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Sample records for sample preparation project

  1. Sample preparation for the HAW project and experimental results from the HFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.; Wees, H. van; Miralles, L.

    1990-09-01

    This report deals with the preparation and analysis of samples, during the period May 1989-November 1989, for the High-Active Waste (HAW) project, a large-scale in situ test being performed underground in the Asse salt mine, Remlingen FRG. The development of the technical procedures required, and the scientific results, which regard mostly characterization of Potasas del Llobregat sample, are reported. Prior to using the samples in both the H.A.W. and the H.F.R. experiments they have to be machined to fit their holders. Technical improvements for machining samples of salt are reported. (H.W.). 9 refs.; 68 figs.; 10 tabs

  2. Guidance document for preparing water sampling and analysis plans for UMTRA Project sites. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    A water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is prepared for each Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide the rationale for routine ground water sampling at disposal sites and former processing sites. The WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine ground water monitoring stations at each site. This guidance document has been prepared by the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Its purpose is to provide a consistent technical approach for sampling and monitoring activities performed under the WSAP and to provide a consistent format for the WSAP documents. It is designed for use by the TAC in preparing WSAPs and by the DOE, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, state and tribal agencies, other regulatory agencies, and the public in evaluating the content of WSAPS

  3. The minimum information required for a glycomics experiment (MIRAGE) project: sample preparation guidelines for reliable reporting of glycomics datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struwe, Weston B; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Campbell, Matthew P; Costello, Catherine E; Dell, Anne; Ten Feizi; Haslam, Stuart M; Karlsson, Niclas G; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Kolarich, Daniel; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Novotny, Milos V; Packer, Nicolle H; Paulson, James C; Rapp, Erdmann; Ranzinger, Rene; Rudd, Pauline M; Smith, David F; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wells, Lance; York, William S; Zaia, Joseph; Kettner, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    The minimum information required for a glycomics experiment (MIRAGE) project was established in 2011 to provide guidelines to aid in data reporting from all types of experiments in glycomics research including mass spectrometry (MS), liquid chromatography, glycan arrays, data handling and sample preparation. MIRAGE is a concerted effort of the wider glycomics community that considers the adaptation of reporting guidelines as an important step towards critical evaluation and dissemination of datasets as well as broadening of experimental techniques worldwide. The MIRAGE Commission published reporting guidelines for MS data and here we outline guidelines for sample preparation. The sample preparation guidelines include all aspects of sample generation, purification and modification from biological and/or synthetic carbohydrate material. The application of MIRAGE sample preparation guidelines will lead to improved recording of experimental protocols and reporting of understandable and reproducible glycomics datasets. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Sample preparation prior to HPLC analysis is certainly one of the most important steps to consider in trace or ultratrace analysis. For many years scientists have tried to simplify the sample preparation process. It is rarely possible to inject a neat liquid sample or a sample where preparation may not be any more complex than dissolution of the sample in a given solvent. The last process alone can remove insoluble materials, which is especially helpful with the samples in complex matrices if other interactions do not affect extraction. Here, it is very likely a large number of components will not dissolve and are, therefore, eliminated by a simple filtration process. In most cases, the process of sample preparation is not as simple as dissolution of the component interest. At times, enrichment is necessary, that is, the component of interest is present in very large volume or mass of material. It needs to be concentrated in some manner so a small volume of the concentrated or enriched sample can be injected into HPLC. 88 refs

  5. Final LDRD report : development of sample preparation methods for ChIPMA-based imaging mass spectrometry of tissue samples.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maharrey, Sean P.; Highley, Aaron M.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Wiese-Smith, Deneille

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this short-term LDRD project was to acquire the tools needed to use our chemical imaging precision mass analyzer (ChIPMA) instrument to analyze tissue samples. This effort was an outgrowth of discussions with oncologists on the need to find the cellular origin of signals in mass spectra of serum samples, which provide biomarkers for ovarian cancer. The ultimate goal would be to collect chemical images of biopsy samples allowing the chemical images of diseased and nondiseased sections of a sample to be compared. The equipment needed to prepare tissue samples have been acquired and built. This equipment includes an cyro-ultramicrotome for preparing thin sections of samples and a coating unit. The coating unit uses an electrospray system to deposit small droplets of a UV-photo absorbing compound on the surface of the tissue samples. Both units are operational. The tissue sample must be coated with the organic compound to enable matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and matrix enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry (ME-SIMS) measurements with the ChIPMA instrument Initial plans to test the sample preparation using human tissue samples required development of administrative procedures beyond the scope of this LDRD. Hence, it was decided to make two types of measurements: (1) Testing the spatial resolution of ME-SIMS by preparing a substrate coated with a mixture of an organic matrix and a bio standard and etching a defined pattern in the coating using a liquid metal ion beam, and (2) preparing and imaging C. elegans worms. Difficulties arose in sectioning the C. elegans for analysis and funds and time to overcome these difficulties were not available in this project. The facilities are now available for preparing biological samples for analysis with the ChIPMA instrument. Some further investment of time and resources in sample preparation should make this a useful tool for chemical imaging applications.

  6. Status report of AMS sample preparation laboratory at GADAM Centre, Gliwice, Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrowska, N., E-mail: natalia.piotrowska@polsl.pl [GADAM Centre of Excellence, Department of Radioisotopes, Institute of Physics, Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2013-01-15

    The laboratory for {sup 14}C AMS sample preparation in the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory has gradually evolved since its start in 1999 to cater for an increase in volume and variety of radiocarbon dating samples. To date, nearly 2000 graphite targets have been produced from materials such as plant macrofossils, charcoal, peat, bones, shells and wood. The equipment comprises a station for chemical preparation and high vacuum lines for production, purification and graphitization of sample carbon dioxide. The present capacity allows preparation of up to 400 targets annually for the needs of scientific projects and external orders for radiocarbon dating continuously received by the GADAM Centre of Excellence. The laboratory's sample preparation protocols and recent improvements are described and its performance during the 10 years of activity is discussed in terms of parameters obtained from reference materials prepared in this laboratory and demonstrated with a few science applications.

  7. 40 CFR 761.323 - Sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample preparation. 761.323 Section... Remediation Waste Samples § 761.323 Sample preparation. (a) The comparison study requires analysis of a... concentrations by dilution. Any excess material resulting from the preparation of these samples, which is not...

  8. Sample preparation in foodomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinović, Tamara; Šrajer Gajdošik, Martina; Josić, Djuro

    2018-04-16

    Representative sampling and adequate sample preparation are key factors for successful performance of further steps in foodomic analyses, as well as for correct data interpretation. Incorrect sampling and improper sample preparation can be sources of severe bias in foodomic analyses. It is well known that both wrong sampling and sample treatment cannot be corrected anymore. These, in the past frequently neglected facts, are now taken into consideration, and the progress in sampling and sample preparation in foodomics is reviewed here. We report the use of highly sophisticated instruments for both high-performance and high-throughput analyses, as well as miniaturization and the use of laboratory robotics in metabolomics, proteomics, peptidomics and genomics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Sample management implementation plan: Salt Repository Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Sample Management Implementation Plan is to define management controls and building requirements for handling materials collected during the site characterization of the Deaf Smith County, Texas, site. This work will be conducted for the US Department of Energy Salt Repository Project Office (SRPO). The plan provides for controls mandated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Salt Repository Project (SRP) Sample Management will interface with program participants who request, collect, and test samples. SRP Sample Management will be responsible for the following: (1) preparing samples; (2) ensuring documentation control; (3) providing for uniform forms, labels, data formats, and transportation and storage requirements; and (4) identifying sample specifications to ensure sample quality. The SRP Sample Management Facility will be operated under a set of procedures that will impact numerous program participants. Requesters of samples will be responsible for definition of requirements in advance of collection. Sample requests for field activities will be approved by the SRPO, aided by an advisory group, the SRP Sample Allocation Committee. This document details the staffing, building, storage, and transportation requirements for establishing an SRP Sample Management Facility. Materials to be managed in the facility include rock core and rock discontinuities, soils, fluids, biota, air particulates, cultural artifacts, and crop and food stuffs. 39 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs

  10. Synchrotron/crystal sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Barry

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) prepared this final report entitled 'Synchrotron/Crystal Sample Preparation' in completion of contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order No. 53. Hughes Danbury Optical Systems (HDOS) is manufacturing the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) mirrors. These thin-walled, grazing incidence, Wolter Type-1 mirrors, varying in diameter from 1.2 to 0.68 meters, must be ground and polished using state-of-the-art techniques in order to prevent undue stress due to damage or the presence of crystals and inclusions. The effect of crystals on the polishing and grinding process must also be understood. This involves coating special samples of Zerodur and measuring the reflectivity of the coatings in a synchrotron system. In order to gain the understanding needed on the effect of the Zerodur crystals by the grinding and polishing process, UAH prepared glass samples by cutting, grinding, etching, and polishing as required to meet specifications for witness bars for synchrotron measurements and for investigations of crystals embedded in Zerodur. UAH then characterized these samples for subsurface damage and surface roughness and figure.

  11. Standard methods for sampling and sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskaeva, M.; Taskaev, E.; Nikolov, P.

    1993-01-01

    The strategy for sampling and sample preparation is outlined: necessary number of samples; analysis and treatment of the results received; quantity of the analysed material according to the radionuclide concentrations and analytical methods; the minimal quantity and kind of the data needed for making final conclusions and decisions on the base of the results received. This strategy was tested in gamma spectroscopic analysis of radionuclide contamination of the region of Eleshnitsa Uranium Mines. The water samples was taken and stored according to the ASTM D 3370-82. The general sampling procedures were in conformity with the recommendations of ISO 5667. The radionuclides was concentrated by coprecipitation with iron hydroxide and ion exchange. The sampling of soil samples complied with the rules of ASTM C 998, and their sample preparation - with ASTM C 999. After preparation the samples were sealed hermetically and measured. (author)

  12. Technical project of complex fast cycle heat treatment of hydrogenous coal preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Moiseev, V. A.; Andrienko, V. G.; Pileckij, V. G.; Urvancev, A. I.; Gvozdyakov, Dmitry Vasilievich; Gubin, Vladimir Evgenievich; Matveev, Aleksandr Sergeevich; Savostiyanova, Ludmila Viktorovna

    2015-01-01

    Problems of heat-treated milled hydrogenous coal preparation site creation in leading fast cycle heat treatment complex were considered. Conditions for effective use of electrostatic methods of heat-treated milled hydrogenous coal preparation were set. Technical project of heat treatment of milled hydrogenous coal preparation site was developed including coupling of working equipment complex on fast heat treatment and experimental samples of equipment being designed for manufacturing. It was ...

  13. [Sample preparation and bioanalysis in mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Wagner, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of compounds of clinical interest of low molecular weight (sample preparation. Sample preparation is a crucial part of chemical/biological analysis and in a sense is considered the bottleneck of the whole analytical process. The main objectives of sample preparation are the removal of potential interferences, analyte preconcentration, and converting (if needed) the analyte into a more suitable form for detection or separation. Without chromatographic separation, endogenous compounds, co-eluted products may affect a quantitative method in mass spectrometry performance. This work focuses on three distinct parts. First, quantitative bioanalysis will be defined, different matrices and sample preparation techniques currently used in bioanalysis by mass spectrometry of/for small molecules of clinical interest in biological fluids. In a second step the goals of sample preparation will be described. Finally, in a third step, sample preparation strategies will be made either directly ("dilute and shoot") or after precipitation.

  14. METALLOGRAPHIC SAMPLE PREPARATION STATION-CONSTRUCTIVE CONCEPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AVRAM Florin Timotei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose to present the issues involved in the case of the constructive conception of a station for metallographic sample preparation. This station is destined for laboratory work. The metallographic station is composed of a robot ABB IRB1600, a metallographic microscope, a gripping device, a manipulator, a laboratory grinding and polishing machine. The robot will be used for manipulation of the sample preparation and the manipulator take the sample preparation for processing.

  15. Sample preparation guidelines for two-dimensional electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, Anton

    2014-12-01

    Sample preparation is one of the key technologies for successful two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE). Due to the great diversity of protein sample types and sources, no single sample preparation method works with all proteins; for any sample the optimum procedure must be determined empirically. This review is meant to provide a broad overview of the most important principles in sample preparation in order to avoid a multitude of possible pitfalls. Sample preparation protocols from the expert in the field were screened and evaluated. On the basis of these protocols and my own comprehensive practical experience important guidelines are given in this review. The presented guidelines will facilitate straightforward protocol development for researchers new to gel-based proteomics. In addition the available choices are rationalized in order to successfully prepare a protein sample for 2DE separations. The strategies described here are not limited to 2DE and can also be applied to other protein separation techniques.

  16. Robotic, MEMS-based Multi Utility Sample Preparation Instrument for ISS Biological Workstation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop a multi-functional, automated sample preparation instrument for biological wet-lab workstations on the ISS. The instrument is based on a...

  17. Collection and preparation of samples for gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jingquan

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents the basic principles of sample collection and preparation: setting up unified sampling program, methods and procedures, sample packing, transportation and storage, determination of sample quantity, sample pretreatment and preparation of samples to be analysed, etc. for gamma spectrometry. And the paper also describes briefly the main methods and special issues of sampling and preparation for the same environmental and biological samples, such as, air, water, grass, soil and foods

  18. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Diagnostic Cytopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Albert J.; Adeyiga, Oladunni B.; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-01-01

    The cellular components of body fluids are routinely analyzed to identify disease and treatment approaches. While significant focus has been placed on developing cell analysis technologies, tools to automate the preparation of cellular specimens have been more limited, especially for body fluids beyond blood. Preparation steps include separating, concentrating, and exposing cells to reagents. Sample preparation continues to be routinely performed off-chip by technicians, preventing cell-based point-of-care diagnostics, increasing the cost of tests, and reducing the consistency of the final analysis following multiple manually-performed steps. Here, we review the assortment of biofluids for which suspended cells are analyzed, along with their characteristics and diagnostic value. We present an overview of the conventional sample preparation processes for cytological diagnosis. We finally discuss the challenges and opportunities in developing microfluidic devices for the purpose of automating or miniaturizing these processes, with particular emphases on preparing large or small volume samples, working with samples of high cellularity, automating multi-step processes, and obtaining high purity subpopulations of cells. We hope to convey the importance of and help identify new research directions addressing the vast biological and clinical applications in preparing and analyzing the array of available biological fluids. Successfully addressing the challenges described in this review can lead to inexpensive systems to improve diagnostic accuracy while simultaneously reducing overall systemic healthcare costs. PMID:23380972

  19. Innovative methods for inorganic sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1992-04-01

    Procedures and guidelines are given for the dissolution of a variety of selected materials using fusion, microwave, and Parr bomb techniques. These materials include germanium glass, corium-concrete mixtures, and zeolites. Emphasis is placed on sample-preparation approaches that produce a single master solution suitable for complete multielement characterization of the sample. In addition, data are presented on the soil microwave digestion method approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Advantages and disadvantages of each sample-preparation technique are summarized.

  20. Innovative methods for inorganic sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essling, A.M.; Huff, E.A.; Graczyk, D.G.

    1992-04-01

    Procedures and guidelines are given for the dissolution of a variety of selected materials using fusion, microwave, and Parr bomb techniques. These materials include germanium glass, corium-concrete mixtures, and zeolites. Emphasis is placed on sample-preparation approaches that produce a single master solution suitable for complete multielement characterization of the sample. In addition, data are presented on the soil microwave digestion method approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Advantages and disadvantages of each sample-preparation technique are summarized

  1. Novel Sample-handling Approach for XRD Analysis with Minimal Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Chipera, S.; Bish, D.; Blake, D.; Feldman, S.; Vaniman, D.; Bryson, C.

    2004-01-01

    Sample preparation and sample handling are among the most critical operations associated with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. These operations require attention in a laboratory environment, but they become a major constraint in the deployment of XRD instruments for robotic planetary exploration. We are developing a novel sample handling system that dramatically relaxes the constraints on sample preparation by allowing characterization of coarse-grained material that would normally be impossible to analyze with conventional powder-XRD techniques.

  2. Newly introduced sample preparation techniques: towards miniaturization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Sampling and sample preparation are of crucial importance in an analytical procedure, representing quite often a source of errors. The technique chosen for the isolation of analytes greatly affects the success of a chemical determination. On the other hand, growing concerns about environmental and human safety, along with the introduction of international regulations for quality control, have moved the interest of scientists towards specific needs. Newly introduced sample preparation techniques are challenged to meet new criteria: (i) miniaturization, (ii) higher sensitivity and selectivity, and (iii) automation. In this survey, the most recent techniques introduced in the field of sample preparation will be described and discussed, along with many examples of applications.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory TRU waste sampling projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeamans, D.; Rogers, P.; Mroz, E.

    1997-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has begun characterizing transuranic (TRU) waste in order to comply with New Mexico regulations, and to prepare the waste for shipment and disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Sampling consists of removing some head space gas from each drum, removing a core from a few drums of each homogeneous waste stream, and visually characterizing a few drums from each heterogeneous waste stream. The gases are analyzed by GC/MS, and the cores are analyzed for VOC's and SVOC's by GC/MS and for metals by AA or AE spectroscopy. The sampling and examination projects are conducted in accordance with the ''DOE TRU Waste Quality Assurance Program Plan'' (QAPP) and the ''LANL TRU Waste Quality Assurance Project Plan,'' (QAPjP), guaranteeing that the data meet the needs of both the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) of DOE and the ''WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria, Rev. 5,'' (WAC)

  4. Green approaches in sample preparation of bioanalytical samples prior to chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippou, Olga; Bitas, Dimitrios; Samanidou, Victoria

    2017-02-01

    Sample preparation is considered to be the most challenging step of the analytical procedure, since it has an effect on the whole analytical methodology, therefore it contributes significantly to the greenness or lack of it of the entire process. The elimination of the sample treatment steps, pursuing at the same time the reduction of the amount of the sample, strong reductions in consumption of hazardous reagents and energy also maximizing safety for operators and environment, the avoidance of the use of big amount of organic solvents, form the basis for greening sample preparation and analytical methods. In the last decade, the development and utilization of greener and sustainable microextraction techniques is an alternative to classical sample preparation procedures. In this review, the main green microextraction techniques (solid phase microextraction, stir bar sorptive extraction, hollow-fiber liquid phase microextraction, dispersive liquid - liquid microextraction, etc.) will be presented, with special attention to bioanalytical applications of these environment-friendly sample preparation techniques which comply with the green analytical chemistry principles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Sample preparation of environmental samples using benzene synthesis followed by high-performance LSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippis, S. De; Noakes, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) techniques have been widely employed as the detection method for determining environmental levels of tritium and 14 C. Since anthropogenic and nonanthropogenic inputs to the environment are a concern, sampling the environment surrounding a nuclear power facility or fuel reprocessing operation requires the collection of many different sample types, including agriculture products, water, biota, aquatic life, soil, and vegetation. These sample types are not suitable for the direct detection of tritium of 14 C for liquid scintillation techniques. Each sample type must be initially prepared in order to obtain the carbon or hydrogen component of interest and present this in a chemical form that is compatible with common chemicals used in scintillation counting applications. Converting the sample of interest to chemically pure benzene as a sample preparation technique has been widely accepted for processing samples for radiocarbon age-dating applications. The synthesized benzene is composed of the carbon or hydrogen atoms from the original sample and is ideal as a solvent for LSC with excellent photo-optical properties. Benzene synthesis followed by low-background scintillation counting can be applied to the preparation and measurement of environmental samples yielding good detection sensitivities, high radionuclide counting efficiency, and shorter preparation time. The method of benzene synthesis provides a unique approach to the preparation of a wide variety of environmental sample types using similar chemistry for all samples

  6. Quantitative sample preparation of some heavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffey, A.H.

    1977-01-01

    A discussion is given of some techniques that have been useful in quantitatively preparing and analyzing samples used in the half-life determinations of some plutonium and uranium isotopes. Application of these methods to the preparation of uranium and plutonium samples used in neutron experiments is discussed

  7. The MEGAPIE PIE sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohlmuther, M.; Boutellier, V.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Geissmann, K.; Hahl, S.; Hammer, B.; Lagotzki, A.; Leu, H.; Linder, H.P.; Kalt, A.; Kuster, D.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Schwarz, R.; Schweikert, H.; Spahr, A.; Suter, P.; Teichmann, S.; Thomsen, K.; Wiese, H.; Wagner, W.; Zimmermann, U.; Zumbach, C.

    2015-01-01

    On the way towards Accelerator-driven Systems (ADS), the MEGAPIE (Mega-Watt Pilot Experiment) project is one of the key milestones. The MEGAPIE project aimed to prove that a liquid Lead-Bismuth-Eutectic (LBE) spallation target can be licensed, planned, built, operated, dismantled, examined and disposed. The project has finished the phase of producing the samples for Post-irradiation Examination (PIE). Samples to study structural material property changes due to the harsh environment of high temperatures, contact with flowing liquid metal (LBE), proton and neutron irradiation will be investigated by all partner laboratories (CEA, CNRS, ENEA, KIT, PSI and SCK-CEN). (authors)

  8. 7 CFR 27.21 - Preparation of samples of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preparation of samples of cotton. 27.21 Section 27.21... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.21 Preparation of samples of cotton. The samples from each bale shall be prepared as specified in this section...

  9. Sample preparation in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, Joaquim A.; Santos, Mirian C.; Sousa, Rafael A. de; Cadore, Solange; Barnes, Ramon M.; Tatro, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide, tertiary amines and strongly alkaline reagents for sample treatment involving extraction and digestion procedures is discussed in this review. The preparation of slurries is also discussed. Based on literature data, alkaline media offer a good alternative for sample preparation involving an appreciable group of analytes in different types of samples. These reagents are also successfully employed in tailored speciation procedures wherein there is a critical dependence on maintenance of chemical forms. The effects of these reagents on measurements performed using spectroanalytical techniques are discussed. Several undesirable effects on transport and atomization processes necessitate use of the method of standard additions to obtain accurate results. It is also evident that alkaline media can improve the performance of techniques such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and accessories, such as autosamplers coupled to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometers

  10. Urine sample preparation for proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszowy, Pawel; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2014-10-01

    Sample preparation for both environmental and more importantly biological matrices is a bottleneck of all kinds of analytical processes. In the case of proteomic analysis this element is even more important due to the amount of cross-reactions that should be taken into consideration. The incorporation of new post-translational modifications, protein hydrolysis, or even its degradation is possible as side effects of proteins sample processing. If protocols are evaluated appropriately, then identification of such proteins does not bring difficulties. However, if structural changes are provided without sufficient attention then protein sequence coverage will be reduced or even identification of such proteins could be impossible. This review summarizes obstacles and achievements in protein sample preparation of urine for proteome analysis using different tools for mass spectrometry analysis. The main aim is to present comprehensively the idea of urine application as a valuable matrix. This article is dedicated to sample preparation and application of urine mainly in novel cancer biomarkers discovery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Recent advances in applications of nanomaterials for sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linnan; Qi, Xiaoyue; Li, Xianjiang; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2016-01-01

    Sample preparation is a key step for qualitative and quantitative analysis of trace analytes in complicated matrix. Along with the rapid development of nanotechnology in material science, numerous nanomaterials have been developed with particularly useful applications in analytical chemistry. Benefitting from their high specific areas, increased surface activities, and unprecedented physical/chemical properties, the potentials of nanomaterials for rapid and efficient sample preparation have been exploited extensively. In this review, recent progress of novel nanomaterials applied in sample preparation has been summarized and discussed. Both nanoparticles and nanoporous materials are evaluated for their unusual performance in sample preparation. Various compositions and functionalizations extended the applications of nanomaterials in sample preparations, and distinct size and shape selectivity was generated from the diversified pore structures of nanoporous materials. Such great variety make nanomaterials a kind of versatile tools in sample preparation for almost all categories of analytes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Liquid scintillation: Sample preparation and counting atypical emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid scintillation sample preparation has the most published information but the least amount of definitive technical direction because the chemical and physical nature of the samples from biological investigations varies widely. This chapter discusses the following related topics: Aqueous Samples; Tissue Solubilizers; Absorption of 14 CO 2 ; Sample Combustion Methods; Heterogeneous Systems; Sample Preparation Problems (colored samples, chemiluminescence, photoluminescence, static electricity); Counting Various Types of Emitters; Counting Atypical Emissions. 2 refs., 2 figs

  13. Recent advances in column switching sample preparation in bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Saito, Keita

    2012-04-01

    Column switching techniques, using two or more stationary phase columns, are useful for trace enrichment and online automated sample preparation. Target fractions from the first column are transferred online to a second column with different properties for further separation. Column switching techniques can be used to determine the analytes in a complex matrix by direct sample injection or by simple sample treatment. Online column switching sample preparation is usually performed in combination with HPLC or capillary electrophoresis. SPE or turbulent flow chromatography using a cartridge column and in-tube solid-phase microextraction using a capillary column have been developed for convenient column switching sample preparation. Furthermore, various micro-/nano-sample preparation devices using new polymer-coating materials have been developed to improve extraction efficiency. This review describes current developments and future trends in novel column switching sample preparation in bioanalysis, focusing on innovative column switching techniques using new extraction devices and materials.

  14. Modular microfluidic system for biological sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Klint A.; Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Bailey, Christopher G.; Ness, Kevin Dean

    2015-09-29

    A reconfigurable modular microfluidic system for preparation of a biological sample including a series of reconfigurable modules for automated sample preparation adapted to selectively include a) a microfluidic acoustic focusing filter module, b) a dielectrophoresis bacteria filter module, c) a dielectrophoresis virus filter module, d) an isotachophoresis nucleic acid filter module, e) a lyses module, and f) an isotachophoresis-based nucleic acid filter.

  15. Applications of Liquid-Phase Microextraction in the Sample Preparation of Environmental Solid Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Prosen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extraction remains one of the fundamental sample preparation techniques in the analysis of environmental solid samples, but organic solvents are toxic and environmentally harmful, therefore one of the possible greening directions is its miniaturization. The present review covers the relevant research from the field of application of microextraction to the sample preparation of environmental solid samples (soil, sediments, sewage sludge, dust etc. published in the last decade. Several innovative liquid-phase microextraction (LPME techniques that have emerged recently have also been applied as an aid in sample preparation of these samples: single-drop microextraction (SDME, hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME. Besides the common organic solvents, surfactants and ionic liquids are also used. However, these techniques have to be combined with another technique to release the analytes from the solid sample into an aqueous solution. In the present review, the published methods were categorized into three groups: LPME in combination with a conventional solvent extraction; LPME in combination with an environmentally friendly extraction; LPME without previous extraction. The applicability of these approaches to the sample preparation for the determination of pollutants in solid environmental samples is discussed, with emphasis on their strengths, weak points and environmental impact.

  16. Applications of liquid-phase microextraction in the sample preparation of environmental solid samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Helena

    2014-05-23

    Solvent extraction remains one of the fundamental sample preparation techniques in the analysis of environmental solid samples, but organic solvents are toxic and environmentally harmful, therefore one of the possible greening directions is its miniaturization. The present review covers the relevant research from the field of application of microextraction to the sample preparation of environmental solid samples (soil, sediments, sewage sludge, dust etc.) published in the last decade. Several innovative liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques that have emerged recently have also been applied as an aid in sample preparation of these samples: single-drop microextraction (SDME), hollow fiber-liquid phase microextraction (HF-LPME), dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). Besides the common organic solvents, surfactants and ionic liquids are also used. However, these techniques have to be combined with another technique to release the analytes from the solid sample into an aqueous solution. In the present review, the published methods were categorized into three groups: LPME in combination with a conventional solvent extraction; LPME in combination with an environmentally friendly extraction; LPME without previous extraction. The applicability of these approaches to the sample preparation for the determination of pollutants in solid environmental samples is discussed, with emphasis on their strengths, weak points and environmental impact.

  17. Indigenous development of automated metallographic sample preparation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, A.P.; Pandit, K.M.; Deshmukh, A.G.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    Surface preparation of specimens for Metallographic studies on irradiated material involves a lot of remote handling of radioactive material by skilled manpower. These are laborious and man-rem intensive activities and put limitations on number of samples that can be prepared for the metallographic studies. To overcome these limitations, automated systems have been developed for surface preparation of specimens in PIE division. The system includes (i) Grinding and polishing stations (ii) Water jet cleaning station (iii) Ultrasonic cleaning stations (iv) Drying station (v) Sample loading and unloading station (vi) Dispenser for slurries and diluents and (vii) Automated head for movement of the sample holder disc from one station to other. System facilities the operator for programming/changing sequence of the sample preparations including remote changing of grinding/polishing discs from the stations. Two such systems have been installed and commissioned in Hot Cell for PIE Division. These are being used for preparation of irradiated samples from nuclear fuels and structural components. This development has increased the throughput of metallography work and savings in terms of (man-severts) radiation exposure to operators. This presentation will provide details of the challenges in undertaking this developmental work. (author)

  18. Global Threat Reduction Initiative Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project: Sample Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pereira, Mario M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steen, Franciska H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This sample management plan provides guidelines for sectioning, preparation, acceptance criteria, analytical path, and end-of-life disposal for the fuel element segments utilized in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project. The Fuel Thermo-Physical Characterization Project is tasked with analysis of irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel element samples to support the GTRI conversion program. Sample analysis may include optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) fuel-surface interface analysis, gas pycnometry (density) measurements, laser flash analysis (LFA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis with mass spectroscopy (TG /DTA-MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometry (ICP), alpha spectroscopy, and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS). The project will utilize existing Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) operating, technical, and administrative procedures for sample receipt, processing, and analyses. Test instructions (TIs), which are documents used to provide specific details regarding the implementation of an existing RPL approved technical or operational procedure, will also be used to communicate to staff project specific parameters requested by the Principal Investigator (PI). TIs will be developed, reviewed, and issued in accordance with the latest revision of the RPL-PLN-700, RPL Operations Plan. Additionally, the PI must approve all project test instructions and red-line changes to test instructions.

  19. Applications of Liquid-Phase Microextraction in the Sample Preparation of Environmental Solid Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Prosen

    2014-01-01

    Solvent extraction remains one of the fundamental sample preparation techniques in the analysis of environmental solid samples, but organic solvents are toxic and environmentally harmful, therefore one of the possible greening directions is its miniaturization. The present review covers the relevant research from the field of application of microextraction to the sample preparation of environmental solid samples (soil, sediments, sewage sludge, dust etc.) published in the last decade. Several...

  20. New materials for sample preparation techniques in bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazario, Carlos Eduardo Domingues; Fumes, Bruno Henrique; da Silva, Meire Ribeiro; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2017-02-01

    The analysis of biological samples is a complex and difficult task owing to two basic and complementary issues: the high complexity of most biological matrices and the need to determine minute quantities of active substances and contaminants in such complex sample. To succeed in this endeavor samples are usually subject to three steps of a comprehensive analytical methodological approach: sample preparation, analytes isolation (usually utilizing a chromatographic technique) and qualitative/quantitative analysis (usually with the aid of mass spectrometric tools). Owing to the complex nature of bio-samples, and the very low concentration of the target analytes to be determined, selective sample preparation techniques is mandatory in order to overcome the difficulties imposed by these two constraints. During the last decade new chemical synthesis approaches has been developed and optimized, such as sol-gel and molecularly imprinting technologies, allowing the preparation of novel materials for sample preparation including graphene and derivatives, magnetic materials, ionic liquids, molecularly imprinted polymers, and much more. In this contribution we will review these novel techniques and materials, as well as their application to the bioanalysis niche. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Sample Preparation for Electron Probe Microanalysis-Pushing the Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Joseph D; Engle, Paul D

    2002-01-01

    There are two fundamental considerations in preparing samples for electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The first one may seem obvious, but we often find it is overlooked. That is, the sample analyzed should be representative of the population from which it comes. The second is a direct result of the assumptions in the calculations used to convert x-ray intensity ratios, between the sample and standard, to concentrations. Samples originate from a wide range of sources. During their journey to being excited under the electron beam for the production of x rays there are many possibilities for sample alteration. Handling can contaminate samples by adding extraneous matter. In preparation, the various abrasives used in sizing the sample by sawing, grinding and polishing can embed themselves. The most accurate composition of a contaminated sample is, at best, not representative of the original sample; it is misleading. Our laboratory performs EPMA analysis on customer submitted samples and prepares over 250 different calibration standards including pure elements, compounds, alloys, glasses and minerals. This large variety of samples does not lend itself to mass production techniques, including automatic polishing. Our manual preparation techniques are designed individually for each sample. The use of automated preparation equipment does not lend itself to this environment, and is not included in this manuscript. The final step in quantitative electron probe microanalysis is the conversion of x-ray intensities ratios, known as the "k-ratios," to composition (in mass fraction or atomic percent) and/or film thickness. Of the many assumptions made in the ZAF (where these letters stand for atomic number, absorption and fluorescence) corrections the localized geometry between the sample and electron beam, or takeoff angle, must be accurately known. Small angular errors can lead to significant errors in the final results. The sample preparation technique then becomes very

  2. Preparation of honey sample for tritium monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bingru; Wang Chenlian; Wang Weihua

    1989-01-01

    The method of preparation of honey sample for tritium monitoring was described. The equipments consist of an air and honey supply system, a quartz combustor with CM-type monolithic combustion catalyst and a condensation system. In the equipments, honey sample was converted into cooling water by the distilling, cracking and carbonizing procedures for tritium counting. The recovery ratio is 99.0 ± 4.5 percent for tritiated water and 96.0 ± 2.0 for tritiated organic compounds. It is a feasible preparing method for the total tritium monitoring in honey sample

  3. 14C sample preparation for AMS microdosing studies at Lund University using online combustion and septa-sealed vials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydoff, Marie; Stenström, Kristina

    2010-04-01

    The Department of Physics at Lund University is participating in a European Union project called EUMAPP (European Union Microdose AMS Partnership Programme), in which sample preparation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of biological samples from microdosing studies have been made. This paper describes a simplified method of converting biological samples to solid graphite for 14C analysis with AMS. The method is based on online combustion of the samples, and reduction of CO 2 in septa-sealed vials. The septa-sealed vials and disposable materials are used to eliminate sample cross-contamination. Measurements of ANU and Ox I standards show deviations of 2% and 3%, respectively, relative to reference values. This level of accuracy is sufficient for biological samples from microdosing studies. Since the method has very few handling steps from sample to graphite, the risk of failure during the sample preparation process is minimized, making the method easy to use in routine preparation of samples.

  4. 14C sample preparation for AMS microdosing studies at Lund University using online combustion and septa-sealed vials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydoff, Marie; Stenstroem, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Physics at Lund University is participating in a European Union project called EUMAPP (European Union Microdose AMS Partnership Programme), in which sample preparation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of biological samples from microdosing studies have been made. This paper describes a simplified method of converting biological samples to solid graphite for 14 C analysis with AMS. The method is based on online combustion of the samples, and reduction of CO 2 in septa-sealed vials. The septa-sealed vials and disposable materials are used to eliminate sample cross-contamination. Measurements of ANU and Ox I standards show deviations of 2% and 3%, respectively, relative to reference values. This level of accuracy is sufficient for biological samples from microdosing studies. Since the method has very few handling steps from sample to graphite, the risk of failure during the sample preparation process is minimized, making the method easy to use in routine preparation of samples.

  5. Platelet-rich fibrin prepared from stored whole-blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Kazushige; Suzuki, Masashi; Watanabe, Taisuke; Kitamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Taiji; Kawabata, Hideo; Nakamura, Masayuki; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Okudera, Hajime; Uematsu, Kohya; Nakata, Koh; Tanaka, Takaaki; Kawase, Tomoyuki

    2017-12-01

    In regenerative therapy, self-clotted platelet concentrates, such as platelet-rich fibrin (PRF), are generally prepared on-site and are immediately used for treatment. If blood samples or prepared clots can be preserved for several days, their clinical applicability will expand. Here, we prepared PRF from stored whole-blood samples and examined their characteristics. Blood samples were collected from non-smoking, healthy male donors (aged 27-67 years, N = 6), and PRF clots were prepared immediately or after storage for 1-2 days. Fibrin fiber was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Bioactivity was evaluated by means of a bioassay system involving human periosteal cells, whereas PDGF-BB concentrations were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Addition of optimal amounts of a 10% CaCl 2 solution restored the coagulative ability of whole-blood samples that contained an anticoagulant (acid citrate dextrose) and were stored for up to 2 days at ambient temperature. In PRF clots prepared from the stored whole-blood samples, the thickness and cross-links of fibrin fibers were almost identical to those of freshly prepared PRF clots. PDGF-BB concentrations in the PRF extract were significantly lower in stored whole-blood samples than in fresh samples; however, both extracts had similar stimulatory effects on periosteal-cell proliferation. Quality of PRF clots prepared from stored whole-blood samples is not reduced significantly and can be ensured for use in regenerative therapy. Therefore, the proposed method enables a more flexible treatment schedule and choice of a more suitable platelet concentrate immediately before treatment, not after blood collection.

  6. The effect of sample preparation on uranium hydriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos, A.; Stitt, C.A.; Scott, T.B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Distinct differences in uranium hydride growth rates and characteristics between different surface preparation methods. • The primary difference between the categories of sample preparations is the level of strain present in the surface. • Greater surface-strain, leads to higher nucleation number density, implying a preferred attack of strained vs unstrained metal. • As strain is reduced, surface features such as carbides and grain boundaries become more important in controlling the UH3 location. - Abstract: The influence of sample cleaning preparation on the early stages of uranium hydriding has been examined, by using four identical samples but concurrently prepared using four different methods. The samples were reacted together in the same corrosion cell to ensure identical exposure conditions. From the analysis, it was found that the hydride nucleation rate was proportional to the level of strain exhibiting higher number density for the more strained surfaces. Additionally, microstructure of the metal plays a secondary role regarding initial hydrogen attack on the highly strained surfaces yet starts to dominate the system while moving to more pristine samples.

  7. Efficient sample preparation from complex biological samples using a sliding lid for immobilized droplet extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavant, Benjamin P; Guckenberger, David J; Beebe, David J; Berry, Scott M

    2014-07-01

    Sample preparation is a major bottleneck in many biological processes. Paramagnetic particles (PMPs) are a ubiquitous method for isolating analytes of interest from biological samples and are used for their ability to thoroughly sample a solution and be easily collected with a magnet. There are three main methods by which PMPs are used for sample preparation: (1) removal of fluid from the analyte-bound PMPs, (2) removal of analyte-bound PMPs from the solution, and (3) removal of the substrate (with immobilized analyte-bound PMPs). In this paper, we explore the third and least studied method for PMP-based sample preparation using a platform termed Sliding Lid for Immobilized Droplet Extractions (SLIDE). SLIDE leverages principles of surface tension and patterned hydrophobicity to create a simple-to-operate platform for sample isolation (cells, DNA, RNA, protein) and preparation (cell staining) without the need for time-intensive wash steps, use of immiscible fluids, or precise pinning geometries. Compared to other standard isolation protocols using PMPs, SLIDE is able to perform rapid sample preparation with low (0.6%) carryover of contaminants from the original sample. The natural recirculation occurring within the pinned droplets of SLIDE make possible the performance of multistep cell staining protocols within the SLIDE by simply resting the lid over the various sample droplets. SLIDE demonstrates a simple easy to use platform for sample preparation on a range of complex biological samples.

  8. On the development of automatic sample preparation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesselmann, J.

    1987-01-01

    Modern mass spectrometers for stable isotope analysis offer accurate isotope ratio results from gaseous samples (CO 2 , N 2 , H 2 , SO 2 ) in a completely automated fashion. However, most samples of interest either are associated with contaminant gases or the gas has to be liberated by a chemical procedure prior to measurement. In most laboratories this sample preparation step is performed manually. As a consequence, sample throughput is rather low and - despite skilful operation - the preparation procedure varies slightly from one sample to the next affecting mainly the reproducibility of the data. (author)

  9. Sample Preparation for Electron Probe Microanalysis—Pushing the Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Joseph D.; Engle, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    There are two fundamental considerations in preparing samples for electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The first one may seem obvious, but we often find it is overlooked. That is, the sample analyzed should be representative of the population from which it comes. The second is a direct result of the assumptions in the calculations used to convert x-ray intensity ratios, between the sample and standard, to concentrations. Samples originate from a wide range of sources. During their journey to being excited under the electron beam for the production of x rays there are many possibilities for sample alteration. Handling can contaminate samples by adding extraneous matter. In preparation, the various abrasives used in sizing the sample by sawing, grinding and polishing can embed themselves. The most accurate composition of a contaminated sample is, at best, not representative of the original sample; it is misleading. Our laboratory performs EPMA analysis on customer submitted samples and prepares over 250 different calibration standards including pure elements, compounds, alloys, glasses and minerals. This large variety of samples does not lend itself to mass production techniques, including automatic polishing. Our manual preparation techniques are designed individually for each sample. The use of automated preparation equipment does not lend itself to this environment, and is not included in this manuscript. The final step in quantitative electron probe microanalysis is the conversion of x-ray intensities ratios, known as the “k-ratios,” to composition (in mass fraction or atomic percent) and/or film thickness. Of the many assumptions made in the ZAF (where these letters stand for atomic number, absorption and fluorescence) corrections the localized geometry between the sample and electron beam, or takeoff angle, must be accurately known. Small angular errors can lead to significant errors in the final results. The sample preparation technique then becomes very

  10. 40 CFR 205.160-2 - Test sample selection and preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test sample selection and preparation... sample selection and preparation. (a) Vehicles comprising the sample which are required to be tested... maintained in any manner unless such preparation, tests, modifications, adjustments or maintenance are part...

  11. FISHprep: A Novel Integrated Device for Metaphase FISH Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Kwasny, Dorota

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel integrated device for preparing metaphase chromosomes spread slides (FISHprep). The quality of cytogenetic analysis from patient samples greatly relies on the efficiency of sample pre-treatment and/or slide preparation. In cytogenetic slide preparation, cell cultures...... are routinely used to process samples (for culture, arrest and fixation of cells) and/or to expand limited amount of samples (in case of prenatal diagnostics). Arguably, this expansion and other sample pretreatments form the longest part of the entire diagnostic protocols spanning over 3–4 days. We present here...... with minimal handling for metaphase FISH slide preparation....

  12. Independent assessment of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) sample preparation quality: Effect of sample preparation on MALDI-MS of synthetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Pieter C; Kok, Sander; Honing, Maarten

    2017-02-28

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) provides detailed and in-depth information about the molecular characteristics of synthetic polymers. To obtain the most accurate results the sample preparation parameters should be chosen to suit the sample and the aim of the experiment. Because the underlying principles of MALDI are still not fully known, a priori determination of optimal sample preparation protocols is often not possible. Employing an automated sample preparation quality assessment method recently presented by us we quantified the sample preparation quality obtained using various sample preparation protocols. Six conventional matrices with and without added potassium as a cationization agent and six ionic liquid matrices (ILMs) were assessed using poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polytetrahydrofuran (PTHF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as samples. All sample preparation protocols were scored and ranked based on predefined quality parameters and spot-to-spot repeatability. Clearly distinctive preferences were observed in matrix identity and cationization agent for PEG, PTHF and PMMA, as the addition of an excess of potassium cationization agent results in an increased score for PMMA and a contrasting matrix-dependent effect for PTHF and PEG. The addition of excess cationization agent to sample mixtures dissipates any overrepresentation of high molecular weight polymer species. Our results show reduced ionization efficiency and similar sample deposit homogeneity for all tested ILMs, compared with well-performing conventional MALDI matrices. The results published here represent a start in the unsupervised quantification of sample preparation quality for MALDI samples. This method can select the best sample preparation parameters for any synthetic polymer sample and the results can be used to formulate hypotheses on MALDI principles. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. PROJECT ENGINEERING DATA MANAGEMENT AT AUTOMATED PREPARATION OF DESIGN DOCUMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Guryanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and realized instrumental means for automated support of end-to-end design process for design documentation on a product at the programming level. The proposed decision is based on processing of the engineering project data that are contained in interdependent design documents: tactical technical characteristics of products, data on the valuable metals contained in them, the list of components applied in a product and others. Processing of engineering data is based on their conversion to the form provided by requirements of industry standards for design documentation preparation. The general graph of the design documentation developed on a product is provided. The description of the developed software product is given. Automated preparation process of interdependent design documents is shown on the example of preparation of purchased products list. Results of work can be used in case of research and development activities on creation of perspective samples of ADP equipment.

  14. Congener Production in Blood Samples During Preparation and Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felby, Søren; Nielsen, Erik

    1995-01-01

    Retsmedicin, congener production, preparation, head space GC, acetone, isobutanol, storage, blood samples, n-propanol, methanol, methylethylketone......Retsmedicin, congener production, preparation, head space GC, acetone, isobutanol, storage, blood samples, n-propanol, methanol, methylethylketone...

  15. Trends in sample preparation 2002. Development and application. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, T.; Eberl, M.; Zischka, M.; Knapp, G.

    2002-01-01

    This conference comprised topics dealing with sample preparation such as: sample decomposition, solvent extraction, derivatization techniques and uncertainty in sample preparation. In particular microwave assisted sample preparation techniques and equipment were discussed. The papers were organized under the general topics: trace element analysis, trace analysis of organic compounds, high performance instrumentation in sample preparation, speciation analysis and posters session. Those papers of INIS interest are cited individually. (nevyjel)

  16. Trends in sample preparation 2002. Development and application. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzl, T; Eberl, M; Zischka, M; Knapp, G [eds.

    2002-07-01

    This conference comprised topics dealing with sample preparation such as: sample decomposition, solvent extraction, derivatization techniques and uncertainty in sample preparation. In particular microwave assisted sample preparation techniques and equipment were discussed. The papers were organized under the general topics: trace element analysis, trace analysis of organic compounds, high performance instrumentation in sample preparation, speciation analysis and posters session. Those papers of INIS interest are cited individually. (nevyjel)

  17. {sup 14}C sample preparation for AMS microdosing studies at Lund University using online combustion and septa-sealed vials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sydoff, Marie, E-mail: marie.sydoff@med.lu.s [Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Malmo University Hospital, SE-205 02 Malmoe (Sweden); Lund University, Department of Physics, Division of Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Stenstroem, Kristina [Lund University, Department of Physics, Division of Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-04-15

    The Department of Physics at Lund University is participating in a European Union project called EUMAPP (European Union Microdose AMS Partnership Programme), in which sample preparation and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of biological samples from microdosing studies have been made. This paper describes a simplified method of converting biological samples to solid graphite for {sup 14}C analysis with AMS. The method is based on online combustion of the samples, and reduction of CO{sub 2} in septa-sealed vials. The septa-sealed vials and disposable materials are used to eliminate sample cross-contamination. Measurements of ANU and Ox I standards show deviations of 2% and 3%, respectively, relative to reference values. This level of accuracy is sufficient for biological samples from microdosing studies. Since the method has very few handling steps from sample to graphite, the risk of failure during the sample preparation process is minimized, making the method easy to use in routine preparation of samples.

  18. On-line Automated Sample Preparation-Capillary Gas Chromatography for the Analysis of Plasma Samples.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, A.J.H.; van der Wagt, R.A.C.A.; Brinkman, U.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    An automated sample preparation module, (the automated sample preparation with extraction columns, ASPEC), was interfaced with a capillary gas chromatograph (GC) by means of an on-column interface. The system was optimised for the determination of the antidepressant trazodone in plasma. The clean-up

  19. Cr(VI) generation during sample preparation of solid samples – A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cr(VI) generation during sample preparation of solid samples – A chromite ore case study. R.I Glastonbury, W van der Merwe, J.P Beukes, P.G van Zyl, G Lachmann, C.J.H Steenkamp, N.F Dawson, M.H Stewart ...

  20. Solid sample atomic absorption spectroscopy in a chemical contaminant monitoring pilot project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.; Schmidt, H.; Dirscherl, C.; Muntau, H.

    1987-09-01

    The Institute for Technology and Hygiene of Food of Animal Origin is developing a practible system of monitoring the distribution of toxic substances in the environment, using the dairy cows as bioindicators. A pilot project has been established to solve basic problems as sampling strategy, sample preparation, analysis and data handling. In the preliminary stage of this study the new technique of SS-AAS turned out to be a useful tool. In order to test overall analytical reliability of the data obtained all analytical procedures applied for the different matrices are controlled by the use of reference material of similar matrix compositions. Results of studies on the distribution of admium and lead are reported; the representativity of small sample amounts of cortical tissue (50-60 mg and 1-2 mg dry mass) has additionally been investigated. Direct analysis of wet tissue aliquots (5-10 mg) was not feasible. A possible method of sample preparation of wet tissue is presented which yields reliable results within 10 min of operation time.

  1. Current trends in sample preparation for cosmetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhixiong; Li, Gongke

    2017-01-01

    The widespread applications of cosmetics in modern life make their analysis particularly important from a safety point of view. There is a wide variety of restricted ingredients and prohibited substances that primarily influence the safety of cosmetics. Sample preparation for cosmetic analysis is a crucial step as the complex matrices may seriously interfere with the determination of target analytes. In this review, some new developments (2010-2016) in sample preparation techniques for cosmetic analysis, including liquid-phase microextraction, solid-phase microextraction, matrix solid-phase dispersion, pressurized liquid extraction, cloud point extraction, ultrasound-assisted extraction, and microwave digestion, are presented. Furthermore, the research and progress in sample preparation techniques and their applications in the separation and purification of allowed ingredients and prohibited substances are reviewed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The Recent Developments in Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhi-Gang; Hu, Jing; Wu, Xi; Xu, Yong-Jiang

    2017-07-04

    Metabolomics is a critical member in systems biology. Although great progress has been achieved in metabolomics, there are still some problems in sample preparation, data processing and data interpretation. In this review, we intend to explore the roles, challenges and trends in sample preparation for mass spectrometry- (MS-) based metabolomics. The newly emerged sample preparation methods were also critically examined, including laser microdissection, in vivo sampling, dried blood spot, microwave, ultrasound and enzyme-assisted extraction, as well as microextraction techniques. Finally, we provide some conclusions and perspectives for sample preparation in MS-based metabolomics.

  3. Soil sample preparation using microwave digestion for uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Preston, Rose; Akbarzadeh, Mansoor; Bakthiar, Steven

    2000-01-01

    A new sample preparation procedure has been developed for digestion of soil samples for uranium analysis. The technique employs a microwave oven digestion system to digest the sample and to prepare it for separation chemistry and analysis. The method significantly reduces the volume of acids used, eliminates a large fraction of acid vapor emissions, and speeds up the analysis time. The samples are analyzed by four separate techniques: Gamma Spectrometry, Alpha Spectroscopy using the open digestion method, Kinetic Phosphorescence Analysis (KPA) using open digestion, and KPA by Microwave digestion technique. The results for various analytical methods are compared and used to confirm the validity of the new procedure. The details of the preparation technique along with its benefits are discussed

  4. 7 CFR 61.34 - Drawing and preparation of sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drawing and preparation of sample. 61.34 Section 61.34 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Cottonseed Samplers § 61.34 Drawing and preparation of sample. Each licensed cottonseed sampler shall draw...

  5. New trends in sample preparation techniques for environmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cláudia; Ribeiro, Ana Rita; Maia, Alexandra S; Gonçalves, Virgínia M F; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Environmental samples include a wide variety of complex matrices, with low concentrations of analytes and presence of several interferences. Sample preparation is a critical step and the main source of uncertainties in the analysis of environmental samples, and it is usually laborious, high cost, time consuming, and polluting. In this context, there is increasing interest in developing faster, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly sample preparation techniques. Recently, new methods have been developed and optimized in order to miniaturize extraction steps, to reduce solvent consumption or become solventless, and to automate systems. This review attempts to present an overview of the fundamentals, procedure, and application of the most recently developed sample preparation techniques for the extraction, cleanup, and concentration of organic pollutants from environmental samples. These techniques include: solid phase microextraction, on-line solid phase extraction, microextraction by packed sorbent, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction, and QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe).

  6. Tooth enamel sample preparation using alkaline treatment in ESR dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yongzeng, Zhou; Jiadong, Wang; Xiaomei, Jia; Ke, Wu; Jianbo, Cong

    2002-01-01

    Tooth enamel sample preparation using alkaline treatment was studied and compared with traditional mechanical method in this paper. 20 adult teeth were used. Samples were placed into NaOH solution. This method requires 4-5 weeks and the enamel was separated from dentin. Experimental results show that 8M NaOH was appropriate for separating enamel from dentin and that there is no difference in background signal relative intensity between samples prepared by mechanical and by chemical methods. There is also no difference in radiosensitivity between samples prepared by two methods mentioned above. Dose response curve for tooth enamel samples isolated by 8M NaOH solution was obtained

  7. Sample preparation for special PIE-techniques at ITU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toscano, E.H.; Manzel, R.

    2002-01-01

    Several sample preparation techniques were developed and installed in hot cells. The techniques were conceived to evaluate the performance of highly burnt fuel rods and include: (a) a device for the removal of the fuel, (b) a method for the preparation of the specimen ends for the welding of new end caps and for the careful cleaning of samples for Transmission Electron Microscopy and Glow Discharge Mass Spectroscopy, (c) a sample pressurisation device for long term creep tests, and (d) a diameter measuring device for creep or burst samples. Examples of the determination of the mechanical properties, the behaviour under transient conditions and for the assessment of the corrosion behaviour of high burnup cladding materials are presented. (author)

  8. High-throughput automated microfluidic sample preparation for accurate microbial genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soohong; De Jonghe, Joachim; Kulesa, Anthony B; Feldman, David; Vatanen, Tommi; Bhattacharyya, Roby P; Berdy, Brittany; Gomez, James; Nolan, Jill; Epstein, Slava; Blainey, Paul C

    2017-01-27

    Low-cost shotgun DNA sequencing is transforming the microbial sciences. Sequencing instruments are so effective that sample preparation is now the key limiting factor. Here, we introduce a microfluidic sample preparation platform that integrates the key steps in cells to sequence library sample preparation for up to 96 samples and reduces DNA input requirements 100-fold while maintaining or improving data quality. The general-purpose microarchitecture we demonstrate supports workflows with arbitrary numbers of reaction and clean-up or capture steps. By reducing the sample quantity requirements, we enabled low-input (∼10,000 cells) whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and soil micro-colonies with superior results. We also leveraged the enhanced throughput to sequence ∼400 clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa libraries and demonstrate excellent single-nucleotide polymorphism detection performance that explained phenotypically observed antibiotic resistance. Fully-integrated lab-on-chip sample preparation overcomes technical barriers to enable broader deployment of genomics across many basic research and translational applications.

  9. Sample preparations for spark source mass spectrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catlett, C.W.; Rollins, M.B.; Griffin, E.B.; Dorsey, J.G.

    1977-10-01

    Methods have been developed for the preparation of various materials for spark source mass spectrography. The essential features of these preparations (all which can provide adequate precision in a cost-effective manner) consist in obtaining spark-stable electrode sample pieces, a common matrix, a reduction of anomolous effects in the spark, the incorporation of a suitable internal standard for plate response normalization, and a reduction in time

  10. Present status of NMCC and sample preparation method for bio-samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatsugawa, S.; Hatakeyama, S.; Saitou, S.; Sera, K.

    1993-01-01

    In NMCC(Nishina Memorial Cyclotron Center) we are doing researches on PET of nuclear medicine (Positron Emission Computed Tomography) and PIXE analysis (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) using a small cyclotron of compactly designed. The NMCC facilities have been opened to researchers of other institutions since April 1993. The present status of NMCC is described. Bio-samples (medical samples, plants, animals and environmental samples) have mainly been analyzed by PIXE in NMCC. Small amounts of bio-samples for PIXE are decomposed quickly and easily in a sealed PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) vessel with a microwave oven. This sample preparation method of bio-samples also is described. (author)

  11. Finding even more anthropogenic indicators in mildly prepared sediment samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Renée; Odgaard, Bent Vad

    2016-01-01

    be worth the effort to prepare the NPP samples with as mild a preparation method as possible. We have mildly prepared NPP samples from a small forest hollow, Tårup Lund, Denmark. From the recovered NPP assemblages we attempt identifying anthropogenic indicators by comparing to the environmental information......NPPs in anthropogenic soils and archaeological samples are often numerous in types as well as in abundance. Preparing these soil samples with methods based on acid digestion holds the potential of severe bias leaving the NPP assemblages devoid of acid vulnerable NPPs. In many cases it might...... derived from sediment, pollen and macrofossil analyses. The sediment from the forest hollow encompasses environmental information from the last 6000 years, including a period of locally intense pastoral and/or agricultural activity during the Iron Age. Keywords: NPP diversity, forest hollow, anthropogenic...

  12. Sampling, storage and sample preparation procedures for X ray fluorescence analysis of environmental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    X ray fluorescence (XRF) method is one of the most commonly used nuclear analytical technique because of its multielement and non-destructive character, speed, economy and ease of operation. From the point of view of quality assurance practices, sampling and sample preparation procedures are the most crucial steps in all analytical techniques, (including X ray fluorescence) applied for the analysis of heterogeneous materials. This technical document covers recent modes of the X ray fluorescence method and recent developments in sample preparation techniques for the analysis of environmental materials. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Influences of different sample preparation methods on tooth enamel ESR signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenyi; Jiao Ling; Zhang Liang'an; Pan Zhihong; Zeng Hongyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the influences of different sample preparation methods on tooth enamel ESR signals in order to reduce the effect of dentine on their sensitivities to radiation. Methods: The enamel was separated from dentine of non-irradiated adult teeth by mechanical, chemical, or both methods. The samples of different preparations were scanned by an ESR spectrometer before and after irradiation. Results: The response of ESR signals of samples prepared with different methods to radiation dose was significantly different. Conclusion: The selection of sample preparation method is very important for dose reconstruction by tooth enamel ESR dosimetry, especially in the low dose range. (authors)

  14. The appliction of project management in operations preparation of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhengrong; Zhang Zhixiong

    2001-01-01

    Concept, history, characteristics of the project management is introduced. Analysis is performed on the suitability of application of project management approach in nuclear power station operations preparation. Then the application of project management is detailed in order to present the readers our study and practice. Theory and practice indicate that the project management is a useful management tool for operations preparation of nuclear power station to achieve a good performance

  15. Global metabolite analysis of yeast: evaluation of sample preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villas-Bôas, Silas Granato; Højer-Pedersen, Jesper; Åkesson, Mats Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    Sample preparation is considered one of the limiting steps in microbial metabolome analysis. Eukaryotes and prokaryotes behave very differently during the several steps of classical sample preparation methods for analysis of metabolites. Even within the eukaryote kingdom there is a vast diversity...

  16. Fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, W. Henry; Dzenitis, John M.; Bennet, William J.; Baker, Brian R.

    2014-08-19

    Herein provided are fluidics platform and method for sample preparation and analysis. The fluidics platform is capable of analyzing DNA from blood samples using amplification assays such as polymerase-chain-reaction assays and loop-mediated-isothermal-amplification assays. The fluidics platform can also be used for other types of assays and analyzes. In some embodiments, a sample in a sealed tube can be inserted directly. The following isolation, detection, and analyzes can be performed without a user's intervention. The disclosed platform may also comprises a sample preparation system with a magnetic actuator, a heater, and an air-drying mechanism, and fluid manipulation processes for extraction, washing, elution, assay assembly, assay detection, and cleaning after reactions and between samples.

  17. Combining Electrochemical Sensors with Miniaturized Sample Preparation for Rapid Detection in Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyakul, Natinan; Baeumner, Antje J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical analyses benefit world-wide from rapid and reliable diagnostics tests. New tests are sought with greatest demand not only for new analytes, but also to reduce costs, complexity and lengthy analysis times of current techniques. Among the myriad of possibilities available today to develop new test systems, amperometric biosensors are prominent players—best represented by the ubiquitous amperometric-based glucose sensors. Electrochemical approaches in general require little and often enough only simple hardware components, are rugged and yet provide low limits of detection. They thus offer many of the desirable attributes for point-of-care/point-of-need tests. This review focuses on investigating the important integration of sample preparation with (primarily electrochemical) biosensors. Sample clean up requirements, miniaturized sample preparation strategies, and their potential integration with sensors will be discussed, focusing on clinical sample analyses. PMID:25558994

  18. The application of project management in operations preparation of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhixiong; Tang Zhengrong

    2000-01-01

    The author first presents a brief introduction of the concept, history, characteristics of project management. Analysis is performed on the suitability of application of project management approach in nuclear power station operations preparation. Then the application of project management is detailed in order to present the readers authors' study and practice. Theory and practice indicate that the project management is a useful management tool for operations preparation of nuclear power station to achieve a good performance

  19. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1998 - FY 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Analytical Services projections are compiled for the Hanford site based on inputs from the major programs for the years 1998 through 2002. Projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and program. Analyses requirements are also presented. This document summarizes the Hanford sample projections for fiscal years 1998 to 2002. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition, details on laboratory scale technology (development) work, Sample Management, and Data Management activities are included. This information will be used by Hanford Analytical Services (HAS) and the Sample Management Working Group (SMWG) to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs

  20. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1998--FY 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1998-02-12

    Analytical Services projections are compiled for the Hanford site based on inputs from the major programs for the years 1998 through 2002. Projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and program. Analyses requirements are also presented. This document summarizes the Hanford sample projections for fiscal years 1998 to 2002. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition, details on laboratory scale technology (development) work, Sample Management, and Data Management activities are included. This information will be used by Hanford Analytical Services (HAS) and the Sample Management Working Group (SMWG) to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs.

  1. Relationship management in preparation for the new engineering projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magomedova Julia Yurievna

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The author reveals the constituent elements of the customer relationship and the Executive in the preparation of a new engineering projects. Relationships are built with a focus on effective risk management in the execution of the project on energy efficiency a major consumer.

  2. Sample preparation techniques in trace element analysis by X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    1983-11-01

    The report, written under a research contract with the IAEA, contains a detailed presentation of the most difficult problem encountered in the trace element analysis by methods of the X-ray emission spectroscopy, namely the sample preparation techniques. The following items are covered. Sampling - with specific consideration of aerosols, water, soil, biological materials, petroleum and its products, storage of samples and their handling. Pretreatment of samples - preconcentration, ashing, solvent extraction, ion exchange and electrodeposition. Sample preparations for PIXE - analysis - backings, target uniformity and homogeneity, effects of irradiation, internal standards and specific examples of preparation (aqueous, biological, blood serum and solid samples). Sample preparations for radioactive sources or tube excitation - with specific examples (water, liquid and solid samples, soil, geological, plants and tissue samples). Finally, the problem of standards and reference materials, as well as that of interlaboratory comparisons, is discussed

  3. Quantitating morphological changes in biological samples during scanning electron microscopy sample preparation with correlative super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Tao; Jorgens, Danielle M; Nickerson, Andrew; Lin, Li-Jung; Pelz, Joshua; Gray, Joe W; López, Claudia S; Nan, Xiaolin

    2017-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical to biological electron microscopy (EM), and there have been continuous efforts on optimizing the procedures to best preserve structures of interest in the sample. However, a quantitative characterization of the morphological changes associated with each step in EM sample preparation is currently lacking. Using correlative EM and superresolution microscopy (SRM), we have examined the effects of different drying methods as well as osmium tetroxide (OsO4) post-fixation on cell morphology during scanning electron microscopy (SEM) sample preparation. Here, SRM images of the sample acquired under hydrated conditions were used as a baseline for evaluating morphological changes as the sample went through SEM sample processing. We found that both chemical drying and critical point drying lead to a mild cellular boundary retraction of ~60 nm. Post-fixation by OsO4 causes at least 40 nm additional boundary retraction. We also found that coating coverslips with adhesion molecules such as fibronectin prior to cell plating helps reduce cell distortion from OsO4 post-fixation. These quantitative measurements offer useful information for identifying causes of cell distortions in SEM sample preparation and improving current procedures.

  4. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites. PMID:26904042

  5. Sample Preparation for Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Plant Tissues: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yonghui; Li, Bin; Malitsky, Sergey; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Kaftan, Filip; Svatoš, Aleš; Franceschi, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a mass spectrometry based molecular ion imaging technique. It provides the means for ascertaining the spatial distribution of a large variety of analytes directly on tissue sample surfaces without any labeling or staining agents. These advantages make it an attractive molecular histology tool in medical, pharmaceutical, and biological research. Likewise, MSI has started gaining popularity in plant sciences; yet, information regarding sample preparation methods for plant tissues is still limited. Sample preparation is a crucial step that is directly associated with the quality and authenticity of the imaging results, it therefore demands in-depth studies based on the characteristics of plant samples. In this review, a sample preparation pipeline is discussed in detail and illustrated through selected practical examples. In particular, special concerns regarding sample preparation for plant imaging are critically evaluated. Finally, the applications of MSI techniques in plants are reviewed according to different classes of plant metabolites.

  6. Legacy sample disposition project. Volume 2: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurley, R.N.; Shifty, K.L.

    1998-02-01

    This report describes the legacy sample disposition project at the Idaho Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), which assessed Site-wide facilities/areas to locate legacy samples and owner organizations and then characterized and dispositioned these samples. This project resulted from an Idaho Department of Environmental Quality inspection of selected areas of the INEEL in January 1996, which identified some samples at the Test Reactor Area and Idaho Chemical Processing Plant that had not been characterized and dispositioned according to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. The objective of the project was to manage legacy samples in accordance with all applicable environmental and safety requirements. A systems engineering approach was used throughout the project, which included collecting the legacy sample information and developing a system for amending and retrieving the information. All legacy samples were dispositioned by the end of 1997. Closure of the legacy sample issue was achieved through these actions

  7. 15N sample preparation for mass spectroscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelin, P.C.O.; Salati, E.; Matsui, E.

    1973-01-01

    Technics for preparing 15 N samples to be analised is presented. Dumas method and oxidation by sodium hypobromite method are described in order to get the appropriate sample. Method to calculate 15 N ratio from mass spectrometry dates is also discussed [pt

  8. Preparation of archaeological samples for its dating by thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia F, D.

    2000-01-01

    The present work shows the results of the preparation of archaeological samples for their dating by thermoluminescence (Tl) using the Fine grain technique established by Zimmerman but with the varying of such preparation was realized in normal daylight conditions, only the taking of the Tl readings were realized in dark room and red light. In the chapter 1 basic concepts are described about: matter constitution, radioactivity, units and radiation magnitudes, and thermoluminescence. In the chapter 2 some theoretical aspects on dating are showed. It is described how realizing the samples collection, the fine grain method, the determination of the accumulated dose through the years or paleodoses (P=Q+I) by mean of the increasing to obtain the dose equivalent dose (Q) and the signal regeneration method to obtain the correction factor by supra linearity (1), the determination of the annual dose rate to apply the age equation and the evaluation of the age uncertainty with the error limits. The development of experimental part with samples from the archaeological site named Edzna in Campeche, Mexico is described in the chapter 3. The results are presented in the chapter 4. It was obtained an age for the sample named CH7 it was obtained an age of 389 ± years. In conclusion the preparation of the archaeological samples for their dating by Tl in the conditions before mentioned is reliable, but they must be realized more studies with samples of well known age, preparing them in normal daylight conditions and simultaneously in dark room with red light. In order to observe how respond the minerals present in the sample at different dose rapidity, the same samples must be radiated with radiation sources with different dose rate. (Author)

  9. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1998 - FY 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Sample projections are compiled for the Hanford site based on inputs from the major programs for the years 1998 through 2002. Sample projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and Program. Analyses requirements are also presented

  10. Sample preparation and EFTEM of Meat Samples for Nanoparticle Analysis in Food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lari, L; Dudkiewicz, A

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles are used in industry for personal care products and the preparation of food. In the latter application, their functions include the prevention of microbes' growth, increase of the foods nutritional value and sensory quality. EU regulations require a risk assessment of the nanoparticles used in foods and food contact materials before the products can reach the market. However, availability of validated analytical methodologies for detection and characterisation of the nanoparticles in food hampers appropriate risk assessment. As part of a research on the evaluation of the methods for screening and quantification of Ag nanoparticles in meat we have tested a new TEM sample preparation alternative to resin embedding and cryo-sectioning. Energy filtered TEM analysis was applied to evaluate thickness and the uniformity of thin meat layers acquired at increasing input of the sample demonstrating that the protocols used ensured good stability under the electron beam, reliable sample concentration and reproducibility

  11. Sample preparation and EFTEM of Meat Samples for Nanoparticle Analysis in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, L.; Dudkiewicz, A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used in industry for personal care products and the preparation of food. In the latter application, their functions include the prevention of microbes' growth, increase of the foods nutritional value and sensory quality. EU regulations require a risk assessment of the nanoparticles used in foods and food contact materials before the products can reach the market. However, availability of validated analytical methodologies for detection and characterisation of the nanoparticles in food hampers appropriate risk assessment. As part of a research on the evaluation of the methods for screening and quantification of Ag nanoparticles in meat we have tested a new TEM sample preparation alternative to resin embedding and cryo-sectioning. Energy filtered TEM analysis was applied to evaluate thickness and the uniformity of thin meat layers acquired at increasing input of the sample demonstrating that the protocols used ensured good stability under the electron beam, reliable sample concentration and reproducibility.

  12. Sample preparation composite and replicate strategy for assay of solid oral drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Brent; Nickerson, Beverly; Guo, Michele Xuemei; Barber, Marc; Giamalva, David; Lee, Carlos; Scrivens, Garry

    2014-12-16

    In pharmaceutical analysis, the results of drug product assay testing are used to make decisions regarding the quality, efficacy, and stability of the drug product. In order to make sound risk-based decisions concerning drug product potency, an understanding of the uncertainty of the reportable assay value is required. Utilizing the most restrictive criteria in current regulatory documentation, a maximum variability attributed to method repeatability is defined for a drug product potency assay. A sampling strategy that reduces the repeatability component of the assay variability below this predefined maximum is demonstrated. The sampling strategy consists of determining the number of dosage units (k) to be prepared in a composite sample of which there may be a number of equivalent replicate (r) sample preparations. The variability, as measured by the standard error (SE), of a potency assay consists of several sources such as sample preparation and dosage unit variability. A sampling scheme that increases the number of sample preparations (r) and/or number of dosage units (k) per sample preparation will reduce the assay variability and thus decrease the uncertainty around decisions made concerning the potency of the drug product. A maximum allowable repeatability component of the standard error (SE) for the potency assay is derived using material in current regulatory documents. A table of solutions for the number of dosage units per sample preparation (r) and number of replicate sample preparations (k) is presented for any ratio of sample preparation and dosage unit variability.

  13. Characterization of solid heterogeneous waste fuel - the effect of sampling and preparation method; Karaktaerisering av fasta inhomogena avfallsbraenslen - inverkan av metoder foer provtagning och provberedning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikstroem-Blomqvist, Evalena; Franke, Jolanta; Johansson, Ingvar

    2007-12-15

    The aim of the project is to evaluate the possibilities to simplify the methods used during sampling and laboratory preparation of heterogeneous waste materials. Existing methods for solid fuel material is summarized and evaluated in the project. As a result of the project two new simplified methods, one for field sampling and one for laboratory preparation work has been suggested. One large challenge regarding waste sampling is to achieve a representative sample due to the considerable heterogeneity of the material. How do you perform a sampling campaign that will give rise to representative results without too large costs? The single largest important source of error is the sampling procedure, equivalent to about 80% of the total error. Meanwhile the sample reduction and laboratory work only represents 15 % and 5 % respectively. Thus, to minimize the total error it is very important that the sampling is well planned in a testing program. In the end a very small analytical sample (1 gram) should reflected a large heterogeneous sample population of 1000 of tons. In this project two sampling campaigns, the fall of 2006 and early winter 2007, were conducted at the waste power plant Renova in Gothenburg, Sweden. The first campaign consisted of three different sample sizes with different number of sub-samples. One reference sample (50 tons and 48 sub-samples), two samples consisting of 16 tons and 8 sub-samples and finally two 4 tons consisting of 2 sub-samples each. During the second sampling campaign, four additional 4 ton samples were taken to repeat and thus evaluate the simplified sampling method. This project concludes that the simplified sampling methods only consisting of two sub-samples and a total sample volume of 4 tons give rise to results with as good quality and precision is the more complicated methods tested. Moreover the results from the two sampling campaigns generated equivalent results. The preparation methods used in the laboratory can as well be

  14. Use of robotic systems for radiochemical sample changing and for analytical sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmastro, J.R.; Hartenstein, S.D.; Wade, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Two uses of the Perkin-Elmer (PE) robotic system will be presented. In the first, a PE robot functions as an automatic sample changer for up to five low energy photon spectrometry (LEPS) detectors operated with a Nuclear Data ND 6700 system. The entire system, including the robot, is controlled by an IBM PC-AT using software written in compiled BASIC. Problems associated with the development of the system and modifications to the robot will be presented. In the second, an evaluation study was performed to assess the abilities of the PE robotic system for performing complex analytical sample preparation procedures. For this study, a robotic system based upon the PE robot and auxiliary devices was constructed and programmed to perform the preparation of final product samples (UO 3 ) for accountability and impurity specification analyses. These procedures require sample dissolution, dilution, and liquid-liquid extraction steps. The results of an in-depth evaluation of all system components will be presented

  15. Sample preparation of energy materials for X-ray nanotomography with micromanipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Camino, Fernando E; Wang, Jun

    2014-06-06

    X-ray nanotomography presents an unprecedented opportunity to study energy storage/conversion materials at nanometer scales in three dimensions, with both elemental and chemical sensitivity. A critical step in obtaining high-quality X-ray nanotomography data is reliable sample preparation to ensure that the entire sample fits within the field of view of the X-ray microscope. Although focused-ion-beam lift-out has previously been used for large sample (few to tens of microns) preparation, a difficult undercut and lift-out procedure results in a time-consuming sample preparation process. Herein, we propose a much simpler and direct sample preparation method to resolve the issues that block the view of the sample base after milling and during the lift-out process. This method is applied on a solid-oxide fuel cell and a lithium-ion battery electrode, before numerous critical 3D morphological parameters are extracted, which are highly relevant to their electrochemical performance. A broad application of this method for microstructure study with X-ray nanotomography is discussed and presented. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Sample preparation optimization in fecal metabolic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deda, Olga; Chatziioannou, Anastasia Chrysovalantou; Fasoula, Stella; Palachanis, Dimitris; Raikos, Νicolaos; Theodoridis, Georgios A; Gika, Helen G

    2017-03-15

    Metabolomic analysis of feces can provide useful insight on the metabolic status, the health/disease state of the human/animal and the symbiosis with the gut microbiome. As a result, recently there is increased interest on the application of holistic analysis of feces for biomarker discovery. For metabolomics applications, the sample preparation process used prior to the analysis of fecal samples is of high importance, as it greatly affects the obtained metabolic profile, especially since feces, as matrix are diversifying in their physicochemical characteristics and molecular content. However there is still little information in the literature and lack of a universal approach on sample treatment for fecal metabolic profiling. The scope of the present work was to study the conditions for sample preparation of rat feces with the ultimate goal of the acquisition of comprehensive metabolic profiles either untargeted by NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS or targeted by HILIC-MS/MS. A fecal sample pooled from male and female Wistar rats was extracted under various conditions by modifying the pH value, the nature of the organic solvent and the sample weight to solvent volume ratio. It was found that the 1/2 (w f /v s ) ratio provided the highest number of metabolites under neutral and basic conditions in both untargeted profiling techniques. Concerning LC-MS profiles, neutral acetonitrile and propanol provided higher signals and wide metabolite coverage, though extraction efficiency is metabolite dependent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of sample preparation procedures on metal(loid) fractionation patterns in lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroukamp, E M; Godeto, T W; Forbes, P B C

    2017-08-13

    The effects of different sample preparation strategies and storage on metal(loid) fractionation trends in plant material is largely underresearched. In this study, a bulk sample of lichen Parmotrema austrosinense (Zahlbr.) Hale was analysed for its total extractable metal(loid) content by ICP-MS, and was determined to be adequately homogenous (sample were prepared utilising a range of sample preservation techniques and subjected to a modified sequential extraction procedure or to total metal extraction. Both experiments were repeated after 1-month storage at 4 °C. Cryogenic freezing gave the best reproducibility for total extractable elemental concentrations between months, indicating this to be the most suitable method of sample preparation in such studies. The combined extraction efficiencies were >82% for As, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sr and Zn but poor for other elements, where sample preparation strategies 'no sample preparation' and 'dried in a desiccator' had the best extraction recoveries. Cryogenic freezing procedures had a significantly (p sample cleaning and preservation when species fractionation patterns are of interest. This study also shows that the assumption that species stability can be ensured through cryopreservation and freeze drying techniques needs to be revisited.

  18. Field Sample Preparation Method Development for Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibman, C.; Weisbrod, K.; Yoshida, T.

    2015-01-01

    Non-proliferation and International Security (NA-241) established a working group of researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to evaluate the utilization of in-field mass spectrometry for safeguards applications. The survey of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) mass spectrometers (MS) revealed no instrumentation existed capable of meeting all the potential safeguards requirements for performance, portability, and ease of use. Additionally, fieldable instruments are unlikely to meet the International Target Values (ITVs) for accuracy and precision for isotope ratio measurements achieved with laboratory methods. The major gaps identified for in-field actinide isotope ratio analysis were in the areas of: 1. sample preparation and/or sample introduction, 2. size reduction of mass analyzers and ionization sources, 3. system automation, and 4. decreased system cost. Development work in 2 through 4, numerated above continues, in the private and public sector. LANL is focusing on developing sample preparation/sample introduction methods for use with the different sample types anticipated for safeguard applications. Addressing sample handling and sample preparation methods for MS analysis will enable use of new MS instrumentation as it becomes commercially available. As one example, we have developed a rapid, sample preparation method for dissolution of uranium and plutonium oxides using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). ABF is a significantly safer and faster alternative to digestion with boiling combinations of highly concentrated mineral acids. Actinides digested with ABF yield fluorides, which can then be analyzed directly or chemically converted and separated using established column chromatography techniques as needed prior to isotope analysis. The reagent volumes and the sample processing steps associated with ABF sample digestion lend themselves to automation and field

  19. Choice and preparation of standard samples for X-ray spectral microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilenko, I.S.; Surzhko, V.F.

    1989-01-01

    Choice, preparation and certification of standard samples for X-ray spectral microanalysis are considered. Requirements for standard samples in terms of concentration and volume, porosity, corrosion, conductivity distribution are formulated. Stages of sample preparation process, including composition choice, heat treatment, section production, certification, are considered in detail. The choice of composition is based on studying phase equilibrium diagrams, subdivided into 6 types

  20. Novel strategies for sample preparation in forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanidou, Victoria; Kovatsi, Leda; Fragou, Domniki; Rentifis, Konstantinos

    2011-09-01

    This paper provides a review of novel strategies for sample preparation in forensic toxicology. The review initially outlines the principle of each technique, followed by sections addressing each class of abused drugs separately. The novel strategies currently reviewed focus on the preparation of various biological samples for the subsequent determination of opiates, benzodiazepines, amphetamines, cocaine, hallucinogens, tricyclic antidepressants, antipsychotics and cannabinoids. According to our experience, these analytes are the most frequently responsible for intoxications in Greece. The applications of techniques such as disposable pipette extraction, microextraction by packed sorbent, matrix solid-phase dispersion, solid-phase microextraction, polymer monolith microextraction, stir bar sorptive extraction and others, which are rapidly gaining acceptance in the field of toxicology, are currently reviewed.

  1. TEM sample preparation by FIB for carbon nanotube interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke, Xiaoxing; Bals, Sara; Romo Negreira, Ainhoa; Hantschel, Thomas; Bender, Hugo; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2009-01-01

    A powerful method to study carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown in patterned substrates for potential interconnects applications is transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, high-quality TEM samples are necessary for such a study. Here, TEM specimen preparation by focused ion beam (FIB) has been used to obtain lamellae of patterned samples containing CNTs grown inside contact holes. A dual-cap Pt protection layer and an extensive 5 kV cleaning procedure are applied in order to preserve the CNTs and avoid deterioration during milling. TEM results show that the inner shell structure of the carbon nanotubes has been preserved, which proves that focused ion beam is a useful technique to prepare TEM samples of CNT interconnects.

  2. TEM sample preparation by FIB for carbon nanotube interconnects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Xiaoxing, E-mail: xiaoxing.ke@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Bals, Sara [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Romo Negreira, Ainhoa [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Metallurgy and Materials Engineering Department, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, Leuven B-3001 (Belgium); Hantschel, Thomas; Bender, Hugo [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2009-10-15

    A powerful method to study carbon nanotubes (CNTs) grown in patterned substrates for potential interconnects applications is transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, high-quality TEM samples are necessary for such a study. Here, TEM specimen preparation by focused ion beam (FIB) has been used to obtain lamellae of patterned samples containing CNTs grown inside contact holes. A dual-cap Pt protection layer and an extensive 5 kV cleaning procedure are applied in order to preserve the CNTs and avoid deterioration during milling. TEM results show that the inner shell structure of the carbon nanotubes has been preserved, which proves that focused ion beam is a useful technique to prepare TEM samples of CNT interconnects.

  3. Supporting Sampling and Sample Preparation Tools for Isotope and Nuclear Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear and related techniques can help develop climate-smart agricultural practices by optimizing water and nutrient use efficiency, assessing organic carbon sequestration in soil, and assisting in the evaluation of soil erosion control measures. Knowledge on the behaviour of radioactive materials in soil, water and foodstuffs is also essential in enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response. Appropriate sampling and sample preparation are the first steps to ensure the quality and effective use of the measurements and this publication provides comprehensive detail on the necessary steps

  4. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-08-22

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  5. Development of sample preparation method for honey analysis using PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Katsumi; Chiba, Keiko; Sera, Koichiro

    2008-01-01

    We developed an original preparation method for honey samples (samples in paste-like state) specifically designed for PIXE analysis. The results of PIXE analysis of thin targets prepared by adding a standard containing nine elements to honey samples demonstrated that the preparation method bestowed sufficient accuracy on quantitative values. PIXE analysis of 13 kinds of honey was performed, and eight mineral components (Si, P, S, K, Ca, Mn, Cu and Zn) were detected in all honey samples. The principal mineral components were K and Ca, and the quantitative value for K accounted for the majority of the total value for mineral components. K content in honey varies greatly depending on the plant source. Chestnuts had the highest K content. In fact, it was 2-3 times that of Manuka, which is known as a high quality honey. K content of false-acacia, which is produced in the greatest abundance, was 1/20 that of chestnuts. (author)

  6. Witness sample preparation for measuring antireflection coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Ronald R

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of antireflection coating of witness samples from across the worldwide industry has been shown to have excess variability from a sampling taken for the OSA Topical Meeting on Optical Interference Coatings: Measurement Problem. Various sample preparation techniques have been discussed with their limitations, and a preferred technique is recommended with its justification, calibration procedures, and limitations. The common practice of grinding the second side to reduce its reflection is less than satisfactory. One recommended practice is to paint the polished second side, which reduces its reflection to almost zero. A method to evaluate the suitability of given paints is also described.

  7. Sample preparation method for scanning force microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Jankov, I R; Szente, R N; Carreno, M N P; Swart, J W; Landers, R

    2001-01-01

    We present a method of sample preparation for studies of ion implantation on metal surfaces. The method, employing a mechanical mask, is specially adapted for samples analysed by Scanning Force Microscopy. It was successfully tested on polycrystalline copper substrates implanted with phosphorus ions at an acceleration voltage of 39 keV. The changes of the electrical properties of the surface were measured by Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy and the surface composition was analysed by Auger Electron Spectroscopy.

  8. Sample preparation techniques of biological material for isotope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axmann, H.; Sebastianelli, A.; Arrillaga, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Sample preparation is an essential step in all isotope-aided experiments but often it is not given enough attention. The methods of sample preparation are very important to obtain reliable and precise analytical data and for further interpretation of results. The size of a sample required for chemical analysis is usually very small (10mg-1500mg). On the other hand the amount of harvested plant material from plots in a field experiment is often bulky (several kilograms) and the entire sample is too large for processing. In addition, while approaching maturity many crops show not only differences in physical consistency but also a non-uniformity in 15 N content among plant parts, requiring a plant fractionation or separation into parts (vegetative and reproductive) e.g. shoots and spikes, in case of small grain cereals, shoots and pods in case of grain legumes and tops and roots or beets (including crown) in case of sugar beet, etc. In any case the ultimate goal of these procedures is to obtain representative subsample harvested from greenhouse or field experiments for chemical analysis. Before harvesting an isotopic-aided experiment the method of sampling has to be selected. It should be based on the type of information required in relation to the objectives of the research and the availability of resources (staff, sample preparation equipment, analytical facilities, chemicals and supplies, etc.). 10 refs, 3 figs, 3 tabs

  9. [Progress in sample preparation and analytical methods for trace polar small molecules in complex samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianchun; Luo, Xialin; Li, Gongke; Xiao, Xiaohua

    2015-09-01

    Small polar molecules such as nucleosides, amines, amino acids are important analytes in biological, food, environmental, and other fields. It is necessary to develop efficient sample preparation and sensitive analytical methods for rapid analysis of these polar small molecules in complex matrices. Some typical materials in sample preparation, including silica, polymer, carbon, boric acid and so on, are introduced in this paper. Meanwhile, the applications and developments of analytical methods of polar small molecules, such as reversed-phase liquid chromatography, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, etc., are also reviewed.

  10. Considerations for Sample Preparation Using Size-Exclusion Chromatography for Home and Synchrotron Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambo, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    The success of a SAXS experiment for structural investigations depends on two precise measurements, the sample and the buffer background. Buffer matching between the sample and background can be achieved using dialysis methods but in biological SAXS of monodisperse systems, sample preparation is routinely being performed with size exclusion chromatography (SEC). SEC is the most reliable method for SAXS sample preparation as the method not only purifies the sample for SAXS but also almost guarantees ideal buffer matching. Here, I will highlight the use of SEC for SAXS sample preparation and demonstrate using example proteins that SEC purification does not always provide for ideal samples. Scrutiny of the SEC elution peak using quasi-elastic and multi-angle light scattering techniques can reveal hidden features (heterogeneity) of the sample that should be considered during SAXS data analysis. In some cases, sample heterogeneity can be controlled using a small molecule additive and I outline a simple additive screening method for sample preparation.

  11. A Method for Microalgae Proteomics Analysis Based on Modified Filter-Aided Sample Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Cao, Xupeng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhen; Zhang, Haowei; Xue, Song; Tian, Jing

    2017-11-01

    With the fast development of microalgal biofuel researches, the proteomics studies of microalgae increased quickly. A filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) method is widely used proteomics sample preparation method since 2009. Here, a method of microalgae proteomics analysis based on modified filter-aided sample preparation (mFASP) was described to meet the characteristics of microalgae cells and eliminate the error caused by over-alkylation. Using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as the model, the prepared sample was tested by standard LC-MS/MS and compared with the previous reports. The results showed mFASP is suitable for most of occasions of microalgae proteomics studies.

  12. Best practices for preparing vessel internals segmentation projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, Joseph; Segerud, Per; Sanchez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    Westinghouse has been involved in reactor internals segmentation activities in the U.S. and Europe for 30 years. Westinghouse completed in 2015 the segmentation of the reactor vessel and reactor vessel internals at the Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant in Spain and a similar project is on-going at Chooz A in France. For all reactor dismantling projects, it is essential that all activities are thoroughly planned and discussed up-front together with the customer. Detailed planning is crucial for achieving a successful project. One key activity in the preparation phase is the 'Segmentation and Packaging Plan' that documents the sequential steps required to segment, separate, and package each individual component, based on an activation analysis and component characterization study. Detailed procedures and specialized rigging equipment have to be developed to provide safeguards for preventing certain identified risks. The preparatory work can include some plant civil structure modifications for making the segmentation work easier and safer. Some original plant equipment is sometimes not suitable enough and need to be replaced. Before going to the site, testing and qualification are performed on full scale mock-ups in a specially designed pool for segmentation purposes. The mockup testing is an important step in order to verify the function of the equipment and minimize risk on site. This paper is describing the typical activities needed for preparing the reactor internals segmentation activities using under water mechanical cutting techniques. It provides experiences and lessons learned that Westinghouse has collected from its recent projects and that will be applied for the new awarded projects. (authors)

  13. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hernandez-Valladares

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC. We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  14. Final Report for X-ray Diffraction Sample Preparation Method Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ely, T. M. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Meznarich, H. K. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Valero, T. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-30

    WRPS-1500790, “X-ray Diffraction Saltcake Sample Preparation Method Development Plan/Procedure,” was originally prepared with the intent of improving the specimen preparation methodology used to generate saltcake specimens suitable for XRD-based solid phase characterization. At the time that this test plan document was originally developed, packed powder in cavity supports with collodion binder was the established XRD specimen preparation method. An alternate specimen preparation method less vulnerable, if not completely invulnerable to preferred orientation effects, was desired as a replacement for the method.

  15. HyLights: Preparation of the Large-Scale Demonstration Projects on Hydrogen for Transport in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrich Bunger; Volker Blandow; Volker Jaensch; Harm Jeeninga; Cristina Morte Gomez

    2006-01-01

    The strategically important project HyLights has been launched by the European Commission in preparation of the large scale demonstration projects in transition to hydrogen as a fuel and long-term renewable energy carrier. HyLights, monitors concluded/ongoing demonstration projects and assists the planning of the next demonstration project phase, putting a clear focus on hydrogen in transport. HyLights is a coordination action that comprises 5 tasks to: 1) develop an assessment framework for concluded/ongoing demonstration projects, 2) analyse individual projects and establish a project database, 3) carry out a gaps analysis and prepare a requirement profile for the next stage projects, 4) assess and identify necessary financial and legal steps in preparation of the new projects, and 5) develop a European Initiative for the Growth of Hydrogen for Transport (EIGHT). (authors)

  16. Protocol for Cohesionless Sample Preparation for Physical Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Standard test method for consolidated drained triaxial compression test for soils . In Annual book of ASTM standards. West Conshohocken, PA: ASTM...derived wherein uncertainties and laboratory scatter associated with soil fabric-behavior variance during sample preparation are mitigated. Samples of...wherein comparable analysis between different laboratory tests’ results can be made by ensuring a comparable soil fabric prior to laboratory testing

  17. Sample Preparation (SS): SE51_SS01 [Metabolonote[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e Master NEO, BMS, Tokyo, Japan), and the seed powder was extracted with 1 mL of extraction buffer (0.1% HCO...trifugation (4 ℃, 10,000 rpm, 5 min), the sample tubes were subjected to sample preparation (buffer transfer

  18. Challenges in TEM sample preparation of solvothermally grown CuInS2 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Anna; Changizi, Rasa; Scheu, Christina

    2018-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a widely used tool to characterize materials. The required samples need to be electron transparent which should be achieved without changing the microstructure. This work describes different TEM sample preparation techniques of nanostructured CuInS 2 thin films on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrates, synthesized solvothermally using l-cysteine as sulfur source. Focused ion beam lamellae, conventional cross section samples and scratch samples have been prepared and investigated. It was possible to prepare appropriate samples with each technique, however, each technique brings with it certain advantages and disadvantages. FIB preparation of solvothermally synthesized CuInS 2 suffers from two main drawbacks. First, the whole CuInS 2 layer displays a strongly increased Cu content caused by Cu migration and preferential removal of In. Further, electron diffraction shows the formation of an additional CuS phase after Ga + bombardment. Second, diffraction analysis is complicated by a strong contribution of crystalline Pt introduced during the FIB preparation and penetrating into the porous film surface. The conventional cross sectional CuInS 2 sample also shows a Cu signal enhancement which is caused by contribution of the brass tube material used for embedding. Additionally, Cu particles have been observed inside the CuInS 2 which have been sputtered on the film during preparation. Only the scratch samples allow an almost artefact-free and reliable elemental quantification using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. However, scratch samples suffer from the drawback that it is not possible to determine the layer thickness, which is possible for both cross sectional preparation techniques. Consequently, it is concluded that the type of sample preparation should be chosen dependent on the required information. A full characterization can only be achieved when the different techniques are combined. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Automated SEM and TEM sample preparation applied to copper/low k materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Shaapur, F.; Griffiths, D.; Diebold, A. C.; Foran, B.; Raz, E.

    2001-01-01

    We describe the use of automated microcleaving for preparation of both SEM and TEM samples as done by SELA's new MC500 and TEMstation tools. The MC500 is an automated microcleaving tool that is capable of producing cleaves with 0.25 μm accuracy resulting in SEM-ready samples. The TEMstation is capable of taking a sample output from the MC500 (or from SELA's earlier MC200 tool) and producing a FIB ready slice of 25±5 μm, mounted on a TEM-washer and ready for FIB thinning to electron transparency for TEM analysis. The materials selected for the tool set evaluation mainly included the Cu/TaN/HOSP low-k system. The paper is divided into three sections, experimental approach, SEM preparation and analysis of HOSP low-k, and TEM preparation and analysis of Cu/TaN/HOSP low-k samples. For the samples discussed, data is presented to show the quality of preparation provided by these new automated tools.

  20. Polymeric ionic liquid-based portable tip microextraction device for on-site sample preparation of water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Pei, Junxian; Huang, Xiaojia; Lu, Min

    2018-06-05

    On-site sample preparation is highly desired because it avoids the transportation of large-volume samples and ensures the accuracy of the analytical results. In this work, a portable prototype of tip microextraction device (TMD) was designed and developed for on-site sample pretreatment. The assembly procedure of TMD is quite simple. Firstly, polymeric ionic liquid (PIL)-based adsorbent was in-situ prepared in a pipette tip. After that, the tip was connected with a syringe which was driven by a bidirectional motor. The flow rates in adsorption and desorption steps were controlled accurately by the motor. To evaluate the practicability of the developed device, the TMD was used to on-site sample preparation of waters and combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection to measure trace estrogens in water samples. Under the most favorable conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) for the target analytes were in the range of 4.9-22 ng/L, with good coefficients of determination. Confirmatory study well evidences that the extraction performance of TMD is comparable to that of the traditional laboratory solid-phase extraction process, but the proposed TMD is more simple and convenient. At the same time, the TMD avoids complicated sampling and transferring steps of large-volume water samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimization of Sample Preparation processes of Bone Material for Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikhani, Madelen; Wuhrer, Richard; Green, Hayley

    2018-03-30

    Raman spectroscopy has recently been investigated for use in the calculation of postmortem interval from skeletal material. The fluorescence generated by samples, which affects the interpretation of Raman data, is a major limitation. This study compares the effectiveness of two sample preparation techniques, chemical bleaching and scraping, in the reduction of fluorescence from bone samples during testing with Raman spectroscopy. Visual assessment of Raman spectra obtained at 1064 nm excitation following the preparation protocols indicates an overall reduction in fluorescence. Results demonstrate that scraping is more effective at resolving fluorescence than chemical bleaching. The scraping of skeletonized remains prior to Raman analysis is a less destructive method and allows for the preservation of a bone sample in a state closest to its original form, which is beneficial in forensic investigations. It is recommended that bone scraping supersedes chemical bleaching as the preferred method for sample preparation prior to Raman spectroscopy. © 2018 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  2. Magnetic separation techniques in sample preparation for biological analysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jincan; Huang, Meiying; Wang, Dongmei; Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke

    2014-12-01

    Sample preparation is a fundamental and essential step in almost all the analytical procedures, especially for the analysis of complex samples like biological and environmental samples. In past decades, with advantages of superparamagnetic property, good biocompatibility and high binding capacity, functionalized magnetic materials have been widely applied in various processes of sample preparation for biological analysis. In this paper, the recent advancements of magnetic separation techniques based on magnetic materials in the field of sample preparation for biological analysis were reviewed. The strategy of magnetic separation techniques was summarized. The synthesis, stabilization and bio-functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles were reviewed in detail. Characterization of magnetic materials was also summarized. Moreover, the applications of magnetic separation techniques for the enrichment of protein, nucleic acid, cell, bioactive compound and immobilization of enzyme were described. Finally, the existed problems and possible trends of magnetic separation techniques for biological analysis in the future were proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. State of the art in sample preparation for trace element analysis (M1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The accelerated capabilities of modern trace element analysis techniques, especially inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), have challenged the sample preparation competence of most laboratories. Exceptional analytical sensitivity, remarkable analysis speed, automated sample presentation, and intelligent sample sequencing of modern spectroscopic instrumentation have lead to demanding requirements for appropriate sample preparation steps needed for ultra trace concentration and speciation measurements. Contamination control, reliable digestion and extraction techniques, presentation of chemical forms, sample matrix management, and intelligent sample processing available today are often inadequate for the most demanding measurements. Some commercial instrumentation provides convenient implementation of well-established contamination control measures, and reagent and container purity are steadily being improved. Direct sample introduction approaches offer alternatives to conventional solution samples, but achieving calibration reliability is difficult. Developing new sample preparation chemistry is especially arduous and rare, yet progress exists in characterizing microwave-assisted reactions. This presentation will describe contemporary targets for modern sample preparation approaches for ultra trace elemental analysis and the likelihood that they can be reasonably achieved. (author)

  4. The effect of sample preparation methods on glass performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, M.S.; Oversby, V.M.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted using SRL 165 synthetic waste glass to investigate the effects of surface preparation and leaching solution composition on the alteration of the glass. Samples of glass with as-cast surfaces produced smooth reaction layers and some evidence for precipitation of secondary phases from solution. Secondary phases were more abundant in samples reacted in deionized water than for those reacted in a silicate solution. Samples with saw-cut surfaces showed a large reduction in surface roughness after 7 days of reaction in either solution. Reaction in silicate solution for up to 91 days produced no further change in surface morphology, while reaction in DIW produced a spongy surface that formed the substrate for further surface layer development. The differences in the surface morphology of the samples may create microclimates that control the details of development of alteration layers on the glass; however, the concentrations of elements in leaching solutions show differences of 50% or less between samples prepared with different surface conditions for tests of a few months duration. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  5. Preparation of Cytology Samples: Tricks of the Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A Russell

    2017-01-01

    General principles and techniques for collection, preparation, and staining of cytologic samples in the general practice setting are reviewed. Tips for collection of digital images are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sample preparation procedures utilized in microbial metabolomics: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patejko, Małgorzata; Jacyna, Julia; Markuszewski, Michał J

    2017-02-01

    Bacteria are remarkably diverse in terms of their size, structure and biochemical properties. Due to this fact, it is hard to develop a universal method for handling bacteria cultures during metabolomic analysis. The choice of suitable processing methods constitutes a key element in any analysis, because only appropriate selection of procedures may provide accurate results, leading to reliable conclusions. Because of that, every analytical experiment concerning bacteria requires individually and very carefully planned research methodology. Although every study varies in terms of sample preparation, there are few general steps to follow while planning experiment, like sampling, separation of cells from growth medium, stopping their metabolism and extraction. As a result of extraction, all intracellular metabolites should be washed out from cell environment. What is more, extraction method utilized cannot cause any chemical decomposition or degradation of the metabolome. Furthermore, chosen extraction method should correlate with analytical technique, so it will not disturb or prolong following sample preparation steps. For those reasons, we observe a need to summarize sample preparation procedures currently utilized in microbial metabolomic studies. In the presented overview, papers concerning analysis of extra- and intracellular metabolites, published over the last decade, have been discussed. Presented work gives some basic guidelines that might be useful while planning experiments in microbial metabolomics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sample preparation techniques for (p, X) spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitehead, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    Samples are ashed at low temperature, using oxygen plasma; a rotary evaporator, and freeze drying speeded up the ashing. The new design of apparatus manufactured was only 10 watt but was as efficient as a 200 watt commercial machine; a circuit diagram is included. Samples of hair and biopsy samples of skin were analysed by the technique. A wool standard was prepared for interlaboratory comparison exercises. It was based on New Zealand merino sheep wool and was 2.9 kg in weight. A washing protocol was developed, which preserves most of the trace element content. The wool was ground in liquid nitrogen using a plastic pestle and beaker, driven by a rotary drill press. (author)

  8. Optimizing Frozen Sample Preparation for Laser Microdissection: Assessment of CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena G Golubeva

    Full Text Available Laser microdissection is an invaluable tool in medical research that facilitates collecting specific cell populations for molecular analysis. Diversity of research targets (e.g., cancerous and precancerous lesions in clinical and animal research, cell pellets, rodent embryos, etc. and varied scientific objectives, however, present challenges toward establishing standard laser microdissection protocols. Sample preparation is crucial for quality RNA, DNA and protein retrieval, where it often determines the feasibility of a laser microdissection project. The majority of microdissection studies in clinical and animal model research are conducted on frozen tissues containing native nucleic acids, unmodified by fixation. However, the variable morphological quality of frozen sections from tissues containing fat, collagen or delicate cell structures can limit or prevent successful harvest of the desired cell population via laser dissection. The CryoJane Tape-Transfer System®, a commercial device that improves cryosectioning outcomes on glass slides has been reported superior for slide preparation and isolation of high quality osteocyte RNA (frozen bone during laser dissection. Considering the reported advantages of CryoJane for laser dissection on glass slides, we asked whether the system could also work with the plastic membrane slides used by UV laser based microdissection instruments, as these are better suited for collection of larger target areas. In an attempt to optimize laser microdissection slide preparation for tissues of different RNA stability and cryosectioning difficulty, we evaluated the CryoJane system for use with both glass (laser capture microdissection and membrane (laser cutting microdissection slides. We have established a sample preparation protocol for glass and membrane slides including manual coating of membrane slides with CryoJane solutions, cryosectioning, slide staining and dissection procedure, lysis and RNA extraction

  9. Traceability and measurement uncertainty in sample preparation (W5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegscheider, W.; Walner, U.; Moser, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Very few chemical measurements are being made directly on the object of interest and sample preparation is thus the rule rather than the exception in daily practice. Unfortunately the operations undertaken in the course of sample preparation are prone to rendering a sample useless for the purpose of interpreting a measurement performed on it, as it might not represent the original and relevant status any longer. Sample preparation along with sampling itself constitutes therefore a procedure that leads to a loss of representation of the original specimen or population. On the other hand it is also not sufficient to confine aspects of traceability and measurement uncertainty to the ultimate measurement, as the key purpose of measuring is to supply adequate data for some kind of decision, be it in production, in health, in the environment, or indeed in any other circumstance. These considerations have led to severe confusion in the community as to what traceability really means in chemistry. CITAC and EURACHEM have only recently issued a preliminary document that clarifies these issues and gives a firm handle on the future development of quality assurance in analytical chemistry. In this talk it will be attempted to outline the general ideas and procedures that lead to traceability of analytical chemical results accompanied by valid statements of their uncertainty. It will be argued that the central element in achieving these goals is a well-designed validation study that frequently goes beyond those requirements currently laid out in official documents. (author)

  10. Mechanical Conversion for High-Throughput TEM Sample Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendrick, Anthony B; Moore, Thomas M; Zaykova-Feldman, Lyudmila

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method of direct mechanical conversion from lift-out sample to TEM sample holder. The lift-out sample is prepared in the FIB using the in-situ liftout Total Release TM method. The mechanical conversion is conducted using a mechanical press and one of a variety of TEM coupons, including coupons for both top-side and back-side thinning. The press joins a probe tip point with attached TEM sample to the sample coupon and separates the complete assembly as a 3mm diameter TEM grid, compatible with commercially available TEM sample holder rods. This mechanical conversion process lends itself well to the high through-put requirements of in-line process control and to materials characterization labs where instrument utilization and sample security are critically important

  11. 40 CFR 205.171-2 - Test exhaust system sample selection and preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Systems § 205.171-2 Test exhaust system sample selection and preparation. (a)(1) Exhaust systems... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test exhaust system sample selection and preparation. 205.171-2 Section 205.171-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  12. Droplet Size-Aware and Error-Correcting Sample Preparation Using Micro-Electrode-Dot-Array Digital Microfluidic Biochips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zipeng; Lai, Kelvin Yi-Tse; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu; Ho, Tsung-Yi; Lee, Chen-Yi

    2017-12-01

    Sample preparation in digital microfluidics refers to the generation of droplets with target concentrations for on-chip biochemical applications. In recent years, digital microfluidic biochips (DMFBs) have been adopted as a platform for sample preparation. However, there remain two major problems associated with sample preparation on a conventional DMFB. First, only a (1:1) mixing/splitting model can be used, leading to an increase in the number of fluidic operations required for sample preparation. Second, only a limited number of sensors can be integrated on a conventional DMFB; as a result, the latency for error detection during sample preparation is significant. To overcome these drawbacks, we adopt a next generation DMFB platform, referred to as micro-electrode-dot-array (MEDA), for sample preparation. We propose the first sample-preparation method that exploits the MEDA-specific advantages of fine-grained control of droplet sizes and real-time droplet sensing. Experimental demonstration using a fabricated MEDA biochip and simulation results highlight the effectiveness of the proposed sample-preparation method.

  13. Preparation for Instruction. A Module of Instruction in Teacher Education. Prepared for Project RAFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Herbert M., Ed.

    This module, developed by the Research Applications for Teaching (RAFT) project, was written to assist students to write lesson plans that are effective and interactive. Students are given directions for the preparation of behavioral objectives and for the selection of appropriate instructional methodologies to meet the widely varying needs of…

  14. Automated Blood Sample Preparation Unit (ABSPU) for Portable Microfluidic Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Akhil; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2017-02-01

    Portable microfluidic diagnostic devices, including flow cytometers, are being developed for point-of-care settings, especially in conjunction with inexpensive imaging devices such as mobile phone cameras. However, two pervasive drawbacks of these have been the lack of automated sample preparation processes and cells settling out of sample suspensions, leading to inaccurate results. We report an automated blood sample preparation unit (ABSPU) to prevent blood samples from settling in a reservoir during loading of samples in flow cytometers. This apparatus automates the preanalytical steps of dilution and staining of blood cells prior to microfluidic loading. It employs an assembly with a miniature vibration motor to drive turbulence in a sample reservoir. To validate performance of this system, we present experimental evidence demonstrating prevention of blood cell settling, cell integrity, and staining of cells prior to flow cytometric analysis. This setup is further integrated with a microfluidic imaging flow cytometer to investigate cell count variability. With no need for prior sample preparation, a drop of whole blood can be directly introduced to the setup without premixing with buffers manually. Our results show that integration of this assembly with microfluidic analysis provides a competent automation tool for low-cost point-of-care blood-based diagnostics.

  15. Error Analysis of Ceramographic Sample Preparation for Coating Thickness Measurement of Coated Fuel Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaoxue; Li Ziqiang; Zhao Hongsheng; Zhang Kaihong; Tang Chunhe

    2014-01-01

    The thicknesses of four coatings of HTR coated fuel particle are very important parameters. It is indispensable to control the thickness of four coatings of coated fuel particles for the safety of HTR. A measurement method, ceramographic sample-microanalysis method, to analyze the thickness of coatings was developed. During the process of ceramographic sample-microanalysis, there are two main errors, including ceramographic sample preparation error and thickness measurement error. With the development of microscopic techniques, thickness measurement error can be easily controlled to meet the design requirements. While, due to the coated particles are spherical particles of different diameters ranged from 850 to 1000μm, the sample preparation process will introduce an error. And this error is different from one sample to another. It’s also different from one particle to another in the same sample. In this article, the error of the ceramographic sample preparation was calculated and analyzed. Results show that the error introduced by sample preparation is minor. The minor error of sample preparation guarantees the high accuracy of the mentioned method, which indicates this method is a proper method to measure the thickness of four coatings of coated particles. (author)

  16. Miniaturizing EM Sample Preparation: Opportunities, Challenges, and "Visual Proteomics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Stefan A; Müller, Shirley A; Schmidli, Claudio; Syntychaki, Anastasia; Rima, Luca; Chami, Mohamed; Stahlberg, Henning; Goldie, Kenneth N; Braun, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    This review compares and discusses conventional versus miniaturized specimen preparation methods for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The progress brought by direct electron detector cameras, software developments and automation have transformed transmission cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and made it an invaluable high-resolution structural analysis tool. In contrast, EM specimen preparation has seen very little progress in the last decades and is now one of the main bottlenecks in cryo-EM. Here, we discuss the challenges faced by specimen preparation for single particle EM, highlight current developments, and show the opportunities resulting from the advanced miniaturized and microfluidic sample grid preparation methods described, such as visual proteomics and time-resolved cryo-EM studies. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan summarizes the results of previous water sampling activities and the plan for future water sampling activities, in accordance with the Guidance Document for Preparing Sampling and Analysis Plans for UMTRA Sites. A buffer zone monitoring plan for the Dos Rios Subdivision is included as an appendix. The buffer zone monitoring plan was developed to ensure continued protection to the public from residual contamination. The buffer zone is beyond the area depicted as contaminated ground water due to former milling operations. Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually at the Gunnison processing site and disposal site. Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Gunnison disposal site. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation

  18. Optimized preparation of urine samples for two-dimensional electrophoresis and initial application to patient samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafitte, Daniel; Dussol, Bertrand; Andersen, Søren

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We optimized of the preparation of urinary samples to obtain a comprehensive map of urinary proteins of healthy subjects and then compared this map with the ones obtained with patient samples to show that the pattern was specific of their kidney disease. DESIGN AND METHODS: The urinary...

  19. Analytical characterization of high-level mixed wastes using multiple sample preparation treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.G.; Baldwin, D.L.; Urie, M.W.; McKinley, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington, is actively involved in performing analytical characterization of high-level mixed waste from Hanford's single shell and double shell tank characterization programs. A full suite of analyses is typically performed on homogenized tank core samples. These analytical techniques include inductively-coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, total organic carbon methods and radiochemistry methods, as well as many others, all requiring some type of remote sample-preparation treatment to solubilize the tank sludge material for analysis. Most of these analytical methods typically use a single sample-preparation treatment, inherently providing elemental information only. To better understand and interpret tank chemistry and assist in identifying chemical compounds, selected analytical methods are performed using multiple sample-preparation treatments. The sample preparation treatments used at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for this work with high-level mixed waste include caustic fusion, acid digestion, and water leach. The type of information available by comparing results from different sample-prep treatments includes evidence for the presence of refractory compounds, acid-soluble compounds, or water-soluble compounds. Problems unique to the analysis of Hanford tank wastes are discussed. Selected results from the Hanford single shell ferrocyanide tank, 241-C-109, are presented, and the resulting conclusions are discussed

  20. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Benjamin K.; Barker, Trevor M.; Crozier, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. - Highlights: • High in-situ conversion of CO to CO 2 achieved by a novel TEM sample preparation method. • A 3 mm fiber pellet increases the TEM sample surface area by 50×. • Operando atomic resolution is maintained by also including a 3 mm grid in the sample. • Evidence for a well-mixed gas composition inside the ETEM cell is given

  1. Modern methods of sample preparation for GC analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, S.; Janssen, H.-G.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    2009-01-01

    Today, a wide variety of techniques is available for the preparation of (semi-) solid, liquid and gaseous samples, prior to their instrumental analysis by means of capillary gas chromatography (GC) or, increasingly, comprehensive two-dimensional GC (GC × GC). In the past two decades, a large number

  2. Collection and preparation of wet and dry stream-sediment samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchlik, K.

    1977-03-01

    Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is responsible for the Hydrogeochemistry and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program for uranium in the seven far western states. The work thus far has concentrated on the arid to semi-arid regions of the West and this paper discusses the collection and preparation of sediment samples in the Basin and Range province. The sample collection and preparation procedures described here may not be applicable to other parts of the far western states or other areas. These procedures also differ somewhat from those used by the other three laboratories involved in the HSSR program

  3. Sampling and sample preparation methods for the analysis of trace elements in biological material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.; Iyengar, V.

    1978-05-01

    The authors attempt to give a most systamtic possible treatment of the sample taking and sample preparation of biological material (particularly in human medicine) for trace analysis (e.g. neutron activation analysis, atomic absorption spectrometry). Contamination and loss problems are discussed as well as the manifold problems of the different consistency of solid and liquid biological materials, as well as the stabilization of the sample material. The process of dry and wet ashing is particularly dealt with, where new methods are also described. (RB) [de

  4. Sample preparation with solid phase microextraction and exhaustive extraction approaches: Comparison for challenging cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacı, Ezel; Rodríguez-Lafuente, Ángel; Gorynski, Krzysztof; Mirnaghi, Fatemeh; Souza-Silva, Érica A; Hein, Dietmar; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2015-05-11

    In chemical analysis, sample preparation is frequently considered the bottleneck of the entire analytical method. The success of the final method strongly depends on understanding the entire process of analysis of a particular type of analyte in a sample, namely: the physicochemical properties of the analytes (solubility, volatility, polarity etc.), the environmental conditions, and the matrix components of the sample. Various sample preparation strategies have been developed based on exhaustive or non-exhaustive extraction of analytes from matrices. Undoubtedly, amongst all sample preparation approaches, liquid extraction, including liquid-liquid (LLE) and solid phase extraction (SPE), are the most well-known, widely used, and commonly accepted methods by many international organizations and accredited laboratories. Both methods are well documented and there are many well defined procedures, which make them, at first sight, the methods of choice. However, many challenging tasks, such as complex matrix applications, on-site and in vivo applications, and determination of matrix-bound and free concentrations of analytes, are not easily attainable with these classical approaches for sample preparation. In the last two decades, the introduction of solid phase microextraction (SPME) has brought significant progress in the sample preparation area by facilitating on-site and in vivo applications, time weighted average (TWA) and instantaneous concentration determinations. Recently introduced matrix compatible coatings for SPME facilitate direct extraction from complex matrices and fill the gap in direct sampling from challenging matrices. Following introduction of SPME, numerous other microextraction approaches evolved to address limitations of the above mentioned techniques. There is not a single method that can be considered as a universal solution for sample preparation. This review aims to show the main advantages and limitations of the above mentioned sample

  5. Automated dried blood spots standard and QC sample preparation using a robotic liquid handler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Long; Zhang, Duxi; Aubry, Anne-Francoise; Arnold, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    A dried blood spot (DBS) bioanalysis assay involves many steps, such as the preparation of standard (STD) and QC samples in blood, the spotting onto DBS cards, and the cutting-out of the spots. These steps are labor intensive and time consuming if done manually, which, therefore, makes automation very desirable in DBS bioanalysis. A robotic liquid handler was successfully applied to the preparation of STD and QC samples in blood and to spot the blood samples onto DBS cards using buspirone as the model compound. This automated preparation was demonstrated to be accurate and consistent. However the accuracy and precision of automated preparation were similar to those from manual preparation. The effect of spotting volume on accuracy was evaluated and a trend of increasing concentrations of buspirone with increasing spotting volumes was observed. The automated STD and QC sample preparation process significantly improved the efficiency, robustness and safety of DBS bioanalysis.

  6. Green sample preparation for liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis of anionic and cationic analytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuethrich, Alain; Haddad, Paul R; Quirino, Joselito P

    2015-04-21

    A sample preparation device for the simultaneous enrichment and separation of cationic and anionic analytes was designed and implemented in an eight-channel configuration. The device is based on the use of an electric field to transfer the analytes from a large volume of sample into small volumes of electrolyte that was suspended into two glass micropipettes using a conductive hydrogel. This simple, economical, fast, and green (no organic solvent required) sample preparation scheme was evaluated using cationic and anionic herbicides as test analytes in water. The analytical figures of merit and ecological aspects were evaluated against the state-of-the-art sample preparation, solid-phase extraction. A drastic reduction in both sample preparation time (94% faster) and resources (99% less consumables used) was observed. Finally, the technique in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis was applied to analysis of quaternary ammonium and phenoxypropionic acid herbicides in fortified river water as well as drinking water (at levels relevant to Australian guidelines). The presented sustainable sample preparation approach could easily be applied to other charged analytes or adopted by other laboratories.

  7. Independent assessment of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) sample preparation quality : Effect of sample preparation on MALDI-MS of synthetic polymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, Pieter C.; Kok, Sander; Honing, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) provides detailed and in-depth information about the molecular characteristics of synthetic polymers. To obtain the most accurate results the sample preparation parameters should be chosen to suit the sample and the

  8. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed.

  9. Sample Preparation of Corn Seed Tissue to Prevent Analyte Relocations for Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Jeongkwon; Lee, Young Jin; Lee, Tae Geol; Yoon, Sohee

    2017-08-01

    Corn seed tissue sections were prepared by the tape support method using an adhesive tape, and mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was performed. The effect of heat generated during sample preparation was investigated by time-of-flight secondary mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) imaging of corn seed tissue prepared by the tape support and the thaw-mounted methods. Unlike thaw-mounted sample preparation, the tape support method does not cause imaging distortion because of the absence of heat, which can cause migration of the analytes on the sample. By applying the tape-support method, the corn seed tissue was prepared without structural damage and MSI with accurate spatial information of analytes was successfully performed. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  10. Universal Sample Preparation Module for Molecular Analysis in Space, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lynntech proposes to develop and demonstrate the ability of a compact, light-weight, and automated universal sample preparation module (USPM) to process samples from...

  11. Recent developments in sample preparation and data pre-treatment in metabonomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Song, Yi peng; Tang, Huiru; Wang, Yulan

    2016-01-01

    Metabonomics is a powerful approach for biomarker discovery and an effective tool for pinpointing endpoint metabolic effects of external stimuli, such as pathogens and disease development. Due to its wide applications, metabonomics is required to deal with various biological samples of different properties. Hence sample preparation and corresponding data pre-treatment become important factors in ensuring validity of an investigation. In this review, we summarize some recent developments in metabonomics sample preparation and data-pretreatment procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Current advances and strategies towards fully automated sample preparation for regulated LC-MS/MS bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Naiyu; Jiang, Hao; Zeng, Jianing

    2014-09-01

    Robotic liquid handlers (RLHs) have been widely used in automated sample preparation for liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) bioanalysis. Automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis offers significantly higher assay efficiency, better data quality and potential bioanalytical cost-savings. For RLHs that are used for regulated bioanalysis, there are additional requirements, including 21 CFR Part 11 compliance, software validation, system qualification, calibration verification and proper maintenance. This article reviews recent advances in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis in the last 5 years. Specifically, it covers the following aspects: regulated bioanalysis requirements, recent advances in automation hardware and software development, sample extraction workflow simplification, strategies towards fully automated sample extraction, and best practices in automated sample preparation for regulated bioanalysis.

  13. Synthesis and application of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers in sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuyao; Xu, Jianqiao; Zheng, Jiating; Zhu, Fang; Xie, Lijun; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2018-04-12

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have superior advantages in sample pretreatment because of their high selectivity for target analytes and the fast and easy isolation from samples. To meet the demand of both good magnetic property and good extraction performance, MMIPs with various structures, from traditional core-shell structures to novel composite structures with a larger specific surface area and more accessible binding sites, are fabricated by different preparation technologies. Moreover, as the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layers determine the affinity, selectivity, and saturated adsorption amount of MMIPs, the development and innovation of the MIP layer are attracting attention and are reviewed here. Many studies that used MMIPs as sorbents in dispersive solid-phase extraction of complex samples, including environmental, food, and biofluid samples, are summarized. Graphical abstract The application of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) in the sample preparation procedure improves the analytical performances for complex samples. MITs molecular imprinting technologies.

  14. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1996 - FY 2001. Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, S.M.

    1997-07-02

    This document summarizes the biannual Hanford sample projections for fiscal year 1997-2001. Sample projections are based on inputs submitted to Analytical Services covering Environmental Restoration, Tank Wastes Remediation Systems, Solid Wastes, Liquid Effluents, Spent Nuclear Fuels, Transition Projects, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, Analytical Services and miscellaneous Hanford support activities. In addition to this revision, details on Laboratory scale technology (development), Sample management, and Data management activities were requested. This information will be used by the Hanford Analytical Services program and the Sample Management Working Group to assure that laboratories and resources are available and effectively utilized to meet these documented needs.

  15. Sample preparation and detection device for infectious agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Wang, Amy W.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Lemoff, Asuncion V.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Yu, June

    2003-06-10

    A sample preparation and analysis device which incorporates both immunoassays and PCR assays in one compact, field-portable microchip. The device provides new capabilities in fluid and particle control which allows the building of a fluidic chip with no moving parts, thus decreasing fabrication cost and increasing the robustness of the device. The device can operate in a true continuous (not batch) mode. The device incorporates magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumps to move the fluid through the system, acoustic mixing and fractionation, dielectropheretic (DEP) sample concentration and purification, and on-chip optical detection capabilities.

  16. An improved method of sample preparation on AnchorChip targets for MALDI-MS and MS/MS and its application in the liver proteome project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Shi, Liang; Shu, Shaokung

    2007-01-01

    An improved method for sample preparation for MALDI-MS and MS/MS using AnchorChip targets is presented. The method, termed the SMW method (sample, matrix wash), results in better sensitivity for peptide mass fingerprinting as well as for sequencing by MS/MS than previously published methods. The ...

  17. High-resolution X-ray diffraction with no sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, G M; Turner, S M R; Degryse, P; Shortland, A J

    2017-07-01

    It is shown that energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) implemented in a back-reflection geometry is extremely insensitive to sample morphology and positioning even in a high-resolution configuration. This technique allows high-quality X-ray diffraction analysis of samples that have not been prepared and is therefore completely non-destructive. The experimental technique was implemented on beamline B18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Oxfordshire, UK. The majority of the experiments in this study were performed with pre-characterized geological materials in order to elucidate the characteristics of this novel technique and to develop the analysis methods. Results are presented that demonstrate phase identification, the derivation of precise unit-cell parameters and extraction of microstructural information on unprepared rock samples and other sample types. A particular highlight was the identification of a specific polytype of a muscovite in an unprepared mica schist sample, avoiding the time-consuming and difficult preparation steps normally required to make this type of identification. The technique was also demonstrated in application to a small number of fossil and archaeological samples. Back-reflection EDXRD implemented in a high-resolution configuration shows great potential in the crystallographic analysis of cultural heritage artefacts for the purposes of scientific research such as provenancing, as well as contributing to the formulation of conservation strategies. Possibilities for moving the technique from the synchrotron into museums are discussed. The avoidance of the need to extract samples from high-value and rare objects is a highly significant advantage, applicable also in other potential research areas such as palaeontology, and the study of meteorites and planetary materials brought to Earth by sample-return missions.

  18. Y-STR analysis on DNA mixture samples--results of a collaborative project of the ENFSI DNA Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, Walther; Niederstätter, Harald; Lindinger, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    The ENFSI (European Network of Forensic Science Institutes) DNA Working Group undertook a collaborative project on Y-STR typing of DNA mixture samples that were centrally prepared and thoroughly tested prior to the shipment. Four commercial Y-STR typing kits (Y-Filer, Applied Biosystems, Foster C...... a laboratory-specific optimization process is indicated to reach a comparable sensitivity for the analysis of minute amounts of DNA....

  19. Application of immunoaffinity columns for different food item samples preparation in micotoxins determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćurčić Marijana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In analytical methods used for monitoring of what special attention is paid to sample preparation. Therefore, the objective of this study was testing the efficiency of immunoaffinity columns (IAC that are based on solid phase extraction principles used for samples preparation in determining aflatoxins and ochratoxins. Aflatoxins and ochratoxins concentrations were determined in totally 56 samples of food items: wheat, corn, rice, barley and other grains (19 samples, flour and flour products from grain and additives for the bakery industry (7 samples, fruits and vegetables (3 samples, hazelnut, walnut, almond, coconut flour (4 samples, roasted cocoa beans, peanuts, tea, coffee (16 samples, spices (4 samples and meat and meat products (4 samples. Obtained results indicate advantage of IAC use for sample preparation based on enhanced specificity due to binding of extracted molecules to incorporated specific antibodies and rinsing the rest molecules from sample which could interfere with further analysis. Additional advantage is the usage of small amount of organic solvents and consequently decreased exposure of staff who conduct micotoxins determination. Of special interest is increase in method sensitivity since limit of quantification for aflatoxins and ochratoxins determination method is lower than maximal allowed concentration of these toxines prescribed by national rule book.

  20. HASE - The Helsinki adaptive sample preparation line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palonen, V., E-mail: vesa.palonen@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 (Finland); Pesonen, A. [Laboratory of Chronology, Finnish Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 (Finland); Herranen, T.; Tikkanen, P. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 (Finland); Oinonen, M. [Laboratory of Chronology, Finnish Museum of Natural History, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 (Finland)

    2013-01-15

    We have designed and built an adaptive sample preparation line with separate modules for combustion, molecular sieve handling, CO{sub 2} gas cleaning, CO{sub 2} storage, and graphitization. The line is also connected to an elemental analyzer. Operation of the vacuum equipment, a flow controller, pressure sensors, ovens, and graphitization reactors are automated with a reliable NI-cRIO real-time system. Stepped combustion can be performed in two ovens at temperatures up to 900 Degree-Sign C. Depending on the application, CuO or O{sub 2}-flow combustion can be used. A flow controller is used to adjust the O{sub 2} flow and pressure during combustion. For environmental samples, a module for molecular sieve regeneration and sample desorption is attached to the line replacing the combustion module. In the storage module, CO{sub 2} samples can be stored behind a gas-tight diaphragm valve and either stored for later graphitization or taken for measurements with separate equipment (AMS gas ion source or a separate mass spectrometer). The graphitization module consists of four automated reactors, capable of graphitizing samples with masses from 3 mg down to 50 {mu}g.

  1. Gel-aided sample preparation (GASP)--a simplified method for gel-assisted proteomic sample generation from protein extracts and intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Roman; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-04-01

    We describe a "gel-assisted" proteomic sample preparation method for MS analysis. Solubilized protein extracts or intact cells are copolymerized with acrylamide, facilitating denaturation, reduction, quantitative cysteine alkylation, and matrix formation. Gel-aided sample preparation has been optimized to be highly flexible, scalable, and to allow reproducible sample generation from 50 cells to milligrams of protein extracts. This methodology is fast, sensitive, easy-to-use on a wide range of sample types, and accessible to nonspecialists. © 2014 The Authors. PROTEOMICS published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A Proteomics Sample Preparation Method for Mature, Recalcitrant Leaves of Perennial Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Zhang; Chengying, Lao; Bo, Wang; Dingxiang, Peng; Lijun, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Sample preparation is key to the success of proteomics studies. In the present study, two sample preparation methods were tested for their suitability on the mature, recalcitrant leaves of six representative perennial plants (grape, plum, pear, peach, orange, and ramie). An improved sample preparation method was obtained: Tris and Triton X-100 were added together instead of CHAPS to the lysis buffer, and a 20% TCA-water solution and 100% precooled acetone were added after the protein extraction for the further purification of protein. This method effectively eliminates nonprotein impurities and obtains a clear two-dimensional gel electrophoresis array. The method facilitates the separation of high-molecular-weight proteins and increases the resolution of low-abundance proteins. This method provides a widely applicable and economically feasible technology for the proteomic study of the mature, recalcitrant leaves of perennial plants. PMID:25028960

  3. A proteomics sample preparation method for mature, recalcitrant leaves of perennial plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Gang

    Full Text Available Sample preparation is key to the success of proteomics studies. In the present study, two sample preparation methods were tested for their suitability on the mature, recalcitrant leaves of six representative perennial plants (grape, plum, pear, peach, orange, and ramie. An improved sample preparation method was obtained: Tris and Triton X-100 were added together instead of CHAPS to the lysis buffer, and a 20% TCA-water solution and 100% precooled acetone were added after the protein extraction for the further purification of protein. This method effectively eliminates nonprotein impurities and obtains a clear two-dimensional gel electrophoresis array. The method facilitates the separation of high-molecular-weight proteins and increases the resolution of low-abundance proteins. This method provides a widely applicable and economically feasible technology for the proteomic study of the mature, recalcitrant leaves of perennial plants.

  4. Advances in modern sample preparation techniques using microwaves assisted chemistry for metal species determination (W1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponard, O.F.X.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Sample preparation has long been the bottleneck of environmental analysis for both total and species specific analysis. Digestion, extraction and preparation of the analytes are relying on a series of chemical reactions. The introduction of microwave assisted sample preparation has first been viewed as a mean to accelerate the kinetics of digestion of the matrix for total elements and fast samples preparation procedures. However, the extensive development and success of microwave digestion procedures in total elemental analysis has now allowed to have a larger insight of the perspectives offered by this technique. Microwave technologies now offer to have a precise control of the temperature and indirectly control the reaction kinetics taking place during the sample preparation procedures. Microwave assisted chemistry permits to perform simultaneously the fundamental steps required for metal species extraction and derivatization. The number of sample preparation steps used for organotin or organomercury species have been reduced to one and the total time of sample preparation brought down for a few hours to some minutes. Further, the developments of GC/ICP/MS techniques allow to routinely use speciated isotopic dilution methods has internal probe of the chemical reactions. These new approaches allow us to use the addition of the labeled species for isotopic dilution as a mean to evaluate and follow the chemical processes taking place during the extraction procedure. These procedures will help us to understand and check for the stability of the analytes during the chemistry of the sample preparation procedure and bring some insights of the chemistry taking place during the extraction. Understanding the different mechanisms involved in the sample preparation steps will allow us in return to further improve all theses procedures and bring us to the horizon of 'on-line sample preparation and detection'. (author)

  5. On the use of ultracentrifugal devices for routine sample preparation in biomolecular magic-angle-spinning NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Abhishek; Boatz, Jennifer C; Wheeler, Travis B; van der Wel, Patrick C A

    2017-03-01

    A number of recent advances in the field of magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR have enabled its application to a range of biological systems of ever increasing complexity. To retain biological relevance, these samples are increasingly studied in a hydrated state. At the same time, experimental feasibility requires the sample preparation process to attain a high sample concentration within the final MAS rotor. We discuss these considerations, and how they have led to a number of different approaches to MAS NMR sample preparation. We describe our experience of how custom-made (or commercially available) ultracentrifugal devices can facilitate a simple, fast and reliable sample preparation process. A number of groups have since adopted such tools, in some cases to prepare samples for sedimentation-style MAS NMR experiments. Here we argue for a more widespread adoption of their use for routine MAS NMR sample preparation.

  6. On the use of ultracentrifugal devices for routine sample preparation in biomolecular magic-angle-spinning NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Abhishek; Boatz, Jennifer C. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology (United States); Wheeler, Travis B. [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Cell Biology (United States); Wel, Patrick C. A. van der, E-mail: vanderwel@pitt.edu [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Structural Biology (United States)

    2017-03-15

    A number of recent advances in the field of magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR have enabled its application to a range of biological systems of ever increasing complexity. To retain biological relevance, these samples are increasingly studied in a hydrated state. At the same time, experimental feasibility requires the sample preparation process to attain a high sample concentration within the final MAS rotor. We discuss these considerations, and how they have led to a number of different approaches to MAS NMR sample preparation. We describe our experience of how custom-made (or commercially available) ultracentrifugal devices can facilitate a simple, fast and reliable sample preparation process. A number of groups have since adopted such tools, in some cases to prepare samples for sedimentation-style MAS NMR experiments. Here we argue for a more widespread adoption of their use for routine MAS NMR sample preparation.

  7. On-chip sample preparation for complete blood count from raw blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, John; Wei, Yuan; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2015-03-21

    This paper describes a monolithic microfluidic device capable of on-chip sample preparation for both RBC and WBC measurements from whole blood. For the first time, on-chip sample processing (e.g. dilution, lysis, and filtration) and downstream single cell measurement were fully integrated to enable sample preparation and single cell analysis from whole blood on a single device. The device consists of two parallel sub-systems that perform sample processing and electrical measurements for measuring RBC and WBC parameters. The system provides a modular environment capable of handling solutions of various viscosities by adjusting the length of channels and precisely controlling mixing ratios, and features a new 'offset' filter configuration for increased duration of device operation. RBC concentration, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), cell distribution width, WBC concentration and differential are determined by electrical impedance measurement. Experimental characterization of over 100,000 cells from 10 patient blood samples validated the system's capability for performing on-chip raw blood processing and measurement.

  8. Difficulties in preparing a standard sample of uranium metal having traces of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toteja, R.S.D.; Jangida, B.L.; Sundaresan, M.

    1991-01-01

    Normally in the analysis of uranium for nitrogen, the nitrides are hydrolysed to give NH 3 and that for standardisation purposes to approximate the closest conditions of analysis of ammonia, NH 4 Cl is added to the sample and the recovery is tested. An appropriate method will be to have a standard sample of uranium with known amounts of nitrogen to be used as reference sample. The present work describes the efforts made in the preparation of such a reference sample and a general assessment of such methods available. In present work, known microamounts of nitrogen in an enclosed volume were allowed to react at a temperature of 773 K with a fixed amount of uranium metal of nitrogen content determined chemically. As the reaction of nitrogen with uranium is essentially a surface reaction, a sample had to be homogenised by allowing the nitrided sample to melt at about 1500 K and allow the nitrogen to diffuse through so that the concentration gradient along the profile will disappear. Attempts were made to prepare such samples in the range to 40 to 100 ppm of nitrogen. The density differences of uranium nitride and uranium metal made this diffusion and homogenisation process difficult. The prepared samples were analysed by the micro-kjeldahl's method and the recoveries tested. The equipment used for the preparation of the nitrided samples, for homogenisation and analysis of the results obtained are detailed in the paper together with the assessment of the general methods. (author). 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  9. Skin sample preparation by collagenase digestion for diclofenac quantification using LC-MS/MS after topical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Padala, Naga Surya Prakash; Boggavarapu, Rajesh Kumar; Kalaikadhiban, Ilayaraja; Ajjala, Devender Reddy; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Muddana, Nageswara Rao

    2016-06-01

    Skin is the target site to evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters of topical applications. Sample preparation is one of the influential steps in the bioanalysis of drugs in the skin. Evaluation of dermatopharmacokinetics at preclinical stage is challenging due to lack of proper sample preparation method. There is a need for an efficient sample preparation procedure for quantification of drugs in the skin using LC-MS/MS. The skin samples treated with collagenase followed by homogenization using a bead beater represents a best-fit method resulting in uniform homogenate for reproducible results. A new approach involving enzymatic treatment and mechanical homogenization techniques were evaluated for efficient sample preparation of skin samples in the bioanalysis.

  10. imFASP: An integrated approach combining in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment with microwave-assisted protein digestion for fast and efficient proteome sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qun; Fang, Fei; Wu, Ci; Wu, Qi; Liang, Yu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    An integrated sample preparation method, termed "imFASP", which combined in-situ filter-aided sample pretreatment and microwave-assisted trypsin digestion, was developed for preparation of microgram and even nanogram amounts of complex protein samples with high efficiency in 1 h. For imFASP method, proteins dissolved in 8 M urea were loaded onto a filter device with molecular weight cut off (MWCO) as 10 kDa, followed by in-situ protein preconcentration, denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and microwave-assisted tryptic digestion. Compared with traditional in-solution sample preparation method, imFASP method generated more protein and peptide identifications (IDs) from preparation of 45 μg Escherichia coli protein sample due to the higher efficiency, and the sample preparation throughput was significantly improved by 14 times (1 h vs. 15 h). More importantly, when the starting amounts of E. coli cell lysate decreased to nanogram level (50-500 ng), the protein and peptide identified by imFASP method were improved at least 30% and 44%, compared with traditional in-solution preparation method, suggesting dramatically higher peptide recovery of imFASP method for trace amounts of complex proteome samples. All these results demonstrate that the imFASP method developed here is of high potential for high efficient and high throughput preparation of trace amounts of complex proteome samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced aliasing artifacts using shaking projection k-space sampling trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan-Chun; Du, Jiang; Yang, Wen-Chao; Duan, Chai-Jie; Wang, Hao-Yu; Gao, Song; Bao, Shang-Lian

    2014-03-01

    Radial imaging techniques, such as projection-reconstruction (PR), are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for dynamic imaging, angiography, and short-T2 imaging. They are less sensitive to flow and motion artifacts, and support fast imaging with short echo times. However, aliasing and streaking artifacts are two main sources which degrade radial imaging quality. For a given fixed number of k-space projections, data distributions along radial and angular directions will influence the level of aliasing and streaking artifacts. Conventional radial k-space sampling trajectory introduces an aliasing artifact at the first principal ring of point spread function (PSF). In this paper, a shaking projection (SP) k-space sampling trajectory was proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts in MR images. SP sampling trajectory shifts the projection alternately along the k-space center, which separates k-space data in the azimuthal direction. Simulations based on conventional and SP sampling trajectories were compared with the same number projections. A significant reduction of aliasing artifacts was observed using the SP sampling trajectory. These two trajectories were also compared with different sampling frequencies. A SP trajectory has the same aliasing character when using half sampling frequency (or half data) for reconstruction. SNR comparisons with different white noise levels show that these two trajectories have the same SNR character. In conclusion, the SP trajectory can reduce the aliasing artifact without decreasing SNR and also provide a way for undersampling reconstruction. Furthermore, this method can be applied to three-dimensional (3D) hybrid or spherical radial k-space sampling for a more efficient reduction of aliasing artifacts.

  12. Reduced aliasing artifacts using shaking projection k-space sampling trajectory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yan-Chun; Yang Wen-Chao; Wang Hao-Yu; Gao Song; Bao Shang-Lian; Du Jiang; Duan Chai-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Radial imaging techniques, such as projection-reconstruction (PR), are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for dynamic imaging, angiography, and short-T2 imaging. They are less sensitive to flow and motion artifacts, and support fast imaging with short echo times. However, aliasing and streaking artifacts are two main sources which degrade radial imaging quality. For a given fixed number of k-space projections, data distributions along radial and angular directions will influence the level of aliasing and streaking artifacts. Conventional radial k-space sampling trajectory introduces an aliasing artifact at the first principal ring of point spread function (PSF). In this paper, a shaking projection (SP) k-space sampling trajectory was proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts in MR images. SP sampling trajectory shifts the projection alternately along the k-space center, which separates k-space data in the azimuthal direction. Simulations based on conventional and SP sampling trajectories were compared with the same number projections. A significant reduction of aliasing artifacts was observed using the SP sampling trajectory. These two trajectories were also compared with different sampling frequencies. A SP trajectory has the same aliasing character when using half sampling frequency (or half data) for reconstruction. SNR comparisons with different white noise levels show that these two trajectories have the same SNR character. In conclusion, the SP trajectory can reduce the aliasing artifact without decreasing SNR and also provide a way for undersampling reconstruction. Furthermore, this method can be applied to three-dimensional (3D) hybrid or spherical radial k-space sampling for a more efficient reduction of aliasing artifacts

  13. A review of sample preparation and its influence on pH determination in concrete samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manso, S.; Aguado, A.

    2017-01-01

    If we are to monitor the chemical processes in cementitious materials, then pH assays in the pore solutions of cement pastes, mortars, and concretes are of key importance. However, there is no standard method that regulates the sample-preparation method for pH determination. The state-of-the-art of different methods for pH determination in cementitious materials is presented in this paper and the influence of sample preparation in each case. Moreover, an experimental campaign compares three different techniques for pH determination. Its results contribute to establishing a basic criterion to help researchers select the most suitable method, depending on the purpose of the research. A simple tool is described for selecting the easiest and the most economic pH determination method, depending on the objective; especially for researchers and those with limited experience in this field.

  14. A user-friendly robotic sample preparation program for fully automated biological sample pipetting and dilution to benefit the regulated bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Ouyang, Zheng; Zeng, Jianing; Yuan, Long; Zheng, Naiyu; Jemal, Mohammed; Arnold, Mark E

    2012-06-01

    Biological sample dilution is a rate-limiting step in bioanalytical sample preparation when the concentrations of samples are beyond standard curve ranges, especially when multiple dilution factors are needed in an analytical run. We have developed and validated a Microsoft Excel-based robotic sample preparation program (RSPP) that automatically transforms Watson worklist sample information (identification, sequence and dilution factor) to comma-separated value (CSV) files. The Freedom EVO liquid handler software imports and transforms the CSV files to executable worklists (.gwl files), allowing the robot to perform sample dilutions at variable dilution factors. The dynamic dilution range is 1- to 1000-fold and divided into three dilution steps: 1- to 10-, 11- to 100-, and 101- to 1000-fold. The whole process, including pipetting samples, diluting samples, and adding internal standard(s), is accomplished within 1 h for two racks of samples (96 samples/rack). This platform also supports online sample extraction (liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, protein precipitation, etc.) using 96 multichannel arms. This fully automated and validated sample dilution and preparation process has been applied to several drug development programs. The results demonstrate that application of the RSPP for fully automated sample processing is efficient and rugged. The RSPP not only saved more than 50% of the time in sample pipetting and dilution but also reduced human errors. The generated bioanalytical data are accurate and precise; therefore, this application can be used in regulated bioanalysis.

  15. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jungdae [Department of Physics, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics and EHSRC, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Hyoungdo; Schroeder, Allan; Shih, Chih-Kang, E-mail: shih@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Qin, Shengyong [Department of Physics, The University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); ICQD, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Kim, Sang-ui [Department of Physics and EHSRC, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Daejin [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  16. Compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope with in-situ sample preparation capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungdae; Nam, Hyoungdo; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Sang-ui; Schroeder, Allan; Eom, Daejin; Shih, Chih-Kang

    2015-09-01

    We report on the design of a compact low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) having in-situ sample preparation capability. The in-situ sample preparation chamber was designed to be compact allowing quick transfer of samples to the STM stage, which is ideal for preparing temperature sensitive samples such as ultra-thin metal films on semiconductor substrates. Conventional spring suspensions on the STM head often cause mechanical issues. To address this problem, we developed a simple vibration damper consisting of welded metal bellows and rubber pads. In addition, we developed a novel technique to ensure an ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) seal between the copper and stainless steel, which provides excellent reliability for cryostats operating in UHV. The performance of the STM was tested from 2 K to 77 K by using epitaxial thin Pb films on Si. Very high mechanical stability was achieved with clear atomic resolution even when using cryostats operating at 77 K. At 2 K, a clean superconducting gap was observed, and the spectrum was easily fit using the BCS density of states with negligible broadening.

  17. Automated cellular sample preparation using a Centrifuge-on-a-Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, Albert J; Kim, Jae Hyun; Arshi, Armin; Hur, Soojung Claire; Di Carlo, Dino

    2011-09-07

    The standard centrifuge is a laboratory instrument widely used by biologists and medical technicians for preparing cell samples. Efforts to automate the operations of concentration, cell separation, and solution exchange that a centrifuge performs in a simpler and smaller platform have had limited success. Here, we present a microfluidic chip that replicates the functions of a centrifuge without moving parts or external forces. The device operates using a purely fluid dynamic phenomenon in which cells selectively enter and are maintained in microscale vortices. Continuous and sequential operation allows enrichment of cancer cells from spiked blood samples at the mL min(-1) scale, followed by fluorescent labeling of intra- and extra-cellular antigens on the cells without the need for manual pipetting and washing steps. A versatile centrifuge-analogue may open opportunities in automated, low-cost and high-throughput sample preparation as an alternative to the standard benchtop centrifuge in standardized clinical diagnostics or resource poor settings.

  18. NGSI FY15 Final Report. Innovative Sample Preparation for in-Field Uranium Isotopic Determinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyers, Lisa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Our FY14 Final Report included an introduction to the project, background, literature search of uranium dissolution methods, assessment of commercial off the shelf (COTS) automated sample preparation systems, as well as data and results for dissolution of bulk quantities of uranium oxides, and dissolution of uranium oxides from swipe filter materials using ammonium bifluoride (ABF). Also, discussed were reaction studies of solid ABF with uranium oxide that provided a basis for determining the ABF/uranium oxide dissolution mechanism. This report details the final experiments for optimizing dissolution of U3O8 and UO2 using ABF and steps leading to development of a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for dissolution of uranium oxides on swipe filters.

  19. Ultra-High-Throughput Sample Preparation System for Lymphocyte Immunophenotyping Point-of-Care Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David I; Murthy, Shashi K; Russom, Aman

    2016-10-01

    Point-of-care (POC) microfluidic devices often lack the integration of common sample preparation steps, such as preconcentration, which can limit their utility in the field. In this technology brief, we describe a system that combines the necessary sample preparation methods to perform sample-to-result analysis of large-volume (20 mL) biopsy model samples with staining of captured cells. Our platform combines centrifugal-paper microfluidic filtration and an analysis system to process large, dilute biological samples. Utilizing commercialization-friendly manufacturing methods and materials, yielding a sample throughput of 20 mL/min, and allowing for on-chip staining and imaging bring together a practical, yet powerful approach to microfluidic diagnostics of large, dilute samples. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  20. Highly Reproducible Automated Proteomics Sample Preparation Workflow for Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qin; Kowalski, Michael P; Mastali, Mitra; Parker, Sarah J; Sobhani, Kimia; van den Broek, Irene; Hunter, Christie L; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2018-01-05

    Sample preparation for protein quantification by mass spectrometry requires multiple processing steps including denaturation, reduction, alkylation, protease digestion, and peptide cleanup. Scaling these procedures for the analysis of numerous complex biological samples can be tedious and time-consuming, as there are many liquid transfer steps and timed reactions where technical variations can be introduced and propagated. We established an automated sample preparation workflow with a total processing time for 96 samples of 5 h, including a 2 h incubation with trypsin. Peptide cleanup is accomplished by online diversion during the LC/MS/MS analysis. In a selected reaction monitoring (SRM) assay targeting 6 plasma biomarkers and spiked β-galactosidase, mean intraday and interday cyclic voltammograms (CVs) for 5 serum and 5 plasma samples over 5 days were samples repeated on 3 separate days had total CVs below 20%. Similar results were obtained when the workflow was transferred to a second site: 93% of peptides had CVs below 20%. An automated trypsin digestion workflow yields uniformly processed samples in less than 5 h. Reproducible quantification of peptides was observed across replicates, days, instruments, and laboratory sites, demonstrating the broad applicability of this approach.

  1. Focused-microwave-assisted sample preparation (M8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobrega, J.A.; Santos, D.M.; Trevizan, L.C.; Costa, L.M.; Nogueira, A.R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Focused-microwave-assisted sample preparation is a suitable strategy when dealing with high masses of organic samples. However, the final acid concentration of the digestate can difficult routine analytical measurements using spectroscopic techniques. Acids could be evaporated, but this step could be slow even when using microwave-assisted heating and requires a scrubber system for acid vapor collection and neutralization. We are investigating two procedures to decrease the acid concentration of digestates. The first one is based on acid vapor phase digestion of samples contained in PTFE devices' inserted into the microwave flask. The acid solution is heated by absorption of microwave radiation, then the acid vapor partially condenses in the upper part of the reaction flask and it is partially collected in each sample container. Calcium, Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn were quantitatively recovered in samples of animal and vegetable tissues. Better recoveries were attained when adding a small volume of sodium hypochlorite to the sample. This effect is probably related to the generation of chlorine in the sample container after collecting condensed acid. The second procedure developed is based on the gradual addition of liquid samples to a previously heated acid digestion mixture. This procedure was successfully applied for digestion of milk, fruit juices, and red wine. The main advantage is the possibility of digesting up to four-fold more sample using up to ten-fold lower amounts of concentrated acids. Results obtained using both digestion procedures and measurements by ICP-OES with axial view will be presented. (author)

  2. Ionic liquids: solvents and sorbents in sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kevin D; Emaus, Miranda N; Varona, Marcelino; Bowers, Ashley N; Anderson, Jared L

    2018-01-01

    The applications of ionic liquids (ILs) and IL-derived sorbents are rapidly expanding. By careful selection of the cation and anion components, the physicochemical properties of ILs can be altered to meet the requirements of specific applications. Reports of IL solvents possessing high selectivity for specific analytes are numerous and continue to motivate the development of new IL-based sample preparation methods that are faster, more selective, and environmentally benign compared to conventional organic solvents. The advantages of ILs have also been exploited in solid/polymer formats in which ordinarily nonspecific sorbents are functionalized with IL moieties in order to impart selectivity for an analyte or analyte class. Furthermore, new ILs that incorporate a paramagnetic component into the IL structure, known as magnetic ionic liquids (MILs), have emerged as useful solvents for bioanalytical applications. In this rapidly changing field, this Review focuses on the applications of ILs and IL-based sorbents in sample preparation with a special emphasis on liquid phase extraction techniques using ILs and MILs, IL-based solid-phase extraction, ILs in mass spectrometry, and biological applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Development of a sample preparation system for AMS radiocarbon dating at CRICH, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung-Jin; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Lim, Eun-Soo [Cultural Research Institute of Chungcheong Heritage, Gongju (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Duk-Geun [Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soon-Bal [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Min-Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    We developed a sample preparation system for radiocarbon dating by using AMS measurement at Cultural Research Institute of Chungcheong Heritage, Korea. From the investigation of the reduction process, the optimum graphitization temperature was chosen as 625 .deg. C. Using Aldrich graphite powder of 0.75 {+-} 0.023 pMC, the background value of our preparation system was controlled at a low level. The robustness against chemical treatment and contamination was also observed from samples of Oxalic acid II and IAEA-C4. The resultant values, 134.04 {+-} 0.99 pMC and 0.38 {+-} 0.043 pMC, were in good agreement with the consensus values. Based on comparison, our conventional ages agreed very well with those of Beta Analytic Co. and SNU-AMS. No memory effect existed in the preparation system. Therefore, we concluded that the sample preparation system was operated in a stable manner and that the basic radiocarbon dating procedures were completely verified.

  4. TCLP Preparation and Analysis of K East Basin Composite Sludge Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvers, K.L.; Wagner, J.J.; Steele, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Sludge samples from the Hanford K East Basin were analyzed by the Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) to assist in the appropriate Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCIL4) designation of this material. Sludge samples were collected by Fluor Hanford, Inc. using the consolidated sludge sampling system (system that allows collection of a single sample from multiple sample locations). These samples were shipped to the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) and then transferred to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL, 325 Building) for recovery and testing. Two sludge composites were prepared, using the consolidated sludge samples, to represent K East canister sludge (sample KC Can Comp) and K East floor sludge (sample KC Floor Comp). Each composite was extracted in duplicate and analyzed in duplicate following pre-approved(a) TCLP extraction and analyses procedures. In addition, these samples and duplicates were analyzed for total RCRA metals (via acid digestion preparation). The work was conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Hanford Analytical Quality Assurance Requirements Document (HASQARD). A PNNL Quality Assurance Program compliant with J HASQARD was implemented for this effort. The results from the TCLP analyses showed that all RCRA metal concentrations were less than the TCLP limits for both the canister and floor composite samples and their respective duplicates

  5. Capacitive deionization on-chip as a method for microfluidic sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Susan Helena; Kim, Bumjoo; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; Han, Jongyoon; van den Berg, Albert; Odijk, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Desalination as a sample preparation step is essential for noise reduction and reproducibility of mass spectrometry measurements. A specific example is the analysis of proteins for medical research and clinical applications. Salts and buffers that are present in samples need to be removed before

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Tuba City, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Tuba City, Arizona, are described in the following sections of this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). This plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the stations routinely monitored at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and the final EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), and the most effective technical approach for the site

  7. Sample preparation in separation of the extracellular chitinolytic enzymes of the human intestinal bacterium Clostridium paraputrificum J4 from the culture fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tishchenko, Galina; Šimůnek, Jiří; Bartoňová, Hana; Dušková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Ponomareva, Evgenia; Tennikova, T.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 879, č. 22 (2011), s. 2175-2178 ISSN 1570-0232 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/09/1407; GA ČR GA525/05/2584 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : sample preparation * culture fluids C. paraputrificum J4 * chitinases Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.888, year: 2011

  8. LC-MS analysis of the plasma metabolome–a novel sample preparation strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kasper; Hadrup, Niels; Smedsgaard, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Blood plasma is a well-known body fluid often analyzed in studies on the effects of toxic compounds as physiological or chemical induced changes in the mammalian body are reflected in the plasma metabolome. Sample preparation prior to LC-MS based analysis of the plasma metabolome is a challenge...... as plasma contains compounds with very different properties. Besides, proteins, which usually are precipitated with organic solvent, phospholipids, are known to cause ion suppression in electrospray mass spectrometry. We have compared two different sample preparation techniques prior to LC-qTOF analysis...... of plasma samples: The first is protein precipitation; the second is protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction with sub-fractionation into three sub-samples; a phospholipid, a lipid and a polar sub-fraction. Molecular feature extraction of the data files from LC-qTOF analysis of the samples...

  9. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) describes planned water sampling activities and provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water sampling in 1994 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Maybell, Colorado. The WSAP identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequencies at the site. The ground water data will be used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for the ground water and surface water monitoring activities is derived from the EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1993) and the proposed EPA standards of 1987 (52 FR 36000). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. This WSAP also includes a summary and the results of water sampling activities from 1989 through 1992 (no sampling was performed in 1993)

  10. [Sample preparation methods for chromatographic analysis of organic components in atmospheric particulate matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Liang; Wu, Dapeng; Guan, Yafeng

    2014-09-01

    The determination of organic composition in atmospheric particulate matter (PM) is of great importance in understanding how PM affects human health, environment, climate, and ecosystem. Organic components are also the scientific basis for emission source tracking, PM regulation and risk management. Therefore, the molecular characterization of the organic fraction of PM has become one of the priority research issues in the field of environmental analysis. Due to the extreme complexity of PM samples, chromatographic methods have been the chief selection. The common procedure for the analysis of organic components in PM includes several steps: sample collection on the fiber filters, sample preparation (transform the sample into a form suitable for chromatographic analysis), analysis by chromatographic methods. Among these steps, the sample preparation methods will largely determine the throughput and the data quality. Solvent extraction methods followed by sample pretreatment (e. g. pre-separation, derivatization, pre-concentration) have long been used for PM sample analysis, and thermal desorption methods have also mainly focused on the non-polar organic component analysis in PM. In this paper, the sample preparation methods prior to chromatographic analysis of organic components in PM are reviewed comprehensively, and the corresponding merits and limitations of each method are also briefly discussed.

  11. A review of sample preparation and its influence on pH determination in concrete samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available If we are to monitor the chemical processes in cementitious materials, then pH assays in the pore solutions of cement pastes, mortars, and concretes are of key importance. However, there is no standard method that regulates the sample-preparation method for pH determination. The state-of-the-art of different methods for pH determination in cementitious materials is presented in this paper and the influence of sample preparation in each case. Moreover, an experimental campaign compares three different techniques for pH determination. Its results contribute to establishing a basic criterion to help researchers select the most suitable method, depending on the purpose of the research. A simple tool is described for selecting the easiest and the most economic pH determination method, depending on the objective; especially for researchers and those with limited experience in this field.

  12. A developed wedge fixtures assisted high precision TEM samples pre-thinning method: Towards the batch lamella preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ion milling, wedge cutting or polishing, and focused ion beam (FIB milling are widely-used techniques for the transmission electron microscope (TEM sample preparation. Especially, the FIB milling provides a site-specific analysis, deposition, and ablation of materials in the micrometer and nanometer scale. However, the cost of FIB tools has been always a significant concern. Since it is inevitable to use the FIB technique, the improvement of efficiency is a key point. Traditional TEM sample preparation with FIB was routinely implemented on a single sample each time. Aiming at cost efficiency, a new pre-thinning technique for batch sample preparation was developed in this paper. The present proposal combines the sample preparation techniques with multi-samples thinning, cross-section scanning electron microscopy (SEM, wedge cutting, FIB and other sample pre-thinning techniques. The new pre-thinning technique is to prepare an edge TEM sample on a grinding and polishing fixture with a slant surface. The thickness of the wedges sample can be measured to 1∼2 μm under optical microscope. Therefore, this fixture is superior to the traditional optical method of estimating the membrane thickness. Moreover, by utilizing a multi-sample holding fixture, more samples can be pre-thinned simultaneously, which significantly improved the productivity of TEM sample preparation.

  13. HIFS VNL Monthly Progress Report Preparation for NDCX-II Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Logan, Grant; Kwan, Joe; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Gilson, Erik; Leitner, Matthaeus; Waldron, Will; Bieniosek, Frank

    2009-01-01

    In preparation for the project and for anticipated review in August, the HIFS-VNL hosted an NDCX-II Advisory Meeting at LBNL on May 27, 2009. A number of experts in accelerator physics, engineering, and construction were asked to visit for a full day, listen to presentations on the project, its goals, and its status, and to offer their advice on how best to proceed, what topics needed attention, and what technical options seemed most attractive to them. This was a productive meeting, and the Committee's comments will provide useful guidance.

  14. Automated injection of a radioactive sample for preparative HPLC with feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Ren; Yamazaki, Shigeki

    1990-01-01

    The injection of a radioactive reaction mixture into a preparative HPLC column has been automated with computer control for rapid purification of routinely prepared positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. Using pneumatic valves, a motor-driven pump and a liquid level sensor, two intelligent injection methods for the automation were compared with regard to efficient and rapid sample loading into a 2 mL loop of the 6-way valve. One, a precise but rather slow method, was demonstrated to be suitable for purification of 18 F-radiopharmaceuticals, while the other, due to its rapid operation, was more suitable for 11 C-radiopharmaceuticals. A sample volume of approx 0.5 mL can be injected onto a preparative HPLC column with over 90% efficiency with the present automated system. (author)

  15. Sample preparation and fractionation for proteome analysis and cancer biomarker discovery by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2009-03-01

    Sample preparation and fractionation technologies are one of the most crucial processes in proteomic analysis and biomarker discovery in solubilized samples. Chromatographic or electrophoretic proteomic technologies are also available for separation of cellular protein components. There are, however, considerable limitations in currently available proteomic technologies as none of them allows for the analysis of the entire proteome in a simple step because of the large number of peptides, and because of the wide concentration dynamic range of the proteome in clinical blood samples. The results of any undertaken experiment depend on the condition of the starting material. Therefore, proper experimental design and pertinent sample preparation is essential to obtain meaningful results, particularly in comparative clinical proteomics in which one is looking for minor differences between experimental (diseased) and control (nondiseased) samples. This review discusses problems associated with general and specialized strategies of sample preparation and fractionation, dealing with samples that are solution or suspension, in a frozen tissue state, or formalin-preserved tissue archival samples, and illustrates how sample processing might influence detection with mass spectrometric techniques. Strategies that dramatically improve the potential for cancer biomarker discovery in minimally invasive, blood-collected human samples are also presented.

  16. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamic, M.L., E-mail: Mary.Adamic@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Lister, T.E.; Dufek, E.J.; Jenson, D.D.; Olson, J.E. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Vockenhuber, C. [Laboratory of Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zurich, Otto-Stern-Weg 5, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Watrous, M.G. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for {sup 129}I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  17. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamic, M.L.; Lister, T.E.; Dufek, E.J.; Jenson, D.D.; Olson, J.E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for "1"2"9I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  18. A high-throughput sample preparation method for cellular proteomics using 96-well filter plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzar, Linda; van Angeren, Jordy; Pinkse, Martijn; Kool, Jeroen; Niessen, Wilfried M A

    2013-10-01

    A high-throughput sample preparation protocol based on the use of 96-well molecular weight cutoff (MWCO) filter plates was developed for shotgun proteomics of cell lysates. All sample preparation steps, including cell lysis, buffer exchange, protein denaturation, reduction, alkylation and proteolytic digestion are performed in a 96-well plate format, making the platform extremely well suited for processing large numbers of samples and directly compatible with functional assays for cellular proteomics. In addition, the usage of a single plate for all sample preparation steps following cell lysis reduces potential samples losses and allows for automation. The MWCO filter also enables sample concentration, thereby increasing the overall sensitivity, and implementation of washing steps involving organic solvents, for example, to remove cell membranes constituents. The optimized protocol allowed for higher throughput with improved sensitivity in terms of the number of identified cellular proteins when compared to an established protocol employing gel-filtration columns. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Review of sample preparation techniques for the analysis of pesticide residues in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadeo, José L; Pérez, Rosa Ana; Albero, Beatriz; García-Valcárcel, Ana I; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the sample preparation techniques used for the analysis of pesticides in soil. The present status and recent advances made during the last 5 years in these methods are discussed. The analysis of pesticide residues in soil requires the extraction of analytes from this matrix, followed by a cleanup procedure, when necessary, prior to their instrumental determination. The optimization of sample preparation is a very important part of the method development that can reduce the analysis time, the amount of solvent, and the size of samples. This review considers all aspects of sample preparation, including extraction and cleanup. Classical extraction techniques, such as shaking, Soxhlet, and ultrasonic-assisted extraction, and modern techniques like pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, solid-phase microextraction and QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe) are reviewed. The different cleanup strategies applied for the purification of soil extracts are also discussed. In addition, the application of these techniques to environmental studies is considered.

  20. Ergonomic analysis of radiopharmaceuticals samples preparation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Luciene Betzler C.; Santos, Isaac Luquetti dos; Fonseca, Antonio Carlos C. da; Pellini, Marcos Pinto; Rebelo, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    The doses of radioisotopes to be administrated in patients for diagnostic effect or therapy are prepared in the radiopharmacological sector. The preparation process adopts techniques that are aimed to reduce the exposition time of the professionals and the absorption of excessive doses for patients. The ergonomic analysis of this process contributes in the prevention of occupational illnesses and to prevent risks of accidents during the routines, providing welfare and security to the involved users and conferring to the process an adequate working standard. In this context it is perceived relevance of studies that deal with the analysis of factors that point with respect to the solution of problems and for establishing proposals that minimize risks in the exercise of the activities. Through a methodology that considers the application of the concepts of Ergonomics, it is searched the improvement of the effectiveness or the quality and reduction of the difficulties lived for the workers. The work prescribed, established through norms and procedures codified will be faced with the work effectively carried through, the real work, shaped to break the correct appreciation, with focus in the activities. This work has as objective to argue an ergonomic analysis of samples preparation process of radioisotopes in the Setor de Radiofarmacia do Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). (author)

  1. Improved sample preparation and counting techniques for enhanced tritium measurement sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J.; Aalseth, C.; Bailey, V. L.; Mace, E. K.; Overman, C.; Seifert, A.; Wilcox Freeburg, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Tritium (T) measurements offer insight to a wealth of environmental applications including hydrologic tracking, discerning ocean circulation patterns, and aging ice formations. However, the relatively short half-life of T (12.3 years) limits its effective age dating range. Compounding this limitation is the decrease in atmospheric T content by over two orders of magnitude (from 1000-2000 TU in 1962 to testing in the 1960's. We are developing sample preparation methods coupled to direct counting of T via ultra-low background proportional counters which, when combined, offer improved T measurement sensitivity (~4.5 mmoles of H2 equivalent) and will help expand the application of T age dating to smaller sample sizes linked to persistent environmental questions despite the limitations above. For instance, this approach can be used to T date ~ 2.2 mmoles of CH4 collected from sample-limited systems including microbial communities, soils, or subsurface aquifers and can be combined with radiocarbon dating to distinguish the methane's formation age from C age in a system. This approach can also expand investigations into soil organic C where the improved sensitivity will permit resolution of soil C into more descriptive fractions and provide direct assessments of the stability of specific classes of organic matter in soils environments. We are employing a multiple step sample preparation system whereby organic samples are first combusted with resulting CO2 and H2O being used as a feedstock to synthesize CH4. This CH4 is mixed with Ar and loaded directly into an ultra-low background proportional counter for measurement of T β decay in a shallow underground laboratory. Analysis of water samples requires only the addition of geologic CO2 feedstock with the sample for methane synthesis. The chemical nature of the preparation techniques enable high sample throughput with only the final measurement requiring T decay with total sample analysis time ranging from 2 -5 weeks

  2. Preparation and application of radioactive soil samples for intercomparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zequan; Li Zhou; Li Pengxiang; Wang Ruijun; Ren Xiaona

    2014-01-01

    This article summarized the preparation process and intercomparison results of the simulated environmental radioactive soil samples. The components of the matrix were: SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 , MgO, CaO, NaCl, KCl and TiO 2 . All of the components were milled, oven-dried, sieved and then blended together. The homogeneity test was according to GB 15000. 5-1994, and no significant differences were observed. The 3 H analysis soils were spiked natural soils with the moisture content of 15%. Eight laboratories attended this intercomparison. The results proves that the preparation of the simulated soils were suitable for the inter-laboratories comparison. (authors)

  3. Preparation of rock samples for measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czubek, J.A.; Burda, J.; Drozdowicz, K.; Igielski, A.; Kowalik, W.; Krynicka-Drozdowicz, E.; Woznicka, U.

    1986-03-01

    Preparation of rock samples for the measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section in small cylindrical two-region systems by a pulsed technique is presented. Requirements which should be fulfilled during the preparation of the samples due to physical assumptions of the method are given. A cylindrical vessel is filled with crushed rock and saturated with a medium strongly absorbing thermal neutrons. Water solutions of boric acid of well-known macroscopic absorption cross-section are used. Mass contributions of the components in the sample are specified. This is necessary for the calculation of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section of the rock matrix. The conditions necessary for assuring the required accuracy of the measurement are given and the detailed procedure of preparation of the rock sample is described. (author)

  4. Should the mass of a nanoferrite sample prepared by autocombustion method be considered as a realistic preparation parameter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahba, Adel Maher, E-mail: adel.mousa@f-eng.tanta.edu.eg [Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University (Egypt); Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr [Ain shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-02-15

    Detectable variations in structural, elastic and magnetic properties have been reported depending on the mass of the cobalt nanoferrite sample prepared by citrate autocombustion method. Heat released during the autocombustion process and its duration are directly proportional to the mass to be prepared, and is thus expected to affect both the crystallite size and the cation distribution giving rise to the reported variations in microstrain, magnetization, and coercivity. Formation of a pure spinel phase has been validated using X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. Crystallite sizes obtained from Williamson-Hall (W-H) method range from 28–87 nm, being further supported by images of high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). Saturation magnetization and coercivity deduced from M-H hysteresis loops show a clear correlation with the cation distribution, which was proposed on the basis of experimentally obtained data of XRD, VSM, and IR. Elastic parameters have been estimated using the cation distribution and FTIR data, with a resulting trend quite opposite to that of the lattice parameter. - Highlights: • Samples with different masses of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were prepared by autocombustion method. • XRD and IR data confirmed a pure spinel cubic structure for all samples. • Structural and magnetic properties show detectable changes with the mass prepared. • Cation distribution was suggested from experimental data of XRD, IR, and M-H loops.

  5. Experiences from Refurbishment of Metallography Hot Cells and Application of a New Preparation Concept for Materialography Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberlander, B. C.; Espeland, M.; Solum, N. O.

    2001-01-01

    After more than 30 years of operation the lead shielded metallography hot cells needed a basic renewal and modernisation not least of the specimen preparation equipment. Preparation in hot cells of radioactive samples for metallography and ceramography is challenging and time consuming. It demands a special design and quality of all in-cell equipment and skill and patience from the operator. Essentials in the preparation process are: simplicity and reliability of the machines, and a good quality, reproducibility and efficiency in performance. Desirable is process automation, flexibility and an alara amounto of radioactive waste produced per sample prepared. State of the art preparation equipment for materialography seems to meet most of the demands, however, it cannot be used in hot cells without modifications. Therefore. IFE and Struers in Copenhagen modified a standard model of a Strues precision cutting machine and a microprocessor controlled grinding and polishing machine for Hot Cell application. Hot cell utilisation of the microcomputer controlled grinding and polishing machine and the existing automatic dosing equipment made the task of preparing radioactive samples more attractive. The new grinding and polishing system for hot cells provides good sample preparation quality and reproductibility at reduced preparation time and reduced amount of contaminated waste produced per sample prepared. the sample materials examined were irradiated cladding materials and fuels

  6. Radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) sample preparation laboratory in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macario, Kita D.; Gomes, Paulo R. S.; Anjos, Roberto M. dos; Linares, Roberto; Queiroz, Eduardo; Oliveira, Fabiana M. de; Cardozo, Laio; Carvalho, Carla R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: For decades Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has been widely used for radiocarbon measurements all over the world with application in several fields of science from archaeology to geosciences. This technique provides ultrasensitive analysis of reduced size samples or even specific compounds since sample atoms are accelerated to high energies and measured using nuclear particle detectors. Sample preparation is extremely important for accurate radiocarbon measurement and includes chemical pre-treatment to remove all possible contaminants. For beam extraction in the accelerator ion source, samples are usually converted to graphite. In this work we report a new radiocarbon sample preparation facility installed at the Physics Institute of Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), in Brazil. At the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory (LACRON) samples are chemically treated and converted to carbon dioxide by hydrolysis or combustion. A stainless steel based vacuum line was constructed for carbon dioxide separation and graphitization is performed in sealed quartz tubes in a muffle oven. Successful graphite production is important to provide stable beam currents and to minimize isotopic fractionation. Performance tests for graphite production are currently under way and isotopic analysis will soon be possible with the acquisition of a Single Stage AMS System by our group. The Single Stage Accelerator produced by National Electrostatic Corporation is a 250 kV air insulated accelerator especially constructed to measure the amount of 14 C in small modern graphite samples to a precision of 0.3 % or better. With the installation of such equipment in the first half of 2012, UFF will be ready to perform the 14C -AMS technique. (author)

  7. TruSeq Stranded mRNA and Total RNA Sample Preparation Kits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total RNA-Seq enabled by ribosomal RNA (rRNA) reduction is compatible with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples, which contain potentially critical biological information. The family of TruSeq Stranded Total RNA sample preparation kits provides a unique combination of unmatched data quality for both mRNA and whole-transcriptome analyses, robust interrogation of both standard and low-quality samples and workflows compatible with a wide range of study designs.

  8. Preparation and characterisation of magnetic nanostructured samples for inelastic neutron scattering experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang

    2010-06-22

    Recent advances in thin-film structuring techniques have generated significant interest in the dynamics of spin waves in magnetic nanostructures and the possible use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) for their investigation. This thesis describes the design and implementation, at GKSS Research Centre, of equipment for preparation of large and laterally submicron and nanometre structured magnetic samples for such future INS experiments. After a brief resume on spin waves in nanostructures, the development work on new purpose-designed equipment, including high vacuum (HV) argon ion beam milling and ultra high vacuum (UHV) e-beam evaporation setups, is described. Ni nanodot as well as Ni and novel Gd nanowire samples were prepared using combinations of sputter deposition, laser interference lithography, argon ion beam milling, e-beam evaporation and self organisation techniques. With reference to sample preparation, epitaxial growth studies for Ni on Si(100) substrate were performed, resulting in the development of a new deposition process, which by thermal tuning allows for the direct epitaxial growth of Ni on Si with unprecedented crystalline quality. The results of various characterisation experiments on the prepared nanostructured samples, including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis, Atomic and Magnetic Force Microscopy (AFM/MFM), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), unpolarised and Polarised Neutron Scattering (PNR) and off-specular scattering by X-rays and neutrons using rocking scans and Time-Of-Flight Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (TOF-GISANS), together with various analysis procedures such as Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA), are reported. The analysis of a Gd nanowire sample by TOF-GISANS led to a novel evaluation technique which in comparison with single wavelength methods allows portions of reciprocal space to be scanned without changing the angle of

  9. Preparation and characterisation of magnetic nanostructured samples for inelastic neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuzpaintner, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in thin-film structuring techniques have generated significant interest in the dynamics of spin waves in magnetic nanostructures and the possible use of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) for their investigation. This thesis describes the design and implementation, at GKSS Research Centre, of equipment for preparation of large and laterally submicron and nanometre structured magnetic samples for such future INS experiments. After a brief resume on spin waves in nanostructures, the development work on new purpose-designed equipment, including high vacuum (HV) argon ion beam milling and ultra high vacuum (UHV) e-beam evaporation setups, is described. Ni nanodot as well as Ni and novel Gd nanowire samples were prepared using combinations of sputter deposition, laser interference lithography, argon ion beam milling, e-beam evaporation and self organisation techniques. With reference to sample preparation, epitaxial growth studies for Ni on Si(100) substrate were performed, resulting in the development of a new deposition process, which by thermal tuning allows for the direct epitaxial growth of Ni on Si with unprecedented crystalline quality. The results of various characterisation experiments on the prepared nanostructured samples, including Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), microprobe analysis, Atomic and Magnetic Force Microscopy (AFM/MFM), Vibrating Sample Magnetometry (VSM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Reflectivity (XRR), unpolarised and Polarised Neutron Scattering (PNR) and off-specular scattering by X-rays and neutrons using rocking scans and Time-Of-Flight Grazing Incidence Small Angle Neutron Scattering (TOF-GISANS), together with various analysis procedures such as Distorted-Wave Born Approximation (DWBA), are reported. The analysis of a Gd nanowire sample by TOF-GISANS led to a novel evaluation technique which in comparison with single wavelength methods allows portions of reciprocal space to be scanned without changing the angle of

  10. Optimal sampling plan for clean development mechanism energy efficiency lighting projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Xianming; Xia, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jiangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A metering cost minimisation model is built to assist the sampling plan for CDM projects. • The model minimises the total metering cost by the determination of optimal sample size. • The required 90/10 criterion sampling accuracy is maintained. • The proposed metering cost minimisation model is applicable to other CDM projects as well. - Abstract: Clean development mechanism (CDM) project developers are always interested in achieving required measurement accuracies with the least metering cost. In this paper, a metering cost minimisation model is proposed for the sampling plan of a specific CDM energy efficiency lighting project. The problem arises from the particular CDM sampling requirement of 90% confidence and 10% precision for the small-scale CDM energy efficiency projects, which is known as the 90/10 criterion. The 90/10 criterion can be met through solving the metering cost minimisation problem. All the lights in the project are classified into different groups according to uncertainties of the lighting energy consumption, which are characterised by their statistical coefficient of variance (CV). Samples from each group are randomly selected to install power meters. These meters include less expensive ones with less functionality and more expensive ones with greater functionality. The metering cost minimisation model will minimise the total metering cost through the determination of the optimal sample size at each group. The 90/10 criterion is formulated as constraints to the metering cost objective. The optimal solution to the minimisation problem will therefore minimise the metering cost whilst meeting the 90/10 criterion, and this is verified by a case study. Relationships between the optimal metering cost and the population sizes of the groups, CV values and the meter equipment cost are further explored in three simulations. The metering cost minimisation model proposed for lighting systems is applicable to other CDM projects as

  11. Infrared biospectroscopy for a fast qualitative evaluation of sample preparation in metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuligowski, Julia; Pérez-Guaita, David; Escobar, Javier; Lliso, Isabel; de la Guardia, Miguel; Lendl, Bernhard; Vento, Máximo; Quintás, Guillermo

    2014-09-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) has been increasingly used in biomedicine to study the dynamic metabolomic responses of biological systems under different physiological or pathological conditions. To obtain an integrated snapshot of the system, metabolomic methods in biomedicine typically analyze biofluids (e.g. plasma) that require clean-up before being injected into LC-MS systems. However, high resolution LC-MS is costly in terms of resources required for sample and data analysis and care must be taken to prevent chemical (e.g. ion suppression) or statistical artifacts. Because of that, the effect of sample preparation on the metabolomic profile during metabolomic method development is often overlooked. This work combines an Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and a multivariate exploratory data analysis for a cost-effective qualitative evaluation of major changes in sample composition during sample preparation. ATR-FTIR and LC-time of flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) data from the analysis of a set of plasma samples precipitated using acetonitrile, methanol and acetone performed in parallel were used as a model example. Biochemical information obtained from the analysis of the ATR-FTIR and LC-TOFMS data was thoroughly compared to evaluate the strengths and shortcomings of FTIR biospectroscopy for assessing sample preparation in metabolomics studies. Results obtained show the feasibility of ATR-FTIR for the evaluation of major trends in the plasma composition changes among different sample pretreatments, providing information in terms of e.g., amino acids, proteins, lipids and carbohydrates overall contents comparable to those found by LC-TOFMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Highly oriented Bi-system bulk sample prepared by a decomposition-crystallization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Zhengping; Zhou Lian; Ji Chunlin

    1992-01-01

    A decomposition-crystallization method, preparing highly oriented Bi-system bulk sample is reported. The effects of processing parameter, decomposition temperature, cooling rate and post-treatment condition on texture and superconductivity are investigated. The method has successfully prepared highly textured Bi-system bulk samples. High temperature annealing does not destroy the growing texture, but the cooling rate has some effect on texture and superconductivity. Annealing in N 2 /O 2 atmosphere can improve superconductivity of the textured sample. The study on the superconductivity of the Bi(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O bulk material has been reported in numerous papers. The research on J c concentrates on the tape containing the 2223 phase, with very few studies on the J c of bulk sample. The reason for the lack of studies is that the change of superconducting phases at high temperatures has not been known. The authors have reported that the 2212 phase incongruently melted at about 875 degrees C and proceeded to orient the c-axis perpendicular to the surface in the process of crystallization of the 2212 phase. Based on that result, a decomposition-crystallization method was proposed to prepare highly oriented Bi-system bulk sample. In this paper, the process is described in detail and the effects of processing parameters on texture and superconductivity are reported

  13. X-ray diffraction without sample preparation: Proof-of-principle experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansford, Graeme M.

    2013-01-01

    The properties of a novel X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique having very low sensitivity to the sample morphology were previously elucidated through theoretical considerations and model simulations (Hansford, 2011). This technique opens up the possibility of mineralogical analysis by XRD without sample preparation. Here, the results of proof-of-principle experimental tests are presented. Two sets of experiments were performed using a vacuum chamber equipped with an X-ray tube source, sample holder and charge-coupled detector. Firstly, a pressed-powder pellet of α-quartz was placed in three different positions relative to the X-ray source and detector. The changes in position represent gross sample movements which would be inconceivable in conventional XRD analysis. The resulting back-reflection energy-dispersive spectra show a very high degree of correspondence other than an overall intensity factor dependent on the distance between the sample and detector. Secondly, the back-reflection spectrum of an unprepared limestone hand specimen, having mm-scale surface morphology, was compared to the spectrum of a calcite pressed-powder pellet. The correspondence of the diffraction peaks in the spectra demonstrate that the limestone is comprised dominantly of calcite. In both cases, the claims of the earlier paper are fully supported by the results of these experimental tests. -- Highlights: • Proof-of-principle tests of a novel X-ray diffraction (XRD) method were conducted. • Very low sensitivity to sample position and orientation was demonstrated. • Insensitivity to sample morphology is inferred. • A simple analysis of an unprepared limestone hand specimen was performed. • This technique enables mineralogical analysis by XRD without sample preparation

  14. pH adjustment of human blood plasma prior to bioanalytical sample preparation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, G.; Uges, D. R. A.; Franke, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    pH adjustment in bioanalytical sample preparation concerning ionisable compounds is one of the most common sample treatments. This is often done by mixing an aliquot of the sample with a proper buffer adjusted to the proposed pH. The pH of the resulting mixture however, does not necessarily have to

  15. The role of graphene-based sorbents in modern sample preparation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toffoli, Ana Lúcia; Maciel, Edvaldo Vasconcelos Soares; Fumes, Bruno Henrique; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2018-01-01

    The application of graphene-based sorbents in sample preparation techniques has increased significantly since 2011. These materials have good physicochemical properties to be used as sorbent and have shown excellent results in different sample preparation techniques. Graphene and its precursor graphene oxide have been considered to be good candidates to improve the extraction and concentration of different classes of target compounds (e.g., parabens, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, pyrethroids, triazines, and so on) present in complex matrices. Its applications have been employed during the analysis of different matrices (e.g., environmental, biological and food). In this review, we highlight the most important characteristics of graphene-based material, their properties, synthesis routes, and the most important applications in both off-line and on-line sample preparation techniques. The discussion of the off-line approaches includes methods derived from conventional solid-phase extraction focusing on the miniaturized magnetic and dispersive modes. The modes of microextraction techniques called stir bar sorptive extraction, solid phase microextraction, and microextraction by packed sorbent are discussed. The on-line approaches focus on the use of graphene-based material mainly in on-line solid phase extraction, its variation called in-tube solid-phase microextraction, and on-line microdialysis systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Preparation and validation of gross alpha/beta samples used in EML's quality assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpitta, S.C.

    1997-10-01

    A set of water and filter samples have been incorporated into the existing Environmental Measurements Laboratory's (EML) Quality Assessment Program (QAP) for gross alpha/beta determinations by participating DOE laboratories. The participating laboratories are evaluated by comparing their results with the EML value. The preferred EML method for measuring water and filter samples, described in this report, uses gas flow proportional counters with 2 in. detectors. Procedures for sample preparation, quality control and instrument calibration are presented. Liquid scintillation (LS) counting is an alternative technique that is suitable for quantifying both the alpha ( 241 Am, 230 Th and 238 Pu) and beta ( 90 Sr/ 90 Y) activity concentrations in the solutions used to prepare the QAP water and air filter samples. Three LS counting techniques (Cerenkov, dual dpm and full spectrum analysis) are compared. These techniques may be used to validate the activity concentrations of each component in the alpha/beta solution before the QAP samples are actually prepared

  17. Sample preparation and characterization of technetium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Serizawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kousaku; Itoh, Mitsuo

    1997-10-01

    Technetium-99 is a long-lived fission product with a half-life of about 2.1 x 10 5 years, which decays by β-emission. For the transmutation of 99 Tc, research on solid technetium was started. Technetium metal powder purchased was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, γ-ray spectrometry, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and -mass spectrometry. The lattice parameters obtained were agreed with the reported values. The metallic impurity was about 15 ppm, where aluminum and iron contributed mainly. No impurity nuclide with γ-emission was found. Using the technetium metal powder, button-, rod-, and disk-shaped samples of technetium metal were prepared by arc-melting technique. Thermal diffusivity of technetium metal was measured on a disk sample from room temperature to 1173 K by laser flash method. The thermal diffusivity decreased with increasing temperature though it was almost constant above 600 K. (author)

  18. Comparison of leach results from field and laboratory prepared samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblath, S.B.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The leach behavior of saltstone prepared in the laboratory agrees well with that from samples mixed in the field using the Littleford mixer. Leach rates of nitrates and cesium from the current reference formulation saltstone were compared. The laboratory samples were prepared using simulated salt solution; those in the field used Tank 50 decontaminated supernate. For both nitrate and cesium, the field and laboratory samples showed nearly identical leach rates for the first 30 to 50 days. For the remaining period of the test, the field samples showed higher leach rates with the maximum difference being less than a factor of three. Ruthenium and antimony were present in the Tank 50 supernate in known amounts. Antimony-125 was observed in the leachate and a fractional leach rate was calculated to be at least a factor of ten less than that of 137 Cs. No 106 Ru was observed in the leachate, and the release rate was not calculated. However, based on the detection limits for the analysis, the ruthenium leach rate must also be at least a factor of ten less than cesium. These data are the first measurements of the leach rates of Ru and Sb from saltstone. The nitrate leach rates for these samples were 5 x 10 -5 grams of nitrate per square cm per day after 100 days for the laboratory samples and after 200 days for the field samples. These values are consistent with the previously measured leach rates for reference formulation saltstone. The relative standard deviation in the leach rate is about 15% for the field samples, which all were produced from one batch of saltstone, and about 35% for the laboratory samples, which came from different batches. These are the first recorded estimates of the error in leach rates for saltstone

  19. The NOSAMS sample preparation laboratory in the next millenium: Progress after the WOCE program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, Alan R.; McNichol, Ann P.; Donoghue, Joanne C.; Stuart, Dana R.; Reden, Karl von

    2000-01-01

    Since 1991, the primary charge of the National Ocean Sciences AMS (NOSAMS) facility at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has been to supply high throughput, high precision AMS 14 C analyses for seawater samples collected as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). Approximately 13,000 samples taken as part of WOCE should be fully analyzed by the end of Y2K. Additional sample sources and techniques must be identified and incorporated if NOSAMS is to continue in its present operation mode. A trend in AMS today is the ability to routinely process and analyze radiocarbon samples that contain tiny amounts ( 14 C analysis has been recognized as a major facility goal. The installation of a new 134-position MC-SNICS ion source, which utilizes a smaller graphite target cartridge than presently used, is one step towards realizing this goal. New preparation systems constructed in the sample preparation laboratory (SPL) include an automated bank of 10 small-volume graphite reactors, an automated system to process organic carbon samples, and a multi-dimensional preparative capillary gas chromatograph (PCGC)

  20. Collection and preparation of bottom sediment samples for analysis of radionuclides and trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    The publication is the first in a series of TECDOCs on sampling and sample handling as part of the IAEA support to improve reliability of nuclear analytical techniques (NATs) in Member State laboratories. The purpose of the document is to provide information on the methods for collecting sediments, the equipment used, and the sample preparation techniques for radionuclide and elemental analysis. The most appropriate procedures for defining the strategies and criteria for selecting sampling locations, for sample storage and transportation are also given. Elements of QA/QC and documentation needs for sampling and sediment analysis are discussed. Collection and preparation of stream and river bottom sediments, lake bottom sediments, estuary bottom sediments, and marine (shallow) bottom sediments are covered. The document is intended to be a comprehensive manual for the collection and preparation of bottom sediments as a prerequisite to obtain representative and meaningful results using NATs. Quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) is emphasized as an important aspect to ensure proper collection, transportation, preservation, and analysis since it forms the basis for interpretation and legislation. Although there are many approaches and methods available for sediment analyses, the scope of the report is limited to sample preparation for (1) analysis of radionuclides (including sediment dating using radionuclides such as Pb-210 and Cs-137) and (2) analysis of trace, minor and major elements using nuclear and related analytical techniques such as NAA, XRF and PIXE

  1. Collection and preparation of bottom sediment samples for analysis of radionuclides and trace elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The publication is the first in a series of TECDOCs on sampling and sample handling as part of the IAEA support to improve reliability of nuclear analytical techniques (NATs) in Member State laboratories. The purpose of the document is to provide information on the methods for collecting sediments, the equipment used, and the sample preparation techniques for radionuclide and elemental analysis. The most appropriate procedures for defining the strategies and criteria for selecting sampling locations, for sample storage and transportation are also given. Elements of QA/QC and documentation needs for sampling and sediment analysis are discussed. Collection and preparation of stream and river bottom sediments, lake bottom sediments, estuary bottom sediments, and marine (shallow) bottom sediments are covered. The document is intended to be a comprehensive manual for the collection and preparation of bottom sediments as a prerequisite to obtain representative and meaningful results using NATs. Quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) is emphasized as an important aspect to ensure proper collection, transportation, preservation, and analysis since it forms the basis for interpretation and legislation. Although there are many approaches and methods available for sediment analyses, the scope of the report is limited to sample preparation for (1) analysis of radionuclides (including sediment dating using radionuclides such as Pb-210 and Cs-137) and (2) analysis of trace, minor and major elements using nuclear and related analytical techniques such as NAA, XRF and PIXE.

  2. Microfluidic devices for sample preparation and rapid detection of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Krishna; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Dave, Vivek Priy; Ngo, Tien Anh; Chidambara, Vinayaka Aaydha; Than, Linh Quyen; Bang, Dang Duong; Wolff, Anders

    2018-03-10

    Rapid detection of foodborne pathogens at an early stage is imperative for preventing the outbreak of foodborne diseases, known as serious threats to human health. Conventional bacterial culturing methods for foodborne pathogen detection are time consuming, laborious, and with poor pathogen diagnosis competences. This has prompted researchers to call the current status of detection approaches into question and leverage new technologies for superior pathogen sensing outcomes. Novel strategies mainly rely on incorporating all the steps from sample preparation to detection in miniaturized devices for online monitoring of pathogens with high accuracy and sensitivity in a time-saving and cost effective manner. Lab on chip is a blooming area in diagnosis, which exploits different mechanical and biological techniques to detect very low concentrations of pathogens in food samples. This is achieved through streamlining the sample handling and concentrating procedures, which will subsequently reduce human errors and enhance the accuracy of the sensing methods. Integration of sample preparation techniques into these devices can effectively minimize the impact of complex food matrix on pathogen diagnosis and improve the limit of detections. Integration of pathogen capturing bio-receptors on microfluidic devices is a crucial step, which can facilitate recognition abilities in harsh chemical and physical conditions, offering a great commercial benefit to the food-manufacturing sector. This article reviews recent advances in current state-of-the-art of sample preparation and concentration from food matrices with focus on bacterial capturing methods and sensing technologies, along with their advantages and limitations when integrated into microfluidic devices for online rapid detection of pathogens in foods and food production line. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. A River Model Intercomparison Project in Preparation for SWOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C. H.; Andreadis, K.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Beighley, E.; Boone, A. A.; Yamazaki, D.; Paiva, R. C. D.; Fleischmann, A. S.; Collischonn, W.; Fisher, C. K.; Kim, H.; Biancamaria, S.

    2017-12-01

    The Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission is currently scheduled to launch at the beginning of next decade. SWOT is expected to retrieve unprecedented measurements of water extent, elevation, and slope in the largest terrestrial water bodies. Such potential transformative information motivates the investigation of our ability to ingest the associated data into continental-scale models of terrestrial hydrology. In preparation for the expected SWOT observations, an inter-comparison of continental-scale river models is being performed. This comparison experiment focuses on four of the world's largest river basins: the Amazon, the Mississippi, the Niger, and the Saint-Lawrence. This ongoing project focuses on two main research questions: 1) How can we best prepare for the expected SWOT continental to global measurements before SWOT even flies?, and 2) What is the added value of including SWOT terrestrial measurements into global hydro models for enhancing our understanding of the terrestrial water cycle and the climate system? We present here the results of the second year of this project which now includes simulations from six numerical models of rivers over the Mississippi and sheds light on the implications of various modeling choices on simulation quality as well as on the potential impact of SWOT observations.

  4. Rapid immunohistochemical diagnosis of tobacco mosaic virus disease by microwave-assisted plant sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellnig, Günther; Möstl, Stefan; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Immunoelectron microscopy is a powerful method to diagnose viral diseases and to study the distribution of the viral agent within plant cells and tissues. Nevertheless, current protocols for the immunological detection of viral diseases with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in plants take between 3 and 6 days and are therefore not suited for rapid diagnosis of virus diseases in plants. In this study, we describe a method that allows rapid cytohistochemical detection of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in leaves of tobacco plants. With the help of microwave irradiation, sample preparation of the leaves was reduced to 90 min. After sample sectioning, virus particles were stained on the sections by immunogold labelling of the viral coat protein, which took 100 min. After investigation with the TEM, a clear visualization of TMV in tobacco cells was achieved altogether in about half a day. Comparison of gold particle density by image analysis revealed that samples prepared with the help of microwave irradiation yielded significantly higher gold particle density as samples prepared conventionally at room temperature. This study clearly demonstrates that microwave-assisted plant sample preparation in combination with cytohistochemical localization of viral coat protein is well suited for rapid diagnosis of plant virus diseases in altogether about half a day by TEM. PMID:23580761

  5. Protocols for the analytical characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. II - Enzymatic and chemical sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobaly, Balazs; D'Atri, Valentina; Goyon, Alexandre; Colas, Olivier; Beck, Alain; Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2017-08-15

    The analytical characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and related proteins usually incorporates various sample preparation methodologies. Indeed, quantitative and qualitative information can be enhanced by simplifying the sample, thanks to the removal of sources of heterogeneity (e.g. N-glycans) and/or by decreasing the molecular size of the tested protein by enzymatic or chemical fragmentation. These approaches make the sample more suitable for chromatographic and mass spectrometric analysis. Structural elucidation and quality control (QC) analysis of biopharmaceutics are usually performed at intact, subunit and peptide levels. In this paper, general sample preparation approaches used to attain peptide, subunit and glycan level analysis are overviewed. Protocols are described to perform tryptic proteolysis, IdeS and papain digestion, reduction as well as deglycosylation by PNGase F and EndoS2 enzymes. Both historical and modern sample preparation methods were compared and evaluated using rituximab and trastuzumab, two reference therapeutic mAb products approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). The described protocols may help analysts to develop sample preparation methods in the field of therapeutic protein analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The NOSAMS sample preparation laboratory in the next millenium: Progress after the WOCE program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, Alan R. E-mail: agagnon@whoi.edu; McNichol, Ann P.; Donoghue, Joanne C.; Stuart, Dana R.; Reden, Karl von

    2000-10-01

    Since 1991, the primary charge of the National Ocean Sciences AMS (NOSAMS) facility at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has been to supply high throughput, high precision AMS {sup 14}C analyses for seawater samples collected as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). Approximately 13,000 samples taken as part of WOCE should be fully analyzed by the end of Y2K. Additional sample sources and techniques must be identified and incorporated if NOSAMS is to continue in its present operation mode. A trend in AMS today is the ability to routinely process and analyze radiocarbon samples that contain tiny amounts (<100 {mu}g) of carbon. The capability to mass-produce small samples for {sup 14}C analysis has been recognized as a major facility goal. The installation of a new 134-position MC-SNICS ion source, which utilizes a smaller graphite target cartridge than presently used, is one step towards realizing this goal. New preparation systems constructed in the sample preparation laboratory (SPL) include an automated bank of 10 small-volume graphite reactors, an automated system to process organic carbon samples, and a multi-dimensional preparative capillary gas chromatograph (PCGC)

  7. Sample preparation method for induced mutation on orchid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhaimi Musa; Sakinah Ariffin

    2005-01-01

    Studies on the induction of mutation in Dendrobium orchid at MINT has produced a number of new orchid mutant cultivars. Tissue culture techniques on orchid seeds and meristem cloning are employed in preparing the samples for the mutation induction. Solid medium based on the Murashige and Skoog (1962) and liquid medium based on Vacin and Went (1949) were found to be suitable in producing protocorm like bodies (PLBs) that are required for the irradiation treatment. (Author)

  8. [Standard sample preparation method for quick determination of trace elements in plastic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wen-Qing; Zong, Rui-Long; Zhu, Yong-Fa

    2011-08-01

    Reference sample was prepared by masterbatch method, containing heavy metals with known concentration of electronic information products (plastic), the repeatability and precision were determined, and reference sample preparation procedures were established. X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) analysis method was used to determine the repeatability and uncertainty in the analysis of the sample of heavy metals and bromine element. The working curve and the metrical methods for the reference sample were carried out. The results showed that the use of the method in the 200-2000 mg x kg(-1) concentration range for Hg, Pb, Cr and Br elements, and in the 20-200 mg x kg(-1) range for Cd elements, exhibited a very good linear relationship, and the repeatability of analysis methods for six times is good. In testing the circuit board ICB288G and ICB288 from the Mitsubishi Heavy Industry Company, results agreed with the recommended values.

  9. Risk management of PPP project in the preparation stage based on Fault Tree Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yuanzhi; Guan, Qiuling

    2017-03-01

    The risk management of PPP(Public Private Partnership) project can improve the level of risk control between government departments and private investors, so as to make more beneficial decisions, reduce investment losses and achieve mutual benefit as well. Therefore, this paper takes the PPP project preparation stage venture as the research object to identify and confirm four types of risks. At the same time, fault tree analysis(FTA) is used to evaluate the risk factors that belong to different parts, and quantify the influencing degree of risk impact on the basis of risk identification. In addition, it determines the importance order of risk factors by calculating unit structure importance on PPP project preparation stage. The result shows that accuracy of government decision-making, rationality of private investors funds allocation and instability of market returns are the main factors to generate the shared risk on the project.

  10. Cytotoxicity of Light-Cured Dental Materials according to Different Sample Preparation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Jin Lee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental light-cured resins can undergo different degrees of polymerization when applied in vivo. When polymerization is incomplete, toxic monomers may be released into the oral cavity. The present study assessed the cytotoxicity of different materials, using sample preparation methods that mirror clinical conditions. Composite and bonding resins were used and divided into four groups according to sample preparation method: uncured; directly cured samples, which were cured after being placed on solidified agar; post-cured samples were polymerized before being placed on agar; and “removed unreacted layer” samples had their oxygen-inhibition layer removed after polymerization. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using an agar diffusion test, MTT assay, and confocal microscopy. Uncured samples were the most cytotoxic, while removed unreacted layer samples were the least cytotoxic (p < 0.05. In the MTT assay, cell viability increased significantly in every group as the concentration of the extracts decreased (p < 0.05. Extracts from post-cured and removed unreacted layer samples of bonding resin were less toxic than post-cured and removed unreacted layer samples of composite resin. Removal of the oxygen-inhibition layer resulted in the lowest cytotoxicity. Clinicians should remove unreacted monomers on the resin surface immediately after restoring teeth with light-curing resin to improve the restoration biocompatibility.

  11. Sample preparation prior to the LC-MS-based metabolomics/metabonomics of blood-derived samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gika, Helen; Theodoridis, Georgios

    2011-07-01

    Blood represents a very important biological fluid and has been the target of continuous and extensive research for diagnostic, or health and drug monitoring reasons. Recently, metabonomics/metabolomics have emerged as a new and promising 'omics' platform that shows potential in biomarker discovery, especially in areas such as disease diagnosis, assessment of drug efficacy or toxicity. Blood is collected in various establishments in conditions that are not standardized. Next, the samples are prepared and analyzed using different methodologies or tools. When targeted analysis of key molecules (e.g., a drug or its metabolite[s]) is the aim, enforcement of certain measures or additional analyses may correct and harmonize these discrepancies. In omics fields such as those performed by holistic analytical approaches, no such rules or tools are available. As a result, comparison or correlation of results or data fusion becomes impractical. However, it becomes evident that such obstacles should be overcome in the near future to allow for large-scale studies that involve the assaying of samples from hundreds of individuals. In this case the effect of sample handling and preparation becomes very serious, in order to avoid wasting months of work from experts and expensive instrument time. The present review aims to cover the different methodologies applied to the pretreatment of blood prior to LC-MS metabolomic/metabonomic studies. The article tries to critically compare the methods and highlight issues that need to be addressed.

  12. Recent advances in sample preparation techniques and methods of sulfonamides detection - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrienko, Stanislava G; Kochuk, Elena V; Apyari, Vladimir V; Tolmacheva, Veronika V; Zolotov, Yury A

    2014-11-19

    Sulfonamides (SAs) have been the most widely used antimicrobial drugs for more than 70 years, and their residues in foodstuffs and environmental samples pose serious health hazards. For this reason, sensitive and specific methods for the quantification of these compounds in numerous matrices have been developed. This review intends to provide an updated overview of the recent trends over the past five years in sample preparation techniques and methods for detecting SAs. Examples of the sample preparation techniques, including liquid-liquid and solid-phase extraction, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and QuEChERS, are given. Different methods of detecting the SAs present in food and feed and in environmental, pharmaceutical and biological samples are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Monolith Chromatography as Sample Preparation Step in Virome Studies of Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Ion; Kutnjak, Denis; Rački, Nejc; Rupar, Matevž; Ravnikar, Maja

    2018-01-01

    Viruses exist in aquatic media and many of them use this media as transmission route. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have opened new doors in virus research, allowing also to reveal a hidden diversity of viral species in aquatic environments. Not surprisingly, many of the newly discovered viruses are found in environmental fresh and marine waters. One of the problems in virome research can be the low amount of viral nucleic acids present in the sample in contrast to the background ones (host, eukaryotic, prokaryotic, environmental). Therefore, virus enrichment prior to NGS is necessary in many cases. In water samples, an added problem resides in the low concentration of viruses typically present in aquatic media. Different concentration strategies have been used to overcome such limitations. CIM monoliths are a new generation of chromatographic supports that due to their particular structural characteristics are very efficient in concentration and purification of viruses. In this chapter, we describe the use of CIM monolithic chromatography for sample preparation step in NGS studies targeting viruses in fresh or marine water. The step-by-step protocol will include a case study where CIM concentration was used to study the virome of a wastewater sample using NGS.

  14. Electrodeposition as a sample preparation technique for TXRF analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesel, S.; Reus, U.; Prange, A.

    2000-01-01

    TXRF analysis of trace elements at concentrations in the μg/L range and below in high salt matrices normally requires a number of sample preparation steps that include separation of the salt matrix and preconcentration of the trace elements. A neat approach which allows samples to be prepared straightforwardly in a single step involves the application of electrochemical deposition using the TXRF sample support itself as an electrode. For this work a common three-electrode arrangement (radiometer analytical) with a rotating disc electrode as the working electrode, as is frequently employed in voltametric analysis, has been used. A special electrode tip has been constructed as a holder for the sample carrier which consists of polished glassy carbon. This material has been proven to be suitable for both its electrical and chemical properties. Measurements of the trace elements were performed using the ATOMIKA 8030C TXRF spectrometer, with the option of variable incident angles. In first experiments an artificial sea water matrix containing various trace elements in the μg/L range has been used. Elements such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Pb deposited on glassy carbon carriers. The deposition can be optimized by controlling the potential of the working electrode with respect to the reference electrode. Metal ions with a suitable standard potential are reduced to the metallic state and plated onto the electrode surface. When deposition is finished the sample carrier is demounted, rinsed with ultra-pure water and measured directly. Deposition yields for the elements under investigation are quite similar, and with an appropriate choice of the reference element, quantification can be achieved directly by internal standardization. The influence of parameters such as time, pH value, and trace element concentration on the deposition yield has been examined, and the results will be presented along with reproducibility studies. (author)

  15. Sample preparation for large-scale bioanalytical studies based on liquid chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedovici, Andrei; Bacalum, Elena; David, Victor

    2018-01-01

    Quality of the analytical data obtained for large-scale and long term bioanalytical studies based on liquid chromatography depends on a number of experimental factors including the choice of sample preparation method. This review discusses this tedious part of bioanalytical studies, applied to large-scale samples and using liquid chromatography coupled with different detector types as core analytical technique. The main sample preparation methods included in this paper are protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction, derivatization and their versions. They are discussed by analytical performances, fields of applications, advantages and disadvantages. The cited literature covers mainly the analytical achievements during the last decade, although several previous papers became more valuable in time and they are included in this review. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Sample Preparation and Identification of Biological, Chemical and Mid-Spectrum Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hancock, J. R; Dragon, D. C

    2005-01-01

    A general survey of sample preparation and identification techniques for biological, chemical and mid-spectrum agents was conducted as part of Canada's contribution to a joint NATO Allied Engineering Publication (AEP) handbook...

  17. Bovine liver sample preparation and micro-homogeneity study for Cu and Zn determination by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Cassiana S.; Silva, Cintia S.; Nogueira, Ana R.A.; Oliveira, Pedro V.

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a systematic study for the bovine liver sample preparation for Cu and Zn determination by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The main parameters investigated were sample drying, grinding process, particle size, sample size, microsample homogeneity, and their relationship with the precision and accuracy of the method. A bovine liver sample was prepared using different drying procedures: (1) freeze drying, and (2) drying in a household microwave oven followed by drying in a stove at 60 deg. C until constant mass. Ball and cryogenic mills were used for grinding. Less sensitive wavelengths for Cu (216.5 nm) and Zn (307.6 nm), and Zeeman-based three-field background correction for Cu were used to diminish the sensitivities. The pyrolysis and atomization temperatures adopted were 1000 deg. C and 2300 deg. C for Cu, and 700 deg. C and 1700 deg. C for Zn, respectively. For both elements, it was possible to calibrate the spectrometer with aqueous solutions. The use of 250 μg of W + 200 μg of Rh as permanent chemical modifier was imperative for Zn. Under these conditions, the characteristic mass and detection limit were 1.4 ng and 1.6 ng for Cu, and 2.8 ng and 1.3 ng for Zn, respectively. The results showed good agreement (95% confidence level) for homogeneity of the entire material (> 200 mg) when the sample was dried in microwave/stove and ground in a cryogenic mill. The microsample homogeneity study showed that Zn is more dependent on the sample pretreatment than Cu. The bovine liver sample prepared in microwave/stove and ground in a cryogenic mill presented results with the lowest relative standard deviation for Cu than Zn. Good accuracy and precision were observed for bovine liver masses higher than 40 μg for Cu and 30 μg for Zn. The concentrations of Cu and Zn in the prepared bovine liver sample were 223 mg kg - 1 and 128 mg kg - 1 , respectively. The relative standard deviations were lower than 6% (n = 5). The

  18. Sample preparation: a critical step in the analysis of cholesterol oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Christiana A; Constantinou, Michalis S; Kapnissi-Christodoulou, Constantina P

    2014-02-15

    In recent years, cholesterol oxidation products (COPs) have drawn scientific interest, particularly due to their implications on human health. A big number of these compounds have been demonstrated to be cytotoxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic. The main source of COPs is through diet, and particularly from the consumption of cholesterol-rich foods. This raises questions about the safety of consumers, and it suggests the necessity for the development of a sensitive and a reliable analytical method in order to identify and quantify these components in food samples. Sample preparation is a necessary step in the analysis of COPs in order to eliminate interferences and increase sensitivity. Numerous publications have, over the years, reported the use of different methods for the extraction and purification of COPs. However, no method has, so far, been established as a routine method for the analysis of COPs in foods. Therefore, it was considered important to overview different sample preparation procedures and evaluate the different preparative parameters, such as time of saponification, the type of organic solvents for fat extraction, the stationary phase in solid phase extraction, etc., according to recovery, precision and simplicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation of solid-state samples of a transition metal coordination compound for synchrotron radiation photoemission studies

    CERN Document Server

    Crotti, C; Celestino, T; Fontana, S

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research was to identify a sample preparation method suitable for the study of transition metal complexes by photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation as the X-ray source, even in the case where the compound is not evaporable. Solid-phase samples of W(CO) sub 4 (dppe) [dppe=1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane] were prepared according to different methods and their synchrotron radiation XPS spectra measured. The spectra acquired from samples prepared by spin coating show core level peaks only slightly broader than the spectrum recorded from UHV evaporated samples. Moreover, for these samples the reproducibility of the binding energy values is excellent. The dependence of the spin coating technique on parameters such as solvent and solution concentration, spinning speed and support material was studied. The same preparation method also allowed the acquisition of valence band spectra, the main peaks of which were clearly resolved. The results suggest that use of the spin coating techniqu...

  20. Microfluidic devices for sample preparation and rapid detection of foodborne pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant, Krishna; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Dave, Vivek Priy

    2018-01-01

    and improve the limit of detections. Integration of pathogen capturing bio-receptors on microfluidic devices is a crucial step, which can facilitate recognition abilities in harsh chemical and physical conditions, offering a great commercial benefit to the food-manufacturing sector. This article reviews...... diagnosis competences. This has prompted researchers to call the current status of detection approaches into question and leverage new technologies for superior pathogen sensing outcomes. Novel strategies mainly rely on incorporating all the steps from sample preparation to detection in miniaturized devices...... recent advances in current state-of-the-art of sample preparation and concentration from food matrices with focus on bacterial capturing methods and sensing technologies, along with their advantages and limitations when integrated into microfluidic devices for online rapid detection of pathogens in foods...

  1. Sample preparation method for the combined extraction of ethyl glucuronide and drugs of abuse in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ulf; Briellmann, Thomas; Scheurer, Eva; Dussy, Franz

    2018-04-01

    Often in hair analysis, a small hair sample is available while the analysis of a multitude of structurally diverse substances with different concentration ranges is demanded. The analysis of the different substances often requires different sample preparation methods, increasing the amount of required hair sample. When segmental hair analysis is necessary, the amount of hair sample needed is further increased. Therefore, the required sample amount for a full analysis can quickly exceed what is available. To combat this problem, a method for the combined hair sample preparation using a single extraction procedure for analysis of ethyl glucuronide with liquid chromatography-multistage fragmentation mass spectrometry/multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MS 3 /MRM) and common drugs of abuse with LC-MRM was developed. The combined sample preparation is achieved by separating ethyl glucuronide from the drugs of abuse into separate extracts by fractionation in the solid-phase extraction step during sample clean-up. A full validation for all substances for the parameters selectivity, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision, matrix effects, and recovery was successfully completed. The following drugs of abuse were included in the method: Amphetamine; methamphetamine; 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA); 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA); 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-ethylamphetamine (MDE); morphine; 6-monoacetylmorphine; codeine; acetylcodeine; cocaine; benzoylecgonine; norcocaine; cocaethylene; methadone; 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) and methylphenidate. In conclusion, as only 1 sample preparation is needed with 1 aliquot of hair, the presented sample preparation allows an optimal analysis of both ethyl glucuronide and of the drugs of abuse, even when the sample amount is a limiting factor. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Durango, Colorado, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used to characterize the site ground water compliance strategies and to monitor contaminants of potential concern identified in the baseline risk assessment (DOE, 1995a). Regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site

  3. Study of sample preparation in the measurement of 36Ar(n, p)36Cl reaction cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Songsheng; Hemick, T.K.

    1992-01-01

    The preparation of enriched 36 Ar gas samples and 36 Cl samples for the use in the AMS measurement of 36 Ar(n, p) 36 Cl reaction cross section was described. The 36 Ar samples prepared had the volumes of about 0.4 ml and the weights of about 0.5 mg. The uncertainty in atomic numbers of 36 Ar was (0.3∼0.4)%. The reaction product, 36 Cl, in the 36 Ar was collected and the AgCl samples were prepared

  4. Dynamic Headspace Sampling as an Initial Step for Sample Preparation in Chromatographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnowski, Wojciech; Majchrzak, Tomasz; Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    This work represents a brief summary of the use of dynamic headspace (DHS) as a technique for sample preparation in chromatographic analysis. Despite numerous developments in the area of analyte isolation and enrichment, DHS remains one of the fundamental methods used with GC. In our opinion, interest in this technique will not diminish significantly because it conforms to stipulations of green analytical chemistry. Moreover, DHS fulfills the need for methods that facilitate detection and determination of analytes present at ultratrace levels in complex matrixes. The main focus of this work was placed on the theoretical fundamentals of this method. Also described herein were DHS development, the advantages and disadvantages of this technique compared with other headspace sampling techniques, and selected examples of its applications in food and environmental analyses.

  5. Ultrasonic assisted extraction - an alternative for sample preparation (M4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Junior, P.; Barbosa Junior, F.; Krug, F.J.; Trevizan, L.C.; Nobrega, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In the last years the ultrasound assisted metal extraction has been frequency proposed as a simple and inexpensive alternative for sample preparation of biological and inorganic samples. The extraction effect is considered as being caused by acoustic cavitation, that is, bubble formation and subsequent disruptive action. The collapse of bubbles created by sonication of solutions results in the generation of extremely high local temperature and pressure gradients, which may be regarded as localized 'hot spots'. On a timescale of about 10 -10 s, effective local pressures and temperature of about 10 5 atm and about 5000 K, respectively, are generated under sonochemical conditions. Usually, this method uses a diluted acid medium decreasing blank values and reducing both reagents and time consumption compared to traditional wet digestion systems using conductive or microwave-assisted heating. Furthermore, sonication can also allow the preparation of samples directly within the sample container, thereby preventing sample losses and minimizing sample contamination. Although some controversial results concerning metals extraction behavior have been reported, they could be explained by analyte-matrix interaction and the ability of the ultrasonic processor to generate ultrasound (i.e. the use of an ultrasonic bath or an ultrasonic probe at different power, frequency, and amplitude). This contribution presents a review of ultrasound assisted metal extraction and recent performance data obtained in our laboratory for determination of elements in biological materials, soils and sediments by ICP-OES and ETAAS. The effect of extraction parameters, such as type and concentration of the leaching solution, sonication time and performance of ultrasonic processor (bath or probe) will be presented. (author)

  6. Homogeneous immunosubtraction integrated with sample preparation is enabled by a microfluidic format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apori, Akwasi A.; Herr, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Immunosubtraction is a powerful and resource-intensive laboratory medicine assay that reports both protein mobility and binding specificity. To expedite and automate this electrophoretic assay, we report on advances to the electrophoretic immunosubtraction assay by introducing a homogeneous, not heterogeneous, format with integrated sample preparation. To accomplish homogeneous immunosubtraction, a step-decrease in separation matrix pore-size at the head of a polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) separation channel enables ‘subtraction’ of target analyte when capture antibody is present (as the large immune-complex is excluded from PAGE), but no subtraction when capture antibody is absent. Inclusion of sample preparation functionality via small pore size polyacrylamide membranes is also key to automated operation (i.e., sample enrichment, fluorescence sample labeling, and mixing of sample with free capture antibody). Homogenous sample preparation and assay operation allows on-the-fly, integrated subtraction of one to multiple protein targets and reuse of each device. Optimization of the assay is detailed which allowed for ~95% subtraction of target with 20% non-specific extraction of large species at the optimal antibody-antigen ratio, providing conditions needed for selective target identification. We demonstrate the assay on putative markers of injury and inflammation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), an emerging area of diagnostics research, by rapidly reporting protein mobility and binding specificity within the sample matrix. We simultaneously detect S100B and C-reactive protein, suspected biomarkers for traumatic brain injury (TBI), in ~2 min. Lastly, we demonstrate S100B detection (65 nM) in raw human CSF with a lower limit of detection of ~3.25 nM, within the clinically relevant concentration range for detecting TBI in CSF. Beyond the novel CSF assay introduced here, a fully automated immunosubtraction assay would impact a spectrum of routine but labor

  7. Recent Trends in Microextraction Techniques Employed in Analytical and Bioanalytical Sample Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuzar Kabir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sample preparation has been recognized as a major step in the chemical analysis workflow. As such, substantial efforts have been made in recent years to simplify the overall sample preparation process. Major focusses of these efforts have included miniaturization of the extraction device; minimizing/eliminating toxic and hazardous organic solvent consumption; eliminating sample pre-treatment and post-treatment steps; reducing the sample volume requirement; reducing extraction equilibrium time, maximizing extraction efficiency etc. All these improved attributes are congruent with the Green Analytical Chemistry (GAC principles. Classical sample preparation techniques such as solid phase extraction (SPE and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE are being rapidly replaced with emerging miniaturized and environmentally friendly techniques such as Solid Phase Micro Extraction (SPME, Stir bar Sorptive Extraction (SBSE, Micro Extraction by Packed Sorbent (MEPS, Fabric Phase Sorptive Extraction (FPSE, and Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Micro Extraction (DLLME. In addition to the development of many new generic extraction sorbents in recent years, a large number of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs created using different template molecules have also enriched the large cache of microextraction sorbents. Application of nanoparticles as high-performance extraction sorbents has undoubtedly elevated the extraction efficiency and method sensitivity of modern chromatographic analyses to a new level. Combining magnetic nanoparticles with many microextraction sorbents has opened up new possibilities to extract target analytes from sample matrices containing high volumes of matrix interferents. The aim of the current review is to critically audit the progress of microextraction techniques in recent years, which has indisputably transformed the analytical chemistry practices, from biological and therapeutic drug monitoring to the environmental field; from foods to phyto

  8. Effect of sample preparation methods on photometric determination of the tellurium and cobalt content in the samples of copper concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Butenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods of determination of cobalt and nickel in copper concentrates currently used in factory laboratories are very labor intensive and time consuming. The limiting stage of the analysis is preliminary chemical sample preparation. Carrying out the decomposition process of industrial samples with concentrated mineral acids in open systems does not allow to improve the metrological characteristics of the methods, for this reason improvement the methods of sample preparation is quite relevant and has a practical interest. The work was dedicated to the determination of the optimal conditions of preliminary chemical preparation of copper concentrate samples for the subsequent determination of cobalt and tellurium in the obtained solution using tellurium-spectrophotometric method. Decomposition of the samples was carried out by acid dissolving in individual mineral acids and their mixtures by heating in an open system as well as by using ultrasonification and microwave radiation in a closed system. In order to select the optimal conditions for the decomposition of the samples in a closed system the phase contact time and ultrasonic generator’s power were varied. Intensification of the processes of decomposition of copper concentrates with nitric acid (1:1, ultrasound and microwave radiation allowed to transfer quantitatively cobalt and tellurium into solution spending 20 and 30 min respectively. This reduced the amount of reactants used and improved the accuracy of determination by running the process in strictly identical conditions.

  9. Robotic sample preparation for radiochemical plutonium and americium analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalnaker, N.; Beugelsdijk, T.; Thurston, A.; Quintana, J.

    1985-01-01

    A Zymate robotic system has been assembled and programmed to prepare samples for plutonium and americium analyses by radioactivity counting. The system performs two procedures: a simple dilution procedure and a TTA (xylene) extraction of plutonium. To perform the procedures, the robotic system executes 11 unit operations such as weighing, pipetting, mixing, etc. Approximately 150 programs, which require 64 kilobytes of memory, control the system. The system is now being tested with high-purity plutonium metal and plutonium oxide samples. Our studies indicate that the system can give results that agree within 5% at the 95% confidence level with determinations performed manually. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Sample preparation composite and replicate strategy case studies for assay of solid oral drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Beverly; Harrington, Brent; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Michele Xuemei

    2017-11-30

    Drug product assay is one of several tests required for new drug products to ensure the quality of the product at release and throughout the life cycle of the product. Drug product assay testing is typically performed by preparing a composite sample of multiple dosage units to obtain an assay value representative of the batch. In some cases replicate composite samples may be prepared and the reportable assay value is the average value of all the replicates. In previously published work by Harrington et al. (2014) [5], a sample preparation composite and replicate strategy for assay was developed to provide a systematic approach which accounts for variability due to the analytical method and dosage form with a standard error of the potency assay criteria based on compendia and regulatory requirements. In this work, this sample preparation composite and replicate strategy for assay is applied to several case studies to demonstrate the utility of this approach and its application at various stages of pharmaceutical drug product development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrated Automation of High-Throughput Screening and Reverse Phase Protein Array Sample Preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marlene Lemvig; Block, Ines; List, Markus

    into automated robotic high-throughput screens, which allows subsequent protein quantification. In this integrated solution, samples are directly forwarded to automated cell lysate preparation and preparation of dilution series, including reformatting to a protein spotter-compatible format after the high......-throughput screening. Tracking of huge sample numbers and data analysis from a high-content screen to RPPAs is accomplished via MIRACLE, a custom made software suite developed by us. To this end, we demonstrate that the RPPAs generated in this manner deliver reliable protein readouts and that GAPDH and TFR levels can...

  12. Influence of rice sample preparation and milling procedures on milling quality appraisals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of sample preparation and milling procedure on milling quality appraisals of rough rice. Samples of freshly harvested medium-grain rice (M202) with different initial moisture contents (MCs) ranging from 20.2% to 25.1% (w.b.) were used for...

  13. Microextraction sample preparation techniques in biomedical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szultka, Malgorzata; Pomastowski, Pawel; Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Buszewski, Boguslaw

    2014-11-01

    Biologically active compounds are found in biological samples at relatively low concentration levels. The sample preparation of target compounds from biological, pharmaceutical, environmental, and food matrices is one of the most time-consuming steps in the analytical procedure. The microextraction techniques are dominant. Metabolomic studies also require application of proper analytical technique for the determination of endogenic metabolites present in biological matrix on trace concentration levels. Due to the reproducibility of data, precision, relatively low cost of the appropriate analysis, simplicity of the determination, and the possibility of direct combination of those techniques with other methods (combination types on-line and off-line), they have become the most widespread in routine determinations. Additionally, sample pretreatment procedures have to be more selective, cheap, quick, and environmentally friendly. This review summarizes the current achievements and applications of microextraction techniques. The main aim is to deal with the utilization of different types of sorbents for microextraction and emphasize the use of new synthesized sorbents as well as to bring together studies concerning the systematic approach to method development. This review is dedicated to the description of microextraction techniques and their application in biomedical analysis. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Notes on sample preparation of food: food of plant and animal origins, and daily meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilgeist, M.

    1992-01-01

    The procedure of food sample preparation to determine their specific radioactivity, analogous to chemical residue analysis, is laid down in the relevant sets of regulations. Several procedural steps of sample preparation of single food and composite food are dealt with. The sample size necessary for gamma spectroscopy and Sr-89/Sr-90 analysis, and the incineration step to enrich radionuclides are explained. Finally, enrichment by freeze drying of the high-volatile radionuclide I-131 is considered. (orig.) [de

  15. Sample collection and preparation of biofluids and extracts for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M; Al-Talla, Zeyad A; Kharbatia, Najeh M

    2015-01-01

    To maximize the utility of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in metabonomics research, all stages of the experimental design should be standardized, including sample collection, storage, preparation, and sample separation. Moreover, the prerequisite for any GC-MS analysis is that a compound must be volatile and thermally stable if it is to be analyzed using this technique. Since many metabolites are nonvolatile and polar in nature, they are not readily amenable to analysis by GC-MS and require initial chemical derivatization of the polar functional groups in order to reduce the polarity and to increase the thermal stability and volatility of the analytes. In this chapter, an overview is presented of the optimum approach to sample collection, storage, and preparation for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabonomics with particular focus on urine samples as example of biofluids.

  16. Open focused microwave-assisted sample preparation for rapid total and mercury species determination in environmental solid samples

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, C. M.; Garraud, H.; Amouroux, D.; Donard, O. F. X.; de Diego, A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes rapid, simple microwave-assisted leaching/ digestion procedures for total and mercury species determination in sediment samples and biomaterials. An open focused microwave system allowed the sample preparation time to be dramatically reduced to only 24 min when a power of 40-80 W was applied. Quantitative leaching of methylmercury from sediments by HNO3 solution and complete dissolution of biomaterials by an alkaline solution, such as 25% TMAH solution, were obtained. Met...

  17. Sample preparation strategies for food and biological samples prior to nanoparticle detection and imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Löschner, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    microscopy (TEM) proved to be necessary for trouble shooting of results obtained from AFFF-LS-ICP-MS. Aqueous and enzymatic extraction strategies were tested for thorough sample preparation aiming at degrading the sample matrix and to liberate the AgNPs from chicken meat into liquid suspension. The resulting...... AFFF-ICP-MS fractograms, which corresponded to the enzymatic digests, showed a major nano-peak (about 80 % recovery of AgNPs spiked to the meat) plus new smaller peaks that eluted close to the void volume of the fractograms. Small, but significant shifts in retention time of AFFF peaks were observed...... for the meat sample extracts and the corresponding neat AgNP suspension, and rendered sizing by way of calibration with AgNPs as sizing standards inaccurate. In order to gain further insight into the sizes of the separated AgNPs, or their possible dissolved state, fractions of the AFFF eluate were collected...

  18. Effect of method of sample preparation on ruminal in situ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Midmar) was harvested at three and four weeks after cutting and fertilizing with 200 kg nitrogen (N)/ha. Freshly cut herbage was used to investigate the following four sample preparation methods. In trial 1, herbage was (1) chopped with a paper-cutting guillotine into 5-10 mm lengths, representing fresh (FR) herbage; ...

  19. EGNOS Monitoring Prepared in Space Research Centre P.A.S. for SPMS Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatek, Anna; Jaworski, Leszek; Tomasik, Lukasz

    2017-12-01

    The European Geostationary Overlay Service (EGNOS) augments Global Positioning System (GPS) by providing correction data and integrity information for improving positioning over Europe. EGNOS Service Performance Monitoring Support (SPMS) project has assumed establishment, maintenance and implementation of an EGNOS performance monitoring network. The paper presents preliminary results of analyses prepared in Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences (Warsaw), as one of partners in SPMS project.

  20. Soybean and lactose in meat products and preparations sampled at retail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Piccolo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Food allergies and intolerances have increased during the last decades and regulatory authorities have taken different measures to prevent and manage consumers’ adverse reactions, including correct labelling of foods. Aim of this work was to search for soybean and lactose in meat products and meat preparations taken from retail in some provinces of Campania Region (Southern Italy and to evaluate the food labels compliance with Regulation (EU n.1169/2011. Soybean and lactose were searched using commercial kits in n. 58 samples of meat products produced in or distributed by 19 establishments, and in n. 55 samples of meat products and n. 8 of meat preparations produced in 21 plants. All samples were selected on the basis of the absence of any information on the labels about the presence of the two searched allergens, with the exception of n. 5 samples tested for lactose. Traces of soybean were detected in 50 out of the 58 examined samples, at concentrations up to 0.93 mg kg–1. Only two samples contained levels above the detection limit of 0.31 mg kg–1. Lactose levels ranging from 0.11 to 2.95 g/100 g, i.e. above the detection limit, were found in all the tested samples (n. 63. The results of the present research underline the need for careful controls and planning by operators as part of the self-control plans, and deserve attention from the competent authorities considering not only the consumers’ health but also the great attention media pay to regulations providing consumers with information on food.

  1. Influence of sample preparation on the microstructure of tooth enamel apatite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kallistová, Anna; Skála, Roman; Horáček, I.; Miyajima, N.; Malíková, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2015), s. 763-768 ISSN 0021-8898 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : X-ray powder diffraction * sample preparation * microstructure * dental hydroxyapatite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2014

  2. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Monument Valley Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Cane Valley is a former uranium mill that has undergone surface remediation in the form of tailings and contaminated materials removal. Contaminated materials from the Monument Valley (Arizona) UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat (Utah) UMTRA Project site for consolidation with the Mexican Hat tailings. Tailings removal was completed in February 1994. Three geologic units at the site contain water: the unconsolidated eolian and alluvial deposits (alluvial aquifer), the Shinarump Conglomerate (Shinarump Member), and the De Chelly Sandstone. Water quality analyses indicate the contaminant plume has migrated north of the site and is mainly in the alluvial aquifer. An upward hydraulic gradient in the De Chelly Sandstone provides some protection to that aquifer. This water sampling and analysis plan recommends sampling domestic wells, monitor wells, and surface water in April and September 1994. The purpose of sampling is to continue periodic monitoring for the surface program, evaluate changes to water quality for site characterization, and provide data for the baseline risk assessment. Samples taken in April will be representative of high ground water levels and samples taken in September will be representative of low ground water levels. Filtered and nonfiltered samples will be analyzed for plume indicator parameters and baseline risk assessment parameters

  3. Partners in projects: preparing for public involvement in health and social care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jacqueline H; Pyer, Michelle; Wray, Paula; Taylor, Jane

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, several UK and, international funders of health and social care related research have adopted the policy of requiring explicit evidence of the 'public' voice in all aspects of project design. For many academic researchers engaged within research, evaluations or audit projects, this formal requirement to actively engage members of the public will present them with both benefits and challenges to securing knowledgeable, skilled, and confident lay representation onto project teams. This could potentially lead to the exploitation of those individuals who are available, appropriately informed, and adequately prepared for such activities. Currently, much of the preparation of patients or members of the public for research involvement tends to be aligned to specific projects; however, with the call for greater active and meaningful involvement of lay representatives in future national and international funding applications, there is clearly a growing need to 'train' sufficient numbers of confident and competent representatives to meet this growing demand. This paper describes the development of a specifically designed research awareness training programme and underpinning theoretical model, which has been specifically designed to support active and meaningful lay involvement in research, evaluations and audit projects. Developed over a four year period, the course is a culmination of learning extracted from a series of four completed research projects, which have incorporated an element of public and patient involvement (PPI) training in their overall design. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of two sample preparation procedures for HPLC determination of ochratoxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Gorica L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In preparation of samples for chromatographic determination of ochratoxin A, two types of columns were used for sample cleanup (SPE and immunoaffinity columns. The first method consisted of liquid-liquid extraction with a mixture of chloroform and phosphoric acid, followed by ion-exchange cleanup on Waters Oasis MAX columns. The sec­ond method consisted of extraction with a mixture of water and methanol, followed by LCTech OtaCLEAN immunoaf­finity column cleanup. Recoveries of the methods were determined at three levels in three repetitions for maize flour, and they were 84% (%RSD = 19.2 for the first method of sample preparation and 101% (%RSD = 2.2 for the second method. Values of LOQ for OTA were 0.25 and 1.00 μg/kg for the IAC and SPE clean-up procedures, respectively. Both methods comply with present regulations, but the MAX sample clean-up procedure should be used as an alternative, since the immunoaffinity column clean-up procedure is characterized by better reproducibility, accuracy, and efficiency.

  5. Methods for preparing comparative standards and field samples for neutron activation analysis of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasgow, D.C.; Dyer, F.F.; Robinson, L.

    1995-01-01

    One of the more difficult problems associated with comparative neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is the preparation of standards which are tailor-made to the desired irradiation and counting conditions. Frequently, there simply is not a suitable standard available commercially, or the resulting gamma spectrum is convoluted with interferences. In a recent soil analysis project, the need arose for standards which contained about 35 elements. In response, a computer spreadsheet was developed to calculate the appropriate amount of each element so that the resulting gamma spectrum is relatively free of interferences. Incorporated in the program are options for calculating all of the irradiation and counting parameters including activity produced, necessary flux/bombardment time, counting time, and appropriate source-to-detector distance. The result is multi-element standards for CNAA which have optimal concentrations. The program retains ease of use without sacrificing capability. In addition to optimized standard production, a novel soil homogenization technique was developed which is a low cost, highly efficient alternative to commercially available homogenization systems. Comparative neutron activation analysis for large scale projects has been made easier through these advancements. This paper contains details of the design and function of the NAA spreadsheet and innovative sample handling techniques. (author) 7 refs.; 5 tabs

  6. Methods for preparing comparative standards and field samples for neutron activation analysis of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasgow, D.C.; Dyer, F.F.; Robinson, L.

    1994-01-01

    One of the more difficult problems associated with comparative neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is the preparation of standards which are tailor-made to the desired irradiation and counting conditions. Frequently, there simply is not a suitable standard available commercially, or the resulting gamma spectrum is convoluted with interferences. In a recent soil analysis project, the need arose for standards which contained about 35 elements. In response, a computer spreadsheet was developed to calculate the appropriate amount of each element so that the resulting gamma spectrum is relatively free of interferences. Incorporated in the program are options for calculating all of the irradiation and counting parameters including activity produced, necessary flux/bombardment time, counting time, and appropriate source-to-detector distance. The result is multi-element standards for CNAA which have optimal concentrations. The program retains ease of use without sacrificing capability. In addition to optimized standard production, a novel soil homogenization technique was developed which is a low cost, highly efficient alternative to commercially available homogenization systems. Comparative neutron activation analysis for large scale projects has been made easier through these advancements. This paper contains details of the design and function of the NAA spreadsheet and innovative sample handling techniques

  7. An electrodeposition method for the preparation of actinides and Ra samples for α spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Madurga, G.; Piazza, C.

    1986-01-01

    As it is confirmed in this work, electrodeposition of α radionuclides gives a simple method for preparing α samples of high spectrometric quality, compared to those prepared by evaporation. Then we give the methods for electrodepositon or α emitters use in our Department. Actinides α emitters are electroplated from a 1% H 2 SO 4 medium with a recovery of about 90%. The samples of Ra are prepared by electrodeposition from a HCl + CH 3 -COONH 4 medium at pH approx.= 5. In this case the recovery reaches a value that ranges from 70 to 90%. For these measurements a Si surface barrier detector has been used. Some of its features are discussed in the text. (author)

  8. On the preparation of as-produced and purified single-walled carbon nanotube samples for standardized X-ray diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allaf, Rula M.; Rivero, Iris V.; Spearman, Shayla S.; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was to specify proper sample conditioning for acquiring representative X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles for single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) samples. In doing so, a specimen preparation method for quantitative XRD characterization of as-produced and purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples has been identified. Series of powder XRD profiles were collected at different temperatures, states, and points of time to establish appropriate conditions for acquiring XRD profiles without inducing much change to the specimen. It was concluded that heating in the 300-450 deg. C range for 20 minutes, preferably vacuum-assisted, and then sealing the sample is an appropriate XRD specimen preparation technique for purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples, while raw samples do not require preconditioning for characterization. - Graphical Abstract: A sample preparation method for XRD characterization of as-produced and purified arc-discharge SWCNT samples is identified. The preparation technique seeks to acquire representative XRD profiles without inducing changes to the samples. Purified samples required 20 minutes of heating at (300-450)deg. C, while raw samples did not require preconditioning for characterization. Highlights: → Purification routines may induce adsorption onto the SWCNT samples. → Heating a SWCNT sample may result in material loss, desorption, and SWCNTs closing. → Raw arc-discharge samples do not require preparation for XRD characterization. → Heating is appropriate specimen preparation for purified and heat-treated samples. → XRD data fitting is required for structural analysis of SWCNT bundles.

  9. Validation of a fully automated robotic setup for preparation of whole blood samples for LC-MS toxicology analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, David Wederkinck; Rasmussen, Brian; Linnet, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    A fully automated setup was developed for preparing whole blood samples using a Tecan Evo workstation. By integrating several add-ons to the robotic platform, the flexible setup was able to prepare samples from sample tubes to a 96-well sample plate ready for injection on liquid chromatography...

  10. A sample preparation method for recovering suppressed analyte ions in MALDI TOF MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, X.; Waal, de B.F.M.; Milroy, L.G.; Dongen, van J.L.J.

    2015-01-01

    In matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS), analyte signals can be substantially suppressed by other compounds in the sample. In this technical note, we describe a modified thin-layer sample preparation method that significantly reduces the analyte

  11. Implementation of antimicrobial peptides for sample preparation prior to nucleic acid amplification in point-of-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krõlov, Katrin; Uusna, Julia; Grellier, Tiia; Andresen, Liis; Jevtuševskaja, Jekaterina; Tulp, Indrek; Langel, Ülo

    2017-12-01

    A variety of sample preparation techniques are used prior to nucleic acid amplification. However, their efficiency is not always sufficient and nucleic acid purification remains the preferred method for template preparation. Purification is difficult and costly to apply in point-of-care (POC) settings and there is a strong need for more robust, rapid, and efficient biological sample preparation techniques in molecular diagnostics. Here, the authors applied antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for urine sample preparation prior to isothermal loop-mediated amplification (LAMP). AMPs bind to many microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses causing disruption of their membrane integrity and facilitate nucleic acid release. The authors show that incubation of E. coli with antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 for 5 min had a significant effect on the availability of template DNA compared with untreated or even heat treated samples resulting in up to six times increase of the amplification efficiency. These results show that AMPs treatment is a very efficient sample preparation technique that is suitable for application prior to nucleic acid amplification directly within biological samples. Furthermore, the entire process of AMPs treatment was performed at room temperature for 5 min thereby making it a good candidate for use in POC applications.

  12. Evaluation of sample preparation protocols for spider venom profiling by MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bočánek, Ondřej; Šedo, Ondrej; Pekár, Stano; Zdráhal, Zbyněk

    2017-07-01

    Spider venoms are highly complex mixtures containing biologically active substances with potential for use in biotechnology or pharmacology. Fingerprinting of venoms by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization - Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a thriving technology, enabling the rapid detection of peptide/protein components that can provide comparative information. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sample preparation procedures on MALDI-TOF mass spectral quality to establish a protocol providing the most reliable analytical outputs. We adopted initial sample preparation conditions from studies already published in this field. Three different MALDI matrixes, three matrix solvents, two sample deposition methods, and different acid concentrations were tested. As a model sample, venom from Brachypelma albopilosa was used. The mass spectra were evaluated on the basis of absolute and relative signal intensities, and signal resolution. By conducting three series of analyses at three weekly intervals, the reproducibility of the mass spectra were assessed as a crucial factor in the selection for optimum conditions. A sample preparation protocol based on the use of an HCCA matrix dissolved in 50% acetonitrile with 2.5% TFA deposited onto the target by the dried-droplet method was found to provide the best results in terms of information yield and repeatability. We propose that this protocol should be followed as a standard procedure, enabling the comparative assessment of MALDI-TOF MS spider venom fingerprints. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Challenges of sample preparation for cross sectional EBSD analysis of electrodeposited nickel films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; Pantleon, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Thorough microstructure and crystallographic orientation analysis of thin films by means of electron backscatter diffraction requires cross section preparation of the film-substrate compound. During careful preparation, changes of the rather non-stable as-deposited microstructure must be avoided....... Different procedures for sample preparation including mechanical grinding and polishing, electropolishing and focused ion beam milling have been applied to a nickel film electrodeposited on top of an amorphous Ni-P layer on a Cu-substrate. Reliable EBSD analysis of the whole cross section can be obtained...

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Sample Preparation of Si(1-x)Gex in c-Plane Sapphire Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Choi, Sang H.; Bae, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Tae Woo

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration-invented X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, including the total defect density measurement method and the spatial wafer mapping method, have confirmed super hetero epitaxy growth for rhombohedral single crystalline silicon germanium (Si1-xGex) on a c-plane sapphire substrate. However, the XRD method cannot observe the surface morphology or roughness because of the method s limited resolution. Therefore the authors used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with samples prepared in two ways, the focused ion beam (FIB) method and the tripod method to study the structure between Si1-xGex and sapphire substrate and Si1?xGex itself. The sample preparation for TEM should be as fast as possible so that the sample should contain few or no artifacts induced by the preparation. The standard sample preparation method of mechanical polishing often requires a relatively long ion milling time (several hours), which increases the probability of inducing defects into the sample. The TEM sampling of the Si1-xGex on sapphire is also difficult because of the sapphire s high hardness and mechanical instability. The FIB method and the tripod method eliminate both problems when performing a cross-section TEM sampling of Si1-xGex on c-plane sapphire, which shows the surface morphology, the interface between film and substrate, and the crystal structure of the film. This paper explains the FIB sampling method and the tripod sampling method, and why sampling Si1-xGex, on a sapphire substrate with TEM, is necessary.

  15. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan -- Shiprock, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    Water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) is required for each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site to provide a basis for ground water and surface water sampling at disposal and former processing sites. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring stations at the Navaho Reservation in Shiprock, New Mexico, UMTRA Project site. The purposes of the water sampling at Shiprock for fiscal year (FY) 1994 are to (1) collect water quality data at new monitoring locations in order to build a defensible statistical data base, (2) monitor plume movement on the terrace and floodplain, and (3) monitor the impact of alluvial ground water discharge into the San Juan River. The third activity is important because the community of Shiprock withdraws water from the San Juan River directly across from the contaminated alluvial floodplain below the abandoned uranium mill tailings processing site

  16. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high...... the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given....

  17. An On-Target Desalting and Concentration Sample Preparation Protocol for MALDI-MS and MS/MS Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Wang, Quanhui; Lou, Xiaomin

    2012-01-01

    2DE coupled with MALDI-MS is one of the most widely used and powerful analytic technologies in proteomics study. The MALDI sample preparation method has been developed and optimized towards the combination of simplicity, sample-cleaning, and sample concentration since its introduction. Here we...... present a protocol of the so-called Sample loading, Matrix loading, and on-target Wash (SMW) method which fulfills the three criteria by taking advantage of the AnchorChip™ targets. Our method is extremely simple and no pre-desalting or concentration is needed when dealing with samples prepared from 2DE...

  18. A comparison of sample preparation strategies for biological tissues and subsequent trace element analysis using LA-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonta, Maximilian; Török, Szilvia; Hegedus, Balazs; Döme, Balazs; Limbeck, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) is one of the most commonly applied methods for lateral trace element distribution analysis in medical studies. Many improvements of the technique regarding quantification and achievable lateral resolution have been achieved in the last years. Nevertheless, sample preparation is also of major importance and the optimal sample preparation strategy still has not been defined. While conventional histology knows a number of sample pre-treatment strategies, little is known about the effect of these approaches on the lateral distributions of elements and/or their quantities in tissues. The technique of formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE) has emerged as the gold standard in tissue preparation. However, the potential use for elemental distribution studies is questionable due to a large number of sample preparation steps. In this work, LA-ICP-MS was used to examine the applicability of the FFPE sample preparation approach for elemental distribution studies. Qualitative elemental distributions as well as quantitative concentrations in cryo-cut tissues as well as FFPE samples were compared. Results showed that some metals (especially Na and K) are severely affected by the FFPE process, whereas others (e.g., Mn, Ni) are less influenced. Based on these results, a general recommendation can be given: FFPE samples are completely unsuitable for the analysis of alkaline metals. When analyzing transition metals, FFPE samples can give comparable results to snap-frozen tissues. Graphical abstract Sample preparation strategies for biological tissues are compared with regard to the elemental distributions and average trace element concentrations.

  19. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank SX-102: Results from samples collected on July 19, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeety, B.D.; Evans, J.C.; Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-102 (Tank SX-102) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed under the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5046. Samples were collected by WHC on July 19, 1995, using the vapor sampling system (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  20. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-103: Results from samples collected on June 21, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-AX-103 (Tank AX-103) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5029. Samples were collected by WHC on June 21, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  1. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank AX-101: Results from samples collected on June 15, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.; McVeety, B.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-AX-101 (Tank AX-101) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) under the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5028. Samples were collected by WHC on June 15, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  2. Atomic absorption determination of metals in soils using ultrasonic sample preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmilenko, F.A.; Smityuk, N.M.; Baklanov, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    It was shown that ultrasonic treatment accelerates sample preparation of soil extracts from chernozem into different solvents by a factor of 6 to 60. These extracts are used for the atomic absorption determination of soluble species of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The optimum ultrasound parameters (frequency, intensity, and treatment time) were found for preparing soil extracts containing analytes in concentrations required in agrochemical procedures. Different extractants used to extract soluble heavy metals from soils of an ordinary chernozem type in agrochemical procedures using ultrasonic treatment were classified in accordance with the element nature [ru

  3. 9 CFR 147.8 - Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... samples for diagnostic tests. 147.8 Section 147.8 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... IMPROVEMENT PLAN Blood Testing Procedures § 147.8 Procedures for preparing egg yolk samples for diagnostic... for diagnostic testing. (b) The authorized laboratory must identify each egg as to the breeding flock...

  4. Analytical sample preparation strategies for the determination of antimalarial drugs in human whole blood, plasma and urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casas, Monica Escolà; Hansen, Martin; Krogh, Kristine A

    2014-01-01

    the available sample preparation strategies combined with liquid chromatographic (LC) analysis to determine antimalarials in whole blood, plasma and urine published over the last decade. Sample preparation can be done by protein precipitation, solid-phase extraction, liquid-liquid extraction or dilution. After...

  5. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Surface remedial action was completed at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Canonsburg and Burrell Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1985 and 1987, respectively. The Burrell disposal site, included in the UMTRA Project as a vicinity property, was remediated in conjunction with the remedial action at Canonsburg. On 27 May 1994, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) accepted the DOE final Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) (DOE, 1993) for Burrell thus establishing the site under the general license in 10 CFR section 40.27 (1994). In accordance with the DOE guidance document for long-term surveillance (DOE, 1995), all NRC/DOE interaction on the Burrell site's long-term care now is conducted with the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and is no longer the responsibility of the DOE UMTRA Project Team in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Therefore, the planned sampling activities described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) are limited to the Canonsburg site. This WSAP identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring at the Canonsburg site for calendar years 1995 and 1996. Currently, the analytical data further the site characterization and demonstrate that the disposal cell's initial performance is in accordance with design requirements

  6. A Simple and Reproducible Method to Prepare Membrane Samples from Freshly Isolated Rat Brain Microvessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzica, Hrvoje; Abdullahi, Wazir; Reilly, Bianca G; Ronaldson, Patrick T

    2018-05-07

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic barrier tissue that responds to various pathophysiological and pharmacological stimuli. Such changes resulting from these stimuli can greatly modulate drug delivery to the brain and, by extension, cause considerable challenges in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Many BBB changes that affect pharmacotherapy, involve proteins that are localized and expressed at the level of endothelial cells. Indeed, such knowledge on BBB physiology in health and disease has sparked considerable interest in the study of these membrane proteins. From a basic science research standpoint, this implies a requirement for a simple but robust and reproducible method for isolation of microvessels from brain tissue harvested from experimental animals. In order to prepare membrane samples from freshly isolated microvessels, it is essential that sample preparations be enriched in endothelial cells but limited in the presence of other cell types of the neurovascular unit (i.e., astrocytes, microglia, neurons, pericytes). An added benefit is the ability to prepare samples from individual animals in order to capture the true variability of protein expression in an experimental population. In this manuscript, details regarding a method that is utilized for isolation of rat brain microvessels and preparation of membrane samples are provided. Microvessel enrichment, from samples derived, is achieved by using four centrifugation steps where dextran is included in the sample buffer. This protocol can easily be adapted by other laboratories for their own specific applications. Samples generated from this protocol have been shown to yield robust experimental data from protein analysis experiments that can greatly aid the understanding of BBB responses to physiological, pathophysiological, and pharmacological stimuli.

  7. Improvement of a sample preparation method assisted by sodium deoxycholate for mass-spectrometry-based shotgun membrane proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong; Lin, Haiyan; Liu, Zhonghua; Wang, Kunbo; Yan, Yujun

    2014-11-01

    In current shotgun-proteomics-based biological discovery, the identification of membrane proteins is a challenge. This is especially true for integral membrane proteins due to their highly hydrophobic nature and low abundance. Thus, much effort has been directed at sample preparation strategies such as use of detergents, chaotropes, and organic solvents. We previously described a sample preparation method for shotgun membrane proteomics, the sodium deoxycholate assisted method, which cleverly circumvents many of the challenges associated with traditional sample preparation methods. However, the method is associated with significant sample loss due to the slightly weaker extraction/solubilization ability of sodium deoxycholate when it is used at relatively low concentrations such as 1%. Hence, we present an enhanced sodium deoxycholate sample preparation strategy that first uses a high concentration of sodium deoxycholate (5%) to lyse membranes and extract/solubilize hydrophobic membrane proteins, and then dilutes the detergent to 1% for a more efficient digestion. We then applied the improved method to shotgun analysis of proteins from rat liver membrane enriched fraction. Compared with other representative sample preparation strategies including our previous sodium deoxycholate assisted method, the enhanced sodium deoxycholate method exhibited superior sensitivity, coverage, and reliability for the identification of membrane proteins particularly those with high hydrophobicity and/or multiple transmembrane domains. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Inferring category characteristics from sample characteristics: inductive reasoning and social projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, J; Clement, R W

    1996-03-01

    Inductive reasoning involves generalization from sample observations to categories. This research examined the conditions under which generalizations go beyond the boundaries of the sampled categories. In Experiment 1, participants sampled colored chips from urns. When categorization was not salient, participants revised their estimates of the probability of a particular color even in urns they had not sampled. As categorization became more salient, generalization became limited to the sampled urn. In Experiment 2 the salience of categorization in social induction was varied. When social categorization was not salient, participants projected their own responses to test items to members of a laboratory group even when they themselves did not belong to this group. When salience increased, projection decreased among nonmembers but not among members. In Experiment 3 these results were replicated in a field setting.

  9. M3FT-17OR0301070211 - Preparation of Hot Isostatically Pressed AgZ Waste Form Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jordan, Jacob A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The production of radioactive iodine-bearing waste forms that exhibit long-term stability and are suitable for permanent geologic disposal has been the subject of substantial research interest. One potential method of iodine waste form production is hot isostatic pressing (HIP). Recent studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have investigated the conversion of iodine-loaded silver mordenite (I-AgZ) directly to a waste form by HIP. ORNL has performed HIP with a variety of sample compositions and pressing conditions. The base mineral has varied among AgZ (in pure and engineered forms), silver-exchanged faujasite, and silverexchanged zeolite A. Two iodine loading methods, occlusion and chemisorption, have been explored. Additionally, the effects of variations in temperature and pressure of the process have been examined, with temperature ranges of 525°C–1,100°C and pressure ranges of 100–300 MPa. All of these samples remain available to collaborators upon request. The sample preparation detailed in this document is an extension of that work. In addition to previously prepared samples, this report documents the preparation of additional samples to support stability testing. These samples include chemisorbed I-AgZ and pure AgI. Following sample preparation, each sample was processed by HIP by American Isostatic Presses Inc. and returned to ORNL for storage. ORNL will store the samples until they are requested by collaborators for durability testing. The sample set reported here will support waste form durability testing across the national laboratories and will provide insight into the effects of varied iodine content on iodine retention by the produced waste form and on potential improvements in waste form durability provided by the zeolite matrix.

  10. Collection and preparation of marine samples for radionuclide analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.

    1997-01-01

    The ultimate goal of research in radioecology is to be able to predict the pathways of radioactive material in the environment and hence estimate possible doses to the population in various regions. Knowledge of levels of contamination are necessary to maintain control of operations of nuclear facilities. Correct methods of sample collection, handling and preparation are among the most important parts for a correct assessment. On basis of the final results of radionuclide concentrations, scientific, medical and political decisions are taken. (author)

  11. Preparing Monodisperse Macromolecular Samples for Successful Biological Small-Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Cy M.; Graewert, Melissa A.; Blanchet, Clément E.; Langley, David B.; Whitten, Andrew E.; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2017-01-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering (SAXS and SANS) are techniques used to extract structural parameters and determine the overall structures and shapes of biological macromolecules, complexes and assemblies in solution. The scattering intensities measured from a sample contain contributions from all atoms within the illuminated sample volume including the solvent and buffer components as well as the macromolecules of interest. In order to obtain structural information, it is essential to prepare an exactly matched solvent blank so that background scattering contributions can be accurately subtracted from the sample scattering to obtain the net scattering from the macromolecules in the sample. In addition, sample heterogeneity caused by contaminants, aggregates, mismatched solvents, radiation damage or other factors can severely influence and complicate data analysis so it is essential that the samples are pure and monodisperse for the duration of the experiment. This Protocol outlines the basic physics of SAXS and SANS and reveals how the underlying conceptual principles of the techniques ultimately ‘translate’ into practical laboratory guidance for the production of samples of sufficiently high quality for scattering experiments. The procedure describes how to prepare and characterize protein and nucleic acid samples for both SAXS and SANS using gel electrophoresis, size exclusion chromatography and light scattering. Also included are procedures specific to X-rays (in-line size exclusion chromatography SAXS) and neutrons, specifically preparing samples for contrast matching/variation experiments and deuterium labeling of proteins. PMID:27711050

  12. Experience in the Canadian programme in preparing for DGRs of all waste types. Preparing for Canada's DGR Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierszewski, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text follows: The presentation gives an overview of two Canadian Deep Geologic Repository projects, and draws on this experience with respect to the Workshop topics of Issues for Construction, Preparing as an Organization, and Optimization. The first project is the Ontario Power Generation proposed DGR for Low and Intermediate Level Waste. This facility would be sited at the Bruce nuclear site near Kincardine, Ontario. The project is currently in the Environmental Assessment and Site Preparation and Construction Licensing stage. The second project is the Nuclear Waste Management Organisation's proposed DGR for used fuel. This facility is currently in the siting phase. This is a staged process to find a willing and informed host community. Currently several communities have indicated interest in learning more about the project and having an initial feasibility screening conducted on their area. Construction of a DGR is a large undertaking, with numerous technical topics to be addressed that may not be initially considered as part of conceptual design and initial postclosure safety assessment. Examples of construction issues that may affect the design are: - Site access (supplies, access, workforce, and infrastructure); - Shaft sinking approach, and ensuring it aligns with need for geo-scientific information and postclosure performance; - Local rock stresses impacting DGR design and layout; and - Regulations applicable to DGR and their implications. Examples of topics that need to be taken into account with respect to transition as an organization from a research or siting group to preparing to build a DGR are: - Staffing, and evolution of required skills; - Establishing appropriate Quality Assurance processes; - Establishing design / records management; Optimization proceeds in stages. During conceptual/preliminary design, there is iterative development of the safety case between geoscience, engineering and safety

  13. Sulfonate-terminated carbosilane dendron-coated nanotubes: a greener point of view in protein sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Estefanía; Gutiérrez Ulloa, Carlos E; de la Mata, Francisco Javier; Marina, María Luisa; García, María Concepción

    2017-09-01

    Reduction or removal of solvents and reagents in protein sample preparation is a requirement. Dendrimers can strongly interact with proteins and have great potential as a greener alternative to conventional methods used in protein sample preparation. This work proposes the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) functionalized with carbosilane dendrons with sulfonate groups for protein sample preparation and shows the successful application of the proposed methodology to extract proteins from a complex matrix. SEM images of nanotubes and mixtures of nanotubes and proteins were taken. Moreover, intrinsic fluorescence intensity of proteins was monitored to observe the most significant interactions at increasing dendron generations under neutral and basic pHs. Different conditions for the disruption of interactions between proteins and nanotubes after protein extraction and different concentrations of the disrupting reagent and the nanotube were also tried. Compatibility of extraction and disrupting conditions with the enzymatic digestion of proteins for obtaining bioactive peptides was also studied. Finally, sulfonate-terminated carbosilane dendron-coated SWCNTs enabled the extraction of proteins from a complex sample without using non-environmentally friendly solvents that were required so far. Graphical Abstract Green protein extraction from a complex sample employing carbosilane dendron coated nanotubes.

  14. Feedback from D and D projects - Improvement through preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykora, Alexandra; Arnold, Hans-Uwe; Clement, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes feedback from AREVA's experience in all stages of decommissioning projects (from end of life to greenfield), focusing on the recommendations for initial actions to be taken early in the project and in the preparation phase. Such initiatives can be summarized in the following four points: (i) Build a strong and specific Decommissioning Team composed of the plant staff together with D and D specialists that shall take the lead and promote the culture change within the remaining staff; (ii) Insist on pre-work as well as real-time Radiological Characterization to optimize waste production; (iii) Develop a tailored Decommissioning Manual streamlined from the legacy Operation Manual (that is no longer appropriate); (iv) Replace the plant's legacy support systems (e.g. ventilation, water treatment, electricity, lighting etc.) with modular and lighter systems better fit for the D and D purpose and allowing to accelerate the cutting and knocking down ('straight backwards') operations. (authors)

  15. Preparation Of Deposited Sediment Sample By Casting Method For Environmental Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutabarat, Tommy; Ristin PI, Evarista

    2000-01-01

    The preparation of deposited sediment sample by c asting m ethod for environmental study has been carried out. This method comprises separation of size fraction and casting process. The deposited sediment samples were wet sieved to separate the size fraction of >500 mum, (250-500) mum, (125-250) mum and (63-125) mum and settling procedures were followed for the separation of (40-63) mum, (20-40) mum, (10-20) mum and o C, ashed at 450 o C, respectively. In the casting process of sample, it was used polyester rapid cure resin and methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) hardener. The moulded sediment sample was poured onto caster, allow for 60 hours long. The aim of this method is to get the casted sample which can be used effectively, efficiently and to be avoided from contamination of each other samples. Before casting, samples were grinded up to be fine. The result shows that casting product is ready to be used for natural radionuclide analysis

  16. Project W-236A, work plan for preparation of a design requirements document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    This work plan outlines the tasks necessary, and defines the organizational responsibilities for preparing a Design Requirements Document (DRD) for project W-236A, Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). A DRD is a Systems Engineering document which bounds, at a high level, the requirements of a discrete system element of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program. This system element is usually assigned to a specific project, in this case the MWTF. The DRD is the document that connects the TWRS program requirements with the highest level projects requirements and provides the project's link to the overall TWRS mission. The MWTF DRD effort is somewhat unique in that the project is already in detailed design, whereas a DRO is normally prepared prior to preliminary design. The MWTF design effort was initiated with a Functional Design Criteria (FDC) and a Supplemental Design Requirements Document (SDRD) bounding the high level requirements. Another unique aspect of this effort is that some of the TWRS program requirements are still in development. Because of these unique aspects of the MWTF DRD development, the MWTF will be developed from existing TWRS Program requirements and project specific requirements contained in the FDC and SDRD. The following list describes the objectives of the MWTF DRD: determine the primary functions of the tanks through a functional decomposition of the TWRS Program high level functions; allocate the primary functions to a sub-system architecture for the tanks; define the fundamental design features in terms of performance requirements for the system and subsystems; identify system interfaces and design constraints; and document the results in a DRD

  17. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An overview of the main foodstuff sample preparation technologies for tetracycline residue determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Michael; Pellerano, Roberto Gerardo; Pezza, Leonardo; Pezza, Helena Redigolo

    2018-05-15

    Tetracyclines are widely used for both the treatment and prevention of diseases in animals as well as for the promotion of rapid animal growth and weight gain. This practice may result in trace amounts of these drugs in products of animal origin, such as milk and eggs, posing serious risks to human health. The presence of tetracycline residues in foods can lead to the transmission of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria through the food chain. In order to ensure food safety and avoid exposure to these substances, national and international regulatory agencies have established tolerance levels for authorized veterinary drugs, including tetracycline antimicrobials. In view of that, numerous sensitive and specific methods have been developed for the quantification of these compounds in different food matrices. One will note, however, that the determination of trace residues in foods such as milk and eggs often requires extensive sample extraction and preparation prior to conducting instrumental analysis. Sample pretreatment is usually the most complicated step in the analytical process and covers both cleaning and pre-concentration. Optimal sample preparation can reduce analysis time and sources of error, enhance sensitivity, apart from enabling unequivocal identification, confirmation and quantification of target analytes. The development and implementation of more environmentally friendly analytical procedures, which involve the use of less hazardous solvents and smaller sample sizes compared to traditional methods, is a rapidly increasing trend in analytical chemistry. This review seeks to provide an updated overview of the main trends in sample preparation for the determination of tetracycline residues in foodstuffs. The applicability of several extraction and clean-up techniques employed in the analysis of foodstuffs, especially milk and egg samples, is also thoroughly discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sampling design for use by the soil decontamination project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, D.W.; Stevens, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    This report proposes a general approach to the problem and discusses sampling of soil to map the contaminated area and to provide samples for characterizaton of soil components and contamination. Basic concepts in sample design are reviewed with reference to environmental transuranic studies. Common designs are reviewed and evaluated for use with specific objectives that might be required by the soil decontamination project. Examples of a hierarchial design pilot study and a combined hierarchial and grid study are proposed for the Rocky Flats 903 pad area

  20. Optimal sampling plan for clean development mechanism lighting projects with lamp population decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Xianming; Xia, Xiaohua; Zhang, Jiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A metering cost minimisation model is built with the lamp population decay to optimise CDM lighting projects sampling plan. • The model minimises the total metering cost and optimise the annual sample size during the crediting period. • The required 90/10 criterion sampling accuracy is satisfied for each CDM monitoring report. - Abstract: This paper proposes a metering cost minimisation model that minimises metering cost under the constraints of sampling accuracy requirement for clean development mechanism (CDM) energy efficiency (EE) lighting project. Usually small scale (SSC) CDM EE lighting projects expect a crediting period of 10 years given that the lighting population will decay as time goes by. The SSC CDM sampling guideline requires that the monitored key parameters for the carbon emission reduction quantification must satisfy the sampling accuracy of 90% confidence and 10% precision, known as the 90/10 criterion. For the existing registered CDM lighting projects, sample sizes are either decided by professional judgment or by rule-of-thumb without considering any optimisation. Lighting samples are randomly selected and their energy consumptions are monitored continuously by power meters. In this study, the sampling size determination problem is formulated as a metering cost minimisation model by incorporating a linear lighting decay model as given by the CDM guideline AMS-II.J. The 90/10 criterion is formulated as constraints to the metering cost minimisation problem. Optimal solutions to the problem minimise the metering cost whilst satisfying the 90/10 criterion for each reporting period. The proposed metering cost minimisation model is applicable to other CDM lighting projects with different population decay characteristics as well

  1. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-T-110: Results from samples collected on August 31, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVeety, B.D.; Thomas, B.L.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-T-110 (Tank T-110) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5056. Samples were collected by WHC on August 31, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  2. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-TX-111: Results from samples collected on October 12, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-TX-111 (Tank TX-111) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5069. Samples were collected by WHC on October 12, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  3. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-109: Results from samples collected on August 1, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-109 (Tank SX-109) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5048. Samples were collected by WHC on August 1, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  4. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-104: Results from samples collected on July 25, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, B.L.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-104 (Tank SX-104) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5049. Samples were collected by WHC on July 25, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  5. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-S-112: Results from samples collected on July 11, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, T.W.; Pool, K.H.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage Tank 241-S-112 (Tank S-112) at the Hanford. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5044. Samples were collected by WHC on July 11, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  6. Headspace vapor characterization of Hanford Waste Tank 241-SX-105: Results from samples collected on July 26, 1995. Tank Vapor Characterization Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, K.H.; Clauss, T.W.; Evans, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes the results of vapor samples taken from the headspace of waste storage tank 241-SX-105 (Tank SX-105) at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contracted with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to provide sampling devices and analyze samples for inorganic and organic analytes collected from the tank headspace and ambient air near the tank. The analytical work was performed by the PNNL Vapor Analytical Laboratory (VAL) by the Tank Vapor Characterization Project. Work performed was based on a sample and analysis plan (SAP) prepared by WHC. The SAP provided job-specific instructions for samples, analyses, and reporting. The SAP for this sample job was open-quotes Vapor Sampling and Analysis Planclose quotes, and the sample job was designated S5047. Samples were collected by WHC on July 26, 1995, using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS), a truck-based sampling method using a heated probe inserted into the tank headspace

  7. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2008-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O 2 + ) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of 19 (H 3 O) + . A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K + and Na + in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K-low Na signature in individual cells

  8. Challenges of biological sample preparation for SIMS imaging of elements and molecules at subcellular resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2008-12-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based imaging techniques capable of subcellular resolution characterization of elements and molecules are becoming valuable tools in many areas of biology and medicine. Due to high vacuum requirements of SIMS, the live cells cannot be analyzed directly in the instrument. The sample preparation, therefore, plays a critical role in preserving the native chemical composition for SIMS analysis. This work focuses on the evaluation of frozen-hydrated and frozen freeze-dried sample preparations for SIMS studies of cultured cells with a CAMECA IMS-3f dynamic SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing SIMS images with a spatial resolution of 500 nm. The sandwich freeze-fracture method was used for fracturing the cells. The complimentary fracture planes in the plasma membrane were characterized by field-emission secondary electron microscopy (FESEM) in the frozen-hydrated state. The cells fractured at the dorsal surface were used for SIMS analysis. The frozen-hydrated SIMS analysis of individual cells under dynamic primary ion beam (O 2+) revealed local secondary ion signal enhancements correlated with the water image signals of 19(H 3O) +. A preferential removal of water from the frozen cell matrix in the Z-axis was also observed. These complications render the frozen-hydrated sample type less desirable for subcellular dynamic SIMS studies. The freeze-drying of frozen-hydrated cells, either inside the instrument or externally in a freeze-drier, allowed SIMS imaging of subcellular chemical composition. Morphological evaluations of fractured freeze-dried cells with SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed well-preserved mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, and stress fibers. SIMS analysis of fractured freeze-dried cells revealed well-preserved chemical composition of even the most highly diffusible ions like K + and Na + in physiologically relevant concentrations. The high K-low Na signature in individual cells

  9. TFTR DT preparation project status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, E.D.; Dudek, L.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) research program is preparing to commence the first high power Deuterium-Tritium (DT) experiments of the US Fusion Program. Hardware upgrades to TFTR required for DT operations have been completed. This paper discusses these hardware preparations.

  10. The role of sample preparation in interpretation of trace element concentration variability in moss bioindication studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaszewski, Z.M.; Lamothe, P.J.; Crock, J.G.; Galuszka, A.; Dolegowska, S.

    2011-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in plant bioindicators are often determined to assess the quality of the environment. Instrumental methods used for trace element determination require digestion of samples. There are different methods of sample preparation for trace element analysis, and the selection of the best method should be fitted for the purpose of a study. Our hypothesis is that the method of sample preparation is important for interpretation of the results. Here we compare the results of 36 element determinations performed by ICP-MS on ashed and on acid-digested (HNO3, H2O2) samples of two moss species (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) collected in Alaska and in south-central Poland. We found that dry ashing of the moss samples prior to analysis resulted in considerably lower detection limits of all the elements examined. We also show that this sample preparation technique facilitated the determination of interregional and interspecies differences in the chemistry of trace elements. Compared to the Polish mosses, the Alaskan mosses displayed more positive correlations of the major rock-forming elements with ash content, reflecting those elements' geogenic origin. Of the two moss species, P. schreberi from both Alaska and Poland was also highlighted by a larger number of positive element pair correlations. The cluster analysis suggests that the more uniform element distribution pattern of the Polish mosses primarily reflects regional air pollution sources. Our study has shown that the method of sample preparation is an important factor in statistical interpretation of the results of trace element determinations. ?? 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Sample preparation method for ICP-MS measurement of 99Tc in a large amount of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, M.; Seki, R.

    2002-01-01

    Sample preparation for measurement of 99 Tc in a large amount of soil and water samples by ICP-MS has been developed using 95m Tc as a yield tracer. This method is based on the conventional method for a small amount of soil samples using incineration, acid digestion, extraction chromatography (TEVA resin) and ICP-MS measurement. Preliminary concentration of Tc has been introduced by co-precipitation with ferric oxide. The matrix materials in a large amount of samples were more sufficiently removed with keeping the high recovery of Tc than previous method. The recovery of Tc was 70-80% for 100 g soil samples and 60-70% for 500 g of soil and 500 L of water samples. The detection limit of this method was evaluated as 0.054 mBq/kg in 500 g soil and 0.032 μBq/L in 500 L water. The determined value of 99 Tc in the IAEA-375 (soil sample collected near the Chernobyl Nuclear Reactor) was 0.25 ± 0.02 Bq/kg. (author)

  12. A critical review of microextraction by packed sorbent as a sample preparation approach in drug bioanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Márcio; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar; Queiroz, João

    2013-06-01

    Sample preparation is widely accepted as the most labor-intensive and error-prone part of the bioanalytical process. The recent advances in this field have been focused on the miniaturization and integration of sample preparation online with analytical instrumentation, in order to reduce laboratory workload and increase analytical performance. From this perspective, microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) has emerged in the last few years as a powerful sample preparation approach suitable to be easily automated with liquid and gas chromatographic systems applied in a variety of bioanalytical areas (pharmaceutical, clinical, toxicological, environmental and food research). This paper aims to provide an overview and a critical discussion of recent bioanalytical methods reported in literature based on MEPS, with special emphasis on those developed for the quantification of therapeutic drugs and/or metabolites in biological samples. The advantages and some limitations of MEPS, as well as its comparison with other extraction techniques, are also addressed herein.

  13. Quality Assessment of Platelet-Rich Fibrin-Like Matrix Prepared from Whole Blood Samples after Extended Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Kawabata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The platelet-rich fibrin–like matrix (PRFM is usually prepared onsite and immediately used for regenerative therapy. Nonetheless, to meet the clinical necessity of preserving the PRFM without quality deterioration, we developed a method for preparation of PRFMs from short-term-stored whole blood (WB samples. In this study, to evaluate the practical expiration date of storage, we extended the storage time of WB samples from 2 to 7 days and assessed the quality of the resulting PRFMs. WB samples collected with acid-citrate-dextrose were stored with gentle agitation at ambient temperature. To prepare PRFMs, the stored WB samples were mixed with CaCl2 in glass tubes and centrifuged. Fibrin fiber networks, CD41 and CD62P expression, and Platelet Derived Growth Factor-BB (PDGF-BB levels were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, flow cytometry, and an Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA, respectively. Long-term storage had no significant effect on either blood cell counts or platelet functions tested. The resulting PRFMs were visually identical to freshly prepared ones. PDGF-BB levels did not markedly decrease in a time-dependent manner. However, fibrin fibers gradually became thinner after storage. Although the coagulation activity may diminish, we propose that PRFMs can be prepared—without evident loss of quality—from WB samples stored for up to 7 days by our previously developed method.

  14. Development of a Novel Self-Enclosed Sample Preparation Device for DNA/RNA Isolation in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Mehta, Satish K.; Pensinger, Stuart J.; Pickering, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    Modern biology techniques present potentials for a wide range of molecular, cellular, and biochemistry applications in space, including detection of infectious pathogens and environmental contaminations, monitoring of drug-resistant microbial and dangerous mutations, identification of new phenotypes of microbial and new life species. However, one of the major technological blockades in enabling these technologies in space is a lack of devices for sample preparation in the space environment. To overcome such an obstacle, we constructed a prototype of a DNA/RNA isolation device based on our novel designs documented in the NASA New Technology Reporting System (MSC-24811-1/3-1). This device is self-enclosed and pipette free, purposely designed for use in the absence of gravity. Our design can also be modified easily for preparing samples in space for other applications, such as flowcytometry, immunostaining, cell separation, sample purification and separation according to its size and charges, sample chemical labeling, and sample purification. The prototype of our DNA/RNA isolation device was tested for efficiencies of DNA and RNA isolation from various cell types for PCR analysis. The purity and integrity of purified DNA and RNA were determined as well. Results showed that our developed DNA/RNA isolation device offers similar efficiency and quality in comparison to the samples prepared using the standard protocol in the laboratory.

  15. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aro, Lasse (Finnish Forest Research Inst. (METLA) (Finland)); Plamboeck, Agneta H. (Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) (Sweden)); Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) (Finland)); Straalberg, Elisabeth (Inst. Energy Technology (IFE) (Norway))

    2009-01-15

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  16. Sampling in forests for radionuclide analysis. General and practical guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, Lasse; Plamboeck, Agneta H.; Rantavaara, Aino; Vetikko, Virve; Straelberg, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    The NKS project FOREST was established to prepare a guide for sampling in forest ecosystems for radionuclide analysis. The aim of this guide is to improve the reliability of datasets generated in future studies by promoting the use of consistent, recommended practices, thorough documentation of field sampling regimes and robust preparation of samples from the forest ecosystem. The guide covers general aims of sampling, the description of major compartments of the forest ecosystem and outlines key factors to consider when planning sampling campaigns for radioecological field studies in forests. Recommended and known sampling methods for various sample types are also compiled and presented. The guide focuses on sampling practices that are applicable in various types of boreal forests, robust descriptions of sampling sites, and documentation of the origin and details of individual samples. The guide is intended for scientists, students, forestry experts and technicians who appreciate the need to use sound sampling procedures in forest radioecological projects. The guide will hopefully encourage readers to participate in field studies and sampling campaigns, using robust techniques, thereby fostering competence in sampling. (au)

  17. Soil and Water – What is Detectable through Microbiological Sample Preparation Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concerns of a potential terrorist’s use of biological agents in soil and ground water are articulated by comparisons to major illnesses in this Country involving contaminated drinking water sources. Objectives are focused on the importance of sample preparation in the rapid, ...

  18. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics in environmental waters: sample preparation and determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speltini, Andrea; Sturini, Michela; Maraschi, Federica; Profumo, Antonella

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a general overview on the analytical methods proposed in the last decade for trace fluoroquinolone (FQ) determination in environmental waters. A large number of studies have been developed on this topic in reason of the importance of their monitoring in the studies of environmental mobility and potential degradation pathways. Every step of the analysis has been carefully considered, with a particular attention to sample preparation, in relationship with the problems involved in the analysis of real matrices. The different strategies to minimise interference from organic matter and to achieve optimal sensitivity, especially important in those samples with lower FQ concentrations, were also highlighted. Results and progress in this field have been described and critically commented. Moreover, a worldwide overview on the presence of FQs in the environmental waters has been reported.

  19. Solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction: A sample preparation method for trace detection of diazinon in urine and environmental water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladaghlo, Zolfaghar; Fakhari, Alireza; Behbahani, Mohammad

    2016-09-02

    In this research, a sample preparation method termed solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction (SA-DSPE) was applied. The used sample preparation method was based on the dispersion of the sorbent into the aqueous sample to maximize the interaction surface. In this approach, the dispersion of the sorbent at a very low milligram level was received by inserting a solution of the sorbent and disperser solvent into the aqueous sample. The cloudy solution created from the dispersion of the sorbent in the bulk aqueous sample. After pre-concentration of the diazinon, the cloudy solution was centrifuged and diazinon in the sediment phase dissolved in ethanol and determined by gas chromatography-flame ionization detector. Under the optimized conditions (pH of solution=7.0, Sorbent: benzophenone, 2%, Disperser solvent: ethanol, 500μL, Centrifuge: centrifuged at 4000rpm for 3min), the method detection limit for diazinon was 0.2, 0.3, 0.3 and 0.3μgL(-1) for distilled water, lake water, waste water and urine sample, respectively. Furthermore, the pre-concentration factor was 363.8, 356.1, 360.7 and 353.38 in distilled water, waste water, lake water and urine sample, respectively. SA-DSPE was successfully used for trace monitoring of diazinon in urine, lake and waste water samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Basic technology of high-Tc superconductors. Project: Preparation, microstructure, contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlt, G.; Bonnenberg, D.; Kliem, H.

    1991-01-01

    By conventional mixed oxide sintering technique some hundred samples of polycrystalline BYaCuO were prepared. Their physical properties were measured here and in some other research organizations. We investigated mainly: The origin of domain configuration, the contact resistances metal-superconductor, the critical current. All problems were solved satisfactorily. (orig.) With 30 refs [de

  1. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udey, R. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Corzett, T. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alcaraz, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  2. Nuclear and radiological preparedness: the achievements of the European research project prepare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Thierry; Gering, Florian; Charron, Sylvie; Zhelezniak, Mark; Andronopoulos, Spyros; Heriard-Dubreuil, Gilles; Camps, Johan; Raskob, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    The PREPARE project aimed closing gaps identified in nuclear and radiological preparedness in Europe following the first evaluation of the Fukushima disaster. With 46 partners from Europe and Japan, it collected the key players in the area of emergency management and rehabilitation preparedness. Starting from February 2013, the project ended in January 2016. Among others, the project reviewed existing operational procedures for long-lasting releases, cross-border problems in radiation monitoring and food safety and further developed missing functionalities in decision support systems ranging from improved source term estimation and dispersion modelling to the inclusion of hydrological pathways for European water bodies. In addition, a so-called Analytical Platform has been developed to explore the scientific and operational means to improve information collection, information exchange and the evaluation of such types of disasters. The tools developed within the project will be partly integrated into the decision support systems ARGOS and JRODOS. (authors)

  3. Optimized pre-thinning procedures of ion-beam thinning for TEM sample preparation by magnetorheological polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hu; Yin, Shaohui; Zhang, Guanhua; Liu, Chunhui; Tang, Qingchun; Guo, Meijian

    2017-10-01

    Ion-beam-thinning is a well-established sample preparation technique for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), but tedious procedures and labor consuming pre-thinning could seriously reduce its efficiency. In this work, we present a simple pre-thinning technique by using magnetorheological (MR) polishing to replace manual lapping and dimpling, and demonstrate the successful preparation of electron-transparent single crystal silicon samples after MR polishing and single-sided ion milling. Dimples pre-thinned to less than 30 microns and with little mechanical surface damage were repeatedly produced under optimized MR polishing conditions. Samples pre-thinned by both MR polishing and traditional technique were ion-beam thinned from the rear side until perforation, and then observed by optical microscopy and TEM. The results show that the specimen pre-thinned by MR technique was free from dimpling related defects, which were still residual in sample pre-thinned by conventional technique. Nice high-resolution TEM images could be acquired after MR polishing and one side ion-thinning. MR polishing promises to be an adaptable and efficient method for pre-thinning in preparation of TEM specimens, especially for brittle ceramics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Methods of biological fluids sample preparation - biogenic amines, methylxanthines, water-soluble vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płonka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In recent years demands on the amount of information that can be obtained from the analysis of a single sample have increased. For time and economic reasons it is necessary to examine at the same time larger number of compounds, and compounds from different groups. This can best be seen in such areas as clinical analysis. In many diseases, the best results for patients are obtained when treatment fits the individual characteristics of the patient. Dosage monitoring is important at the beginning of therapy and in the full process of treatment. In the treatment of many diseases biogenic amines (dopamine, serotonin) and methylxanthines (theophylline, theobromine, caffeine) play an important role. They are used as drugs separately or in combination with others to support and strengthen the action of other drugs - for example, the combination of caffeine and paracetamol. Vitamin supplementation may be also an integral part of the treatment process. Specification of complete sample preparation parameters for extraction of the above compounds from biological matrices has been reviewed. Particular attention was given to the preparation stage and extraction methods. This review provides universal guidance on establishing a common procedures across laboratories to facilitate the preparation and analysis of all discussed compounds. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Recent trends in sorption-based sample preparation and liquid chromatography techniques for food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V Soares Maciel, Edvaldo; de Toffoli, Ana Lúcia; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2018-04-20

    The accelerated rising of the world's population increased the consumption of food, thus demanding more rigors in the control of residue and contaminants in food-based products marketed for human consumption. In view of the complexity of most food matrices, including fruits, vegetables, different types of meat, beverages, among others, a sample preparation step is important to provide more reliable results when combined with HPLC separations. An adequate sample preparation step before the chromatographic analysis is mandatory in obtaining higher precision and accuracy in order to improve the extraction of the target analytes, one of the priorities in analytical chemistry. The recent discovery of new materials such as ionic liquids, graphene-derived materials, molecularly imprinted polymers, restricted access media, magnetic nanoparticles, and carbonaceous nanomaterials, provided high sensitivity and selectivity results in an extensive variety of applications. These materials, as well as their several possible combinations, have been demonstrated to be highly appropriate for the extraction of different analytes in complex samples such as food products. The main characteristics and application of these new materials in food analysis will be presented and discussed in this paper. Another topic discussed in this review covers the main advantages and limitations of sample preparation microtechniques, as well as their off-line and on-line combination with HPLC for food analysis. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Molecularly imprinted polymers for sample preparation and biosensing in food analysis: Progress and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Jon; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Kant, Krishna; Chidambara, Vinayaka Aaydha; Wolff, Anders; Bang, Dang Duong; Sun, Yi

    2017-05-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are biomimetics which can selectively bind to analytes of interest. One of the most interesting areas where MIPs have shown the biggest potential is food analysis. MIPs have found use as sorbents in sample preparation attributed to the high selectivity and high loading capacity. MIPs have been intensively employed in classical solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction. More recently, MIPs have been combined with magnetic bead extraction, which greatly simplifies sample handling procedures. Studies have consistently shown that MIPs can effectively minimize complex food matrix effects, and improve recoveries and detection limits. In addition to sample preparation, MIPs have also been viewed as promising alternatives to bio-receptors due to the inherent molecular recognition abilities and the high stability in harsh chemical and physical conditions. MIPs have been utilized as receptors in biosensing platforms such as electrochemical, optical and mass biosensors to detect various analytes in food. In this review, we will discuss the current state-of-the-art of MIP synthesis and applications in the context of food analysis. We will highlight the imprinting methods which are applicable for imprinting food templates, summarize the recent progress in using MIPs for preparing and analysing food samples, and discuss the current limitations in the commercialisation of MIPs technology. Finally, future perspectives will be given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic PCR: validation and sample preparation are two sides of the same coin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoorfar, Jeffrey; Wolffs, Petra; Radstrøm, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Increased use of powerful PCR technology for the routine detection of pathogens has focused attention on the need for international validation and preparation of official non-commercial guidelines. Bacteria of epidemiological importance should be the prime focus, although a "validation...... of quantitative reference DNA material and reagents, production of stringent protocols and tools for thermal cycler performance testing, uncomplicated sample preparation techniques, and extensive ring trials for assessment of the efficacy of selected matrix/pathogen detection protocols....

  8. Alteration in sample preparation to increase the yield of multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction assay for diagnosis of genital ulcer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Genital Ulcer Disease (GUD is common sexually transmitted infection (STI. Multiple studies have shown that GUDs are strongly associated with the transmission and the acquisition of HIV infection. An accurate diagnosis of common etiology of GUD namely Herpes, syphilis and Chancroid is possible using Multiplex PCR (M-PCR. However, frequent presence of Polymerase Chain Reaction inhibitors in the ulcer swab specimen limits the performance of the assay. In order to overcome this problem, alternative specimen preparation method was used. Materials and Methods: To determine the common etiology, GUD specimens obtained under an STI operations research study were tested with M-PCR after the samples were prepared using Roche Amplicor specimen preparation kit. PCR inhibiting samples were identified from that, which showed negative results. These samples were subjected to phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation before the conduct of M-PCR on them. Results: Of the 237 GUD specimens tested, in 145 etiologies could be detected, whereas 92 samples were found negative. Further spiking with one of the target DNA, 128 of the negative samples were found to contain the inhibitors. These 126 samples were then subjected to phenol chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation followed by M-PCR. Using this method for sample preparation, etiology could be determined in 46 (23% additional samples. This success rate of altered sample preparation method has been lower than that has reported. Conclusion: The results indicate that sample preparation using phenol chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation, prior to M-PCR helps to eliminate the inhibitors and increase the yield of the assay. However, being a laborious procedure, it may be used for samples giving negative results after the screening by Roche Amplicor specimen preparation kit.

  9. The Proteome of Ulcerative Colitis in Colon Biopsies from Adults - Optimized Sample Preparation and Comparison with Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schniers, Armin; Anderssen, Endre; Fenton, Christopher Graham; Goll, Rasmus; Pasing, Yvonne; Paulssen, Ruth Hracky; Florholmen, Jon; Hansen, Terkel

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to optimize the sample preparation and to further use an improved sample preparation to identify proteome differences between inflamed ulcerative colitis tissue from untreated adults and healthy controls. To optimize the sample preparation, we studied the effect of adding different detergents to a urea containing lysis buffer for a Lys-C/trypsin tandem digestion. With the optimized method, we prepared clinical samples from six ulcerative colitis patients and six healthy controls and analysed them by LC-MS/MS. We examined the acquired data to identify differences between the states. We improved the protein extraction and protein identification number by utilizing a urea and sodium deoxycholate containing buffer. Comparing ulcerative colitis and healthy tissue, we found 168 of 2366 identified proteins differently abundant. Inflammatory proteins are higher abundant in ulcerative colitis, proteins related to anion-transport and mucus production are lower abundant. A high proportion of S100 proteins is differently abundant, notably with both up-regulated and down-regulated proteins. The optimized sample preparation method will improve future proteomic studies on colon mucosa. The observed protein abundance changes and their enrichment in various groups improve our understanding of ulcerative colitis on protein level. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. An Integrated Solution-Based Rapid Sample Preparation Procedure for the Analysis of N-Glycans From Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aich, Udayanath; Liu, Aston; Lakbub, Jude; Mozdzanowski, Jacek; Byrne, Michael; Shah, Nilesh; Galosy, Sybille; Patel, Pramthesh; Bam, Narendra

    2016-03-01

    Consistent glycosylation in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is a major concern in the biopharmaceutical industry as it impacts the drug's safety and efficacy and manufacturing processes. Large numbers of samples are created for the analysis of glycans during various stages of recombinant proteins drug development. Profiling and quantifying protein N-glycosylation is important but extremely challenging due to its microheterogeneity and more importantly the limitations of existing time-consuming sample preparation methods. Thus, a quantitative method with fast sample preparation is crucial for understanding, controlling, and modifying the glycoform variance in therapeutic monoclonal antibody development. Presented here is a rapid and highly quantitative method for the analysis of N-glycans from monoclonal antibodies. The method comprises a simple and fast solution-based sample preparation method that uses nontoxic reducing reagents for direct labeling of N-glycans. The complete work flow for the preparation of fluorescently labeled N-glycans takes a total of 3 h with less than 30 min needed for the release of N-glycans from monoclonal antibody samples. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectral Characterization of H2020/PTAL Mineral Samples: Implications for In Situ Martian Exploration and Mars Sample Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, C.; Pilorget, C.; Poulet, F.; Riu, L.; Dypvik, H.; Hellevang, H.; Rull Perez, F.; Veneranda, M.; Cousin, A.; Viennet, J.-C.; Werner, S. C.

    2018-04-01

    We present combined analysis performed in the framework of the Planetary Terrestrial Analogues Library (H2020 project). XRD, NIR, Raman, and LIBS spectroscopies are used to characterise samples to prepare ExoMars/ESA and Mars2020/NASA observations.

  12. Sample Preparation for Determination of Biological Thiols by Liquid Chromatography and Electromigration Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Bald, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Wydrukowano z dostarczonych Wydawnictwu UŁ gotowych materiałów Majority of the bioanalytical or environmental methods do not use just one chromatografie or electrophoretic step, but rather involve several sample pretreatment steps which simplfy the matrix, and often preconcentrate and chemically modify the analytes. This work surveys typical procedures for sample preparation for most commonly analyzed biofluids with particular emphasis placed on chemical derivatization of su...

  13. A METHOD FOR PREPARING A SUBSTRATE BY APPLYING A SAMPLE TO BE ANALYSED

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for preparing a substrate (105a) comprising a sample reception area (110) and a sensing area (111). The method comprises the steps of: 1) applying a sample on the sample reception area; 2) rotating the substrate around a predetermined axis; 3) during rotation......, at least part of the liquid travels from the sample reception area to the sensing area due to capillary forces acting between the liquid and the substrate; and 4) removing the wave of particles and liquid formed at one end of the substrate. The sensing area is closer to the predetermined axis than...... the sample reception area. The sample comprises a liquid part and particles suspended therein....

  14. Importance of Sample Preparation for Molecular Diagnosis of Lyme Borreliosis from Urine

    OpenAIRE

    Bergmann, A. R.; Schmidt, B. L.; Derler, A.-M.; Aberer, E.

    2002-01-01

    Urine PCR has been used for the diagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in recent years but has been abandoned because of its low sensitivity and the irreproducibility of the results. Our study aimed to analyze technical details related to sample preparation and detection methods. Crucial for a successful urine PCR were (i) avoidance of the first morning urine sample; (ii) centrifugation at 36,000 × g; and (iii) the extraction method, with only DNAzol of the seven different extraction met...

  15. Recent advances in metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks for sample preparation and chromatographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Ye, Nengsheng

    2017-12-01

    In the field of analytical chemistry, sample preparation and chromatographic separation are two core procedures. The means by which to improve the sensitivity, selectivity and detection limit of a method have become a topic of great interest. Recently, porous organic frameworks, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), have been widely used in this research area because of their special features, and different methods have been developed. This review summarizes the applications of MOFs and COFs in sample preparation and chromatographic stationary phases. The MOF- or COF-based solid-phase extraction (SPE), solid-phase microextraction (SPME), gas chromatography (GC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC) methods are described. The excellent properties of MOFs and COFs have resulted in intense interest in exploring their performance and mechanisms for sample preparation and chromatographic separation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. GeLC-MS: A Sample Preparation Method for Proteomics Analysis of Minimal Amount of Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makridakis, Manousos; Vlahou, Antonia

    2017-10-10

    Application of various proteomics methodologies have been implemented for the global and targeted proteome analysis of many different types of biological samples such as tissue, urine, plasma, serum, blood, and cell lines. Among the aforementioned biological samples, tissue has an exceptional role into clinical research and practice. Disease initiation and progression is usually located at the tissue level of different organs, making the analysis of this material very important for the understanding of the disease pathophysiology. Despite the significant advances in the mass spectrometry instrumentation, tissue proteomics still faces several challenges mainly due to increased sample complexity and heterogeneity. However, the most prominent challenge is attributed to the invasive procedure of tissue sampling which restricts the availability of fresh frozen tissue to minimal amounts and limited number of samples. Application of GeLC-MS sample preparation protocol for tissue proteomics analysis can greatly facilitate making up for these difficulties. In this chapter, a step by step guide for the proteomics analysis of minute amounts of tissue samples using the GeLC-MS sample preparation protocol, as applied by our group in the analysis of multiple different types of tissues (vessels, kidney, bladder, prostate, heart) is provided.

  17. Preparation of in-house calibration source for the use in radioactivity analysis of the environmental samples. Consideration of homogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aba, A.; Ismaeel, A.

    2013-01-01

    An in-house reference material has been prepared in Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research radioecology laboratory, for quality control purposes of gamma spectrometer systems. The material contains a known amount of uranium ore reference material (prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency and coded as IAEA-RGU-1) which is mixed with marine sediment collected from Kuwait bay. The IAEA-RGU-1 has been certified that it is in equilibrium state with the decay daughters, and stable to be used for quality control purposes. Nevertheless, the homogeneous distribution of the doped material with the prepared source should be verified. This has been examined using gamma spectrometry measurements in conjunction with analysis of variance statistical tools, Dixon, box plots and Grubbs tests. The calculated total uncertainty has been utilized to establish the recommended specific activity ranges of 226 Ra, 224 Th, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 210 Pb radioisotopes in the prepared source. The obtained results showed that the estimated uncertainty arising from the sample inhomogeneity has a significant contribution in the total uncertainty. The stability control charts of the ultra-low background gamma spectrometry system demonstrated the suitability of the prepared material for the purpose of quality control. However, the emitted gamma-rays from the prepared source covers the required energy range for determination of natural and artificial radionuclides in different species of environmental samples such as marine sediment, soil samples, and samples contaminated by naturally occurring radioactive material produced by oil industry. In addition, the material might be used for system calibration in case its traceability is proven. The experimental data revealed the significance of the homogeneity in preparing environmental samples for radioactivity measurements; in particular when small sample quantities of environmental samples are required to be analyzed. (author)

  18. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  19. Inverse supercritical fluid extraction as a sample preparation method for the analysis of the nanoparticle content in sunscreen agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, David; Cattaneo, Stefano; Meier, Florian; Welz, Roland; de Vries, Tjerk; Portugal-Cohen, Meital; Antonio, Diana C; Cascio, Claudia; Calzolai, Luigi; Gilliland, Douglas; de Mello, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of inverse supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extraction as a novel method of sample preparation for the analysis of complex nanoparticle-containing samples, in our case a model sunscreen agent with titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The sample was prepared for analysis in a simplified process using a lab scale supercritical fluid extraction system. The residual material was easily dispersed in an aqueous solution and analyzed by Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) hyphenated with UV- and Multi-Angle Light Scattering detection. The obtained results allowed an unambiguous determination of the presence of nanoparticles within the sample, with almost no background from the matrix itself, and showed that the size distribution of the nanoparticles is essentially maintained. These results are especially relevant in view of recently introduced regulatory requirements concerning the labeling of nanoparticle-containing products. The novel sample preparation method is potentially applicable to commercial sunscreens or other emulsion-based cosmetic products and has important ecological advantages over currently used sample preparation techniques involving organic solvents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electromembrane extraction as a rapid and selective miniaturized sample preparation technique for biological fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Seip, Knut Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    This special report discusses the sample preparation method electromembrane extraction, which was introduced in 2006 as a rapid and selective miniaturized extraction method. The extraction principle is based on isolation of charged analytes extracted from an aqueous sample, across a thin film....... Technical aspects of electromembrane extraction, important extraction parameters as well as a handful of examples of applications from different biological samples and bioanalytical areas are discussed in the paper....

  1. Review of online coupling of sample preparation techniques with liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jialiang; Zhang, Chengjiang; Zhang, Zhuomin; Li, Gongke

    2014-03-07

    Sample preparation is still considered as the bottleneck of the whole analytical procedure, and efforts has been conducted towards the automation, improvement of sensitivity and accuracy, and low comsuption of organic solvents. Development of online sample preparation techniques (SP) coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) is a promising way to achieve these goals, which has attracted great attention. This article reviews the recent advances on the online SP-LC techniques. Various online SP techniques have been described and summarized, including solid-phase-based extraction, liquid-phase-based extraction assisted with membrane, microwave assisted extraction, ultrasonic assisted extraction, accelerated solvent extraction and supercritical fluids extraction. Specially, the coupling approaches of online SP-LC systems and the corresponding interfaces have been discussed and reviewed in detail, such as online injector, autosampler combined with transport unit, desorption chamber and column switching. Typical applications of the online SP-LC techniques have been summarized. Then the problems and expected trends in this field are attempted to be discussed and proposed in order to encourage the further development of online SP-LC techniques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Author Contribution to the Pu Handbook II: Chapter 37 LLNL Integrated Sample Preparation Glovebox (TEM) Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, Mark A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-25

    The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and its alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmosphere of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, high-pressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the

  3. Author Contribution to the Pu Handbook II: Chapter 37 LLNL Integrated Sample Preparation Glovebox (TEM) Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of our Integrated Actinide Sample Preparation Laboratory (IASPL) commenced in 1998 driven by the need to perform transmission electron microscopy studies on naturally aged plutonium and its alloys looking for the microstructural effects of the radiological decay process (1). Remodeling and construction of a laboratory within the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate facilities at LLNL was required to turn a standard radiological laboratory into a Radiological Materials Area (RMA) and Radiological Buffer Area (RBA) containing type I, II and III workplaces. Two inert atmosphere dry-train glove boxes with antechambers and entry/exit fumehoods (Figure 1), having a baseline atmosphere of 1 ppm oxygen and 1 ppm water vapor, a utility fumehood and a portable, and a third double-walled enclosure have been installed and commissioned. These capabilities, along with highly trained technical staff, facilitate the safe operation of sample preparation processes and instrumentation, and sample handling while minimizing oxidation or corrosion of the plutonium. In addition, we are currently developing the capability to safely transfer small metallographically prepared samples to a mini-SEM for microstructural imaging and chemical analysis. The gloveboxes continue to be the most crucial element of the laboratory allowing nearly oxide-free sample preparation for a wide variety of LLNL-based characterization experiments, which includes transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, optical microscopy, electrical resistivity, ion implantation, X-ray diffraction and absorption, magnetometry, metrological surface measurements, high-pressure diamond anvil cell equation-of-state, phonon dispersion measurements, X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. The sample preparation and materials processing capabilities in the IASPL have also facilitated experimentation at world-class facilities such as the

  4. Use of CTX-I and PINP as bone turnover markers: National Bone Health Alliance recommendations to standardize sample handling and patient preparation to reduce pre-analytical variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulc, P; Naylor, K; Hoyle, N R; Eastell, R; Leary, E T

    2017-09-01

    The National Bone Health Alliance (NBHA) recommends standardized sample handling and patient preparation for C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I) and N-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen (PINP) measurements to reduce pre-analytical variability. Controllable and uncontrollable patient-related factors are reviewed to facilitate interpretation and minimize pre-analytical variability. The IOF and the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) Bone Marker Standards Working Group have identified PINP and CTX-I in blood to be the reference markers of bone turnover for the fracture risk prediction and monitoring of osteoporosis treatment. Although used in clinical research for many years, bone turnover markers (BTM) have not been widely adopted in clinical practice primarily due to their poor within-subject and between-lab reproducibility. The NBHA Bone Turnover Marker Project team aim to reduce pre-analytical variability of CTX-I and PINP measurements through standardized sample handling and patient preparation. Recommendations for sample handling and patient preparations were made based on review of available publications and pragmatic considerations to reduce pre-analytical variability. Controllable and un-controllable patient-related factors were reviewed to facilitate interpretation and sample collection. Samples for CTX-I must be collected consistently in the morning hours in the fasted state. EDTA plasma is preferred for CTX-I for its greater sample stability. Sample collection conditions for PINP are less critical as PINP has minimal circadian variability and is not affected by food intake. Sample stability limits should be observed. The uncontrollable aspects (age, sex, pregnancy, immobility, recent fracture, co-morbidities, anti-osteoporotic drugs, other medications) should be considered in BTM interpretation. Adopting standardized sample handling and patient preparation procedures will significantly reduce controllable pre

  5. On the preparation of electron sensor using LiRbSO4 samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Muraikhi, M.; Kassem, M. E.; Gaafar, M.; Abdel Gawad, M. M. H.; Ragab, I. M.

    2005-01-01

    The dielectric spectroscopy of metal-metal sulfate LiRbSO4 samples are described with particular emphasis on sensor performance to be used in the field of radiation. The obtained results as the effect of different electron energy beams at fixed dose, 0.5 Gy, showed abrupt change of the electrical properties (electrical conductivity, capacitance, and loss tangent). The results can be explained on the basis of radiation-induced defects followed by radiation quenching. The prepared samples can be used in the field of radiation dosimeter.

  6. Preparation of higher-actinide burnup and cross section samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adair, H.L.; Kobisk, E.H.; Quinby, T.C.; Thomas, D.K.; Dailey, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was instigated about four years ago for the purpose of studying burnup of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the burnup and cross section samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the burnup study were 241 Am and 244 Cm in the forms of Am 2 O 3 , Cm 2 O 3 , and Am 6 Cm(RE) 7 O 21 , where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanide sesquioxides. It is the purpose of this paper to describe technology development and its application in the preparation of the fuel specimens and the cross section specimens that are being used in this cooperative program

  7. Novel sample preparation for operando TEM of catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin K; Barker, Trevor M; Crozier, Peter A

    2015-09-01

    A new TEM sample preparation method is developed to facilitate operando TEM of gas phase catalysis. A porous Pyrex-fiber pellet TEM sample was produced, allowing a comparatively large amount of catalyst to be loaded into a standard Gatan furnace-type tantalum heating holder. The increased amount of catalyst present inside the environmental TEM allows quantitative determination of the gas phase products of a catalytic reaction performed in-situ at elevated temperatures. The product gas concentration was monitored using both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and residual gas analysis (RGA). Imaging of catalyst particles dispersed over the pellet at atomic resolution is challenging, due to charging of the insulating glass fibers. To overcome this limitation, a metal grid is placed into the holder in addition to the pellet, allowing catalyst particles dispersed over the grid to be imaged, while particles in the pellet, which are assumed to experience identical conditions, contribute to the overall catalytic conversion inside the environmental TEM cell. The gas within the cell is determined to be well-mixed, making this assumption reasonable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. New Sample Preparation Method for Quantification of Phenolic Compounds of Tea (Camellia sinensis L. Kuntze: A Polyphenol Rich Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Nimal Punyasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis of the Sri Lankan tea (Camellia sinensis, L. germplasm would immensely contribute to the success of the tea breeding programme. However, the polyphenols, particularly catechins (flavan-3-ols, are readily prone to oxidation in the conventional method of sample preparation. Therefore, optimization of the present sample preparation methodology for the profiling of metabolites is much important. Two sample preparation methodologies were compared, fresh leaves (as in the conventional procedures and freeze-dried leaves (a new procedure, for quantification of major metabolites by employing two cultivars, one is known to be high quality black tea and the other low quality black tea. The amounts of major metabolites such as catechins, caffeine, gallic acid, and theobromine, recorded in the new sampling procedure via freeze-dried leaves, were significantly higher than those recorded in the conventional sample preparation procedure. Additionally new method required less amount of leaf sample for analysis of major metabolites and facilitates storage of samples until analysis. The freeze-dried method would be useful for high throughput analysis of large number of samples in shorter period without chemical deterioration starting from the point of harvest until usage. Hence, this method is more suitable for metabolite profiling of tea as well as other phenol rich plants.

  9. Evaluation of six sample preparation procedures for qualitative and quantitative proteomics analysis of milk fat globule membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongxin; Anderson, Elizabeth; Zhang, Sheng

    2018-04-12

    Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins is challenged by the proteins solubility and detergent incompatibility with MS analysis. No single perfect protocol can be used to comprehensively characterize the proteome of membrane fraction. Here, we used cow milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) proteome analysis to assess six sample preparation procedures including one in-gel and five in-solution digestion approaches prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. The largest number of MFGM proteins were identified by suspension trapping (S-Trap) and filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) methods, followed by acetone precipitation without clean-up of tryptic peptides method. Protein identifications with highest average coverage was achieved by Chloroform/MeOH, in-gel and S-Trap methods. Most distinct proteins were identified by FASP method, followed by S-Trap. Analyses by Venn diagram, principal-component analysis, hierarchical clustering and the abundance ranking of quantitative proteins highlight differences in the MFGM fraction by the all sample preparation procedures. These results reveal the biased proteins/peptides loss occurred in each protocol. In this study, we found several novel proteins that were not observed previously by in-depth proteomics characterization of MFGM fraction in milk. Thus, a combination of multiple procedures with orthologous properties of sample preparation was demonstrated to improve the protein sequence coverage and expression level accuracy of membrane samples. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwiej, Joanna; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Lankosz, Marek; Wojcik, Slawomir; Falkenberg, Gerald; Stegowski, Zdzislaw; Setkowicz, Zuzanna

    2005-01-01

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain

  11. Preparation of tissue samples for X-ray fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwiej, Joanna [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: jchwiej@novell.ftj.agh.edu.pl; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Lankosz, Marek [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Wojcik, Slawomir [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Falkenberg, Gerald [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestr. 85, Hamburg (Germany); Stegowski, Zdzislaw [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Setkowicz, Zuzanna [Department of Neuroanatomy, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 6, 30-060 Cracow (Poland)

    2005-12-15

    As is well-known, trace elements, especially metals, play an important role in the pathogenesis of many disorders. The topographic and quantitative elemental analysis of pathologically changed tissues may shed some new light on processes leading to the degeneration of cells in the case of selected diseases. An ideal and powerful tool for such purpose is the Synchrotron Microbeam X-ray Fluorescence technique. It enables the carrying out of investigations of the elemental composition of tissues even at the single cell level. The tissue samples for histopathological investigations are routinely fixed and embedded in paraffin. The authors try to verify the usefulness of such prepared tissue sections for elemental analysis with the use of X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Studies were performed on rat brain samples. Changes in elemental composition caused by fixation in formalin or paraformaldehyde and embedding in paraffin were examined. Measurements were carried out at the bending magnet beamline L of the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB in Hamburg. The decrease in mass per unit area of K, Br and the increase in P, S, Fe, Cu and Zn in the tissue were observed as a result of the fixation. For the samples embedded in paraffin, a lower level of most elements was observed. Additionally, for these samples, changes in the composition of some elements were not uniform for different analyzed areas of rat brain.

  12. EFFECT OF ADDING THE INTERNAL STANDARD TO BLOOD SAMPLES, PRIOR TO THE PREPARATION OF BLOOD SPOTS FOR ACYLCARNITINE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, José Henry; Pourfarzam, Morteza

    2010-01-01

    Background: some general factors can influence when determining acylcarnitines through tandem mass spectrometry. Objective: to study the effect of adding the internal standard to blood samples before the preparation of filter paper cards compared with the addition of internal standard after having the filter paper cards prepared for determining acylcarnitines in blood for tandem mass spectrometry. Methodology: two groups of blood samples were prepared: group one without adding internal standa...

  13. State of the art of environmentally friendly sample preparation approaches for determination of PBDEs and metabolites in environmental and biological samples: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Paula; Lana, Nerina B; Ríos, Juan M; García-Reyes, Juan F; Altamirano, Jorgelina C

    2016-01-28

    Green chemistry principles for developing methodologies have gained attention in analytical chemistry in recent decades. A growing number of analytical techniques have been proposed for determination of organic persistent pollutants in environmental and biological samples. In this light, the current review aims to present state-of-the-art sample preparation approaches based on green analytical principles proposed for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metabolites (OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs) in environmental and biological samples. Approaches to lower the solvent consumption and accelerate the extraction, such as pressurized liquid extraction, microwave-assisted extraction, and ultrasound-assisted extraction, are discussed in this review. Special attention is paid to miniaturized sample preparation methodologies and strategies proposed to reduce organic solvent consumption. Additionally, extraction techniques based on alternative solvents (surfactants, supercritical fluids, or ionic liquids) are also commented in this work, even though these are scarcely used for determination of PBDEs. In addition to liquid-based extraction techniques, solid-based analytical techniques are also addressed. The development of greener, faster and simpler sample preparation approaches has increased in recent years (2003-2013). Among green extraction techniques, those based on the liquid phase predominate over those based on the solid phase (71% vs. 29%, respectively). For solid samples, solvent assisted extraction techniques are preferred for leaching of PBDEs, and liquid phase microextraction techniques are mostly used for liquid samples. Likewise, green characteristics of the instrumental analysis used after the extraction and clean-up steps are briefly discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Collection and preparation of water samples for hydrogeochemical reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baucom, E.I.; Ferguson, R.B.; Wallace, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method based on ion exchange and neutron activation analysis (NAA) was developed and field-tested to determine uranium over the range 0.02 to 10,000 ppb in natural water using a single procedure. Water samples are filtered in the field using a specially-designed one-liter filter apparatus pressurized to 40 psig with an inert gas. The filtered water is treated with a high purity, mixed cation-anion resin in the hydronium-hydroxide form. All ions are removed from solution under the strong driving force of the neutralization reaction. Anionic, cationic, and natural complexes of uranium can be concentrated with this method. Field tests showed greater than 95 percent recovery of 13 elements analyzed (including greater than 99 percent recovery of uranium) and greater than or equal to 90 percent recovery of 4 other elements. Uranium collected on the resin was quantitatively determined by NAA. Coefficient of variation for sampling plus analysis was less than 20 percent for samples containing more than 0.1 ppb uranium. Advantages of this method include: (1) wide dynamic range, (2) low detection limit for uranium (0.02 ppb), (3) high precision and accuracy, (4) relatively low cost, (5) high-yield recovery from low-level aqueous samples without risk of loss to containers, (6) decreased risk of significant sample contamination compared with other low-level methods, (7) production of stable samples suitable for retrievable storage, and(8) concentration of other ions that can be determined by NAA. This paper presents (1) background regarding development of procedures for sample collection and preparation, (2) results of development programs, (3) description of equipment and field procedures, and (4) preliminary conclusions regarding use of this technology for hydrogeochemical reconnaissance for uranium

  15. Comparison of Different Sample Preparation Protocols Reveals Lysis Buffer-Specific Extraction Biases in Gram-Negative Bacteria and Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatter, Timo; Ahrné, Erik; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-11-06

    We evaluated different in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation strategies for absolute protein quantification. Label-free quantification (LFQ) was employed to compare different sample preparation strategies in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK), and organismal-specific differences in general performance and enrichment of specific protein classes were noted. The original FASP protocol globally enriched for most proteins in the bacterial sample, whereas the sodium deoxycholate in-solution strategy was more efficient with HEK cells. Although detergents were found to be highly suited for global proteome analysis, higher intensities were obtained for high-abundant nucleic acid-associated protein complexes, like the ribosome and histone proteins, using guanidine hydrochloride. Importantly, we show for the first time that the observable total proteome mass of a sample strongly depends on the sample preparation protocol, with some protocols resulting in a significant underestimation of protein mass due to incomplete protein extraction of biased protein groups. Furthermore, we demonstrate that some of the observed abundance biases can be overcome by incorporating a nuclease treatment step or, alternatively, a correction factor for complementary sample preparation approaches.

  16. Sample preparation for accelerator mass spectrometry at the University of Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grootes, P.M.; Stuiver, M.; Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    The adaptation of the University of Washington FN tandem Van de Graaff to accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), as well as some of the results obtained, are described in another paper in this volume (Farwell et al., 1981). Here we discuss our experiences in preparing carbon and beryllium samples that give large and stable ion beams when used in our Extrion cesium sputter source with an inverted cesium beam geometry

  17. The creation of science projects in the physics teachers preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, Daniela; Rakovská, Mária; Zelenický, Ľubomír

    2017-01-01

    Terms - project, projecting and the method of projecting - are nowadays frequently used in different relations. Those terms, especially as methods (of a cognitive process), are also transferred to the educational process. Before a new educational method comes to practice, the teacher should be familiar with it and preferably when it is done so during his university studies. An optional subject called Physics in a system of science subjects has been included into physics curricula for students of the fourth year of their studies at the Faculty of Science of Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra. Its task is to make students aware of ways how to coordinate knowledge and instructions presented in these subjects through analysis of curricula and textbooks. As a part of their seminars students are asked to create integrated tasks and experiments which can be assessed from the point of view of either physics or chemistry or biology and which can motivate pupils and form their complex view on various phenomena in the nature. Therefore the article discusses theoretical and also practical questions related to experience that originates from placing the mentioned method and the subject Physics in a system of science subjects into the preparation of a natural sciences teacher in our workplace.

  18. Evaluation of the Frequency for Gas Sampling for the High Burnup Confirmatory Data Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, Christine T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alsaed, Halim A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Marschman, Steven C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project. The evaluation of: 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be present in the project cask and, 2) the degradation mechanisms that could change gas compositions culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. This adaptive strategy is compared against the sampling frequency that has been developed based on operational considerations.

  19. Methodology for sample preparation and size measurement of commercial ZnO nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jia Lu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the strategies on sample preparation to acquire images with sufficient quality for size characterization by scanning electron microscope (SEM using two commercial ZnO nanoparticles of different surface properties as a demonstration. The central idea is that micrometer sized aggregates of ZnO in powdered forms need to firstly be broken down to nanosized particles through an appropriate process to generate nanoparticle dispersion before being deposited on a flat surface for SEM observation. Analytical tools such as contact angle, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential have been utilized to optimize the procedure for sample preparation and to check the quality of the results. Meanwhile, measurements of zeta potential values on flat surfaces also provide critical information and save lots of time and efforts in selection of suitable substrate for particles of different properties to be attracted and kept on the surface without further aggregation. This simple, low-cost methodology can be generally applied on size characterization of commercial ZnO nanoparticles with limited information from vendors. Keywords: Zinc oxide, Nanoparticles, Methodology

  20. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Monument Valley, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm the Project's present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as the intent to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Riverton. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 and 60 FR 2854. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Riverton site are the Riverton Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) (DOE, 1995a) and the Riverton Site Observational Work Plan (SOWP) (DOE, 1995b)

  1. Preparing the Production of a New Product in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises by Using the Method of Projects Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijańska, Jolanta; Wodarski, Krzysztof; Wójcik, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    Efficient and effective preparation the production of new products is important requirement for a functioning and development of small and medium-sized enterprises. One of the methods, which support the fulfilment of this condition is project management. This publication presents the results of considerations, which are aimed at developing a project management model of preparation the production of a new product, adopted to specificity of small and medium-sized enterprises.

  2. Applications of Blue Light-curing Acrylic Resin to Forensic Sample Preparation and Microtomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Ethan; Palenik, Christopher S

    2016-03-01

    This study discusses the results of an evaluation of a one-part blue light-curing acrylic resin for embedding trace evidence prior to the preparation of thin sections with a microtome. Through a comparison to several epoxy resins, the physical properties relevant to both trace evidence examination and analytical microscopy in general, including as viscosity, clarity, color, hardness, and cure speed, were explored. Finally, thin sections from paint samples embedded in this acrylic resin were evaluated to determine if, through smearing or impregnation, the resin contributed to the infrared spectra. The results of this study show that blue light-curing acrylic resins provide the desired properties of an embedding medium, generate high-quality thin sections, and can significantly simplify the preparation of paint chips, fibers and a multitude of other types of microscopic samples in the forensic trace evidence laboratory. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. Sample preparation methods for scanning electron microscopy of homogenized Al-Mg-Si billets: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Österreicher, Johannes Albert; Kumar, Manoj; Schiffl, Andreas; Schwarz, Sabine; Hillebrand, Daniel; Bourret, Gilles Remi

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of Mg-Si precipitates is crucial for optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of Al-Mg-Si alloys. Although sample preparation is key for high quality scanning electron microscopy imaging, most common methods lead to dealloying of Mg-Si precipitates. In this article we systematically evaluate different sample preparation methods: mechanical polishing, etching with various reagents, and electropolishing using different electrolytes. We demonstrate that the use of a nitric acid and methanol electrolyte for electropolishing a homogenized Al-Mg-Si alloy prevents the dissolution of Mg-Si precipitates, resulting in micrographs of higher quality. This preparation method is investigated in depth and the obtained scanning electron microscopy images are compared with transmission electron micrographs: the shape and size of Mg-Si precipitates appear very similar in either method. The scanning electron micrographs allow proper identification and measurement of the Mg-Si phases including needles with lengths of roughly 200 nm. These needles are β″ precipitates as confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: •Secondary precipitation in homogenized 6xxx Al alloys is crucial for extrudability. •Existing sample preparation methods for SEM are improvable. •Electropolishing with nitric acid/methanol yields superior quality in SEM. •The obtained micrographs are compared to TEM micrographs.

  4. Sample preparation methods for scanning electron microscopy of homogenized Al-Mg-Si billets: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Österreicher, Johannes Albert; Kumar, Manoj [LKR Light Metals Technologies Ranshofen, Austrian Institute of Technology, Postfach 26, 5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Schiffl, Andreas [Hammerer Aluminium Industries Extrusion GmbH, Lamprechtshausener Straße 69, 5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Schwarz, Sabine [University Service Centre for Transmission Electron Microscopy, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Hillebrand, Daniel [Hammerer Aluminium Industries Extrusion GmbH, Lamprechtshausener Straße 69, 5282 Ranshofen (Austria); Bourret, Gilles Remi, E-mail: gilles.bourret@sbg.ac.at [Department of Materials Science and Physics, University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Straße 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2016-12-15

    Characterization of Mg-Si precipitates is crucial for optimizing the homogenization heat treatment of Al-Mg-Si alloys. Although sample preparation is key for high quality scanning electron microscopy imaging, most common methods lead to dealloying of Mg-Si precipitates. In this article we systematically evaluate different sample preparation methods: mechanical polishing, etching with various reagents, and electropolishing using different electrolytes. We demonstrate that the use of a nitric acid and methanol electrolyte for electropolishing a homogenized Al-Mg-Si alloy prevents the dissolution of Mg-Si precipitates, resulting in micrographs of higher quality. This preparation method is investigated in depth and the obtained scanning electron microscopy images are compared with transmission electron micrographs: the shape and size of Mg-Si precipitates appear very similar in either method. The scanning electron micrographs allow proper identification and measurement of the Mg-Si phases including needles with lengths of roughly 200 nm. These needles are β″ precipitates as confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: •Secondary precipitation in homogenized 6xxx Al alloys is crucial for extrudability. •Existing sample preparation methods for SEM are improvable. •Electropolishing with nitric acid/methanol yields superior quality in SEM. •The obtained micrographs are compared to TEM micrographs.

  5. Preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, J. L.; Browner, R.

    1982-01-01

    The preparation and analysis of standardized waste samples for controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) are considered. Analysis of samples from wet oxidation experiments, the development of ion chromatographic techniques utilizing conventional high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipment, and an investigation of techniques for interfacing an ion chromatograph (IC) with an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICPOES) are discussed.

  6. Quantitative in-situ TEM nanotensile testing of single crystal Ni facilitated by a new sample preparation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaeeaghmiyoni, Vahid; Idrissi, Hosni; Groten, Jonas; Schwaiger, Ruth; Schryvers, Dominique

    2017-03-01

    Twin-jet electro-polishing and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) were combined to produce small size Nickel single crystal specimens for quantitative in-situ nanotensile experiments in the transmission electron microscope. The combination of these techniques allows producing samples with nearly defect-free zones in the centre in contrast to conventional FIB-prepared samples. Since TEM investigations can be performed on the electro-polished samples prior to in-situ TEM straining, specimens with desired crystallographic orientation and initial microstructure can be prepared. The present results reveal a dislocation nucleation-controlled plasticity, in which small loops induced by FIB near the edges of the samples play a central role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Naturita, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Naturita UMTRA Project processing site in the spring of 1994. No water sampling was performed during 1993 at either the Naturita processing site (NAT-01) or the Dry Flats disposal site (NAT-12). Results of previous water sampling at the Naturita processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated as a result of uranium processing activities. Baseline ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer at the Dry Flats disposal site. Water sampling activities scheduled for April 1994 include preconstruction sampling of selected monitor wells at the processing site, surface water sampling of the San Miguel River, sampling of several springs/seeps in the vicinity of the disposal site, and sampling of two monitor wells in Coke Oven Valley. The monitor well locations provide sampling points to characterize ground water quality and flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been updated to reflect constituents related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation. Water sampling will be conducted annually at minimum during the period of construction activities

  8. Present state of tandem accelerator analysis facility of the National Institute for Environmental Studies. 2. Sample preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumamoto, Yuichiro; Shibata, Yasuyuki; Kume, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yoneda, Minoru; Uehiro, Takashi; Morita, Masatoshi [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    An AMS exclusive apparatus constituted for a center of 5 MV of tandem accelerator (15SDH-2) was introduced to the National Institute for Environmental Studies on September, 1995. The incidental part of the apparatus is constituted by combining negative ion source for solid sample (MC-SNICS) with successive incidental system and combining negative ion source for gas sample (MGF-SNICS) with simultaneous incidental system. In this study, preparation of graphite target for testing of {sup 14}C at a temporary aim of supplying solid sample for MC-SNICS necessary to modulate the apparatus has been conducted. As a result, it was found that most of isotope fractionation on graphite formation from oxalic acid could be neglected. However, as it was said that efficiency of the graphite formation was largely changed with mixing with traced volume of gas such as sulfur dioxide and so on, future presumption is laid at investigation of such isotope fractionation effect on some samples except oxalic acid. In order to conduct contamination evaluation of 14-C at sample preparation, graphite preparation from organic matters and carbon dioxide obtained the fossil fuels without containing 14-C are exchanged in present research. (G.K.)

  9. A high-throughput robotic sample preparation system and HPLC-MS/MS for measuring urinary anatabine, anabasine, nicotine and major nicotine metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Binnian; Feng, June; Rehmani, Imran J; Miller, Sharyn; McGuffey, James E; Blount, Benjamin C; Wang, Lanqing

    2014-09-25

    Most sample preparation methods characteristically involve intensive and repetitive labor, which is inefficient when preparing large numbers of samples from population-scale studies. This study presents a robotic system designed to meet the sampling requirements for large population-scale studies. Using this robotic system, we developed and validated a method to simultaneously measure urinary anatabine, anabasine, nicotine and seven major nicotine metabolites: 4-Hydroxy-4-(3-pyridyl)butanoic acid, cotinine-N-oxide, nicotine-N-oxide, trans-3'-hydroxycotinine, norcotinine, cotinine and nornicotine. We analyzed robotically prepared samples using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in positive electrospray ionization mode using scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (sMRM) with a total runtime of 8.5 min. The optimized procedure was able to deliver linear analyte responses over a broad range of concentrations. Responses of urine-based calibrators delivered coefficients of determination (R(2)) of >0.995. Sample preparation recovery was generally higher than 80%. The robotic system was able to prepare four 96-well plate (384 urine samples) per day, and the overall method afforded an accuracy range of 92-115%, and an imprecision of labor-saving for sample preparation, making it efficient and practical for routine measurements in large population-scale studies such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Application of a Dual-Arm Robot in Complex Sample Preparation and Measurement Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Heidi; Drews, Robert Ralf; Janson, Jessica; Chinna Patlolla, Bharath Reddy; Chu, Xianghua; Klos, Michael; Thurow, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Automation systems with applied robotics have already been established in industrial applications for many years. In the field of life sciences, a comparable high level of automation can be found in the areas of bioscreening and high-throughput screening. Strong deficits still exist in the development of flexible and universal fully automated systems in the field of analytical measurement. Reasons are the heterogeneous processes with complex structures, which include sample preparation and transport, analytical measurements using complex sensor systems, and suitable data analysis and evaluation. Furthermore, the use of nonstandard sample vessels with various shapes and volumes results in an increased complexity. The direct use of existing automation solutions from bioscreening applications is not possible. A flexible automation system for sample preparation, analysis, and data evaluation is presented in this article. It is applied for the determination of cholesterol in biliary endoprosthesis using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A dual-arm robot performs both transport and active manipulation tasks to ensure human-like operation. This general robotic concept also enables the use of manual laboratory devices and equipment and is thus suitable in areas with a high standardization grade. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Sampling strategy for a large scale indoor radiation survey - a pilot project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.; Stranden, E.

    1986-01-01

    Optimisation of a stratified random sampling strategy for large scale indoor radiation surveys is discussed. It is based on the results from a small scale pilot project where variances in dose rates within different categories of houses were assessed. By selecting a predetermined precision level for the mean dose rate in a given region, the number of measurements needed can be optimised. The results of a pilot project in Norway are presented together with the development of the final sampling strategy for a planned large scale survey. (author)

  12. A novel sample preparation method to avoid influence of embedding medium during nano-indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yujie; Wang, Siqun; Cai, Zhiyong; Young, Timothy M.; Du, Guanben; Li, Yanjun

    2013-02-01

    The effect of the embedding medium on the nano-indentation measurements of lignocellulosic materials was investigated experimentally using nano-indentation. Both the reduced elastic modulus and the hardness of non-embedded cell walls were found to be lower than those of the embedded samples, proving that the embedding medium used for specimen preparation on cellulosic material during nano-indentation can modify cell-wall properties. This leads to structural and chemical changes in the cell-wall constituents, changes that may significantly alter the material properties. Further investigation was carried out to detect the influence of different vacuum times on the cell-wall mechanical properties during the embedding procedure. Interpretation of the statistical analysis revealed no linear relationships between vacuum time and the mechanical properties of cell walls. The quantitative measurements confirm that low-viscosity resin has a rapid penetration rate early in the curing process. Finally, a novel sample preparation method aimed at preventing resin diffusion into lignocellulosic cell walls was developed using a plastic film to wrap the sample before embedding. This method proved to be accessible and straightforward for many kinds of lignocellulosic material, but is especially suitable for small, soft samples.

  13. MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) of skin: Aspects of sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo, Cristiana Santos; Anderson, David M; Schey, Kevin L

    2017-11-01

    MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) allows molecular analysis of biological materials making possible the identification and localization of molecules in tissues, and has been applied to address many questions on skin pathophysiology, as well as on studies about drug absorption and metabolism. Sample preparation for MALDI IMS is the most important part of the workflow, comprising specimen collection and preservation, tissue embedding, cryosectioning, washing, and matrix application. These steps must be carefully optimized for specific analytes of interest (lipids, proteins, drugs, etc.), representing a challenge for skin analysis. In this review, critical parameters for MALDI IMS sample preparation of skin samples will be described. In addition, specific applications of MALDI IMS of skin samples will be presented including wound healing, neoplasia, and infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hanford analytical sample projections FY 1995--FY 2000. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, F.M.

    1994-12-02

    Sample projections have been categorized into 7 major areas: Environmental Restoration, Tank Waste Remediation, Solid Waste, Liquid Effluents, Site Monitoring, Industrial Hygiene, and General Process Support Programs. The estimates are through the Fiscal Year 2000 and are categorized by radiation level. The yearly sample projection for each program will be categorized as follows: Category 1: Non-Radioactive; Category 2: <1 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; <10 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 3: 1 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma} to <10 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and <10 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 4: <10 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and <200 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 5: 10 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma} to <100 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and <200 nCi/g {alpha}; Category 6: >100 mR/hr {beta}/{gamma}; and Category 7: >200 nCi/g {alpha}.

  15. Effect of sample preparation method on quantification of polymorphs using PXRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shahnwaz; Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the sensitivity and accuracy of quantitative analysis of polymorphic mixtures. Various techniques such as hand grinding and mixing (in mortar and pestle), air jet milling and ball milling for micronization of particle and mixing were used to prepare binary mixtures. Using these techniques, mixtures of form I and form II of clopidogrel bisulphate were prepared in various proportions from 0-5% w/w of form I in form II and subjected to x-ray powder diffraction analysis. In order to obtain good resolution in minimum time, step time and step size were varied to optimize scan rate. Among the six combinations, step size of 0.05 degrees with step time of 5 s demonstrated identification of maximum characteristic peaks of form I in form II. Data obtained from samples prepared using both grinding and mixing in ball mill showed good analytical sensitivity and accuracy compared to other methods. Powder x-ray diffraction method was reproducible, precise with LOD of 0.29% and LOQ of 0.91%. Validation results showed excellent correlation between actual and predicted concentration with R2 > 0.9999.

  16. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    Planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site near Falls City, Texas, are described in this water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP). The following plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, and sampling frequency for the routine monitoring stations at the site. The ground water data are used for site characterization and risk assessment. The regulatory basis for routine ground water monitoring at UMTRA Project sites is derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations in 40 CFR Part 192. Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (SOP) (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (TAD) (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. The Falls City site is in Karnes County, Texas, approximately 8 miles [13 kilometers southwest of the town of Falls City and 46 mi (74 km) southeast of San Antonio, Texas. Before surface remedial action, the tailings site consisted of two parcels. Parcel A consisted of the mill site, one mill building, five tailings piles, and one tailings pond south of Farm-to-Market (FM) Road 1344 and west of FM 791. A sixth tailings pile designated Parcel B was north of FM 791 and east of FM 1344

  17. Improved sample preparation for CE-LIF analysis of plant N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Bieke; Santens, Francis; Weterings, Koen; Van Damme, Els J M; Callewaert, Nico

    2011-12-01

    In view of glycomics studies in plants, it is important to have sensitive tools that allow one to analyze and characterize the N-glycans present on plant proteins in different species. Earlier methods combined plant-based sample preparations with CE-LIF N-glycan analysis but suffered from background contaminations, often resulting in non-reproducible results. This publication describes a reproducible and sensitive protocol for the preparation and analysis of plant N-glycans, based on a combination of the 'in-gel release method' and N-glycan analysis on a multicapillary DNA sequencer. Our protocol makes it possible to analyze plant N-glycans starting from low amounts of plant material with highly reproducible results. The developed protocol was validated for different plant species and plant cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Sample preparation for combined chemical analysis and bioassay application in water quality assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, A.; Schriks, M.; Brand, W; Bäuerlein, P.S.; van der Kooi, M.M.E.; van Doorn, R.H.; Emke, E.; Reus, A.; van der Linden, S.; de Voogt, P.; Heringa, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of in vitro bioassays and chemical screening can provide a powerful toolbox to determine biologically relevant compounds in water extracts. In this study, a sample preparation method is evaluated for the suitability for both chemical analysis and in vitro bioassays. A set of 39

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Heavy Metals in Water Based on LIBS with an Automatic Device for Sample Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Li; Zhao Nanjing; Liu Wenqing; Meng Deshuo; Fang Li; Wang Yin; Yu Yang; Ma Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals in water can be deposited on graphite flakes, which can be used as an enrichment method for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and is studied in this paper. The graphite samples were prepared with an automatic device, which was composed of a loading and unloading module, a quantitatively adding solution module, a rapid heating and drying module and a precise rotating module. The experimental results showed that the sample preparation methods had no significant effect on sample distribution and the LIBS signal accumulated in 20 pulses was stable and repeatable. With an increasing amount of the sample solution on the graphite flake, the peak intensity at Cu I 324.75 nm accorded with the exponential function with a correlation coefficient of 0.9963 and the background intensity remained unchanged. The limit of detection (LOD) was calculated through linear fitting of the peak intensity versus the concentration. The LOD decreased rapidly with an increasing amount of sample solution until the amount exceeded 20 mL and the correlation coefficient of exponential function fitting was 0.991. The LOD of Pb, Ni, Cd, Cr and Zn after evaporating different amounts of sample solution on the graphite flakes was measured and the variation tendency of their LOD with sample solution amounts was similar to the tendency for Cu. The experimental data and conclusions could provide a reference for automatic sample preparation and heavy metal in situ detection. (paper)

  20. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado. Revision 1, Version 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes the planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the Grand Junction US DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site (GRJ-01) in Grand Junction, Colorado, and at the Cheney Disposal Site (GRJ-03) near Grand Junction. The plan identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for the routine monitoring stations at the sites. Regulatory basis is in the US EPA regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and EPA ground water quality standards of 1995 (60 FR 2854). This plan summarizes results of past water sampling activities, details water sampling activities planned for the next 2 years, and projects sampling activities for the next 5 years

  1. The automated sample preparation system MixMaster for investigation of volatile organic compounds with mid-infrared evanescent wave spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, F; Karlowatz, M; Jakusch, M; Mizaikoff, B

    2003-04-01

    For efficient development assessment, and calibration of new chemical analyzers a large number of independently prepared samples of target analytes is necessary. Whereas mixing units for gas analysis are readily available, there is a lack of instrumentation for accurate preparation of liquid samples containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Manual preparation of liquid samples containing VOCs at trace concentration levels is a particularly challenging and time consuming task. Furthermore, regularly scheduled calibration of sensors and analyzer systems demands for computer controlled automated sample preparation systems. In this paper we present a novel liquid mixing device enabling extensive measurement series with focus on volatile organic compounds, facilitating analysis of water polluted by traces of volatile hydrocarbons. After discussing the mixing system and control software, first results obtained by coupling with an FT-IR spectrometer are reported. Properties of the mixing system are assessed by mid-infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy of methanol-acetone mixtures and by investigation of multicomponent samples containing volatile hydrocarbons such as 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene and tetrachloroethylene. Obtained ATR spectra are evaluated by principal component regression (PCR) algorithms. It is demonstrated that the presented sample mixing device provides reliable multicomponent mixtures with sufficient accuracy and reproducibility at trace concentration levels.

  2. Preparation and calibration by liquid scintillation of a sample of Cl 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Los Arcos, J.M.; Rodriguez Barquero, L.; Suarez, C.

    1989-01-01

    A procedure to prepare a sample of Clorine 36, as Li 36 Cl, able to be measured by liquid scintillation counting, is described. The sample is chemically stable, with no variation of the quenching parameter up to 4 mg of LiCl per 15 ml of scintillator, keeps constant the counting efficiency for concentration higher than 40 μg of Li 36 Cl in that volume, and shows no deterioration over a 3 weed period. The Li 36 Cl solution has been standarized using the free parameter method with different volumes of toluene, PCS and Instagel, to an uncertainty of 0,3% (Author)

  3. Simple and Reproducible Sample Preparation for Single-Shot Phosphoproteomics with High Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jersie-Christensen, Rosa R.; Sultan, Abida; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    The traditional sample preparation workflow for mass spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics is time consuming and usually requires multiple steps, e.g., lysis, protein precipitation, reduction, alkylation, digestion, fractionation, and phosphopeptide enrichment. Each step can introduce chemical...... artifacts, in vitro protein and peptide modifications, and contaminations. Those often result in sample loss and affect the sensitivity, dynamic range and accuracy of the mass spectrometric analysis. Here we describe a simple and reproducible phosphoproteomics protocol, where lysis, denaturation, reduction......, and alkylation are performed in a single step, thus reducing sample loss and increasing reproducibility. Moreover, unlike standard cell lysis procedures the cell harvesting is performed at high temperatures (99 °C) and without detergents and subsequent need for protein precipitation. Phosphopeptides are enriched...

  4. Ultrasound: a subexploited tool for sample preparation in metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque de Castro, M D; Delgado-Povedano, M M

    2014-01-02

    Metabolomics, one of the most recently emerged "omics", has taken advantage of ultrasound (US) to improve sample preparation (SP) steps. The metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial has experienced a dissimilar development that has depended on the area (vegetal or animal) and the SP step. Thus, vegetal metabolomics and US assisted leaching has received the greater attention (encompassing subdisciplines such as metallomics, xenometabolomics and, mainly, lipidomics), but also liquid-liquid extraction and (bio)chemical reactions in metabolomics have taken advantage of US energy. Also clinical and animal samples have benefited from US assisted SP in metabolomics studies but in a lesser extension. The main effects of US have been shortening of the time required for the given step, and/or increase of its efficiency or availability for automation; nevertheless, attention paid to potential degradation caused by US has been scant or nil. Achievements and weak points of the metabolomics-US assisted SP step binomial are discussed and possible solutions to the present shortcomings are exposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Efficient sample preparation method based on solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction for the trace detection of butachlor in urine and waste water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aladaghlo, Zolfaghar; Fakhari, Alireza; Behbahani, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    In this work, an efficient sample preparation method termed solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction was applied. The used sample preparation method was based on the dispersion of the sorbent (benzophenone) into the aqueous sample to maximize the interaction surface. In this approach, the dispersion of the sorbent at a very low milligram level was achieved by inserting a solution of the sorbent and disperser solvent into the aqueous sample. The cloudy solution created from the dispersion of the sorbent in the bulk aqueous sample. After pre-concentration of the butachlor, the cloudy solution was centrifuged and butachlor in the sediment phase dissolved in ethanol and determined by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Under the optimized conditions (solution pH = 7.0, sorbent: benzophenone, 2%, disperser solvent: ethanol, 500 μL, centrifuged at 4000 rpm for 3 min), the method detection limit for butachlor was 2, 3 and 3 μg/L for distilled water, waste water, and urine sample, respectively. Furthermore, the preconcentration factor was 198.8, 175.0, and 174.2 in distilled water, waste water, and urine sample, respectively. Solvent-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction was successfully used for the trace monitoring of butachlor in urine and waste water samples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Preparation of hard-to-make TEM samples using the FIB microscope; Praeparation von kompliziert herstellbaren TEM-Proben mit dem FIB-Mikroskop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkert, C.A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Heiland, B.; Kauffmann, F. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    The focused ion beam (FIB) microscope has become an important tool for the preparation of TEM samples over the last few years. Preparation of samples with the FIB has some specific advantages over conventional preparation methods which make it possible to prepare samples that would otherwise be difficult to prepare. The advantages that will be illustrated in this paper include: (1) precise selection of the sample volume to be prepared, (2) preparation of brittle materials, (3) preparation of highly stressed materials, and (4) preparation of composites composed of materials with widely differing properties. These advantages will be illustrated through several examples including cross-sectional preparation of nanocrystalline Ti-Si-N films, thermal barrier coatings, fatigued Al films, pecan shells, apatite, and metal whiskers. [German] Das Focused Ion Beam (FIB)-Mikroskop ist in den letzten Jahren zu einem wichtigen Werkzeug fuer die Praeparation von TEM-Proben geworden. Die Probenpraeparation mittels FIB hat gegenueber den konventionellen Praeparationsmethoden eine Reihe spezifischer Vorteile, die es ermoeglichen, Proben herzustellen, die ansonsten schwierig zu praeparieren waeren. Die in diesem Beitrag veranschaulichten Vorteile sind: (1) praezise Auswahl des zu praeparierenden Probenvolumens, (2) Praeparation von sproeden Materialien, (3) Praeparation von Materialien mit hohen Eigenspannungen, und (4) die Praeparation von Verbundwerkstoffen, die aus Komponenten mit stark unterschiedlichen Eigenschaften bestehen. Diese Vorteile werden anhand verschiedener Beispiele wie der Querschnittspraeparation von nanokristallinen Ti-Si-N-Schichten, thermischen Barriereschichten, Al-Schichten nach Ermuedung, Pekan-Nussschalen, Apatiten und Metallwhiskern veranschaulicht.

  7. Proteoglycan and proteome profiling of central human pulmonary fibrotic tissue utilizing miniaturized sample preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Johan; Larsen, Kristoffer; Hansson, Lennart

    2002-01-01

    -dimensional electrophoresis was interfaced to miniaturized sample preparation techniques using microcapillary extraction. Four protein groups were identified; cytoskeletal, adhesion, scavenger and metabolic proteins. These patient's proteomes showed a high degree of heterogeneity between patients but larger homogeneity...

  8. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng

    2014-07-15

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses, storage time at 4°C, and DNA extraction method) on the downstream analysis of nitrifying biofilms grown on ultrafiltration membranes. Both rinse and storage affected biofilm structure, as suggested by their strong correlation with total biovolume, biofilm thickness, roughness and the spatial distribution of EPS. Significant variations in DNA yields and microbial community diversity were also observed among samples treated by different rinses, storage and DNA extraction methods. For the tested biofilms, two rinses, no storage and DNA extraction with both mechanical and chemical cell lysis from attached biofilm were the optimal sample preparation procedures for obtaining accurate information about biofilm structure, EPS distribution and the microbial community. © 2014 © 2014 Taylor & Francis.

  9. Error baseline rates of five sample preparation methods used to characterize RNA virus populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Kugelman

    Full Text Available Individual RNA viruses typically occur as populations of genomes that differ slightly from each other due to mutations introduced by the error-prone viral polymerase. Understanding the variability of RNA virus genome populations is critical for understanding virus evolution because individual mutant genomes may gain evolutionary selective advantages and give rise to dominant subpopulations, possibly even leading to the emergence of viruses resistant to medical countermeasures. Reverse transcription of virus genome populations followed by next-generation sequencing is the only available method to characterize variation for RNA viruses. However, both steps may lead to the introduction of artificial mutations, thereby skewing the data. To better understand how such errors are introduced during sample preparation, we determined and compared error baseline rates of five different sample preparation methods by analyzing in vitro transcribed Ebola virus RNA from an artificial plasmid-based system. These methods included: shotgun sequencing from plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a basic "no amplification" method, amplicon sequencing from the plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a "targeted" amplification method, sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA as a "random" amplification method, rolling circle reverse transcription sequencing (CirSeq as an advanced "no amplification" method, and Illumina TruSeq RNA Access as a "targeted" enrichment method. The measured error frequencies indicate that RNA Access offers the best tradeoff between sensitivity and sample preparation error (1.4-5 of all compared methods.

  10. Error baseline rates of five sample preparation methods used to characterize RNA virus populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Jeffrey R.; Wiley, Michael R.; Nagle, Elyse R.; Reyes, Daniel; Pfeffer, Brad P.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo F.

    2017-01-01

    Individual RNA viruses typically occur as populations of genomes that differ slightly from each other due to mutations introduced by the error-prone viral polymerase. Understanding the variability of RNA virus genome populations is critical for understanding virus evolution because individual mutant genomes may gain evolutionary selective advantages and give rise to dominant subpopulations, possibly even leading to the emergence of viruses resistant to medical countermeasures. Reverse transcription of virus genome populations followed by next-generation sequencing is the only available method to characterize variation for RNA viruses. However, both steps may lead to the introduction of artificial mutations, thereby skewing the data. To better understand how such errors are introduced during sample preparation, we determined and compared error baseline rates of five different sample preparation methods by analyzing in vitro transcribed Ebola virus RNA from an artificial plasmid-based system. These methods included: shotgun sequencing from plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a basic “no amplification” method, amplicon sequencing from the plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a “targeted” amplification method, sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA) as a “random” amplification method, rolling circle reverse transcription sequencing (CirSeq) as an advanced “no amplification” method, and Illumina TruSeq RNA Access as a “targeted” enrichment method. The measured error frequencies indicate that RNA Access offers the best tradeoff between sensitivity and sample preparation error (1.4−5) of all compared methods. PMID:28182717

  11. A "three-in-one" sample preparation method for simultaneous determination of B-group water-soluble vitamins in infant formula using VitaFast(®) kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Lan, Fang; Shi, Yupeng; Wan, Zhi-Gang; Yue, Zhen-Feng; Fan, Fang; Lin, Yan-Kui; Tang, Mu-Jin; Lv, Jing-Zhang; Xiao, Tan; Yi, Changqing

    2014-06-15

    VitaFast(®) test kits designed for the microbiological assay in microtiter plate format can be applied to quantitative determination of B-group water-soluble vitamins such as vitamin B12, folic acid and biotin, et al. Compared to traditional microbiological methods, VitaFast(®) kits significantly reduce sample processing time and provide greater reliability, higher productivity and better accuracy. Recently, simultaneous determination of vitamin B12, folic acid and biotin in one sample is urgently required when evaluating the quality of infant formulae in our practical work. However, the present sample preparation protocols which are developed for individual test systems, are incompatible with simultaneous determination of several analytes. To solve this problem, a novel "three-in-one" sample preparation method is herein developed for simultaneous determination of B-group water-soluble vitamins using VitaFast(®) kits. The performance of this novel "three-in-one" sample preparation method was systematically evaluated through comparing with individual sample preparation protocols. The experimental results of the assays which employed "three-in-one" sample preparation method were in good agreement with those obtained from conventional VitaFast(®) extraction methods, indicating that the proposed "three-in-one" sample preparation method is applicable to the present three VitaFast(®) vitamin test systems, thus offering a promising alternative for the three independent sample preparation methods. The proposed new sample preparation method will significantly improve the efficiency of infant formulae inspection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Emanation thermal analysis. Principle of the method, preparation of samples and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.; Pentinghaus, H.J.

    1993-12-01

    Principles of the title method are outlined and the sample preparation procedures and instrumental designs are described. The publication is divided into chapters as follows: (I) Introduction; (II) Sample labelling: (II.1) Introducing parent nuclides as a source of inert gas in solid; Distribution of inert gas in the sample; (II.2) Introducing inert gases without parent nuclides (using the recoil effect of nuclear reactions and using ion bombardment); (II.3) Choice of the suitable labelling technique; (III) Equipment for emanation thermal analysis: (III.1) Inert gas detection and measurement of inert gas release rate; (III.2) System of carrier gas flow and stabilization; (IV) Determination of the optimal conditions for radon release rate measurement; (V) Example of ETA measurement. (P.A.). 1 tab., 10 figs. 5 refs

  13. Enhancing sample preparation capabilities for accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon and radiocalcium studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    With support provided by the LLNL Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, the UCR Radiocarbon Laboratory continued its studies involving sample pretreatment and target preparation for both AMS radiocarbon ( 14 C) and radiocalcium ( 41 Ca) involving applications to archaeologically -- and paleoanthropologically- related samples. With regard to AMS 14 C-related studies, we have extended the development of a series of procedures which have, as their initial goal, the capability to combust several hundred microgram amounts of a chemically-pretreated organic sample and convert the resultant CO 2 to graphitic carbon which will consistently yield relatively high 13 C - ion currents and blanks which will yield, on a consistent basis, 14 C count rates at or below 0.20% modern, giving an 2 sigma age limit of >50,000 yr BP

  14. 75 FR 49517 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Walker Ridge Wind Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ...] Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Walker Ridge Wind Project, Lake and...: You may submit comments related to the Walker Ridge Wind Project by any of the following methods: Web... CONTACT: For further information and/or to have your name added to our mailing list, contact Bethney...

  15. Solid phase extraction for sample preparation in trace analysis of ionogenic compounds by capillary isotachophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutta, M.; Kaniansky, D.; Simunicova, E.; Zelenska, V.; Madajova, V.; Siskova, A.

    1992-01-01

    Various sorbents recommended for solid phase extraction (SPE) in sample preparation procedures were studied for use in combination with capillary isotachophoresis (ITP). They were very efficient in achieving trace concentration levels (low ppb, i.e., low parts per 10 9 ) for different types of ITP analytes present in environmental and biological matrices. A macroporous carbon sorbent was convenient for sample preparation in ITP analysis of short chain fatty acids (C 4 -C 9 ) in drinking water. Chelating sorbents based on hydroxyalkyl methacrylate matrix with salicylate, thioglycolate and 8-hydroxyquinolinate functionalities were found to be very suitable for preconcentration of heavy metals with an inherent sample clean-up. An octadecyl-bonded silica sorbent enabled in ITP a photometric detection of γ-aminobutyrate (labeled with a 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl group) at concentrations considerably lower than required for the determination of this amino acid in cerebrospinal fluid (∼5*10 -8 mol/l). (author) 34 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  16. Optimized cryo-focused ion beam sample preparation aimed at in situ structural studies of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Miroslava; Mahamid, Julia; Engel, Benjamin D; Laugks, Tim; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Plitzko, Jürgen M

    2017-02-01

    While cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) can reveal biological structures in their native state within the cellular environment, it requires the production of high-quality frozen-hydrated sections that are thinner than 300nm. Sample requirements are even more stringent for the visualization of membrane-bound protein complexes within dense cellular regions. Focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well-established technique in material science, but there are only few examples of biological samples exhibiting sufficient quality for high-resolution in situ investigation by cryo-ET. In this work, we present a comprehensive description of a cryo-sample preparation workflow incorporating additional conductive-coating procedures. These coating steps eliminate the adverse effects of sample charging on imaging with the Volta phase plate, allowing data acquisition with improved contrast. We discuss optimized FIB milling strategies adapted from material science and each critical step required to produce homogeneously thin, non-charging FIB lamellas that make large areas of unperturbed HeLa and Chlamydomonas cells accessible for cryo-ET at molecular resolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Robert E.

    2015-12-08

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  18. Highly simplified lateral flow-based nucleic acid sample preparation and passive fluid flow control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Robert B.

    2018-04-17

    Highly simplified lateral flow chromatographic nucleic acid sample preparation methods, devices, and integrated systems are provided for the efficient concentration of trace samples and the removal of nucleic acid amplification inhibitors. Methods for capturing and reducing inhibitors of nucleic acid amplification reactions, such as humic acid, using polyvinylpyrrolidone treated elements of the lateral flow device are also provided. Further provided are passive fluid control methods and systems for use in lateral flow assays.

  19. TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) Metallurgical Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Neimark, L.A.

    1990-06-01

    The TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project (VIP) Metallurgical Program is a part of the international TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project being conducting jointly by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The overall project consists of three phases, namely (1) recovery of material samples from the lower head of the TMI-2 reactor, (2) examination and analysis of the lower head samples and the preparation and testing of archive material subjected to a similar thermal history, and (3) procurement, examination, and analysis of companion core material located adjacent to or near the lower head material. The specific objectives of the ANL Metallurgical Program, which comprises a major portion of Phase 2, are to prepare metallographic and mechanical test specimen blanks from the TMI-2 lower head material, prepare similar test specimen blanks from suitable archive material subjected to the appropriate thermal processing, determine the mechanical properties of the lower vessel head and archive materials under the conditions of the core-melt accident, and assess the lower head integrity and margin-to-failure during the accident. The ANL work consists of three tasks: (1) archive materials program, (2) fabrication of metallurgical and mechanical test specimens from the TMI-2 pressure vessel samples, and (3) mechanical property characterization of TMI-2 lower pressure vessel head and archive material

  20. Sample preparation for liquid chromatographic analysis of phytochemicals in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Young-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Natural products have been used traditionally for the treatment and prevention of diseases for thousands of years and are nowadays consumed as dietary supplements and herbal medicine. To ensure the safe and effective use of these herbal products, information about bioavailability of active compounds in plasma or target tissues should be provided via validated analytical methods combined with appropriate sampling methods. To provide comprehensive and abridged information about sample preparation methods for the quantification of phytochemicals in biological samples using liquid chromatography analysis. Sample pre-treatment procedures used in analytical methods for in vivo pharmacokinetic studies of natural compounds or herbal medicines were reviewed. These were categorised according to the biological matrices (plasma, bile, urine, faeces and tissues) and sample clean-up processes (protein precipitation, liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction). Although various kinds of sample pre-treatment methods have been developed, liquid-liquid extraction is still widely used and solid-phase extraction is becoming increasingly popular because of its efficiency for extensive clean up of complex matrix samples. However, protein precipitation is still favoured due to its simplicity. Sample treatment for phytochemical analysis in biological fluids is an indispensable and critical step to obtain high quality results. This step could dominate the overall analytical process because both the duration of the process as well as the reliability of the data depend in large part on its efficiency. Thus, special attention should be given to the choice of a proper sample treatment method that targets analytes and their biomatrix. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Merging Regular and Special Education Teacher Preparation Programs: The Integrated Special Education-English Project (ISEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darcy E.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the Integrated Special Education-English Project (ISEP) which facilitated the gradual integration of special education and English teacher preparation programs. A description of the ISEP model and a case study are included. The case study indicated student teachers who participated in the ISEP improved special education and English…

  2. Draft evaluation of the frequency for gas sampling for the high burnup confirmatory data project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, Christine T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alsaed, Halim A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-15SN0802041, “Draft Evaluation of the Frequency for Gas Sampling for the High Burn-up Storage Demonstration Project” under Work Package FT-15SN080204, “ST Field Demonstration Support – SNL”. This report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project. The evaluation of: 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be present in the project cask and, 2) the degradation mechanisms that could change gas compositions culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. This adaptive strategy is compared against the sampling frequency that has been developed based on operational considerations. Gas sampling will provide information on the presence of residual water (and byproducts associated with its reactions and decomposition) and breach of cladding, which could inform the decision of when to open the project cask.

  3. TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project Metallurgical Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Neimark, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    The TMI-2 [Three Mile Island unit 2] Vessel Investigation Project Metallurgical Program at Argonne National Laboratory is a part of the international TMI-2 Vessel Investigation Project being conducted jointly by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The overall project consists of three phases, namely (1) recovery of material samples from the lower head of the TMI-2 reactor, (2) examination and analysis of the lower head samples and the preparation and testing of archive material subjected to a similar thermal history, and (3) procurement, examination, and analysis of companion core material located adjacent to or near the lower head material. The specific objectives of the ANL Metallurgical Program, which accounts for a major portion of Phase 2, are to prepare metallographic and mechanical test specimen blanks from the TMI-2 lower head material, prepare similar test specimen blanks from suitable archive material subjected to the appropriate thermal processing, determine the mechanical properties of the lower vessel head and archive materials under the conditions of the core-melt accident, and assess the lower head integrity and margin-to-failure during the accident. The ANL work consists of three tasks: (1) archive materials program, (2) fabrication of metallurgical and mechanical test specimens from the TMI-2 pressure vessel samples, and (3) mechanical property characterization of TMI-2 lower pressure vessel head and archive material

  4. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Salt Lake City, Utah. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan describes planned, routine ground water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site in Salt Lake City, Utah. This plan identifies and justifies sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequencies for routine monitoring of ground water, sediments, and surface waters at monitoring stations on the site

  5. "On-off" switchable tool for food sample preparation: merging molecularly imprinting technology with stimuli-responsive blocks. Current status, challenges and highlighted applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raquel; Gomes da Silva, Marco D R; Cabrita, Maria João

    2018-01-01

    Sample preparation still remains a great challenge in the analytical workflow representing the most time-consuming and laborious step in analytical procedures. Ideally, sample pre-treatment procedures must be more selective, cheap, quick and environmental friendly. Molecular imprinting technology is a powerful tool in the development of highly selective sample preparation methodologies enabling to preconcentrate the analytes from a complex food matrix. Actually, the design and development of molecularly imprinted polymers-based functional materials that merge an enhancement of selectivity with a controllable and switchable mode of action by means of specific stimulus constitutes a hot research topic in the field of food analysis. Thus, combining the stimuli responsive mechanism and imprinting technology a new generation of materials are emerging. The application of these smart materials in sample preparation is in early stage of development, nevertheless new improvements will promote a new driven in the demanding field of food sample preparation. The new trends in the advancement of food sample preparation using these smart materials will be presented in this review and highlighted the most relevant applications in this particular area of knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of sample preparation conditions on biomolecular solid-state NMR lineshapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakeman, David L.; Mitchell, Dan J.; Shuttleworth, Wendy A.; Evans, Jeremy N.S. [Washington State University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States)

    1998-10-15

    Sample preparation conditions with the 46 kDa enzyme complex of 5-enolpyruvyl-shikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase, shikimate-3-phosphate (S3P) and glyphosate (GLP) have been examined in an attempt to reduce linewidths in solid-state NMR spectra. The linewidths of {sup 13}P resonances associated with enzyme bound S3P and GLP in the lyophilized ternary complex have been reduced to 150 {+-} 12 Hz and 125 {+-} 7 Hz respectively, by a variety of methods involving additives and freezing techniques.

  7. Analysis of aroma compounds of Roselle by Dynamic Headspace Sampling using different preparation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhari, Nurul Hanisah Binti; Varming, Camilla; Petersen, Mikael Agerlin

    2015-01-01

    The influence of different methods of sample preparation on the aroma profiles of dried Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa) was studied. Least amounts of aroma compounds were recovered by analysis of whole dry calyxes (WD) followed by ground dry (GD), blended together with water (BTW), and ground...

  8. Preparation of edible wild fruit and plant samples for analysis and some difficulties encountered in such analyses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Strydom, ESP

    1969-12-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-dried samples are used for analysis and the methods of preparation of samples for freeze-drying are discussed. Freeze-drying has obvious advantages but has also a few minor disadvantages. Difficulties encountered in the determination of some...

  9. Membrane biofouling characterization: effects of sample preparation procedures on biofilm structure and the microbial community

    KAUST Repository

    Xue, Zheng; Lu, Huijie; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring the quality and reproducibility of results from biofilm structure and microbial community analysis is essential to membrane biofouling studies. This study evaluated the impacts of three sample preparation factors (ie number of buffer rinses

  10. Effect of Preparation Method on Phase Formation Process and Structural and Magnetic Properties of Mn2.5Ge Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sobhani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the phase formation process of Mn2.5Ge samples, prepared by mechanical alloying of Mn and Ge metal powders and annealing, has been studied. Results showed that in the milled samples the stable phase is Mn11Ge8 compound with orthorhombic structure and Pnam space group. The value of saturation magnetization increases by increasing milling time from 0.2 up to 1.95 (Am2Kg-1. The remanece of the samples increases by increasing the milling time while the coercivity decreases. Annealing of 15-hour milled sample results in disappearance of Mn and Ge and the formation of new phases of Mn3Ge, Mn5Ge2, Mn5Ge3 and Mn2.3Ge. Mn3Ge is the main phase with Do22 tetragonal structure and I4/mmm space group which is stable and dominant. The enhancement of saturation magnetization in the annealed sample is related to the formation of three new magnetic phases and the increase of coercivity is due to the presence of Mn3Ge compound with tetragonal structure. Studies were replicated on samples made by arc melting method to compare the results and to investigate the effect of the preparation method on phase formation and structural and magnetic properties of the materials. In these samples the saturation value was in range of 0.2 up to 1.95 (Am2Kg-1 depending on preparation methods. Rietveld refinement shows that Mn2.3Ge sample prepared from arc melted under 620oC anealing is single phase. Magnetic analysis of this sample show a saturation magnetization of 5.252(Am2Kg-1 and 0.005 T coercive field.

  11. Site-specific waste management instruction for the field sampling organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The Site-Specific Waste Management Instruction (SSWMI) provides guidance for the management of waste generated from field-sampling activities performed by the Environment Restoration Contractor (ERC) Sampling Organization that are not managed as part of a project SSWMI. Generally, the waste is unused preserved groundwater trip blanks, used and expired calibration solutions, and other similar waste that cannot be returned to an ERC project for disposal. The specific waste streams addressed by this SSWMI are identified in Section 2.0. This SSWMI was prepared in accordance with BHI-EE-02, Environmental Requirements. Waste generated from field sample collection activities should be returned to the project and managed in accordance with the applicable project-specific SSWMI whenever possible. However, returning all field sample collection and associated waste to a project for disposal may not always be practical or cost effective. Therefore, the ERC field sampling organization must manage and arrange to dispose of the waste using the (Bechtel Hanford, Inc. [BHI]) Field Support Waste Management (FSWM) services. This SSWMI addresses those waste streams that are the responsibility of the field sampling organization to manage and make arrangements for disposal

  12. Collection and preparation of samples for Agency's programme of intercalibration methods and procedures for measurement of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, B.

    1975-12-01

    In the period of 1971-1975 several samples of marine sediment and organisms were collected from the Bombay Harbour Bay as well as from the vicinity of the Tarapur nuclear power station in order to supply the materials for preparing intercalibration samples for radionuclides measurements. All samples collected were freeze-dried and homogenized prior to the dispatch to the Monaco Laboratory, where final homogenization and the homogeneity tests were carried out. Altogether 2 marine organisms and 3 marine sediments were supplied during this period. The materials supplied were proved to be useful to prepare intercalibration samples for radionuclide measurements in the levels for monitoring operations. Based on these materials several intercalibration exercises were successfully conducted. This work thus formed a basis for bringing the better comparability of radionuclide measurements in marine environmental samples in an international scale

  13. Abstracts book of 4. Poznan Analytical Seminar on Modern Methods of Sample Preparation and Trace Amounts Determination of Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The 4. Poznan Analytical Seminar on Modern Methods of Sample Preparation and Trace Amounts Determination of Elements has been held in Poznan 27-28 April 1995. The new versions of analytical methods have been presented for quantitative determination of trace elements in biological, environmental and geological materials. Also the number of special techniques for sample preparation enables achievement the best precision of analytical results have been shown and discussed

  14. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Maybell, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Maybell, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Maybell (DOE, 1994a). Further, this supplement serves to confirm our present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as our intention to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Maybell. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) and 60 CFR 2854 (1 995). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Maybell site are the Maybell Baseline Risk Assessment (currently in progress), the Maybell Remedial Action Plan (RAP) (DOE, 1994b), and the Maybell Environmental Assessment (DOE, 1995)

  15. Bid Preparation and Evaluation for Nuclear Power Plant Project Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Idris Taib, Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan and Nur Farizan Amadzun

    2011-01-01

    Bid preparation and evaluation is one of the main activities in Nuclear Power Plant Project management. International Atomic Energy Agency guide and Korean experience was studied for Malaysian requirement in realization of first Nuclear Power Plant. Several aspects shall be taken into consideration such as political scenario, financial capabilities, sitting, human resource, technologies, fuel supplies and decommissioning for long term exceeded hundred years. Bidding process and activities is proposed for our country requirement. The main activities included but unlimited to Bid Invitation Specification, Bid Evaluation Process, Technical Evaluation, Economic Bid Evaluation and Contracting. On the end of day, Malaysia need safe and reliable Nuclear Power Plant. Malaysian Economic Transformation Programme also get benefit from spin-off localization products and services as well as Technology Transfer Programme. (author)

  16. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  17. Benchmarking sample preparation/digestion protocols reveals tube-gel being a fast and repeatable method for quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Leslie; Fornecker, Luc; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Cianférani, Sarah; Carapito, Christine

    2016-12-01

    Sample preparation, typically by in-solution or in-gel approaches, has a strong influence on the accuracy and robustness of quantitative proteomics workflows. The major benefit of in-gel procedures is their compatibility with detergents (such as SDS) for protein solubilization. However, SDS-PAGE is a time-consuming approach. Tube-gel (TG) preparation circumvents this drawback as it involves directly trapping the sample in a polyacrylamide gel matrix without electrophoresis. We report here the first global label-free quantitative comparison between TG, stacking gel (SG), and basic liquid digestion (LD). A series of UPS1 standard mixtures (at 0.5, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 fmol) were spiked in a complex yeast lysate background. TG preparation allowed more yeast proteins to be identified than did the SG and LD approaches, with mean numbers of 1979, 1788, and 1323 proteins identified, respectively. Furthermore, the TG method proved equivalent to SG and superior to LD in terms of the repeatability of the subsequent experiments, with mean CV for yeast protein label-free quantifications of 7, 9, and 10%. Finally, known variant UPS1 proteins were successfully detected in the TG-prepared sample within a complex background with high sensitivity. All the data from this study are accessible on ProteomeXchange (PXD003841). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Adapting RNAseq sample preparation for ISS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary innovation for this CIF will be the ability to accomplish library preparation of isolated RNA that will enable transcriptional (RNA instead of DNA)...

  19. Effort versus Reward: Preparing Samples for Fungal Community Characterization in High-Throughput Sequencing Surveys of Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewei Song

    Full Text Available Next generation fungal amplicon sequencing is being used with increasing frequency to study fungal diversity in various ecosystems; however, the influence of sample preparation on the characterization of fungal community is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of four procedural modifications to library preparation for high-throughput sequencing (HTS. The following treatments were considered: 1 the amount of soil used in DNA extraction, 2 the inclusion of additional steps (freeze/thaw cycles, sonication, or hot water bath incubation in the extraction procedure, 3 the amount of DNA template used in PCR, and 4 the effect of sample pooling, either physically or computationally. Soils from two different ecosystems in Minnesota, USA, one prairie and one forest site, were used to assess the generality of our results. The first three treatments did not significantly influence observed fungal OTU richness or community structure at either site. Physical pooling captured more OTU richness compared to individual samples, but total OTU richness at each site was highest when individual samples were computationally combined. We conclude that standard extraction kit protocols are well optimized for fungal HTS surveys, but because sample pooling can significantly influence OTU richness estimates, it is important to carefully consider the study aims when planning sampling procedures.

  20. Glycan characterization of the NIST RM monoclonal antibody using a total analytical solution: From sample preparation to data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Mark; Alley, William R; McManus, Ciara A; Yu, Ying Qing; Hallinan, Sinead; Gebler, John; Rudd, Pauline M

    Glycosylation is an important attribute of biopharmaceutical products to monitor from development through production. However, glycosylation analysis has traditionally been a time-consuming process with long sample preparation protocols and manual interpretation of the data. To address the challenges associated with glycan analysis, we developed a streamlined analytical solution that covers the entire process from sample preparation to data analysis. In this communication, we describe the complete analytical solution that begins with a simplified and fast N-linked glycan sample preparation protocol that can be completed in less than 1 hr. The sample preparation includes labelling with RapiFluor-MS tag to improve both fluorescence (FLR) and mass spectral (MS) sensitivities. Following HILIC-UPLC/FLR/MS analyses, the data are processed and a library search based on glucose units has been included to expedite the task of structural assignment. We then applied this total analytical solution to characterize the glycosylation of the NIST Reference Material mAb 8761. For this glycoprotein, we confidently identified 35 N-linked glycans and all three major classes, high mannose, complex, and hybrid, were present. The majority of the glycans were neutral and fucosylated; glycans featuring N-glycolylneuraminic acid and those with two galactoses connected via an α1,3-linkage were also identified.

  1. Sample preparation of waste water to determine metallic contaminants by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Olivos, Javier.

    1987-01-01

    Trace X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy analysis in liquid samples is preceded by sample preparation, which usually consists in the precipitation of the metallic ions and concentration over a thin cellulose filter. The samples preparation of waste water by this method is not efficient, due to the great amount of organic and insoluble matter that they contain. The purpose of this work was to determine the optimal value of pH in order to adsorbe all the insoluble matter contained in a waste water sample in the activated charcoal, so that the metallic ions could be precipitated and concentrated on a thin filter and determinated by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. A survey about the adsorption of some ions in activated charcoal in function of the pH was made for the following: Cr 3+ , Fe 3+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , Zn 2+ , Se 2+ , Hg 2+ , and Pb 2+ . It was observed that at pH 0, the ions are not adsorbed, but Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ are adsorbed in small amount; at pH 14, the ions are adsorbed, excluding Se, which is not adsorbed at any value of pH. If a waste water sample is treated at pH 0 with activated charcoal to adsorbe the organic and insoluble matter, most of the metallic ions are not adsorbed by the activated charcoal and could be precipitated with APDC (ammonium 1-pirrolidine dithio carbamate salt) and concentrated on a thin filter. The analysis of the metallic ions contained on the filter and those adsorbed in the activated charcoal by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, gave the total amount of the ions in the sample. (author)

  2. HPLC/DAD determination of rosmarinic acid in Salvia officinalis: sample preparation optimization by factorial design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Karina B. de [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Oliveira, Bras H. de, E-mail: bho@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2013-01-15

    Sage (Salvia officinalis) contains high amounts of the biologically active rosmarinic acid (RA) and other polyphenolic compounds. RA is easily oxidized, and may undergo degradation during sample preparation for analysis. The objective of this work was to develop and validate an analytical procedure for determination of RA in sage, using factorial design of experiments for optimizing sample preparation. The statistically significant variables for improving RA extraction yield were determined initially and then used in the optimization step, using central composite design (CCD). The analytical method was then fully validated, and used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. The optimized procedure involved extraction with aqueous methanol (40%) containing an antioxidant mixture (ascorbic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)), with sonication at 45 deg C for 20 min. The samples were then injected in a system containing a C{sub 18} column, using methanol (A) and 0.1% phosphoric acid in water (B) in step gradient mode (45A:55B, 0-5 min; 80A:20B, 5-10 min) with flow rate of 1.0 mL min-1 and detection at 330 nm. Using this conditions, RA concentrations were 50% higher when compared to extractions without antioxidants (98.94 {+-} 1.07% recovery). Auto-oxidation of RA during sample extraction was prevented by the use of antioxidants resulting in more reliable analytical results. The method was then used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. (author)

  3. HPLC/DAD determination of rosmarinic acid in Salvia officinalis: sample preparation optimization by factorial design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Karina B. de; Oliveira, Bras H. de

    2013-01-01

    Sage (Salvia officinalis) contains high amounts of the biologically active rosmarinic acid (RA) and other polyphenolic compounds. RA is easily oxidized, and may undergo degradation during sample preparation for analysis. The objective of this work was to develop and validate an analytical procedure for determination of RA in sage, using factorial design of experiments for optimizing sample preparation. The statistically significant variables for improving RA extraction yield were determined initially and then used in the optimization step, using central composite design (CCD). The analytical method was then fully validated, and used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. The optimized procedure involved extraction with aqueous methanol (40%) containing an antioxidant mixture (ascorbic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)), with sonication at 45 deg C for 20 min. The samples were then injected in a system containing a C 18 column, using methanol (A) and 0.1% phosphoric acid in water (B) in step gradient mode (45A:55B, 0-5 min; 80A:20B, 5-10 min) with flow rate of 1.0 mL min−1 and detection at 330 nm. Using this conditions, RA concentrations were 50% higher when compared to extractions without antioxidants (98.94 ± 1.07% recovery). Auto-oxidation of RA during sample extraction was prevented by the use of antioxidants resulting in more reliable analytical results. The method was then used for the analysis of commercial samples of sage. (author)

  4. Evaluation of three sample preparation methods for the direct identification of bacteria in positive blood cultures by MALDI-TOF

    OpenAIRE

    Tanner, Hannah; Evans, Jason T.; Gossain, Savita; Hussain, Abid

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient mortality is significantly reduced by rapid identification of bacteria from sterile sites. MALDI-TOF can identify bacteria directly from positive blood cultures and multiple sample preparation methods are available. We evaluated three sample preparation methods and two MALDI-TOF score cut-off values. Positive blood culture bottles with organisms present in Gram stains were prospectively analysed by MALDI-TOF. Three lysis reagents (Saponin, SDS, and SepsiTyper lysis bufer) w...

  5. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-01-01

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural

  6. Benefits From R and D For D and D Projects Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, Christine; Boucher, Lionel; Charton, Frederic; Soulabaille, Yves

    2016-01-01

    CEA (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission) is both the operator of important nuclear facilities all over the nuclear cycle, in charge of major new built or Decommissioning and Dismantling (D and D) projects and a R and D group with dynamic policy of technology transfer. The position of CEA in D and D is unique because of the number and the wide diversity of facilities under decommissioning, with some high level of contamination. Innovative solutions are being developed in 6 main axes to protect the operators, to minimize the overall costs and the volumes of waste, especially used when preparing D and D operations: Investigations in the facilities, Radiological measurement of waste, Technologies for hostile environment, Decontamination of soils and structures, Waste treatment and conditioning and Methods and Information Technology (IT) Tools for project and waste management. The last developments are shown and examples of industrial applications given. CEA is willing to share actions in partnership with other operators or with industrials dealing with the same problems to solve. (authors)

  7. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is a former uranium mill that is undergoing surface remediation in the form of on-site tailings stabilization. Contaminated surface materials from the Monument Valley, Arizona, UMTRA Project site have been transported to the Mexican Hat site and are being consolidated with the Mexican Hat tailings. The scheduled completion of the tailings disposal cell is August 1995. Water is found in two geologic units at the site: the Halgaito Shale Formation and the Honaker Trail Formation. The tailings rest on the Halgaito Shale, and water contained in that unit is a result of milling activities and, to a lesser extent, water released from the tailings from compaction during remedial action construction of the disposal cell. Water in the Halgaito Shale flows through fractures and discharges at seeps along nearby arroyos. Flow from the seeps will diminish as water drains from the unit. Ground water in the lower unit, the Honaker Trail Formation, is protected from contamination by an upward hydraulic gradient. There are no nearby water supply wells because of widespread poor background ground water quality and quantity, and the San Juan River shows no impacts from the site. This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) recommends sampling six seeps and one upgradient monitor well compared in the Honaker Trail Formation. Samples will be taken in April 1994 (representative of high group water levels) and September 1994 (representative of low ground water levels). Analyses will be performed on filtered samples for plume indicator parameters

  8. Independent assessment of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) sample preparation quality: A novel statistical approach for quality scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, Pieter C; Kok, Sander J; Weusten, Jos J A M; Honing, Maarten

    2016-05-05

    Preparation of samples according to an optimized method is crucial for accurate determination of polymer sample characteristics by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization (MALDI) analysis. Sample preparation conditions such as matrix choice, cationization agent, deposition technique or even the deposition volume should be chosen to suit the sample of interest. Many sample preparation protocols have been developed and employed, yet finding the optimal sample preparation protocol remains a challenge. Because an objective comparison between the results of diverse protocols is not possible, "gut-feeling" or "good enough" is often decisive in the search for an optimum. This implies that sub-optimal protocols are used, leading to a loss of mass spectral information quality. To address this problem a novel analytical strategy based on MALDI imaging and statistical data processing was developed in which eight parameters were formulated to objectively quantify the quality of sample deposition and optimal MALDI matrix composition and finally sum up to an overall quality score of the sample deposition. These parameters can be established in a fully automated way using commercially available mass spectrometry imaging instruments without any hardware adjustments. With the newly developed analytical strategy the highest quality MALDI spots were selected, resulting in more reproducible and more valuable spectra for PEG in a variety of matrices. Moreover, our method enables an objective comparison of sample preparation protocols for any analyte and opens up new fields of investigation by presenting MALDI performance data in a clear and concise way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Importance of sample preparation for molecular diagnosis of lyme borreliosis from urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, A R; Schmidt, B L; Derler, A-M; Aberer, E

    2002-12-01

    Urine PCR has been used for the diagnosis of Borrelia burgdorferi infection in recent years but has been abandoned because of its low sensitivity and the irreproducibility of the results. Our study aimed to analyze technical details related to sample preparation and detection methods. Crucial for a successful urine PCR were (i) avoidance of the first morning urine sample; (ii) centrifugation at 36,000 x g; and (iii) the extraction method, with only DNAzol of the seven different extraction methods used yielding positive results with patient urine specimens. Furthermore, storage of frozen urine samples at -80 degrees C reduced the sensitivity of a positive urine PCR result obtained with samples from 72 untreated erythema migrans (EM) patients from 85% in the first 3 months to samples was proven by hybridization with a GEN-ETI-K-DEIA kit and for a 10 further positive amplicons by sequencing. By using all of these steps to optimize the urine PCR technique, B. burgdorferi infection could be diagnosed by using urine samples from EM patients with a sensitivity (85%) substantially better than that of serological methods (50%). This improved method could be of future importance as an additional laboratory technique for the diagnosis of unclear, unrecognized borrelia infections and diseases possibly related to Lyme borreliosis.

  10. Bibliography of publications related to the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project prepared by U.S. Geological Survey personnel through April 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glanzman, V.M.

    1991-01-01

    Personnel of the US Geological Survey have participated in nuclear-waste management studies in the State of Nevada since the mid-1970's. A bibliography of publications prepared principally for the US Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (formerly Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations) through April 1991 contains 475 entries in alphabetical order. The listing includes publications prepared prior to the inception of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project in April 1977 and selected publications of interest to the Yucca Mountain region. 480 refs

  11. Sample preparation procedure for PIXE elemental analysis on soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubica, B.; Kwiatek, W.M.; Dutkiewicz, E.M.; Lekka, M.

    1997-01-01

    Trace element analysis is one of the most important field in analytical chemistry. There are several instrumental techniques which are applied for determinations of microscopic elemental content. The PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) technique is one of the nuclear techniques that is commonly applied for such purpose due to its multielemental analysis possibilities. The aim of this study was to establish the optimal conditions for target preparation procedure. In this paper two different approaches to the topic are presented and widely discussed. The first approach was the traditional pellet technique and the second one was mineralization procedure. For the analysis soft tissue such as liver was used. Some results are also presented on water samples. (author)

  12. An overview of sample preparation procedures for LC-MS multiclass antibiotic determination in environmental and food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bondi, María Cruz; Marazuela, María Dolores; Herranz, Sonia; Rodriguez, Erika

    2009-10-01

    Antibiotics are a class of pharmaceuticals that are of great interest due to the large volumes of these substances that are consumed in both human and veterinary medicine, and due to their status as the agents responsible for bacterial resistance. They can be present in foodstuffs and in environmental samples as multicomponent chemical mixtures that exhibit a wide range of mechanisms of action. Moreover, they can be transformed into different metabolites by the action of microorganisms, as well as by other physical or chemical means, resulting in mixtures with higher ecotoxicities and risks to human health than those of the individual compounds. Therefore, there is growing interest in the availability of multiclass methods for the analysis of antimicrobial mixtures in environmental and food samples at very low concentrations. Liquid chromatography (LC) has become the technique of choice for multiclass analysis, especially when coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem MS (LC-MS(2)). However, due to the complexity of the matrix, in most cases an extraction step for sample clean-up and preconcentration is required before analysis in order to achieve the required sensitivities. This paper reviews the most recent developments and applications of multiclass antimicrobial determination in environmental and food matrices, emphasizing the practical aspects of sample preparation for the simultaneous extraction of antimicrobials from the selected samples. Future trends in the application of LC-MS-based techniques to multiclass antibiotic analysis are also presented.

  13. Supplement to the UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Slick Rock, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) provides the regulatory and technical basis for ground water and surface water sampling at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Union Carbide (UC) and North Continent (NC) processing sites and the Burro Canyon disposal site near Slick Rock, Colorado. The initial WSAP was finalized in August 1994 and will be completely revised in accordance with the WSAP guidance document (DOE, 1995) in late 1996. This version supplements the initial WSAP, reflects only minor changes in sampling that occurred in 1995, covers sampling scheduled for early 1996, and provides a preliminary projection of the next 5 years of sampling and monitoring activities. Once surface remedial action is completed at the former processing sites, additional and more detailed hydrogeologic characterization may be needed to develop the Ground Water Program conceptual ground water model and proposed compliance strategy. In addition, background ground water quality needs to be clearly defined to ensure that the baseline risk assessment accurately estimated risks from the contaminants of potential concern in contaminated ground water at the UC and NC sites

  14. A novel PFIB sample preparation protocol for correlative 3D X-ray CNT and FIB-TOF-SIMS tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priebe, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.priebe@gmail.com [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France); Audoit, Guillaume; Barnes, Jean-Paul [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2017-02-15

    We present a novel sample preparation method that allows correlative 3D X-ray Computed Nano-Tomography (CNT) and Focused Ion Beam Time-Of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (FIB-TOF-SIMS) tomography to be performed on the same sample. In addition, our invention ensures that samples stay unmodified structurally and chemically between the subsequent experiments. The main principle is based on modifying the topography of the X-ray CNT experimental setup before FIB-TOF-SIMS measurements by incorporating a square washer around the sample. This affects the distribution of extraction field lines and therefore influences the trajectories of secondary ions that are now guided more efficiently towards the detector. As the result, secondary ion detection is significantly improved and higher, i.e. statistically better, signals are obtained. - Highlights: • Novel sample preparation for correlative 3D X-ray CNT and FIB-TOF-SIMS is presented. • Two experiments are conducted on exactly the same sample without any modifications. • Introduction of a square washer around the sample leads to increased ion detection.

  15. Status report on sample preparation facilities for 14C analysis at the new CologneAMS center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rethemeyer, J.; Fülöp, R.-H.; Höfle, S.; Wacker, L.; Heinze, S.; Hajdas, I.; Patt, U.; König, S.; Stapper, B.; Dewald, A.

    2013-01-01

    The new AMS facility at University of Cologne (CologneAMS), Germany, was established in 2010 with the delivery of the HVE 6 MV Tandetron AMS, which will be used for 14 C, 26 Al, 36 Cl, 41 Ca, 129 I, 239 U and 244 Pu analyses. Parallel to the AMS installation the radiocarbon group has started to set up and test sample preparation methods and instruments for different materials. We present first results of reference and standard materials that have been processed and graphitized in our lab and measured at the ETH and CologneAMS facilities. The graphitization blank and its influence on small samples sizes processed with an automated graphitization system have been determined. Work on isolation of individual organic compounds with a preparative gas chromatography system has been started. The focus of our future work will be on reducing process blank levels and sample sizes as well as on the application of compound-specific radiocarbon analyses in (paleo-) environmental research.

  16. Determination of protein carbonyls in plasma, cell extracts, tissue homogenates, isolated proteins: Focus on sample preparation and derivatization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela; Davies, Michael J; Grune, Tilman

    2015-08-01

    Protein oxidation is involved in regulatory physiological events as well as in damage to tissues and is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of diseases and in the aging process. Protein-bound carbonyls represent a marker of global protein oxidation, as they are generated by multiple different reactive oxygen species in blood, tissues and cells. Sample preparation and stabilization are key steps in the accurate quantification of oxidation-related products and examination of physiological/pathological processes. This review therefore focuses on the sample preparation processes used in the most relevant methods to detect protein carbonyls after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine with an emphasis on measurement in plasma, cells, organ homogenates, isolated proteins and organelles. Sample preparation, derivatization conditions and protein handling are presented for the spectrophotometric and HPLC method as well as for immunoblotting and ELISA. An extensive overview covering these methods in previously published articles is given for researchers who plan to measure protein carbonyls in different samples. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Ion-Neutron Irradiated BOR60 Sample Preparation and Characterization: Nuclear Science User Facility 2017 Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linton, Kory D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Quinlan B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This document outlines the results obtained by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with the University of Michigan-led Consolidated Innovative Nuclear Research project, “Feasibility of combined ion-neutron irradiation for accessing high dose levels.” In this reporting period, neutron irradiated were prepared and shipped to the University of Michigan for subsequent ion irradiation. The specimens were returned to ORNL’s Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis facility, prepared via focused ion beam for examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM), and then examined using S/TEM to measure the as-irradiated microstructure. This report briefly summarizes the S/TEM results obtained at ORNL’s Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis facility.

  18. Novel sample preparation method for surfactant containing suppositories: effect of micelle formation on drug recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmár, Éva; Ueno, Konomi; Forgó, Péter; Szakonyi, Gerda; Dombi, György

    2013-09-01

    Rectal drug delivery is currently at the focus of attention. Surfactants promote drug release from the suppository bases and enhance the formulation properties. The aim of our work was to develop a sample preparation method for HPLC analysis for a suppository base containing 95% hard fat, 2.5% Tween 20 and 2.5% Tween 60. A conventional sample preparation method did not provide successful results as the recovery of the drug failed to fulfil the validation criterion 95-105%. This was caused by the non-ionic surfactants in the suppository base incorporating some of the drug, preventing its release. As guidance for the formulation from an analytical aspect, we suggest a well defined surfactant content based on the turbidimetric determination of the CMC (critical micelle formation concentration) in the applied methanol-water solvent. Our CMC data correlate well with the results of previous studies. As regards the sample preparation procedure, a study was performed of the effects of ionic strength and pH on the drug recovery with the avoidance of degradation of the drug during the procedure. Aminophenazone and paracetamol were used as model drugs. The optimum conditions for drug release from the molten suppository base were found to be 100 mM NaCl, 20-40 mM NaOH and a 30 min ultrasonic treatment of the final sample solution. As these conditions could cause the degradation of the drugs in the solution, this was followed by NMR spectroscopy, and the results indicated that degradation did not take place. The determined CMCs were 0.08 mM for Tween 20, 0.06 mM for Tween 60 and 0.04 mM for a combined Tween 20, Tween 60 system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Space science technology: In-situ science. Sample Acquisition, Analysis, and Preservation Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Kim

    1991-01-01

    The Sample Acquisition, Analysis, and Preservation Project is summarized in outline and graphic form. The objective of the project is to develop component and system level technology to enable the unmanned collection, analysis and preservation of physical, chemical and mineralogical data from the surface of planetary bodies. Technology needs and challenges are identified and specific objectives are described.

  20. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Gunnison, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan summarizes the results of previous water sampling activities and the plan for water sampling activities for calendar year 1994. A buffer zone monitoring plan is included as an appendix. The buffer zone monitoring plan is designed to protect the public from residual contamination that entered the ground water as a result of former milling operations. Surface remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site began in 1992; completion is expected in 1995. Ground water and surface water will be sampled semiannually in 1994 at the Gunnison processing site (GUN-01) and disposal site (GUN-08). Results of previous water sampling at the Gunnison processing site indicate that ground water in the alluvium is contaminated by the former uranium processing activities. Background ground water conditions have been established in the uppermost aquifer (Tertiary gravels) at the Gunnison disposal site. The monitor well locations provide a representative distribution of sampling points to characterize ground water quality and ground water flow conditions in the vicinity of the sites. The list of analytes has been modified with time to reflect constituents that are related to uranium processing activities and the parameters needed for geochemical evaluation. Water sampling will be conducted at least semiannually during and one year following the period of construction activities, to comply with the ground water protection strategy discussed in the remedial action plan (DOE, 1992a)

  1. Investigation of CPD and HMDS Sample Preparation Techniques for Cervical Cells in Developing Computer-Aided Screening System Based on FE-SEM/EDX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siew Cheok; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated the effects of critical-point drying (CPD) and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) sample preparation techniques for cervical cells on field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray (FE-SEM/EDX). We investigated the visualization of cervical cell image and elemental distribution on the cervical cell for two techniques of sample preparation. Using FE-SEM/EDX, the cervical cell images are captured and the cell element compositions are extracted for both sample preparation techniques. Cervical cell image quality, elemental composition, and processing time are considered for comparison of performances. Qualitatively, FE-SEM image based on HMDS preparation technique has better image quality than CPD technique in terms of degree of spread cell on the specimen and morphologic signs of cell deteriorations (i.e., existence of plate and pellet drying artifacts and membrane blebs). Quantitatively, with mapping and line scanning EDX analysis, carbon and oxygen element compositions in HMDS technique were higher than the CPD technique in terms of weight percentages. The HMDS technique has shorter processing time than the CPD technique. The results indicate that FE-SEM imaging, elemental composition, and processing time for sample preparation with the HMDS technique were better than CPD technique for cervical cell preparation technique for developing computer-aided screening system. PMID:25610902

  2. Joint verification project on environmentally friendly coal utilization systems. Joint verification project on the water-saving coal preparation system; Kankyo chowagata sekitan riyo system kyodo jissho jigyo. Shosuigata sentan system kyodo jissho jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    In this verification project, clean technology which should be spread in China was verified and the base structure for its spread was prepared for the purpose of controlling emissions of environmental pollutants associated with the coal utilization in China and of contributing to secure energy acquisition of Japan. As joint verification projects, a general rehabilitation type coal preparation system was installed in the Wangfenggang coal preparation plant, and a central control coal preparation system was installed in the Qingtan coal preparation plant. In the former, a system is verified in which optimum operation, water-saving, high quality, and heightening of efficiency can be obtained by introducing two computing systems for operation control and quality control, various measuring instruments, and analyzers to coal preparation plants where analog operation is conducted helped by Russia and Porland and have problems about quality control. In the latter, a central control system achieving water saving is verified by introducing rapid ash meters, scales, desitometers and computers to coal preparation plants having zigzag or heavy-fluid cyclon and connecting various kinds of information through network. For fiscal 1994, investigation and study were conducted. 51 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. A novel sample preparation method to avoid influence of embedding medium during nano-indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yujie Meng; Siqun Wang; Zhiyong Cai; Timothy M. Young; Guanben Du; Yanjun Li

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the embedding medium on the nano-indentation measurements of lignocellulosic materials was investigated experimentally using nano-indentation. Both the reduced elastic modulus and the hardness of nonembedded cell walls were found to be lower than those of the embedded samples, proving that the embedding medium used for specimen preparation on cellulosic...

  4. Effluent monitoring Quality Assurance Project Plan for radioactive airborne emissions data. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1995-12-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for compiling Hanford Site radioactive airborne emissions data. These data will be reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, and the Washington State Department of Health. Effluent Monitoring performs compliance assessments on radioactive airborne sampling and monitoring systems. This Quality Assurance Project Plan is prepared in compliance with interim guidelines and specifications. Topics include: project description; project organization and management; quality assurance objectives; sampling procedures; sample custody; calibration procedures; analytical procedures; monitoring and reporting criteria; data reduction, verification, and reporting; internal quality control; performance and system audits; corrective actions; and quality assurance reports

  5. UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    Surface remedial action is scheduled to begin at the Belfield and Bowman Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in the spring of 1996. Water sampling was conducted in 1993 at both the Belfield processing site and the Bowman processing/disposal site. Results of the sampling at both sites indicate that ground water conditions have remained relatively stable over time. Water sampling activities are not scheduled for 1994 because ground water conditions at the two sites are relatively stable, the 1993 sampling was comprehensive, and surface remediation activities are not scheduled to start until 1996. The next water sampling event is scheduled before the start of remedial activities and will include sampling selected monitor wells at both sites and several domestic wells in the vicinity

  6. A Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) for In-Situ Mars Surface Sample Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunson, J.; Gaskin, J. A.; Jerman, G. A.; Harvey, R. P.; Doloboff, I. J.; Neidholdt, E. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Miniaturized Variable Pressure Scanning Electron Microscope (MVP-SEM) project, funded by the NASA Planetary Instrument Concepts for the Advancement of Solar System Observations (PICASSO) Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES), will build upon previous miniaturized SEM designs and recent advancements in variable pressure SEM's to design and build a SEM to complete analyses of samples on the surface of Mars using the atmosphere as an imaging medium. This project is a collaboration between NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), electron gun and optics manufacturer Applied Physics Technologies, and small vacuum system manufacturer Creare. Dr. Ralph Harvery and environmental SEM (ESEM) inventor Dr. Gerry Danilatos serve as advisors to the team. Variable pressure SEMs allow for fine (nm-scale) resolution imaging and micron-scale chemical study of materials without sample preparation (e.g., carbon or gold coating). Charging of a sample is reduced or eliminated by the gas surrounding the sample. It is this property of ESEMs that make them ideal for locations where sample preparation is not yet feasible, such as the surface of Mars. In addition, the lack of sample preparation needed here will simplify the sample acquisition process and allow caching of the samples for future complementary payload use.

  7. Sample pretretment in microsystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.

    2003-01-01

    : Sample preparation → DNA amplification → DNA analysis. The overall goal of the project is integration of as many as possible of these steps. This thesis covers mainly pretreatment in a microchip. Some methods for sample pretreatment have been tested. Most conventional is fluorescence activated cell sort......When a sample, e.g. from a patient, is processed using conventional methods, the sample must be transported to the laboratory where it is analyzed, after which the results is sent back. By integrating the separate steps of the analysis in a micro total analysis system (μTAS), results can...... be obtained fast and better. Preferably with all the processes from sample to signal moved to the bedside of the patient. Of course there is still much to learn and study in the process of miniaturization. DNA analysis is one process subject to integration. There are roughly three steps in a DNA analysis...

  8. Trichlorosilane and silicon tetrachloride sample preparation for determination of boron, phosphorus and arsenic microelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolyarova, I.V.; Orlova, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    The conditions of sample preparation ensuring virtually complete elimination of boron, phosphorus, and arsenic losses are elaborated. Analysis procedures are proposed that involve hydrolysis in an autoclave for exothermic reactions and/or in an open reaction reservoir on frozen twice-distilled water with complexing-agent and oxidant solutionsd applied layer-by-layer, with the possible subsequent atomic-emission, extraction-spectrophotometric, or extraction-colorimetric determination of boron, phosphorus, and arsenic. The procedures improve the accuracy and precision of the results and reduce the duration of chemical preparation due to the quantitative preconcentration of boron, phosphorus, and arsenic; they almost completely eliminate the possibility of the formation of volatile fluoride forms of these elements. 11 refs.; 3 tabs

  9. Matrix removal in state of the art sample preparation methods for serum by charged aerosol detection and metabolomics-based LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimek, Denise; Francesconi, Kevin A; Mautner, Anton; Libiseller, Gunnar; Raml, Reingard; Magnes, Christoph

    2016-04-07

    Investigations into sample preparation procedures usually focus on analyte recovery with no information provided about the fate of other components of the sample (matrix). For many analyses, however, and particularly those using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), quantitative measurements are greatly influenced by sample matrix. Using the example of the drug amitriptyline and three of its metabolites in serum, we performed a comprehensive investigation of nine commonly used sample clean-up procedures in terms of their suitability for preparing serum samples. We were monitoring the undesired matrix compounds using a combination of charged aerosol detection (CAD), LC-CAD, and a metabolomics-based LC-MS/MS approach. In this way, we compared analyte recovery of protein precipitation-, liquid-liquid-, solid-phase- and hybrid solid-phase extraction methods. Although all methods provided acceptable recoveries, the highest recovery was obtained by protein precipitation with acetonitrile/formic acid (amitriptyline 113%, nortriptyline 92%, 10-hydroxyamitriptyline 89%, and amitriptyline N-oxide 96%). The quantification of matrix removal by LC-CAD showed that the solid phase extraction method (SPE) provided the lowest remaining matrix load (48-123 μg mL(-1)), which is a 10-40 fold better matrix clean-up than the precipitation- or hybrid solid phase extraction methods. The metabolomics profiles of eleven compound classes, comprising 70 matrix compounds showed the trends of compound class removal for each sample preparation strategy. The collective data set of analyte recovery, matrix removal and matrix compound profile was used to assess the effectiveness of each sample preparation method. The best performance in matrix clean-up and practical handling of small sample volumes was showed by the SPE techniques, particularly HLB SPE. CAD proved to be an effective tool for revealing the considerable differences between the sample preparation methods. This detector can

  10. Miniaturized Sample Preparation and Rapid Detection of Arsenite in Contaminated Soil Using a Smartphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farhan Siddiqui

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for analyzing heavy metal contamination in soil and water generally require laboratory equipped instruments, complex procedures, skilled personnel and a significant amount of time. With the advancement in computing and multitasking performances, smartphone-based sensors potentially allow the transition of the laboratory-based analytical processes to field applicable, simple methods. In the present work, we demonstrate the novel miniaturized setup for simultaneous sample preparation and smartphone-based optical sensing of arsenic As(III in the contaminated soil. Colorimetric detection protocol utilizing aptamers, gold nanoparticles and NaCl have been optimized and tested on the PDMS-chip to obtain the high sensitivity with the limit of detection of 0.71 ppm (in the sample and a correlation coefficient of 0.98. The performance of the device is further demonstrated through the comparative analysis of arsenic-spiked soil samples with standard laboratory method, and a good agreement with a correlation coefficient of 0.9917 and the average difference of 0.37 ppm, are experimentally achieved. With the android application on the device to run the experiment, the whole process from sample preparation to detection is completed within 3 hours without the necessity of skilled personnel. The approximate cost of setup is estimated around 1 USD, weight 55 g. Therefore, the presented method offers the simple, rapid, portable and cost-effective means for onsite sensing of arsenic in soil. Combined with the geometric information inside the smartphones, the system will allow the monitoring of the contamination status of soils in a nation-wide manner.

  11. Miniaturized Sample Preparation and Rapid Detection of Arsenite in Contaminated Soil Using a Smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Mohd Farhan; Kim, Soocheol; Jeon, Hyoil; Kim, Taeho; Joo, Chulmin; Park, Seungkyung

    2018-03-04

    Conventional methods for analyzing heavy metal contamination in soil and water generally require laboratory equipped instruments, complex procedures, skilled personnel and a significant amount of time. With the advancement in computing and multitasking performances, smartphone-based sensors potentially allow the transition of the laboratory-based analytical processes to field applicable, simple methods. In the present work, we demonstrate the novel miniaturized setup for simultaneous sample preparation and smartphone-based optical sensing of arsenic As(III) in the contaminated soil. Colorimetric detection protocol utilizing aptamers, gold nanoparticles and NaCl have been optimized and tested on the PDMS-chip to obtain the high sensitivity with the limit of detection of 0.71 ppm (in the sample) and a correlation coefficient of 0.98. The performance of the device is further demonstrated through the comparative analysis of arsenic-spiked soil samples with standard laboratory method, and a good agreement with a correlation coefficient of 0.9917 and the average difference of 0.37 ppm, are experimentally achieved. With the android application on the device to run the experiment, the whole process from sample preparation to detection is completed within 3 hours without the necessity of skilled personnel. The approximate cost of setup is estimated around 1 USD, weight 55 g. Therefore, the presented method offers the simple, rapid, portable and cost-effective means for onsite sensing of arsenic in soil. Combined with the geometric information inside the smartphones, the system will allow the monitoring of the contamination status of soils in a nation-wide manner.

  12. Supplement to the UMTRA Project water sampling and analysis plan, Mexican Hat, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) supplement supports the regulatory and technical basis for water sampling at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site, as defined in the 1994 WSAP document for Mexican Hat (DOE, 1994). Further, the supplement serves to confirm our present understanding of the site relative to the hydrogeology and contaminant distribution as well as our intention to continue to use the sampling strategy as presented in the 1994 WSAP document for Mexican Hat. Ground water and surface water monitoring activities are derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency regulations in 40 CFR Part 192 (1991) and 60 FR 2854 (1995). Sampling procedures are guided by the UMTRA Project standard operating procedures (JEG, n.d.), the Technical Approach Document (DOE, 1989), and the most effective technical approach for the site. Additional site-specific documents relevant to the Mexican Hat site are the Mexican Hat Long-Term Surveillance Plan (currently in progress), and the Mexican Hat Site Observational Work Plan (currently in progress)

  13. Evaluation of FASP, SP3, and iST Protocols for Proteomic Sample Preparation in the Low Microgram Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielaff, Malte; Kuharev, Jörg; Bohn, Toszka; Hahlbrock, Jennifer; Bopp, Tobias; Tenzer, Stefan; Distler, Ute

    2017-11-03

    Efficient and reproducible sample preparation is a prerequisite for any robust and sensitive quantitative bottom-up proteomics workflow. Here, we performed an independent comparison between single-pot solid-phase-enhanced sample preparation (SP3), filter-aided sample preparation (FASP), and a commercial kit based on the in-StageTip (iST) method. We assessed their performance for the processing of proteomic samples in the low μg range using varying amounts of HeLa cell lysate (1-20 μg of total protein). All three workflows showed similar performances for 20 μg of starting material. When handling sample sizes below 10 μg, the number of identified proteins and peptides as well as the quantitative reproducibility and precision drastically dropped in case of FASP. In contrast, SP3 and iST provided high proteome coverage even in the low μg range. Even when digesting 1 μg of starting material, both methods still enabled the identification of over 3000 proteins and between 25 000 and 30 000 peptides. On average, the quantitative reproducibility between experimental replicates was slightly higher in case of SP3 (R 2 = 0.97 (SP3); R 2 = 0.93 (iST)). Applying SP3 toward the characterization of the proteome of FACS-sorted tumor-associated macrophages in the B16 tumor model enabled the quantification of 2965 proteins and revealed a "mixed" M1/M2 phenotype.

  14. Crystal orientation and sample preparation effects on sputtering and lattice damage in 100 keV self-irradiated copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, J.A.; Malmberg, P.R.; Reynolds, G.W.; Lambert, J.M.; Treado, P.A.; Vincenz, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Sputtering yields and angular distributions have been measured as functions of sample preparation techniques and incident ion-beam orientation with respect to the crystal axes for 100 keV Cu-ion beams on Cu crystals and polycrystalline samples. The angular distributions have structure requiring an nth order cosine with two Gaussians superimposed to fit the data; strong peaking is observed near the backscatter direction. The yield is dependent on the beam to crystal and beam to polycrystalline-rod axis orientation, on the grain size of the polycrystals and on sample-preparation techniques. Yield measurements vary by as much as a factor of 4. Lattice-damage differences, measured with alpha particle channeling, are much smaller and seem to be saturated by fluences of the order of 1x10 16 /cm 2 . (orig.)

  15. High efficiency environmental sampling with UV-cured peelable coatings (aka NuGoo project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Junghans, Sylvia Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    This report presents slides on CA Related Project (FY13-17); Environmental sampling by IAEA (not only) during CA; Decontamination gels; Cotton swipes vs. decon gel (FY15); Contamination removal study; The origins of the NuGoo; NuGoo – proof of concept; NuGoo – FY17 project ($250K); LED lamp – which one works and why; Selecting photoinitiator; Monomers and oligomers; Results.

  16. Optimization of sample preparation variables for wedelolactone from Eclipta alba using Box-Behnken experimental design followed by HPLC identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, A A; Sachin, B S; Shinde, D B; Wakte, P S

    2013-07-01

    Coumestan wedelolactone is an important phytocomponent from Eclipta alba (L.) Hassk. It possesses diverse pharmacological activities, which have prompted the development of various extraction techniques and strategies for its better utilization. The aim of the present study is to develop and optimize supercritical carbon dioxide assisted sample preparation and HPLC identification of wedelolactone from E. alba (L.) Hassk. The response surface methodology was employed to study the optimization of sample preparation using supercritical carbon dioxide for wedelolactone from E. alba (L.) Hassk. The optimized sample preparation involves the investigation of quantitative effects of sample preparation parameters viz. operating pressure, temperature, modifier concentration and time on yield of wedelolactone using Box-Behnken design. The wedelolactone content was determined using validated HPLC methodology. The experimental data were fitted to second-order polynomial equation using multiple regression analysis and analyzed using the appropriate statistical method. By solving the regression equation and analyzing 3D plots, the optimum extraction conditions were found to be: extraction pressure, 25 MPa; temperature, 56 °C; modifier concentration, 9.44% and extraction time, 60 min. Optimum extraction conditions demonstrated wedelolactone yield of 15.37 ± 0.63 mg/100 g E. alba (L.) Hassk, which was in good agreement with the predicted values. Temperature and modifier concentration showed significant effect on the wedelolactone yield. The supercritical carbon dioxide extraction showed higher selectivity than the conventional Soxhlet assisted extraction method. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood plasma sample preparation method to determine thyroid hormone-disrupting compounds in Effect-Directed Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, E.; Bytingsvik, J.; Jonker, W.; Leonards, P.E.G.; de Boer, J.; Jenssen, B.M.; Lie, E.; Aars, J.; Hamers, T.H.M.; Lamoree, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    A sample preparation method combining solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) was developed to be used in Effect-Directed Analysis (EDA) of blood plasma. Until now such a method was not available. It can be used for extraction of a broad range of thyroid hormone

  18. Sample Preparation Methodologies for In Situ Liquid and Gaseous Cell Analytical Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electropolished Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiang Li; Schilling, Sibylle; Zaluzec, Nestor J; Burke, M Grace

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies utilizing in situ liquid and/or gaseous cell scanning/transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) have been reported. Because of the difficulty in the preparation of suitable specimens, these environmental S/TEM studies have been generally limited to studies of nanoscale structured materials such as nanoparticles, nanowires, or sputtered thin films. In this paper, we present two methodologies which have been developed to facilitate the preparation of electron-transparent samples from conventional bulk metals and alloys for in situ liquid/gaseous cell S/TEM experiments. These methods take advantage of combining sequential electrochemical jet polishing followed by focused ion beam extraction techniques to create large electron-transparent areas for site-specific observation. As an example, we illustrate the application of this methodology for the preparation of in situ specimens from a cold-rolled Type 304 austenitic stainless steel sample, which was subsequently examined in both 1 atm of air as well as fully immersed in a H2O environment in the S/TEM followed by hyperspectral imaging. These preparation techniques can be successfully applied as a general procedure for a wide range of metals and alloys, and are suitable for a variety of in situ analytical S/TEM studies in both aqueous and gaseous environments.

  19. Laboratory manual on sample preparation procedures for x-ray micro-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    X-ray micro fluorescence is a non-destructive and sensitive method for studying the microscopic distribution of different elements in almost all kinds of samples. Since the beginning of this century, x-rays and electrons have been used for the analysis of many different kinds of material. Techniques which rely on electrons are mainly developed for microscopic studies, and are used in conventional Electron Microscopy (EM) or Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), while x-rays are widely used for chemical analysis at the microscopic level. The first chemical analysis by fluorescence spectroscopy using small x-ray beams was conducted in 1928 by Glockner and Schreiber. Since then much work has been devoted to developing different types of optical systems for focusing an x-ray beam, but the efficiency of these systems is still inferior to the conventional electron optical systems. However, even with a poor optical efficiency, the x-ray microbeam has many advantages compared with electron or proton induced x-ray emission methods. These include: The analyses are non-destructive, losses of mass are negligible, and due to the low thermal loading of x-rays, materials which may be thermally degraded can be analysed; Samples can be analysed in air, and no vacuum is required, therefore specimens with volatile components such as water in biological samples, can be imaged at normal pressure and temperature; No charging occurs during analysis and therefore coating of the sample with a conductive layer is not necessary; With these advantages, simpler sample preparation procedures including mounting and preservation can be used

  20. Quality improvement primer part 1: Preparing for a quality improvement project in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Lucas B; Cheng, Amy H Y; Stang, Antonia S; Vaillancourt, Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) providers work in a fast-paced and often hectic environment that has a high risk for patient safety incidents and gaps in the quality of care. These challenges have resulted in opportunities for frontline EM providers to play a role in quality improvement (QI) projects. QI has developed into a mature field with methodologies that can dramatically improve the odds of having a successful project with a sustainable impact. However, this expertise is not yet commonly taught during professional training. In this first of three articles meant as a QI primer for EM clinicians, we will introduce QI methodology and strategic planning using a fictional case study as an example. We will review how to identify a QI problem, define components of an effective problem statement, and identify stakeholders and core change team members. We will also describe three techniques used to perform root cause analyses-Ishikawa diagrams, Pareto charts and process mapping-and how they relate to preparing for a QI project. The next two papers in this series will focus on the execution of the QI project itself using rapid-cycle testing and on the evaluation and sustainability of QI projects.

  1. Cyclization of the N-Terminal X-Asn-Gly Motif during Sample Preparation for Bottom-Up Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xumin; Højrup, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N-terminal ......We, herein, report a novel -17 Da peptide modification corresponding to an N-terminal cyclization of peptides possessing the N-terminal motif of X-Asn-Gly. The cyclization occurs spontaneously during sample preparation for bottom-up proteomics studies. Distinct from the two well-known N......-terminal cyclizations, cyclization of N-terminal glutamine and S-carbamoylmethylcysteine, it is dependent on pH instead of [NH(4)(+)]. The data set from our recent study on large-scale N(α)-modified peptides revealed a sequence requirement for the cyclization event similar to the well-known deamidation of Asn to iso...

  2. An integrated sample preparation to determine coccidiostats and emerging Fusarium-mycotoxins in various poultry tissues with LC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jestoi, Marika; Rokka, Mervi; Peltonen, Kimmo

    2007-05-01

    The usefulness of an existing sample preparation technique used for ionophoric coccidiostats (lasalocid, monensin, salinomycin and narasin) was applied in the analysis of emerging Fusarium-mycotoxins beauvericin (BEA) and enniatins (ENNs) in poultry tissues (liver and meat). Also, maduramicin and liver as a new sample matrix was introduced. The developed methods were validated and applied for the determination of coccidiostats and BEA/ENNs in Finnish poultry tissues in 2004-2005. The validation parameters demonstrated that the integrated sample preparation technique is applicable to the parallel determination of these contaminants in poultry tissues. Of the samples analysed (276 meat and 43 liver), only trace levels of LAS, MON, SAL, NAR and MAD were detected in 7, 3, 5, 6 and 4% of the samples, respectively. Interestingly, for the first time, traces of BEA and ENNs could also be detected in animal tissues. BEA and ENNs A, A1, B and B1 were found in 2, 0.3, 0.6, 4 and 3% of the samples, respectively. The simultaneous presence of coccidiostats and mycotoxins was detected in three turkey samples in 2004.

  3. Study of exhaled breath condensate sample preparation for metabolomics analysis by LC-MS/MS in high resolution mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Peralbo, M A; Calderón Santiago, M; Priego-Capote, F; Luque de Castro, M D

    2015-11-01

    Metabolomic analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) requires an unavoidable sample preparation step because of the low concentration of its components, and potential cleanup for possible interferents. Sample preparation based on protein precipitation (PP), solid-phase extraction (SPE) by hydrophilic and lipophilic sorbents or lyophilization has demonstrated that the analytical sample from the last is largely the best because lyophilization allows reconstitution in a volume as small as required (preconcentration factors up to 80-times with respect to the original sample), thus doubling the number of detected compounds as compared with the other alternatives (47 versus 25). In addition, PP and/or SPE cleanup are unnecessary as no effect from the EBC components removed by these steps appears in the chromatograms. The total 49 EBC compounds tentatively identified and confirmed by MS/MS in this research include amino acids, fatty acids, fatty amides, fatty aldehydes, sphingoid bases, oxoanionic compounds, imidazoles, hydroxy acids and aliphatic acyclic acids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sample preparation techniques based on combustion reactions in closed vessels - A brief overview and recent applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, Erico M.M.; Barin, Juliano S.; Mesko, Marcia F.; Knapp, Guenter

    2007-01-01

    In this review, a general discussion of sample preparation techniques based on combustion reactions in closed vessels is presented. Applications for several kinds of samples are described, taking into account the literature data reported in the last 25 years. The operational conditions as well as the main characteristics and drawbacks are discussed for bomb combustion, oxygen flask and microwave-induced combustion (MIC) techniques. Recent applications of MIC techniques are discussed with special concern for samples not well digested by conventional microwave-assisted wet digestion as, for example, coal and also for subsequent determination of halogens

  5. EX8000 ramps up preparation phase in Horizon oil sands project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2006-07-15

    This article presented details of Hitachi's EX8000 hydraulic shovel, a key piece of equipment that will be used throughout the extensive mine preparation phase of the Horizon oil sands project. Within 2 years, the project expects to produce over 200,000 barrels of oil per day. However, more than 400 million cubic metres of soil will need to be moved before production can begin. In order to remain on schedule, overburden must be removed in massive volumes. With a 52.3 cubic yard bucket, the Hitachi EX8000 has the capacity to feed a dozen 320 metric tonne haul trucks as well as several smaller 282 metric tonne trucks, and can fill each truck in 4 passes. Material is now being moved by to an area in which dikes are being constructed to house water generated in the refining process. Stockpiling, relocation and reclamation phases will follow as the project progresses. In order to reach the oil, as much as 75 feet of overburden must be removed, including layers of sandstone, limestone, trap rock and other materials. Once the overburden has been removed, oil sand layers are also often intermixed with other materials. The EX8000 can separate the tramp material from the oil sands, improving the overall efficiency of the operation. The Alberta-based North American Construction Group, who have a 10-year contract with Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. for the Horizon project, owns more than 100 Hitachi units in various sizes and has already purchased another EX8000 which is slated for delivery in the Fall of 2006. It was concluded that the company has purchased hundreds of new trucks to handle added volumes of materials being moved as the oil sands industry gains momentum. 3 figs.

  6. Influence of sampling interval and number of projections on the quality of SR-XFMT reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Biao; Yu Xiaohan; Xu Hongjie

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation based X-ray Fluorescent Microtomography (SR-XFMT) is a nondestructive technique for detecting elemental composition and distribution inside a specimen with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. In this paper, computer simulation of SR-XFMT experiment is performed. The influence of the sampling interval and the number of projections on the quality of SR-XFMT image reconstruction is analyzed. It is found that the sampling interval has greater effect on the quality of reconstruction than the number of projections. (authors)

  7. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastián C.

    2006-03-01

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon® seat, and Kalrez® O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  8. 78 FR 13643 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Delta Wetlands Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army, Corps of Engineers Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Delta Wetlands Project in San Joaquin and Contra Costa Counties... Joaquin County and Holland Tract and Webb Tract are located in Contra Costa County. A wetland delineation...

  9. Scientific Opinion on the Pest Risk Analysis on Phytophthora ramorum prepared by the FP6 project RAPRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, R.; Candresse, T.; Dormannsné Simon, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Panel on Plant Health was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the Pest Risk Analysis on Phytophthora ramorum prepared by the FP6 project RAPRA, taking into account comments by Member States and additional information since RAPRA. P. ramorum is the oomycete causing sudden oak death...

  10. Irradiation to ensure the safety and quality of prepared meals. Results of the coordinated research project (2002-2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    The consumption of prepared meals has increased enormously during the last decade, not only in developed countries but also in developing countries where many types of ethnic foods are now also prepared as convenience foods. Consumer studies carried out on the consumption of these types of foods have shown that perceived time pressures contribute positively to the purchase of both prepared meals and takeaway meals. Other reasons are also mentioned in the literature, among them are the increasing proportion of working women outside of the home, not enjoying cooking for oneself and the need of family members to eat at different times. Traditionally, prepared meals are retort processed, or, more recently, stored frozen, whereas an increasing demand exists for chilled commodities, partly due to their fresh appearance. However, the chilled prepared meals are non-sterile and potential survival of some pathogenic microorganisms and/or post-processing contamination before packaging creates microbiological risks and a considerable limitation of shelf life. This is particularly important for countries where the microbiological safety of many ethnic prepared meals is questionable and their shelf life limited due to the conditions under which they are produced, stored and distributed. Food irradiation used on its own, or in combination with other technologies, could significantly enhance the microbial safety of such products as well as extend their shelf life. Although extensive research has been carried out on the microbiological, chemical, nutritional and sensorial effects of irradiating individual uncooked food items, little work has been reported on the irradiation of complex food systems such as prepared meals. In 2002, the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture initiated in a Coordinated Research Project on Irradiation to Ensure the Safety and Quality of Prepared Meals. This project included the studies of participants from different

  11. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Surface remedial action has been completed at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project in Durango, Colorado. Contaminated soil and debris have been removed from the former processing site and placed in the Bodo Canyon disposal cell. Ground water at the former uranium mill/tailings site and raffinate pond area has been contaminated by the former milling operations. The ground water at the disposal site was not impacted by the former milling operations at the time of the cell's construction. Activities for fiscal 1994 involve ground water sampling and site characterization of the disposal site

  12. Structure and soft magnetic properties of the bulk samples prepared by compaction of the mixtures of Co-based and Fe-based powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuezer, J.; Bednarcik, J.; Kollar, P.; Roth, S.

    2007-01-01

    Ball milling of CoFeZrB ribbons and subsequent compaction of the resulting powders were used to prepare bulk amorphous samples. Further, two sets of powder samples were prepared by cryomilling of FeCuNbMoSiB alloy in amorphous and nanocrystalline state. Amorphous and nanocrystalline FeCuNbMoSiB powders were blended with CoFeZrB powder at different concentrations. Such powder mixtures were consolidated and several bulk nanocomposites have been synthesized. An addition of nanocrystalline or amorphous FeCuNbMoSiB powder to amorphous CoFeZrB powder caused a decrease of the magnetostriction of the resultant bulk samples, while the coercivity shows an opposite behavior. Our results show that the powder consolidation by hot pressing is an alternative method for the preparation of bulk metallic glasses, which are difficult to prepare by casting methods

  13. Simplified sample preparation in the simultaneous measurement of whole blood antimony, bismuth, manganese, and zinc by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglock-Adler, Carrie J; Strathmann, Frederick G

    2015-02-01

    We developed and validated a simplified sample preparation for the analysis of antimony (Sb), bismuth (Bi), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) in whole blood. This simplification included a reduction in sample volume, removal of a lengthy acidic digestion, and optimization of the internal standard. Measurement of Sb, Bi, Mn and Zn in whole blood was conducted using inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry. Method performance characteristics, including intra- and inter-assay imprecision, accuracy, linearity, AMR, sensitivity, carryover, sample stability and assay stability were determined in accordance with clinical laboratory standards. In addition, analytical and clinical recoveries were assessed to investigate comparability between goat blood matrix and pooled patient blood. Established assay performance characteristics included inter- and intra-assay imprecision samples, proficiency testing samples, and comparison to an outside reference laboratory. This method overcomes the laborious acidic heat digestion previously used and replaces it with a simplified sample preparation involving an alkaline dilution. The method requires minimal sample preparation with the dilution of alkaline diluent and is validated to quantify Sb and Bi from 1 to 25 μg/L, Mn from 1 to 80 μg/L, and Zn from 50 to 1500 μg/dL in whole blood. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spectrophotometric Determination of Lamotrigine in Pharmaceutical Preparations and Urine Samples Using Bromothymol Blue and Bromophenol Blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najib, F.M.; Aziz, K.H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Two simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of the antiepileptic drug lamotrigine (LMT) in pharmaceutical preparations and urine samples. The methods are based on the interaction of LMT with two sulphonphthalein dyes, namely, bromothymol blue (BTB) and bromophenol blue (BPB) in dichloromethane (DCM) medium to form stable and yellow-colored ion-pairs with λ max 410 and 413 nm respectively. The ion-pair LMT-BPB has been extracted from aqueous solutions at pH 3.25±0.25 using DCM; while LMT-BTB ion-pair was directly prepared in DCM. Interferences from the compounds of the urine samples, in case of LMT-BPB were removed using a suppressing solution (S.S.) prepared from the salts of the interfering ions. In LMT-BTB method, the urine of normal person not taking LMT, was used as a blank to remove the effect of interferences. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve of LMT-BTB was linear over the range of 1-12 μg.ml -1 , ε=1.97x10 4 L.mole -1 .cm -1 , r 2 = 0.9983, and D.L of 0.13 μg.ml -1 . The corresponding values for (LMT-BPB) ion-pair were 0.5-12 μg.ml -1 linear range, ε=1.92x10 4 , r 2 = 0.9980, and D.L= 0.24 μg.ml -1 . The stoichiometry of the ion-pairs were found to be 1:1, based on Jobs, mole ratio and slope ratio methods. The recoveries (%R) for both methods were in the range of 97-101.8 % and 95-97.1 % with RSD≤1.68 and 3.1 % respectively. For LMT- spiked urine samples, the recoveries were 98.5-106.6 % with RSD≤1.66 %. Interferences from phenobarbital and carbamazepine were in the range of 25-40 folds. Statistical comparison of the results with a published method using F and t-tests showed no significant differences between each of the two methods and the reported one at 95 % confidence level. A standard addition method, gave high accuracy with LMT-BPB method. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of LMT in pharmaceutical preparation and urine samples. (author)

  15. On-site sampling and sample-preparation approach with a portable sampler based on hollow-fiber/graphene bars for the microextraction of nitrobenzene compounds in lake water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Rongrong; Hu, Shuang; Chen, Xuan; Bai, Xiaohong; Feng, Meiqin

    2015-02-01

    A novel on-site sampling and sample-preparation approach was developed and evaluated in the present work. In this procedure, hollow-fiber/graphene bars (HF/GBs) were used for sampling and sample preparation. A handheld battery-operated electric egg beater was utilized to support the HF/GBs and stir the sample solution to facilitate extraction at the sampling site. Four nitrobenzene compounds (nitrobenzene, o-nitrophenol, m-nitrophenol, and p-nitrophenol) were used as model compounds. Several factors affecting performance, including types and amount of graphene used and extraction and desorption times, were investigated and optimized in the laboratory. Under optimized conditions, the enrichment factors of the four nitrobenzene compounds ranged from 46 to 69. Good linearities of 0.01-10 μg/mL with regression coefficients between 0.9917 and 0.9973 were obtained for all analytes. The LOD of the method was 0.3 ng/mL. Satisfactory recoveries (98-102%) and precision (1.0-5.8%) were also achieved. The ultrastructures and extraction mechanism of the HF/GBs were characterized and analyzed. The proposed approach coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography was successfully applied in the extraction and determination of trace nitrobenzene compounds in lake water. Experimental results showed that the approach is simple, convenient, rapid, and practical for routine environmental monitoring. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Comparison of Three Sample Preparation Procedures for the Quantification of L-Arginine, Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, and Symmetric Dimethylarginine in Human Plasma Using HPLC-FLD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2018-01-01

    Increased asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in human plasma has been associated with reduced generation of nitric oxide, leading to atherosclerotic diseases. ADMA may therefore be an important biomarker for cardiovascular disease. In the present study, three sample preparation techniques were co...... sample preparation of human plasma samples before HPLC-FLD in providing important information regarding elevated ADMA concentrations.......Increased asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) in human plasma has been associated with reduced generation of nitric oxide, leading to atherosclerotic diseases. ADMA may therefore be an important biomarker for cardiovascular disease. In the present study, three sample preparation techniques were...... compared regarding the quantification of L-arginine and ADMA in human plasma: (A) protein precipitation (PP) based on aqueous trichloroacetic acid (TCA), (B) PP using a mixture of ammonia and acetonitrile, and (C) solid-phase extraction (SPE). The samples were analysed by using high-performance liquid...

  17. Pressure-driven one-step solid phase-based on-chip sample preparation on a microfabricated plastic device and integration with flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hong Hanh; Trinh, Kieu The Loan; Lee, Nae Yoon

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we fabricate a monolithic poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) microdevice on which solid phase-based DNA preparation and flow-through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) units were functionally integrated for one-step sample preparation and amplification operated by pressure. Chelex resin, which is used as a solid support for DNA preparation, can capture denatured proteins but releases DNA, and the purified DNA can then be used as a template in a subsequent amplification process. Using the PMMA microdevices, DNA was successfully purified from both Escherichia coli and human hair sample, and the plasmid vector inserted in E. coli and the D1S80 locus in human genomic DNA were successfully amplified from on-chip purified E. coli and human hair samples. Furthermore, the integration potential of the proposed sample preparation and flow-through PCR units was successfully demonstrate on a monolithic PMMA microdevice with a seamless flow, which could pave the way for a pressure-driven, simple one-step sample preparation and amplification with greatly decreased manufacture cost and enhanced device disposability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of an Internet-based data explorer for a samples databases: the example of the STRATFEED project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dardenne P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A key aspect of the European STRATFEED project on developing and validating analytical methods to detect animal meal in feed was the creation of a samples bank. To manage the 2,500 samples that were stored in the samples bank, another important objective was to build a database and develop an Internet-based data explorer – the STRATFEED explorer – to enable all laboratories and manufacturers working in the feed sector to make use of the database. The concept developed for the STRATFEED project could be used for samples management in other projects and it is easily adapted to meet a variety of requirements. The STRATFEED explorer can now be run from the public website http://stratfeed.cra.wallonie.be. Each webpage of this application is described in a documentation file aimed at helping the user to explore the database.

  19. Selectivity in the sample preparation for the analysis of drug residues in products of animal origin using LC-MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, B.J.A.; Stolker, A.A.M.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2013-01-01

    Sample preparation is critical in relation to analysis time, sample throughput and therefore analysis costs. Due to recent advances in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) instrumentation, the detection of many compounds within one run became possible, and methods for the simultaneous

  20. THE zCOSMOS-SINFONI PROJECT. I. SAMPLE SELECTION AND NATURAL-SEEING OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, C.; Renzini, A. [INAF-OAPD, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L.; Davies, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cresci, G. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (OAF), INAF-Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Peng, Y.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, M.; Oesch, P. [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zurich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Vergani, D.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G. [INAF-Bologna, Via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Daddi, E. [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Maraston, C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, PO1 3HE Portsmouth (United Kingdom); McCracken, H. J. [IAP, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bouche, N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Shapiro, K. [Aerospace Research Laboratories, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10

    The zCOSMOS-SINFONI project is aimed at studying the physical and kinematical properties of a sample of massive z {approx} 1.4-2.5 star-forming galaxies, through SINFONI near-infrared integral field spectroscopy (IFS), combined with the multiwavelength information from the zCOSMOS (COSMOS) survey. The project is based on one hour of natural-seeing observations per target, and adaptive optics (AO) follow-up for a major part of the sample, which includes 30 galaxies selected from the zCOSMOS/VIMOS spectroscopic survey. This first paper presents the sample selection, and the global physical characterization of the target galaxies from multicolor photometry, i.e., star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, age, etc. The H{alpha} integrated properties, such as, flux, velocity dispersion, and size, are derived from the natural-seeing observations, while the follow-up AO observations will be presented in the next paper of this series. Our sample appears to be well representative of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, covering a wide range in mass and SFR. The H{alpha} integrated properties of the 25 H{alpha} detected galaxies are similar to those of other IFS samples at the same redshifts. Good agreement is found among the SFRs derived from H{alpha} luminosity and other diagnostic methods, provided the extinction affecting the H{alpha} luminosity is about twice that affecting the continuum. A preliminary kinematic analysis, based on the maximum observed velocity difference across the source and on the integrated velocity dispersion, indicates that the sample splits nearly 50-50 into rotation-dominated and velocity-dispersion-dominated galaxies, in good agreement with previous surveys.

  1. Sample preparation technique for transmission electron microscopy anodized Al-Li-SiC metal matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Thomson, G.E.

    1997-01-01

    Along with improved mechanical properties, metal matrix composites (MMC) have a disadvantage of enhanced corrosion susceptibility in aggressive environments. Recent studies on corrosion behaviour of an Al-alloy 8090/SiC MMC, revealed considerably high corrosion rates of the MMC in near neutral solutions containing chloride ions. Anodizing is one of the potential surface treatment for the MMC to provide protective coating against corrosion. The surface and cross section of the anodized MMC can easily be observed using scanning electron microscope. The anodizing behaviour of the MMC can be understood further if the anodized cross section in examined under transmission electron microscope (TEM). However, it is relatively difficult to prepare small (3 mm diameter) electron transparent specimens of the MMC supporting an anodic film. In the present study a technique has been developed for preparing thin electron transparent specimens of the anodized MMC. This technique employed conventional ion beam thinning process but the preparation of small discs was a problem. A MMMC consisting of Al-alloy 8090 with 20 % (by weight) SiC particulate with an average size of 5 Mu m, was anodized and observed in TEM after preparing the samples using the above mentioned techniques. (author)

  2. Use of a holder-vacuum tube device to save on-site hands in preparing urine samples for head-space gas-chromatography, and its application to determine the time allowance for sample sealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Toshio; Sumino, Kimiaki; Ohashi, Fumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    To facilitate urine sample preparation prior to head-space gas-chromatographic (HS-GC) analysis. Urine samples containing one of the five solvents (acetone, methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone and toluene) at the levels of biological exposure limits were aspirated into a vacuum tube via holder, a device commercially available for venous blood collection (the vacuum tube method). The urine sample, 5 ml, was quantitatively transferred to a 20-ml head-space vial prior to HS-GC analysis. The loaded tubes were stored at +4 ℃ in dark for up to 3 d. The vacuum tube method facilitated on-site procedures of urine sample preparation for HS-GC with no significant loss of solvents in the sample and no need of skilled hands, whereas on-site sample preparation time was significantly reduced. Furthermore, no loss of solvents was detected during the 3-d storage, irrespective of hydrophilic (acetone) or lipophilic solvent (toluene). In a pilot application, high performance of the vacuum tube method in sealing a sample in an air-tight space succeeded to confirm that no solvent will be lost when sealing is completed within 5 min after urine voiding, and that the allowance time is as long as 30 min in case of toluene in urine. The use of the holder-vacuum tube device not only saves hands for transfer of the sample to air-tight space, but facilitates sample storage prior to HS-GC analysis.

  3. SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-01-01

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and

  4. A comparison of sample preparation methods for extracting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from equine faeces using HS-SPME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Rachael; Archer, Debra; Probert, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Disturbance to the hindgut microbiota can be detrimental to equine health. Metabolomics provides a robust approach to studying the functional aspect of hindgut microorganisms. Sample preparation is an important step towards achieving optimal results in the later stages of analysis. The preparation of samples is unique depending on the technique employed and the sample matrix to be analysed. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) is one of the most widely used platforms for the study of metabolomics and until now an optimised method has not been developed for equine faeces. To compare a sample preparation method for extracting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from equine faeces. Volatile organic compounds were determined by headspace solid phase microextraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GCMS). Factors investigated were the mass of equine faeces, type of SPME fibre coating, vial volume and storage conditions. The resultant method was unique to those developed for other species. Aliquots of 1000 or 2000 mg in 10 ml or 20 ml SPME headspace were optimal. From those tested, the extraction of VOCs should ideally be performed using a divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethysiloxane (DVB-CAR-PDMS) SPME fibre. Storage of faeces for up to 12 months at - 80 °C shared a greater percentage of VOCs with a fresh sample than the equivalent stored at - 20 °C. An optimised method for extracting VOCs from equine faeces using HS-SPME-GCMS has been developed and will act as a standard to enable comparisons between studies. This work has also highlighted storage conditions as an important factor to consider in experimental design for faecal metabolomics studies.

  5. Status report on sample preparation facilities for {sup 14}C analysis at the new CologneAMS center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rethemeyer, J., E-mail: janet.rethemeyer@uni-koeln.de [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Fueloep, R.-H.; Hoefle, S. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Wacker, L. [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Heinze, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Hajdas, I. [Ion Beam Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Patt, U.; Koenig, S.; Stapper, B. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany); Dewald, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne, 50674 Cologne (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    The new AMS facility at University of Cologne (CologneAMS), Germany, was established in 2010 with the delivery of the HVE 6 MV Tandetron AMS, which will be used for {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca, {sup 129}I, {sup 239}U and {sup 244}Pu analyses. Parallel to the AMS installation the radiocarbon group has started to set up and test sample preparation methods and instruments for different materials. We present first results of reference and standard materials that have been processed and graphitized in our lab and measured at the ETH and CologneAMS facilities. The graphitization blank and its influence on small samples sizes processed with an automated graphitization system have been determined. Work on isolation of individual organic compounds with a preparative gas chromatography system has been started. The focus of our future work will be on reducing process blank levels and sample sizes as well as on the application of compound-specific radiocarbon analyses in (paleo-) environmental research.

  6. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This water sampling and analysis plan (WSAP) provides the basis for ground water sampling at the Ambrosia Lake Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site during fiscal year 1994. It identifies and justifies the sampling locations, analytical parameters, detection limits, and sampling frequency for the monitoring locations and will be updated annually. The Ambrosia Lake site is in McKinley County, New Mexico, about 40 kilometers (km) (25 miles [mi]) north of Grants, New Mexico, and 1.6 km (1 mi) east of New Mexico Highway 509 (Figure 1.1). The town closest to the tailings pile is San Mateo, about 16 km ( 10 mi) southeast (Figure 1.2). The former mill and tailings pile are in Section 28, and two holding ponds are in Section 33, Township 14 North, Range 9 West. The site is shown on the US Geological Survey (USGS) map (USGS, 1980). The site is approximately 2100 meters (m) (7000 feet [ft]) above sea level

  7. Sources of variability in collection and preparation of paint and lead-coating samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, S L; Gutknecht, W F

    2001-06-01

    Chronic exposure of children to lead (Pb) can result in permanent physiological impairment. Since surfaces coated with lead-containing paints and varnishes are potential sources of exposure, it is extremely important that reliable methods for sampling and analysis be available. The sources of variability in the collection and preparation of samples were investigated to improve the performance and comparability of methods and to ensure that data generated will be adequate for its intended use. Paint samples of varying sizes (areas and masses) were collected at different locations across a variety of surfaces including metal, plaster, concrete, and wood. A variety of grinding techniques were compared. Manual mortar and pestle grinding for at least 1.5 min and mechanized grinding techniques were found to generate similar homogenous particle size distributions required for aliquots as small as 0.10 g. When 342 samples were evaluated for sample weight loss during mortar and pestle grinding, 4% had 20% or greater loss with a high of 41%. Homogenization and sub-sampling steps were found to be the principal sources of variability related to the size of the sample collected. Analysis of samples from different locations on apparently identical surfaces were found to vary by more than a factor of two both in Pb concentration (mg cm-2 or %) and areal coating density (g cm-2). Analyses of substrates were performed to determine the Pb remaining after coating removal. Levels as high as 1% Pb were found in some substrate samples, corresponding to more than 35 mg cm-2 Pb. In conclusion, these sources of variability must be considered in development and/or application of any sampling and analysis methodologies.

  8. Preparation and Loading Process of Single Crystalline Samples into a Gas Environmental Cell Holder for In Situ Atomic Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straubinger, Rainer; Beyer, Andreas; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-06-01

    A reproducible way to transfer a single crystalline sample into a gas environmental cell holder for in situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis is shown in this study. As in situ holders have only single-tilt capability, it is necessary to prepare the sample precisely along a specific zone axis. This can be achieved by a very accurate focused ion beam lift-out preparation. We show a step-by-step procedure to prepare the sample and transfer it into the gas environmental cell. The sample material is a GaP/Ga(NAsP)/GaP multi-quantum well structure on Si. Scanning TEM observations prove that it is possible to achieve atomic resolution at very high temperatures in a nitrogen environment of 100,000 Pa.

  9. Novel Sample Preparation Method for Safe and Rapid Detection of Bacillus anthracis Spores in Environmental Powders and Nasal Swabs

    OpenAIRE

    Luna, Vicki A.; King, Debra; Davis, Carisa; Rycerz, Tony; Ewert, Matthew; Cannons, Andrew; Amuso, Philip; Cattani, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis spores have been used as a biological weapon in the United States. We wanted to develop a safe, rapid method of sample preparation that provided safe DNA for the detection of spores in environmental and clinical specimens. Our method reproducibly detects B. anthracis in samples containing

  10. Determining the directions of increasing the innovative potential of the region by developing innovative technologies and competences when preparing and implementing large investment projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur V. Kramin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the directions of increasing the innovative potential of a region through the development of innovative technologies and competences in the process of preparation and implementation of large investment projects in the Republic of Tatarstan. Methods methodology of project management institutional approach. Results it is proved that the main largescale directions of innovative potential development in the Republic of Tatarstan as a result of preparation and implementing of Universiade 2013 in Kazan are knowledge management information technologies risk management. It is shown that in the framework of the considered innovative areas a complete system was formed of competences of employees and managers in the fields of education trade hospitality and service. Scientific novelty the key directions were defined of increasing the innovative potential of a region through the development of innovative technologies and competences in the process of preparation and implementation of large investment projects by the example of the World Summer Student Games in Kazan in 2013. Practical significance on the basis of specific examples the authors illustrate the practiceoriented mechanism of innovative potential development of a region as a result of implementation of large investment projects. nbsp

  11. Reproducibility of measurement of the environmental carbon-14 samples prepared by the gel suspension method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohura, Hirotaka; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nakamura, Kouji; Okai, Tomio; Matoba, Masaru; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Hidehisa.

    1997-01-01

    Simple liquid scintillation counting technique for the assay of 14 C in the environment was developed. This technique was done by using gel suspension method, in which sample preparation is very simple and requires no special equipments. The reproducibility of this technique was considered and it was shown that the gel suspension method had enough reproducibility to monitor the environmental 14 C. (author)

  12. Automated microfluidic sample-preparation platform for high-throughput structural investigation of proteins by small-angle X-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Snakenborg, Detlef; Nielsen, Søren Skou

    2011-01-01

    A new microfluidic sample-preparation system is presented for the structural investigation of proteins using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) at synchrotrons. The system includes hardware and software features for precise fluidic control, sample mixing by diffusion, automated X-ray exposure...... control, UV absorbance measurements and automated data analysis. As little as 15 l of sample is required to perform a complete analysis cycle, including sample mixing, SAXS measurement, continuous UV absorbance measurements, and cleaning of the channels and X-ray cell with buffer. The complete analysis...

  13. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehpour, Mehran; Håkansson, Karl; Possnert, Göran

    2013-01-01

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for 14 C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoing projects are described and presented. Examples are: (1) Ultra-small sample AMS. We routinely analyze samples with masses in the 5–10 μg C range. Data is presented regarding the sample preparation method, (2) bomb peak biological dating of ultra-small samples. A long term project is presented where purified and cell-specific DNA from various part of the human body including the heart and the brain are analyzed with the aim of extracting regeneration rate of the various human cells, (3) biological dating of various human biopsies, including atherosclerosis related plaques is presented. The average built up time of the surgically removed human carotid plaques have been measured and correlated to various data including the level of insulin in the human blood, and (4) In addition to standard microdosing type measurements using small pharmaceutical drugs, pre-clinical pharmacokinetic data from a macromolecular drug candidate are discussed.

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry of ultra-small samples with applications in the biosciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehpour, Mehran, E-mail: mehran.salehpour@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, PO Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Hakansson, Karl; Possnert, Goeran [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ion Physics, PO Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-01-15

    An overview is presented covering the biological accelerator mass spectrometry activities at Uppsala University. The research utilizes the Uppsala University Tandem laboratory facilities, including a 5 MV Pelletron tandem accelerator and two stable isotope ratio mass spectrometers. In addition, a dedicated sample preparation laboratory for biological samples with natural activity is in use, as well as another laboratory specifically for {sup 14}C-labeled samples. A variety of ongoin