; Enander, Jonas M. D.; Mogensen, Hannes; Bengtsson, Fredrik; Camboni, Domenico; Micera, Silvestro; Jörntell, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of the mechanisms of touch perception and decoding has been hampered by difficulties in achieving invariant patterns of skin sensor activation. To obtain reproducible spatiotemporal patterns of activation of sensory afferents, we used an artificial fingertip equipped with an array of neuromorphic sensors. The artificial fingertip was used to transduce real-world haptic stimuli into spatiotemporal patterns of spikes. These spike patterns were delivered to the skin afferents of the second digit of rats via an array of stimulation electrodes. Combined with low-noise intra- and extracellular recordings from neocortical neurons in vivo, this approach provided a previously inaccessible high resolution analysis of the representation of tactile information in the neocortical neuronal circuitry. The results indicate high information content in individual neurons and reveal multiple novel neuronal tactile coding features such as heterogeneous and complementary spatiotemporal input selectivity also between neighboring neurons. Such neuronal heterogeneity and complementariness can potentially support a very high decoding capacity in a limited population of neurons. Our results also indicate a potential neuroprosthetic approach to communicate with the brain at a very high resolution and provide a potential novel solution for evaluating the degree or state of neurological disease in animal models. PMID:28374841

  18. The Practical Pros and Cons of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Practice: Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine into Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Rachel W; Korzenik, Joshua R

    2017-12-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is changing health care for individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. The move toward increasing patient autonomy and addressing lifestyle and psychosocial factors contributes to this shift. Numerous clinics and centers are offering new models to incorporate these elements. There is need for better and more robust data regarding CAM efficacy and safety. CAM offers a test kitchen for new approaches to care and care delivery, which are now being developed and studied, and has the possibility to affect patient quality of life, disease morbidity, cost, and use of health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multidimensional Screening with Complementary Activities: Regulating a Monopolist with Unknown Cost and Unknown Preference for Empire Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Laussel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the optimal regulation of a monopolist when intrinsic efficiency (intrinsic cost and empire building tendency (marginal utility of output are private information, but actual cost (the difference between intrinsic cost and effort level is observable. This is a problem of multidimensional screening with complementary activities. Results are not only driven by the prior probabilities of the four possible types, but also by the relative magnitude of the uncertainty along the two dimensions of private information. If the marginal utility of output varies much more (less across managers than the intrinsic marginal cost, there is empire building (efficiency dominance. In that case, an inefficient empire builder produces more (less and at lower (higher marginal cost than an efficient money-seeker. It is only when variabilities are similar that there may be the natural ranking of activities (empire builders produce more, while efficient managers produce at a lower cost.

  20. Economic Evaluation of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Oncology: Is There a Difference Compared to Conventional Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Jutta; Prott, Franz J; Muecke, Ralph; Stoll, Christoph; Buentzel, Jens; Muenstedt, Karsten; Micke, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the financial burden of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in cancer treatment. Based on a systematic search of the literature (Medline and the Cochrane Library, combining the MeSH terms 'complementary therapies', 'neoplasms', 'costs', 'cost analysis', and 'cost-benefit analysis'), an expert panel discussed different types of analyses and their significance for CAM in oncology. Of 755 publications, 43 met our criteria. The types of economic analyses and their parameters discussed for CAM in oncology were cost, cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, and cost-utility analyses. Only a few articles included arguments in favor of or against these different methods, and only a few arguments were specific for CAM because most CAM methods address a broad range of treatment aim parameters to assess effectiveness and are hard to define. Additionally, the choice of comparative treatments is difficult. To evaluate utility, healthy subjects may not be adequate as patients with a life-threatening disease and may be judged differently, especially with respect to a holistic treatment approach. We did not find any arguments in the literature that were directed at the economic analysis of CAM in oncology. Therefore, a comprehensive approach assessment based on criteria from evidence-based medicine evaluating direct and indirect costs is recommended. The usual approaches to conventional medicine to assess costs, benefits, and effectiveness seem adequate in the field of CAM in oncology. Additionally, a thorough deliberation on the comparator, endpoints, and instruments is mandatory for designing studies. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.